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Sample records for mr-1 outer surface

  1. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are outer membrane and periplasmic extensions of the extracellular electron transport components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirbadian, Sahand; Barchinger, Sarah E; Leung, Kar Man; Byun, Hye Suk; Jangir, Yamini; Bouhenni, Rachida A; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A; Golbeck, John H; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y

    2014-09-02

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report, to our knowledge, the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis point to S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires as extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures as previously thought. These membrane extensions are associated with outer membrane vesicles, structures ubiquitous in Gram-negative bacteria, and are consistent with bacterial nanowires that mediate long-range EET by the previously proposed multistep redox hopping mechanism. Redox-functionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  2. Joint segmentation of lumen and outer wall from femoral artery MR images: Towards 3D imaging measurements of peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, Eranga; Yuan, Jing; Qiu, Wu; Rajchl, Martin; Chiu, Bernard; Fenster, Aaron

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) plaque burden extracted from fast black-blood magnetic resonance (MR) images have shown to be more predictive of clinical outcomes than PAD stenosis measurements. To this end, accurate segmentation of the femoral artery lumen and outer wall is required for generating volumetric measurements of PAD plaque burden. Here, we propose a semi-automated algorithm to jointly segment the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces from 3D black-blood MR images, which are reoriented and reconstructed along the medial axis of the femoral artery to obtain improved spatial coherence between slices of the long, thin femoral artery and to reduce computation time. The developed segmentation algorithm enforces two priors in a global optimization manner: the spatial consistency between the adjacent 2D slices and the anatomical region order between the femoral artery lumen and outer wall surfaces. The formulated combinatorial optimization problem for segmentation is solved globally and exactly by means of convex relaxation using a coupled continuous max-flow (CCMF) model, which is a dual formulation to the convex relaxed optimization problem. In addition, the CCMF model directly derives an efficient duality-based algorithm based on the modern multiplier augmented optimization scheme, which has been implemented on a GPU for fast computation. The computed segmentations from the developed algorithm were compared to manual delineations from experts using 20 black-blood MR images. The developed algorithm yielded both high accuracy (Dice similarity coefficients ≥ 87% for both the lumen and outer wall surfaces) and high reproducibility (intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.95 for generating vessel wall area), while outperforming the state-of-the-art method in terms of computational time by a factor of ≈ 20. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. High-resolution MR imaging of the elbow using a microscopy surface coil and a clinical 1.5 T MR machine: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Ueno, Teruko; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Saida, Yukihisa; Tanaka, Toshikazu; Kujiraoka, Yuka; Shindo, Masashi; Nishiura, Yasumasa; Ochiai, Naoyuki

    2004-01-01

    To obtain high-resolution MR images of the elbow using a microscopy surface coil with a 1.5 T clinical machine and to evaluate the feasibility of its use for elbow injuries. Five asymptomatic normal volunteers and 13 patients with elbow pain were prospectively studied with MR imaging using a microscopy surface coil 47 mm in diameter. High-resolution MR images using a microscopy coil were obtained with fast spin echo (FSE) proton density-weighted sequence, gradient recalled echo (GRE) T2*-weighted sequence, and short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequence, with a 1-2 mm slice thickness, a 50-70 mm field of view, an imaging matrix of 140-224 x 512 using zero fill interpolation, and 2-6 excitations. High-resolution MR images of normal volunteers using a microscopy coil clearly showed each structure of the medial and lateral collateral ligaments on GRE T2*-weighted images and FSE proton-density weighted images. Partial medial collateral ligament injury, a small avulsion of the medial epicondyle, and osteochondritis dissecans were well demonstrated on high-resolution MR images. High-resolution MR imaging of the elbow using a microscopy surface coil with a 1.5 T clinical machine is a promising method for accurately characterizing the normal anatomy of the elbow and depicting its lesions in detail. (orig.)

  4. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

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    Liang eShi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III] (oxy(hydroxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 has evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway for transferring electrons across the entire cell envelope to the surface of extracellular Fe(III oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt that is proposed to oxidize the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons across the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. Functioning as terminal reductases, the outer membrane and decaheme c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III oxides. MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III. Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III oxides.

  5. Do carotid MR surface coils affect PET quantification in PET/MR imaging?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willemink, Martin J; Eldib, Mootaz; Leiner, Tim; Fayad, Zahi A; Mani, Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of surface coils for carotid MR imaging on PET quantification in a clinical simultaneous whole-body PET/MR scanner. A cylindrical phantom was filled with a homogeneous 2L water-FDG mixture at a starting dose of 301.2MBq. Clinical PET/MR and PET/CT systems were used to acquire PET-data without a coil (reference standard) and with two carotid MRI coils (Siemens Special Purpose 8-Channel and Machnet 4-Channel Phased Array). PET-signal attenuation was evaluated with Osirix using 51 (PET/MR) and 37 (PET/CT) circular ROIs. Mean and maximum standardized uptake values (SUVs) were quantified for each ROI. Furthermore, SUVs of PET/MR and PET/CT were compared. For validation, a patient was scanned with an injected dose of 407.7MBq on both a PET/CT and a PET/MR system without a coil and with both coils. PET/MR underestimations were -2.2% (Siemens) and -7.8% (Machnet) for SUVmean, and -1.2% (Siemens) and -3.3% (Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively. For PET/CT, underestimations were -1.3% (Siemens) and -1.4% (Machnet) for SUVmean and -0.5% (both Siemens and Machnet) for SUVmax, respectively using no coil data as reference. Except for PET/CT SUVmax values all differences were significant. SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT with SUVmean values of 0.51-0.55 for PET/MR and 0.68-0.69 for PET/CT, respectively. The patient examination showed that median SUVmean values measured in the carotid arteries decreased from 0.97 without a coil to 0.96 (Siemens) and 0.88 (Machnet). Carotid surface coils do affect attenuation correction in both PET/MR and PET/CT imaging. Furthermore, SUVs differed significantly between PET/MR and PET/CT.

  6. Study on residual stress across the pipes' thickness using outer surface rapid heating. Development of pipe outer surface irradiated laser stress improvement process (L-SIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takahiro; Terasaki, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    The new process called L-SIP (outer surface irradiated Laser Stress Improvement Process) is developed to improve the tensile residual stress of the inner surface near the butt welded joints of pipes in the compression stress. The temperature gradient occurs in the thickness of pipes in heating the outer surface rapidly by laser beam. By the thermal expansion difference between the inner surface and the outer surface, the compression plastic strain generates near the outer surface and the tensile plastic strain generates near the inner surface of pipes. The compression stress occurs near the inner surface of pipes by the plastic deformation. In this paper, the theoretical equation which calculates residual stress distribution from the inherent strain distribution in the thickness of pipes is derived. And, the relation between the distribution of temperature and the residual stress in the thickness is examined for various pipes size. (1) By rapidly heating from the outer surface, the residual stress near the inner surface of the pipe is improved to the compression stress. (2) Pipes size hardly affects the distribution of the residual stress in the stainless steel pipes for piping (JISG3459). (3) The temperature rising area from the outside is smaller, the area of the compression residual stress near the inner surface becomes wider. (author)

  7. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer

  8. Effects of Contrast Agent and Outer Volume Saturation Bands on Water Suppression and Shimming of Hepatic Single-Volume Proton MR Spectroscopy at 3.0T

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    Li Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether administration of gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA and whether placement of the outer volume saturation bands significantly affect shimming and water suppression on hepatic MR spectroscopic prescanning. Method. Region of interest (ROI of 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm was carefully positioned in the region of the middle portion of the right hepatic lobe. 32 patients were examined before and after administration of Gd-DTPA with and without outer-volume saturation bands. Linewidths (Full-Width Half-Maximum (FWHM and water suppression were obtained. A paired t-test for comparison of means was used. Results. (1 The group with the outer volume saturation bands demonstrated slightly better water suppression effect than the group without outer volume saturation bands before administration. (2 The group with the outer volume saturation bands demonstrated better water suppression effect than the group without outer volume saturation bands after administration. (3 Both shimming and water suppression effectswere decreased on enhanced MR spectroscopic prescanning (all P<0.05. Conclusions. Placement of the outer volume saturation bands is helpful to improve water suppression both before and after contrast agent administration. Gd-DTPA exerts a slightly adverse effect (a statistically significant but clinically unimportant on magnetic resonance spectroscopic prescanning at 3T.

  9. The outer membrane protein Omp35 affects the reduction of Fe(III, nitrate, and fumarate by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myers Charles R

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses several electron acceptors to support anaerobic respiration including insoluble species such as iron(III and manganese(IV oxides, and soluble species such as nitrate, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and many others. MR-1 has complex branched electron transport chains that include components in the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm, and outer membrane (OM. Previous studies have implicated a role for anaerobically upregulated OM electron transport components in the use of insoluble electron acceptors, and have suggested that other OM components may also contribute to insoluble electron acceptor use. In this study, the role for an anaerobically upregulated 35-kDa OM protein (Omp35 in the use of anaerobic electron acceptors was explored. Results Omp35 was purified from the OM of anaerobically grown cells, the gene encoding Omp35 was identified, and an omp35 null mutant (OMP35-1 was isolated and characterized. Although OMP35-1 grew on all electron acceptors tested, a significant lag was seen when grown on fumarate, nitrate, and Fe(III. Complementation studies confirmed that the phenotype of OMP35-1 was due to the loss of Omp35. Despite its requirement for wild-type rates of electron acceptor use, analysis of Omp35 protein and predicted sequence did not identify any electron transport moieties or predicted motifs. OMP35-1 had normal levels and distribution of known electron transport components including quinones, cytochromes, and fumarate reductase. Omp35 is related to putative porins from MR-1 and S. frigidimarina as well as to the PorA porin from Neisseria meningitidis. Subcellular fraction analysis confirmed that Omp35 is an OM protein. The seven-fold anaerobic upregulation of Omp35 is mediated post-transcriptionally. Conclusion Omp35 is a putative porin in the OM of MR-1 that is markedly upregulated anaerobically by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Omp35 is required for normal rates of growth on Fe

  10. Regulation of Gene Expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 during Electron Acceptor Limitation and Bacterial Nanowire Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barchinger, Sarah E.; Pirbadian, Sahand; Baker, Carol S.; Leung, Kar Man; Burroughs, Nigel J.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In limiting oxygen as an electron acceptor, the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 rapidly forms nanowires, extensions of its outer membrane containing the cytochromes MtrC and OmcA needed for extracellular electron transfer. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis was employed to determine differential gene expression over time from triplicate chemostat cultures that were limited for oxygen. We identified 465 genes with decreased expression and 677 genes with increased expression. The coordinated increased expression of heme biosynthesis, cytochrome maturation, and transport pathways indicates that S. oneidensis MR-1 increases cytochrome production, including the transcription of genes encoding MtrA, MtrC, and OmcA, and transports these decaheme cytochromes across the cytoplasmic membrane during electron acceptor limitation and nanowire formation. In contrast, the expression of the mtrA and mtrC homologs mtrF and mtrD either remains unaffected or decreases under these conditions. The ompW gene, encoding a small outer membrane porin, has 40-fold higher expression during oxygen limitation, and it is proposed that OmpW plays a role in cation transport to maintain electrical neutrality during electron transfer. The genes encoding the anaerobic respiration regulator cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and the extracytoplasmic function sigma factor RpoE are among the transcription factor genes with increased expression. RpoE might function by signaling the initial response to oxygen limitation. Our results show that RpoE activates transcription from promoters upstream of mtrC and omcA. The transcriptome and mutant analyses of S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowire production are consistent with independent regulatory mechanisms for extending the outer membrane into tubular structures and for ensuring the electron transfer function of the nanowires. IMPORTANCE Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to transfer electrons to its external surface

  11. Stability of marginally outer trapped surfaces and symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, Alberto; Mars, Marc, E-mail: acf@usal.e, E-mail: marc@usal.e [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de la Merced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2009-09-07

    We study the properties of stable, strictly stable and locally outermost marginally outer trapped surfaces in spacelike hypersurfaces of spacetimes possessing certain symmetries such as isometries, homotheties and conformal Killings. We first obtain results for general diffeomorphisms in terms of the so-called metric deformation tensor and then particularize to different types of symmetries. In particular, we find restrictions at the surfaces on the vector field generating the symmetry. Some consequences are discussed. As an application, we present a result on non-existence of stable marginally outer trapped surfaces in slices of FLRW.

  12. Inverse analysis of inner surface temperature history from outer surface temperature measurement of a pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, S; Ioka, S; Onchi, S; Matsumoto, Y

    2010-01-01

    When slug flow runs through a pipe, nonuniform and time-varying thermal stresses develop and there is a possibility that thermal fatigue occurs. Therefore it is necessary to know the temperature distributions and the stress distributions in the pipe for the integrity assessment of the pipe. It is, however, difficult to measure the inner surface temperature directly. Therefore establishment of the estimation method of the temperature history on inner surface of pipe is needed. As a basic study on the estimation method of the temperature history on the inner surface of a pipe with slug flow, this paper presents an estimation method of the temperature on the inner surface of a plate from the temperature on the outer surface. The relationship between the temperature history on the outer surface and the inner surface is obtained analytically. Using the results of the mathematical analysis, the inverse analysis method of the inner surface temperature history estimation from the outer surface temperature history is proposed. It is found that the inner surface temperature history can be estimated from the outer surface temperature history by applying the inverse analysis method, even when it is expressed by the multiple frequency components.

  13. The MR evaluation of pachygyria and associated syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, S.E.; Radkowski, M.A.; Northwestern Univ., Chicago, IL; Osborn, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective study of 40 children with some form of pachygyria was performed at the Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago. All children had MR brain scans. The MR findings were analyzed, and correlated with the clinical symptoms and course in all the children. 15 percent had autopsy findings. Based on the clinical, MR and autopsy findings, in conjunction with the medical literature, the following was found: (1) Pachygyria can occur as an isolated entity without an association with lissencephaly. The MR findings in these children consisted of a brain that demonstrated normal opercularization with either focal or diffuse areas of pachygyria without areas of agyria. These children live longer and have less severity of symptoms than the children with lissencephaly. (2) The MR findings in children with lissencephaly consisted of a brain that demonstrated abnormal oper-cularization with areas of total agyria or areas with agyria with pachygyria. (3) The MR findings in 25 percent of the children with poly-microgyria simulated pachygyria. The MR findings of the brain in these children consisted of a 'nubby' appearance to the outer surface of these abnormal gyri which resembled pachygyria but on histologic exam was polymicrogyria. (author). 11 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  14. Study on the essential variables for pipe outer surface irradiated laser stress improvement process (L-SIP). Development of pipe outer surface irradiated laser stress improvement process (L-SIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takahiro; Kamo, Kazuhiko; Muroya, Itaru; Asada, Seiji; Nakamura, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    The new process called L-SIP (outer surface irradiated Laser Stress Improvement Process) is developed to improve the tensile residual stress of the inner surface near the butt welded joints of pipes in the compression stress. The temperature gradient occurs in the thickness of pipes in heating the outer surface rapidly by laser beam. By the thermal expansion difference between the inner surface and the outer surface, the compression stress occurs near the inner surface of pipes. In this paper, the essential variables for L-SIP is studied by experimental and FEM analysis. The range of the essential variables for L-SIP, which are defined by thermo-elastic FEM analysis, are Tmax=550 - 650degC, L Q /√rh ≥ 3, W Q /√rh ≥ 1.7, and, 0.04 ≤ F 0 ≤ 0.10 where Tmax is maximum temperature on the monitor point of the outer surface, F 0 is k x τ 0 /h 2 , k is thermal diffusivity coefficient, τ 0 is the temperature rise time from 100degC to maximum temperature on the monitor point of the outer surface, W Q is τ 0 x v, υ is moving velocity, L Q is the uniform temperature length in the axial direction, h is thickness of the pipe, and r is average radius of the pipe. It is showed by thermo-elastic-plastic FEM analysis that the residual stresses near the inner surface of pipes are improved in 4 different size pipes under the same essential variables. L-SIP is actually applied to welding joints of 4B x Sch160 and 2B x Sch80 SUS304 type stainless steel pipes within the defined range of the essential variables. The measured welding residual stresses on the inner surface near the welding joints are tensile. The residual stresses on the inner surface change to compression in all joints by L-SIP. (author)

  15. Ultrasonic examination of defects close to the outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benoist, P.; Serre, M.; Champigny, F.

    1986-11-01

    During the examination of a pressurized water reactor vessel with an in Service Inspection Machine (MIS), various welds are scanned with immersion ultrasonic focused transducers from the inside of the vessel. Defects close to the outer surface are sometimes detected, and sizing with the successive 6 dB drop method leads to oversize some indications; this is caused by various reflections on the outer wall; the corner echo is of particular importance here. CEA and EDF have started an experimental program in order to study the response of volumetric and planar defects located near the outer surface. We present here the first results obtained with artificial defects. 2 refs

  16. MR imaging of brain surface structures: Surface anatomy scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katada, K.; Koga, S.; Asahina, M.; Kanno, T.; Asahina, K.

    1987-01-01

    Preoperative evaluation of brain surface anatomy, including cortical sulci and veins, relative to cerebral and cerebellar lesions is an important subject for surgeons. Until now, no imaging modality existed that allowed direct visualization of brain surface anatomy. A new MR imaging technique (surface anatomy scanning) was developed to visualize brain surface structures. The technique uses a spin-echo pulse sequence with long repetition and echo times, thick sections and a surface coil. Cortical sulci, fissures, veins, and intracranial lesions were clearly identified with this technique. Initial clinical results indicate that surface anatomy scanning is useful for lesion localization and for detailed evaluation of cortical and subcortical lesions

  17. Fine tuning the ionic liquid-vacuum outer atomic surface using ion mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Garcia, Ignacio J; Fearn, Sarah; Ismail, Nur L; McIntosh, Alastair J S; Lovelock, Kevin R J

    2015-03-28

    Ionic liquid-vacuum outer atomic surfaces can be created that are remarkably different from the bulk composition. In this communication we demonstrate, using low-energy ion scattering (LEIS), that for ionic liquid mixtures the outer atomic surface shows significantly more atoms from anions with weaker cation-anion interactions (and vice versa).

  18. Focused surface coil for MR imaging of the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harms, S.E.; Sherry, C.S.; Youshimura, L.; Lokken, R.; Hyde, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    A specially designed surface coil for pituitary MR imaging results in improved image quality over that achieved with conventional pituitary Mr imaging. The coil consists of connected planar pair coils with a variable intercoil distance to accommodate differences in head size. The sensitive field is focused deep to the surface between the two planar pairs. This arrangement optimizes the signal-to-noise ratio and allows better gradient magnification of the pituitary region. Fifteen subjects with a variety of pituitary disorders were imaged

  19. Electrochemical Measurement of Electron Transfer Kinetics by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Daniel; LaBelle, Edward; Coursolle, Dan; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Bond, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 can respire using carbon electrodes and metal oxyhydroxides as electron acceptors, requiring mechanisms for transferring electrons from the cell interior to surfaces located beyond the cell. Although purified outer membrane cytochromes will reduce both electrodes and metals, S. oneidensis also secretes flavins, which accelerate electron transfer to metals and electrodes. We developed techniques for detecting direct electron transfer by intact cells, using turnover and single turnover voltammetry. Metabolically active cells attached to graphite electrodes produced thin (submonolayer) films that demonstrated both catalytic and reversible electron transfer in the presence and absence of flavins. In the absence of soluble flavins, electron transfer occurred in a broad potential window centered at ∼0 V (versus standard hydrogen electrode), and was altered in single (ΔomcA, ΔmtrC) and double deletion (ΔomcA/ΔmtrC) mutants of outer membrane cytochromes. The addition of soluble flavins at physiological concentrations significantly accelerated electron transfer and allowed catalytic electron transfer to occur at lower applied potentials (−0.2 V). Scan rate analysis indicated that rate constants for direct electron transfer were slower than those reported for pure cytochromes (∼1 s−1). These observations indicated that anodic current in the higher (>0 V) window is due to activation of a direct transfer mechanism, whereas electron transfer at lower potentials is enabled by flavins. The electrochemical dissection of these activities in living cells into two systems with characteristic midpoint potentials and kinetic behaviors explains prior observations and demonstrates the complementary nature of S. oneidensis electron transfer strategies. PMID:19661057

  20. Efficacy of passive acoustic screening: implications for the design of imager and MR-suite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moelker, Adriaan; Vogel, Mika W; Pattynama, Peter M T

    2003-02-01

    To investigate the efficacy of passive acoustic screening in the magnetic resonance (MR) environment by reducing direct and indirect MR-related acoustic noise, both from the patient's and health worker's perspective. Direct acoustic noise refers to sound originating from the inner and outer shrouds of the MR imager, and indirect noise to acoustic reflections from the walls of the MR suite. Sound measurements were obtained inside the magnet bore (patient position) and at the entrance of the MR imager (health worker position). Inner and outer shrouds and walls were lined with thick layers of sound insulation to eliminate the direct and indirect acoustic pathways. Sound pressure levels (SPLs) and octave band frequencies were acquired during various MR imaging sequences at 1.5 T. Inside the magnet bore, direct acoustic noise radiating from the inner shroud was most relevant, with substantial reductions of up to 18.8 dB when using passive screening of the magnetic bore. At the magnet bore entrance, blocking acoustic noise from the outer shroud and reflections showed significant reductions of 4.5 and 2.8 dB, respectively, and 9.4 dB when simultaneously applied. Inner shroud coverage contributed minimally to the overall SPL reduction. Maximum noise reduction by passive acoustic screening can be achieved by reducing direct sound conduction through the inner and outer shrouds. Additional measures to optimize the acoustic properties of the MR suite have only little effect. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. High spatial resolution quantitative MR images: an experimental study of dedicated surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gensanne, D; Josse, G; Lagarde, J M; Vincensini, D

    2006-01-01

    Measuring spin-spin relaxation times (T 2 ) by quantitative MR imaging represents a potentially efficient tool to evaluate the physicochemical properties of various media. However, noise in MR images is responsible for uncertainties in the determination of T 2 relaxation times, which limits the accuracy of parametric tissue analysis. The required signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) depends on the T 2 relaxation behaviour specific to each tissue. Thus, we have previously shown that keeping the uncertainty in T 2 measurements within a limit of 10% implies that SNR values be greater than 100 and 300 for mono- and biexponential T 2 relaxation behaviours, respectively. Noise reduction can be obtained either by increasing the voxel size (i.e., at the expense of spatial resolution) or by using high sensitivity dedicated surface coils (which allows us to increase SNR without deteriorating spatial resolution in an excessive manner). However, surface coil sensitivity is heterogeneous, i.e., it- and hence SNR-decreases with increasing depth, and the more so as the coil radius is smaller. The use of surface coils is therefore limited to the analysis of superficial structure such as the hypodermic tissue analysed here. The aim of this work was to determine the maximum limits of spatial resolution and depth compatible with reliable in vivo T 2 quantitative MR images using dedicated surface coils available on various clinical MR scanners. The average thickness of adipose tissue is around 15 mm, and the results obtained have shown that obtaining reliable biexponential relaxation analysis requires a minimum achievable voxel size of 13 mm 3 for a conventional volume birdcage coil and only of 1.7 mm 3 for the smallest available surface coil (23 mm in diameter). Further improvement in spatial resolution allowing us to detect low details in MR images without deteriorating parametric T 2 images can be obtained by image filtering. By using the non-linear selective blurring filter described in a

  2. Biomechanical modeling constrained surface-based image registration for prostate MR guided TRUS biopsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, W.J.M. van de; Hu, Y.; Barentsz, J.O.; Karssemeijer, N.; Barratt, D.; Huisman, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Adding magnetic resonance (MR)-derived information to standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for guiding prostate biopsy is of substantial clinical interest. A tumor visible on MR images can be projected on ultrasound (US) by using MR-US registration. A common approach is to use surface-based

  3. MR-fluid yield surface determination in disc-type MR rotary brakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farjoud, Alireza; Vahdati, Nader; Fah, Yap Fook

    2008-01-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids are currently attracting a great deal of attention because of their unique rheological behavior. Many devices have been designed using MR fluids, and of potential interest here are disc-type MR rotary brakes. The plug flow region in MR devices is defined as the region where the fluid is not flowing. The plug flow region plays an important role in design and analysis of MR devices. In MR dampers, the damping coefficient is a function of the plug thickness. In MR valves, the plug thickness is used to control the flow rate through, and the pressure drop across, the MR valve. A MR clutch is performing at the highest efficiency when the entire MR gap is the plug region. For an MR rotary brake, the highest restraining torque is obtained when the entire gap is the plug region as far as there are no wall slip effects. In this paper, using the Bercovier and Engelman constitutive model, the MR fluid flow in disc-type MR brakes is modeled to determine the plug flow region. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically. It is shown that the existence of a plug flow region in the brake will affect the control torque ratio. Better estimation of the plug flow region results in better estimation of the viscous torque

  4. High-resolution MR imaging of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC): comparison of microscopy coils and a conventional small surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, 75 Francis Street, 02115, Boston, MA (United States); Ueno, Teruko; Itai, Yuji [Department of Radiology, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Tanaka, Toshikazu [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tsukuba Kinen Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan); Shindo, Masashi [Tsukuba University Hospital, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2003-10-01

    To compare MR images of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using microscopy coils with those using a conventional surface coil qualitatively and quantitatively. Proton density-weighted images and T2*-weighted images of the TFCC from ten normal volunteers were obtained with a conventional surface coil (C4 coil; 80 mm in diameter), a 47-mm microscopy surface coil and a 23-mm microscopy surface coil at 1.5 T. Qualitative image analysis of MR images with three coils was performed by two radiologists who assigned one of five numerical scores (0, nonvisualization; 1, poor; 2, average; 3, good; 4, excellent) for five TFCC components, which were disc proper, triangular ligament, meniscus homologue, ulnotriquetral and ulnolunate ligament. Quantitative analysis included the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the disc proper of TFCC, the lunate cartilage, the lunate bone and the contrast-noise-ratio (C/N) between articular cartilage and disc proper or bone marrow were measured. All structures show higher scores qualitatively on MR with microscopy coils than those with a C4 coil, and the difference was significant with the exception of the ulnolunate ligament. MR with microscopy coils showed significantly higher S/N values than those with a conventional surface coil (P<0.05 to P<0.001). T2*-weighted images using microscopy coils showed significantly higher cartilage-disc proper C/N and cartilage-bone marrow C/N (P<0.01 to P<0.001). On proton density-weighted images, the C/N between cartilage and disc proper with two microscopy coils was significantly higher (P<0.01) than that with a conventional coil. High-resolution MR images of the normal wrist using microscopy coils were superior to those using a conventional surface coil qualitatively and quantitatively. High-resolution MR imaging with a microscopy coil would be a promising method to diagnose TFCC lesions. (orig.)

  5. In situ spectroscopic evidence for neptunium(V)-carbonate inner-sphere and outer-sphere ternary surface complexes on hematite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yuji; Moran, P B; Honeyman, B D; Davis, J A

    2007-06-01

    Np(V) surface speciation on hematite surfaces at pH 7-9 under pC2 = 10(-3.45) atm was investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). In situ XAS analyses suggest that bis-carbonato inner-sphere and tris-carbonato outer-sphere ternary surface species coexist at the hematite-water interface at pH 7-8.8, and the fraction of outer-sphere species gradually increases from 27 to 54% with increasing pH from 7 to 8.8. The results suggest that the heretofore unknown Np(V)-carbonato ternary surface species may be important in predicting the fate and transport of Np(V) in the subsurface environment down gradient of high-level nuclear waste respositories.

  6. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  7. Methylation and in vivo expression of the surface-exposed Leptospira interrogans outer-membrane protein OmpL32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshghi, Azad; Pinne, Marija; Haake, David A; Zuerner, Richard L; Frank, Ami; Cameron, Caroline E

    2012-03-01

    Recent studies have revealed that bacterial protein methylation is a widespread post-translational modification that is required for virulence in selected pathogenic bacteria. In particular, altered methylation of outer-membrane proteins has been shown to modulate the effectiveness of the host immune response. In this study, 2D gel electrophoresis combined with MALDI-TOF MS identified a Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni strain Fiocruz L1-130 protein, corresponding to ORF LIC11848, which undergoes extensive and differential methylation of glutamic acid residues. Immunofluorescence microscopy implicated LIC11848 as a surface-exposed outer-membrane protein, prompting the designation OmpL32. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy of golden Syrian hamster liver and kidney sections revealed expression of OmpL32 during colonization of these organs. Identification of methylated surface-exposed outer-membrane proteins, such as OmpL32, provides a foundation for delineating the role of this post-translational modification in leptospiral virulence.

  8. MR arthrography of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.; Engel, A. Jr.; Stiglbauer, R. Jr.; Prayer, L. Jr.; Hajek, P. Jr.; Imhof, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the diagnostic value of MR arthrography in the assessment of cartilaginous lesions, including osteochondritis dissecans. One hundred thirty-two knees of 125 patients were examined with MR arthrography performed on a 1.5-T magnet with a knee resonator. T1-weighted spin-echo and T2*-weighted three-dimensional gradient-echo sequences were obtained after intraarticular administration of 40 mL of 2-mmol GD-DTPA solution. Seventy-five patients were also imaged without contrast agent. The description of the articular surface was classified into four types: I, normal cartilage surface and thickness; II, surface normal or slightly irregular; III, severe surface irregularities and cartilage defects; and IV, extensive cartilage defects, scar formation. MR findings were correlated with those of arthroscopy/arthrotomy (n = 75)

  9. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica N. Alves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1 relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR, but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR. In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA, the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  10. Normal appearance of the prostate and seminal tract: MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Moo Sang; Choi, Pil Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Yeon Hee; Choi, Hak Yong

    1994-01-01

    To assess the ability of MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil for the depiction of normal anatomical structure of prostate and its adjacent organs. MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil was performed in 23 male patients(age ; 20-75) to evaluate various prostatic and vasovesicular disorders, i. e, 14 cases of ejaculatory problems, 3 cases of hypogonadism, and 4 cases of prostatic cancers and 2 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia. MR images were obtained with axial, sagittal and coronal fast spin echo long TR/TE images and axial spin echo short TR/TE images. Field of views was 10-12 cm and scan thickness was 3-5 mm. Depiction of normal anatomcial structures was excellent in all cases. On T2WI, zonal anatomy of the prostate and prostatic urethra, urethral crest, and ejaculatory duct were cleary visualized. On T1WI, periprostatic fat plane is more cleary visualized. On transverse images, periprostatic structures were well visualized on T1WI,and on T2WI, anterior fibromuscular stroma, transition zone and peripheral zone could be readily differentiated. Coronal images were more helpful in visualization of both central and peripheral zones. Vas deferens, ejaculatory duct and vermontanum were also more easily defined on these images. Sagittal images was helpful in the depiction of anterior fibromuscular stroma, central zone and peripheral zone with prostatic urethra and ejaculatory duct in a single plane. High resolution MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil can readily visualize the normal anatomy of the prostate and its related structures and may be useful in the evaluation of various diseases of prostate and vasvesicular system

  11. Normal appearance of the prostate and seminal tract: MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Lee, Jong Tae; Lee, Moo Sang; Choi, Pil Sik; Hong, Sung Joon; Lee, Yeon Hee; Choi, Hak Yong [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-15

    To assess the ability of MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil for the depiction of normal anatomical structure of prostate and its adjacent organs. MR imaging using an endorectal surface coil was performed in 23 male patients(age ; 20-75) to evaluate various prostatic and vasovesicular disorders, i. e, 14 cases of ejaculatory problems, 3 cases of hypogonadism, and 4 cases of prostatic cancers and 2 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia. MR images were obtained with axial, sagittal and coronal fast spin echo long TR/TE images and axial spin echo short TR/TE images. Field of views was 10-12 cm and scan thickness was 3-5 mm. Depiction of normal anatomcial structures was excellent in all cases. On T2WI, zonal anatomy of the prostate and prostatic urethra, urethral crest, and ejaculatory duct were cleary visualized. On T1WI, periprostatic fat plane is more cleary visualized. On transverse images, periprostatic structures were well visualized on T1WI,and on T2WI, anterior fibromuscular stroma, transition zone and peripheral zone could be readily differentiated. Coronal images were more helpful in visualization of both central and peripheral zones. Vas deferens, ejaculatory duct and vermontanum were also more easily defined on these images. Sagittal images was helpful in the depiction of anterior fibromuscular stroma, central zone and peripheral zone with prostatic urethra and ejaculatory duct in a single plane. High resolution MR imaging with an endorectal surface coil can readily visualize the normal anatomy of the prostate and its related structures and may be useful in the evaluation of various diseases of prostate and vasvesicular system.

  12. Vacuum Outer-Gap Structure in Pulsar Outer Magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui-Fang, Lin; Li, Zhang

    2009-01-01

    We study the vacuum outer-gap structure in the outer magnetosphere of rotation-powered pulsars by considering the limit of trans-field height through a pair production process. In this case, the trans-field height is limited by the photon-photon pair production process and the outer boundary of the outer gap can be extended outside the light cylinder. By solving self-consistently the Poisson equation for electrical potential and the Boltzmann equations of electrons/positrons and γ-rays in a vacuum outer gap for the parameters of Vela pulsar, we obtain an approximate geometry of the outer gap, i.e. the trans-field height is limited by the pair-production process and increases with the radial distance to the star and the width of the outer gap starts at the inner boundary (near the null charge surface) and ends at the outer boundary which locates inside or outside the light cylinder depending on the inclination angle. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  13. Mass and heat transfer at the outer surface of helical coils under single and two phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aziz, M.H.; Nirdosh, I.; Sedahmed, G.H.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The work aims to develop reactors which need rapid temperature control. • Mass and heat transfer at the outer surface of helical coils was studied experimentally. • The experiments were conducted under gas sparing, single and two phase flow. • Variables were helical tube diameter, physical properties, and gas and liquid velocity. • Results verification in terms of natural convection and surface renewal mechanism was explained. - Abstract: The mass transfer behavior of the outer surface of vertical helical coil was studied by the electrochemical technique under single phase flow, gas sparging and two phase flow. Variables studied were helical tube diameter, physical properties of the solution, solution velocity and superficial gas velocity. The mass transfer data were correlated by dimensionless equations. Mass transfer enhancement ratio in case of two phase flow ranged from 1.1 to 4.9 compared to single phase flow. Implication of the results for the design and operation of helical coil reactors used to conduct L–S exothermic diffusion controlled reactions which need rapid temperature control were outlined. In this case the inner coil surface will act as a cooler while the outer surface will act a reaction surface. Immobilized enzyme catalyzed biochemical reactions where heat sensitive materials may be involved represent an example for the reactions which can employ the helical coil reactor. Also the importance of the results in the design of and operation of diffusion controlled membrane processes which employ helical coil membrane was noted. In view of the analogy between heat and mass transfer the possibility of using the results in the design and operation of helical coil heat exchangers was highlighted.

  14. Envelope composition of Salmonella typhimurium 395 MS and 395 MR10 assesses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (ESCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnusson, K.F.; Johansson, L.

    1977-01-01

    The Salmonella typhimurium 395 MS and MR10 bacteria and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with the aid of the ESCA technique for the in situ analysis of chemical elements (C, O and N) at the surface. The nitrogen peak was large in both bacteria implying the presence of protein in the very outer part of the bacterial envelope due to the surface-sensitive measurement. The nitrogen peak was larger in the MR10 than in the MS bacteria, presumably reflecting an increased exposure of proteins concomitantly with the reduction of the LPS in MR10. After corrections for background and sensitivity of detection the relative intensities of the peaks agreed appreciably well with the proposed chemical structure of the LPS, indicating that at least semiquantitative relationships between the elements were obtained. (author)

  15. New configuration for efficient and durable copper coating on the outer surface of a tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A well-adhered copper coating on stainless steel power coupler parts is required in superconducting radio frequency (SRF accelerators. Radio frequency power coupler parts are complex, tubelike stainless steel structures, which require copper coating on their outer and inner surfaces. Conventional copper electroplating sometimes produces films with inadequate adhesion strength for SRF applications. Electroplating also requires a thin nickel strike layer under the copper coating, whose magnetic properties can be detrimental to SRF applications. Coaxial energetic deposition (CED and sputtering methods have demonstrated efficient conformal coating on the inner surfaces of tubes but coating the outer surface of a tube is challenging because these coating methods are line of sight. When the substrate is off axis and the plasma source is on axis, only a small section of the substrate’s outer surface is exposed to the source cathode. The conventional approach is to rotate the tube to achieve uniformity across the outer surface. This method results in poor film thickness uniformity and wastes most of the source plasma. Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC has developed a novel configuration called hollow external cathode CED (HEC-CED to overcome these issues. HEC-CED produces a film with uniform thickness and efficiently uses all eroded source material. The Cu film deposited on the outside of a stainless steel tube using the new HEC-CED configuration survived a high pressure water rinse adhesion test. HEC-CED can be used to coat the outside of any cylindrical structure.

  16. MR imaging of pineal cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Yong Sik; Yu, Hyeon; Kim, Wan Tae; Bae, Jin Woo; Moon, Hee Jung; Shin, Hyun Ja

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence and characteristic findings of pineal cyst incidentally detected on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Brain MR images obtained in 2432 patients were retrospectively reviewed to determine the incidence and MR findings of pineal cysts, which were evaluated according to their size, shape, location, signal intensity, interval change, contrast enhancement and mass effect on adjacent structures. Cysts were encountered in 107(4.4 %) of 2432 patients evaluated. their size ranged from 1 X 1 X 1 to 15 X 8 X 9 (mean, 5.97 X 3.82 X 4.82)mm. All were spherical (n=53) or oval (n=54) in shape. Their margin was smooth and they were homogeneous in nature. On T1-weighted images, the cysts were seen to be hyperintense (n=57) or isointense (n=50) to cerebrospinal fluid, but less so than brain parenchyma. T2-weighted images showed them to be isointense (n=51)or hyperintense (n=56) to cerebrospinal fluid. The cysts were centrally located in 65 cases and eccentrically in 42. Compression of the superior colliculi of the tectum was demonstrated in 17 cases (15.9 %). NO patients presented clinical symptoms or signs related to either pineal or tectal lesions. Peripheral enhancement around the cyst after Gd-DTPA injection was demonstrated in 51 cases(100 %). Follow-up examinations in 19 cases demonstrated no interval change. The incidence of pineal cysts was 4.4 %. The MR characteristics of simple pineal cysts include: (1) an oval or spherical shape, (2) a smooth outer margin and homogeneous nature, (3) isosignal or slightly high signal intensity to cerebrospinal fluid on whole pulse sequences, (4) ring enhancement after contrast injection, (5) an absence of interval change, as seen during follow up MR study. These MR appearances of pineal cysts might be helpful for differentiating them from pineal tumors

  17. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  18. MR imaging of the brachial plexus: comparison between 1.5-T and 3-T MR imaging: preliminary experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliafico, Alberto; Neumaier, Carlo Emanuele; Calabrese, Massimo [National Institute for Cancer Research, Department of Radiology, Genova (Italy); Succio, Giulia; Serafini, Giovanni; Ghidara, Matteo [Santa Corona Hospital, Radiology Department, Savona (Italy); Martinoli, Carlo [Universita di Genova, Radiology Department, Genova (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    To compare 1.5-T and 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brachial plexus. Institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained from 30 healthy volunteers and 30 consecutive patients with brachial plexus disturbances. MR was prospectively performed with comparable sequence parameters and coils with a 1.5-T and a 3-T system. Imaging protocols at both field strengths included T1-weighted turbo spin-echo (tSE) sequences and T2-weighed turbo spin-echo (tSE) sequences with fat saturation. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) between muscle and nerve were calculated for both field strengths. The visibility of brachial plexus nerve at various anatomic levels (roots, interscalene area, costoclavicular space, and axillary level) was analyzed with a four-point grading scale by two radiologists. MR imaging diagnoses and pathological findings were also compared qualitatively. SNR and CNRs were significantly higher on 3-T MR images than on 1.5-T MR images (Friedman test) for all sequences. Nerve visibility was significantly better on 3-T MR images than on 1.5-T MR images (paired sign test). Pathological findings (n = 30/30) were seen equally well with both field strengths. MR imaging diagnoses did not differ for the 1.5- and 3-T protocols. High-quality MR images of the brachial plexus can be obtained with 3-T MR imaging by using sequences similar to those used at 1.5-T MR imaging. In patients and healthy volunteers, the visibility of nerve trunks and cords at 3-T MR imaging appears to be superior to that at 1.5-T MR imaging. (orig.)

  19. High-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist. Application of a 5-cm surface coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, J.; Bleschkowski, A.; Tempka, A.; Felix, R. [Medical Faculty of the Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2000-07-01

    In order to make a comparative analysis of transversal tomograms obtained by high-resolution MR imaging with frozen cross-sections of an anatomical forearm specimen, twenty-two healthy volunteers were also examined using the same coil system to test for a range of possible clinical applications and for the depiction of morphological and morphometrical values of normal anatomy in vivo. MR images of the carpal tunnel of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained with a 1.5-T whole-body system with a 5-cm surface coil. Measurements were recorded with a field-of-view between 50x50 mm{sup 2} and 60x60 mm{sup 2} in a 256x256 pixel matrix for the T1 sequence. A slice thickness of 2 mm was used. The images were acquired using a T1-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 500/38 ms) and a T2-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 2000/70 ms). Additionally, a formalin-fixed anatomical forearm specimen was imaged for anatomic correlation. The imaged transversal cross-section levels in the specimen were subsequently freeze-sectioned. The anatomical structures of the MR findings were identified and compared with the macroscopical sections of the specimen. Based on the good depiction of details at this coil system with a pixel size in T1 of 0.195x0.195 mm, high-resolution MR imaging enabled identification of the interior structures of the carpal tunnel, as well as delineation of connective tissue. The clinical value of high-resolution MR includes the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and inflammatory disorders of the wrist. Our results support the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist using small surface coils.

  20. High-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist. Application of a 5-cm surface coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, J.; Bleschkowski, A.; Tempka, A.; Felix, R.

    2000-01-01

    In order to make a comparative analysis of transversal tomograms obtained by high-resolution MR imaging with frozen cross-sections of an anatomical forearm specimen, twenty-two healthy volunteers were also examined using the same coil system to test for a range of possible clinical applications and for the depiction of morphological and morphometrical values of normal anatomy in vivo. MR images of the carpal tunnel of 22 healthy volunteers were obtained with a 1.5-T whole-body system with a 5-cm surface coil. Measurements were recorded with a field-of-view between 50x50 mm 2 and 60x60 mm 2 in a 256x256 pixel matrix for the T1 sequence. A slice thickness of 2 mm was used. The images were acquired using a T1-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 500/38 ms) and a T2-weighted SE sequence (TR/TE 2000/70 ms). Additionally, a formalin-fixed anatomical forearm specimen was imaged for anatomic correlation. The imaged transversal cross-section levels in the specimen were subsequently freeze-sectioned. The anatomical structures of the MR findings were identified and compared with the macroscopical sections of the specimen. Based on the good depiction of details at this coil system with a pixel size in T1 of 0.195x0.195 mm, high-resolution MR imaging enabled identification of the interior structures of the carpal tunnel, as well as delineation of connective tissue. The clinical value of high-resolution MR includes the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and inflammatory disorders of the wrist. Our results support the feasibility of high-resolution MR imaging of the carpal tunnel and the wrist using small surface coils

  1. MR imaging of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Hideo

    1992-01-01

    A total of 115 patients with clinical symptoms and signs suggesting rotator cuff tears underwent MR imaging with a 1.5-Tesla system. The body coil was used as the receiver coil in 24 patients and a single 10 cm surface coil in 91. Arthrography or MR imaging with intra-articular Gd-DTPA (MR arthrography) was performed in 95 of the 115. T2-weighted images with the body coil showed high signal intensity lesions in rotator cuffs in only seven of the 10 patients who had tears demonstrated by arthrography or MR arthrography. On the other hand, T2-weighted images with the surface coil demonstrated high signal intensity lesions in cuffs in all 27 patients who were diagnosed to have tears by arthrography or MR arthrography. In 12 patietns, T2-wighted images with the surface coil showed high signal intensity lesions in cuffs, while arthrography and MR arthrography did not show tears. Surgery was performed in four of the 12 patients and partial tears were confirmed. A single 10 cm surface coil, 3 mm slice thickness and 2.5 second repetition time seem to account for the fine visualization of cuff tears by the T2-weighted images. These results suggest that T2-weighted images obtained with the surface coil are superior to arthrography and MR arthrography. (author)

  2. Exposure of outer membrane proteins on the surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01 revealed by labelling with [125I]lactoperoxidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, P.A.; Booth, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    The authors have investigated the exposure of the major outer membrane proteins on the cell surface by treating whole cells of P. aeruginosa with [ 125 I]lactoperoxidase. This reagent catalyses the iodination of tyrosine and histidine residues of proteins in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. It is too large to penetrate the outer membrane (Msub(r) 77500), therefore it is assumed to label only those proteins which have such residues exposed on the cell surface and has been applied to a number of Gram-negative organisms. It is found that F was the major labelled protein, D1 and/or D2 were less heavily labelled, and G was very faintly labelled. In addition, two proteins (Msub(r) 72500 and 38000) which did not appear to be major outer membrane proteins were labelled. (Auth.)

  3. Gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted MR urography versus T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography in children; Kontrastangehobene T{sub 1}-gewichtete MR-Urographie versus T{sub 2}-gewichtete (HASTE) MR-Urographie im Kindesalter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staatz, G.; Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Haage, P.; Tacke, J.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Rohrmann, D. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Urologische Klinik; Stollbrink, C. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Kinderklinik

    2001-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted excretory MR urography (EMRU) versus T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography in children with upper urinary tract abnormalities. Patients and Methods: In a prospective study 63 children, aged from 3 weeks to 15 years, underwent MR urography in a 1.5-T scanner. Before and after an intravenous injection of 0.05 mg/kg body weight of furosemide, respiratory-triggered HASTE images were obtained for T{sub 2}-weighted MR urography. EMRU was performed subsequent to i.v. gadolinium injection with respiratory-gated, coronal 3D-gradient-echo sequences. Results: Compared to T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography, gadolinium-enhanced MR urography revealed a superior diagnostic accuracy in non-dilated collecting systems (horseshoe kidneys, ectopic kidneys, duplex systems, single ectopic ureters, ureteroceles). EMRU and T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MRU turned out to be equivalent in the assessment of obstructed but normal functioning upper urinary tracts (UPJ obstructions, megaureters). Non-functioning dilated collecting systems and multicystic dysplastic kidneys were best visualized with use of T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MR urography. Conclusion: Respiratory-gated gadolinium-enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted MRU allows accurate evaluation of most upper urinary tract abnormalities. T{sub 2}-weighted (HASTE) MRU complements GMRU in the evaluation of non-functioning renal units and cystic disease of the kidneys. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Vergleich der kontrastangehobenen T{sub 1}-gewichteten MR-Urographie mit der T{sub 2}-gewichteten (HASTE) MR-Urographie bei Kindern mit Anomalien des oberen Harntraktes. Methoden: In einer prospektiven Studie wurde bei 63 Kindern (3 Wo. - 15J.) eine MR-Urographie (MRU) in einem 1,5-Tesla-Magneten durchgefuehrt. Die T{sub 2}-gewichtete MRU erfolgte vor und nach intravenoeser Injektion von 0,05 mg/kg KG Furosemid mit atemgetriggerten HASTE-Sequenzen. Fuer die T{sub 1}-gewichtete MRU wurden nach

  4. Clinical stage T1c prostate cancer: evaluation with endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingbo; Hricak, Hedvig; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Akin, Oguz; Ishill, Nicole M; Carlino, Lauren J; Reuter, Victor E; Eastham, James A

    2009-11-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of endorectal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging for prediction of the pathologic stage of prostate cancer and the presence of clinically nonimportant disease in patients with clinical stage T1c prostate cancer. The institutional review board approved-and waived the informed patient consent requirement for-this HIPAA-compliant study involving 158 patients (median age, 58 years; age range, 40-76 years) who had clinical stage T1c prostate cancer, had not been treated preoperatively, and underwent combined 1.5-T endorectal MR imaging-MR spectroscopic imaging between January 2003 and March 2004 before undergoing radical prostatectomy. On the MR images and combined endorectal MR-MR spectroscopic images, two radiologists retrospectively and independently rated the likelihood of cancer in 12 prostate regions and the likelihoods of extracapsular extension (ECE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), and adjacent organ invasion by using a five-point scale, and they determined the probability of clinically nonimportant prostate cancer by using a four-point scale. Whole-mount step-section pathology maps were used for imaging-pathologic analysis correlation. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed and areas under the curves (AUCs) were estimated nonparametrically for assessment of reader accuracy. At surgical-pathologic analysis, one (0.6%) patient had no cancer; 124 (78%) patients, organ-confined (stage pT2) disease; 29 (18%) patients, ECE (stage pT3a); two (1%) patients, SVI (stage pT3b); and two (1%) patients, bladder neck invasion (stage pT4). Forty-six (29%) patients had a total tumor volume of less than 0.5 cm(3). With combined MR imaging-MR spectroscopic imaging, the two readers achieved 80% accuracy in disease staging and AUCs of 0.62 and 0.71 for the prediction of clinically nonimportant cancer. Clinical stage T1c prostate cancers are heterogeneous in pathologic stage and volume. MR imaging may

  5. MR-angiogram-added surface anatomy scanning of superficial cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Hachiya, Junichi [Department of Radiology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan); Shiokawa, Yoshiaki [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8611 (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the utility of surface anatomy scanning (SAS) of the brain with superimposition of MR angiograms in the diagnosis and presurgical planning of superficial cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We performed SAS in 15 patients with superficial cerebral AVMs. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MR angiograms were then obtained in the same section and superimposed on the SAS images. The images were assessed regarding the visualization of each AVM component using a four-point grading scale (3=excellent to 0=poor). In 13 of the patients, the assessment was made comparing with conventional angiograms. The images were also compared with the surgical findings in 5 patients. The added images agreed well with the angiographic findings and demonstrated the relationships between the AVM components and the adjacent brain surface. The average scores of the feeder(s), nidus, and drainer(s) were 2.27, 2.33, and 2.67, respectively. The surgical findings also correlated well with the added images. Our technique can noninvasively demonstrate superficial AVMs along with the brain surface and provide information useful for planning surgery. (orig.)

  6. MR-angiogram-added surface anatomy scanning of superficial cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro; Katase, Shichiro; Yoshino, Ayako; Hachiya, Junichi; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2002-01-01

    Our purpose was to evaluate the utility of surface anatomy scanning (SAS) of the brain with superimposition of MR angiograms in the diagnosis and presurgical planning of superficial cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We performed SAS in 15 patients with superficial cerebral AVMs. Two-dimensional phase-contrast MR angiograms were then obtained in the same section and superimposed on the SAS images. The images were assessed regarding the visualization of each AVM component using a four-point grading scale (3=excellent to 0=poor). In 13 of the patients, the assessment was made comparing with conventional angiograms. The images were also compared with the surgical findings in 5 patients. The added images agreed well with the angiographic findings and demonstrated the relationships between the AVM components and the adjacent brain surface. The average scores of the feeder(s), nidus, and drainer(s) were 2.27, 2.33, and 2.67, respectively. The surgical findings also correlated well with the added images. Our technique can noninvasively demonstrate superficial AVMs along with the brain surface and provide information useful for planning surgery. (orig.)

  7. Superior MR images with electronically tuned and decoupled surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingwersen, H.; Freisen, L.; Friedrich, A.; Kess, H.; Krause, N.; Meissner, R.; Popp, W.

    1987-01-01

    In order to gain free positioning of surface coils in linearly polarized transmitting coils, it is absolutely necessary to electronically decouple both coils. For circularly polarized transmitting coils, decoupling is necessary in any case. In addition to the decoupling circuit automatic electronic tuning of the surface coils is used to gain the bast ratio of signal to noise. This combination of electronically decoupling and tuning of the surface coils yields intrinsic patient safety concerning local power deposition as well as free positioning and easy handling at the same time. Block diagrams, circuit schemes, and MR images obtained with several different surface coils are shown

  8. 3D-shaded surface rendering of gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography in congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, S.; Kikinis, R.; Dumanli, H.; Geva, T.; Powell, A.J.; Chung, T.

    2000-01-01

    Background. Gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography is a useful imaging technique for patients with congenital heart disease. Objective. This study sought to determine the added value of creating 3D shaded surface displays compared to standard maximal intensity projection (MIP) and multiplanar reformatting (MPR) techniques when analyzing 3D MR angiography data. Materials and methods. Seventeen patients (range, 3 months to 51 years old) with a variety of congenital cardiovascular defects underwent gadolinium-enhanced 3D MR angiography of the thorax. Color-coded 3D shaded surface models were rendered from the image data using manual segmentation and computer-based algorithms. Models could be rotated, translocated, or zoomed interactively by the viewer. Information available from the 3D models was compared to analysis based on viewing standard MIP/MPR displays. Results. Median postprocessing time for the 3D models was 6 h (range, 3-25 h) compared to approximately 20 min for MIP/MPR viewing. No additional diagnostic information was gained from 3D model analysis. All major findings with MIP/MPR postprocessing were also apparent on the 3D models. Qualitatively, the 3D models were more easily interpreted and enabled adjacent vessels to be distinguished more readily. Conclusion. Routine use of 3D shaded surface reconstructions for visualization of contrast enhanced MR angiography in congenital heart disease cannot be recommended. 3D surface rendering may be more useful for presenting complex anatomy to an audience unfamiliar with congenital heart disease and as an educational tool. (orig.)

  9. Adoptive T cell therapy targeting CD1 and MR1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingxi eGuo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, much of these therapies have been focused on enhancing, or generating de novo, effector functions of conventional T cells recognizing HLA molecules. Given the heterogeneity of HLA alleles, mismatched patients are ineligible for current HLA-restricted adoptive T cell therapies. CD1 and MR1 are class I-like monomorphic molecules and their restricted T cells possess unique T cell receptor specificity against entirely different classes of antigens. CD1 and MR1 molecules present lipid and vitamin B metabolite antigens, respectively, and offer a new front of targets for T cell therapies. This review will cover the recent progress in the basic research of CD1, MR1, and their restricted T cells that possess translational potential.

  10. Comparison of surface coil and knee coil for evaluation of the patellar cartilage by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steen, M. van den; Maeseneer, M. de; Hoste, M.; Vanderdood, K.; Ridder, F. de; Osteaux, M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to compare the knee coil and the surface coil for the visualisation of the patellar cartilage. Materials and methods: In 28 patients (17 women, 11 men) with an average age of 40 years (range 14-76) with knee pain MR was performed. Transverse images were obtained using a fast spin echo proton density weighted sequence on a Philips Gyroscan Intera 1.5 T clinical system. Transverse images were obtained at the level of the patellar cartilage using both the surface and the knee coil. All images were evaluated by consensus of two radiologists. They evaluated a number of quality criteria on a 4-point scale. Criteria for artefacts were also graded on a 4-point scale. Results: For the visualisation of fluid there was no significant difference between the knee coil and the surface coil (P=0.021). For all other criteria regarding image quality and presence of imaging artefacts there was a significant difference between both coils (P<0.001) with the surface coil obtaining the better result. Conclusion: The use of the surface coil in the visualisation of the patellar cartilage can be recommended at knee MR

  11. Fluid flow near the surface of earth's outer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloxham, Jeremy; Jackson, Andrew

    1991-01-01

    This review examines the recent attempts at extracting information on the pattern of fluid flow near the surface of the outer core from the geomagnetic secular variation. Maps of the fluid flow at the core surface are important as they may provide some insight into the process of the geodynamo and may place useful constraints on geodynamo models. In contrast to the case of mantle convection, only very small lateral variations in core density are necessary to drive the flow; these density variations are, by several orders of magnitude, too small to be imaged seismically; therefore, the geomagnetic secular variation is utilized to infer the flow. As substantial differences exist between maps developed by different researchers, the possible underlying reasons for these differences are examined with particular attention given to the inherent problems of nonuniqueness.

  12. Serial MR imaging and 1H-MR spectroscopy in monozygotic twins with Tay-Sachs disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, A; Miyajima, H; Ito, R; Orii, K O

    2008-10-01

    Four-year-old monozygotic female twins with early onset Tay-Sachs disease are described. The sisters showed similar slowly progressive clinical symptoms and deterioration, however the younger sister also demonstrated intractable myoclonus in the right leg. The serial MR images and (1)H-MR spectroscopy of the brain were obtained in both twins. MR images showed high intensity on T (2)-weighted image in the bilateral white matter, however there were no signal changes in the basal ganglia and thalamus during any of the phases. The ratio of N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) was decreased in the both white matter lesions and the corpus striatum, and that of myoinositol (mI)/Cr was increased in the damaged white matter on MR spectroscopy. The elevation of the lactate peak was clearly demonstrated in the left basal ganglia of the younger sister; however it was not shown in cerebral lesions of the elder sister. Changes in metabolites on MR spectroscopy were closely linked to the respective clinical features of each twin. Follow-up examination by (1)H-MR spectroscopy is useful for the evaluation of neuronal changes in children with Tay-Sachs disease.

  13. 64,000-Mr autoantigen in type I diabetes. Evidence against its surface location on human islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colman, P.G.; Campbell, I.L.; Kay, T.W.; Harrison, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    The sera of type I (insulin-dependent) diabetic subjects are reported to contain autoantibodies against a 64,000-Mr protein identified in [ 35 S]methionine biosynthetically labeled pancreatic islet cells. We have attempted to localize this autoantigen to the surface of the beta-cell and to define its properties. Sera from 10 newly diagnosed type I diabetic subjects, including five of the index sera originally used to identify the autoantigen, were shown to specifically precipitate a reduced protein of 67,000 Mr from Triton-solubilized, surface 125 I-labeled cultured adult human islet and rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells but not from fresh rat spleen cells. Further characterization revealed that this protein was bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorbed to cells from fetal calf serum (FCS)-supplemented culture medium and precipitated by BSA antibodies present in many diabetic sera. No labeled proteins were specifically precipitated when surface 125 I-labeled and solubilized human islet or RINm5F cells were precleared with anti-BSA immunoglobulins or when cells were first cultured in human serum. In contrast, a 64,000-Mr protein, clearly not BSA, was precipitated by diabetic globulins from human islets but not from RINm5F cells labeled with [ 35 S]methionine. In addition, a protein of the same size as well as proteins of approximately 35,000, 43,000, 140,000, and 200,000 Mr were specifically precipitated by diabetic globulins from freshly isolated human islets solubilized in Triton X-100 and then labeled with 125 I. These findings suggest that the 64,000-Mr antigen is not expressed on the surface of human islet cells, at least in culture, and therefore question its relevance as a target for islet cell surface antibodies in initiating beta-cell damage

  14. Functional MR imaging on an open 1T MR imaging system: exploiting the advantages of an open MR imaging system for functional MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Giessen, E.; Groot, P. F. C.; Booij, J.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D. J.; Nederveen, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Open MR imaging scanners are designed for imaging of specific patient groups that cannot be routinely scanned with conventional MR imaging scanners (eg, patients with obesity and claustrophobia). This study aims to determine whether BOLD sensitivity on an open 1T scanner is adequate for fMRI for

  15. High-resolution MR imaging of urethra for incontinence by means of intracavitary surface coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, A.; Mostwin, J.L.; Genadry, R.; Yang, S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Urinary incontinence is a major medical problem affecting millions of older women. This paper demonstrates the use of dynamic MR imaging in noninvasive quantification of prolapse in all three pelvic compartments. In this exhibit we use high-resolution MR imaging with intracavity (intravaginal, intrarectal) and surface/intracavitary coils to diagnose intrinsic urethral pathology that prevents opening (dysuria) or coaptation (incontinence). Normal anatomy, congenital anatomy (pelvic floor defects, hypoplasia), acquired anatomy (periurethral cyst/divertivulum, tumor, hypertrophy), and operative failure as causes of incontinence (postoperative scarring, misplacement/dehiscence of sutures and flaps) are shown. We demonstrate a novel method for MR cine voiding cystourethrography. Technical factors and applications are discussed

  16. Clinical usefulness of a newly-developed head and neck surface coil for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Morio; Kogure, Takashi; Hayashi, Sanshin

    1995-01-01

    To obtain correct diagnosis at early stages of cervical lymph node swelling, especially cases with suspected epipharyngeal carcinoma, and cerebral arterial sclerotic diseases, high-quality MR images visualizing the entire head and neck structures and vessels are of crucial importance. When obtaining images of head and neck regions using a head coil, signal intensity (SI) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of regions below the hypopharynx are weakened. Moreover, when obtaining images of head and neck regions using an anterior neck coil, SI and SNR of upper regions of epipharynx are also weakened. In an attempt to solve these problems, we developed a new head and neck surface coil for MR imaging. With this new coil we were able to obtain better images (153 cases) from regions below the hypopharynx to the upper regions of the epipharynx in the same time as images obtained using the head coil and anterior neck coil. 2D TOF MR angiographic images (11 cases) obtained by the head and neck surface coil are superior to 2D TOF angiographic images obtained by the anterior neck coil. MR images obtained with this improved method are valuable in the evaluation and management of head and neck region disease. (author)

  17. Simultaneous and long-lasting hydrophilization of inner and outer wall surfaces of polytetrafluoroethylene tubes by transferring atmospheric pressure plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Faze; Song, Jinlong; Huang, Shuai; Xu, Wenji; Sun, Jing; Liu, Xin; Xu, Sihao; Xia, Guangqing; Yang, Dezheng

    2016-01-01

    Plasma hydrophilization is a general method to increase the surface free energy of materials. However, only a few works about plasma modification focus on the hydrophilization of tube inner and outer walls. In this paper, we realize simultaneous and long-lasting plasma hydrophilization on the inner and outer walls of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes by atmospheric pressure plasmas (APPs). Specifically, an Ar atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is used to modify the PTFE tube’s outer wall and meanwhile to induce transferred He APP inside the PTFE tube to modify its inner wall surface. The optical emission spectrum (OES) shows that the plasmas contain many chemically active species, which are known as enablers for various applications. Water contact angle (WCA) measurements, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) are used to characterize the plasma hydrophilization. Results demonstrate that the wettability of the tube walls are well improved due to the replacement of the surface fluorine by oxygen and the change of surface roughness. The obtained hydrophilicity decreases slowly during more than 180 d aging, indicating a long-lasting hydrophilization. The results presented here clearly demonstrate the great potential of transferring APPs for surface modification of the tube’s inner and outer walls simultaneously. (paper)

  18. Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is a novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for human ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Jingjing

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1 is overexpressed in human cancer cells and plays an essential role in cancer cell growth. However, the significance of MR-1 in human ovarian cancer has not yet been explored. The aim of this study was to examine whether MR-1 is a predictor of ovarian cancer and its value as a therapeutic target in ovarian cancer patients. Methods Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR and quantitative real-time PCR were used to detect MR-1 mRNA levels in tissue samples from 26 ovarian cancer patients and 25 controls with benign ovarian disease. Anti-MR-1 polyclonal antibodies were prepared, tested by ELISA and western blotting, and then used for immunohistochemical analysis of the tissue samples. Adhesion and invasion of 292T cells was also examined after transfection of a pMX-MR-1 plasmid. Knockdown of MR-1 expression was achieved after stable transfection of SKOV3 cells with a short hairpin DNA pGPU6/GFP/Neo plasmid against the MR-1 gene. In addition, SKOV3 cells were treated with paclitaxel and carboplatin, and a potential role for MR-1 as a therapeutic target was evaluated. Results MR-1 was overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissues and SKOV3 cells. 293T cells overexpressed MR-1, and cellular spread and invasion were enhanced after transfection of the pMX-MR-1 plasmid, suggesting that MR-1 is critical for ovarian cancer cell growth. Knockdown of MR-1 expression inhibited cell adhesion and invasion, and treatment with anti-cancer drugs decreased its expression in cancer cells. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which MR-1 might serve as a novel biological marker and potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. Conclusions MR-1 may be a biomarker for diagnosis of ovarian cancer. It may also be useful for monitoring of the effects of anti-cancer therapies. Further studies are needed to clarify whether MR-1 is an early

  19. Three-dimensional brain-surface MR images of brain anomalies in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and its differentiation from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toda, Tatsushi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Teruo; Iwata, Makoto; Kanazawa, Ichiro (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Matsumura, Kiichiro

    1993-12-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is the second most common form of muscular dystrophy in Japan and is peculiarly associated with brain anomalies such as micropolygyria. Since these anomalies are preferentially observed on the brain surface, it is difficult to identify them by either X-ray CT or conventional MRI. In addition, FCMD has an atypical (mild) form in which the patients are capable of walking. In such cases, clinical differential diagnosis from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation (DMD-MR) is not necessarily easy. We analyzed the brain-surface structures of 4 typical FCMD cases. 1 atypical FCMD case, 4 DMD-MR cases, and 1 undiagnosed case using a method of 3-dimensional (3-D) brain-surface MR imaging; we then compared the results with dystrophin immuno-stainings of the biopsied skeletal muscles. In both typical and atypical FCMD cases, micropolygyria could be clearly demonstrated, with individual variations. The 3-D images were verified by neuropathology. Of the 4 DMD-MR cases, 3 cases showed no gyral abnormality. However, in 1 DMD-MR case the diagnosis was corrected to atypical FCMD because of micropolygyria found on 3-D MRI. The one undiangosed case was diagnosed as DMD-MR on the basis of 3-D MRI. There was a good correspondence between the results of the 3-D imaging and the dystrophin test. Recently, some FCMD cases with a complete deficiency of dystrophin have been reported. Therefore, the detection of brain anomalies is important for the precise diagnosis of FCMD; the present method is considered effective for this purpose. (author).

  20. Three-dimensional brain-surface MR images of brain anomalies in Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy and its differentiation from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toda, Tatsushi; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Shimizu, Teruo; Iwata, Makoto; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Matsumura, Kiichiro.

    1993-01-01

    Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is the second most common form of muscular dystrophy in Japan and is peculiarly associated with brain anomalies such as micropolygyria. Since these anomalies are preferentially observed on the brain surface, it is difficult to identify them by either X-ray CT or conventional MRI. In addition, FCMD has an atypical (mild) form in which the patients are capable of walking. In such cases, clinical differential diagnosis from Duchenne muscular dystrophy with severe mental retardation (DMD-MR) is not necessarily easy. We analyzed the brain-surface structures of 4 typical FCMD cases. 1 atypical FCMD case, 4 DMD-MR cases, and 1 undiagnosed case using a method of 3-dimensional (3-D) brain-surface MR imaging; we then compared the results with dystrophin immuno-stainings of the biopsied skeletal muscles. In both typical and atypical FCMD cases, micropolygyria could be clearly demonstrated, with individual variations. The 3-D images were verified by neuropathology. Of the 4 DMD-MR cases, 3 cases showed no gyral abnormality. However, in 1 DMD-MR case the diagnosis was corrected to atypical FCMD because of micropolygyria found on 3-D MRI. The one undiangosed case was diagnosed as DMD-MR on the basis of 3-D MRI. There was a good correspondence between the results of the 3-D imaging and the dystrophin test. Recently, some FCMD cases with a complete deficiency of dystrophin have been reported. Therefore, the detection of brain anomalies is important for the precise diagnosis of FCMD; the present method is considered effective for this purpose. (author)

  1. Difference in radiocarbon ages of carbonized material from the inner and outer surfaces of pottery from a wetland archaeological site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Yoshiki; Minami, Masayo; Onbe, Shin; Sakamoto, Minoru; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshio; Imamura, Mineo

    2011-01-01

    AMS (Accelerator Mass Spectrometry) radiocarbon dates for eight potsherds from a single piece of pottery from a wetland archaeological site indicated that charred material from the inner pottery surfaces (5052 ± 12 BP; N = 5) is about 90 (14)C years older than that from the outer surfaces (4961 ± 22 BP; N = 7). We considered three possible causes of this difference: the old wood effect, reservoir effects, and diagenesis. We concluded that differences in the radiocarbon ages between materials from the inner and outer surfaces of the same pot were caused either by the freshwater reservoir effect or by diagenesis. Moreover, we found that the radiocarbon ages of carbonized material on outer surfaces (soot) of pottery from other wetland archaeological sites were the same as the ages of material on inner surfaces (charred food) of the same pot within error, suggesting absence of freshwater reservoir effect or diagenesis.

  2. Flair MR imaging in the Detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage : comparison with CT and T1-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Soo Hyun; Kim, Soo Youn; Lee, Ghi Jai; Shim, Jae Chan; Oh, Tae Kyung; Kim, Ho Kyun [College of Medicine, Jnje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-01

    To compare the findings of fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging in the detection of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), with those of precontrast CT and T1-weighted MR imaging. In 13 patients (14 cases) with SAH, FLAIR MR images were retrospectively analyzed and compared with CT (10 patients, 11 cases) and T1-weighted MR images (9 cases). SAH was confirmed on the basis of high density along the subarachnoid space, as seen on precontrast CT, or lumbar puncture. MR imaging was performed on a 1.0T unit. FLAIR MR and CT images were obtained during the acute stage(less than 3 days after ictus) in 10 and 9 cases, respectively, during the subacute stage (4-14 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively, and during the chronic stage (more than 15 days after ictus) in two cases and one, respectively. CT was performed before FLAIR MR imaging, and the interval between CT and FLAIR ranged from 24 hours (6 cases) to 2-3 (2 cases) or 4-7 days (3 cases). In each study, the conspicuity of visualization of SAH was graded as excellent, good, fair, or negative at five locations (sylvian fissure, cortical sulci, anterior basal cistern, posterior basal cistern, and perimesencephalic cistern). In all cases, subarachnoid hemorrhages were demonstrated as high signal intensity areas on FLAIR images. The detection rates for SAH on CT and T1-weighted MR images were 100% (11/11) and 89% (8/9), respectively. FLAIR was superior to T1-weighted imaging in the detection of SAH at all sites except the anterior basal cistern (p less than 0.05) and superior to CT in the detection of SAH at the cortical sulci (p less than 0.05). On FLAIR MR images, subarachnoid hemorrhages at all stages are demonstrated as high signal intensity areas; the FLAIR MR sequence is thus considered useful in the detection of SAH. In particular FLAIR is more sensitive than CT for the detection of SAH in the cortical sulci. (author)

  3. Inverse estimation for temperatures of outer surface and geometry of inner surface of furnace with two layer walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-K.; Su, C.-R.

    2008-01-01

    This study provides an inverse analysis to estimate the boundary thermal behavior of a furnace with two layer walls. The unknown temperature distribution of the outer surface and the geometry of the inner surface were estimated from the temperatures of a small number of measured points within the furnace wall. The present approach rearranged the matrix forms of the governing differential equations and then combined the reversed matrix method, the linear least squares error method and the concept of virtual area to determine the unknown boundary conditions of the furnace system. The dimensionless temperature data obtained from the direct problem were used to simulate the temperature measurements. The influence of temperature measurement errors upon the precision of the estimated results was also investigated. The advantage of this approach is that the unknown condition can be directly solved by only one calculation process without initially guessed temperatures, and the iteration process of the traditional method can be avoided in the analysis of the heat transfer. Therefore, the calculation in this work is more rapid and exact than the traditional method. The result showed that the estimation error of the geometry increased with increasing distance between measured points and inner surface and in preset error, and with decreasing number of measured points. However, the geometry of the furnace inner surface could be successfully estimated by only the temperatures of a small number of measured points within and near the outer surface under reasonable preset error

  4. Dynamic MR-mammography in invasive lobular breast cancer; Dynamische MR-Mammographie beim invasiv lobulaeren Mammakarzinom bei 1,0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sittek, H.; Perlet, C.; Kessler, M.; Reiser, M. [Institut fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Grossenhadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany); Untch, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Klinikum Grossenhadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ., Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Material and Methods: We carried out 1505 MR mammographoes in 1357 patients. Biopsy was indicated in 413 cases. Among the malignancies, 23/214 (10%) were ILC. MR-M was performed with a 1.0 T whole body MRI system with a dynamic FLASH-3D sequence. Relative signal enhancement within lesions detected and morphologic pattern of contrast enhancement (mep) were determined. Three types of mep were distinguished: type 1 without contrast enhancement, type 2 with focal contrast enhancement, and type 3 with diffuse contrast enhancement of the glandular body. Results: Within MR-M alone, 19/23 (82.6%) of ILC were detected due to a mep type 2. Four ILC were false negative on MR-M (2 cases show mep type 1 or mep type 3). The sensitivity of Mx alone was 86.9% (20/23). When both Mx and MR-M were combined, all 23 ILC were detected. The addition of MR-M to Mx may increase sensitivity to about 100% in the detection of ILC. (orig.) [Deutsch] Material und Methode: Im Zeitraum 05/1993 bis 06/1996 fuehrten wir bei 1357 Patientinnen 1505 MR-Mammographien durch. In 413 Faellen wurde eine Probeexzision indiziert. Die histologische Untersuchung ergab in 214 Faellen einen malignen Tumor. Darunter befanden sich 23 ILC. Die MR-M wurden an einem 1,0 T MRT-System (Impact, Siemens, Erlangen) mit einer dynamischen FLASH 3D Sequenz durchgefuehrt. Neben dem prozentualen Anstieg der Signalintensitaet innerhalb einer Laesion haben wir fuer die Diagnostik folgende morphologische Befundmuster (BM) unterschieden: Typ 1: Keine Aufnahme, Typ 2: Fokale Aufnahme, Typ 3: Diffuse Aufnahme des Druesenkoerpers in der MR-M. Ergebnisse: Mit der MR-M konnten 19/23 (82,6%) der ILC anhand einer fokalen Zunahme der Signalintensitaet richtig positiv erkannt werden (BM Typ 2). Vier der ILC waren in der MR-M falsch negativ. In zwei Faellen (2/23) war keine Zunahme der Signalintensitaet zu verzeichnen (BM Typ 1). In zwei weiteren Faellen (2/23) maskierte eine diffuse Signalintensitaetszunahme des Druesenkoerpers (BM Typ 3

  5. MR imaging of colorectal carcinomas using an MR endoscopic coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murano, Akihiko; Kido, Choichiro; Sasaki, Fumio; Nakamura, Tsuneya; Kobayashi, Semi; Katoh, Tomoyuki; Hirai, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    Diagnosis of the depth of wall invasion by rectal carcinoma using MR endoscopy was performed in ten resected specimens, including five rectal carcinomas, three colon carcinomas, two normal gastric wall. In addition, the gastric wall of a pig was examined. MR imaging was done with a 1.5-T Signa Advantage (GE Medical System) system, with the surface coil of the MR endoscope acting as the receiver coil. Five layers could be distinguished in the bowel wall: mucosa, submucosa and muscularis propria divided into circular muscle, longitudinal muscle and intervening connective tissue. Tumors had almost the same signal intensity as muscle. The MR images of colon carcinomas, rectal carcinomas, and extrinsically metastatic involvement of the sigmoid colon by rectal carcinoma all correlated well with the pathological findings. The normal structure of the gastric wall was similar to that of the colon. 3D-fast Spoiled Grass (SPGR) sequence has a fairly short scanning time. Thus, the possibility of precise clinical diagnosis by this method was suggested. (author)

  6. Correlation of Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT with surface EEG, MR, and CT for noninvasive localization of seizure foci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelstad, B.L.; Laxer, K.D.; Dickson, H.S.; Cooper, K.E.; Huberty, J.P.; White, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Some patients with refractory seizure disorders are candidates for surgical management. Correct preoperative lateralization is essential. Of 19 patients with seizure disorders who underwent Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT, 14 were considered to have ultimately had definitive localization by other means: consistently abnormal surface electroencephalogram (EEG), subdural or deep electrode EEG, EEG response to resection, abnormal histopatholgy, or grossly abnormal MR image. Lateralization with SPECT was (1) focal or regional hypoperfusion (11 patients) or (2) discrete focal hyperperfusion (one patient). Correct lateralization was obtained in ten of 14 with SPECT, nine of 14 with surface EEG, seven of 12 with MR, and one of eight with CT. Preoperative evaluation of patients with medically refractory seizures can be aided by Tc-99m HMPAO SPECT

  7. Iodo-gen-catalysed iodination for identification of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli K12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.C.S.; Almeida, D.F. de

    1987-01-01

    Surface proteins of Escherichia coli K12 were identified by radiolabelling using 1,3,4,6 - tatrachloro, 3-alpha, 6-alpha - diphenylgycoluryl (Iodo-Gen) and 131 I. Labelled proteins were localized in the outer membrane of the cells. Using this technique it has been possible to observe technique it has been possible to observe that the eletrophoretic pattern of surface proteins changes according to the growth phases in culture. Radiolabelling of E.coli cells inculbated at 42 0 C showed that the syntheses of two surface proteins were temperature-inducible. At least one such protein may be involved in the process of cell division in E.coli K12. (author) [pt

  8. Iodo-gen-catalysed iodination for identification of surface-exposed outer membrane proteins of Escherichia coli K12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, L C.S.; Almeida, D.F. de

    1987-12-01

    Surface proteins of Escherichia coli K12 were identified by radiolabelling using 1,3,4,6 - tatrachloro, 3-alpha, 6-alpha - diphenylgycoluryl (Iodo-Gen) and /sup 131/I. Labelled proteins were localized in the outer membrane of the cells. Using this technique it has been possible to observe technique it has been possible to observe that the eletrophoretic pattern of surface proteins changes according to the growth phases in culture. Radiolabelling of E.coli cells inculbated at 42/sup 0/C showed that the syntheses of two surface proteins were temperature-inducible. At least one such protein may be involved in the process of cell division in E.coli K12.

  9. Usher syndrome type 1-associated cadherins shape the photoreceptor outer segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schietroma, Cataldo; Parain, Karine; Estivalet, Amrit; Aghaie, Asadollah; Boutet de Monvel, Jacques; Picaud, Serge; Sahel, José-Alain; Perron, Muriel; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Petit, Christine

    2017-06-05

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) causes combined hearing and sight defects, but how mutations in USH1 genes lead to retinal dystrophy in patients remains elusive. The USH1 protein complex is associated with calyceal processes, which are microvilli of unknown function surrounding the base of the photoreceptor outer segment. We show that in Xenopus tropicalis , these processes are connected to the outer-segment membrane by links composed of protocadherin-15 (USH1F protein). Protocadherin-15 deficiency, obtained by a knockdown approach, leads to impaired photoreceptor function and abnormally shaped photoreceptor outer segments. Rod basal outer disks displayed excessive outgrowth, and cone outer segments were curved, with lamellae of heterogeneous sizes, defects also observed upon knockdown of Cdh23 , encoding cadherin-23 (USH1D protein). The calyceal processes were virtually absent in cones and displayed markedly reduced F-actin content in rods, suggesting that protocadherin-15-containing links are essential for their development and/or maintenance. We propose that calyceal processes, together with their associated links, control the sizing of rod disks and cone lamellae throughout their daily renewal. © 2017 Schietroma et al.

  10. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs, as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the extracellular electron-transfer processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extra-cellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological bases for MFCs.

  11. Cerebrovascular plaque segmentation using object class uncertainty snake in MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bipul; Saha, Punam K.; Wolf, Ronald; Song, Hee Kwon; Wright, Alexander C.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2005-04-01

    Atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease leads to formation of lipid-laden plaques that can form emboli when ruptured causing blockage to cerebral vessels. The clinical manifestation of this event sequence is stroke; a leading cause of disability and death. In vivo MR imaging provides detailed image of vascular architecture for the carotid artery making it suitable for analysis of morphological features. Assessing the status of carotid arteries that supplies blood to the brain is of primary interest to such investigations. Reproducible quantification of carotid artery dimensions in MR images is essential for plaque analysis. Manual segmentation being the only method presently makes it time consuming and sensitive to inter and intra observer variability. This paper presents a deformable model for lumen and vessel wall segmentation of carotid artery from MR images. The major challenges of carotid artery segmentation are (a) low signal-to-noise ratio, (b) background intensity inhomogeneity and (c) indistinct inner and/or outer vessel wall. We propose a new, effective object-class uncertainty based deformable model with additional features tailored toward this specific application. Object-class uncertainty optimally utilizes MR intensity characteristics of various anatomic entities that enable the snake to avert leakage through fuzzy boundaries. To strengthen the deformable model for this application, some other properties are attributed to it in the form of (1) fully arc-based deformation using a Gaussian model to maximally exploit vessel wall smoothness, (2) construction of a forbidden region for outer-wall segmentation to reduce interferences by prominent lumen features and (3) arc-based landmark for efficient user interaction. The algorithm has been tested upon T1- and PD- weighted images. Measures of lumen area and vessel wall area are computed from segmented data of 10 patient MR images and their accuracy and reproducibility are examined. These results correspond

  12. Lateral and vertical manipulations of single atoms on the Ag(1 1 1) surface with the copper single-atom and trimer-apex tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Yiqun; Yang Tianxing; Ye Xiang; Huang Lei

    2011-01-01

    We study the lateral and vertical manipulations of single Ag and Cu atoms on the Ag(1 1 1) surface with the Cu single-atom and trimer-apex tips using molecular statics simulations. The reliability of the lateral manipulation with the Cu single-atom tip is investigated, and compared with that for the Ag tips. We find that overall the manipulation reliability (MR) increases with the decreasing tip height, and in a wide tip-height range the MR is better than those for both the Ag single-atom and trimer-apex tips. This is due to the stronger attractive force of the Cu tip and its better stability against the interactions with the Ag surface. With the Cu trimer-apex tip, the single Ag and Cu adatoms can be picked up from the flat Ag(1 1 1) surface, and moreover a reversible vertical manipulation of single Ag atoms on the stepped Ag(1 1 1) surface is possible, suggesting a method to modify two-dimensional Ag nanostructures on the Ag(1 1 1) surface with the Cu trimer-apex tip.

  13. Quantification of hepatic steatosis with T1-independent, T2-corrected MR imaging with spectral modeling of fat: blinded comparison with MR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisamy, Sina; Hines, Catherine D G; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B; McKenzie, Charles A; Yu, Huanzhou; Brittain, Jean H; Reeder, Scott B

    2011-03-01

    To prospectively compare an investigational version of a complex-based chemical shift-based fat fraction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging method with MR spectroscopy for the quantification of hepatic steatosis. This study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPAA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained before all studies. Fifty-five patients (31 women, 24 men; age range, 24-71 years) were prospectively imaged at 1.5 T with quantitative MR imaging and single-voxel MR spectroscopy, each within a single breath hold. The effects of T2 correction, spectral modeling of fat, and magnitude fitting for eddy current correction on fat quantification with MR imaging were investigated by reconstructing fat fraction images from the same source data with different combinations of error correction. Single-voxel T2-corrected MR spectroscopy was used to measure fat fraction and served as the reference standard. All MR spectroscopy data were postprocessed at a separate institution by an MR physicist who was blinded to MR imaging results. Fat fractions measured with MR imaging and MR spectroscopy were compared statistically to determine the correlation (r(2)), and the slope and intercept as measures of agreement between MR imaging and MR spectroscopy fat fraction measurements, to determine whether MR imaging can help quantify fat, and examine the importance of T2 correction, spectral modeling of fat, and eddy current correction. Two-sided t tests (significance level, P = .05) were used to determine whether estimated slopes and intercepts were significantly different from 1.0 and 0.0, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for the classification of clinically significant steatosis were evaluated. Overall, there was excellent correlation between MR imaging and MR spectroscopy for all reconstruction combinations. However, agreement was only achieved when T2 correction, spectral modeling of fat, and magnitude fitting for eddy current correction were used (r(2

  14. Synthesis and characterization of magneto-rheological (MR fluids for MR brake application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhau K. Kumbhar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magneto rheological (MR fluid technology has been proven for many industrial applications like shock absorbers, actuators, etc. MR fluid is a smart material whose rheological characteristics change rapidly and can be controlled easily in presence of an applied magnetic field. MR brake is a device to transmit torque by the shear stress of MR fluid. However, MR fluids exhibit yield stress of 50–90 kPa. In this research, an effort has been made to synthesize MR fluid sample/s which will typically meet the requirements of MR brake applications. In this study, various electrolytic and carbonyl iron powder based MR fluids have been synthesized by mixing grease as a stabilizer, oleic acid as an antifriction additive and gaur gum powder as a surface coating to reduce agglomeration of the MR fluid. MR fluid samples based on sunflower oil, which is bio-degradable, environmentally friendly and abundantly available have also been synthesized. These MR fluid samples are characterized for determination of magnetic, morphological and rheological properties. This study helps identify most suitable localized MR fluid meant for MR brake application.

  15. Study of temperature distribution of pipes heated by moving rectangular gauss distribution heat source. Development of pipe outer surface irradiated laser stress improvement process (L-SIP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Takahiro; Kamo, Kazuhiko; Asada, Seiji; Terasaki, Toshio

    2009-01-01

    The new process called L-SIP (outer surface irradiated Laser Stress Improvement Process) is developed to improve the tensile residual stress of the inner surface near the butt welded joints of pipes in the compression stress. The temperature gradient occurs in the thickness of pipes in heating the outer surface rapidly by laser beam. By the thermal expansion difference between the inner surface and the outer surface, the compression stress occurs near the inner surface of pipes. In this paper, the theoretical equation for the temperature distributions of pipes heated by moving rectangular Gauss distribution heat source on the outer surface is derived. The temperature histories of pipes calculated by theoretical equation agree well with FEM analysis results. According to the theoretical equation, the controlling parameters of temperature distributions and histories are q/2a y , vh, a x /h and a y /h, where q is total heat input, a y is heat source length in the axial direction, a x is Gaussian radius of heat source in the hoop direction, ν is moving velocity, and h is thickness of the pipe. The essential variables for L-SIP, which are defined on the basis of the measured temperature histories on the outer surface of the pipe, are Tmax, F 0 =kτ 0 /h 2 , vh, W Q and L Q , where Tmax is maximum temperature on the monitor point of the outer surface, k is thermal diffusivity coefficient, τ 0 is the temperature rise time from 100degC to maximum temperature on the monitor point of the outer surface, W Q is τ 0 x ν, and L Q is the uniform temperature length in the axial direction. It is verified that the essential variables for L-SIP match the controlling parameters by the theoretical equation. (author)

  16. MR-guided discography using an open 1 Tesla MRI system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streitparth, Florian; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.; Hartwig, T.; Strube, P.; Putzier, M.; Schnackenburg, B.; Chopra, S.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of MR-guided discography using an open 1 Tesla MRI system. 48 disc segments of 41 patients scheduled for intradiscal thermal treatment, total disc replacement or spondylodesis were examined. A 1.0-T open MRI was used for instrument guidance and imaging. After primary disc puncture under guidance of interactive PDw TSE imaging, 1-2 ml of gadolinium contrast saline mixture was injected into the disc. The occurrence of memory pain during injection was recorded. Axial and sagittal T1w TSE images with and without fat saturation were obtained. All MRI discograms were analysed by two readers, who were blinded to the clinical findings. Overall, the placement of the puncture needle in the targeted disc was accurate under real-time MR guidance. Injections were technically successful in all cases. No major complications occurred. The mean procedure time was 17 min (range 13-34 min). Image quality of contrast-enhanced MR discograms was excellent when using an optimized gadolinium contrast saline mixture of 1:600. Memory pain was detected in 16 out of 48 affected segments. MR-guided discography is accurate and safe. Multiplanar dynamic imaging facilitates the puncture of discs and provides high-quality MR discograms. (orig.)

  17. Quantification of Hepatic Steatosis with T1-independent, T2*-corrected MR Imaging with Spectral Modeling of Fat: Blinded Comparison with MR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Catherine D. G.; Hamilton, Gavin; Sirlin, Claude B.; McKenzie, Charles A.; Yu, Huanzhou; Brittain, Jean H.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively compare an investigational version of a complex-based chemical shift–based fat fraction magnetic resonance (MR) imaging method with MR spectroscopy for the quantification of hepatic steatosis. Materials and Methods: This study was approved by the institutional review board and was HIPAA compliant. Written informed consent was obtained before all studies. Fifty-five patients (31 women, 24 men; age range, 24–71 years) were prospectively imaged at 1.5 T with quantitative MR imaging and single-voxel MR spectroscopy, each within a single breath hold. The effects of T2* correction, spectral modeling of fat, and magnitude fitting for eddy current correction on fat quantification with MR imaging were investigated by reconstructing fat fraction images from the same source data with different combinations of error correction. Single-voxel T2-corrected MR spectroscopy was used to measure fat fraction and served as the reference standard. All MR spectroscopy data were postprocessed at a separate institution by an MR physicist who was blinded to MR imaging results. Fat fractions measured with MR imaging and MR spectroscopy were compared statistically to determine the correlation (r2), and the slope and intercept as measures of agreement between MR imaging and MR spectroscopy fat fraction measurements, to determine whether MR imaging can help quantify fat, and examine the importance of T2* correction, spectral modeling of fat, and eddy current correction. Two-sided t tests (significance level, P = .05) were used to determine whether estimated slopes and intercepts were significantly different from 1.0 and 0.0, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity for the classification of clinically significant steatosis were evaluated. Results: Overall, there was excellent correlation between MR imaging and MR spectroscopy for all reconstruction combinations. However, agreement was only achieved when T2* correction, spectral modeling of fat, and magnitude

  18. Usher syndrome type 1–associated cadherins shape the photoreceptor outer segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, Karine; Aghaie, Asadollah; Picaud, Serge

    2017-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) causes combined hearing and sight defects, but how mutations in USH1 genes lead to retinal dystrophy in patients remains elusive. The USH1 protein complex is associated with calyceal processes, which are microvilli of unknown function surrounding the base of the photoreceptor outer segment. We show that in Xenopus tropicalis, these processes are connected to the outer-segment membrane by links composed of protocadherin-15 (USH1F protein). Protocadherin-15 deficiency, obtained by a knockdown approach, leads to impaired photoreceptor function and abnormally shaped photoreceptor outer segments. Rod basal outer disks displayed excessive outgrowth, and cone outer segments were curved, with lamellae of heterogeneous sizes, defects also observed upon knockdown of Cdh23, encoding cadherin-23 (USH1D protein). The calyceal processes were virtually absent in cones and displayed markedly reduced F-actin content in rods, suggesting that protocadherin-15–containing links are essential for their development and/or maintenance. We propose that calyceal processes, together with their associated links, control the sizing of rod disks and cone lamellae throughout their daily renewal. PMID:28495838

  19. Intravascular (catheter) MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Hurst, G.C.; Katz, D.E.; Dverk, J.L.; Wiesen, E.J.; Czerski, L.W.; Malaya, R.; Bellon, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Intravascular MR probes allow excellent spatial resolution and have the potential to detect arterial wall microstructure. Ultrasonic intravascular probes suggest that detailed morphologic information can assist clinical decision making. Catheter MR probes of 2--7 mm outside diameter (OD) were built of copper wire, Teflon, and parts from standard commercial catheters. The probes were connected to the surface coil receiver input of our Picker VISTA 2055HP 1.5-T imaging system. The extant (linear) body coil was used for transmit. Phantoms were constructed of coaxial glass MR tubes, filled with doped water. Watanabe rabbit aorta and human autopsy iliac artery specimens were examined within 4 hours of excision or stored by freezing. In vivo iliac arteries in dogs under general anesthesia were imaged, with percutaneous placement of the probe. Results are presented

  20. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B. [VA San Diego Healthcare System, Radiology Service, San Diego, CA (United States); University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon [Mahidol University, Department of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Rachathewi, Bangkok (Thailand); Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda [University of California-San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-04-15

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques. (orig.)

  1. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Won C.; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques. (orig.)

  2. MR morphology of triangular fibrocartilage complex: correlation with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Won C; Ruangchaijatuporn, Thumanoon; Chang, Eric Y; Biswas, Reni; Du, Jiang; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate pathology of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) using high-resolution morphologic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and compare with quantitative MR and biomechanical properties. Five cadaveric wrists (22-70 years) were imaged at 3 T using morphologic (proton density weighted spin echo, PD FS, and 3D spoiled gradient echo, 3D SPGR) and quantitative MR sequences to determine T2 and T1rho properties. In eight geographic regions, morphology of TFC disc and laminae were evaluated for pathology and quantitative MR values. Samples were disarticulated and biomechanical indentation testing was performed on the distal surface of the TFC disc. On morphologic PD SE images, TFC disc pathology included degeneration and tears, while that of the laminae included degeneration, degeneration with superimposed tear, mucinous transformation, and globular calcification. Punctate calcifications were highly visible on 3D SPGR images and found only in pathologic regions. Disc pathology occurred more frequently in proximal regions of the disc than distal regions. Quantitative MR values were lowest in normal samples, and generally higher in pathologic regions. Biomechanical testing demonstrated an inverse relationship, with indentation modulus being high in normal regions with low MR values. The laminae studied were mostly pathologic, and additional normal samples are needed to discern quantitative changes. These results show technical feasibility of morphologic MR, quantitative MR, and biomechanical techniques to characterize pathology of the TFCC. Quantitative MRI may be a suitable surrogate marker of soft tissue mechanical properties, and a useful adjunct to conventional morphologic MR techniques.

  3. Silencing MR-1 attenuates inflammatory damage in mice heart induced by AngII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Wenjian; Chen, Haiyang; Jiang, Jiandong; Kong, Weijia; Wang, Yiguang

    2010-01-01

    Myofibrillogenesis regulator-1(MR-1) can aggravate cardiac hypertrophy induced by angiotensin(Ang) II in mice through activation of NF-κB signaling pathway, and nuclear transcription factor (NF)-κB and activator protein-1(AP-1) regulate inflammatory and immune responses by increasing the expression of specific inflammatory genes in various tissues including heart. Whether inhibition of MR-1 expression will attenuate AngII-induced inflammatory injury in mice heart has not been explored. Herein, we monitored the activation of NF-κB and AP-1, together with expression of pro-inflammatory of interleukin(IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-α, vascular-cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM), and inflammatory cell infiltration in heart of mice which are induced firstly by AngII (PBS),then received MR-1-siRNA or control-siRNA injecting. We found that the activation of NF-κB and AP-1 was inhibited significantly, together with the decreased expression of IL-6, TNF-α, VCAM-1, and PECAM in AngII-induced mice myocardium in MR-1-siRNA injection groups compared with control-siRNA injecting groups. However, the expression level of MR-1 was not an apparent change in PBS-infused groups than in unoperation groups, and MR-1-siRNA do not affect the expression of MR-1 in PBS-infused mice. Our findings suggest that silencing MR-1 protected mice myocardium against inflammatory injury induced by AngII by suppression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1 signaling pathway.

  4. Gallbladder wall thickening: MR imaging and pathologic correlation with emphasis on layered pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.E.; Lee, J.M.; Hahn, S.T.; Lee, K.; Rha, S.E.; Choi, B.G.; Kim, E.K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate MR findings of gallbladder wall thickening with pathologic findings on the basis of the layered pattern and to evaluate the diagnostic value of MR imaging in gallbladder disease. We retrospectively evaluated the source images of HASTE sequences for MR cholangiography in 144 patients with gallbladder wall thickening. The layered pattern of thickened wall was classified into four patterns. Type 1 shows two layers with a thin hypointense inner layer and thick hyperintense outer layer. Type 2 has two layers of ill-defined margin. Type 3 shows multiple hyperintense cystic spaces in the wall. Type 4 shows diffuse nodular thickening without layering. MR findings of a layered pattern of thickened gallbladder were well correlated with histopathology. Chronic cholecystitis matched to type 1, acute cholecystitis corresponded to type 2, adenomyomatosis showed type 3, and the gallbladder carcinomas showed type 4. All four layered patterns were associated with PPV of 73% or greater, sensitivity of 92% or greater and specificity of 95% or greater. Our results indicate that MR findings of gallbladder wall thickening are characteristic in each entity and correlate well with pathologic findings. The classification of the layered pattern may be valuable for interpreting thickened gallbladder wall. (orig.)

  5. Turbine airfoil with a compliant outer wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Christian X [Oviedo, FL; Morrison, Jay A [Oviedo, FL

    2012-04-03

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine with a cooling system and a compliant dual wall configuration configured to enable thermal expansion between inner and outer layers while eliminating stress formation in the outer layer is disclosed. The compliant dual wall configuration may be formed a dual wall formed from inner and outer layers separated by a support structure. The outer layer may be a compliant layer configured such that the outer layer may thermally expand and thereby reduce the stress within the outer layer. The outer layer may be formed from a nonplanar surface configured to thermally expand. In another embodiment, the outer layer may be planar and include a plurality of slots enabling unrestricted thermal expansion in a direction aligned with the outer layer.

  6. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular arthrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    1996-09-01

    This review described lesions of articular disk and its surrounding tissues revealed by MR examination in temporomandibular arthrosis, and problems and limits of the examination. Apparatus and imaging methods: Spin echo method was generally used and gradient echo method was alternatively used. Author`s apparatus was 1.5 tesla Signa, Advantage type, equipped with surface coil for temporomandibular joint. Imaging conditions were T1-weighted spin echo method, T2-weighted fast spin echo method, spoiled GRASS (gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state) method and GRASS method. MR findings of articular disk: MR images of normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint were presented together with computed radiographic findings. The role of dynamic imaging was described for evaluation and analysis of the joint functioning. MR findings of surrounding tissues of the disk: Dynamic MRI of the tissues was found useful to see whether the cause of pain was present inside or outside of the articular capsule. Joint effusion could not be fully imaged in T2-weighted conditions. (K.H.)

  7. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular arthrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suenaga, Shigeaki

    1996-01-01

    This review described lesions of articular disk and its surrounding tissues revealed by MR examination in temporomandibular arthrosis, and problems and limits of the examination. Apparatus and imaging methods: Spin echo method was generally used and gradient echo method was alternatively used. Author's apparatus was 1.5 tesla Signa, Advantage type, equipped with surface coil for temporomandibular joint. Imaging conditions were T1-weighted spin echo method, T2-weighted fast spin echo method, spoiled GRASS (gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state) method and GRASS method. MR findings of articular disk: MR images of normal and abnormal temporomandibular joint were presented together with computed radiographic findings. The role of dynamic imaging was described for evaluation and analysis of the joint functioning. MR findings of surrounding tissues of the disk: Dynamic MRI of the tissues was found useful to see whether the cause of pain was present inside or outside of the articular capsule. Joint effusion could not be fully imaged in T2-weighted conditions. (K.H.)

  8. MR imaging of the pediatric spine: Comparison of myelography, MCT, and surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.C.; Hoffman, J.C.; Ball, T.I.; Wyly, J.B.; Braun, I.F.; Fry, S.M.

    1986-01-01

    Results of MR imaging of 53 pediatric patients with suspected spinal abnormalities were compared findings on metrizamide myelography, MCT, and surgery. Prototype surface coil studies with multisection multiplanar imaging (0.5 and 1.5 T) using T1-weighted sequences were optimum for anatomic definition, while T2-weighted sequences were utilized for intramedullary pathology. Diseases studied included neoplasia, infection, trauma, scoliosis, and dysrhaphsium. Surface coils were essential for imaging the thoracic and lumbar spine. MR imaging yielded approximately equivalent information to that obtained on myelography or MCT in 25 of 31 patients. Limitations to MR imaging included bony spurs, small eccentric lesions, tumor seeding, metal artifacts, postoperative scarring, and motion. With further refinements, MR imaging may replace more invasive techniques for pediatric spinal imaging

  9. Analysis of the lipidated recombinant outer surface protein A from Borrelia burgdorferi by mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouchon, B.; Klein, Michele; Bischoff, Rainer; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Roitsch, C.

    1997-01-01

    The outer surface protein A, OspA, from the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi is a lipoprotein of 25 kDa. The recombinant OspA (rOspA) expressed in Escherichia coli has been purified and analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry (ESMS). A heterogenous spectrum gave a measured mass of 28,462 +/- 9 Da

  10. {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy in anorexia nervosa. Reversible cerebral metabolic changes; {sup 1}H-MR-Spektroskopie bei Anorexia nervosa: Reversible zerebrale Metabolitenaenderungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeckel, R.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Becker, G.; Koepke, J.; Georgi, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie; Gueckel, C.; Goepel, C.; Schmidt, M. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, Mannheim (Germany). Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie; Hentschel, F. [Zentralinstitut fuer Seelische Gesundheit, Mannheim (Germany). Neuroradiologie

    1999-04-01

    Purpose: By using localized {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa we wanted to verify our preliminary results and to look for a reversibility of the metabolic changes under therapy. Methods: In 22 patients and 17 healthy volunteers (11 follow-up examinations) single voxel {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy (TE=50 ms, TM=30 ms, TR=1500 ms, voxel (2 cm){sup 3}, acq.: 256) was used in two different localizations (thalamus and parieto-occipital region). The first examination of the patients was performed before therapy, the follow-up examination at the end of therapy. Results: In both regions of the brain we found a statistically significant elevation of the Cho/Cr-ratio in comparison to normal controls. The follow-up examinations revealed reversibility of the metabolic changes under successful therapy. Conclusion: {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy reveals metabolic changes in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa, which are reversible under successful therapy. These metabolic changes can be conclusively explained using a biochemical model. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Im Rahmen dieser weiterfuehrenden Studie sollten die bisherigen Ergebnisse der lokalisierten {sup 1}H-MR-Spektroskopie des Gehirns an Patienten mit Anorexia nervosa verifiziert werden. Weiter sollte ueberprueft werden, ob die von uns nachgewiesenen metabolischen Veraenderungen unter Therapie reversibel sind. Methode: Die {sup 1}H-MR-Spektren wurden bei 22 Patientinnen und 17 Probanden (11 Verlaufskontrollen) in Einzelvolumentechnik (TE=50 ms, TM=30 ms, TR=1500 ms, Voxel: (2 cm){sup 3}, Acq.: 256) in zwei unterschiedlichen Hirnregionen (Thalamus, parieto-okzipitale Region) durchgefuehrt. Die erste Untersuchung der Patienten erfolgte bei Aufnahme und die Verlaufskontrolle zum Abschluss der stationaeren Behandlung. Ergebnisse: Bei den Patienten wurde in beiden Hirnregionen ein statistisch signifikant erhoehter Wert fuer das Cho/Cr-Verhaeltnis im Vergleich zu dem Normalkollektiv nachgewiesen

  11. Long-Lived Glass Mirrors For Outer Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, Frank L.; Maag, Carl R.; Heggen, Philip M.

    1988-01-01

    Paper summarizes available knowledge about glass mirrors for use in outer space. Strengths and weaknesses of various types of first and second reflective surfaces identified. Second-surface glass mirrors used in outer space designed to different criteria more stringent for terrestrial mirrors. Protons, electrons, cosmic rays, meteorites, and orbiting space debris affect longevities of components. Contamination also factor in space.

  12. Growth Plate Flow and Metabolism Screening Using MR: A New Application for Specialized MR Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiguetomi Medina, Juan Manuel; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Rahbek, Ole

    . Methods Four normal pig frozen tibiae were studied. Tomography, MR T1 and T2 sequences were performed and compared. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Surface Tension Images were also performed and analyzed. Finally, methylmethacrylate embedding histology was performed using hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine...

  13. High resolution MR imaging of bladder cancer: new criteria for determining depth of wall invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Hae; Kressel, Herbert Y

    1993-01-01

    To establish new criteria to determine the depth of bladder cancer as well as to obtain the findings of each stage of bladder cancer we reviewed high resolution MR images of 18 bladder cancer patients including seven cases (26%) with superficial bladder wall invasion. All MR scans were done before biopsy or surgery. Multiple layers of the bladder wall (inner black, middle white, outer black) were demonstrated in 11 cases out of a total 18 cases. Thickening of the middle layer caused by tumor infiltration or edema of lamina propria was seen in 8 of 12 patients with stage T2 or greater, and was suggestive of superficial muscle invasion when multiple layers were demonstrated. Disruption of outer layer (as well as inner layer) and external protrusion of tumor itself were indicative of perivesical invasion. When multiple layers were not demonstrated, the depth of tumor invasion could not be judged. High resolution MR imaging can depict submucosal invasion, muscle invasion, and perivesical invasion secondary to bladder cancer

  14. Quantification of dextrose in model solution by 1H MR spectroscopy at 1.5T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu; Kim, Hyung Jin; Suh, Chang Hae; Kim, Yong Seong; Lee, Jung Hee

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) using a 1.5T magnetic resonance (MR) imager for quantification of the contents of model solutions. We prepared model solutions of dextrose +water and dextrose +water + ethanol at dextrose concentrations of 0.01% to 50% and 0.01% to 20%, respectively. Using these solutions and a 1.5T MR imager together with a high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscope, we calculated the ratios of dextrose to water peak, (dextrose +ethanol) to water peak, and (dextrose + ethanol) to ethanol peak, as seen on MR and NMR spectra, analysing the relationships between dextrose concentration and the ratios of peaks, and between the ratios of the peaks seen on MR spectra and those seen on NMR spectra. Changes in the ratios between dextrose concentration and dextrose to water peak, (dextrose + ethanol) to water peak and (dextrose + ethanol) to ethanol peak, as seen on MR spectra, were statistically significant, and there was good linear regression. There was also close correlation between the ratios of the observed on MR and NMR spectra. The results depict the quantification of dextrose concentration according to the ratios of spectral peaks obtained by proton MRS at 1.5T. Using proton MRS at 1.5T, and on the basis of the ratios of spectcal peaks, it was possible to quantify the concentration of dextrose in model solutions of dextrose + water and dextrose + water+ ethanol. The results of this study suggest that for quantifying the contents of biofluids, the use of low-tesla 1 H-MRS is feasible

  15. MR-guided facet joint injection therapy using an open 1.0-T MRI system: an outcome study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyhardt, Patrick; Bucourt, Maximilian de; Maurer, Martin; Renz, Diane; Gebauer, Bernhard; Hamm, Bernd; Streitparth, Florian; Hartwig, Tony; Teichgraeber, Ulf K.M.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the accuracy, safety and efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided facet joint injection therapy using a 1.0-T open MRI. One hundred and sixty-six facet joint blocks in 45 patients with lower back pain were performed under MR fluoroscopic guidance using a proton-density-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence. An in-room monitor, wireless MR-mouse for operator-controlled multiplanar navigation, a flexible surface coil and MR-compatible 20-G needle were used. Clinical outcome was evaluated by questionnaire before intervention and after 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months using a numerical visual analogue scale (VAS). All facet joint blocks were considered technically successful with distribution of the injectant within and/or around the targeted facet joint. No major complications occurred. The final outcome analysis included 38 patients. An immediate effect was reported by 63 % of the patients. A positive mid-/long-term effect was seen in 13 patients (34 %) after 6 months and in 9 patients (24 %) after 12 months. Mean VAS was reduced from 7.1 ± 1.7 (baseline) to 3.5 ± 2.2, 4.1 ± 3.0, 3.8 ± 2.9 and 4.6 ± 2.9 at 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months (P < 0.01). MR-guided facet joint injection therapy of the lumbosacral spine is accurate, safe and efficient in the symptomatic treatment of lower back pain. (orig.)

  16. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging monitoring of acute tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, D.F.; Cohen, J.M.; Antich, P.P.; Endman, W.A.; Kulkarni, P.; Weinreb, J.C.; Giovanella, B.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment responses of human malignant melanomas were monitored at millimeter resolution in athymic mice by injecting a new polymeric contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-dextran (0.1 mmol Gd/kg, intravenously). Proton MR imaging (0.35 T, spin-echo, repetition time = 0.5 second, echo time = 50 msec) was performed 30 hours after administering diphtheria toxin. Pre-contrast medium images revealed only homogeneous intermediate-intensity tumor masses. Post-contrast medium images of untreated (viable) tumors demonstrated 32% enhancement throughout the entire mass. Post-contrast medium images of toxin-treated tumors revealed marked enhancement (65%) of the histologically viable outer rims, lesser enhancement (38%) of heavily damaged subregions, and no enhancement of dead tumor. These acute, contrast medium-enhanced MR images accurately identified tumor subregions that survived for longer than one week

  17. MR imaging of recurrent hyperparathyroidism in comparison with other imaging modalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffermann, W.; Thurnher, S.; Okerland, M.; Levin, K.; Gooding, G.W.; Clark, O.H.; Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty patients with recurrent hyperparathyroidism were evaluated with MR imaging, performed using a saddle-shaped surface coil producing 5-mm sections with T1 and T2 weighting. Twenty-six and 22 of these patients also underwent T1-201 scintigraphy and high-resolution US, respectively. MR imaging accurately localized abnormal parathyroid glands in 75% evaluated prospectively and 86% retrospectively. Scintigraphy localized 64% prospectively and 72% retrospectively. US demonstrated 57% prospectively and 67% retrospectively. MR imaging showed three of four mediastinal adenomas evaluated prospectively retrospectively. There were two false-positive studies with MR imaging, two with scintigraphy, and one with US. Thus, MR imaging was the most effective imaging modality for parathyroid localization in recurrent hyperparathyroidism

  18. Detection of meniscal injuries using MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotysch, M.; Mink, J.H.; Levy, T.; Schwartz, A.; Crues, J.V. III.

    1986-01-01

    Eighty-six knees studied by MR imaging were treated operatively and the surgical-radiologic conditions were reviewed using the following grading system of meniscal signal: grade 1, globular signal within the meniscus that does not involve an articular margin; grade 2, linear signal within the meniscus that does not extend to an articular surface; grade 3, linear or globular signal extending to an articular surface. This grading system was applied to evaluate 86 knees (172 menisci). Eleven menisci had been treated operatively at an earlier period and were excluded. Of 92 grade 1 or 2 menisci, 88 were normal at surgery. Of 69 grade 3 minisci, lesions were associated with meniscal tears in 68 at surgery. MR imaging is an accurate method of evaluating meniscal surgery

  19. Overexpression and surface localization of the Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koehler, JF; Birkelund, Svend; Stephens, RS

    1992-01-01

    The Chlamydia trachomatis major outer membrane protein (MOMP) is the quantitatively predominant surface protein which has important functional, structural and antigenic properties. We have cloned and overexpressed the MOMP in Escherichia coli. The MOMP is surface exposed in C. trachomatis....... The induction of MOMP expression had a rapidly lethal effect on the L2rMOMP E. coli clone. Although no genetic system exists for Chlamydia, development of a stable, inducible E. coli clone which overexpresses the chlamydial MOMP permits a study of the biological properties of the MOMP, including...

  20. Fire-related post-traumatic stress disorder: brain 1H-MR spetroscopic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Myung Kwan; Suh, Chang Hae; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Jeong Seop; Kang, Min Hee; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jung Hee

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the MR imaging and 1 H-MR spectroscopic findings of acute fire-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sixteen patients (M:F=10:6; mean age, 16 years) with fire-related PTSD underwent MR imagine and 1 H-MR spectroscopy, and for control purposes, the procedures were repeated in eight age-matched normal volunteers. In all patients and controls, the regions of interest where data were acquired at MRS were the basal ganglia (BG), frontal periventricular white matter (FWM), and parietal periventricular white matter (PWM). In all patients with PTSD, MR images appeared normal. In contrast, MRS showed that in the BG, NAA/Cr ratios were significantly lower in patients than in volunteers. This decrease did not, however, show close correlation with the severity of the neuropsychiatric symptoms. In patients, neither NAA/Cr ratios in FWM nor PWM, nor Cho/Cr ratios in all three regions, were significantly different from those in the control group. Decreased NAA/Cr ratios in the BG, as seen at 1 H-MRS, might be an early sign of acute fire-related PTSD

  1. Computation of the temperatures of a fluid flowing through a pipe from temperature measurements on the pipe's outer surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauer, G.

    1999-01-01

    A method for computing the temperatures of a fluid flowing through a pipe on the basis of temperatures recorded at the pipe's outer surface is presented. The heat conduction in the pipe wall is described by one-dimensional heat conduction elements. Heat transfer between fluid, pipe and surrounding is allowed for. The equation system resulting from the standard finite element discretization is reformulated to enable the computation of temperature events preceding the recorded temperature in time. It is shown that the method can be used to identify the actual fluid temperature from temperature data obtained only at the outer surface of the pipe. The temperatures in the pipe wall are computed with good accuracy even in the case of a severe thermal shock. (orig.) [de

  2. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eCoursolle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA, an integral outer membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB and an outer membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC. Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC / mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA / MtrE / OmcA is able to reduce iron(III citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications towards the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production.

  3. Detection of compression vessels in trigeminal neuralgia by surface-rendering three-dimensional reconstruction of 1.5- and 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Imai, Hideaki; Kagoshima, Kaiei; Umezawa, Eriko; Shimizu, Tsuneo; Yoshimoto, Yuhei

    2013-01-01

    Surface-rendered three-dimensional (3D) 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is useful for presurgical simulation of microvascular decompression. This study compared the sensitivity and specificity of 1.5- and 3.0-T surface-rendered 3D MR imaging for preoperative identification of the compression vessels of trigeminal neuralgia. One hundred consecutive patients underwent microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia. Forty and 60 patients were evaluated by 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging, respectively. Three-dimensional MR images were constructed on the basis of MR imaging, angiography, and venography data and evaluated to determine the compression vessel before surgery. MR imaging findings were compared with the microsurgical findings to compare the sensitivity and specificity of 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging. The agreement between MR imaging and surgical findings depended on the compression vessels. For superior cerebellar artery, 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging had 84.4% and 82.7% sensitivity and 100% and 100% specificity, respectively. For anterior inferior cerebellar artery, 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging had 33.3% and 50% sensitivity and 92.9% and 95% specificity, respectively. For the petrosal vein, 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging had 75% and 64.3% sensitivity and 79.2% and 78.1% specificity, respectively. Complete pain relief was obtained in 36 of 40 and 55 of 60 patients undergoing 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging, respectively. The present study showed that both 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imaging provided high sensitivity and specificity for preoperative assessment of the compression vessels of trigeminal neuralgia. Preoperative 3D imaging provided very high quality presurgical simulation, resulting in excellent clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Struma ovarii. MR and CT appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joja, Ikuo; Mitsumori, Akihito; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kudo, Takafumi; Nakagawa, Tomio; Asakawa, Toru; Ando, Masaaki; Akamatsu, Nobuo.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the appearance of struma ovarii on MR and CT images. All 13 patients showed both cystic and solid components with a multilobulated surface and thickened septa. Various signal intensities were seen on both T1WI and T2WI. The cystic component, which showed low signal intensity on T2WI, showed high density on CT images. The characteristic MR and CT appearance of struma ovarii appears to be that of multicystic tumor indicating the presence of viscid materials containing iodine. (author)

  5. Characterization of a prototype MR-compatible Delta4 QA system in a 1.5 tesla MR-linac

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, J. H. W.; Seravalli, E.; Houweling, A. C.; Woodings, S. J.; van Rooij, R.; Wolthaus, J. W. H.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2018-01-01

    To perform patient plan quality assurance (QA) on a newly installed MR-linac (MRL) it is necessary to have an MR-compatible QA device. An MR compatible device (MR-Delta4) has been developed together with Scandidos AB (Uppsala, Sweden). The basic characteristics of the detector response, such as short-term reproducibility, dose linearity, field size dependency, dose rate dependency, dose-per-pulse dependency and angular dependency, were investigated for the clinical Delta4-PT as well as for the MR compatible version. All tests were performed with both devices on a conventional linac and the MR compatible device was tested on the MRL as well. No statistically significant differences were found in the short-term reproducibility (tesla magnetic field of the Elekta MR-linac

  6. SU-E-T-366: Clinical Implementation of MR-Guided Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owrangi, A; Jolly, S; Balter, J; Cao, Y; Young, L; Zhu, T; Prisciandaro, J [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction, each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter.

  7. SU-E-T-366: Clinical Implementation of MR-Guided Vaginal Cylinder Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owrangi, A; Jolly, S; Balter, J; Cao, Y; Young, L; Zhu, T; Prisciandaro, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of MR-based vaginal brachytherapy source localization using an in-house MR-visible marker versus the alignment of an applicator model to MR images. Methods: Three consecutive patients undergoing vaginal HDR brachytherapy with a plastic cylinder were scanned with both CT and MRI (including T1- and T2- weighted images). An MR-visible source localization marker, consisting of a sealed thin catheter filled with either water (for T2 contrast) or Gd-doped water (for T1 contrast), was assembled shortly before scanning. Clinically, the applicator channel was digitized on CT with an x-ray marker. To evaluate the efficacy of MR-based applicator reconstruction, each MR image volume was aligned locally to the CT images based on the region containing the cylinder. Applicator digitization was performed on the MR images using (1) the MR visible marker and (2) alignment of an applicator surface model from Varian's Brachytherapy Planning software to the MRI images. Resulting source positions were compared with the original CT digitization. Results: Although the source path was visualized by the MR marker, the applicator tip proved difficult to identify due to challenges in achieving a watertight seal. This resulted in observed displacements of the catheter tip, at times >1cm. Deviations between the central source positions identified via aligning the applicator surface model to MR and using the xray marker on CT ranged from 0.07 – 0.19 cm and 0.07 – 0.20 cm on T1- weighted and T2-weighted images, respectively. Conclusion: Based on the current study, aligning the applicator model to MRI provides a practical, current approach to perform MR-based brachytherapy planning. Further study is needed to produce catheters with reliably and reproducibly identifiable tips. Attempts are being made to improve catheter seals, as well as to increase the viscosity of the contrast material to decrease fluid mobility inside the catheter

  8. Modeling Surface Processes Occurring on Moons of the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umurhan, O. M.; White, O. L.; Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Schenk, P.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of processes, some with familiar terrestrial analogs, are known to take place on moon surfaces in the outer solar system. In this talk, we discuss the observed features of mass wasting and surface transport seen on both Jupiter's moon Calisto and one of Saturn's Trojan moons Helene. We provide a number of numerical models using upgraded version of MARSSIM in support of several hypotheses suggested on behalf of the observations made regarding these objects. Calisto exhibits rolling plains of low albedo materials surrounding relatively high jutting peaks harboring high albedo deposits. Our modeling supports the interpretation that Calisto's surface is a record of erosion driven by the sublimation of CO2 and H2O contained in the bedrock. Both solar insolation and surface re-radiation drives the sublimation leaving behind debris which we interpret to be the observed darkened regolith and, further, the high albedo peaks are water ice deposits on surface cold traps. On the other hand, the 45 km scale Helene, being a milligravity environment, exhibits mysterious looking streaks and grooves of very high albedo materials extending for several kilometers with a down-sloping grade of 7o-9o. Helene's cratered terrain also shows evidence of narrowed septa. The observed surface features suggest some type of advective processes are at play in this system. Our modeling lends support to the suggestion that Helene's surface materials behave as a Bingham plastic material - our flow modeling with such rheologies can reproduce the observed pattern of streakiness depending upon the smoothness of the underlying bedrock; the overall gradients observed; and the narrowed septa of inter-crater regions.

  9. Characterization of a prototype MR-compatible Delta4 QA-system in a 1.5 tesla MR-linac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Wilfred J H; Seravalli, Enrica; Houweling, Anette; Woodings, Simon J; van Rooij, Rob; Wolthaus, Jochem W H; Lagendijk, JJW; Raaymakers, Bas W

    2018-01-01

    To perform patient plan-quality assurance (QA) on the newly installed MR-Linac (MRL) there was a need for having an MR-compatible QA-device. An MR compatible device (MR-Delta4) was developed together with Scandidos AB (Uppsala, Sweden). The basic characteristics of the detector response

  10. Normal anatomy and MR findings of fetal main organs at MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Liming; Zou Mingli; Feng Dingyi; Hu Junwu; Qi Jianpin; Wang Chengyuan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate normal anatomy and MR findings of fetal main organs. Methods: Forty-seven fetus underwented fast MR imaging, SSFSE sequence was used, the normal anatomy and MR findings of fetal main organs was observed in different gestational age. The organs included: brain, lungs, heart, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, urinary collecting systems, bladder, bones, spine, and subcutaneous fat. Results: Results of MR in 47 fetus showed that the main organs had developed by 20-week-old fetus, about 20 weeks gestation, cerebral cortical surface was smooth, no cortical gyri and sulci, then cortical gyri and sulci developed slowly. The lungs, trachea, bronchus, gastrointestinal tract, renal collecting system and bladder showed high signal intensity; the heart, great vessels, liver, spleen, bones and muscles appeared hypointense; the kidneys appeared isointense, the spine had developed and subcutaneous fat was seen in 20-week-old fetus, the subcutaneous fat increased with fetus maturating. Conclusion: Normal anatomy and MR findings of fetal main organs were clearly showed by fast MR imaging, and they are different from the newborns. (authors)

  11. 3D non-rigid surface-based MR-TRUS registration for image-guided prostate biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue; Qiu, Wu; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2014-03-01

    Two dimensional (2D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate biopsy is the standard approach for definitive diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). However, due to the lack of image contrast of prostate tumors needed to clearly visualize early-stage PCa, prostate biopsy often results in false negatives, requiring repeat biopsies. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been considered to be a promising imaging modality for noninvasive identification of PCa, since it can provide a high sensitivity and specificity for the detection of early stage PCa. Our main objective is to develop and validate a registration method of 3D MR-TRUS images, allowing generation of volumetric 3D maps of targets identified in 3D MR images to be biopsied using 3D TRUS images. Our registration method first makes use of an initial rigid registration of 3D MR images to 3D TRUS images using 6 manually placed approximately corresponding landmarks in each image. Following the manual initialization, two prostate surfaces are segmented from 3D MR and TRUS images and then non-rigidly registered using a thin-plate spline (TPS) algorithm. The registration accuracy was evaluated using 4 patient images by measuring target registration error (TRE) of manually identified corresponding intrinsic fiducials (calcifications and/or cysts) in the prostates. Experimental results show that the proposed method yielded an overall mean TRE of 2.05 mm, which is favorably comparable to a clinical requirement for an error of less than 2.5 mm.

  12. Internal disc derangement in patients with low back pain: correlation of MR imaging and provocative discography and CT discography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Hye Won; Cheon, Jung Eun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Ji Ho; Oh, Joo Han; Jeon, Pyoung

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate the MR imaging abnormalities of the lumbar intervertebral discs, with emphasis being placed on the high intensity zone (HIZ) with the use of discography for pain provocation and disc morphologic evaluation of the disc. Consecutive patients with low back pain unresponsive to conservative treatment, and who were being considered for spinal fusion had MRI performed, and this was followed by lumbar discography. The MR imaging, discography and CT discography (CTD) were evaluated for all of the 19 patients. Forty-three lumbar discs in 19 patients were included in this study. The findings of MR and CTD images were evaluated retrospectively with the professional opinion and agreement of two radiologists. MR images were assessed for the presence or absence of decreased T2-wighted signal intensity, decreased disc height, annular bulging, HIZ on T2-weighted images and disc herniation. The results of pain provocation were graded as 0, nonconcordant pain; 1, definite pain, but only as part of the symptom complex; 2, concordant pain. The morphology of CTD was analyzed for presence or absence of disc degeneration, radial tearing and extravasation of the contrast agent. The presence of radial tearing was defined as contrast extension to the outer third of the annulus. The prevalence of all MR abnormalities was calculated, and the data were compared with disc morphologic characteristics and the pain response on provocative discography. We used the chi-square test to analyze the results. Grade 1 and 2 discogenic pain was observed in 8 (19%) and 12 disc levels (28%), respectively. All of the seven non-degenerated discs on MR had no pain response. The decreased SI on T2-weighted image, annular bulging and HIZ were significantly correlated with discogenic pain. Extravasation of contrast media had good correlation with annular bulging and disc herniation on MRI. Radial tearing on CT discography correlated significantly with HIZ. The HIZ was

  13. SU-G-IeP1-08: MR Geometric Distortion Dependency On Imaging Sequence, Acquisition Orientation and Receiver Bandwidth of a Dedicated 1.5T MR-Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, M; Yuan, J; Wong, O; Yu, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the 3D geometric distortion of four potential MR sequences for radiotheraptic applications, and its dependency on sequence-type, acquisition-orientation and receiver-bandwidth from a dedicated 1.5T 700mm-wide bore MR-simulator (Magnetom-Aera, Sienmens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany), using a large customized geometric accuracy phantom. Methods: This work studied 3D gradient-echo (VIBE) and spin-echo (SPACE) sequences for anatomical imaging; a specific ultra-short-TE sequence (PETRA) potentially for bone imaging and MR-based dosimetry; and a motion-insensitive sequence (BLADE) for dynamic applications like 4D-MRI. Integrated geometric-correction was employed, three orthogonal acquisition-orientations and up to three receiver-bandwidths were used, yielding 27 acquisitions for testing (Table 1a).A customized geometric accuracy phantom (polyurethane, MR/CT invisible, W×L×H:55×55×32.5cm3) was constructed and filled with 3892 spherical markers (6mm diameter, MR/CT visible) arranged on a 25mm-interval 3D isotropic-grid (Fig.1). The marker positions in MR images were quantitatively calculated and compared against those in the CT-reference using customized MatLab scripts. Results: The average distortion within various diameter-of-spherical-volumes (DSVs) and the usable DSVs under various distortion limits were measured (Tables 1b-c). It was observed that distortions fluctuated when sequence-type, acquisition-orientation or receiver-bandwidth changed (e.g. within 300mm-DSV, the lowest/highest average distortions of VIBE were 0.40mm/0.59mm, a 47.5% difference). According to AAPM-TG66 (<1mm distortion, left-most column of Table 1c), PETRA (Largest-DSV:253.9mm) has the potential on brain treatment, while BLADE (Largest-DSV:207.2mm) may need improvement for thoracic/abdominal applications. The results of VIBE (Largest-DSVs:294.3mm, the best among tested acquisitions) and SPACE (Largest-DSVs:267.7mm) suggests their potentials on head and neck

  14. SU-G-IeP1-08: MR Geometric Distortion Dependency On Imaging Sequence, Acquisition Orientation and Receiver Bandwidth of a Dedicated 1.5T MR-Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, M; Yuan, J; Wong, O; Yu, S [Hong Kong Sanatorium & Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the 3D geometric distortion of four potential MR sequences for radiotheraptic applications, and its dependency on sequence-type, acquisition-orientation and receiver-bandwidth from a dedicated 1.5T 700mm-wide bore MR-simulator (Magnetom-Aera, Sienmens Healthcare, Erlangen, Germany), using a large customized geometric accuracy phantom. Methods: This work studied 3D gradient-echo (VIBE) and spin-echo (SPACE) sequences for anatomical imaging; a specific ultra-short-TE sequence (PETRA) potentially for bone imaging and MR-based dosimetry; and a motion-insensitive sequence (BLADE) for dynamic applications like 4D-MRI. Integrated geometric-correction was employed, three orthogonal acquisition-orientations and up to three receiver-bandwidths were used, yielding 27 acquisitions for testing (Table 1a).A customized geometric accuracy phantom (polyurethane, MR/CT invisible, W×L×H:55×55×32.5cm3) was constructed and filled with 3892 spherical markers (6mm diameter, MR/CT visible) arranged on a 25mm-interval 3D isotropic-grid (Fig.1). The marker positions in MR images were quantitatively calculated and compared against those in the CT-reference using customized MatLab scripts. Results: The average distortion within various diameter-of-spherical-volumes (DSVs) and the usable DSVs under various distortion limits were measured (Tables 1b-c). It was observed that distortions fluctuated when sequence-type, acquisition-orientation or receiver-bandwidth changed (e.g. within 300mm-DSV, the lowest/highest average distortions of VIBE were 0.40mm/0.59mm, a 47.5% difference). According to AAPM-TG66 (<1mm distortion, left-most column of Table 1c), PETRA (Largest-DSV:253.9mm) has the potential on brain treatment, while BLADE (Largest-DSV:207.2mm) may need improvement for thoracic/abdominal applications. The results of VIBE (Largest-DSVs:294.3mm, the best among tested acquisitions) and SPACE (Largest-DSVs:267.7mm) suggests their potentials on head and neck

  15. Effects of Cd on reductive transformation of lepidocrocite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaolei Yuan; Fangbai Li; Rui Han; Tongxu Liu; Weimin Sun; Weilin Huang

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the reduction of lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in the presence and absence of Cd.The results showed that Cd2+ retarded microbial reduction of γ-FeOOH and avoided formation of magnetite.The inhibitory effect on γ-FeOOH transformation may not result from Cd2+ toxicity to the bacterium;it rather was probably due to competitive adsorption between Cd2+ and Fe2+ on γ-FeOOH as its surface reduction catalyzed by adsorbed Fe2+ was eliminated by adsorption of Cd2+.

  16. MR-guided MR arthrography of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tratting, S.; Breitenseher, M.; Pretterklieber, M.; Kontaxis, G.; Rand, T.; Imhof, H.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR-guided technique for joint puncture in MR arthrography of the shoulder and to confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip by visualization of the flow of contrast media into the joint. Materials and methods: Three unfixed human shoulder joint specimens were examined on a 1.0 T unit. The optimal point of entrance and depth for joint puncture were estimated by means of MR-compatible markers on the skin. Needle orientation and localization of the needle tip (MR-compatible 22-gauge needle) in the shoulder joint were monitored by rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences in two orthogonal planes. To confirm the intracapsular position of the needle tip, diluted gadolinium-DTPA was administered via a long connecting tube and the flow of contrast media into the joint was viewed directly on an LCD screen using real-time MR imaging (local look technique). Results: The MR-compatible markers on the skin allowed determination of the optimal point of entrance and estimation of the depth for joint puncture. Passive visualization of the MR-compatible needle due to spin dephasing and signal loss provided adequate localization of the intra-articular needle tip position in all specimens, although significant artefacts were present on rapid localizer gradient-echo sequences with an increase in width of the apparent needle shaft. Real-time MR imaging of the flow of contrast media was possible using the local look technique and the LCD screen of the MR unit and allowed confirmation of the intracapsular position. Conclusion: MR-guided joint puncture and real-time MR-assisted contrast media application results in improved MR arthrography and may replace conventional fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.) [de

  17. Aortitis with antiphospholipid antibodies: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seror, O.; Dordea, M.; Ghenassia, C.; Coderc, E.; Sellier, N.; Fain, O.

    1998-01-01

    Two cases of aortitis associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs) are reported. Only CT and MR imaging were able to show these unusual form of aortitis preferentially affecting the outer aortic tunics. We conclude that aortitis could be a new manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and the initial pathological process before the development of aortic thrombosis, reported as a classical complication of APS. (orig.) (orig.)

  18. Electrochemical Catalysis of Inorganic Complex K4[Fe(CN)6] by Shewanellaoneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Xiao, Yong

    The interaction between metal and bacteria is a universal and important biogeochemical processin environment. As a dissimilatory metal reduction bacterium, the electrochemically activebacteriium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can transfer intracellular electrons to minerals. This ability is attribute...... andelectrocatalysis mechanisms of S. oneidensis MR-1 are under investigation. The ability of S. oneidensis MR-1 to catalyze redoxaction of inorganic metal complex compounds will provide an insight on metal cycles in nature....

  19. New N=1 dualities from M5-branes and outer-automorphism twists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Prarit; Song, Jaewon

    2014-01-01

    We generalize recent construction of four-dimensional N=1 SCFT from wrapping six-dimensional N=(2,0) theory on a Riemann surface to the case of D-type with outer-automorphism twists. This construction allows us to build various dual theories for a class of N=1 quiver theories of SO-USp type. In particular, we find there are five dual frames to SO(2N)/USp(2N−2)/G 2 gauge theories with (4N−4)/(4N)/8 fundamental flavors, where three of them being non-Lagrangian. We check the dualities by computing the anomaly coefficients and the superconformal indices. In the process we verify that the index of D 4 theory on a certain three punctured sphere with ℤ 2 and ℤ 3 twist lines exhibits expected symmetry enhancement from G 2 ×USp(6) to E 7

  20. Contrast enhanced MR imaging of postoperative medulloblastoma in childhood: emphasis on meningeal enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yeon, Kyung Mo [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-03-15

    To differentiate the postoperative changes from the recurrence of tumor and to evaluate MR imaging of early postoperative leptomeningeal seeding in medulloblastoma, We have retrospectively analysed 34 cases of MR images of 17 patients who were confirmed as medulloblastoma by histopathology. Noncontrast and postcontrast T1 weighted MR images were obtained in all patients. In 11 patients follow-up MR was done more than once (average: 1.5 times) and average interval of MR imaging was 6 months. The timing of 34 MR images was as follow: 6 case within 2 months, 9 cases between 2 months and 1 year, 19 cases more than 1 year after surgery respectively. MR images within 2 month after surgery revealed contrast enhancement at operation site and adjacent meninges, hemorrhage, residual tumor. In patients who had no evidence of tumor recurrence, these early postoperative changes were markedly decreased within 6 month after surgery. MR images obtained more than 1 year after surgery showed no abnormal contrast enhancement or mild focal dural enhancement at operation site. Diffuse moderate dural enhancement was noted in one patient who had the history of post-surgical subdural hemorrhage. In six patients with tumor recurrences which were detected from as early as 9 months to 6 years after surgery, the findings of recurrence included leptomeningeal enhancement of brain stem and cerebellar surface at early stage, variable sized enhancing leptomeningeal nodules, linear or irregular sulcus obliterating enhancing lesions, enhancing mass at primary or metastatic site. We have concluded that leptomeningeal enhancement detected after 6 months of surgery is an important MR finding suggesting the possibility of tumor recurrence. Small nodular and linear enhancement of leptomeninges at brainstem or cerebellar surface is considered as the early manifestation of intracranial tumor seeding.

  1. Contrast enhanced MR imaging of postoperative medulloblastoma in childhood: emphasis on meningeal enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, In One; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, Ho Chul; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1993-01-01

    To differentiate the postoperative changes from the recurrence of tumor and to evaluate MR imaging of early postoperative leptomeningeal seeding in medulloblastoma, We have retrospectively analysed 34 cases of MR images of 17 patients who were confirmed as medulloblastoma by histopathology. Noncontrast and postcontrast T1 weighted MR images were obtained in all patients. In 11 patients follow-up MR was done more than once (average: 1.5 times) and average interval of MR imaging was 6 months. The timing of 34 MR images was as follow: 6 case within 2 months, 9 cases between 2 months and 1 year, 19 cases more than 1 year after surgery respectively. MR images within 2 month after surgery revealed contrast enhancement at operation site and adjacent meninges, hemorrhage, residual tumor. In patients who had no evidence of tumor recurrence, these early postoperative changes were markedly decreased within 6 month after surgery. MR images obtained more than 1 year after surgery showed no abnormal contrast enhancement or mild focal dural enhancement at operation site. Diffuse moderate dural enhancement was noted in one patient who had the history of post-surgical subdural hemorrhage. In six patients with tumor recurrences which were detected from as early as 9 months to 6 years after surgery, the findings of recurrence included leptomeningeal enhancement of brain stem and cerebellar surface at early stage, variable sized enhancing leptomeningeal nodules, linear or irregular sulcus obliterating enhancing lesions, enhancing mass at primary or metastatic site. We have concluded that leptomeningeal enhancement detected after 6 months of surgery is an important MR finding suggesting the possibility of tumor recurrence. Small nodular and linear enhancement of leptomeninges at brainstem or cerebellar surface is considered as the early manifestation of intracranial tumor seeding

  2. Mr imaging and mr spectroscopy of brain metastases by mr perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Marc-Andre; Lichy, M.P.; Thilmann, C.; Guenther, M.; Bachert, P.; Delorme, S.; Schad, L.R.; Debus, J.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Maudsley, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    In follow-up examinations of irradiated brain metastases conventional contrast-enhanced morphological MR imaging is often unable to distinguish between transient radiation effects, radionecrosis, and tumor recurrence. To evaluate changes of relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in irradiated brain metastases arterial spin-labeling techniques (ASL) were applied and compared to the outcome of 1 H MR spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging ( 1 H MRS, SI). Patients and methods In 2 patients follow-up examinations of irradiated brain metastases were performed on a 1.5-T tomograph (average single dose: 20 Gy/80% isodose). Relative CBF values of gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), and metastases (Met) were measured by means of the ASL techniques ITS-FAIR and Q2TIPS. 1 H MRS was performed with PRESS 1500/135. In both patients with initially hyperperfused metastases (Met/GM >1) the reduction of rCBF after stereotactic radiosurgery indicated response to treatment - even if the contrast-enhancing region increased - while increasing rCBF values indicated tumor progression. The findings were confirmed by 1 H MRS, SI and subsequent follow-up. The ASL techniques ITS-FAIR and Q2TIPS are able to monitor changes of rCBF in irradiated brain metastases. The two cases imply a possible role for ASL-MR perfusion imaging and 1 H MR spectroscopy in differentiating radiation effects from tumor progression. (orig.) [de

  3. MR cholangiopancreatography. Comparison of images obtained with 1.0 and 1.5 tesla units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasui, Masayasu; Ito, Katsuyoshi; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the image quality and visualization obtained in MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) using different high-field strength (1.0 vs. 1.5 Tesla) MR units and to assess the effect of field strength on MRCP. This study population included 10 healthy volunteers and 37 patients suspected of having pancreatobiliary diseases. MRCP images were obtained using two MR units with different high-field strengths (1.0 and 1.5 Tesla), with half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) and rapid acquisition by relaxation enhancement (RARE) sequences. The image quality and visualization of each portion of the pancreatobiliary system were graded and recorded using a four-point scale. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. The SNR and CNR in HASTE sequences acquired with the 1.5 Tesla (T) unit were significantly higher than those acquired with the 1.0 T unit (p=0.001). In qualitative analysis, there were no statistically significant differences in image quality or visualization of the ducts in either HASTE or RARE sequences between 1.0 T and 1.5 T. Our study showed that visual image quality provided by MRCP was equivalent at 1.0 and 1.5 T. (author)

  4. MR images of radiofrequency lesions following ventrolateral thalamotomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinno, Kiyohito [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1992-10-01

    In 14 patients with Parkinson's disease and one with intension tremor, thalamotomy lesions were examined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at acute (day 3), subacute (day 14), and chronic (2 months to 1 year) stages after surgery. Standard radiofrequency lesion-making was repeated up to a complete abolition of motor symptoms. At acute stage, three or four distinct zones of the thalamus were seen on MR images: the central and third zones were of low signal on T1- and high signal on T2-weighted images; and the second zone was isointense on T1- and of low signal on T2-weighted images. The out-most zone was of high signal on T2-weighted images, but not noticeable on T1-weighted images. MR appearances at subacute stage showed hyperintensity on T1- and T2-weighted images for both the central and third zones. The second zone became smaller and fainter, although there was no signal change. The out-most zone became much smaller on T2-weighted images and was invisible on T1-weighted images. At subacute stage, T2-weighted images showed two distinct layers: the inner layer was of high signal and the outer layer was of low signal. T1-weighted imaging showed mixed isointensity and hyperintensity. At chronic stage one year after surgery, the lesions became small, round cystic with low signal on T1- and either low or high signal on T2-weighted images. At acute stage, the central, second, and third zones seemed reflect a small area of needle destruction composed of blood and edema, a layer of coagulation necrosis, and a layer of hemorrhagic colliquation necrosis with edema, respectively. Water content increased due to edema at acute stage; and hemoglobin changed paramagentic forms in association with diminution of edema in subacute or chronic stage.(N.K.).

  5. In vivo MR imaging of the human skin at subnanoliter resolution using a superconducting surface coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laistler, Elmar; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Lambert, Simon A; Dubuisson, Rose-Marie; Girard, Olivier M; Moser, Ewald; Darrasse, Luc; Ginefri, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a highly sensitive superconducting surface coil for microscopic MRI of the human skin in vivo in a clinical 1.5 Tesla (T) scanner. A 12.4-mm high-temperature superconducting coil was used at 1.5T for phantom and in vivo skin imaging. Images were inspected to identify fine anatomical skin structures. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement by the high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coil, as compared to a commercial MR microscopy coil was quantified from phantom imaging; the gain over a geometrically identical coil made from copper (cooled or not) was theoretically deduced. Noise sources were identified to evaluate the potential of HTS coils for future studies. In vivo skin images with isotropic 80 μm resolution were demonstrated revealing fine anatomical structures. The HTS coil improved SNR by a factor 32 over the reference coil in a nonloading phantom. For calf imaging, SNR gains of 380% and 30% can be expected over an identical copper coil at room temperature and 77 K, respectively. The high sensitivity of HTS coils allows for microscopic imaging of the skin at 1.5T and could serve as a tool for dermatology in a clinical setting. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Will Outer Tropical Cyclone Size Change due to Anthropogenic Warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkel, B. A.; Lin, N.; Chavas, D. R.; Vecchi, G. A.; Knutson, T. R.; Oppenheimer, M.

    2017-12-01

    Prior research has shown significant interbasin and intrabasin variability in outer tropical cyclone (TC) size. Moreover, outer TC size has even been shown to vary substantially over the lifetime of the majority of TCs. However, the factors responsible for both setting initial outer TC size and determining its evolution throughout the TC lifetime remain uncertain. Given these gaps in our physical understanding, there remains uncertainty in how outer TC size will change, if at all, due to anthropogenic warming. The present study seeks to quantify whether outer TC size will change significantly in response to anthropogenic warming using data from a high-resolution global climate model and a regional hurricane model. Similar to prior work, the outer TC size metric used in this study is the radius in which the azimuthal-mean surface azimuthal wind equals 8 m/s. The initial results from the high-resolution global climate model data suggest that the distribution of outer TC size shifts significantly towards larger values in each global TC basin during future climates, as revealed by 1) statistically significant increase of the median outer TC size by 5-10% (p<0.05) according to a 1,000-sample bootstrap resampling approach with replacement and 2) statistically significant differences between distributions of outer TC size from current and future climate simulations as shown using two-sample Kolmogorov Smirnov testing (p<<0.01). Additional analysis of the high-resolution global climate model data reveals that outer TC size does not uniformly increase within each basin in future climates, but rather shows substantial locational dependence. Future work will incorporate the regional mesoscale hurricane model data to help focus on identifying the source of the spatial variability in outer TC size increases within each basin during future climates and, more importantly, why outer TC size changes in response to anthropogenic warming.

  7. Fire-related post-traumatic stress disorder: brain {sup 1}H-MR spetroscopic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Myung Kwan; Suh, Chang Hae; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Jeong Seop; Kang, Min Hee [Inha University Hospital College of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hye [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Hee [National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda (United States)

    2003-06-01

    To investigate the MR imaging and {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopic findings of acute fire-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Sixteen patients (M:F=10:6; mean age, 16 years) with fire-related PTSD underwent MR imagine and {sup 1}H-MR spectroscopy, and for control purposes, the procedures were repeated in eight age-matched normal volunteers. In all patients and controls, the regions of interest where data were acquired at MRS were the basal ganglia (BG), frontal periventricular white matter (FWM), and parietal periventricular white matter (PWM). In all patients with PTSD, MR images appeared normal. In contrast, MRS showed that in the BG, NAA/Cr ratios were significantly lower in patients than in volunteers. This decrease did not, however, show close correlation with the severity of the neuropsychiatric symptoms. In patients, neither NAA/Cr ratios in FWM nor PWM, nor Cho/Cr ratios in all three regions, were significantly different from those in the control group. Decreased NAA/Cr ratios in the BG, as seen at {sup 1}H-MRS, might be an early sign of acute fire-related PTSD.

  8. TU-F-BRF-02: MR-US Prostate Registration Using Patient-Specific Tissue Elasticity Property Prior for MR-Targeted, TRUS-Guided HDR Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, X; Rossi, P; Ogunleye, T; Jani, A; Curran, W; Liu, T

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has become a popular treatment modality for prostate cancer. Conventional transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate HDR brachytherapy could benefit significantly from MR-targeted, TRUS-guided procedure where the tumor locations, acquired from the multiparametric MRI, are incorporated into the treatment planning. In order to enable this integration, we have developed a MR-TRUS registration with a patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior. Methods: The proposed method used a biomechanical elasticity prior to guide the prostate volumetric B-spline deformation in the MRI and TRUS registration. The patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior was generated using ultrasound elastography, where two 3D TRUS prostate images were acquired under different probe-induced pressures during the HDR procedure, which takes 2-4 minutes. These two 3D TRUS images were used to calculate the local displacement (elasticity map) of two prostate volumes. The B-spline transformation was calculated by minimizing the Euclidean distance between the normalized attribute vectors of the prostate surface landmarks on the MR and TRUS. This technique was evaluated through two studies: a prostate-phantom study and a pilot study with 5 patients undergoing prostate HDR treatment. The accuracy of our approach was assessed through the locations of several landmarks in the post-registration and TRUS images; our registration results were compared with the surface-based method. Results: For the phantom study, the mean landmark displacement of the proposed method was 1.29±0.11 mm. For the 5 patients, the mean landmark displacement of the surface-based method was 3.25±0.51 mm; our method, 1.71±0.25 mm. Therefore, our proposed method of prostate registration outperformed the surfaced-based registration significantly. Conclusion: We have developed a novel MR-TRUS prostate registration approach based on patient-specific biomechanical elasticity prior

  9. Aortitis with antiphospholipid antibodies: CT and MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seror, O.; Dordea, M.; Ghenassia, C.; Coderc, E.; Sellier, N. [Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Paris XIII, Bondy (France); Fain, O. [Department of Medicine, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire Paris XIII, Bondy (France)

    1998-10-01

    Two cases of aortitis associated with the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (APAs) are reported. Only CT and MR imaging were able to show these unusual form of aortitis preferentially affecting the outer aortic tunics. We conclude that aortitis could be a new manifestation of primary antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and the initial pathological process before the development of aortic thrombosis, reported as a classical complication of APS. (orig.) (orig.) With 2 figs., 6 refs.

  10. Differentiating high-grade from low-grade chondrosarcoma with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Choi, Jung-Ah; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul (Korea); Moon, Kyung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Han-Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the MR imaging features that differentiate between low-grade chondrosarcoma (LGCS) and high-grade chondrosarcoma (HGCS) and to determine the most reliable predictors for differentiation. MR images of 42 pathologically proven chondrosarcomas (28 LGCS and 14 HGCS) were retrospectively reviewed. There were 13 male and 29 female patients with an age range of 23-72 years (average age 51 years). On MR images, signal intensity, specific morphological characteristics including entrapped fat, internal lobular architecture, and outer lobular margin, soft tissue mass formation and contrast enhancement pattern were analysed. MR imaging features used to identify LGCS and HGCS were compared using univariate analysis and multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis. On T1-weighted images, a central area of high signal intensity, which was not seen in LGCS, was frequently observed in HGCS (n = 5, 36%) (p < 0.01). Entrapped fat within the tumour was commonly seen in LGCS (n = 26, 93%), but not in HGCS (n = 1, 4%) (p < 0.01). LGCS more commonly (n = 24, 86%) preserved the characteristic internal lobular structures within the tumour than HGCSs (n = 4, 29%) (p < 0.01). Soft tissue formation was more frequently observed in HGCS (n = 11, 79%) than in LGCS (n = 1, 4%) (p < 0.01). On gadolinium-enhanced images, large central nonenhancing areas were exhibited in only two (7.1%) of LGCS, while HGCS frequently (n = 9, 64%) had a central nonenhancing portion (p < 0.01). Results of multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that soft tissue formation and entrapped fat within the tumour were the variables that could be used to independently differentiate LGCS from HGCS. There were several MR imaging features of chondrosarcoma that could be helpful in distinguishing HGCS from LGCS. Among them, soft tissue mass formation favoured the diagnosis of HGCS, and entrapped fat within the tumour was highly indicative of LGCS. (orig.)

  11. Differentiating high-grade from low-grade chondrosarcoma with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan; Choi, Ja-Young; Choi, Jung-Ah; Kang, Heung Sik; Moon, Kyung Chul; Kim, Han-Soo

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the MR imaging features that differentiate between low-grade chondrosarcoma (LGCS) and high-grade chondrosarcoma (HGCS) and to determine the most reliable predictors for differentiation. MR images of 42 pathologically proven chondrosarcomas (28 LGCS and 14 HGCS) were retrospectively reviewed. There were 13 male and 29 female patients with an age range of 23-72 years (average age 51 years). On MR images, signal intensity, specific morphological characteristics including entrapped fat, internal lobular architecture, and outer lobular margin, soft tissue mass formation and contrast enhancement pattern were analysed. MR imaging features used to identify LGCS and HGCS were compared using univariate analysis and multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis. On T1-weighted images, a central area of high signal intensity, which was not seen in LGCS, was frequently observed in HGCS (n = 5, 36%) (p < 0.01). Entrapped fat within the tumour was commonly seen in LGCS (n = 26, 93%), but not in HGCS (n = 1, 4%) (p < 0.01). LGCS more commonly (n = 24, 86%) preserved the characteristic internal lobular structures within the tumour than HGCSs (n = 4, 29%) (p < 0.01). Soft tissue formation was more frequently observed in HGCS (n = 11, 79%) than in LGCS (n = 1, 4%) (p < 0.01). On gadolinium-enhanced images, large central nonenhancing areas were exhibited in only two (7.1%) of LGCS, while HGCS frequently (n = 9, 64%) had a central nonenhancing portion (p < 0.01). Results of multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that soft tissue formation and entrapped fat within the tumour were the variables that could be used to independently differentiate LGCS from HGCS. There were several MR imaging features of chondrosarcoma that could be helpful in distinguishing HGCS from LGCS. Among them, soft tissue mass formation favoured the diagnosis of HGCS, and entrapped fat within the tumour was highly indicative of LGCS. (orig.)

  12. MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teresi, L.M.; Davis, S.J.; Ziemba, M.R.; Bradley, W.G. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the two-tone meniscus, a sign of meniscal tear on MR imaging. MR images obtained at 0.3 and 1.5 T with 3-mm-thick sections were compared with arthroscopic findings for 86 patients studied over a 2-year period. Menisci described as two-tone menisci had two geographic regions of slightly different signal intensity: a region of subtle increased signal extending to at least one articular surface, which did not have linear or globular configuration, effacing a region of normal meniscal signal. The higher-signal-intensity region shows signal intensity greater than normal meniscus but less than grade 2 or 3 changes, hyalin cartilage, or joint fluid

  13. MR imaging evaluation of plica synoviallis mediopatellaris of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Inoue, Masahiro; Murakami, Takamichi (Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine) (and others)

    1992-12-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability of MR imaging for plica synoviallis mediopatellaris (PSM), we retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging findings of patellofemoral space in 20 knee joints of 11 patients. In all 20 knee joints, arthroscopy and MR imaging were available. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 Tesla Magnetom (Siemens) using a round surface coil. Pulse sequences were SE (TR 600 ms/TE 26 ms), SE (TR 200 ms/TE 26,70 ms) and FLASH (TR 450 ms/TE 15 ms/FA 90deg). In six of the 20 knees with PSM proved by arthroscopy, a low intensity band was shown above the medial condyle of the femur on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images, and on FLASH images this band was shown as intermediate intensity. In the other 14 knees with no PSM observed by arthroscopy, the low intensity band was not shown on MR imaging. In all 20 knees, a similar low intensity band was shown about 1 cm cranial to the medial condyle of the femur. This should not be diagnosed as PSM. The low intensity band seen on T1- and T2-weighted MR images and its anatomical relation to the medial condyle are important in diagnosing PSM. (author).

  14. MR imaging evaluation of plica synoviallis mediopatellaris of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Katsuyuki; Inoue, Masahiro; Murakami, Takamichi

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic ability of MR imaging for plica synoviallis mediopatellaris (PSM), we retrospectively reviewed the MR imaging findings of patellofemoral space in 20 knee joints of 11 patients. In all 20 knee joints, arthroscopy and MR imaging were available. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 Tesla Magnetom (Siemens) using a round surface coil. Pulse sequences were SE (TR 600 ms/TE 26 ms), SE (TR 200 ms/TE 26,70 ms) and FLASH (TR 450 ms/TE 15 ms/FA 90deg). In six of the 20 knees with PSM proved by arthroscopy, a low intensity band was shown above the medial condyle of the femur on both T1- and T2-weighted MR images, and on FLASH images this band was shown as intermediate intensity. In the other 14 knees with no PSM observed by arthroscopy, the low intensity band was not shown on MR imaging. In all 20 knees, a similar low intensity band was shown about 1 cm cranial to the medial condyle of the femur. This should not be diagnosed as PSM. The low intensity band seen on T1- and T2-weighted MR images and its anatomical relation to the medial condyle are important in diagnosing PSM. (author)

  15. Quantitative kinetic analysis of blood vessels in the outer membranes of chronic subdural hematomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Kentaro; Adachi, Keiji; Cho, Kajin; Ishimaru, Sumio; Maeda, Minoru

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic biologic modeling was used to calculate the transfer rate constant for gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA) and capillary permeability in the outer membrane of chronic subdural hematomas and effusions. Following intravenous Gd-DTPA injection, Gd concentrations in the subdural fluid and in timed arterial blood samples were measured by ion-coupled plasma emission spectrometry in 53 chronic subdural hematomas and 18 chronic subdural effusions. The capillary surface area in outer membrane was assessed morphometrically. Transfer rate constants for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 12.4±1.0 and 20.6±1.7 (x 10 -4 )min -1 , respectively. Capillary permeabilities for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 16±1.2 and 19±3.7 ml·min -1 (mm 2 /mm 3 ) -1 , respectively. The capillary surface areas for subdural hematomas and subdural effusions were 48±3 and 77±10 mm 2 /mm 3 , respectively. The high degree of infiltration of Gd into subdural effusions reflects the high capillary surface area in the outer membrane rather than greater permeability of individual capillaries. The value of transfer rate constant was correlated inversely with the duration of the chronic subdural fluid collection. Immature outer membrane has a high transfer rate constant which allows extravasation of plasma components into the subdural space, resulting in increasing volume of the subdural effusion. Delayed magnetic resonance imaging following Gd administration may be clinically useful for estimating the age of chronic subdural fluid accumulations. (author)

  16. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with an axial outer surface flaw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, D.

    1988-04-01

    Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of a test vessel (steel 1.6310=20 MnMoNi 55) with a semi-elliptical axial outer surface crack have been performed. The variations of J and CTOD along the crack front and the stresse state in the vicinity of the crack are presented. The applicability of approaches to determine J is examined. The FE results are compared with the experimental data. The results are analyzed with respect to the validity of J-controlled crack growth. It will be shown that the local ductile crack growth and, especially, the 'canoe effect' for a semi-elliptical crack can only be described correctly if local J R -curves are used which account for the varying triaxiality of the stress state along the crack front. (orig./HP) [de

  17. MR imaging of the parotid gland following sialography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Y.; Nishimura, K.; Togashi, K.; Itoh, K.; Fujisawa, I.; Itoh, H.; Abe, M.; Torizuka, K.; Naito, Y.

    1986-01-01

    MR imaging was performed after sialography (using 76% Renografin) in eight patients with parotid tumor. MR imaging was performed at 1.5 T and using 16-cm-diameter surface coil and a pulse sequence of 600/25 msec. The ductal system and periductal interstitial space consistently appeared as a linear low-intensity band. MR images of two rabbits that had received parotid gland injections of 76% Renografin confirmed that the low-intensity signal arose from the edema fluid in the periductal interstitial space of the gland. Since the facial nerve follows a course immediately lateral to the major duct, an appreciation of the course of the facial nerve may allow more precise presurgical planning

  18. MR/PET quantification tools: Registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based attenuation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Nye, Jonathon A.; Raghunath, Nivedita; Votaw, John R.; Aarsvold, John N.; Cervo, Morgan; Stark, Rebecca; Meltzer, Carolyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combined MR/PET is a relatively new, hybrid imaging modality. A human MR/PET prototype system consisting of a Siemens 3T Trio MR and brain PET insert was installed and tested at our institution. Its present design does not offer measured attenuation correction (AC) using traditional transmission imaging. This study is the development of quantification tools including MR-based AC for quantification in combined MR/PET for brain imaging. Methods: The developed quantification tools include image registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC. These components were integrated into a single scheme for processing MR/PET data. The segmentation method is multiscale and based on the Radon transform of brain MR images. It was developed to segment the skull on T1-weighted MR images. A modified fuzzy C-means classification scheme was developed to classify brain tissue into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Classified tissue is assigned an attenuation coefficient so that AC factors can be generated. PET emission data are then reconstructed using a three-dimensional ordered sets expectation maximization method with the MR-based AC map. Ten subjects had separate MR and PET scans. The PET with ["1"1C]PIB was acquired using a high-resolution research tomography (HRRT) PET. MR-based AC was compared with transmission (TX)-based AC on the HRRT. Seventeen volumes of interest were drawn manually on each subject image to compare the PET activities between the MR-based and TX-based AC methods. Results: For skull segmentation, the overlap ratio between our segmented results and the ground truth is 85.2 ± 2.6%. Attenuation correction results from the ten subjects show that the difference between the MR and TX-based methods was <6.5%. Conclusions: MR-based AC compared favorably with conventional transmission-based AC. Quantitative tools including registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC have been developed for use in combined MR/PET.

  19. Finite element simulation of surface defects in the automobile door outer panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumura, Masaru; Yamasaki, Yuji; Inage, Daisuke; Fujita, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Recently, a sheet metal forming simulation has become an indispensable tool for developing a new model of an automobile part within a limited short period. In these days, the utilization of a springback calculation of the formed part has been increasing. However, only a few papers on the prediction of surface defects have been reported in spite of serious needs.In this paper, surface defects in the door outer panel, especially those around the door handle embossment, have been investigated. Applying an explicit solver to the forming simulation, and an implicit solver to the springback calculation, we have tried to evaluate surface defects in the panel. In order to improve the accuracy of the simulation, numerical tools have been modeled including the precise shape of the draw beads so that the draw bead effects on both the material flow and the restraint on the springback deformation have been considered. Compared with the actual panel shape, which shows apparent surface defects, the simulated result has closely predicted the above defects around the embossment.To demonstrate the applicability of our simulation, a few sensitivity analyses have been carried out, modifying forming conditions such as blank holder force. Each result has shown slight but distinctive differences in the cross section profile of the panel. As a result, it has been realized that the influence of each considered factor on surface defects is qualitatively consistent with our practical knowledge

  20. Ankle ligamints : comparison of MR arthrography with conventional MR imaging in amputated feet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Sung; Lee, Sang Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Chung, Kyung Ho; Kim, CHong Soo

    2001-01-01

    To compare magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography with conventional MR imaging in the evaluation of ankle ligaments. Eight freshly amputated human feet underwent conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography. For the former, 1.5-T magnets in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes were used, and T1-weighted sequences were obtained. Following the injection of 6-10 ml of diluted contrast media (Gd-DTPA 1:250), T1-weighted images were obtained in the same positions as conventional MR images. Paired conventional MR imaging and MR arthrography of each ankle ligament were rated on a five-point scale, and to reflect inter-group differences a Wilcoxon singed-rank test was used to compare the different measurements (p<0.05). In two ankles, MR images of the ligaments were correlated with ankle dissection. Anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments were more clearly revealed by MR arthrography than by conventional MR imaging, while calcaneofibular ligaments showed no difference between these two modalities. With regard to deltoid ligaments, visualization of the anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligament was much improved when contrast material was used to outline the ligament's articular aspect. Visualization of the posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament and inferior transverse ligament were also improved when the use of contrast material provided delineation of the articular side of the ligaments and separated them from adjacent bone. In addition, MR arthography was very useful for indentification of the posterior intermalleolar ligament, though its use did not enhance visualization of the calcaneofibular, tibiocalcaneal, spring or tibiospring ligaments. MR arthrography accurately revealed the anatomic details of ankle ligaments, and may therefore be more useful than conventional Mr imaging for evaluation of these structures

  1. The Outer Planets and their Moons Comparative Studies of the Outer Planets prior to the Exploration of the Saturn System by Cassini-Huygens

    CERN Document Server

    Encrenaz, T; Owen, T. C; Sotin, C

    2005-01-01

    This volume gives an integrated summary of the science related to the four giant planets in our solar system. It is the result of an ISSI workshop on «A comparative study of the outer planets before the exploration of Saturn by Cassini-Huygens» which was held at ISSI in Bern on January 12-16, 2004. Representatives of several scientific communities, such as planetary scientists, astronomers, space physicists, chemists and astrobiologists have met with the aim to review the knowledge on four major themes: (1) the study of the formation and evolution processes of the outer planets and their satellites, beginning with the formation of compounds and planetesimals in the solar nebula, and the subsequent evolution of the interiors of the outer planets, (2) a comparative study of the atmospheres of the outer planets and Titan, (3) the study of the planetary magnetospheres and their interactions with the solar wind, and (4) the formation and properties of satellites and rings, including their interiors, surfaces, an...

  2. Histologic correlation of MR signal intensity in parathyroid adenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumancik, W.M.; Khan, A.; Mir, R.N.; Attie, J.N.; Davis, J.E.; Ashtari, M.; Herman, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    The classic MR signal intensity pattern of parathyroid adenoma (PTA) is bright enhancement on T2-weighted images. However, variations in SI pattern have been observed in clinical practice. The purpose of this report is to describe the histologic characteristics of surgically removed PTAs as correlated with their in vivo MR imaging appearance. From May 1987 to April 1988, 51 consecutive patients with primary hyperparathyroidism were evaluated with MR imaging for preoperative localization of PTA. Surgical confirmation was obtained in all patients, with histologic evaluation available in 40. MR imaging was performed on 1.0-T system (Siemens, Magnetom) using a Helmhotz surface coil positioned at the neck. Spin-echo T1-weighted and T2-weighted multisection images were evaluated retrospectively. Signal intensities of PTA, adjacent thyroid, fat, and skeletal muscle were obtained (1) from direct region of interest determinations, and (2) visually as respective relationships of PTA to thyroid, fat, and muscle. Histologic classification was graded for (1) predominant cell type (i.e., chief or oxyphil cells), (2) acinar or solid growth pattern, (3) cystic change, (4) presence or absence of residual fat, (5) cell count per high power field, (6) heterogeneous histology, (7) gland weight, and (8) giant size (≥3 cm). The relationship of MR signal intensity to histology appears multifactorial

  3. Appearance of normal brain maturation on 1.5-T MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkovich, A.J.; Kjos, B.; Jackson, D.E. Jr.; Norman, D.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the pattern of normal white-matter maturation as demonstrated by high-field-strength MR imaging, 82 normal infants were examined using a 1.5-T unit with spin-echo T1-weighted and T2-weighted pulse sequences. The infants ranged in age from 4 days to 2 years. The scans were assessed for qualitative changes of white matter relative to gray matter and correlated with the patient's age in 14 anatomic areas of the brain. The MR images showed that changes of brain maturation occur in an orderly manner, commencing in the brain stem and progressing to the cerebellum and the cerebrum. Changes from brain myelination were seen earlier on T1-weighted images than on T2-weighted images, possibly because of T1 shortening by the components of the developing myelin sheaths. The later changes on the T2-weighted images correlated best with the development of myelination, as demonstrated by histochemical methods. T1-weighted images were most useful to monitor normal brain development in the first 6 to 8 months of life; T2-weighted images were more useful after 6 months. The milestones in the MR appearance of normal maturation of the brain are presented. The milestones in the MR appearance of normal maturation of the brain are presented. Persistent areas of long T2 relaxation times are seen superior and dorsal to the ventricular trigone in all infants examined and should not be mistaken for ischemic change

  4. MR angiography, MR imaging and proton MR spectroscopy in-vivo assessment of skeletal muscle ischemia in diabetic rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Delli Pizzi

    Full Text Available To prospectively evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic resonance (MR techniques for in-vivo assessing a rat diabetic model of limb ischemia. Unilateral hind limb ischemia was induced by ligation of the iliac-femoral artery in male streptozotocin-treated and non-diabetic control rats. Four weeks after ligation, rats underwent MR Angiography (MRA, T(1-weighted and Short Time Inversion Recovery (STIR sequences and muscle Proton MR Spectroscopy ((1H-MRS on both hind limbs. After MR examinations, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence analysis were performed. MRA showed a signal void due to flow discontinuation distal to the artery ligation. T(1-weighted and STIR images showed, respectively, the presence of tissue swelling (p = 0.018 for non-diabetic; p = 0.027 for diabetic rats and signal hyperintensity in tissue affected by occlusion. Mean total creatine/water for the occluded limb was significantly lower than for the non-occluded limbs in both non-diabetic (5.46×10(-4 vs 1.14×10(-3, p = 0.028 and diabetic rats (1.37×10(-4 vs 1.10×10(-3; p = 0.018. MR Imaging and (1H-MRS changes were more pronounced in diabetic than in non-diabetic occluded limbs (p = 0.032. MR findings were confirmed by using histological findings. Combined MR techniques can be used to demonstrate the presence of structural and metabolic changes produced by iliac-femoral artery occlusion in rat diabetic model of limb ischemia.

  5. Ocular MR imaging. Evaluation of different coil setups in a phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb-Eigner, Katharina; Warmuth, Carsten; Taupitz, Matthias; Bertelmann, Eckart; Hamm, Bernd; Asbach, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Small loop surface coils are generally recommended for ocular magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, but the optimal coil setup has not been systematically investigated. In this phantom study, we investigated which coil setup of those coils available for our MR imaging system provides the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in ocular MR imaging at 1.5 tesla. Using a phantom to simulate the eyeball and the orbital fat, we employed loop surface coils of 4- and 6-cm diameter and a multi-channel head coil to obtain images using a T 1 -weighted spin-echo sequence and then measured the SNR for each coil and coil combination. Use of the 6-cm loop coil alone yielded the highest mean SNR (27.5). Even in superficial regions (mesial and temporal), the SNR was higher using the 6-cm loop coil (33.6 and 45.5) than the 4-cm loop coil (28.0 and 33.8). Additional use of the head coil reduced the mean SNR to 10.4. This quantitative analysis suggests that use of a 6-cm loop surface coil offers the best results in ocular MR imaging. Combinations of loop coils or additional use of a head coil cannot be recommended because higher noise degrades image quality. (author)

  6. Virtual MR arthroscopy of the wrist joint: a new intraarticular perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Guelden; Dogan, Basak Erguvan; Demirtas, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether virtual MR arthroscopy could be used to visualize the internal architecture of the radiocarpal compartment of the wrist joint in comparison to surgical arthroscopy. Diluted paramagnetic contrast material was injected into the radiocarpal compartment prior to MR examination in all patients. A fat-suppressed T1-weighted three-dimensional fast spoiled gradient echo sequence was acquired in addition to our standard MR imaging protocol in each patient. Three-dimensional data sets were then transferred to an independent workstation and were postprocessed using navigator software to generate surface rendered virtual MR arthroscopic images. Nineteen patients referred for chronic ulnar-sided wrist pain were evaluated with conventional MR arthrography prospectively. Virtual MR arthroscopic images demonstrating the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) in an intraarticular perspective were achieved in 12 out of 19 patients. Our preliminary investigation suggests that although it has several limitations, virtual MR arthroscopy shows promise in visualizing the TFCC from an intraarticular perspective. (orig.)

  7. Retinoblastoma - MR appearance using a surface coil in comparison with histopathological results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemke, Arne-Joern; Kazi, Iris; Mergner, Ulrike; Senfft von Pilsach, Marie-Isabell; Felix, Roland [Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Foerster, Paul I. [Universitaetsaugenklinik, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen-Innenstadt, Muenchen (Germany); Heimann, Heinrich; Bechrakis, Nikolaos; Foerster, Michael [Campus Benjamin-Franklin, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Schueler, Andreas [Universitaetsaugenklinik Essen, Essen (Germany); Hosten, Norbert [Institut fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Klinikum der Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaets Greifswald, Greifswald (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the characteristic appearance of untreated retinoblastoma on a large sample in comparison to the histological findings after therapeutical enucleation. In a prospective clinical trial 46 children with retinoblastoma in 63 affected untreated eyes were examined under general anesthesia on MRI using a 1.5-T system. The examinations were performed with a special surface coil applying an examination protocol including fast T2- and T1-weighted spin echo sequences and additional fast T1-WI after intravenous injection of Gd-DTPA in different planes. The imaging results were compared to the histopathological findings in 29 patients with 30 affected eyes. Comparing MRI findings and histopathological results, optic nerve infiltration was detected with a sensitivity of 53.8% and a specificity of 82.3% on MRI, infiltration of the choroid with a sensitivity of 75.0% and a specificity of 100.0%, and the degree of tumor calcification with a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 88.9%. In this study the characteristic MR appearance of untreated retinoblastoma was evaluated. MRI was helpful in relevant aspects of pretherapeutical retinoblastoma staging, deficits remain regarding optic nerve infiltration. (orig.)

  8. MR-based source localization for MR-guided HDR brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beld, E.; Moerland, M. A.; Zijlstra, F.; Viergever, M. A.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Seevinck, P. R.

    2018-04-01

    For the purpose of MR-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, a method for real-time localization of an HDR brachytherapy source was developed, which requires high spatial and temporal resolutions. MR-based localization of an HDR source serves two main aims. First, it enables real-time treatment verification by determination of the HDR source positions during treatment. Second, when using a dummy source, MR-based source localization provides an automatic detection of the source dwell positions after catheter insertion, allowing elimination of the catheter reconstruction procedure. Localization of the HDR source was conducted by simulation of the MR artifacts, followed by a phase correlation localization algorithm applied to the MR images and the simulated images, to determine the position of the HDR source in the MR images. To increase the temporal resolution of the MR acquisition, the spatial resolution was decreased, and a subpixel localization operation was introduced. Furthermore, parallel imaging (sensitivity encoding) was applied to further decrease the MR scan time. The localization method was validated by a comparison with CT, and the accuracy and precision were investigated. The results demonstrated that the described method could be used to determine the HDR source position with a high accuracy (0.4–0.6 mm) and a high precision (⩽0.1 mm), at high temporal resolutions (0.15–1.2 s per slice). This would enable real-time treatment verification as well as an automatic detection of the source dwell positions.

  9. MR imaging of the ankle: Normal variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noto, A.M.; Cheung, Y.; Rosenberg, Z.S.; Norman, A.; Leeds, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty asymptomatic ankles were studied with high-resolution surface coil MR imaging. The thirty ankles were reviewed for identification or normal structures. The MR appearance of the deltoid and posterior to talo-fibular ligaments, peroneous brevis and longus tendons, and posterior aspect of the tibial-talar joint demonstrated several normal variants not previously described. These should not be misinterpreted as pathologic processes. The specific findings included (1) cortical irregularity of the posterior tibial-talar joint in 27 of 30 cases which should not be mistaken for osteonecrois; (2) normal posterior talo-fibular ligament with irregular and frayed inhomogeneity, which represents a normal variant in seven of ten cases; and (3) fluid in the shared peroneal tendons sheath which may be confused for a longitudinal tendon tear in three of 30 cases. Ankle imaging with the use of MR is still a relatively new procedure. Further investigation is needed to better define normal anatomy as well as normal variants. The authors described several structures that normally present with variable MR imaging appearances. This is clinically significant in order to maintain a high sensitivity and specificity in MR imaging interpretation

  10. Indirect MR arthrography in the evaluation of tears of the glenoid labrum; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie in der Diagnostik von Laesionen des Labrum glenoidale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Vahlensieck, M.; Lutterbey, G.; Pauleit, D.; Kreft, B.; Keller, E.; Schild, H. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Wallny, T. [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Bonn (Germany); Steuer, K.; Golombek, V. [Klinik fuer Unfallchirurgie, Univ. Bonn (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that intravenous administration of contrast media produces an MR arthrographic effect without the need for intraarticular injection. This is the first study evaluating this new technique of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of glenoid labrum tears. Methods: 28 patients with clinically suspected labral injuries were prospectively investigated (1.5 Tesla, flexible surface coil). A plain MR examination of the shoulder (transverse and oblique-coronal orientation, T{sub 1}-weighted spin- [T{sub E}/T{sub R} 15/675], proton density- and T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient echo [T{sub E}/T{sub R}/Flip 14,32/600/30 ] sequences) and indirect MR arthrography (transverse and oblique-coronal orientation, fat-suppressed T{sub 1}-weighted spin-echo sequences [T{sub E}/T{sub R} 15/675], intravenous injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine [0.1 mmol/kg], followed by 10-15 min of joint movement) were performed. Results were confirmed by arthroscopy and/or open surgery. Results: Indirect MR arthrography significantly improved delineation of the glenoid labrum and hyaline cartilage (p<0.05). Sensitivity and specificity of indirect MR arthrography in the diagnosis of labral injuries were 90% and 89%, compared to 79% and 67% of the native MR examination. Conclusion: Indirect MR arthrography is a promising non-invasive technique in the evaluation of the glenoid labrum. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: In frueheren Studien wurde gezeigt, dass die intravenoese Injektion gadoliniumhaltiger Kontrastmittel zur Signalintensitaetssteigerung im Gelenkkavum fuehrt. In dieser Studie wurde erstmals diese Technik der indirekten MR-Arthrographie am Schultergelenk in der Diagnostik von Labrumlaesionen evaluiert. Methode: 28 Patienten mit klinischem Verdacht auf eine Verletzung des Labrum glenoidale und/oder der Rotatorenmanschette wurden prospektiv nach folgendem Protokoll an einem 1,5-Tesla-System mit einer Oberflaechen-Ringspule untersucht: 1. Native MR-Standard-Untersuchung mit

  11. MR imaging in the diagnosis of impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, L.L.; Gold, R.H.; Bassett, L.W.; Ellman, H.

    1986-01-01

    The impingement syndrome is entrapment of the supraspinatus tendon by either the acromion, or a subacromial or acromioclavicular spur. Arthrography is normal during stages I (tendon inflammation) and II (fibrosis). The lack of objective findings often delays diagnosis until stage III (ischemic rotator cuff tear) is present. The purpose was to determine if MR imaging is useful in diagnosing this condition. T1-weighted surface coil scans were obtained on eight patients using a 0.3-T MR system. An axial scout allowed oblique alignment for imaging the osseous-soft tissue relationship and the supraspinatus tendon. MR is capable of displaying the specific pathologic anatomy of this disorder. Impinging spurs can be seen, and the adjacent tendon shows inferior displacement and abnormal signal intensity

  12. Deep Learning MR Imaging-based Attenuation Correction for PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Jang, Hyungseok; Kijowski, Richard; Bradshaw, Tyler; McMillan, Alan B

    2018-02-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate the feasibility of deep learning approaches for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based attenuation correction (AC) (termed deep MRAC) in brain positron emission tomography (PET)/MR imaging. Materials and Methods A PET/MR imaging AC pipeline was built by using a deep learning approach to generate pseudo computed tomographic (CT) scans from MR images. A deep convolutional auto-encoder network was trained to identify air, bone, and soft tissue in volumetric head MR images coregistered to CT data for training. A set of 30 retrospective three-dimensional T1-weighted head images was used to train the model, which was then evaluated in 10 patients by comparing the generated pseudo CT scan to an acquired CT scan. A prospective study was carried out for utilizing simultaneous PET/MR imaging for five subjects by using the proposed approach. Analysis of covariance and paired-sample t tests were used for statistical analysis to compare PET reconstruction error with deep MRAC and two existing MR imaging-based AC approaches with CT-based AC. Results Deep MRAC provides an accurate pseudo CT scan with a mean Dice coefficient of 0.971 ± 0.005 for air, 0.936 ± 0.011 for soft tissue, and 0.803 ± 0.021 for bone. Furthermore, deep MRAC provides good PET results, with average errors of less than 1% in most brain regions. Significantly lower PET reconstruction errors were realized with deep MRAC (-0.7% ± 1.1) compared with Dixon-based soft-tissue and air segmentation (-5.8% ± 3.1) and anatomic CT-based template registration (-4.8% ± 2.2). Conclusion The authors developed an automated approach that allows generation of discrete-valued pseudo CT scans (soft tissue, bone, and air) from a single high-spatial-resolution diagnostic-quality three-dimensional MR image and evaluated it in brain PET/MR imaging. This deep learning approach for MR imaging-based AC provided reduced PET reconstruction error relative to a CT-based standard within the brain compared

  13. Proton (1H) MR spectroscopy for routine diagnostic evaluation of brain lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtscher, I.M.; Holtaas, S.; Staahlberg, F.; Univ. Hospital, Lund

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the introduction and performance of proton MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) in the daily routine of a modern standard MR unit. Material and Methods: Over an 8-month period, 52 patients with brain lesions were studied with 1 H-MRS, using SE and STEAM sequences for chemical-shift imaging and single-volume spectroscopy. The quality of the spectra was graded from 1 (best) to 3, and the main factors influencing the quality of the spectra were evaluated. Results: Of the measurements: 85% were graded as 1; 12% as 2; and 3% as 3. The main reasons for poor spectral quality were: the unfortunate positioning of the VOI; hemorrhage; and/or postoperative changes within the VOI. Of 40 patients with a final diagnosis: MRS provided an increased confidence in MR diagnosis in 18 cases; MRS contributed significantly to preoperative diagnosis in 3 cases; and the spectra were not specific (n=10) or were difficult to evaluate (n=9) owing to reduced quality (grade 2 or 3) in 19 cases. Conclusion: MRS of the brain can provide a high percentage of interpretable spectra and frequently can increase confidence in the MR diagnosis of brain lesions in clinical routine. (orig.)

  14. Anode biofilm transcriptomics reveals outer surface components essential for high density current production in Geobacter sulfurreducens fuel cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly P Nevin

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which Geobacter sulfurreducens transfers electrons through relatively thick (>50 microm biofilms to electrodes acting as a sole electron acceptor were investigated. Biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens were grown either in flow-through systems with graphite anodes as the electron acceptor or on the same graphite surface, but with fumarate as the sole electron acceptor. Fumarate-grown biofilms were not immediately capable of significant current production, suggesting substantial physiological differences from current-producing biofilms. Microarray analysis revealed 13 genes in current-harvesting biofilms that had significantly higher transcript levels. The greatest increases were for pilA, the gene immediately downstream of pilA, and the genes for two outer c-type membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcZ. Down-regulated genes included the genes for the outer-membrane c-type cytochromes, OmcS and OmcT. Results of quantitative RT-PCR of gene transcript levels during biofilm growth were consistent with microarray results. OmcZ and the outer-surface c-type cytochrome, OmcE, were more abundant and OmcS was less abundant in current-harvesting cells. Strains in which pilA, the gene immediately downstream from pilA, omcB, omcS, omcE, or omcZ was deleted demonstrated that only deletion of pilA or omcZ severely inhibited current production and biofilm formation in current-harvesting mode. In contrast, these gene deletions had no impact on biofilm formation on graphite surfaces when fumarate served as the electron acceptor. These results suggest that biofilms grown harvesting current are specifically poised for electron transfer to electrodes and that, in addition to pili, OmcZ is a key component in electron transfer through differentiated G. sulfurreducens biofilms to electrodes.

  15. On the geodesic incompleteness of spacetimes containing marginally (outer) trapped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa e Silva, I P

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper, Eichmair et al (2012 arXiv:1204.0278v1) have proved a Gannon–Lee-type singularity theorem based on the existence of marginally outer trapped surfaces (MOTS) on noncompact initial data sets for globally hyperbolic spacetimes. A natural question is whether the corresponding incomplete geodesics could still be complete in a possible non-globally hyperbolic extension of spacetime. In this paper, some variants of their result are given with weaker causality assumptions, thus suggesting that the answer is generically negative, at least if the putative extension has no closed timelike curves. We consider first marginally trapped surfaces (MTS) in chronological spacetimes, introducing the natural notion of a generic MTS, a notion also applicable to MOTS. In particular, a Hawking–Penrose-type singularity theorem is proven in chronological spacetimes with dimension n ⩾ 3 containing a generic MTS. Such surfaces naturally arise as cross-sections of quasi-local generalizations of black hole horizons, such as dynamical and trapping horizons, and we discuss some natural conditions which ensure the existence of MTS in initial data sets. Nevertheless, much of the more recent literature has focused on MOTS rather than MTS as quasi-local substitutes for the description of black holes, as they are arguably more natural and easier to handle in a number of situations. It is therefore pertinent to ask to what extent one can deduce the existence of singularities in the presence of MOTS alone. We address this issue and show that singularities indeed arise in the presence of generic MOTS, but under slightly stronger causal conditions than those in the case of MTS (specifically, for causally simple spacetimes). On the other hand, we show that with additional conditions on the MOTS itself, namely that it is either the boundary of a compact spatial region, or strictly stable in a suitable sense, a Penrose–Hawking-type singularity theorem can still be established for

  16. Integrative analysis of cardiac function and metabolism in patients with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with H-1 cine MR imaging and P-31 MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, S.; Chew, W.M.; Semelka, R.; Tomei, E.; Caputo, G.; O'Sullivan, M.; Chatterjee, K.; Parmley, W.W.; Wolfe, C.L.; Higgins, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to use MR imaging and P-31 spectroscopy for the functional and metabolic characterization of patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Nine patients with HCM underwent combined P-31 spectroscopy (one-dimensional chemical shift imaging) and MR imaging at 1.5 T. MR imaging localized the distribution of ventricular hypertrophy and cine MR imaging quantitated cardiac volumes, contractility, and left ventricular mass. The phosphodiester/phosphocreatine ratio (PDE/PCr) in six HCM patients was not different from normal, but in three patients it was significantly (P <.01) higher. This finding could not be attributed to contractible abnormalities, the distribution of hypertrophy, or the left ventricular mass. The abnormal PDE/PCr ratio was found only in patients with echocardiographic findings of resting left ventricular outflow obstruction but was not associated with severity or distribution of hypertrophy. The study shows the use of combined MR imaging and MR spectroscopy to characterize HCM and possibly to identify abnormal myocardial tissue

  17. Surface expression, single-channel analysis and membrane topology of recombinant Chlamydia trachomatis Major Outer Membrane Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClafferty Heather

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial bacteria are obligate intracellular pathogens containing a cysteine-rich porin (Major Outer Membrane Protein, MOMP with important structural and, in many species, immunity-related roles. MOMP forms extensive disulphide bonds with other chlamydial proteins, and is difficult to purify. Leaderless, recombinant MOMPs expressed in E. coli have yet to be refolded from inclusion bodies, and although leadered MOMP can be expressed in E. coli cells, it often misfolds and aggregates. We aimed to improve the surface expression of correctly folded MOMP to investigate the membrane topology of the protein, and provide a system to display native and modified MOMP epitopes. Results C. trachomatis MOMP was expressed on the surface of E. coli cells (including "porin knockout" cells after optimizing leader sequence, temperature and medium composition, and the protein was functionally reconstituted at the single-channel level to confirm it was folded correctly. Recombinant MOMP formed oligomers even in the absence of its 9 cysteine residues, and the unmodified protein also formed inter- and intra-subunit disulphide bonds. Its topology was modeled as a (16-stranded β-barrel, and specific structural predictions were tested by removing each of the four putative surface-exposed loops corresponding to highly immunogenic variable sequence (VS domains, and one or two of the putative transmembrane strands. The deletion of predicted external loops did not prevent folding and incorporation of MOMP into the E. coli outer membrane, in contrast to the removal of predicted transmembrane strands. Conclusions C. trachomatis MOMP was functionally expressed on the surface of E. coli cells under newly optimized conditions. Tests of its predicted membrane topology were consistent with β-barrel oligomers in which major immunogenic regions are displayed on surface-exposed loops. Functional surface expression, coupled with improved understanding of MOMP

  18. MR imaging of the triangular fibrocartilage complex and intercarpal ligaments of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H.S.; Kindynis, P.; Brahme, S.K.; Resnick, D.L.; Haghighi, P.; Haller, J.; Sartoris, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    To understand MR signal characteristics in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) complex, the authors performed MR imaging with gross pathologic and histologic analysis in 10 fresh cadaveric wrists. Spin-echo T1-and T2-weighted coronal images were obtained at 1.5T (10-cm field of view, 3-mm thickness, 256 x 256 matrix). Normal portions of the TFC showed a smooth surface with homogeneous low signal intensity except near the radial and lunar attachments. Mucoid degeneration of the TFC, present in all cases, was more severe on the proximal surface and was characterized by bright signal on T1-weighted and less bright signal on T2-weighted images. These findings differed from those of TFC perforation. Similar signal characteristics accompanied degeneration in the scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments. The author's findings indicate that MR imaging can accurately delineate degeneration as well as perforation of TFC and intercarpal ligaments

  19. Craniopharyngiomas - the utility of contrast medium enhancement for MR imaging at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hald, J.K.; Eldevik, O.P.; Brunberg, J.A.; Chandler, W.F.

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of i.v. contrast medium administration in MR imaging at 1.5 T in patients with craniopharyngiomas, MR studies of 10 men and 6 women with pathologically proven craniopharyngiomas were made. The MR images were obtained as 3- to 5-mm-thick coronal (n=13) or axial (n=3) T1-weighted images (T1WI) prior to an following i.v. Gd-DTPA administration. Proton density-(PD) and T2-weighted images (T2WI) were also obtained. Conspicuity of tumor margins, cystic versus solid components, size, location and effect upon adjacent structures were separately characterized in all imaging sequences. In 6 patients contrast medium-enhanced T1WI, PD and T2WI demonstrated cystic tumor components not seen on unenhanced T1WI. There were significant differences (p<0.004) on 2-tailed Student's t-test comparing tumor conspicuity on contrast medium-enhanced T1WI with unenhanced T1WI, PD and T2WI. Optimal tumor delineation on MR imaging of patients with craniopharyngiomas justifies the use of i.v. contrast medium. (orig.)

  20. Sedimentology and geochemistry of surface sediments, outer continental shelf, southern Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Vallier, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Present-day sediment dynamics, combined with lowerings of sea level during the Pleistocene, have created a mixture of sediments on the outer continental shelf of the southern Bering Sea that was derived from the Alaskan Mainland, the Aleutian Islands, and the Pribilof ridge. Concentrations of finer-grained, higher-organic sediments in the region of the St. George basin have further modified regional distribution patterns of sediment composition. Q-mode factor analysis of 58 variables related to sediment size and composition - including content of major, minor, and trace elements, heavy and light minerals, and clay minerals - reveals three dominant associations of sediment: 1. (1) The most significant contribution, forming a coarse-grained sediment scattered over most of the shelf consists of felsic sediment derived from the generally quartz-rich rocks of the Alaskan mainland. This sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Si, Ba, Rb, quartz, garnet, epidote, metamorphic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, and illite. 2. (2) The next most important group, superimposed on the felsic group consists of andesitic sediment derived from the Aleutian Islands. This more mafic sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Na, Ca, Ti, Sr, V, Mn, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Zn, Y, Yb, Ga, volcanic rock fragments, glass, clinopyroxene, smectite, and vermiculite. 3. (3) A local group of basaltic sediment, derived from rocks of the Pribilof Islands, is a subgroup of the Aleutian andesite group. Accumulation of fine-grained sediment in St. George basin has created a sediment group containing relatively high concentrations of C, S, U, Li, B, Zr, Ga, Hg, silt, and clay. Sediment of the Aleutian andesite group exhibits a strong gradient, or "plume", with concentrations decreasing away from Unimak Pass and toward St. George basin. The absence of present-day currents sufficient to move even clay-size material as well as the presence of Bering submarine canyon between the Aleutian

  1. Laboratory Studies of Ethane Ice Relevant to Outer Solar System Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Marla H.; Hudson, Reggie; Raines, Lily

    2009-01-01

    Oort Cloud comets, as well as TNOs Makemake (2045 FYg), Quaoar, and Pluto, are known to contain ethane. However, even though this molecule is found on several outer Solar System objects relatively little information is available about its amorphous and crystalline phases. In new experiments, we have prepared ethane ices at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System, and have heated and ion-irradiated these ices to study phase changes and ethane's radiation chemistry using mid-IR spectroscopy (2.2 - 16.6 microns). Included in our work is the meta-stable phase that exists at 35 - 55 K. These results, including newly obtained optical constants, are relevant to ground-based observational campaigns, the New Horizons mission, and supporting laboratory work. An improved understanding of solid-phase ethane may contribute to future searches for this and other hydrocarbons in the outer Solar System.

  2. Examination of human brain tumors in situ with image-localized H-1 MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyten, P.R.; Segebarth, C.; Baleriaux, D.; Den Hollander, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Human brain tumors were examined in situ by combined imaging and H-1 MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Water-suppressed localized H-1 MR spectra obtained from the brains of normal volunteers show resonances from lactate, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine, and choline. Several patients suffering from different brain tumors were examined, showing spectral changes in the region of 0.5-1.5 ppm; spectral editing showed that these changes were not due to lactic acid, but to lipid signals. The NAA signal was decreased in the tumors as compared with normal brain. This study shows that H-1 MR spectroscopy can monitor submillimolar changes in chemical composition of human brain tumors in situ

  3. MR staging of pelvic endometriosis. Role of fat-suppression T1-weighted images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi-Tanaka, Yumiko; Itai, Yuji; Anno, Izumi; Matsumoto, Kunihiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nishida, Masato

    1996-01-01

    We examined whether MR can determine the stage of endometriosis according to the scoring system established and revised by the American Fertility Society (r-AFS), a system which is widely used by gynecologists. We also studied the utility of fat suppression T 1 -weighted images in improving accuracy. Seventeen patients with endometriosis examined by conventional MR were included in this study. All the patients had surgically proved stage III or IV disease. We determined the stage by MR using the following criteria according to the r-AFS system: adnexal masses without normal ovarian tissue were considered deep ovarian lesions, while those with normal tissue were considered superficial. A lack of fat between the lesion and surrounding structures was considered a dense adhesion, and hyperintense spots were considered peritoneal implants. The MR scores of patients with and without fat suppression were correlated with the surgical scores. MR staging corresponded to surgical staging in 15 of the 17 patients. In eight patients, peritoneal implants of less than 1.5 cm were depicted only by fat-suppression images. However, these lesions did not change the score significantly. MR imaging could determine the stage in advanced endometriosis. Fat-suppression could highlight smaller implants. These tiny lesions had little clinical meaning in these advanced cases; however, the clinical value of this technique should be evaluated in milder disease. (author)

  4. Interventional MR imaging: Clinical results obtained with a 1.5 Tesla system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical feasibility of using interventional examination techniques was tested with an equipment combining fluoroscopy and MR imaging. This hybrid system showed to be of advantage in a great number of interventional examinations. The 1.5 Tesla magnet proved to be superior to open MR scanning systems in terms of image quality and scanning times. (orig.) [de

  5. 1H-MR spectroscopy in anorexia nervosa. Reversible cerebral metabolic changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeckel, R.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Becker, G.; Koepke, J.; Georgi, M.; Gueckel, C.; Goepel, C.; Schmidt, M.; Hentschel, F.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: By using localized 1 H-MR spectroscopy in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa we wanted to verify our preliminary results and to look for a reversibility of the metabolic changes under therapy. Methods: In 22 patients and 17 healthy volunteers (11 follow-up examinations) single voxel 1 H-MR spectroscopy (TE=50 ms, TM=30 ms, TR=1500 ms, voxel (2 cm) 3 , acq.: 256) was used in two different localizations (thalamus and parieto-occipital region). The first examination of the patients was performed before therapy, the follow-up examination at the end of therapy. Results: In both regions of the brain we found a statistically significant elevation of the Cho/Cr-ratio in comparison to normal controls. The follow-up examinations revealed reversibility of the metabolic changes under successful therapy. Conclusion: 1 H-MR spectroscopy reveals metabolic changes in the brain of patients with anorexia nervosa, which are reversible under successful therapy. These metabolic changes can be conclusively explained using a biochemical model. (orig.) [de

  6. Inner- and outer-sphere complexation of ions at the goethite-solution interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahnemaie, R.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Formation of inner- and outer-sphere complexes of environmentally important divalent ions on the goethite surface was examined by applying the charge distribution CD model for inner- and outer-sphere complexation. The model assumes spatial charge distribution between the surface (0-plane) and the

  7. Acute cervical spine injuries: prospective MR imaging assessment at a level 1 trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, R W; Benedetti, P F; Drake, C M; Ivanovic, M; Levine, R A; Beatty, C S; Nemzek, W R; McFall, R A; Ontell, F K; Bishop, D M; Poirier, V C; Chong, B W

    1999-10-01

    To determine the weighted average sensitivity of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the prospective detection of acute neck injury and to compare these findings with those of a comprehensive conventional radiographic assessment. Conventional radiography and MR imaging were performed in 199 patients presenting to a level 1 trauma center with suspected cervical spine injury. Weighted sensitivities and specificities were calculated, and a weighted average across eight vertebral levels from C1 to T1 was formed. Fourteen parameters indicative of acute injury were tabulated. Fifty-eight patients had 172 acute cervical injuries. MR imaging depicted 136 (79%) acute abnormalities and conventional radiography depicted 39 (23%). For assessment of acute fractures, MR images (weighted average sensitivity, 43%; CI: 21%, 66%) were comparable to conventional radiographs (weighted average sensitivity, 48%; CI: 30%, 65%). MR imaging was superior to conventional radiography in the evaluation of pre- or paravertebral hemorrhage or edema, anterior or posterior longitudinal ligament injury, traumatic disk herniation, cord edema, and cord compression. Cord injuries were associated with cervical spine spondylosis (P < .05), acute fracture (P < .001), and canal stenosis (P < .001). MR imaging is more accurate than radiography in the detection of a wide spectrum of neck injuries, and further study is warranted of its potential effect on medical decision making, clinical outcome, and cost-effectiveness.

  8. MR thermometry for laser-induced thermotherapy at 1.5 tesla; MR-Thermometrie bei 1,5 Tesla zur thermischen Ablation mittels laserinduzierter Thermotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, D.; Huebner, F.; Mack, M.; Vogl, T.J. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of thermometry with fast MR sequences for laser-induced interstitial laser therapy (LITT) and verification of the thermometric results with a fiber-optic thermometer. Method and Materials: In vitro experiments were conducted using an agarose gel mixture and pig liver lobes. MR-guided LITT was performed using a laser power between 3 and 15?watts. Thermometry was performed using longitudinal relaxation time T1 and proton resonance frequency shift (PRF) methods under acquisition of amplitude and phase shift images. PRF was measured with a fast spoiled GRE sequence. Four different sequences were used for T1 thermometry: gradient echo (GE), TrueFISP (TRUFI), Saturation Recovery Turbo-FLASH (SRTF) and Inversion Recovery Turbo-FLASH (IRTF) sequences. The temperature was controlled using a fiber-optic Luxtron device and correlated with the MR temperature. The range of applied and monitored temperatures exceeded 80 degrees Celsius. Results: The temperature dependence showed a good linear relationship up to 60 degrees Celsius. Calibration experiments for the T1 method delivered coefficients of determination from 0.977 to 0.997 for agarose and from 0.958 to 0.995 for the pig liver samples. The IRTF sequence had the highest temperature sensitivity (agarose 0.99, liver 1.19). During LITT the TRUE-FISP sequence exhibited a strong nonlinear relationship. R{sup 2} of this sequence was 0.809 in the agarose experiments. The average temperature errors when heated up to 80 degrees Celsius were 3.86 - 11.38 degrees Celsius for Agarose gel and 5.7 - 12.16 degrees Celsius for the liver tissue. SRTF and IRTF sequences exhibited the most linear relationship with temperature but were more dependent on tissue differences. (orig.)

  9. Primary biliary cirrhosis: Evaluation with T2-weighted MR imaging and MR cholangiopancreatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haliloglu, Nuray [Ankara University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ibni Sina Hospital, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: nurayunsal2@hotmail.com; Erden, Ayse; Erden, Ilhan [Ankara University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ibni Sina Hospital, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the role of T2-weighted MR imaging (MRI) and MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) findings in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Materials and methods: The following T2-weighted MRI and MRCP findings: segmental hepatic atrophy/hypertrophy, irregular liver surface, parenchymal lace-like fibrosis, rounded low signal intensity lesions centering portal vein branches (periportal halo sign), periportal hyperintensity (cuffing), splenomegaly, ascites, lymphadenopathy, venous collaterals, and the configuration of intrahepatic biliary ducts were reviewed for their diagnostic significance by two observers in 13 female patients (mean age: 49 years) with PBC. Discordant readings of the observers were resolved at consensus. Results: When parenchymal lace-like fibrosis and periportal halo sign were seen together the sensitivity of T2-weighted MR images was 69%. In six cases periportal hyperintensity (cuffing) and periportal halo sign were seen together. Segmental hypertrophy was present in nine patients and hepatic surface irregularity due to regenerative nodules were present in 10 patients. Lymphadenopathy was seen in 10, splenomegaly was seen in 5, collateral vascular structures were seen in 2 and minimal perihepatic free fluid was seen in 2 patients. MRCP images revealed various mild irregularity in the intrahepatic bile ducts in 8 patients and focal narrowing at the common bile duct level in 1 patient. Conclusion: MRI and MRCP may support the clinical and laboratory findings of PBC even in the early stages of the disease. MRI can also be a choice of method for the recommended prolonged follow up.

  10. Primary biliary cirrhosis: Evaluation with T2-weighted MR imaging and MR cholangiopancreatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haliloglu, Nuray; Erden, Ayse; Erden, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the role of T2-weighted MR imaging (MRI) and MR cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) findings in the diagnosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Materials and methods: The following T2-weighted MRI and MRCP findings: segmental hepatic atrophy/hypertrophy, irregular liver surface, parenchymal lace-like fibrosis, rounded low signal intensity lesions centering portal vein branches (periportal halo sign), periportal hyperintensity (cuffing), splenomegaly, ascites, lymphadenopathy, venous collaterals, and the configuration of intrahepatic biliary ducts were reviewed for their diagnostic significance by two observers in 13 female patients (mean age: 49 years) with PBC. Discordant readings of the observers were resolved at consensus. Results: When parenchymal lace-like fibrosis and periportal halo sign were seen together the sensitivity of T2-weighted MR images was 69%. In six cases periportal hyperintensity (cuffing) and periportal halo sign were seen together. Segmental hypertrophy was present in nine patients and hepatic surface irregularity due to regenerative nodules were present in 10 patients. Lymphadenopathy was seen in 10, splenomegaly was seen in 5, collateral vascular structures were seen in 2 and minimal perihepatic free fluid was seen in 2 patients. MRCP images revealed various mild irregularity in the intrahepatic bile ducts in 8 patients and focal narrowing at the common bile duct level in 1 patient. Conclusion: MRI and MRCP may support the clinical and laboratory findings of PBC even in the early stages of the disease. MRI can also be a choice of method for the recommended prolonged follow up.

  11. Ohmic losses in coaxial resonators with longitudinal inner-outer corrugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenyong Hou, A. [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing 408001 (China); Sheng Yu, B.; Hongfu Li, C.; Qixiang Zhao, D. [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Xiang Li, E. [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-15

    In this paper, a coaxial resonator with longitudinal inner-outer corrugation is introduced. Its eigen-equation and expression of ohmic losses are derived. Ohmic losses in the cavity are investigated. Results show that ohmic losses in the outer and inner conductors share a similar variation trend, while the former is larger than the later. What's more, changes of the inner and outer slot depth and width induce different variations of ohmic losses on the surface of the inner and outer conductors.

  12. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A.; Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der; Willems, W.J.; Bipat, Shandra

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  13. Detection of partial-thickness supraspinatus tendon tears: is a single direct MR arthrography series in ABER position as accurate as conventional MR arthrography?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreinemachers, Saskia A. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der; Woude, Henk-Jan van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Willems, W.J. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Orthopaedic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bipat, Shandra [University of Amsterdam (NL). Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center (Netherlands)

    2009-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively evaluate sensitivity and specificity of a single magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography series in abduction external rotation (ABER) position compared with conventional MR arthrography for detection of supraspinatus tendon tears, with arthroscopy as gold standard, and to assess interobserver variability. Institutional review board approval was obtained; informed consent was waived. MR arthrograms of 250 patients (170 men and 80 women; mean age, 36 years) were retrospectively and independently evaluated by three observers. Oblique coronal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images, proton density, and T2-weighted images and axial T1-weighted images and oblique sagittal T1-weighted fat-suppressed images were analyzed to detect supraspinatus tendon tears. Separately, a single T1-weighted fat-suppressed oblique axial series in ABER position was evaluated. Both protocols were scored randomly without knowledge of patients' clinical history and arthroscopy results. Tears were subclassified, based on articular surface integrity and extension (Lee classification). Interobserver agreement was assessed by kappa statistics for all patients. Ninety-two of 250 patients underwent arthroscopy; sensitivity and specificity of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were calculated and compared using paired McNemar test. Weighted kappa values of ABER and conventional MR arthrography were 0.48-0.65 and 0.60-0.67, respectively. According to arthroscopy, 69 of 92 patients had an intact cuff, and 23 patients had a cuff tear (16 partial thickness and seven full thickness). There were no statistically significant differences between ABER and conventional MR arthrography regarding sensitivity (48-61% and 52-70%, respectively) and specificity (80-94% and 91-95%). Sensitivity and specificity of a single T1-weighted series in ABER position and conventional MR arthrography are comparable for assessment of rotator cuff tears. (orig.)

  14. 1H in vivo MR spektroskopie v klinické neurologii

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starčuk, Zenon; Krupa, P.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Horký, Jaroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 3 (2005), s. 140-148 ISSN 1335-9592 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : H-1 MR spectroscopy * single-voxel MRS techniques * clinical application of H-1 MRS Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  15. Indirect MR-arthography in the fellow up of autologous osteochondral transplantation; Indirekte MR-Arthrographie zur Verlaufskontrolle nach autologer osteochondraler Transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herber, S.; Pitton, M.B.; Kalden, P.; Thelen, M.; Kreitner, K.F. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie; Runkel, M. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Unfallchirurgie

    2003-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the spectrum of findings in indirect MR-arthrography following autologous osteochondral transplantation. Patients and Methods: 10 patients with autogenous osteochondral homografts underwent indirect MR-arthrography at three, 6 and 12 months postoperatively. The MR protocol at 1.5T comprised unenhanced imagings with PD- and T{sub 2}-weighted TSE-sequences with and without fat-suppression as well as T{sub 1}-weighted fat-suppressed SE-sequences before and after iv. contrast administration and after active joint exercise. Image analysis was done by two radiologists in conference and comprised the evaluation of signal intensity (SI) and integrity of the osseous plug and the cartilage surface, as well as the presence of joint effusion or bone marrow edema. Results: At three months, all cases demonstrated a significant bone marrow edema at the recipient and donor site that corresponded to a significant enhancement after iv. contrast administration. The interface between the transplant and the normal bone showed an increased SI at three and 6 months in T{sub 2}-weighted images as well as in indirect MR-arthrography. The marrow signal normalized in most cases after 6 to 12 months, indicating vitality and healing of the transplanted osteochondral graft. The SI of the interface decreased in the same period, demonstrating the stability of the homograft at the recipient site. The osteochondral plugs were well-seated in 9/10 cases. Indirect MR-arthrography was superior to unenhanced imaging in the assessment of the cartilage surface. Cartilage coverage was complete in every case. The transplanted hyaline cartilage as well as the original cartilage showed a significant increase of the SI in indirect MR-arthrography, that did not change in follow up studies. There were no pathological alterations of signal and thickness alterations of the transplanted cartilage in follow up investigations. Conclusion: Indirect MR-arthrography is a useful diagnostic tool

  16. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  17. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xiang; Ma, Xiao-Bo; Yuan, Hang; Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui; Du, Dao-Lin; Sun, Jian-Fan; Feng, Yu-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H 2 S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater

  18. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mammoto Takeo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries.

  19. High-resolution axial MR imaging of tibial stress injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relative involvement of tibial stress injuries using high-resolution axial MR imaging and the correlation with MR and radiographic images. Methods A total of 33 patients with exercise-induced tibial pain were evaluated. All patients underwent radiograph and high-resolution axial MR imaging. Radiographs were taken at initial presentation and 4 weeks later. High-resolution MR axial images were obtained using a microscopy surface coil with 60 × 60 mm field of view on a 1.5T MR unit. All images were evaluated for abnormal signals of the periosteum, cortex and bone marrow. Results Nineteen patients showed no periosteal reaction at initial and follow-up radiographs. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and partially abnormal signals in the bone marrow. In 7 patients, periosteal reaction was not seen at initial radiograph, but was detected at follow-up radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue and entire bone marrow. Abnormal signals in the cortex were found in 6 patients. The remaining 7 showed periosteal reactions at initial radiograph. MR imaging showed abnormal signals in the periosteal tissue in 6 patients. Abnormal signals were seen in the partial and entire bone marrow in 4 and 3 patients, respectively. Conclusions Bone marrow abnormalities in high-resolution axial MR imaging were related to periosteal reactions at follow-up radiograph. Bone marrow abnormalities might predict later periosteal reactions, suggesting shin splints or stress fractures. High-resolution axial MR imaging is useful in early discrimination of tibial stress injuries. PMID:22574840

  20. MR fingerprinting with simultaneous B1 estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonincontri, Guido; Sawiak, Stephen J

    2016-10-01

    MR fingerprinting (MRF) can be used for quantitative estimation of physical parameters in MRI. Here, we extend the method to incorporate B1 estimation. The acquisition is based on steady state free precession MR fingerprinting with a Cartesian trajectory. To increase the sensitivity to the B1 profile, abrupt changes in flip angle were introduced in the sequence. Slice profile and B1 effects were included in the dictionary and the results from two- and three-dimensional (3D) acquisitions were compared. Acceleration was demonstrated using retrospective undersampling in the phase encode directions of 3D data exploiting redundancy between MRF frames at the edges of k-space. Without B1 estimation, T2 and B1 were inaccurate by more than 20%. Abrupt changes in flip angle improved B1 maps. T1 and T2 values obtained with the new MRF methods agree with classical spin echo measurements and are independent of the B1 field profile. When using view sharing reconstruction, results remained accurate (error Reson Med 76:1127-1135, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptations are made. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. SU-E-J-217: Multiparametric MR Imaging of Cranial Tumors On a Dedicated 1.0T MR Simulator Prior to Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, N; Glide-Hurst, C; Liu, M; Hearshen, D; Brown, S; Siddiqui, S; Chetty, I [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of cranial lesions prior to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may improve treatment planning and provide potential prognostic value. The practicality and logistics of acquiring advanced multiparametric MRI sequences to measure vascular and cellular properties of cerebral tumors are explored on a 1.0 Tesla MR Simulator. Methods: MR simulation was performed immediately following routine CT simulation on a 1T MR Simulator. MR sequences used were in the order they were performed: T2-Weighted Turbo Spin Echo (T2W-TSE), T2 FLAIR, Diffusion-weighted (DWI, b = 0, 800 to generate an apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map), 3D T1-Weighted Fast Field Echo (T1W-FFE), Dynamic Contrast Enhanced (DCE) and Post Gadolinium Contrast Enhanced 3D T1W-FFE images. T1 pre-contrast values was generated by acquiring six different flip angles. The arterial input function was derived from arterial pixels in the perfusion images selected manually. The extended Tofts model was used to generate the permeability maps. Routine MRI scans took about 30 minutes to complete; the additional scans added 12 minutes. Results: To date, seven patients with cerebral tumors have been imaged and tumor physiology characterized. For example, on a glioblastoma patient, the volume contoured on T1 Gd images, ADC map and the pharmacokinetic map (Ktrans) were 1.9, 1.4, and 1.5 cc respectively with strong spatial correlation. The mean ADC value of the entire volume was 1141 μm2/s while the value in the white matter was 811 μm2/s. The mean value of Ktrans was 0.02 min-1 in the tumor volume and 0.00 in the normal white matter. Conclusion: Our initial results suggest that multiparametric MRI sequences may provide a more quantitative evaluation of vascular and tumor properties. Implementing functional imaging during MR-SIM may be particularly beneficial in assessing tumor extent, differentiating radiation necrosis from tumor recurrence, and establishing reliable

  2. Discoid meniscus of the knee: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Moon; Kang, Heung Sik; Ahn, Joong Mo; Seong, Sang Cheol

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of the discoid meniscus, the authors reviewed 31 cases of discoid menisci diagnosed by MR imaging among which 16 cases received arthroscopy. Using knee surface coil, sagittal T1, T2 and proton density images and coronal T1 weighted images were obtained with 18 cm FOV and 4 mm/ 1 mm thickness/gap. A discoid meniscus was considered if three or more contiguous sagittal images demonstrated continuity of the meniscus between the anterior and posterior horns or the diameter of the mid-portion of the meniscus exceeded 15 mm on the coronal image. The authors also observed the associated abnormalities including tears of meniscus and ligament, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects. All discoid menisci were lateral menisci and torn discoid lateral menisci were present in 26 cases (83%). In two cases, tears of the contralateral medial meniscus were present. The tears of anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments, meniscal cyst, and osteochondral defects were present in 4, 2, 4, and 5 cases respectively. All collateral ligaments were intact. In conclusion MR imaging was useful for the detection of discoid meniscus and associated abnormalities

  3. High-field MR imaging of spinal cord tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Blas, C.; Doyon, D.; Hurth, M.; Bittoun, J.

    1986-01-01

    In 60 patients with spinal cord tumors, MR imaging was performed using a 1.5-T unit (GE Signa) and a planar surface coil, 5-mm-thick sections, and spin-echo pulse sequences (TE/TR = 25/600 and 25-100/2,000-2,500 msec). There were 32 astrocytomas, 13 ependymomas, and five hemangioblastomas. Ten patients were not operated on. Surgical follow-up was available in 35 patients. The MR imaging results were correlated with findings on CT, myelography, intraoperative US, surgery, and pathologic examination. In all cases the tumor appeared markedly inhomogeneous. Four imaging patterns corresponding to structural abnormalities were observed: low signal intensity of the tumor core on both T1- and T2-weighted images; hypointensity on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity on T2-weighted images (low-protein cyst, syrinx, edema); isointensity on T1-weighted and slight hypertensity on T2-weighted images (high-protein tumoral necrotic cyst); and high spinal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images (chronic hemorrhage). MR imaging contributes the most information in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors and delineation of their extent, and consequently has a potential impact on surgical management

  4. LOCUS MR: Localization of unaffected spins in MR tomography and MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthael, D.; Haase, A.

    1986-01-01

    Different pulse sequences have been proposed for localized in vivo MR spectroscopy. For localized MR tomography and MR spectroscopy, a method is proposed, dubbed LOCUS (LOCalization of Unaffected Spins) MR. The method uses the initial saturation of regions surrounding the region of interest (ROI) in the presence of gradients. This is followed by a conventional MR study of the unaffected ROI. In animals, human extremities, and phantoms, proton MR studies demonstrated that the method provides an optimal signal-to-noise ratio, an easily variable ROI, and ROI shim. The method can be combined with two- and three-dimensional imaging, and it allows localized measurement of MR parameters. The multinuclear capability is discussed

  5. Dedicated brain PET system of PET/MR for brain research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Li; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Wei, Qingyang; Xu, Tianpeng

    2015-01-01

    This work is to replace PET ring in human brain PET/MR system with a dedicated wearable PET insert, aimed at improving both patient feasibility and system performance for brain imaging. The designed PET/MR system includes two parts: the inside parts, including a radio frequency (RF) coil and PET ring, are mounted on patient’s head, and the outside part, a MR imager, is dependent of patient. The RF coil is the innermost layer, surrounded by an outer PET-ring layer. They are supported by a MRcompatible structure. And both RF coil and PET detectors are placed inside a standard clinical 3-T MR imager. From the design of the system we can infer that some advantages can be achieved. First, high sensitivity will be achieved with the same amount crystals as the PET ring is more close to region-of-interest area, at a reduced cost. Second, by using a 2-layer depth of interaction (DOI) detector, the parallax effect can be minimized. The resolution will benefit from short positron range caused by magnetic field and smaller ring diameter will also reduce the effect of non-collinearity. Thirdly, as the PET ring is mounted on head, impact of patient motion will be reduced.

  6. Dedicated brain PET system of PET/MR for brain research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Li; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Wei, Qingyang; Xu, Tianpeng [Institute of Medical Physics, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-18

    This work is to replace PET ring in human brain PET/MR system with a dedicated wearable PET insert, aimed at improving both patient feasibility and system performance for brain imaging. The designed PET/MR system includes two parts: the inside parts, including a radio frequency (RF) coil and PET ring, are mounted on patient’s head, and the outside part, a MR imager, is dependent of patient. The RF coil is the innermost layer, surrounded by an outer PET-ring layer. They are supported by a MRcompatible structure. And both RF coil and PET detectors are placed inside a standard clinical 3-T MR imager. From the design of the system we can infer that some advantages can be achieved. First, high sensitivity will be achieved with the same amount crystals as the PET ring is more close to region-of-interest area, at a reduced cost. Second, by using a 2-layer depth of interaction (DOI) detector, the parallax effect can be minimized. The resolution will benefit from short positron range caused by magnetic field and smaller ring diameter will also reduce the effect of non-collinearity. Thirdly, as the PET ring is mounted on head, impact of patient motion will be reduced.

  7. MR staging of pelvic endometriosis. Role of fat-suppression T{sub 1}-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi-Tanaka, Yumiko; Itai, Yuji; Anno, Izumi; Matsumoto, Kunihiko; Ebihara, Reiko; Nishida, Masato [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    1996-05-01

    We examined whether MR can determine the stage of endometriosis according to the scoring system established and revised by the American Fertility Society (r-AFS), a system which is widely used by gynecologists. We also studied the utility of fat suppression T{sub 1}-weighted images in improving accuracy. Seventeen patients with endometriosis examined by conventional MR were included in this study. All the patients had surgically proved stage III or IV disease. We determined the stage by MR using the following criteria according to the r-AFS system: adnexal masses without normal ovarian tissue were considered deep ovarian lesions, while those with normal tissue were considered superficial. A lack of fat between the lesion and surrounding structures was considered a dense adhesion, and hyperintense spots were considered peritoneal implants. The MR scores of patients with and without fat suppression were correlated with the surgical scores. MR staging corresponded to surgical staging in 15 of the 17 patients. In eight patients, peritoneal implants of less than 1.5 cm were depicted only by fat-suppression images. However, these lesions did not change the score significantly. MR imaging could determine the stage in advanced endometriosis. Fat-suppression could highlight smaller implants. These tiny lesions had little clinical meaning in these advanced cases; however, the clinical value of this technique should be evaluated in milder disease. (author)

  8. Craniopharyngioma identification by CT and MR imaging at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, J.K. [Dept. of Radiology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. (Norway)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Eldevik, O.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. (Norway)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Skalpe, I.O. [Dept. of Radiology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. (Norway)]|[Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01

    To compare the detectability of craniopharyngiomas by CT and MR imaging, preoperative CT and MR studies obtained within 16 days of each other were evaluated retrospectively in 9 patients. MR imaging demonstrated cystic and solid tumor components in all 9 tumors, and enhancement in the 7 tumors that were studied after contrast medium injection. MR imaging demonstrated a signal void consistent with calcification in 4 patients. Combining unenhanced and contrast medium-enhanced studies, CT also identified all the tumors. CT demonstrated cysts in 7 lesions, calcification in 7 and enhancement in 6 of the 7 lesions that received i.v. contrast medium. Calcification was better seen by CT than MR imaging, while MR imaging identified cystic tumor components not seen on CT. The contrast medium enhancement pattern was the same with the 2 modalities. MR imaging of the sellar region, including at least one contrast medium-enhanced sequence, should be sufficient in most instances to establish a preoperative diagnosis of craniopharyngioma. (orig.).

  9. MR imaging of normal bone marrow; Obraz MR prawidlowego szpiku kostnego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stajgis, M.; Paprzycki, W. [Osrodek Diagnostyki Obrazowej IR, Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Principles of MR bone marrow imaging on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations of bone marrow in different anatomic sites in 200 patients have been discussed. Significance of different physiologic factors and processes such as age, steatosis, osteoporosis, conversion and reconversion, which influence on MR bone marrow images, have been emphasized. T1-weighted images obtained with spin-echo sequences give the most of information about bone marrow structure in MR. Thorough knowledge of bone marrow physiology and clinical status of the patient is indispensable in correct interpretation of hypointensive lesions on T1-weighted images. When presence of disseminated bone marrow disease is suspected, authors propose routine imaging of lumbar vertebral column, pelvis and proximal parts of femoral bones. (author) 7 refs, 7 figs

  10. Optimization of MR fluid Yield stress using Taguchi Method and Response Surface Methodology Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, S. K.; Sharma, Vivek

    2018-02-01

    Magneto rheological fluids belong to a class of smart materials whose rheological characteristics such as yield stress, viscosity etc. changes in the presence of applied magnetic field. In this paper, optimization of MR fluid constituents is obtained with on-state yield stress as response parameter. For this, 18 samples of MR fluids are prepared using L-18 Orthogonal Array. These samples are experimentally tested on a developed & fabricated electromagnet setup. It has been found that the yield stress of MR fluid mainly depends on the volume fraction of the iron particles and type of carrier fluid used in it. The optimal combination of the input parameters for the fluid are found to be as Mineral oil with a volume percentage of 67%, iron powder of 300 mesh size with a volume percentage of 32%, oleic acid with a volume percentage of 0.5% and tetra-methyl-ammonium-hydroxide with a volume percentage of 0.7%. This optimal combination of input parameters has given the on-state yield stress as 48.197 kPa numerically. An experimental confirmation test on the optimized MR fluid sample has been then carried out and the response parameter thus obtained has found matching quite well (less than 1% error) with the numerically obtained values.

  11. MR tractography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinosada, Yasutomi; Okuda, Yasuyuki; Ono, Mototsugu

    1993-01-01

    We developed a new noninvasive technique to visualize the anatomical structure of the nerve fiber system in vivo, and named this technique magnetic resonance (MR) tractography and the acquired image an MR tractogram. MR tractography has two steps. One is to obtain diffusion-weighted images sensitized along axes appropriate for depicting the intended nerve fibers with anisotropic water diffusion MR imaging. The other is to extract the anatomical structure of the nerve fiber system from a series of diffusion-weighted images by the maximum intensity projection method. To examine the clinical usefulness of the proposed technique, many contiguous, thin (3 mm) coronal two-dimensional sections of the brain were acquired sequentially in normal volunteers and selected patients with paralyses, on a 1.5 Tesla MR system (Signa, GE) with an ECG-gated Stejskal-Tanner pulse sequence. The structure of the nerve fiber system of normal volunteers was almost the same as the anatomy. The tractograms of patients with paralyses clearly showed the degeneration of nerve fibers and were correlated with clinical symptoms. MR tractography showed great promise for the study of neuroanatomy and neuroradiology. (author)

  12. Outer Sphere Adsorption of Pb(II)EDTA on Goethite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bargar, John R

    1999-07-16

    FTIR and EXAFS spectroscopic measurements were performed on Pb(II)EDTA adsorbed on goethite as functions of pH (4-6), Pb(II)EDTA concentration (0.11 {micro}M - 72 {micro}M), and ionic strength (16 {micro}M - 0.5M). FTIR measurements show no evidence for carboxylate-Fe(III) bonding or protonation of EDTA at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Both FTIR and EXAFS measurements suggest that EDTA acts as a hexadentate ligand, with all four of its carboxylate and both amine groups bonded to Pb(II). No evidence was observed for inner-sphere Pb(II)-goethite bonding at Pb:EDTA = 1:1. Hence, the adsorbed complexes should have composition Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}}. Since substantial uptake of PbEDTA(II){sup 2{minus}} occurred in the samples, we infer that Pb(II)EDTA{sup 2{minus}} adsorbed as outer-sphere complexes and/or as complexes that lose part of their solvation shells and hydrogen bond directly to goethite surface sites. We propose the term ''hydration-sphere'' for the latter type of complexes because they should occupy space in the primary hydration spheres of goethite surface functional groups, and to distinguish this mode of sorption from common structural definitions of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The similarity of Pb(II) uptake isotherms to those of other divalent metal ions complexed by EDTA suggests that they too adsorb by these mechanisms. The lack of evidence for inner-sphere EDTA-Fe(III) bonding suggests that previously proposed metal-ligand - promoted dissolution mechanisms should be modified, specifically to account for the presence of outer-sphere precursor species.

  13. Acetabular labral tears: contrast-enhanced MR imaging under continuous leg traction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishii, T. [Div. of Functional Diagnostic Imaging, Biomedical Research Center, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan); Nakanishi, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan); Sugano, N. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan); Naito, H. [Div. of Functional Diagnostic Imaging, Biomedical Research Center, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan); Tamura, S. [Div. of Functional Diagnostic Imaging, Biomedical Research Center, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan); Ochi, T. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka Univ. Medical School, Suita (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of continuous leg traction on contrast-enhanced MR imaging of the hip joint and to determine whether MR imaging under these conditions is useful for demonstrating acetabular labral tears. Nineteen hips underwent MR imaging with a T1-weighted spin-echo sequence, followed by MR imaging under continuous leg traction after intravenous injection of gadolinium-DTPA. Joint fluid enhancement and labral contour detection were evaluated. Eleven hips had labral tears shown by conventional arthrography, arthroscopy and macroscopic surgical findings. Assessment of labral tears by MR imaging was correlated with the diagnosis based on these standard techniques. Joint fluid enhancement was obtained in all hips at 30 min after injection. Superior and inferior labral surfaces were completely delineated in 1 hip on the unenhanced MR images, and in 7 and 13 hips, respectively, on the enhanced images under traction. The enhanced images under traction depicted 9 of the 11 labral tears. Comparison between the unenhanced image and the enhanced image under traction avoided mistaking undercutting of the labrum for a tear in 4 hips. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging under traction was valuable for detecting labral tears non-invasively and without radiation. Follow-up examinations using this method in patients with acetabular dysplasia can help to clarify the natural course of labral disorders and enable better treatment planning. (orig./MG)

  14. Hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging in acute kernicterus: is it common or rare?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coskun, Abdulhakim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Karahan, Okkes Ibrahim; Manav, Ali [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Radiology, Kayseri (Turkey); Kumandas, Sefer [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Neuropediatry, Kayseri (Turkey); Akcakus, Mustafa [Erciyes University Medical School, Department of Neonatalogy, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2005-06-01

    Globus pallidus involvement is a well-known magnetic resonance (MR) imaging finding of acute kernicterus. However, it is not clear how early the involvement of globus pallidus occurs and whether or not it is seen in every case. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the globus pallidus involvement in 13 neonates with acute kernicterus by MR imaging. Thirteen neonates who were admitted with jaundice, encephalopathy and indirect hyperbilirubinemia (mean, 37.0 mg/dl) were prospectively evaluated with cranial MR imaging. Pathological signal changes were noted concerning the globus pallidus. Eight of the 13 patients demonstrated bilateral, symmetric increased signal intensity in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging. These lesions were not apparent on T2-weighted images. Multiple parenchymal punctuate T1 hyperintense lesions were detected in one patient without globus pallidus involvement. This appearance was consistent with hemorrhage. The MR imaging findings of the other four patients showed no evidence of abnormality. The symmetric involvement of globus pallidus seen as hyperintense on T1-weighted MR imaging is a common and characteristic finding of acute kernicterus. (orig.)

  15. Hyperintense globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging in acute kernicterus: is it common or rare?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coskun, Abdulhakim; Yikilmaz, Ali; Karahan, Okkes Ibrahim; Manav, Ali; Kumandas, Sefer; Akcakus, Mustafa

    2005-01-01

    Globus pallidus involvement is a well-known magnetic resonance (MR) imaging finding of acute kernicterus. However, it is not clear how early the involvement of globus pallidus occurs and whether or not it is seen in every case. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the globus pallidus involvement in 13 neonates with acute kernicterus by MR imaging. Thirteen neonates who were admitted with jaundice, encephalopathy and indirect hyperbilirubinemia (mean, 37.0 mg/dl) were prospectively evaluated with cranial MR imaging. Pathological signal changes were noted concerning the globus pallidus. Eight of the 13 patients demonstrated bilateral, symmetric increased signal intensity in the globus pallidus on T1-weighted MR imaging. These lesions were not apparent on T2-weighted images. Multiple parenchymal punctuate T1 hyperintense lesions were detected in one patient without globus pallidus involvement. This appearance was consistent with hemorrhage. The MR imaging findings of the other four patients showed no evidence of abnormality. The symmetric involvement of globus pallidus seen as hyperintense on T1-weighted MR imaging is a common and characteristic finding of acute kernicterus. (orig.)

  16. A combined solenoid-surface RF coil for high-resolution whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 Tesla clinical MR scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Hunter R; Yuan, Chun; Hayes, Cecil E

    2010-09-01

    Rat brain models effectively simulate a multitude of human neurological disorders. Improvements in coil design have facilitated the wider utilization of rat brain models by enabling the utilization of clinical MR scanners for image acquisition. In this study, a novel coil design, subsequently referred to as the rat brain coil, is described that exploits and combines the strengths of both solenoids and surface coils into a simple, multichannel, receive-only coil dedicated to whole-brain rat imaging on a 3.0 T clinical MR scanner. Compared with a multiturn solenoid mouse body coil, a 3-cm surface coil, a modified Helmholtz coil, and a phased-array surface coil, the rat brain coil improved signal-to-noise ratio by approximately 72, 61, 78, and 242%, respectively. Effects of the rat brain coil on amplitudes of static field and radiofrequency field uniformity were similar to each of the other coils. In vivo, whole-brain images of an adult male rat were acquired with a T(2)-weighted spin-echo sequence using an isotropic acquisition resolution of 0.25 x 0.25 x 0.25 mm(3) in 60.6 min. Multiplanar images of the in vivo rat brain with identification of anatomic structures are presented. Improvement in signal-to-noise ratio afforded by the rat brain coil may broaden experiments that utilize clinical MR scanners for in vivo image acquisition. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Part-body hyperthermia with a radiofrequency multiantenna applicator under online control in 1,5 T MR-tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, P.; Gellermann, J.; Faehling, H.; Wlodarczyk, W.; Felix, R.; Seebass, M.; Turner, P.; Nadobny, J.; Rau, B.; Hildebrandt, B.; Schlag, P.M.; Oppelt, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective of this study is the integration of a multiantenna applicator for part-body hyperthermia (BSD 2000/3D) in a 1.5 T MR-tomograph (Siemens Magnetom Symphony) in order to perform noninvasive MR monitoring in real time to increase safety and effectiveness of heat treatments. The positioning unit is mechanically coupled to the MR gantry from the back side and the body coil is utilised for imaging. For that purpose, the hyperthermia antenna system (100 MHz, 1.500 W) and the MR receiver(63.9 MHs) have to be decoupled in terms of high frequency (filter) and electromagnetically (emc). The processing of MR data sets is performed in a hyperthermia planning system. A simultaneous operation of radiofrequency hyperthermia and MR system is possible at clinically relevant power levels. MR imaging is used for tumor diagnostics (standard spin echo sequences), for hyperthermia planning (T1-weighted gradient echo sequences in equal- and opposed-phase techniques), and for temperature measurements according to the proton resonance frequency method (PRF method, phase evaluation registration using a gradient echo sequence with long echo time). In 33 patients with advanced pelvic and abdominal tumors we performed 150 heat sessions under MR monitoring. For 70% of these patients a visualisation of temperature sensitive data during treatment was possible. The evaluated difference images represent a superposition of real temperature increase and a (temperature-induced) perfusion elevation. The hybrid approach renders development of part body hyperthermia possible as an MR-controlled intervention in radiology. (orig.) [de

  18. MR imaging of the spine in children with spina bifida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, M.R.; Glasier, C.M.; Angtuaco, E.J.C.; McConnell, J.R.; Chadduck, W.M.; Binet, E.F.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty infants and children with spina bifida were examined as outpatients with spinal MR imaging. Studies were performed using a 0.6-T imager and a surface coil. These examinations were performed in patients previously operated on who had progressive neurologic symptoms and in newly diagnosed patients to exclude lipomyeloschisis, low-lying cord, diastematomyelia, or syringomyelia. Predominantly T1-weighted sequences were obtained in at least two orthogonal planes with a 5-mm section thickness. Eighteen patients had a low-lying spinal cord. Six patients had syringomyelia, usually lumbar. Five patients had intraspinal lipomas, and three had diastematomyelia. MR imaging was diagnostic in 17 instances. Patient motion or severe kyphoscoliosis comprised three examinations. MR imaging is the screening examination of choice in children with spina bifida

  19. A study on MR signal intensity of calcifications according to calcium concentration and compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Sun Ae; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1996-01-01

    The signal of intracranial calcification on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has been known to be variable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the MR signal of calcifications according to calcium concentration and compound. T1-weighted, proton density and T2-weighted images were obtained in phantoms with various conposition of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate. The signal intensities and T1/T2 relaxation times were measured and analyzed according to calcium concentration and compound. The configurations of calcium particles were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The signal intensity of calcium carbonate on T1-weighted images gradually decreased as the concentration increased, while that of calcium phosphate showed a biphasic curve with a peak intensity at 0.2g/ml. The signal intensity of both calcium phosphate decreased up to 0.2g/ml and then remained constant. The T2 relaxation time of both calcium compounds decreased in a similar fashion with increasing concentration, Calcium phosphate showed larger surface area on scanning electron microscope. Calcifications show variable MR signal due to difference of T1 and T2 relaxation times according to calcium concentration and compound. Large surface area of calcium particle might cause shortening of T1 relaxation time leading to high signal on T1-weighted image. Understanding of these findings will help interpretation of MR images more precisely

  20. MR/PET quantification tools: Registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based attenuation correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baowei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Nye, Jonathon A.; Aarsvold, John N.; Raghunath, Nivedita; Cervo, Morgan; Stark, Rebecca; Meltzer, Carolyn C.; Votaw, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Combined MR/PET is a relatively new, hybrid imaging modality. A human MR/PET prototype system consisting of a Siemens 3T Trio MR and brain PET insert was installed and tested at our institution. Its present design does not offer measured attenuation correction (AC) using traditional transmission imaging. This study is the development of quantification tools including MR-based AC for quantification in combined MR/PET for brain imaging. Methods: The developed quantification tools include image registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC. These components were integrated into a single scheme for processing MR/PET data. The segmentation method is multiscale and based on the Radon transform of brain MR images. It was developed to segment the skull on T1-weighted MR images. A modified fuzzy C-means classification scheme was developed to classify brain tissue into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Classified tissue is assigned an attenuation coefficient so that AC factors can be generated. PET emission data are then reconstructed using a three-dimensional ordered sets expectation maximization method with the MR-based AC map. Ten subjects had separate MR and PET scans. The PET with [11C]PIB was acquired using a high-resolution research tomography (HRRT) PET. MR-based AC was compared with transmission (TX)-based AC on the HRRT. Seventeen volumes of interest were drawn manually on each subject image to compare the PET activities between the MR-based and TX-based AC methods. Results: For skull segmentation, the overlap ratio between our segmented results and the ground truth is 85.2 ± 2.6%. Attenuation correction results from the ten subjects show that the difference between the MR and TX-based methods was <6.5%. Conclusions: MR-based AC compared favorably with conventional transmission-based AC. Quantitative tools including registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC have been developed for use in combined MR

  1. MR/PET quantification tools: Registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based attenuation correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fei, Baowei, E-mail: bfei@emory.edu [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1841 Clifton Road Northeast, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States); Yang, Xiaofeng; Nye, Jonathon A.; Raghunath, Nivedita; Votaw, John R. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Aarsvold, John N. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Nuclear Medicine Service, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, Georgia 30033 (United States); Cervo, Morgan; Stark, Rebecca [The Medical Physics Graduate Program in the George W. Woodruff School, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Meltzer, Carolyn C. [Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30329 (United States); Department of Neurology and Department of Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia 30322 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Combined MR/PET is a relatively new, hybrid imaging modality. A human MR/PET prototype system consisting of a Siemens 3T Trio MR and brain PET insert was installed and tested at our institution. Its present design does not offer measured attenuation correction (AC) using traditional transmission imaging. This study is the development of quantification tools including MR-based AC for quantification in combined MR/PET for brain imaging. Methods: The developed quantification tools include image registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC. These components were integrated into a single scheme for processing MR/PET data. The segmentation method is multiscale and based on the Radon transform of brain MR images. It was developed to segment the skull on T1-weighted MR images. A modified fuzzy C-means classification scheme was developed to classify brain tissue into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid. Classified tissue is assigned an attenuation coefficient so that AC factors can be generated. PET emission data are then reconstructed using a three-dimensional ordered sets expectation maximization method with the MR-based AC map. Ten subjects had separate MR and PET scans. The PET with [{sup 11}C]PIB was acquired using a high-resolution research tomography (HRRT) PET. MR-based AC was compared with transmission (TX)-based AC on the HRRT. Seventeen volumes of interest were drawn manually on each subject image to compare the PET activities between the MR-based and TX-based AC methods. Results: For skull segmentation, the overlap ratio between our segmented results and the ground truth is 85.2 ± 2.6%. Attenuation correction results from the ten subjects show that the difference between the MR and TX-based methods was <6.5%. Conclusions: MR-based AC compared favorably with conventional transmission-based AC. Quantitative tools including registration, segmentation, classification, and MR-based AC have been developed for use in combined MR/PET.

  2. Students’ misconceptions about Newton's second law in outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temiz, B K; Yavuz, A

    2014-01-01

    Students’ misconceptions about Newton's second law in frictionless outer space were investigated. The research was formed according to an epistemic game theoretical framework. The term ‘epistemic’ refers to students’ participation in problem-solving activities as a means of constructing new knowledge. The term ‘game’ refers to a coherent activity that consists of moves and rules. A set of questions in which students are asked to solve two similar Newton's second law problems, one of which is on the Earth and the other in outer space, was administered to 116 undergraduate students. The findings indicate that there is a significant difference between students’ epistemic game preferences and race-type (outer space or frictional surface) question. So students who used Newton's second law on the ground did not apply this law and used primitive reasoning when it came to space. Among these students, voluntary interviews were conducted with 18 students. Analysis of interview transcripts showed that: (1) the term ‘space’ causes spontaneity among students that prevents the use of the law; (2) students hesitate to apply Newton's second law in space due to the lack of a condition—the friction; (3) students feel that Newton's second law is not valid in space for a variety of reasons, but mostly for the fact that the body in space is not in contact with a surface. (paper)

  3. Proton MR spectroscopy of the prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lisse, Ullrich G. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Standorte Grosshadern und Innenstadt, Ziemssenstrasse 1, D-80336 Munich (Germany)], E-mail: ullrich.mueller-lisse@med.uni-muenchen.de; Scherr, Michael K. [Dept. of Clinical Radiology, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Standorte Grosshadern und Innenstadt, Ziemssenstrasse 1, D-80336 Munich (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Purpose: To summarize current technical and biochemical aspects and clinical applications of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of the human prostate in vivo. Material and methods: Pertinent radiological and biochemical literature was searched and retrieved via electronic media (medline, pubmed). Basic concepts of MRS of the prostate and its clinical applications were extracted. Results: Clinical MRS is usually based on point resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) or spin echo (SE) sequences, along with outer volume suppression of signals from outside of the prostate. MRS of the prostate detects indicator lines of citrate, choline, and creatine. While healthy prostate tissue demonstrates high levels of citrate and low levels of choline that marks cell wall turnover, prostate cancer utilizes citrate for energy metabolism and shows high levels of choline. The ratio of (choline + creatine)/citrate distinguishes between healthy tissue and prostate cancer. Particularly when combined with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, three-dimensional MRS imaging (3D-CSI, or 3D-MRSI) detects and localizes prostate cancer in the entire prostate with high sensitivity and specificity. Combined MR imaging and 3D-MRSI exceed the sensitivity and specificity of sextant biopsy of the prostate. When MRS and MR imaging agree on prostate cancer presence, the positive predictive value is about 80-90%. Distinction between healthy tissue and prostate cancer principally is maintained after various therapeutic treatments, including hormone ablation therapy, radiation therapy, and cryotherapy of the prostate. Conclusions: Since it is non-invasive, reliable, radiation-free, and essentially repeatable, combined MR imaging and 3D-MRSI of the prostate lends itself to the planning of biopsy and therapy, and to post-therapeutic follow-up. For broad clinical acceptance, it will be necessary to facilitate MRS examinations and their evaluation and make MRS available to a wider range of institutions.

  4. MR imaging of abdominopelvic involvement in neurofibromatosis type 1: a review of 43 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharia, T. Thomas [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Jaramillo, Diego [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Poussaint, Tina Young [Children' s Hospital Boston, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Korf, Bruce [University of Alabama at Birmingham Hospital, Department of Genetics, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Plexiform neurofibromas are a frequent complication of neurofibromatosis type 1. This article discusses MR imaging findings and distribution of plexiform neurofibromas in the abdomen and pelvis. To define the most prevalent patterns of involvement and MR imaging findings in abdominopelvic neurofibromatosis type 1. We reviewed the MR appearance of abdominopelvic lesions in 23 male and 20 female patients (median age: 16 years) with type 1 neurofibromatosis. The patients were part of a multi-institutional study of 300 patients. Imaging included coronal or sagittal, and axial short tau inversion recovery images. The most common abdominopelvic involvement was in the abdominopelvic wall (n=28, 65%) and lumbosacral plexus (n=27, 63%). Retroperitoneal involvement was frequent (n=15, 35%). Lesions were less often intraperitoneal (21%) (P=0.001). Pelvic disease (n=27, 63%), neural canal involvement (n=18, 42%), and hydronephrosis (n=4, 9%) were also noted. Target-like appearance of plexiform lesions was noted in more than half the patients. Abdominopelvic involvement in neurofibromatosis type 1 is primarily extraperitoneal. Although lesions are most prevalent in the abdominopelvic wall and lumbosacral plexus, retroperitoneal and pelvic involvement is common and usually affects important organs. MR imaging added information in the initial and follow-up clinical evaluation of these patients. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of the spatial and temporal accuracy of heating in the prostate gland using transurethral ultrasound therapy and active MR temperature feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, Rajiv; Tang, Kee; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Boyes, Aaron; Bronskill, Michael; Sugar, Linda; Appu, Sree; Klotz, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    A new MRI-guided therapy is being developed as a minimally invasive treatment for localized prostate cancer utilizing high-intensity ultrasound energy to generate a precise region of thermal coagulation within the prostate gland. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vivo the capability to produce a spatial heating pattern in the prostate that accurately matched the shape of a target region using transurethral ultrasound heating and active MR temperature feedback. Experiments were performed in a canine model (n = 9) in a 1.5 T MR imager using a prototype device comprising a single planar transducer operated under rotational control. The spatial temperature distribution, measured every 5 s with MR thermometry, was used to adjust the acoustic power and rotation rate in order to achieve a temperature of 55 0 C along the outer boundary of the target region. The results demonstrated the capability to produce accurate spatial heating patterns within the prostate gland. An average temperature of 56.2 ± 0.6 0 C was measured along the outer boundary of the target region across all experiments in this study. The average spatial error between the target boundary and the 55 0 C isotherm was 0.8 ± 0.7 mm (-0.2 to 3.2 mm), and the overall treatment time was ≤20 min for all experiments. Excellent spatial agreement was observed between the temperature information acquired with MRI and the pattern of thermal damage measured on H and E-stained tissue sections. This study demonstrates the benefit of adaptive energy delivery using active MR temperature feedback, and an excellent capability to treat precise regions within the prostate gland with this technology.

  6. MR imaging of articular cartilage; Gelenkknorpel in der MR-Tomographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, F.K.W.; Muhle, C.; Heller, M.; Brossmann, J. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie

    2001-04-01

    MR imaging has evolved to the best non-invasive method for the evaluation of articular cartilage. MR imaging helps to understand the structure and physiology of cartilage, and to diagnose cartilage lesions. Numerous studies have shown high accuracy and reliability concerning detection of cartilage lesions and early changes in both structure and biochemistry. High contrast-to-noise ratio and high spatial resolution are essential for analysis of articular cartilage. Fat-suppressed 3D-T{sub 1} weighted gradient echo and T{sub 2}-weighted fast spin echo sequences with or without fat suppression are recommended for clinical routine. In this article the anatomy and pathology of hyaline articular cartilage and the complex imaging characteristics of hyaline cartilage will be discussed. (orig.) [German] Die MR-Tomographie hat sich zur besten nichtinvasiven bildgebenden Methode fuer die Untersuchung von Gelenkknorpel entwickelt. Die MR-Tomographie liefert einen Beitrag zum Verstaendnis der Knorpelstruktur und der Physiologie sowie zur Diagnostik von Knorpelschaeden. Zahlreiche MR-Studien konnten eine hohe Genauigkeit und Zuverlaessigkeit bei der Detektion chondraler Laesionen sowie frueher Veraenderungen struktureller und biochemischer Natur zeigen. Neben einem hohen Kontrast/Rausch-Verhaeltnis ist fuer die Gelenkknorpelanalyse eine hohe raeumliche Aufloesung erforderlich. Im klinischen Routinebetrieb empfehlen sich fuer die Erkennung von Knorpellaesionen besonders fettunterdrueckte 3D-T{sub 1}-gewichtete Gradientenecho- und T{sub 2}-gewichtete Fastspinecho-Sequenzen mit oder ohne Fettunterdrueckung. Die vorliegende Arbeit geht auf die Anatomie und Pathologie des hyalinen Gelenkknorpels ein und diskutiert das komplexe MR-Signalverhalten. (orig.)

  7. Central nervous system involvement of leukemia and systemic lymphoma in children. CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomura, Noriaki; Hirano, Hiroko; Kato, Kohki; Sashi, Ryuji; Hashimoto, Manabu; Watarai, Jiro; Watanabe, Arata

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to retrospectively evaluate CT and MR findings of central nervous system (CNS) involvement of leukemia and systemic lymphoma in children. Over a 12-year period, sixty-five patients with leukemia and fifteen patients with systemic lymphoma underwent cerebral CT and/or MR imaging. Nine patients were diagnosed as CNS involvement of leukemia and lymphoma. The CT and MR abnormalities in these patients were correlated with the findings of histology, cerebrospinal fluid cytology, and/or treatment. The age of the patients ranged from 0 to 15 years old. They consisted of 6 boys and 3 girls. The CT examinations were performed before and after contrast administration. MR examinations were performed on a 1.5-T unit, and T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted images were obtained using spin-echo or fast spin-echo sequences. Tumor masses were present in seven with leukemia, and in two with malignant lymphoma. On the CT scan, tumor masses were hyperdense with contrast enhancement. On the MR images, their signals were variable. In all of nine patients, tumor masses were contiguous with a meningeal surface. Postcontrast T1-weighted images were valuable in demonstrating meningeal infiltration. Tumoral hemorrhage was found in two patients. In a patient with tumor at the superior sagittal sinus, venous infarct was observed. CNS leukemic and lymphomatous masses are almost hyperdense on the CT and they are characteristically contiguous with a meningeal surface. MR imaging was valuable in demonstrating meningeal infiltration. (K.H.)

  8. Topological analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane protein 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, P; Christiansen, Gunna; Birkelund, Svend

    1998-01-01

    Using monospecific polyclonal antisera to different parts of Chlamydia trachomatis L2 outer membrane protein 2 (Omp2), we show that the protein is localized at the inner surface of the outer membrane. Omp2 becomes immunoaccessible when Chlamydia elementary bodies are treated with dithiothreitol...

  9. Experimental validation of hyperthermia SAR treatment planning using MR B1+ imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Cornelis A T van den; Bartels, Lambertus W; Leeuw, Astrid A C De; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Kamer, Jeroen B Van de

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the concept of using B 1+ imaging as a means to validate SAR models for radiofrequency hyperthermia is presented. As in radiofrequency hyperthermia, in common clinical MR imaging which applies RF frequencies between 64 and 128 MHz, the RF field distribution inside a patient is largely determined by the dielectric distribution of the anatomy. Modern MR imaging techniques allow measurement of the RF magnetic field component B 1+ making it possible to measure at high resolution the dielectric interaction of the RF field with the patient. Given these considerations, we propose to use MR imaging to verify the validity of our dielectric patient model used for SAR models of radiofrequency hyperthermia. The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of this concept by performing B 1+ measurements and simulations on cylindrical split phantoms consisting of materials with dielectric properties similar to human tissue types. Important topics of investigation were the accuracy and sensitivity of B 1+ measurements and the validity of the electric model of the MR body coil. The measurements were performed on a clinical 1.5 T MR scanner with its quadrature body coil operating at 64 MHz. It was shown that even small B 1+ variations of 2 to 5% could be measured reliably in the phantom experiments. An electrical model of the transmit coil was implemented on our FDTD-based hyperthermia treatment planning platform and the RF field distributions were calculated assuming an idealized quadrature current distribution in the coil. A quantitatively good correlation between measurements and simulations was found for phantoms consisting of water and oil, while highly conductive phantoms show considerable deviations. However, assuming linear excitation for these conductive phantoms resulted in good correspondence. As an explanation it is suggested that the coil is being detuned due to the inductive nature of the conductive phantoms, breaking up the phase difference of

  10. Inductance and resistance measurement method for vessel detection and coil powering in all-surface inductive heating systems composed of outer squircle coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Veli Tayfun; Unal, Emre; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2017-05-01

    In this work, we investigate a method proposed for vessel detection and coil powering in an all-surface inductive heating system composed of outer squircle coils. Besides conventional circular coils, coils with different shapes such as outer squircle coils are used for and enable efficient all-surface inductive heating. Validity of the method, which relies on measuring inductance and resistance values of a loaded coil at different frequencies, is experimentally demonstrated for a coil with shape different from conventional circular coil. Simple setup was constructed with a small coil to model an all-surface inductive heating system. Inductance and resistance maps were generated by measuring coil's inductance and resistance values at different frequencies loaded by a plate made of different materials and located at various positions. Results show that in an induction hob for various coil geometries it is possible to detect a vessel's presence, to identify its material type and to specify its position on the hob surface by considering inductance and resistance of the coil measured on at least two different frequencies. The studied method is important in terms of enabling safe, efficient and user flexible heating in an all-surface inductive heating system by automatically detecting the vessel's presence and powering on only the coils that are loaded by the vessel with predetermined current levels.

  11. Subdominant Outer Membrane Antigens in Anaplasma marginale: Conservation, Antigenicity, and Protective Capacity Using Recombinant Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre R Ducken

    Full Text Available Anaplasma marginale is a tick-borne rickettsial pathogen of cattle with a worldwide distribution. Currently a safe and efficacious vaccine is unavailable. Outer membrane protein (OMP extracts or a defined surface protein complex reproducibly induce protective immunity. However, there are several knowledge gaps limiting progress in vaccine development. First, are these OMPs conserved among the diversity of A. marginale strains circulating in endemic regions? Second, are the most highly conserved outer membrane proteins in the immunogens recognized by immunized and protected animals? Lastly, can this subset of OMPs recognized by antibody from protected vaccinates and conserved among strains recapitulate the protection of outer membrane vaccines? To address the first goal, genes encoding OMPs AM202, AM368, AM854, AM936, AM1041, and AM1096, major subdominant components of the outer membrane, were cloned and sequenced from geographically diverse strains and isolates. AM202, AM936, AM854, and AM1096 share 99.9 to 100% amino acid identity. AM1041 has 97.1 to 100% and AM368 has 98.3 to 99.9% amino acid identity. While all four of the most highly conserved OMPs were recognized by IgG from animals immunized with outer membranes, linked surface protein complexes, or unlinked surface protein complexes and shown to be protected from challenge, the highest titers and consistent recognition among vaccinates were to AM854 and AM936. Consequently, animals were immunized with recombinant AM854 and AM936 and challenged. Recombinant vaccinates and purified outer membrane vaccinates had similar IgG and IgG2 responses to both proteins. However, the recombinant vaccinates developed higher bacteremia after challenge as compared to adjuvant-only controls and outer membrane vaccinates. These results provide the first evidence that vaccination with specific antigens may exacerbate disease. Progressing from the protective capacity of outer membrane formulations to

  12. Prospective comparison of MR imaging (1.5 T) and CT detection of small intracranial metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowd, C.F.; Dillon, W.P.; Laxer, K.; Norman, D.; Newton, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    Prior studies indicate lack of MR imaging sensitivity in the evaluation of intractable seizure patients. The authors reviewed MR imaging studies of 15 patients with intractable seizures. High-quality thin-section multiplanar images were obtained with electrocardiographic gating and/or flow compensation techniques and a 1.5-T General Electric Signa unit. Correlation with intracranial electro-encephalography (EEG), CT, and pathology was obtained in all patients. Abnormalities on MR imaging were detected in all but one patient. Pathology revealed MTS in 12 of 15 patients. Other entities included heterotopias and cavernous angiomas. The authors' study indicates that high-resolution, flow-compensated MR imaging is quite sensitive for localization of eleptogenic structural abnormalities and complements EEG

  13. A functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid as a receptor directed MR contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Josephson, L.; Groman, E.V.; Menz, E.; Lewis, J.M.; Bengele, H.

    1990-01-01

    We have synthesized a surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloid whose clearance from the vascular compartment was inhibited by asialofetuin but not fetuin. Unlike other particulate or colloidal magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents, the agent of the current communication is not withdrawn from the vascular compartment by cells of the macrophage-monocyte phagocytic system, as indicated by its selective increase in hepatic relaxation rates. Because of this we refer to this colloid as a hepatic selective (HS) MR contrast agent. At 20 mumol Fe/kg the HS MR agent darkened MR images of liver. The HS MR agent exhibited no acute toxicity when injected into rats at 1800 mumol Fe/kg. Based on these observations, surface functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide colloids may be the basis of MR contrast agents internalized by receptor mediated endocytosis generally, and by the asialoglycoprotein receptor in particular

  14. 27 CFR 9.207 - Outer Coastal Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Outer Coastal Plain. 9.207... Outer Coastal Plain. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Outer Coastal Plain”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Outer Coastal Plain” is a term of viticultural...

  15. MR plaque imaging of the carotid artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yuji; Nagayama, Masako

    2010-01-01

    Atherosclerotic carotid plaque represents a major cause of cerebral ischemia. The detection of vulnerable plaque is important for preventing future cardiovascular events. The key factors in advanced plaque that are most likely to lead to patient complications are the condition of the fibrous cap, the size of the necrotic core and hemorrhage, and the extent of inflammatory activity within the plaque. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has excellent soft tissue contrast and can allow for a more accurate and objective estimation of carotid wall morphology and plaque composition. Recent advances in MR imaging techniques have permitted serial monitoring of atherosclerotic disease evolution and the identification of intraplaque risk factors for accelerated progression. The purpose of this review article is to review the current state of techniques of carotid wall MR imaging and the characterization of plaque components and surface morphology with MR imaging, and to describe the clinical practice of carotid wall MR imaging for the determination of treatment plan. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of intracranial hemorrhage with high field MR Imaging (1. 5T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campodonico, F; Brienza, G; Cotroneo, E; Fabbrini, G

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-two patients were studied with high-field Magnetic Resonance imaging (1.5T), with T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo pulse sequences. The study was aimed at assessing the efficacy of MR imaging in the evaluation of intracranical hematomas. Characteristic intensity patterns were observed in the evolution of the hematomas, were observed. In 35 sub-acute hematomas, peripheral hyperintensity could be observed on T1- and T2. weighted pulse sequences. This hyper intensity eventually fills in the hematoma in the chronic stage. In 17 chronic hematomas, a peripheral hypointense ring due to hemosidering deposits was seen on T1- and T2- weighted scans. The authors conclude that high field MR imaging is a very sensible diagnostic method in the evaluation of sub-acute and chronic hematomas. 18 refs.

  17. MR imaging of septic sacroiliitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuerzenbecher, A.; Hamm, B.; Bollow, M. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (DD). Bereich Medizin (Charite); Braun, J. [Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany). Universitaetsklinikum Benjamin Franklin; Paris, S. [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Biedermann, T. [Krankenhaus Berlin-Buch (Germany). II. Kinderklinik

    2000-08-01

    Objective. To investigate the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in detecting septic sacroiliitis and to determine whether the MR characteristics allow this entity to be differentiated from sacroiliitis in spondylarthropathy (SpA).Patients and design. The imaging findings of 11 patients with septic sacroiliitis were retrospectively analyzed by two experienced radiologists. Radiographic surveys of the pelvis as well as computed tomography (CT) and MR images of the sacroiliac joints were available in all cases. Seven of the patients additionally underwent a follow-up MR examination. The MR imaging protocol comprised combinations of coronal and transverse T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) or fast SE sequences, T2-weighted gradient-echo (GE) sequences and short tau inversion recovery sequence (STIR) sequences as well as dynamic contrast- enhanced T1-weighted acquisitions.Results. Three patients with a short disease history showed anterior and/or posterior subperiosteal infiltrations (''lava cleft phenomenon''), transcapsular infiltrations of juxta-articular muscle layers, which obscured the fasciae, and periarticular bone marrow edema. The eight patients with more advanced stages of sacroiliitis additionally showed abscess formation, sequestration, and erosion. At follow-up MR examination (n=7) under systemic antibiotic treatment, the morphologic characteristics showed progression (n=1), regression (n=4), unchanged findings (n=1), or a mixed response (n=1). Clinical improvement precedes resolution of the MR findings.Conclusions. Anterior and/or posterior subperiosteal infiltrations and transcapsular infiltrations of juxta-articular muscle layers were depicted in all patients. These MR imaging findings are characteristic of septic sacroiliitis and may be used to differentiate this entity from sacroiliitis in SpA. (orig.)

  18. MR investigation of recurrent cholesteatomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyon, D.; Chan, K.Y.; Attia, M.; Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Bobin, S.; Sterkers, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    Nine cases of recurrent petrous cholesteatomas have been studied by a 1.5 T MR unit. Gadolinium was injected in 1 case. In all cases, comparison between MR, CT and clinical findings were made. MR allows for accurate topographic study and assessment of cholesteatomas extension, in particular in the posterior fossa and skull base. Relationships with the internal carotid artery and the jugular vein are clearly depicted.

  19. Detection and staging of chondromalacia patellae: relative efficacies of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, J A; Chung, E M; Chandnani, V P; Kesling, K L; Christensen, K P; Null, R N; Radvany, M G; Hansen, M F

    1994-09-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a condition characterized by softening, fraying, and ulceration of patellar articular cartilage. We compare the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of conventional MR imaging, MR arthrography, and CT arthrography in detecting and staging this abnormality. Twenty-seven patients with pain in the anterior part of the knee were prospectively examined with MR imaging, including T1-weighted (650/16), proton density-weighted (2000/20), T2-weighted (2000/80), and spoiled two-dimensional gradient-recalled acquisition in the steady state (SPGR/)/35 degrees (51/10) with fat saturation pulse sequences. All were also examined with T1-weighted MR imaging after intraarticular injection of dilute gadopentetate dimeglumine and with double-contrast CT arthrography. Each imaging technique was evaluated independently by two observers, who reached a consensus interpretation. The signal characteristics of cartilage on MR images and contour abnormalities noted with all imaging techniques were evaluated and graded according to a modification of the classification of Shahriaree. Twenty-six of the 54 facets examined had chondromalacia shown by arthroscopy, which was used as the standard of reference. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of each imaging technique in the diagnosis of each stage of chondromalacia patellae were determined and compared by using the McNemar two-tailed analysis. Arthroscopy showed that 28 facets were normal. Grade 1 chondromalacia patellae was diagnosed only with MR and CT arthrography in two (29%) of seven facets. Intermediate (grade 2 or 3) chondromalacia patellae was detected in two (13%) of 15 facets with T1-weighted and SPGR MR imaging, in three (20%) of 15 facets with proton density-weighted MR imaging, in seven (47%) of 15 facets with T2-weighted MR imaging, in 11 (73%) of 15 facets with CT arthrography, and in 12 (80%) of 15 facets with MR arthrography. Grade 4 was detected in three (75%) of four facets with T1-, proton

  20. MR microscopy of articular cartilage at 1.5 T: orientation and site dependence of laminar structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Anno, Izumi; Echigo, Junko; Itai, Yuji; Haishi, Tomoyuki; Uematsu, Takaaki; Matsuda, Yoshimasa; Kose, Katsumi; Lang, Philipp

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective. To evaluate MR microscopic images of normal-appearing porcine hyaline cartilage (n=15) in vitro obtained with an MR microscope using an independent console system (MRMICS) at 1.5 T.Design and results. The MRMICS is a portable imaging system consisting of a radiofrequency system, gradient power supplies and a personal computer. The images from the MRMICS showed a laminar structure of porcine cartilage similar to the structure demonstrated with other MR imaging techniques. The laminar structures of the articular cartilage, were, however heterogeneous in respect of signal intensity and thickness, which varied according to the site resected. The MR laminar appearance was most comparable to the staining with Masson's trichrome for collagen.Conclusion. MRMICS is a useful add-on system for obtaining microscopic MR images of articular cartilage in vitro. (orig.)

  1. Quorum Sensing Regulation of Adhesion in Serratia Marcescens MG1 is surface dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labbate, M.; Zhu, H.; Thung, L.

    2007-01-01

    in a non-QS-controlled fashion. Therefore, the expression of these two genes appears to be cocontrolled by regulators other than the QS system for mediation of attachment to HCE cells. We also found that QS in S. marcescens regulates other potential cell surface adhesins, including exopolysaccharide...... and the outer membrane protein OmpX. We concluded that S. marcescens MG1 utilizes different regulatory systems and adhesins in attachment to biotic and abiotic surfaces and that QS is a main regulatory pathway in adhesion to an abiotic surface but not in adhesion to a biotic surface....

  2. k-t SENSE-accelerated Myocardial Perfusion MR Imaging at 3.0 Tesla - comparison with 1.5 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Sven; Schwitter, Juerg; Suerder, Daniel; Greenwood, John P.; Boesiger, Peter; Kozerke, Sebastian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the feasibility and diagnostic accuracy of high spatial resolution myocardial perfusion MR at 3.0 Tesla using k-space and time domain undersampling with sensitivity encoding (k-t SENSE). Materials and Methods The study was reviewed and approved by the local ethic review board. k-t SENSE perfusion MR was performed at 1.5 Tesla and 3.0 Tesla (saturation recovery gradient echo pulse sequence, repetition time/echo time 3.0ms/1.0ms, flip angle 15°, 5x k-t SENSE acceleration, spatial resolution 1.3×1.3×10mm3). Fourteen volunteers were studied at rest and 37 patients during adenosine stress. In volunteers, comparison was also made with standard-resolution (2.5×2.5×10mm3) 2x SENSE perfusion MR at 3.0 Tesla. Image quality, artifact scores, signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-enhancement ratios (CER) were derived. In patients, diagnostic accuracy of visual analysis to detect >50% diameter stenosis on quantitative coronary angiography was determined by receiver-operator-characteristics (ROC). Results In volunteers, image quality and artifact scores were similar for 3.0 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla, while SNR was higher (11.6 vs. 5.6) and CER lower (1.1 vs. 1.5, p=0.012) at 3.0 Tesla. Compared with standard-resolution perfusion MR, image quality was higher for k-t SENSE (3.6 vs. 3.1, p=0.04), endocardial dark rim artifacts were reduced (artifact thickness 1.6mm vs. 2.4mm, pTesla and 1.5 Tesla, respectively. Conclusions k-t SENSE accelerated high-resolution perfusion MR at 3.0 Tesla is feasible with similar artifacts and diagnostic accuracy as at 1.5 Tesla. Compared with standard-resolution perfusion MR, image quality is improved and artifacts are reduced. PMID:18936311

  3. Influence of riboflavin on the reduction of radionuclides by Shewanella oneidenis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkouk, Andrea; Law, Gareth T W; Rizoulis, Athanasios; Law, Katie; Renshaw, Joanna C; Morris, Katherine; Livens, Francis R; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2016-03-28

    Uranium (as UO2(2+)), technetium (as TcO4(-)) and neptunium (as NpO2(+)) are highly mobile radionuclides that can be reduced enzymatically by a range of anaerobic and facultatively anaerobic microorganisms, including Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to poorly soluble species. The redox chemistry of Pu is more complicated, but the dominant oxidation state in most environments is highly insoluble Pu(IV), which can be reduced to Pu(III) which has a potentially increased solubility which could enhance migration of Pu in the environment. Recently it was shown that flavins (riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide (FMN)) secreted by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can act as electron shuttles, promoting anoxic growth coupled to the accelerated reduction of poorly-crystalline Fe(III) oxides. Here, we studied the role of riboflavin in mediating the reduction of radionuclides in cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Our results demonstrate that the addition of 10 μM riboflavin enhances the reduction rate of Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), Pu(IV) to Pu(III) and to a lesser extent, Np(V) to Np(IV), but has no significant influence on the reduction rate of U(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Thus riboflavin can act as an extracellular electron shuttle to enhance rates of Tc(VII), Np(V) and Pu(IV) reduction, and may therefore play a role in controlling the oxidation state of key redox active actinides and fission products in natural and engineered environments. These results also suggest that the addition of riboflavin could be used to accelerate the bioremediation of radionuclide-contaminated environments.

  4. WO3 nanorods-modified carbon electrode for sustained electron uptake from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with suppressed biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Feng; Yuan, Shi-Jie; Li, Wen-Wei; Chen, Jie-Jie; Ko, Chi-Chiu; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • WO 3 nanorods-modified carbon paper was used as the anode of MFC. • WO 3 nanorods suppressed biofilm growth on the electrode surface. • Sustained electron transfer from cells to electrode via riboflavin was achieved. • C–WO 3 nanorods enable stable and efficient EET process in long-time operation. - Abstract: Carbon materials are widely used as electrodes for bioelectrochemical systems (BES). However, a thick biofilm tends to grow on the electrode surface during continuous operation, resulting in constrained transport of electrons and nutrients at the cell-electrode interface. In this work, we tackled this problem by adopting a WO 3 -nanorods modified carbon electrode (C–WO 3 nanorods), which completely suppressed the biofilm growth of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1. Moreover, the C–WO 3 nanorods exhibited high electric conductivity and strong response to riboflavin. These two factors together make it possible for the C–WO 3 nanorods to maintain a sustained, efficient process of electron transfer from the MR-1 planktonic cells. As a consequence, the microbial fuel cells with C–WO 3 nanorods anode showed more stable performance than the pure carbon paper and WO 3 -nanoparticles systems in prolonged operation. This work suggests that WO 3 nanorods have the potential to be used as a robust and biofouling-resistant electrode material for practical bioelectrochemical applications

  5. Metabolite ratios in 1H MR spectroscopic imaging of the prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobus, T.; Wright, A.J.; Weiland, E.; Heerschap, A.; Scheenen, T.W.J.

    2015-01-01

    In (1)H MR spectroscopic imaging ((1)H-MRSI) of the prostate the spatial distribution of the signal levels of the metabolites choline, creatine, polyamines, and citrate are assessed. The ratio of choline (plus spermine as the main polyamine) plus creatine over citrate [(Cho+(Spm+)Cr)/Cit] is derived

  6. MR investigation of recurrent cholesteatomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyon, D.; Chan, K.Y.; Attia, M.; Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Bobin, S.; Sterkers, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    Nine cases of recurrent petrous cholesteatomas have been studied by a 1.5 T MR unit. Gadolinium was injected in 1 case. In all cases, comparison between MR, CT and clinical findings were made. MR allows for accurate topographic study and assessment of cholesteatomas extension, in particular in the posterior fossa and skull base. Relationships with the internal carotid artery and the jugular vein are clearly depicted [fr

  7. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR Imaging of Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baik, Jun Hyun; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Young Ha; Chung, Soo Kyo [Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a renal ischemia-reperfusion injury. Twenty-four rabbits were randomly divided into four groups, including a sham operated group (n=3). Renal ischemia was induced for 30 minutes (group 1), 60 minutes (group 2) and 120 minutes (group 3). MR imaging was performed before ischemia as well as one hour, 24 hours, and 72 hours after reperfusion. A 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy was performed before ischemia, as well as 24 hours and 72 hours after reperfusion. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the T2WI, time-relative signal intensity (%RSI) curve on dynamic enhanced images, and relative left renal uptake (%) on DMSA scan were obtained and compared to the histologic findings. The SNR of the cortex on the T2WI changed significantly over the course of the reperfusion time (p<0.001), but was not significantly different among the ischemia groups. The area under the time-%RSI curve gradually decreased from cortex to inner medulla before ischemia, which was reversed and gradually increased after reperfusion. The areas under the time-%RSI curve of outer and inner medulla were significantly different among the ischemia groups (p=0.04, p=0.008). The relative renal uptake (%) of left kidney decreased significantly over the reperfusion time (p=0.03), and was also significantly different among the ischemia groups (p=0.005). Tubular cell necrosis was observed in 16 rabbits (76.2%). The histologic grades of group 3 were higher than those of group 1 and group 2 (p=0.002). Even in rabbits without tubular cell necrosis, the areas under the time-%RSI curves of the cortex, outer, and inner medulla after a 72 hour reperfusion time were significantly lower than those before ischemia (p=0.007, p=0.005, p=0.004). The results of this study suggest that dynamic enhanced MR imaging could be a useful tool for the evaluation of renal ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  8. Localized proton 1H MR spectroscopy in different regions of the human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Hong; Guo Qinglin; Zhang Guixiang

    1997-01-01

    To study the 1 H MR spectrum of normal human brain and the concentration and distribution of main metabolites using 1 H MR spectroscopy eighteen healthy human brains were examined by conventional 1.5 T MRI system. Volume of interest (VOI) included temporal lobe (mainly gray matter), thalamus, cerebellum as well as white matter. Proton MR spectroscopy can detect a variety of metabolites in human brain in vivo. The main detectable metabolites were N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA: at 2.02 ppm), cholineontaining compounds (Cho: at 3.2 ppm), phospho-creating and creatine (PCr + Cr: at 3.0 ppm), glutamine and glutamate (Gln + Glu: at 2.34-2.45 ppm), lipids (Lip: at 1.0 ppm) and lactate (Lac: at 1.3 ppm). the metabolite concentration varied in different parts of the brain. The relative signal intensity calculation showed that: NAA/Cho ratio is the highest in gray matter and lowest in cerebellun. Cr/Cho is the highest in cerebellum and lowest in white matter. The assumed creatine concentration is 10 mmol/L for gray matter and cerebellum, 11 mmol/L for white matter and thalanmus, the absolute concentration of NAA in the brain is about 13-23 mmol/L, and is higher in gray matter than in cerebellum and thalamus. Proton MR spectroscopy is a new noninvasive method which can be used to detect a number of chemical compounds pertaining to energy metabolism, free amino acids, fatty acids and neurotransmitters in the brain. It is useful to assess the cerebral biochemical changes in vivo both in healthy subjects and in patients with various brain disease

  9. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Marielle C.; McLaren, James E.; Reistetter, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usa...

  10. MR imaging of prostate cancer; MR-Tomographie des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A.; Scheidler, J.; Sommer, B.; Graser, A. [Radiologisches Zentrum Muenchen-Pasing (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, U.G. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Massmann, J. [Gemeinschaftspraxis Pathologie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    Accurate diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PC) is developing into an important health care issue in light of the high incidence of PC and the improvements in stage-adapted therapy. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the current role of MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis and staging of PC.Material and methods Pertinent literature was searched and evaluated to collect information on current clinical indications, study techniques, diagnostic value, and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Major indications for MR imaging of patients with supected PC are to define tumor location before biopsy when clinical or TRUS findings are inconclusive, and to provide accurate staging of histologically proven PC to ascertain effective therapy. Current MR imaging techniques for the evaluation of PC include multiplanar high-resolution T2-weighted FSE and T1-weighted SE sequences using combined endorectal and phased-array coils. Using these techniques, the reported accuracy of MR imaging for the diagnosis of extracapsular tumor extension ranges between 82 and 88% with sensitivities between 80 and 95%, and specificities between 82 and 93%. Typical MR findings of PC in different stages of disease, as well as diagnostic problems, such as chronic prostatitis, biopsy-related hemorrhage and therapy-related changes of prostatic tissue are discussed. In addition, the current perspectives and limitations of MR spectroscopy in PC are summarized. Current MR imaging techniques provide important diagnostic information in the pretherapeutic workup of PC including a high staging accuracy, and is superior to TRUS. (orig.) [German] Der Diagnostik des Prostatakarzinoms kommt wegen seiner hohen Inzidenz und den verbesserten stadienadaptierten Therapiemoeglichkeiten eine grosse Bedeutung zu. Dabei spielen bildgebende Verfahren bei den klinisch oft unzureichend diagnostizierbaren Faellen eine wesentliche Rolle fuer die praetherapeutische

  11. Fast high-resolution MR imaging using the snapshot-FLASH MR sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaei, D.; Haase, A.; Henrich, D.; Duhmke, E.

    1990-01-01

    Snapshot, fast low-angle short (FLASH) MR imaging using an accelerated FLASH-MR sequence provides MR images with measuring times far below 1 second. The short TE of this sequence prevents susceptibility artifacts in gradient-echo imaging. In this paper variations of the sequence are shown that provide high resolution images with T1-weighted IR, T2-weighted SE, and chemical shift (CHESS) contrast sequences. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A whole-body 2-T system (Bruker-Medizintechnik) were used in combination with a 60-cm gradient system (providing gradient strength of 5 mT/m) to study healthy volunteers. The measuring time for a 256 x 256 image matrix was 800 msec. This sequence has been used in combination with T1-weighted IR, T2-weighted SE, and CHESS variations

  12. CT and MR findings in retinoblastoma : correlation with histopathologic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Son Won; Han, Moon Hee; Chi, Je G.; Yu, Young Suk; Kim, Yeon Mee; Chung, Jin Haeng; Yu, In Kyu; Chang, Kee Hyun; Yeon, Kyung Mo

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate histopathologic correlation of the component of the lesion on CT and MR of retinoblastomas. Gross pathologic findings of 24 enucleated eyeballs in 24 patients with retinoblastomas were compared with preoperative CT (n=19) and MR (n=5) findings. In eight eyeballs, in which there were findings other than mass, histopathologic findings were reviewed and correlated with image findings. Retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage which were not detected on CT were demonstrated in two of eight eyeballs on histopathologic examination. In one eyeball, retinal detachment and subretinal effusion were detected on both CT and in a pathologic specimen. In two eyeballs with peripheral heterogeneous MR enhancement of the masses, tumor necrosis and calcification were demonstrated in the central non-emhancing portion of the mass, In two eveballs, linear soft tissue along the retina apart from the main mass were revealed as tumor spread along the retinal surface. In one patient, retinal thickening on MR was presumed to be an MR artifact and no lesion was found in the gross specimen. On CT, retinal detachment and subretinal hemorrhage associated with retinoblastoma can mimic mass, and tumor spread along the retinal surface can be seen as a linear retinal lesion. On MR, tumor necrosis and calcification can be a cause of heterogeneous enhancement

  13. Evaluation of patellar cartilage surface lesions: comparison of CT arthrography and fat-suppressed FLASH 3D MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daenen, B.R.; Ferrara, M.A.; Marcelis, S.; Dondelinger, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of fat-suppressed fast low-angle shot (FLASH) 3D MR imaging in the detection of patellar cartilage surface lesions in comparison with CT arthrography. Fifty patients, with or without symptoms of chondromalacia, were prospectively examined by CT arthrography and fat-suppressed 3D gradient-echo MR imaging. All MR examinations were evaluated by three observers, two of them reaching a consensus interpretation. The lesions were graded according to their morphology and their extent. The CT arthrography was considered as the reference examination. For both sets of observers, the final diagnosis of chondromalacia was obtained in 92.5 %. The specificity was 60 % on a patient-by-patient basis. Fissures were missed in 83 and 60 %, respectively, but were isolated findings only in 2.5 % of the cases. Considering ulcers involving more than 50 % of the cartilage thickness, 65 and 88 %, respectively, were recognized. Fat-suppressed FLASH 3D is an adequate pulse sequence for the detection of patellar cartilage ulcers. It can be applied on a routine clinical basis, but it does not show as many fissures as CT arthrography and is less precise for grading of lesions. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of patellar cartilage surface lesions: comparison of CT arthrography and fat-suppressed FLASH 3D MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daenen, B.R.; Ferrara, M.A.; Marcelis, S.; Dondelinger, R.F. [Department of Medical Imaging, University Hospital Sart-Tilman, Liege (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of fat-suppressed fast low-angle shot (FLASH) 3D MR imaging in the detection of patellar cartilage surface lesions in comparison with CT arthrography. Fifty patients, with or without symptoms of chondromalacia, were prospectively examined by CT arthrography and fat-suppressed 3D gradient-echo MR imaging. All MR examinations were evaluated by three observers, two of them reaching a consensus interpretation. The lesions were graded according to their morphology and their extent. The CT arthrography was considered as the reference examination. For both sets of observers, the final diagnosis of chondromalacia was obtained in 92.5 %. The specificity was 60 % on a patient-by-patient basis. Fissures were missed in 83 and 60 %, respectively, but were isolated findings only in 2.5 % of the cases. Considering ulcers involving more than 50 % of the cartilage thickness, 65 and 88 %, respectively, were recognized. Fat-suppressed FLASH 3D is an adequate pulse sequence for the detection of patellar cartilage ulcers. It can be applied on a routine clinical basis, but it does not show as many fissures as CT arthrography and is less precise for grading of lesions. (orig.) With 4 figs., 3 tabs., 21 refs.

  15. Cryovolcanism in the outer solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Cryovolcanism is defined as the extrusion of liquids and vapors of materials that would be frozen solid at the planetary surface temperatures of the icy bodies of the outer solar system. Active cryovolcanism is now known to occur on Saturn's moon Enceladus and on Neptune's moon Triton and is suspected on Jupiter's moon Europa, while evidence for past cryovolcanic activity is widespread throughout the outer solar system. This chapter examines the mechanisms and manifestations of cryovolcanism, beginning with a review of the materials that make up these unusual ‘‘magmas’’ and the means by which they might erupt and concluding with a volcanologist's tour of the farthest reaches of the solar system.

  16. MR IMAGING OF MENINGEAL CARCINOMATOSIS BY SYSTEMIC MALIGNANCY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马林; 于生元; 蔡幼铨; 梁丽; 郭行高

    2003-01-01

    Objective.To investigate the magnetic resonance(MR)features of meningeal carcinomatosis,and to improve the ability in understanding and diagnosing meningeal carcinomatosis by MR findings. Methods. Eleven cases with proven meningeal carcinomatosis were studied by conventional and Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging. The enhancement patterns and features,as well as the types of meningeal involvement,were retrospectively analyzed. Results. Conventional MR imaging showed no evident meningeal abnormalities. After the administration of Gd-DTPA,abnormal pia mater enhancement was detected in 9 cases,demonstrating as the continuous,thin,and lineal high signal intensity on the brain surface that could descend into the sulci. The abnormal pial enhancement occurred on the cortical surfaces of cerebellum,brainstem,and cerebrum. No abnormal enhancement in the subarach-noid space was found. Abnormal dura-arachnoid enhancement was seen in 3 cases,showing as the continuous,thick,and curvilineal high signal intensity over the convexities or in the tentorium without extension into the cortical sulci. Cerebral dura-arachnoid involvement was found in all 3 cases and one of them also showed abnormal enhancement in cerebellar dura-arachnoid and tentorium. Of the 11 cases,9 with pial involvement had abnormal cerebrospinal fluid(CSF)results,2 involving only the dura-arachnoid had normal CSF results. Conclusion. Meningeal carcinomatosis could be well demonstrated by Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging,and its type could be differentiated by the enhancement features. Combined with the clinical information,Gd-enhanced MR imaging may lead to the diagnosis and guide the therapy of meningeal carcinomatosis.

  17. MR microscopy of articular cartilage at 1.5 T: orientation and site dependence of laminar structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Anno, Izumi; Echigo, Junko; Itai, Yuji [Department of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8575 (Japan); Haishi, Tomoyuki; Uematsu, Takaaki; Matsuda, Yoshimasa; Kose, Katsumi [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba (Japan); Lang, Philipp [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Abstract Objective. To evaluate MR microscopic images of normal-appearing porcine hyaline cartilage (n=15) in vitro obtained with an MR microscope using an independent console system (MRMICS) at 1.5 T.Design and results. The MRMICS is a portable imaging system consisting of a radiofrequency system, gradient power supplies and a personal computer. The images from the MRMICS showed a laminar structure of porcine cartilage similar to the structure demonstrated with other MR imaging techniques. The laminar structures of the articular cartilage, were, however heterogeneous in respect of signal intensity and thickness, which varied according to the site resected. The MR laminar appearance was most comparable to the staining with Masson's trichrome for collagen.Conclusion. MRMICS is a useful add-on system for obtaining microscopic MR images of articular cartilage in vitro. (orig.)

  18. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging in a human brain PET/MR system in 50 patients—Current state of image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwenzer, N.F.; Stegger, L.; Bisdas, S.; Schraml, C.; Kolb, A.; Boss, A.; Müller, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The present work illustrates the current state of image quality and diagnostic accuracy in a new hybrid BrainPET/MR. Materials and methods: 50 patients with intracranial masses, head and upper neck tumors or neurodegenerative diseases were examined with a hybrid BrainPET/MR consisting of a conventional 3T MR system and an MR-compatible PET insert. Directly before PET/MR, all patients underwent a PET/CT examination with either [ 18 F]-FDG, [ 11 C]-methionine or [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC. In addition to anatomical MR scans, functional sequences were performed including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and proton-spectroscopy. Image quality score of MR imaging was evaluated using a 4-point-scale. PET data quality was assessed by evaluating FDG-uptake and tumor delineation with [ 11 C]-methionine and [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC. FDG uptake quantification accuracy was evaluated by means of ROI analysis (right and left frontal and temporo-occipital lobes). The asymmetry indices and ratios between frontal and occipital ROIs were compared. Results: In 45/50 patients, PET/MR examination was successful. Visual analysis revealed a diagnostic image quality of anatomical MR imaging (mean quality score T2 FSE: 1.27 ± 0.54; FLAIR: 1.38 ± 0.61). ASL and proton-spectroscopy was possible in all cases. In DTI, dental artifacts lead to one non-diagnostic dataset (mean quality score DTI: 1.32 ± 0.69; ASL: 1.10 ± 0.31). PET datasets of PET/MR and PET/CT offered comparable tumor delineation with [ 11 C]-methionine; additional lesions were found in 2/8 [ 68 Ga]-DOTATOC-PET in the PET/MR. Mean asymmetry index revealed a high accordance between PET/MR and PET/CT (1.5 ± 2.2% vs. 0.9 ± 3.6%; mean ratio (frontal/parieto-occipital) 0.93 ± 0.08 vs. 0.96 ± 0.05), respectively. Conclusions: The hybrid BrainPET/MR allows for molecular, anatomical and functional imaging with uncompromised MR image quality and a high accordance of PET results between PET/MR and PET

  19. Simultaneous PET/MR imaging in a human brain PET/MR system in 50 patients-Current state of image quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwenzer, N.F., E-mail: nina.schwenzer@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Stegger, L., E-mail: stegger@gmx.net [Department of Nuclear Medicine and European Institute for Molecular Imaging, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Bisdas, S., E-mail: sbisdas@gmail.com [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Schraml, C., E-mail: christina.schraml@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Kolb, A., E-mail: armin.kolb@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Laboratory for Preclinical Imaging and Imaging Technology of the Werner Siemens-Foundation, Department of Preclinical Imaging and Radiopharmacy, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Boss, A., E-mail: Andreas.Boss@usz.ch [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital Zuerich, Zuerich (Switzerland); Mueller, M., E-mail: mark.mueller@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: The present work illustrates the current state of image quality and diagnostic accuracy in a new hybrid BrainPET/MR. Materials and methods: 50 patients with intracranial masses, head and upper neck tumors or neurodegenerative diseases were examined with a hybrid BrainPET/MR consisting of a conventional 3T MR system and an MR-compatible PET insert. Directly before PET/MR, all patients underwent a PET/CT examination with either [{sup 18}F]-FDG, [{sup 11}C]-methionine or [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. In addition to anatomical MR scans, functional sequences were performed including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), arterial spin labeling (ASL) and proton-spectroscopy. Image quality score of MR imaging was evaluated using a 4-point-scale. PET data quality was assessed by evaluating FDG-uptake and tumor delineation with [{sup 11}C]-methionine and [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC. FDG uptake quantification accuracy was evaluated by means of ROI analysis (right and left frontal and temporo-occipital lobes). The asymmetry indices and ratios between frontal and occipital ROIs were compared. Results: In 45/50 patients, PET/MR examination was successful. Visual analysis revealed a diagnostic image quality of anatomical MR imaging (mean quality score T2 FSE: 1.27 {+-} 0.54; FLAIR: 1.38 {+-} 0.61). ASL and proton-spectroscopy was possible in all cases. In DTI, dental artifacts lead to one non-diagnostic dataset (mean quality score DTI: 1.32 {+-} 0.69; ASL: 1.10 {+-} 0.31). PET datasets of PET/MR and PET/CT offered comparable tumor delineation with [{sup 11}C]-methionine; additional lesions were found in 2/8 [{sup 68}Ga]-DOTATOC-PET in the PET/MR. Mean asymmetry index revealed a high accordance between PET/MR and PET/CT (1.5 {+-} 2.2% vs. 0.9 {+-} 3.6%; mean ratio (frontal/parieto-occipital) 0.93 {+-} 0.08 vs. 0.96 {+-} 0.05), respectively. Conclusions: The hybrid BrainPET/MR allows for molecular, anatomical and functional imaging with uncompromised MR image quality and a high accordance

  20. 3.0 T conventional hip MR and hip MR arthrography for the acetabular labral tears confirmed by arthroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Chun-Yan [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Jian-Quan [Department of Sports Medicine, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191,PR China (China); Zheng, Zhuo-Zhao, E-mail: zzhuozhao@aliyun.com [Department of Radiology, Peking University Third Hospital, 49 North Garden Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100191 (China); Ren, A.-Hong [Department of Radiology, Beijing Daxing Hospital, 26 West Huangcun Road, Daxing District, Beijing 102600 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • MR is the preferred imaging modality for diagnosing acetabular labral tears. • The diagnostic performance of MR arthrography are superior than conventional hip MR. • The hip MR arthrography is recommended for diagnosing acetabular labral lesions. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the value of hip MR for diagnosing acetabular labrum tears, and to further compare the diagnostic performances of conventional MR with MR arthrography in acetabular labrum tears. Methods: 90 patients undergoing both hip MR examination and subsequent hip arthroscopy were retrospectively evaluated. Of these patients, 34 accepted both conventional MR and MR arthrography; while the other 56 only underwent conventional MR examination. All hip MR images were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and further compared with the results of hip arthroscopy. Results: 59 of 90 patients were confirmed with acetabular labral tears by hip arthroscopy and 31 without tears. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of conventional MR for evaluating the acetabular labral tears were 61.0%, 77.4%, 83.7% and 51.1% (radiologist A), and 66.1%, 74.2%, 82.9% and 53.4% (radiologist B), respectively, with good consistency between the two observers (K = 0.645). The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of MR arthrography for assessing the acetabular labral tears were 90.5%, 84.6%, 90.5% and 84.6% (radiologist A), and 95.2%, 84.6%, 90.9% and 91.7% (radiologist B), respectively, with excellent good consistency between the two observers (K = 0.810). The sensitivity and NPV of MR arthrography for diagnosing the acetabular labral tears were significantly higher than those of conventional MR (both P < 0.05). Conclusion: Hip MR arthrography is a reliable evaluation modality for diagnosing the acetabular labral tears, and its diagnostic performance is superior to that of conventional MR at 3.0 T.

  1. MR of head and neck hemangiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilaniuk, L.T.; Zimmerman, R.A.; Gusnard, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper defines the MR characteristics of head and neck hemangiomas and to evaluate the role of MR in their diagnosis and management. Eighteen pediatric and young adult patients with head and neck hemangiomas (six neck, six face, three eyelid, two scalp, and one parotid) underwent high-field-strength 1.5-T MR imaging. Conventional spin-echo sequences with T1 and T2 weighting were performed. In addition, one-third of patients underwent MR angiography and gadolinium enhancement. The hemangiomas were isointense to muscle on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images

  2. Cell-secreted flavins bound to membrane cytochromes dictate electron transfer reactions to surfaces with diverse charge and pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akihiro; Kalathil, Shafeer; Deng, Xiao; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2014-07-11

    The variety of solid surfaces to and from which microbes can deliver electrons by extracellular electron transport (EET) processes via outer-membrane c-type cytochromes (OM c-Cyts) expands the importance of microbial respiration in natural environments and industrial applications. Here, we demonstrate that the bifurcated EET pathway of OM c-Cyts sustains the diversity of the EET surface in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 via specific binding with cell-secreted flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and riboflavin (RF). Microbial current production and whole-cell differential pulse voltammetry revealed that RF and FMN enhance EET as bound cofactors in a similar manner. Conversely, FMN and RF were clearly differentiated in the EET enhancement by gene-deletion of OM c-Cyts and the dependency of the electrode potential and pH. These results indicate that RF and FMN have specific binding sites in OM c-Cyts and highlight the potential roles of these flavin-cytochrome complexes in controlling the rate of electron transfer to surfaces with diverse potential and pH.

  3. MR imaging in chronic epicondylitis humeri radialis at 1.0 T: is Gd-DTPA administration useful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herber, S.; Kalden, P.; Kreitner, K.-F.; Thelen, M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of the diagnostic value and confidence of contrast-enhanced MR imaging in patients with lateral epicondylitis in comparison to clinical diagnosis. Material and Methods: 42 consecutive patients with clinically proven chronic lateral epicondylitis and 10 elbow joints of healthy controls have been examined on a 1.0 T MR-unit. Criteria for inclusion in the prospective study were: persistant pain and a failed conservative therapy. The MR protocol included STIR sequence, a native, T 2 -weighted, fat-supressed TSE sequence, and a flash-2-D sequence. Also, fat-supressed, T 1 -weighted SE sequences before and after administration of Gd-DTPA contrast media have been recorded. Results: In 39/42 patients the STIR sequence showed an increased SI of the common extensor tendom. Increased MR signal of the lateral collateral ligament combined with a thickening and a partial rupture or a full thickness tear have been observed in 15/42 cases. A bone marrow edema at the lateral epicondylus was noticed in 6 of the studied patients and a joint effusion in 18/42 patients. After administration of contrast media we noticed an average increase of SI by about 150%. However, enhanced MR imaging did not provide additional information. Conclusion: In MR imaging of chronic epicondylitis administration of gadolinium-DTPA does not provide additional information. (orig.) [de

  4. Design of a multimodal ({sup 1}H/{sup 23}Na MR/CT) anthropomorphic thorax phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Wiebke; Lietzmann, Florian; Schad, Lothar R.; Zoellner, Frank G. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine

    2017-08-01

    This work proposes a modular, anthropomorphic MR and CT thorax phantom that enables the comparison of experimental studies for quantitative evaluation of deformable, multimodal image registration algorithms and realistic multi-nuclear MR imaging techniques. A human thorax phantom was developed with insertable modules representing lung, liver, ribs and additional tracking spheres. The quality of human tissue mimicking characteristics was evaluated for {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na MR as well as CT imaging. The position of landmarks in the lung lobes was tracked during CT image acquisition at several positions during breathing cycles. {sup 1}H MR measurements of the liver were repeated after seven months to determine long term stability. The modules possess HU, T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} values comparable to human tissues (lung module: -756 ± 148 HU, artificial ribs: 218 ± 56 HU (low CaCO{sub 3} concentration) and 339 ± 121 (high CaCO{sub 3} concentration), liver module: T{sub 1} = 790 ± 28 ms, T{sub 2} = 65 ± 1 ms). Motion analysis showed that the landmarks in the lung lobes follow a 3D trajectory similar to human breathing motion. The tracking spheres are well detectable in both CT and MRI. The parameters of the tracking spheres can be adjusted in the following ranges to result in a distinct signal: HU values from 150 to 900 HU, T{sub 1} relaxation time from 550 ms to 2000 ms, T{sub 2} relaxation time from 40 ms to 200 ms. The presented anthropomorphic multimodal thorax phantom fulfills the demands of a simple, inexpensive system with interchangeable components. In future, the modular design allows for complementing the present set up with additional modules focusing on specific research targets such as perfusion studies, {sup 23}Na MR quantification experiments and an increasing level of complexity for motion studies.

  5. Infantile and congenital hip dislocation: Assessment by MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.D.; Wood, B.P.; Jackman, K.V.

    1986-01-01

    Dislocations of the infant hip, particularly those that responded poorly to standard treatment, were imaged using a 1.5-T MR imaging unit. Excellent detail of the cartilaginous structures of the femoral head, acetabulum, labrum, pulvinar, and capsular abnormalities was achieved. The most detailed images were obtained using a 3-inch surface coil. The shape and orientation of the acetabulum and femoral head cannot otherwise be as well evaluated, nor can their relationship be as clearly established. Technical factors and considerations of imaging with a 1.5-T magnet, the anatomy of the normal and dislocated hip, and observed variations in acetabular shape and orientation are discussed. MR imaging reliably demonstrates dislocation, and the prolonged T2 of synovial fluid produced an ''arthrogram'' effect, which is useful in the treatment of complicated hip dislocation

  6. Rapid outer-surface protein C DNA tattoo vaccination protects against Borrelia afzelii infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, A; Mason, L M K; Oei, A; de Wever, B; van der Poll, T; Bins, A D; Hovius, J W R

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia afzelii is the predominant Borrelia species causing Lyme borreliosis in Europe. Currently there is no human vaccine against Lyme borreliosis, and most research focuses on recombinant protein vaccines against Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto. DNA tattooing is a novel vaccination method that can be applied in a rapid vaccination schedule. We vaccinated C3H/HeN mice with B. afzelii strain PKo OspC (outer-surface protein C) using a codon-optimized DNA vaccine tattoo and compared this with recombinant protein vaccination in a 0-2-4 week vaccination schedule. We also assessed protection by DNA tattoo in a 0-3-6 day schedule. DNA tattoo and recombinant OspC vaccination induced comparable total IgG responses, with a lower IgG1/IgG2a ratio after DNA tattoo. Two weeks after syringe-challenge with 5 × 10(5) B. afzelii spirochetes most vaccinated mice had negative B. afzelii tissue DNA loads and all were culture negative. Furthermore, DNA tattoo vaccination in a 0-3-6 day regimen also resulted in negative Borrelia loads and cultures after challenge. To conclude, DNA vaccination by tattoo was fully protective against B. afzelii challenge in mice in a rapid vaccination protocol, and induces a favorable humoral immunity compared to recombinant protein vaccination. Rapid DNA tattoo is a promising vaccination strategy against spirochetes.

  7. MR imaging of neonatal cerebral hemorrhage at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McArdle, C.B.; Mehta, S.D.; Kulkarni, M.V.; Keeney, S.A.; Adcock, E.W. III.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-three intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH) were seen in 60 neonates. Both T1- weighted (spin-echo, repetition time/echo time = 600-800/20 msec) and heavily T2- weighted sequences (SE = 2,500/80, 160) were necessary for detecting hemorrhage. MR imaging failed to disclose seven of ten IVH because of an irregular and full choroid, seen on US. US failed to show six ICH because of their small size (≤0.5 cm) or peripheral site. Twelve extracerebral hemorrhages were missed on US, and only one of three was seen on CT. In five other cases there were signal features of hemosidering from earlier hemorrhage. MR imaging is the best modality for visualizing ICH because of its high sensitivity, specificity, and the persistence of hemorrhagic signal for weeks to months longer than on US or CT

  8. Hepatic Steatosis in Morbidly Obese Patients Undergoing Gastric Bypass Surgery: Assessment With Open-System 1H-MR Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werven, Jochem R.; Schreuder, Tim C. M. A.; Aarts, Edo O.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Meijer, Jos W. R.; Berends, Frits J.; Janssen, Ignace M. C.; Mulder, Chris J.; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Stoker, Jaap

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess, with histopathologic control, the use of open-system 1-T (1)H MR spectroscopy for the evaluation of hepatic steatosis in morbidly obese patients undergoing gastric bypass surgery. Patients underwent (1)H MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the assessment of steatosis

  9. Xylella fastidiosa outer membrane vesicles modulate plant colonization by blocking attachment to surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Michael; Zaini, Paulo A; Baccari, Clelia; Tran, Sophia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2014-09-16

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) of Gram-negative bacteria have been studied intensively in recent years, primarily in their role in delivering virulence factors and antigens during pathogenesis. However, the near ubiquity of their production suggests that they may play other roles, such as responding to envelope stress or trafficking various cargoes to prevent dilution or degradation by other bacterial species. Here we show that OMVs produced by Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-colonizing plant pathogenic bacterium, block its interaction with various surfaces such as the walls of xylem vessels in host plants. The release of OMVs was suppressed by the diffusible signal factor-dependent quorum-sensing system, and a X. fastidiosa ΔrpfF mutant in which quorum signaling was disrupted was both much more virulent to plants and less adhesive to glass and plant surfaces than the WT strain. The higher virulence of the ΔrpfF mutant was associated with fivefold higher numbers of OMVs recovered from xylem sap of infected plants. The frequency of attachment of X. fastidiosa to xylem vessels was 20-fold lower in the presence of OMVs than in their absence. OMV production thus is a strategy used by X. fastidiosa cells to adjust attachment to surfaces in its transition from adhesive cells capable of insect transmission to an "exploratory" lifestyle for systemic spread within the plant host which would be hindered by attachment. OMV production may contribute to the movement of other bacteria in porous environments by similarly reducing their contact with environmental constituents.

  10. Structured Light-Based Motion Tracking in the Limited View of an MR Head Coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikshøj, M.; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Conradsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions of the fac......A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions...

  11. Surface-based prostate registration with biomechanical regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Ven, Wendy J. M.; Hu, Yipeng; Barentsz, Jelle O.; Karssemeijer, Nico; Barratt, Dean; Huisman, Henkjan J.

    2013-03-01

    Adding MR-derived information to standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) images for guiding prostate biopsy is of substantial clinical interest. A tumor visible on MR images can be projected on ultrasound by using MRUS registration. A common approach is to use surface-based registration. We hypothesize that biomechanical modeling will better control deformation inside the prostate than a regular surface-based registration method. We developed a novel method by extending a surface-based registration with finite element (FE) simulation to better predict internal deformation of the prostate. For each of six patients, a tetrahedral mesh was constructed from the manual prostate segmentation. Next, the internal prostate deformation was simulated using the derived radial surface displacement as boundary condition. The deformation field within the gland was calculated using the predicted FE node displacements and thin-plate spline interpolation. We tested our method on MR guided MR biopsy imaging data, as landmarks can easily be identified on MR images. For evaluation of the registration accuracy we used 45 anatomical landmarks located in all regions of the prostate. Our results show that the median target registration error of a surface-based registration with biomechanical regularization is 1.88 mm, which is significantly different from 2.61 mm without biomechanical regularization. We can conclude that biomechanical FE modeling has the potential to improve the accuracy of multimodal prostate registration when comparing it to regular surface-based registration.

  12. Three-dimensional surface reconstruction imaging for evaluation of congenital heart disease from ECG-triggered MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vannier, M.W.; Laschinger, J.; Knapp, R.H.; Gutierrez, F.R.; Gronnemeyer, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Three-dimensional surface reconstruction images of the heart and great vessels were produced from contiguous sequences of electrocardiographically triggered MR images in 25 patients with congenital heart disease and in three healthy subjects. The imaging data were semiautomatically processed to separate the epicardial and endocardial surfaces and to define the outline of the enclosed blood volumes on a section by section basis. Images were obtained at 5-mm intervals in patients aged 3 months to 30 years with anomalies of the great vessels, tetralogy of Fallot, septal defects, pulmonary atresia, and other congenital heart malformations. The results were used to facilitate the surgical treatment of these patients and were compared with echocardiographic and cineradiographic studies, and with surgical findings or pathologic specimens. These surface reconstruction images were useful for communicating the results of diagnostic examinations to cardiac surgeons, for sizing and location of intracardiac defects, for imaging the pulmonary venous drainage, and for assessing regional and global function

  13. Rotational instability in the outer region of protoplanetary disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Tomohiro [Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nomura, Hideko; Takeuchi, Taku, E-mail: ono.t@kusastro.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

    2014-05-20

    We analytically calculate the marginally stable surface density profile for the rotational instability of protoplanetary disks. The derived profile can be utilized for considering the region in a rotating disk where radial pressure gradient force is comparable to the gravitational force, such as an inner edge, steep gaps or bumps, and an outer region of the disk. In this paper, we particularly focus on the rotational instability in the outer region of disks. We find that a protoplanetary disk with a surface density profile of similarity solution becomes rotationally unstable at a certain radius, depending on its temperature profile and a mass of the central star. If the temperature is relatively low and the mass of the central star is high, disks have rotationally stable similarity profiles. Otherwise, deviation from the similarity profiles of surface density could be observable, using facilities with high sensitivity, such as ALMA.

  14. Rotational instability in the outer region of protoplanetary disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Tomohiro; Nomura, Hideko; Takeuchi, Taku

    2014-01-01

    We analytically calculate the marginally stable surface density profile for the rotational instability of protoplanetary disks. The derived profile can be utilized for considering the region in a rotating disk where radial pressure gradient force is comparable to the gravitational force, such as an inner edge, steep gaps or bumps, and an outer region of the disk. In this paper, we particularly focus on the rotational instability in the outer region of disks. We find that a protoplanetary disk with a surface density profile of similarity solution becomes rotationally unstable at a certain radius, depending on its temperature profile and a mass of the central star. If the temperature is relatively low and the mass of the central star is high, disks have rotationally stable similarity profiles. Otherwise, deviation from the similarity profiles of surface density could be observable, using facilities with high sensitivity, such as ALMA.

  15. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region: implications for Dixon-based attenuation correction in PET/MR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Hansen, Adam E; Keller, Sune H; Fischer, Barbara M [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Rasmussen, Jacob H [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Law, Ian; Kjær, Andreas; Højgaard, Liselotte [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Lauze, Francois [Department of Computer Science, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark); Beyer, Thomas [Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20/4L, Vienna, A-1090 (Austria); Andersen, Flemming L [Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen East (Denmark)

    2015-03-11

    In the absence of CT or traditional transmission sources in combined clinical positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) systems, MR images are used for MR-based attenuation correction (MR-AC). The susceptibility effects due to metal implants challenge MR-AC in the neck region of patients with dental implants. The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and magnitude of subsequent PET image distortions following MR-AC. A total of 148 PET/MR patients with clear visual signal voids on the attenuation map in the dental region were included in this study. Patients were injected with [{sup 18}F]-FDG, [{sup 11}C]-PiB, [{sup 18}F]-FET, or [{sup 64}Cu]-DOTATATE. The PET/MR data were acquired over a single-bed position of 25.8 cm covering the head and neck. MR-AC was based on either standard MR-AC{sub DIXON} or MR-AC{sub INPAINTED} where the susceptibility-induced signal voids were substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. The MR-based volume of the susceptibility-induced signal voids on the MR-AC attenuation maps was between 1.6 and 520.8 mL. The corresponding/resulting bias of the reconstructed tracer distribution was localized mainly in the area of the signal void. The mean and maximum SUVs averaged across all patients increased after inpainting by 52% (± 11%) and 28% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility

  16. Evaluation of an automatic MR-based gold fiducial marker localisation method for MR-only prostate radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maspero, Matteo; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.; Zijlstra, Frank; Sikkes, Gonda G.; de Boer, Hans C. J.; Meijer, Gert J.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Viergever, Max A.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Seevinck, Peter R.

    2017-10-01

    An MR-only radiotherapy planning (RTP) workflow would reduce the cost, radiation exposure and uncertainties introduced by CT-MRI registrations. In the case of prostate treatment, one of the remaining challenges currently holding back the implementation of an RTP workflow is the MR-based localisation of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers (FMs), which is crucial for accurate patient positioning. Currently, MR-based FM localisation is clinically performed manually. This is sub-optimal, as manual interaction increases the workload. Attempts to perform automatic FM detection often rely on being able to detect signal voids induced by the FMs in magnitude images. However, signal voids may not always be sufficiently specific, hampering accurate and robust automatic FM localisation. Here, we present an approach that aims at automatic MR-based FM localisation. This method is based on template matching using a library of simulated complex-valued templates, and exploiting the behaviour of the complex MR signal in the vicinity of the FM. Clinical evaluation was performed on seventeen prostate cancer patients undergoing external beam radiotherapy treatment. Automatic MR-based FM localisation was compared to manual MR-based and semi-automatic CT-based localisation (the current gold standard) in terms of detection rate and the spatial accuracy and precision of localisation. The proposed method correctly detected all three FMs in 15/17 patients. The spatial accuracy (mean) and precision (STD) were 0.9 mm and 0.5 mm respectively, which is below the voxel size of 1.1 × 1.1 × 1.2 mm3 and comparable to MR-based manual localisation. FM localisation failed (3/51 FMs) in the presence of bleeding or calcifications in the direct vicinity of the FM. The method was found to be spatially accurate and precise, which is essential for clinical use. To overcome any missed detection, we envision the use of the proposed method along with verification by an observer. This will result in a

  17. Water and Volatiles in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasset, O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Guillot, T.; Fletcher, L. N.; Tosi, F.

    2017-10-01

    Space exploration and ground-based observations have provided outstanding evidence of the diversity and the complexity of the outer solar system. This work presents our current understanding of the nature and distribution of water and water-rich materials from the water snow line to the Kuiper Belt. This synthesis is timely, since a thorough exploration of at least one object in each region of the outer solar system has now been achieved. Next steps, starting with the Juno mission now in orbit around Jupiter, will be more focused on understanding the processes at work than on describing the general characteristics of each giant planet systems. This review is organized in three parts. First, the nature and the distribution of water and volatiles in giant and intermediary planets are described from their inner core to their outer envelopes. A special focus is given to Jupiter and Saturn, which are much better understood than the two ice giants (Uranus and Neptune) thanks to the Galileo and Cassini missions. Second, the icy moons will be discussed. Space missions and ground-based observations have revealed the variety of icy surfaces in the outer system. While Europa, Enceladus, and maybe Titan present past or even active tectonic and volcanic activities, many other moons have been dead worlds for more than 3 billion years. Ice compositions found at these bodies are also complex and it is now commonly admitted that icy surfaces are never composed of pure ices. A detailed review of the distribution of non-ice materials on the surfaces and in the tenuous atmospheres of the moons is proposed, followed by a more focused discussion on the nature and the characteristics of the liquid layers trapped below the cold icy crusts that have been suggested in the icy Galilean moons, and in Enceladus, Dione, and Titan at Saturn. Finally, the recent observations collected by Dawn at Ceres and New Horizons at Pluto, as well as the state of knowledge of other transneptunian objects

  18. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritts, H.M.; Craig, E.; Kyle, R.; Strefling, M.; Miller, D.; Heithoff, K.; Schellhas, K.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (1.5-T unit) was performed in over 600 shoulders to evaluate shoulder pain. Ultrasound (US) and arthrography were performed in over 100 patients. Surgery was performed in over 75 patients. MR imaging offers information not well evaluated with other modalities, including bony impingement, tendinitis, bursitis, and osseous abnormalities, such as primary arthritis, avascular necrosis, occult fractures, and tumors. US and MR findings correlate well with surgical findings for medium to large rotator cuff tears. MR imaging with T2 weighting is superior for differentiating small tears from associated tendinitis. An algorithm for cost-effective shoulder imaging integrating US, MR imaging, arthrography, and computed tomographic arthrography are presented

  19. [Technique and value of direct MR arthrography applying articular distraction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becce, Fabio; Wettstein, Michael; Guntern, Daniel; Mouhsine, Elyazid; Palhais, Nuno; Theumann, Nicolas

    2010-02-24

    Direct MR arthrography has a better diagnostic accuracy than MR imaging alone. However, contrast material is not always homogeneously distributed in the articular space. Lesions of cartilage surfaces or intra-articular soft tissues can thus be misdiagnosed. Concomitant application of axial traction during MR arthrography leads to articular distraction. This enables better distribution of contrast material in the joint and better delineation of intra-articular structures. Therefore, this technique improves detection of cartilage lesions. Moreover, the axial stress applied on articular structures may reveal lesions invisible on MR images without traction. Based on our clinical experience, we believe that this relatively unknown technique is promising and should be further developed.

  20. Disorders of migration and sulcation in infants and children: MR spectrum at 1.5 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, R.S.; Nixon, G.W.; Smoker, W.R.K.; Harnsberger, H.R.; Osborn, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    In 750 consecutive high-field-strength (1.5-T) pediatric brain MR imaging studies the authors encountered a fascinating spectrum of developmental anomalies of migration, gyration, and sulcation in 11 patients. Lesions were characterized by disorder anatomy but normal gray-matter signal. MR imaging was excellent in revealing pachygyria, polymicrogyria, agyria (lissencephaly), heterotopia, and schizencephaly, and in displaying associated development anomalies, such as agenesis of the corpus callosum, encephalocele, Chiari II malformation, septo-optic dysplasia, lobar holoprosencephaly, and unilateral megalencephaly. The improved demonstration of gray-matter abnormalities that is possible with high-field-strength MR imaging facilitates recognition of these lesions and associated anomalies

  1. Characterization of the first RF coil dedicated to 1.5 T MR guided radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogcarspel, Stan J.; Zijlema, Stefan E.; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; Kerkmeijer, Linda G. W.; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M.; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; Raaymakers, Bas W.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the attenuation characteristics of a novel radiofrequency (RF) coil, which is the first coil that is solely dedicated to MR guided radiotherapy with a 1.5 T MR-linac. Additionally, we investigated the impact of the treatment beam on the MRI performance of this RF coil. First, the attenuation characteristics of the RF coil were characterized. Second, we investigated the impact of the treatment beam on the MRI performance of the RF coil. We additionally demonstrated the ability of the anterior coil to attenuate returning electrons and thereby reducing the dose to the skin at the distal side of the treatment beam. Intensity modulated radiation therapy simulation of a clinically viable treatment plan for spinal bone metastasis shows a decrease of the dose to the planned tumor volume of 1.8% as a result of the MR coil around the patient. Ionization chamber and film measurements show that the anterior and posterior coil attenuate the beam homogeneously by 0.4% and 2.2%, respectively. The impact of the radiation resulted in a slight drop of the time-course signal-to-noise ratio and was dependent on imaging parameters. However, we could not observe any image artifacts resulting from this irradiation in any situation. In conclusion, the investigated MR-coil can be utilized for treatments with the 1.5 T-linac system. However, there is still room for improvement when considering both the dosimetric and imaging performance of the coil.

  2. Subtraction MR venography acquired from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography: Comparison with phase-contrast MR venography and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Jin Hee; Kim, Bum Soo; KIm, Bom Yi; Choi, Hyun Seok; Jung, So Lyung; Ahn, Kook Jin; Sung, Ji Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the image characteristics of subtraction magnetic resonance venography (SMRV) from time-resolved contrast-enhanced MR angiography (TRMRA) compared with phase-contrast MR venography (PCMRV) and single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography (CEMRV). Twenty-one patients who underwent brain MR venography (MRV) using standard protocols (PCMRV, CEMRV, and TRMRA) were included. SMRV was made by subtracting the arterial phase data from the venous phase data in TRMRA. Co-registration and subtraction of the two volume data was done using commercially available software. Image quality and the degree of arterial contamination of the three MRVs were compared. In the three MRVs, 19 pre-defined venous structures (14 dural sinuses and 5 cerebral veins) were evaluated. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the three MRVs were also compared. Single-phase contrast-enhanced MR venography showed better image quality (median score 4 in both reviewers) than did the other two MRVs (p < 0.001), whereas SMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) and PCMRV (median score 3 in both reviewers) had similar image quality (p ≥ 0.951). SMRV (median score 0 in both reviewers) suppressed arterial signal better than did the other MRVs (median score 1 in CEMRV, median score 2 in PCMRV, both reviewers) (p < 0.001). The dural sinus score of SMRV (median and interquartile range [IQR] 48, 43-50 for reviewer 1, 47, 43-49 for reviewer 2) was significantly higher than for PCMRV (median and IQR 31, 25-34 for reviewer 1, 30, 23-32 for reviewer 2) (p < 0.01) and did not differ from that of CEMRV (median and IQR 50, 47-52 for reviewer 1, 49, 45-51 for reviewer 2) (p = 0.146 in reviewer 1 and 0.123 in reviewer 2). The SNR and CNR of SMRV (median and IQR 104.5, 83.1-121.2 and 104.1, 74.9-120.5, respectively) were between those of CEMRV (median and IQR 150.3, 111-182.6 and 148.4, 108-178.2) and PCMRV (median and IQR 59.4, 49.2-74.9 and 53.6, 43.8-69.2). Subtraction magnetic

  3. Elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis of a pressure vessel with an axial outer surface flaw. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brocks, W.; Kuenecke, G.

    1989-06-01

    Continuing preceding investigations, a further elastic-plastic finite element analysis of a test vessel with a semi-elliptical axial outer surface crack has been performed. The variations of J and CTOD along the crack front and the stress state in the vicinity of the crack are presented. The applicability of analytical approaches to determine J is examined. The FE results are used to analyze the experimental data with respect to the validity of J-controlled crack growth. Local J R -curves of the surface flaw are compared with J R -curves of various specimens of different geometries. Again, it became evident that the local ductile crack growth and, especially, the developing 'canoe shape' of the surface crack cannot be described by a single resistance curve which is assumed to be a material property. A method described in a previous report to predict the ductile crack growth by using local J R -curves which depend on the triaxiality of the stress state did not result in a satisfactory outcome, in the present case. The presumed reasons will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of mesial temporal lobe epilepsies treated with Gamma knife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, Milan; Dezortova, Monika [MR Unit, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Videnska 1958/9, 140 21 Prague (Czech Republic); Center for Cell Therapy and Tissue Repair, V Uvalu 84, 150 00 Prague (Czech Republic); Liscak, Roman; Vymazal, Josef; Vladyka, Vilibald [Department of Stereotactic and Radiation Neurosurgery, Hospital Na Homolce, 151 19, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2003-05-01

    Proton MR spectroscopy was used to observe long-term post-irradiation metabolic changes in epileptogenic tissue and in the contralateral parts of the brain which are not available with conventional imaging methods. We studied these changes in the temporal lobe in six patients, following radiosurgery on the amygdala and hippocampus. {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy at 1.5 T with short and long echo times (TE=10 and 135 ms) were used together with standard MR imaging sequences (T1-, T2-weighted). The treatment was performed by Leksell Gamma Knife with a dose of 50 Gy to the center and a 50% isodose to the margin of the target, represented by the mean volume of approximately 7.5 ml. Magnetic resonance imaging and MR spectroscopy examinations were performed at least once per year for 3 years. The most significant changes in spectra were observed approximately 1 year after the irradiation when edema in irradiated area was observed and strong signal of lipids was identified. Later, edema and lipid signals disappeared and follow-up was characterized by a decrease of NAA, Cr, and Cho concentrations in the ipsilateral region of the brain to the irradiation (LCModel calculation from voxel of interest 3.8-4.5 ml positioned into the centrum of target volume). The concentration of NAA, Cr, and Cho after radiosurgery was significantly different from control values (p<0.05) and also from concentrations in the contralateral part of the brain (p<0.05). In the contralateral part, the concentration of NAA was significantly increased (p<0.05) (NAA: before treatment 8.81, after treatment 11.33 mM). No radiotoxic changes were observed in the contralateral part of the brain or behind the area of target volume. The MR spectroscopy findings precluded MRI observation and MRS results completed data about the development of radiotoxic changes in the target volume. (orig.)

  5. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author)

  6. Pseudodynamic MR imaging of temporomandibular joint disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasato, Tatsuhiko; Ehara, Shigeru (Iwate Medical Coll., Morioka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has now been established as a procedure of choice in the evaluation of TMJ disorders. In this study, we evaluated the dynamics of TMJ motion on MR imaging, which resembles arthrography. Sixty-eight TMJs in 38 symptomatic patients and one healthy volunteer were examined using pseudodynamic images with gradient echo sequences using a 0.5 Tesla MR unit and 8 cm circular planar surface coil. For depiction of each compartment of the meniscus, the optimum sequence was 200/15/2 (TR/TE/excitations) with 50 deg or 60 deg flip angle in gradient refocused acquisition in steady-state (GRASS) sequences. Three contiguous slices on sagittal MR images were routinely obtained at 14-18 different phases of the opening cycle and displayed in closed-loop cine fashion. Internal derangement was observed in 57% of 68 joints. The most common type was anterior meniscal displacement without reduction. Sideway and rotational displacements, observed in 10% each, were noted on both sagittal multislice images and axial reference images. As a pseudodynamic MR technique, jaw movement specifically designed to check bite procedure to adjust splints is useful for detecting the exact time of meniscal redisplacement on the second click. After conservative therapy for arthrosis, pseudodynamic MR provided information on changes in the meniscus and condylar relationship. Pseudodynamic MR with multiple phases is suitable for evaluating subtle motion abnormality of the meniscus and for post-therapeutic monitoring. (author).

  7. Feasibility of MR urography in patients with urinary diversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battal, Bilal; Kocaoglu, Murat; Ilica, Turan; Akgun, Veysel; Aydur, Emin; Dayanc, Murat

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the diagnostic value of MR urography and to compare the T2- and T1-weighted MR urography techniques in patients with urinary diversion. We retrospectively reviewed 19 MR urograms in 14 patients (13 male and one female, 8–77 years old, mean age: 54.2) with urinary diversion. Magnetic resonance urography examinations were performed with 1.5-T MR scanners. In addition to T2- and T1-weighted MR urography techniques, conventional T1- and T2-weighted axial and coronal sequences were also obtained. Collecting systems were evaluated in five segments (right proximal and distal collecting system, left proximal and distal collecting system and conduit or reservoir). Imaging features of the urinary collecting systems were evaluated with T2- and T1-weighted MR urography images. The clinical, laboratory data and follow-up imaging findings were regarded as standard. A cross table was formed to determine sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MR urography techniques. T2-weighted MR urography, T1-weighted MR urography and combination of these two techniques could demonstrate 89.01, 87.65 and 93.83% of all collecting system segments, respectively. For the detection of the pathologic urinary segments, sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100, 95.29 and 95.6% in T2-weighted MR urography and 100, 93.42 and 93.82% in T1-weighted MR urography, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 100% in combined T2- and T1-weighted MR urography technique. Magnetic resonance urography is an effective imaging method for the evaluation of the urinary system in patients with urinary diversion. T2-weighted MR urography alone has high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, does not require intravenous contrast medium and can be obtained in 3–5 min. However, T1-weighted MR urography may provide additional information in some cases.

  8. Cu-doped TiO2 nanoparticles enhance survival of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under Ultraviolet Light (UV) exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Bing; Zhuang, Wei-Qin; Sahu, Manoranjan; Biswas, Pratim; Tang, Yinjie J.

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that photocatalytic TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be used as an efficient anti-microbial agent under UV light due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), while Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal-reducing bacterium highly susceptible to UV radiation. Interestingly, we found that the presence of Cu-doped TiO 2 NPs in the cultural medium dramatically increased the survival rates (based on colony-forming unit) of strain MR-1 by over 10,000-fold (incubation without shaking) and ∼ 200 fold (incubation with shaking) after a 2-h exposure to UV light. Gene expression results (via qPCR measurement) indicated that the DNA repair gene recA in MR-1 was significantly induced by UV exposure (indicating cellular damage under UV stress), but the influence of NPs on recA expression was not statistically evident. Plausible explanations to NP attenuation of UV stresses are: 1. TiO 2 based NPs are capable of scattering and absorbing UV light and thus create a shading effect to protect MR-1 from UV radiation; 2. more importantly, Cu-doped TiO 2 NPs can co-agglomerate with MR-1 to form large flocs that improves cells' survival against the environmental stresses. This study improves our understanding of NP ecological impacts under natural solar radiation and provides useful insights to application of photocatalytic-NPs for bacterial disinfection.

  9. Chondromalacia patellae: diagnosis with MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, T R; Kier, R; Lynch, K J; Jokl, P

    1992-01-01

    Most previous studies of MR imaging for detection of chondromalacia have used T1-weighted images. We correlated findings on axial MR images of the knee with arthroscopic findings to determine MR findings of chondromalacia patellae on T2-weighted and proton density-weighted images. The study population included 52 patients who had MR examination of the knee with a 1.5-T unit and subsequent arthroscopy, which documented chondromalacia patellae in 29 patients and normal cartilage in 23. The patellar cartilage was assessed retrospectively for MR signal and contour characteristics. MR diagnosis based on the criteria of focal signal or focal contour abnormality on either the T2-weighted or proton density-weighted images yielded the highest correlation with the arthroscopic diagnosis of chondromalacia. When these criteria were used, patients with chondromalacia were detected with 86% sensitivity, 74% specificity, and 81% accuracy. MR diagnosis based on T2-weighted images alone was more sensitive and accurate than was diagnosis based on proton density-weighted images alone. In conclusion, most patients with chondromalacia patellae have focal signal or focal contour defects in the patellar cartilage on T2-weighted MR images. These findings are absent in most patients with arthroscopically normal cartilage.

  10. NMR structure of temporin-1 ta in lipopolysaccharide micelles: mechanistic insight into inactivation by outer membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathi Saravanan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs play important roles in the innate defense mechanism. The broad spectrum of activity of AMPs requires an efficient permeabilization of the bacterial outer and inner membranes. The outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria is made of a specialized lipid called lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The LPS layer is an efficient permeability barrier against anti-bacterial agents including AMPs. As a mode of protection, LPS can induce self associations of AMPs rendering them inactive. Temporins are a group of short-sized AMPs isolated from frog skin, and many of them are inactive against Gram negative bacteria as a result of their self-association in the LPS-outer membrane. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using NMR spectroscopy, we have determined atomic resolution structure and characterized localization of temporin-1Ta or TA (FLPLIGRVLSGIL-amide in LPS micelles. In LPS micelles, TA adopts helical conformation for residues L4-I12, while residues F1-L3 are found to be in extended conformations. The aromatic sidechain of residue F1 is involved in extensive packing interactions with the sidechains of residues P3, L4 and I5. Interestingly, a number of long-range NOE contacts have been detected between the N-terminal residues F1, P3 with the C-terminal residues S10, I12, L13 of TA in LPS micelles. Saturation transfer difference (STD NMR studies demonstrate close proximity of residues including F1, L2, P3, R7, S10 and L13 with the LPS micelles. Notably, the LPS bound structure of TA shows differences with the structures of TA determined in DPC and SDS detergent micelles. SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that TA, in LPS lipids, forms helical oligomeric structures employing N- and C-termini residues. Such oligomeric structures may not be translocated across the outer membrane; resulting in the inactivation of the AMP. Importantly, the results of our studies will be useful for the development of antimicrobial agents with a

  11. MR findings of facial nerve on oblique sagittal MRI using TMJ surface coil: normal vs peripheral facial nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yong Ok; Lee, Myeong Jun; Lee, Chang Joon; Yoo, Jeong Hyun

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the findings of normal facial nerve, as seen on oblique sagittal MRI using a TMJ (temporomandibular joint) surface coil, and then to evaluate abnormal findings of peripheral facial nerve palsy. We retrospectively reviewed the MR findings of 20 patients with peripheral facial palsy and 50 normal facial nerves of 36 patients without facial palsy. All underwent oblique sagittal MRI using a T MJ surface coil. We analyzed the course, signal intensity, thickness, location, and degree of enhancement of the facial nerve. According to the angle made by the proximal parotid segment on the axis of the mastoid segment, course was classified as anterior angulation (obtuse and acute, or buckling), straight and posterior angulation. Among 50 normal facial nerves, 24 (48%) were straight, and 23 (46%) demonstrated anterior angulation; 34 (68%) showed iso signal intensity on T1W1. In the group of patients, course on the affected side was either straight (40%) or showed anterior angulation (55%), and signal intensity in 80% of cases was isointense. These findings were similar to those in the normal group, but in patients with post-traumatic or post-operative facial palsy, buckling, of course, appeared. In 12 of 18 facial palsy cases (66.6%) in which contrast materials were administered, a normal facial nerve of the opposite facial canal showed mild enhancement on more than one segment, but on the affected side the facial nerve showed diffuse enhancement in all 14 patients with acute facial palsy. Eleven of these (79%) showed fair or marked enhancement on more than one segment, and in 12 (86%), mild enhancement of the proximal parotid segment was noted. Four of six chronic facial palsy cases (66.6%) showed atrophy of the facial nerve. When oblique sagittal MR images are obtained using a TMJ surface coil, enhancement of the proximal parotid segment of the facial nerve and fair or marked enhancement of at least one segment within the facial canal always suggests pathology of

  12. The use of MR B+1 imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Cornelis A T van den; Bartels, Lambertus W; Bergen, Bob van den; Kroeze, Hugo; Leeuw, Astrid A C de; Kamer, Jeroen B van de; Lagendijk, Jan J W

    2006-01-01

    In this study, MR B + 1 imaging is employed to experimentally verify the validity of FDTD simulations of electromagnetic field patterns in human anatomies. Measurements and FDTD simulations of the B + 1 field induced by a 3 T MR body coil in a human corpse were performed. It was found that MR B + 1 imaging is a sensitive method to measure the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field inside a human anatomy with a precision of approximately 3.5%. A good correlation was found between the B + 1 measurements and FDTD simulations. The measured B + 1 pattern for a human pelvis consisted of a global, diagonal modulation pattern plus local B + 1 heterogeneties. It is believed that these local B + 1 field variations are the result of peaks in the induced electric currents, which could not be resolved by the FDTD simulations on a 5 mm 3 simulation grid. The findings from this study demonstrate that B + 1 imaging is a valuable experimental technique to gain more knowledge about the dielectric interaction of RF fields with the human anatomy

  13. Evaluation of bone marrow by opposed phase T1-weighted images and enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tanabe, Yoshihiro; Miyashita, Tsuguhiro; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Horiuchi, Junichi; Nomura, Takeo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1994-01-01

    We investigated bone marrow in a control group, cases of aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients by examining T1-weighted (T1W1), short T1 inversion recovery (STIR), opposed phase T1W1 (op-T1W1) and Gd-DTPA enhanced op-T1W1 images obtained by 0.5 T MRI. Bone marrow was classified into four types based on MR findings. Normal marrow showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and STIR images without enhancement (I). Fatty marrow, which showed high intensity on T1W1 and op-T1W1 images was observed in aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients (II). Hematopoietic marrow (III) showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and enhanced, while active hematopoietic marrow (IV) revealed high intensity on both STIR and op-T1W1 images and was enhanced following Gd-DTPA infusion. Aplastic anemia of moderate grade included types II, III and IV. Enhanced MR was needed to differentiate between types I and III since both types showed low intensity on op-T1W1 images. Furthermore, type IV was considered as hyperplastic compared with type III. Enhanced MR and op-T1W1 images were useful in evaluating hematopoiesis of bone marrow. (author)

  14. Evaluation of bone marrow by opposed phase T1-weighted images and enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Yasuo; Tanabe, Yoshihiro; Miyashita, Tsuguhiro; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Horiuchi, Junichi; Nomura, Takeo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo (Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    We investigated bone marrow in a control group, cases of aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients by examining T1-weighted (T1W1), short T1 inversion recovery (STIR), opposed phase T1W1 (op-T1W1) and Gd-DTPA enhanced op-T1W1 images obtained by 0.5 T MRI. Bone marrow was classified into four types based on MR findings. Normal marrow showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and STIR images without enhancement (I). Fatty marrow, which showed high intensity on T1W1 and op-T1W1 images was observed in aplastic anemia and post-irradiation patients (II). Hematopoietic marrow (III) showed low intensity on op-T1W1 and enhanced, while active hematopoietic marrow (IV) revealed high intensity on both STIR and op-T1W1 images and was enhanced following Gd-DTPA infusion. Aplastic anemia of moderate grade included types II, III and IV. Enhanced MR was needed to differentiate between types I and III since both types showed low intensity on op-T1W1 images. Furthermore, type IV was considered as hyperplastic compared with type III. Enhanced MR and op-T1W1 images were useful in evaluating hematopoiesis of bone marrow. (author).

  15. 77 FR 65545 - Mr. Jesse S. Capel and Mr. Hilton J. Cochran; EWP LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Project No. 4815-009] Mr. Jesse S. Capel and Mr. Hilton J. Cochran; EWP LLC; Notice of Transfer of Exemption 1. By application filed on July 30, 2012 and supplemented on August 14, 2012, Mr. Jesse S. Capel and Mr. Hilton J. Cochran and EWP...

  16. Role of endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging in defining treatable intraprostatic tumor foci in prostate cancer: Quantitative analysis of imaging contour compared to whole-mount histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar, Mekhail; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Jung, Adam J.; Noworolski, Susan M.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Kurhanewicz, John; Roach, Mack; Carroll, Peter R.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging in defining the contour of treatable intraprostatic tumor foci in prostate cancer, since targeted therapy requires accurate target volume definition. Materials and methods: We retrospectively identified 20 patients with prostate cancer who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging prior to radical prostatectomy and subsequent creation of detailed histopathological tumor maps from whole-mount step sections. Two experienced radiologists independently reviewed all MR images and electronically contoured all suspected treatable (⩾0.5 cm 3 ) tumor foci. Deformable co-registration in MATLAB was used to calculate the margin of error between imaging and histopathological contours at both capsular and non-capsular surfaces and the treatment margin required to ensure at least 95% tumor coverage. Results: Histopathology showed 17 treatable tumor foci in 16 patients, of which 8 were correctly identified by both readers and an additional 2 were correctly identified by reader 2. For all correctly identified lesions, both readers accurately identified that tumor contacted the prostatic capsule, with no error in contour identification. On the non-capsular border, the median distance between the imaging and histopathological contour was 1.4 mm (range, 0–12). Expanding the contour by 5 mm at the non-capsular margin included 95% of tumor volume not initially covered within the MR contour. Conclusions: Endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging can be used to accurately contour treatable intraprostatic tumor foci; adequate tumor coverage is achieved by expanding the treatment contour at the non-capsular margin by 5 mm

  17. Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosa, John

    2014-03-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

  18. MR of experimental cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaPaz, R.; Steinberg, G.; Rocklage, S.; Glover, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on MR imaging of cerebral ischemia and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists in an animal model. Forty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent 1-hour transorbital ICA-MCA-ACA occlusion and pretreatment or immediate posttreatment with systemic dextromethorphan (DM, n = 14), dextrorphan (DX, n = 14), or normal saline (NS, n = 16). Serial MR studies (1.5 T) were performed 1--6 hours after occlusion with T1- and T2-weighted spinecho, IVIM (b = 1,352), gradient recalled acquisition in a steady-state, and chemical shift sequences (for magnetic susceptibility, T2* and T2') and DyDTPA-BMA intravenous contrast material (Salutar). Spatial correlation between MR findings, histologic findings (ischemic neuronal damage), and regional cerebral blood flow (microspheres) was done

  19. Investigating the generalisation of an atlas-based synthetic-CT algorithm to another centre and MR scanner for prostate MR-only radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Jonathan J.; Dowling, Jason A.; Kelly, Charles G.; McKenna, Jill; Johnstone, Emily; Speight, Richard; Henry, Ann; Greer, Peter B.; McCallum, Hazel M.

    2017-12-01

    There is increasing interest in MR-only radiotherapy planning since it provides superb soft-tissue contrast without the registration uncertainties inherent in a CT-MR registration. However, MR images cannot readily provide the electron density information necessary for radiotherapy dose calculation. An algorithm which generates synthetic CTs for dose calculations from MR images of the prostate using an atlas of 3 T MR images has been previously reported by two of the authors. This paper aimed to evaluate this algorithm using MR data acquired at a different field strength and a different centre to the algorithm atlas. Twenty-one prostate patients received planning 1.5 T MR and CT scans with routine immobilisation devices on a flat-top couch set-up using external lasers. The MR receive coils were supported by a coil bridge. Synthetic CTs were generated from the planning MR images with (sCT1V ) and without (sCT) a one voxel body contour expansion included in the algorithm. This was to test whether this expansion was required for 1.5 T images. Both synthetic CTs were rigidly registered to the planning CT (pCT). A 6 MV volumetric modulated arc therapy plan was created on the pCT and recalculated on the sCT and sCT1V . The synthetic CTs’ dose distributions were compared to the dose distribution calculated on the pCT. The percentage dose difference at isocentre without the body contour expansion (sCT-pCT) was Δ D_sCT=(0.9 +/- 0.8) % and with (sCT1V -pCT) was Δ D_sCT1V=(-0.7 +/- 0.7) % (mean  ±  one standard deviation). The sCT1V result was within one standard deviation of zero and agreed with the result reported previously using 3 T MR data. The sCT dose difference only agreed within two standard deviations. The mean  ±  one standard deviation gamma pass rate was Γ_sCT = 96.1 +/- 2.9 % for the sCT and Γ_sCT1V = 98.8 +/- 0.5 % for the sCT1V (with 2% global dose difference and 2~mm distance to agreement gamma criteria). The one voxel body contour

  20. Tolerance of magnetic resonance imaging in children and adolescents performed in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an open design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamietz, B.; Cavallaro, A.; Radkow, T.; Alibek, S.; Bautz, W.A.; Holter, W.; Staatz, G.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tolerance of MR examinations in children and adolescents performed in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an expanded bore diameter. Method and Materials: 163 patients, ages 4 to 25, underwent MR examinations in a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an open design (MAGNETOM Espree, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany), characterized by a compact length of 125 cm and an expanded 70 cm bore diameter. MR imaging of the brain was carried out in most cases (78.5 %), followed by examinations of the spinal canal (9.8 %), the extremities (9.2 %) and the neck (2.5 %). The patients were divided into four age groups and the success rate, motion artifacts and diagnostic quality of the MR examinations were assessed using a 3-grade scale. Results: In 119 of 163 patients (73.0 %), MR examination was possible without any motion artifacts. With respect to the different age groups, 41.7 % of the 4 - 7-year-old children, 67.6 % of the 8 - 10-year-old children, 84.1 % of the 11 - 16-year-old children and 95.8 % of the patients older than 17 showed tolerance grade I without motion artifacts and excellent diagnostic image quality. In 39 of 163 children (23.9 %), the MR images showed moderate motion artifacts but had sufficient diagnostic quality. With regard to the different age groups, 52.8 % of the 4 - 7-year-old children, 26.5 % of the 8 - 10-year-old children, 15.9 % of the 11 - 16-year-old children and none of the patients older than 17 showed tolerance grade II with moderate motion artifacts and sufficient diagnostic image quality. In only 4 of 124 children 10 years old, the MR examination was not feasible and had to be repeated under sedation. Conclusion: Pediatric MR imaging using a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner with an open design can be conducted in children and adolescents with excellent acceptance. The failure rate of 3.0 % of cases for pediatric MR imaging is comparable to that of a conventional low-field open MR scanner. (orig.)

  1. MR-guided direct arthrography of the glenohumeral joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soh, E.; Bearcroft, P.W.P.; Graves, M.J.; Black, R.; Lomas, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided direct arthrography of the glenohumeral joint with a 1.5 T MR system, performing the entire procedure in a single MR examination. Materials and methods: MR-guided direct arthrography was performed on 11 patients. MR imaging guidance and interactive MR fluoroscopy, with in-room control and display system, were used for needle placement and contrast medium injection. The outcome measures were success or failure of joint puncture, the time taken for introduction of contrast medium, and the diagnostic quality of the subsequent MR arthrography images. Results: Contrast medium was successfully instilled into the joint and diagnostic quality MR arthrography images were obtained in all cases. The median time from initial placement of the skin marker to introduction of the contrast medium was 17 min (range 11-29 min). There were no immediate post-procedure complications. Conclusion: Accurate needle placement is feasible in a single MR examination on a commercial 1.5 T closed-bore MR system, using an in-room control and display system together with interactive fluoroscopic imaging, and this was used to provide direct MR arthrography in this study

  2. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Joerg [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Osteology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Bernt, Reinhard [Department of Radiology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: reinhard.bernt@wgkk.sozvers.at; Seeger, Thomas [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Weissenbaeck, Alexander [Department of Trauma Surgery, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Tuechler, Heinrich [Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Hematology, Hanusch Hospital, Heinrich Collin-Strasse 30, A-1140 Vienna (Austria); Resnick, Donald [Department of Radiology, VA Medical Center, UCSD, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr, San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome.

  3. MR-imaging of anterior tibiotalar impingement syndrome: Agreement, sensitivity and specificity of MR-imaging and indirect MR-arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Joerg; Bernt, Reinhard; Seeger, Thomas; Weissenbaeck, Alexander; Tuechler, Heinrich; Resnick, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To clarify the role of MR-imaging in the diagnosis of anterior ankle impingement syndromes. Materials and methods: We prospectively examined 51 consecutive patients with chronic ankle pain by MR-imaging. Arthroscopy was performed in 29 patients who previously underwent non-enhanced MR-imaging; in 11 patients, indirect MR-arthrography additionally was performed. MR-examinations were correlated with clinical findings; MR and arthroscopy scores were statistically compared, agreement was measured. Results: Arthroscopy demonstrated granulation tissue in the lateral gutter (38%) and anterior recess (31%), lesions of the anterior tibiofibular (31%) and the anterior talofibular ligament (21%) as well as intraarticular bodies (10%). Stenosing tenosynovitis and a ganglionic cyst were revealed as extraarticular causes for chronic ankle pain by MR-examination (17%). Agreement of MR-imaging and arthroscopy was fair for the anterior talofibular ligament and the anterior joint cavity (kappa 0.40). Major discrepancy was found for non-enhanced MR scans (kappa 0.49) when compared with indirect MR-arthrography (kappa 0.03) in the anterior cavity. The sensitivity for lesions of the anterior talofibular and calcaneofibular ligament and the anterior cavity (0.91-0.87) detected by MR-imaging was superior in comparison to lesions of the anterior tibiofibular ligament and anteromedial cavity (0.50-0.24). Conclusion: MR-imaging provides additional information about the mechanics of chronic ankle impingement rather than an accurate diagnosis of this clinical entity. The method is helpful in differentiating extra- from intra-articular causes of ankle impingement. Indirect MR-arthrography has little or no additional value in patients with ankle impingement syndrome

  4. Can symptomatic acromioclavicular joints be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Jung Han; Cha, Seong Sook; Park, Young Mi; Park, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Woo; Oh, Minkyung

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether symptomatic acromioclavicular joints can be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging. This study included 146 patients who underwent physical examination of acromioclavicular joints and 3-T MR imaging of the shoulder. Among them, 67 patients showing positive results on physical examination were assigned to the symptomatic group, whereas 79 showing negative results were assigned to the asymptomatic group. The following MR findings were compared between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups: presence of osteophytes, articular surface irregularity, subchondral cysts, acromioclavicular joint fluid, subacromial fluid, subacromial bony spurs, joint capsular distension, bone edema, intraarticular enhancement, periarticular enhancement, superior and inferior joint capsular distension degree, and joint capsular thickness. The patients were subsequently divided into groups based on age (younger, older) and the method of MR arthrography (direct MR arthrography, indirect MR arthrography), and all the MR findings in each subgroup were reanalyzed. The meaningful cutoff value of each significant continuous variable was calculated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The degree of superior capsular distension was the only significant MR finding of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints and its meaningful cutoff value was 2.1mm. After subgroup analyses, this variable was significant in the older age group and indirect MR arthrography group. On 3-T MR imaging, the degree of superior joint capsular distension might be a predictable MR finding in the diagnosis of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. MR staging of malignant musculoskeletal tumors: An experimental study on MR and pathologic correlation of rabbit VX-2 carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Chung, Sung Hoon; KIm, Cheol Woo; Kim, Seong Moon; Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the reliability of MR imaging in tissue characterization and depiction of tumor boundaries, we performed MR pathologic correlation using parosteally implanted VX-2 carcinoma in 17 rabbit thighs. T1-weighted, T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted axial images were obtained 10-30 days after tumor implantation. After the animals were killed, frozen and sectioned along the MR imaging planes, and histopathologic examination were done. For accurate MR pathologic correlation, rabbit were fixed on the cardboard plate to minimize position change during the procedure. Tumor boundaries depicted on MR images were larger than those depicted on the specimen. Small tumors were surrounded by capsule-like loose connective tissue. Loose connective tissue became compact with tumor growth. This connective tissue showed high signal intensity on both T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA enhanced T1-weighted images. Muscle atrophy with fatty tissue accumulation around the tumor also contributed to the high signal intensity on MR images. Peritumoral edema and inflammatory reaction were not remarkable. Six of 8 cases with bone marrow fibrosis were detected on MR images. We concluded that peritumoral loose connective tissue and muscle atrophy exaggerated the size of experimentally induced malignant musculoskeletal tumors on MR images

  6. Value of 3.0 T MR imaging in refractory partial epilepsy and negative 1.5 T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dang Khoa; Rochette, Emilie; Leroux, Jean-Maxime; Beaudoin, Gilles; Cossette, Patrick; Lassonde, Maryse; Guilbert, François

    2010-10-01

    High-field 3.0 T MR scanners provide an improved signal-to-noise ratio which can be translated in higher image resolution, possibly allowing critical detection of subtle epileptogenic lesions missed on standard-field 1.0-1.5 T MRIs. In this study, the authors explore the potential value of re-imaging at 3.0 T patients with refractory partial epilepsy and negative 1.5 T MRI. We retrospectively identified all patients with refractory partial epilepsy candidate for surgery who had undergone a 3.0 T MR study after a negative 1.5 T MR study. High-field 3.0 T MRIs were reviewed qualitatively by neuroradiologists experienced in interpreting epilepsy studies with access to clinical information. Relevance and impact on clinical management were assessed by an epileptologist. Between November 2006 and August 2009, 36 patients with refractory partial epilepsy candidate for surgery underwent 3.0 T MR study after a 1.5 T MR study failed to disclose a relevant epileptogenic lesion. A potential lesion was found only in two patients (5.6%, 95% CI: 1.5-18.1%). Both were found to have hippocampal atrophy congruent with other presurgical localization techniques which resulted in omission of an invasive EEG study and direct passage to surgery. The frequency of detection of a new lesion by re-imaging at 3.0 T patients with refractory partial epilepsy candidate for surgery was found to be low, but seems to offer the potential of a significant clinical impact for selected patients. This finding needs to be validated in a prospective controlled study. Copyright © 2010 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A comparative study of MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging in pre-operative grading of intracranial gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Honglin; Chen Junkun; Zhang Zongjun; Lu Guangming; Chen Ziqian; Wang Wei; Ji Xueman; Tang Xiaojun; Li Lin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of MR imaging scores with MR perfusion imaging in pre-operative grading of intracranial gliomas. Methods: Thirty patients with intracranial gliomas (8 low-grade and 22 high-grade, according to WHO criteria) were examined with MR perfusion imaging pre-operatively. The lesions were evaluated by using an MR imaging score based on nine criteria. rCBV of the lesions were calculated by comparing the CBV of the lesion and that of contralateral normal white matter. The scores and ratios in high-grade and low-grade tumours were compared. Results: The MR imaging score of low grade (grades I and II) gliomas (0.67±0.29) were significantly lower than that of grades III (1.32 ± 0.47) (t=-3.48, P=0.003) and IV (1.56 ± 0.20) (t=-7.36, P=0.000) gliomas. There was no statistical difference when MR imaging scores of grades III and IV gliomas (t=-1.39, P=0.182) were compared. The maximum rCBV ratio of low grade (grades I and II) gliomas (2.38 ± 0.66 ) were significantly lower than that of grades III (5.81 ± 3.20) (t=-3.57, P=0.003) and IV (6.99 ± 2.47) (t=-5.09, P=0.001). There was no statistical difference when rCBV ratios of grades III and IV (t =-0.93, P=0.365) gliomas were compared. The accuracy of MR imaging scores in the noninvasive grading of untreated gliomas was all most the same as that of MR perfusion imaging (90.00% vs 89.29%). Conclusion: The MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging are two very useful tools in the evaluation of the histopathologic grade of cerebral gliomas. The overall accuracy in the noninvasive grading of gliomas may be imp roved if MR imaging scores and MR perfusion imaging are combined. (authors)

  8. Feasibility study of 3-T MR imaging of the skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubry, Sebastien; Kastler, Bruno [CHU Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiologie A, Besancon Cedex (France); Universite de Franche-comte, Laboratoire Intervention, Imagerie, Ingenierie et Innovation en Sante, Besancon (France); Casile, Celine; Jehl, Jerome [CHU Jean Minjoz, Service de Radiologie A, Besancon Cedex (France); Humbert, Philippe [CHU Saint-Jacques, Service de Dermatologie, Besancon (France); Vidal, Chrystelle [CHU Saint-Jacques, Centre d' Investigation Clinique en Innovation technologique, Besancon (France)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the skin, to describe skin anatomy at 3 T and to discuss future prospects of skin MRI. A 7-cm single-element surface receiver coil was developed for our 3-T MRI system. Thin sections were obtained with a three-dimensional FIESTA acquisition sequence and a spin-echo T1-weighted sequence (SET1). Prospective analysis was performed twice by two radiologists independently. Thirty-six healthy volunteers were included and underwent MRI on the face and the calf. Image quality was assessed regarding visibility of skin layers and quantification of artefacts. High field strength MR enables imaging of the skin with a high spatial in-plane resolution (87-180 {mu}m), the total examination lasting 15-20 min. Image quality was excellent for the calf (mean SET1 quality = 96%) with a high intra- and interobserver correlation (SET1 kappa coefficient concerning visibility of epidermis, dermis and hypodermis {>=} 0.84). Motion artefacts resulted in a small loss of quality and reproducibility for the face. In conclusion, 3-T MR allows high spatial resolution imaging of the skin and can potentially provide an accurate noninvasive means of analysing the skin. (orig.)

  9. Chemical shift-selective snapshot FLASH MR imaging in combination with inversion-recovery T1 contrast at different field strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthaei, D.; Haase, A.; Henrich, D.; Duhmke, E.

    1991-01-01

    With fast MR imaging, chemical shift contract becomes available to the clinician in seconds. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the combination of chemical shift selective (CHESS) MR imaging using the snapshot FLASH MR method with the inversion-recovery technique and to obtain information concerning the signal-to-noise and chemical shift with the presaturation method at different field strengths. Investigations with volunteers and experimental animals were done at 2 and 3 T (whole body) and in a 4.7-T animal image. For the inversion-recovery experiments, saturation was done before every snapshot FLASH image. With increasing field strength due to signal-to-noise and chemical shift advantages, the method performs better. Increasing T1 values are also important at high field strengths. The combined technique is useful only for T1 water images with fat saturation. It also allows fast quantification of T1 in water-containing organs and pathologic processes. At high field strengths, fast CHESS and T1 imaging promise fast quantitative information. This is a possible argument for clinical high-field-strength MR imagining along with MR spectroscopy

  10. MR of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.; Dion, J.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging was performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR images as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of MR of the basal cisterns results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR studies in many cases

  11. MR imaging of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Appel, M.; Kaiser, E.; Luttke, G.; Lukas, P.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the occurrence, frequency, and significance of increased signal intensity (SI) in the rotator cuff (RC) of normal volunteers suggestive of pathologic findings such as partial tears and tendinitis. Shoulders of 30 volunteers without evidence of prior shoulder disease or trauma were studied. MR imaging at 1.5 T included T1-weighted, proton-density, and T2-weighted spin-echo (SE) and T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences in axial, oblique coronal, and sagittal planes. Shoulders of 30 cadavers were dissected and studied for correlation with MR findings, five of them after MR examination

  12. Knee extension and flexion: MR delineation of normal and torn anterior cruciate ligaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, Mamoru; Ikeda, Kotaroh; Fukubayashi, Tohru; Anno, Izumi; Itai, Yuji [Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the effect of joint position of semiflexed and extended knees in MR delineation of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semiflexed position (average 45{degrees} of flexion) within the magnet bore. Sets of oblique sagittal MR images were obtained for both extended and flexed knee positions. Thirty-two knees with intact ACLs and 43 knees with arthroscopically proven ACL tears were evaluated. Two observers compared paired MR images of both extended and flexed positions and rated them by a relative three point scale. Anatomic correlation in MR images was obtained by a cadaveric knee with incremental flexion. The MR images of flexed knees were more useful than of extended knees in 53% of the case reviews of femoral attachments and 36% of reviews of midportions of normal ACLs. Compared with knee extensions, the MR images for knee flexion provided better clarity in 48% of reviews of disrupted sites and 52% of residual bundles of torn ACLs. Normal ACL appeared taut in the knee extension and lax in semiflexion. Compared with MR images of knees in extension, MR images of knees in flexion more clearly delineate the femoral side of the ligament with wider space under the intercondylar roof and with decreased volume-averaging artifacts, providing superior visualization of normal and torn ACLs. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. The MrCYP52 cytochrome P450 monoxygenase gene of Metarhizium robertsii is important for utilizing insect epicuticular hydrocarbons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangcai Lin

    Full Text Available Fungal pathogens of plants and insects infect their hosts by direct penetration of the cuticle. Plant and insect cuticles are covered by a hydrocarbon-rich waxy outer layer that represents the first barrier against infection. However, the fungal genes that underlie insect waxy layer degradation have received little attention. Here we characterize the single cytochrome P450 monoxygenase family 52 (MrCYP52 gene of the insect pathogen Metarhizium robertsii, and demonstrate that it encodes an enzyme required for efficient utilization of host hydrocarbons. Expressing a green florescent protein gene under control of the MrCYP52 promoter confirmed that MrCYP52 is up regulated on insect cuticle as well as by artificial media containing decane (C10, extracted cuticle hydrocarbons, and to a lesser extent long chain alkanes. Disrupting MrCYP52 resulted in reduced growth on epicuticular hydrocarbons and delayed developmental processes on insect cuticle, including germination and production of appressoria (infection structures. Extraction of alkanes from cuticle prevented induction of MrCYP52 and reduced growth. Insect bioassays against caterpillars (Galleria mellonella confirmed that disruption of MrCYP52 significantly reduces virulence. However, MrCYP52 was dispensable for normal germination and appressorial formation in vitro when the fungus was supplied with nitrogenous nutrients. We conclude therefore that MrCYP52 mediates degradation of epicuticular hydrocarbons and these are an important nutrient source, but not a source of chemical signals that trigger infection processes.

  14. High Pressure Reduction of Selenite by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Testemale, D.; Letard, I.; Bleuet, P.; Cardon, H.; Oger, P.

    2007-12-01

    High-pressure biotopes comprise cold deep-sea environments, hydrothermal vents, and deep subsurface or deep-sea sediments. The latter are less studied, due to the technical difficulties to sample at great depths without contamination. Nevertheless, microbial sulfate reduction and methanogenesis have been found to be spatially distributed in deep deep-sea sediments (1), and sulfate reduction has been shown to be actually more efficient under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in some sediments (2). Sulfate-reducing bacteria obtained from the Japan Sea are characterized by an increased sulfide production under pressure (3,4). Unfortunately, investigations of microbial metabolic activity as a function of pressure are extremely scarce due to the experimental difficulty of such measurements at high hydrostatic pressure. We were able to measure the reduction of selenite Se(IV) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a function of pressure, to 150 MPa using two different high-pressure reactors that allow in situ X-ray spectroscopy measurements on a synchrotron source. A first series of measurements was carried out in a low-pressure Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) of our own design (5) at ID22 beamline at ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); a second one was performed in an autoclave (6) at the BM30B beamline at ESRF. Selenite reduction by strain MR-17 was monitored from ambient pressure to 150 MPa over 25 hours at 30 deg C by XANES spectroscopy (X-ray Analysis of Near Edge Structure). Spectra were recorded hourly in order to quantify the evolution of the oxidation state of selenium with time. Stationary-phase bacteria were inoculated at a high concentration into fresh growth medium containing 5 or 10 M of sodium selenite and 20 mM sodium lactate. Kinetic parameters of the Se (IV) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 could be extracted from the data, as a function of pressure. They show 1) that the rate constant k of the reaction is decreased by a half at high pressure

  15. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roundhill, Elizabeth; Turnbull, Doug; Burchill, Susan

    2016-05-01

    Overexpression of plasma membrane multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP-1) in Ewing's sarcoma (ES) predicts poor outcome. MRP-1 is also expressed in mitochondria, and we have examined the submitochondrial localization of MRP-1 and investigated the mechanism of MRP-1 transport and role of this organelle in the response to doxorubicin. The mitochondrial localization of MRP-1 was examined in ES cell lines by differential centrifugation and membrane solubilization by digitonin. Whether MRP-1 is chaperoned by heat shock proteins (HSPs) was investigated by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence microscopy, and HSP knockout using small hairpin RNA and inhibitors (apoptozole, 17-AAG, and NVPAUY). The effect of disrupting mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux activity on the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin was investigated by counting viable cell number. Mitochondrial MRP-1 is glycosylated and localized to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is coexpressed with HSP90. MRP-1 binds to both HSP90 and HSP70, although only inhibition of HSP90β decreases expression of MRP-1 in the mitochondria. Disruption of mitochondrial MRP-1-dependent efflux significantly increases the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin (combination index, MRP-1 is expressed in the outer mitochondrial membrane and is a client protein of HSP90β, where it may play a role in the doxorubicin-induced resistance of ES.-Roundhill, E., Turnbull, D., Burchill, S. Localization of MRP-1 to the outer mitochondrial membrane by the chaperone protein HSP90β. © FASEB.

  16. Diagnosis of cardiac allograft rejection with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soulen, R.L.; Fraser, C.D.; Hutchins, G.M.; Baumgartner, W.A.; Reitz, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Serial MR images and endomyocardial biopsy specimens of heterotopic cervical cardiac allotransplants were obtained in six dogs during 2 weeks of immunosuppression followed by 1 week without such therapy. A surface coil and gated spin-echo technique were used. Myocardial intensity (MI) measurements and histopathologic interpretations were performed independently. All six dogs showed a decrease in MI between their first and second MR studies, while showing no rejection. One dog had no rejection and died; in five dogs studies gated to every other beat showed progressive increase in MI that correlated significantly with increasing rejection, though absolute MI values did not correlated with a specific biopsy score. Severe rejection also caused overt increase in myocardial mass. The MI in the early postoperative period may reflect reperfusion injury. Absolute intensity values cannot predict rejection. Serial studies in transplant patients may prove clinically useful

  17. Oscillations of the Outer Boundary of the Outer Radiation Belt During Sawtooth Oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hun Kim

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We report three sawtooth oscillation events observed at geosynchronous orbit where we find quasi-periodic (every 2-3 hours sudden flux increases followed by slow flux decreases at the energy levels of ˜50-400 keV. For these three sawtooth events, we have examined variations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt. In order to determine L values of the outer boundary, we have used data of relativistic electron flux observed by the SAMPEX satellite. We find that the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt oscillates periodically being consistent with sawtooth oscillation phases. Specifically, the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt expands (namely, the boundary L value increases following the sawtooth particle flux enhancement of each tooth, and then contracts (namely, the boundary L value decreases while the sawtooth flux decreases gradually until the next flux enhancement. On the other hand, it is repeatedly seen that the asymmetry of the magnetic field intensity between dayside and nightside decreases (increases due to the dipolarization (the stretching on the nightside as the sawtooth flux increases (decreases. This implies that the periodic magnetic field variations during the sawtooth oscillations are likely responsible for the expansion-contraction oscillations of the outer boundary of the outer radiation belt.

  18. Monte carlo calculation of the neutron effective dose rate at the outer surface of the biological shield of HTR-10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remetti, Romolo; Andreoli, Giulio; Keshishian, Silvina

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We deal with HTR-10, that is a helium-cooled graphite-moderated pebble bed reactor. ► We carried out Monte Carlo simulation of the core by MCNP5. ► Extensive use of MCNP5 variance reduction methods has been done. ► We calculated the trend of neutron flux within the biological shield. ► We calculated neutron effective dose at the outer surface of biological shield. - Abstract: Research on experimental reactors, such as HTR-10, provide useful data about potentialities of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR). The latter is today rated as one of the six nuclear reactor types involved in the Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) Initiative. In this study, the MCNP5 code has been employed to evaluate the neutron radiation trend vs. the biological shield's thickness and to calculate the neutron effective dose rate at the outer surface. The reactor's geometry has been completely modeled by means of lattices and universes provided by MCNP, even though some approximations were required. Monte Carlo calculations have been performed by means of a simple PC and, as a consequence, in order to obtain acceptable run times, it was made an extensive recourse to variance reduction methods.

  19. Proteomic characterization of the outer membrane vesicle of the halophilic marine bacterium Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sung Ho; Lee, Sang-Yeop; Choi, Chi-Won; Lee, Hayoung; Ro, Hyun-Joo; Jun, Sangmi; Kwon, Yong Min; Kwon, Kae Kyoung; Kim, Sang-Jin; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Kim, Seung Il

    2017-01-01

    Novosphingobium pentaromativorans US6-1 is a Gram-negative halophilic marine bacterium able to utilize several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo[a]pyrene. In this study, using transmission electron microscopy, we confirmed that N. pentaromativorans US6-1 produces outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). N. pentaromativorans OMVs (hereafter OMV Novo ) are spherical in shape, and the average diameter of OMV Novo is 25-70 nm. Proteomic analysis revealed that outer membrane proteins and periplasmic proteins of N. pentaromativorans are the major protein components of OMV Novo . Comparative proteomic analysis with the membrane-associated protein fraction and correlation analysis demonstrated that the outer membrane proteins of OMV Novo originated from the membrane- associated protein fraction. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to characterize OMV purified from halophilic marine bacteria.

  20. MR assessment of red marrow distribution and composition in the proximal femur: correlation with clinical and laboratory parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, B.C. vande; Lecouvet, F.E.; Moysan, P.; Maldague, B.; Malghem, J.; Jamart, J.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To correlate the MR appearance of the proximal femur marrow with clinical and blood parameters. Design and patients. The proportion of the femoral neck surface area occupied by red marrow was determined on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip in a series of 120 subjects, aged from 15 to 75 years, with ten females and ten males per decade, and correlated with clinical data. This parameter and the bulk T1 values of femoral red marrow were determined in 30 other subjects 25-46 years of age and correlated with their blood parameters. Results. In the series of 120 subjects, the proportion of red marrow surface area decreased with age (P -4 ) and was higher in female than male subjects (P -4 ). Within each decade, the proportion of red marrow surface area was higher in females than in males between 25 and 65 years but neither before 25 nor after 65 years. In the series of 30 subjects, the proportion of red marrow surface area and bulk T1 values of femoral red marrow were significantly negatively correlated with hemoglobin blood levels but not with blood cell counts. Conclusion. The MR appearance of proximal femur red marrow is influenced by age and sex. A relationship with hemoglobin blood level is demonstrated. (orig.)

  1. Feasibility of MR-guided angioplasty of femoral artery stenoses using real-time imaging and intraarterial contrast-enhanced MR angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paetzel, C.; Zorger, N.; Bachthaler, M.; Voelk, M.; Seitz, J.; Herold, T.; Feuerbach, S.; Lenhart, M.; Nitz, W.R.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To show the feasibility of magnetic resonance (MR) for guided interventional therapy of femoral and popliteal artery stenoses with commercially available materials supported by MR real-time imaging and intraarterial MR angiography. Materials and Methods: Three patients (1 female, 2 male), suffering from symptomatic arterial occlusive disease with stenoses of the femoral (n=2) or popliteal (n=1) arteries were included. Intraarterial digital subtraction angiography was performed in each patient pre- and post-interventionally as standard of reference to quantify stenoses. The degree of the stenoses reached from 71-88%. The MR images were acquired on a 1.5 T MR scanner (Magnetom Sonata; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). For MR-angiography, a Flash 3D sequence was utilized following injection of 5 mL diluted gadodiamide (Omniscan; Amersham Buchler, Braunschweig, Germany) via the arterial access. Two maximum intensity projections (MIP) were used as road maps and localizer for the interactive positioning of a continuously running 2D-FLASH sequence with a temporal solution of 2 images per second. During the intervention, an MR compatible monitor provided the image display inside the scanner room. Safety guidelines were followed during imaging in the presence of a conductive guidewire. The lesion was crossed by a commercially available balloon catheter (Wanda, Boston Scientific; Ratingen, Germany), which was mounted on a 0.035'' guidewire (Terumo; Leuven, Belgium). The visibility was provided by radiopaque markers embedded in the balloon and was improved by injection of 1 mL gadodiamide into the balloon. After dilation, the result was checked by intraarterial MR angiography and catheter angiography. Results: The stenoses could be correctly localized by intraarterial MR angiography. There was complete correlation between intraarterial MR angiography and digital subtraction angiography. The combination of guidewire and balloon was visible and the balloon was placed

  2. Comparison of the capsular width measured on ultrasonography and MR image of the temporomandibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Wan; Yoo, Dong Soo; Han, Won Jeong; Kim, Eun Kyung [Dankook University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate the reliability and clinical usefulness of ultrasonography in the temporomandibular joint(TMJ). Parasagittal and paracoronal 1.5 T MR images and 7.5 MHz ultrasonography of 40 TMJs in 20 asymptomatic volunteers were obtained. Disc position using MR imaging was evaluated and the distance between the lateral surface of mandibular condyle and the articular capsule using MR image and ultrasonography of 27 TMJs with normal disc position was measured and compared. Intraobserver and interobserver measurements reliability was evaluated by using interclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and measurement error. Also, the distance measured on ultrasonography was compared, according to mouth position and disc position. The normal disc position was found in 27 of 40 asymptomatic joints. At the intraobserver reliability of measurement, ICC at the closed and open mouth position were 0.89 and 0.91. The measurement error was 0.4% and 0.5%. At the interobserver reliability, ICC at the closed and open mouth position, the distances between the lateral surface of mandibular condyle and the articular capsule measured on MR images and ultrasonography were 2.0{+-} 0.7 mm, 1.8{+-}0.5 mm, respectively (p<0.05). On the ultrasonography, the distances at open mouth position were 1.2{+-}0.5 mm (p<0.05). At the TMJ with medially displaced disc, the distances at the closed and open mouth position were 1.3{+-}0.3 mm and 0.9{+-}0.2 mm (p<0.05). The results suggest ultrasonography of TMJ is a reliable imaging technique for assessment of normal disc position.

  3. Fast FLAIR MR images of intracranial hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Eun Ju; Choi, Hye Young; Cho, Young A; Kim, Wha Young

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR imaging according to various stages, and to compare FLAIR imaging with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging. We retrospectively evaluated fast FLAIR images along with spin-echo T1- and T2 weighted MR images of 32 lesions in 25 patients (12 males and 14 females, aged 3 - 84 yrs) with intracranial hemorrhagic lesions. For imaging, 1.5 T unit was used, and the nature of the lesions was found to be as follows : intracranial hemorrhage (n=15); tumor (n=9); infarction (n=4); arteriovenous malformation (n=3); and arachnoid cyst with hemorrhage (n=1). On the basis of spin-echo MR imaging, lesions were classified as acute, early subacute, late subacute, early chronic, or late chronic stage. The signal characteristics of intracranial hemorrhage were analysed in accordance with each staging, as seen on MR FLAIR imaging, and compared to the staging seen on spin-echo T1- and T-2 weighted MR imaging. The signal intensity of intracranial hemorrhage, as seen on FLAIR imaging, was not characteristic; it was similar to that of T2WI during the acute and subacute stages, and similiar to that of T1WI during the chronic stage. When used together with spin-echo T1- and T2-weighted MR imaging, however, FLAIR imaging may be useful for the classification of chronic intracranial hemorrhage as either early or late stage. (author). 20 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  4. Plasmas in the outer heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcher, J. W.; Richardson, J. D.; Lazarus, A. J.; Gazis, P. R.; Barnes, A.

    1995-01-01

    We review the observed properties of the solar wind in the outer heliosphere, including observations from Voyager and the Pioneers, as well as from inner heliospheric probes as appropriate. These observations are crucial to modeling of the heliosphere and its interactions with the interstellar medium, since the wind ram pressure and its temporal variations are important in understanding the distance to the termination shock and heliopause and how those boundaries might vary in time. We focus on results since Solar Wind 7. Among the issues we will discuss are: (1) the time scales for and statistical properties of variations in the ram pressure in the outer heliosphere, and how those variations might affect the morphology of the heliospheric/interstellar medium interface; (2) the question of possible solar wind slowing in the outer heliosphere due to the pick-up of interstellar ions; (3) the issue of whether there is bulk heating of the solar wind associated either with interstellar ion pick-up or with continued heating due to stream-stream interactions; (4) evidence for latitudinal variations in solar wind properties; and (5) the 1.3 year periodicities apparent in the outer heliosphere, and the close correspondence with similar variations seen with inner heliospheric probes.

  5. Reduction of superoxide dismutase activity correlates with visualization of edema by T2-weighted MR imaging in focal ischemic rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Shigeki; Chang, LeeHong; Cohen, Yoram; Chan, P.H.; Weinstein, P.R.; James, T.L.; Yoshimoto, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between in vivo serial T 2 -weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and water, sodium ion (Na + ), and potassium ion (K + ) contents measured in vitro using rat brain following right middle cerebral artery occlusion in conjunction with bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) occlusion. One hour later the left CCA was released. Serial MR images showed edema developed from the outer cortex towards the center. The T 2 signal intensity of the injured right cortex increased with time compared to that of the contralateral cortex. Increased Na + and water and decreased K + contents occurred in the injured cortex, indicating that serial T 2 -weighted MR imaging reflects the changes in water content and Na + and K + concentrations determined by biochemical techniques. GSH-Px activity was little changed. Total SOD in the injured cortex decreased 1 hour after ischemia and remained low throughout the experiment. In contrast, SOD activity in the noninfarcted left cortex also decreased after 1 hour but returned to normal after 2 hours of ischemia. Our results suggest that oxygen free radicals are important in developing ischemic brain edema and cerebral infarction. (author)

  6. Selective electrocatalysis of biofuel molecular oxidation using palladium nanoparticles generated on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Ranran; Tian, Xiaochun; Xiao, Yong

    2018-01-01

    of formate with 200 mV less over-potential. Notably they show unique selective activity toward electrochemical oxidation of formate, whereas no electrochemical catalysis was found for oxidation of ethanol, methanol and acetate. This work demonstrates a sustainable and low-cost method for producing efficient......Production of molecular scale palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) is important due to their catalytic function in electrochemical oxidation of a number of core fuel molecules in fuel cells. Biogenic methods offer an economic and environmentally friendly synthesis route. In this work...... membrane surface. Mapping by conductive atomic force microscopy shows that the presence of these PdNPs promotes electron transfer and enhances the electric conductivity of the cells. Compared to electrodeposited PdNPs, PdNPs generated by S. oneidensis MR-1 catalyze electrochemically the oxidation...

  7. MR appearance of hypothalamic hamartoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, F.J.; Leibrock, L.G.; Huseman, C.A.; Makos, M.M.

    1988-02-01

    Hypothalamic hamartoma is the most common detectable cerebral lesion causing precocious puberty. Two histologically confirmed cases were studied by computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. T2 weighted, sagittal MR images were superior to CT in delineating the tumor from surrounding grey matter. The lesion was isointense to grey matter on T1 weighted images allowing exclusion of other hypothalamic tumors. MR will undoubtedly become the imaging modality of choice in the detection of hypothalamic hamartoma.

  8. Localized 1H-MR spectroscopy in moyamoya disease before and after revascularization surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Choi, Hye Young; Suh, Jung Soo [Ewha Womans University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Hee; Lim, Keun Ho; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Ho Kyu; Lim, Tae Hwan; Ra, Young Shin [Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-01

    To evaluate, using localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), the cerebral metabolic change apparent after revascularization surgery in patients with moyamoya disease. Sixteen children with moyamoya disease and eight age-matched normal controls underwent MR imaging, MR angiography, conventional angiography, and {sup 99m}Tc- ECD SPECT. Frontal white matter and the basal ganglia of both hemispheres were subjected to localized {sup 1}H-MRS, and after revascularization surgery, four patients underwent follow-up {sup 1}H-MRS. Decreased NAA/Cr ratios (1.35{+-}0.14 in patients vs. 1.55{+-}0.24 in controls) and Cho/Cr ratios (0.96{+-}0.13 in patients vs. 1.10{+-}0.11 in controls) were observed in frontal white matter. After revascularization surgery, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios in this region increased. In the basal ganglia, there is no abnormal metabolic ratios. Localized 1H-MRS revealed abnormal metabolic change in both hemispheres of children with moyamoya disease. Because of its non-invasive nature, {sup 1}H-MRS is potentially useful for the preoperative evaluation of metabolic abnormalities and their postoperative monitoring.

  9. Localized 1H-MR spectroscopy in moyamoya disease before and after revascularization surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Choi, Hye Young; Suh, Jung Soo; Lee, Jung Hee; Lim, Keun Ho; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Ho Kyu; Lim, Tae Hwan; Ra, Young Shin

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate, using localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS), the cerebral metabolic change apparent after revascularization surgery in patients with moyamoya disease. Sixteen children with moyamoya disease and eight age-matched normal controls underwent MR imaging, MR angiography, conventional angiography, and 99m Tc- ECD SPECT. Frontal white matter and the basal ganglia of both hemispheres were subjected to localized 1 H-MRS, and after revascularization surgery, four patients underwent follow-up 1 H-MRS. Decreased NAA/Cr ratios (1.35±0.14 in patients vs. 1.55±0.24 in controls) and Cho/Cr ratios (0.96±0.13 in patients vs. 1.10±0.11 in controls) were observed in frontal white matter. After revascularization surgery, NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios in this region increased. In the basal ganglia, there is no abnormal metabolic ratios. Localized 1H-MRS revealed abnormal metabolic change in both hemispheres of children with moyamoya disease. Because of its non-invasive nature, 1 H-MRS is potentially useful for the preoperative evaluation of metabolic abnormalities and their postoperative monitoring

  10. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 chemotaxis proteins and electron-transport chain components essential for congregation near insoluble electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, H Wayne; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2012-12-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells utilize a behaviour response called electrokinesis to increase their speed in the vicinity of IEAs (insoluble electron acceptors), including manganese oxides, iron oxides and poised electrodes [Harris, El-Naggar, Bretschger, Ward, Romine, Obraztsova and Nealson (2010) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 107, 326-331]. However, it is not currently understood how bacteria remain in the vicinity of the IEA and accumulate both on the surface and in the surrounding medium. In the present paper, we provide results indicating that cells that have contacted the IEAs swim faster than those that have not recently made contact. In addition, fast-swimming cells exhibit an enhancement of swimming reversals leading to rapid non-random accumulation of cells on, and adjacent to, mineral particles. We call the observed accumulation near IEAs 'congregation'. Congregation is eliminated by the loss of a critical gene involved with EET (extracellular electron transport) (cymA, SO_4591) and is altered or eliminated in several deletion mutants of homologues of genes that are involved with chemotaxis or energy taxis in Escherichia coli. These genes include chemotactic signal transduction protein (cheA-3, SO_3207), methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins with the Cache domain (mcp_cache, SO_2240) or the PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain (mcp_pas, SO_1385). In the present paper, we report studies of S. oneidensis MR-1 that lend some insight into how microbes in this group can 'sense' the presence of a solid substrate such as a mineral surface, and maintain themselves in the vicinity of the mineral (i.e. via congregation), which may ultimately lead to attachment and biofilm formation.

  11. THE STRUCTURE AND STELLAR CONTENT OF THE OUTER DISKS OF GALAXIES: A NEW VIEW FROM THE Pan-STARRS1 MEDIUM DEEP SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zheng; Thilker, David A.; Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3701 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Meurer, Gerhardt R. [International Center for Radio Astronomy Research, The University of Western Australia, M468, 35 StirlingHighway, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Burgett, W. S.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Chambers, K. C.; Metcalfe, N. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Price, P. A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of an analysis of Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey multi-band (grizy) images of a sample of 698 low-redshift disk galaxies that span broad ranges in stellar mass, star-formation rate, and bulge/disk ratio. We use population synthesis spectral energy distribution fitting techniques to explore the radial distribution of the light, color, surface mass density, mass/light ratio, and age of the stellar populations. We characterize the structure and stellar content of the galaxy disks out to radii of about twice Petrosian r {sub 90}, beyond which the halo light becomes significant. We measure normalized radial profiles for sub-samples of galaxies in three bins each of stellar mass and concentration. We also fit radial profiles to each galaxy. The majority of galaxies have down-bending radial surface brightness profiles in the bluer bands with a break radius at roughly r {sub 90}. However, they typically show single unbroken exponentials in the reddest bands and in the stellar surface mass density. We find that the mass/light ratio and stellar age radial profiles have a characteristic 'U' shape. There is a good correlation between the amplitude of the down-bend in the surface brightness profile and the rate of the increase in the M/L ratio in the outer disk. As we move from late- to early-type galaxies, the amplitude of the down-bend and the radial gradient in M/L both decrease. Our results imply a combination of stellar radial migration and suppression of recent star formation can account for the stellar populations of the outer disk.

  12. Outer boundary as arrested history in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, S

    2002-01-01

    We present explicit outer boundary conditions for the canonical variables of general relativity. The conditions are associated with the causal evolution of a finite Cauchy domain, a so-called quasilocal boost, and they suggest a consistent scheme for modelling such an evolution numerically. The scheme involves a continuous boost in the spacetime orthogonal complement 'orthogonal' T sub p (B) of the tangent space T sub p (B) belonging to each point p on the system boundary B. We show how the boost rate may be computed numerically via equations similar to those appearing in canonical investigations of black-hole thermodynamics (although here holding at an outer two-surface rather than the bifurcate two-surface of a Killing horizon). We demonstrate the numerical scheme on a model example, the quasilocal boost of a spherical three-ball in Minkowski spacetime. Developing our general formalism with recent hyperbolic formulations of the Einstein equations in mind, we use Anderson and York's 'Einstein-Christoffel' hy...

  13. Integrated Analysis of Protein Complexes and Regulatory Networks Involved in Anaerobic Energy Metabolism of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedje, James M.

    2005-06-01

    Anaerobic Nitrate Reduction. Nitrate is an extensive co-contaminant at some DOE sites making metal and radionuclide reduction problematic. Hence, we sought to better understand the nitrate reduction pathway and its control in S. oneidensis MR-1. It is not known whether the nitrate reduction is by denitrification or dissimilatory nitrate reduction into ammonium (DNRA). By both physiological and genetic evidence, we proved that DNRA is the nitrate reduction pathway in this organism. Using the complete genome sequence of S. oneidensis MR-1, we identified a gene encoding a periplasmic nitrate reductase based on its 72% sequence identity with the napA gene in E. coli. Anaerobic growth of MR-1 on nitrate was abolished in a site directed napA mutant, indicating that NapA is the only nitrate reductase present. The anaerobic expression of napA and nrfA, a homolog of the cytochrome b552 nitrite reductase in E. coli, increased with increasing nitrate concentration until a plateau was reached at 3 mM KNO3. This indicates that these genes are not repressed by increasing concentrations of nitrate. The reduction of nitrate can generate intermediates that can be toxic to the microorganism. To determine the genetic response of MR-1 to high concentrations of nitrate, DNA microarrays were used to obtain a complete gene expression profile of MR-1 at low (1 mM) versus high (40 mM) nitrate concentrations. Genes encoding transporters and efflux pumps were up-regulated, perhaps as a mechanism to export toxic compounds. In addition, the gene expression profile of MR-1, grown anaerobically with nitrate as the only electron acceptor, suggested that this dissimilatory pathway contributes to N assimilation. Hence the nitrate reduction pathway could serve a dual purpose. The role of EtrA, a homolog of Fnr (global anaerobic regulator in E. coli) was examined using an etrA deletion mutant we constructed, S. oneidensis EtrA7-1.

  14. Gd-DTPA (gadolinium diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid) in MR imaging of the internal derangement of temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tange, Kazuhisa; Mihara, Manabu; Maeda, Sanae; Iwata, Hiroyuki; Ito, Noboru; Fukaya, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in five internal derangement of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) patients, before and after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) as a contrast agent. MR imaging was performed with a 0.5 tesla unit (VISTA MR; PICKER INTERNATIONAL) using a surface coil. We obtained multiple 5 mm sagital images with open and closed jaw positions. Precontrast proton density images were obtained with a repetition time (TR) of 1,000 msec and an echo time (TE) of 40 msec (TR/TE=1,000/40). Gd-DTPA was administered intravenously in a dose of 0.2 ml per kilogram of body weight. After the injection, postcontrast T1 weighted images (500/20) or postcontrast proton density images (1,000/40) were obtained. In the postcontrast T1 weighted images, the soft tissue surrounding the articular disk was enhanced and it provided helpful information for assessing the disk position. On the other hand, there was no effect of the contrast agent in the postcontrast proton density images. None of the patients experienced allergic reactions or other side effects. Gd-DTPA appeared to be a safe and effective contrast agent for MR imaging with T1 weighted images. However, compared with our usual imaging of the TMJ, the imaging did not indicate greater MR sensitivity for detecting the articular disk by means of Gd-DTPA enhancement. (author)

  15. Skeletal MR imaging: Correlation with skeletal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletti, P.M.; Raval, J.K.; Ford, P.V.; Benson, R.C.; Kerr, R.M.; Boswell, W.D.; Siegel, M.E.; Ralls, P.W.

    1987-01-01

    Skeletal MR images bone marrow while skeletal scintigraphy uses bone metabolism to demonstrate abnormalities. The purpose of this paper is to correlate these MR and scintigraphic findings. T1 and T2 MR images at 0.5 T were correlated with planar bone scintigraphy (RN) using Tc-99m MDP in 56 patients. Of 23 cases with suspected spinal metastases, 19 were positive by MR imaging, 16 by RN. Individual lesions were shown better by MR imaging in five and by RN in two. These two cases had scoliosis, a potential difficulty with MR imaging. In 14 cases of suspected avascular necrosis (AVN), MR imaging was positive in 13 while RN was positive in ten. One negative case by RN had bilateral AVN by MR imaging. Four skull lesions shown easily by RN were seen only in retrospect on MR images. MR imaging is advantageous in evaluating bones with predominant marrow such as vertebrae or the femoral head, while RN is superior in areas primarily composed of cortical bone such as the skull

  16. MR cisternography after intrathecal Gd-DTPA application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiche, Werner; Komenda, Yvonne; Steudel, Wolf-Ingo; Schick, Bernhard; Grunwald, Iris; Reith, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish and to evaluate MR cisternography after intrathecal Gd-DTPA administration to detect rhinobasal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistulae in patients with suspected CSF rhinorrhoea. Ten patients with suspected CSF rhinorrhoea were examined. The MR cisternography included the following investigation steps: acquisition of nonenhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted spin-echo (SE) scans of the skull base and the paranasal sinuses, lumbar puncture with administration of 1 ml Gd-DTPA solute with 4 ml NaCl and performance of MR cisternography with the same fat-suppressed T1-weighted sequences as used initially. In 10 patients with suspected CSF rhinorrhoea Gd-DTPA enhanced MR cisternography detected 5 CSF fistulae. In 3 of 5 CSF leaks were located in the cribriform plate and in 2 of 5 sphenoidal. Whereas 4 of these depicted leaks were confirmed surgically, in 1 case the CSF fistula closed spontaneously. In another case, CSF leakage after severe head injury was clinically highly suspected but ceased prior to MR cisternography with inability to detect the temporary fistula. In the remaining 4 patients with serous rhinorrhoea MR cisternography did not provide any evidences for CSF fistulae. Intrathecal Gd-DTPA injection was tolerated excellently. Clinical and EEG examinations showed no gross behavioural or neurological disturbances and no seizure activity, respectively. The MR cisternography after intrathecal administration of Gd-DTPA represents a safe, promising and minimally invasive method for detection of CSF fistulae. This MR investigation provides excellent depiction of CSF spaces and pinpoints CSF fistulae. (orig.)

  17. Technical Note: Harmonic analysis applied to MR image distortion fields specific to arbitrarily shaped volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanescu, T; Jaffray, D

    2018-05-25

    Magnetic resonance imaging is expected to play a more important role in radiation therapy given the recent developments in MR-guided technologies. MR images need to consistently show high spatial accuracy to facilitate RT specific tasks such as treatment planning and in-room guidance. The present study investigates a new harmonic analysis method for the characterization of complex 3D fields derived from MR images affected by system-related distortions. An interior Dirichlet problem based on solving the Laplace equation with boundary conditions (BCs) was formulated for the case of a 3D distortion field. The second-order boundary value problem (BVP) was solved using a finite elements method (FEM) for several quadratic geometries - i.e., sphere, cylinder, cuboid, D-shaped, and ellipsoid. To stress-test the method and generalize it, the BVP was also solved for more complex surfaces such as a Reuleaux 9-gon and the MR imaging volume of a scanner featuring a high degree of surface irregularities. The BCs were formatted from reference experimental data collected with a linearity phantom featuring a volumetric grid structure. The method was validated by comparing the harmonic analysis results with the corresponding experimental reference fields. The harmonic fields were found to be in good agreement with the baseline experimental data for all geometries investigated. In the case of quadratic domains, the percentage of sampling points with residual values larger than 1 mm were 0.5% and 0.2% for the axial components and vector magnitude, respectively. For the general case of a domain defined by the available MR imaging field of view, the reference data showed a peak distortion of about 12 mm and 79% of the sampling points carried a distortion magnitude larger than 1 mm (tolerance intrinsic to the experimental data). The upper limits of the residual values after comparison with the harmonic fields showed max and mean of 1.4 mm and 0.25 mm, respectively, with only 1.5% of

  18. MR appearance of central neurocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, K.H.; Han, M.H.; Kim, D.G.; Chi, J.G.; Suh, D.C.; Kim, S.J.; Cha, S.H.; Han, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    To provide a detailed description of the MR appearances of central neurocytoma, MR images of 13 patients with central neurocytoma were retrospectively reviewed and compared with CT examinations. The histology was confirmed by ultrastructural and immunohistochemical studies. In 12 patients the tumors were histologically benign and located in the anterior part of the lateral ventricle, 6 of which extended to the 3rd ventricle. There was one case of a histologically malignant variant involving the thalamus and lateral ventricle. The tumors were primarily solid, but contained cysts (85%, 11/13), calcifications (69%, 9/13), and signal void from tumor vessels (62%, 8/13), frequently producing heterogeneous signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images. Most of the solid portion appeared isointense or slightly hyperintense relative to the cerebral cortex on all MR pulse sequences. Calcifications were iso- or hypointense on MR, making them difficult to characterize with MR alone. Intratumoral hemorrhage was seen in 2 patients on MR but not on CT. Contrast enhancement was variable in degree and pattern. Coronal and sagittal MR images were valuable in evaluating the tumor extent and origin site, and in planning the surgical approach. It is concluded that MR imaging appears to be more useful than CT in the overall evaluation of central neurocytoma, even though calcification is better characterized with CT. (orig.)

  19. The effect of cadmium shielding on the spatial neutron flux distribution inside one of the outer irradiation sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, I.

    2009-06-01

    A permanent epithermal neutron irradiation facility was designed in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) by using the cadmium (cylindrical vial 1.0 mm in thickness, 38.50 mm in diameter and 180 mm in length) as thermal neutron shielding material, for a permanent epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA). This site was designed by shielding the internal surface of the aluminum tube of the first outer irradiation site in the MNSR reactor. I was used the activation detectors 0.1143% Au-Al alloy foils with 0.1 mm thickness and 2.0 mm diameter for measurement the thermal neutron flux, epithermal and R c d=A b are/A c over ratio in the outer irradiation site. Distribution of the thermal neutron flux in the outer irradiation capsule has been found numerically using MCNP-4C code with and without cadmium shield, and experimentally by irradiating five copper wires using the outer irradiation capsule. Good agreements were obtained between the calculated and the measured results. (author)

  20. MR imaging of normal bone marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stajgis, M.; Paprzycki, W.

    1994-01-01

    Principles of MR bone marrow imaging on the basis of retrospective analysis of MR examinations of bone marrow in different anatomic sites in 200 patients have been discussed. Significance of different physiologic factors and processes such as age, steatosis, osteoporosis, conversion and reconversion, which influence on MR bone marrow images, have been emphasized. T1-weighted images obtained with spin-echo sequences give the most of information about bone marrow structure in MR. Thorough knowledge of bone marrow physiology and clinical status of the patient is indispensable in correct interpretation of hypointensive lesions on T1-weighted images. When presence of disseminated bone marrow disease is suspected, authors propose routine imaging of lumbar vertebral column, pelvis and proximal parts of femoral bones. (author)

  1. MR imaging of breast implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyca, D P

    1994-11-01

    MR imaging has proved to be an excellent imaging modality in locating free silicone and evaluating an implant for rupture, with a sensitivity of approximately 94% and specificity of 97%. Silicone has a unique MR resonance frequency and long T1 and T2 relaxation times, which allows several MR sequences to provide excellent diagnostic images. The most commonly used sequences include T2-weighted, STIR, and chemical shift imaging (Figs. 3, 13, and 14). The T2-weighted and STIR sequences are often used in conjunction with chemical water suppression. The most reliable findings on MR images for detection of implant rupture include identification of the collapsed implant shell (linguine sign) and free silicone within the breast parenchyma.

  2. MR findings of brainstem injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Man Soo; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Park, Choong Ki [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dae Chul [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Joon [Dankook University of College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    To analyze the characteristics of traumatic brainstem injury by CT and MR. CT and MR studies of 10 patients with traumatic brainstem lesion in MR were retrospectively reviewed, particularly attended to location, signal intensity and associated lesions. CT failed to depict 8 of 10 brainstem lesions. All lesions were detected in MR images with T2-weighted images showing higher detection rate (n = 10) (100%) than T1-weighted images (n = 3) (30%) or CT (n = 2) (20%). The brainstem lesions located in the dorsolateral aspects of the rostral brainstem (mid brain and upper pons) in 7 (70%) cases, in ventral aspects of rostral brain in 2 (20%) cases and in median portion of pons in 1 (10%) case. Corpus callosal (n = 5), lobar white matter (n = 5) diffuse axonal injury, and 2 hemorrhagic lesions in basal ganglia were the associated findings. MR imaging is more helpful than CT in the detection of brainstem injury, especially T2 weighted images. Primary brainstem lesions were typically located in the dorsolateral aspect of rostral brainstem (midbrain and upper pons). Corpus callosum and white matter lesions were frequently associated.

  3. Gadoxate-enhanced T1-weighted MR cholangiography: comparison of 1.5 T and 3.0 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koelblinger, C.; Schima, W.; Weber, M.; Mang, T.; Nemec, S.; Kulinna-Cosentini, C.; Bastati, N.; Ba-Ssalamah, A. [Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Medizinische Univ. Wien (Austria)

    2009-06-15

    Purpose: to qualitatively and quantitatively compare gadoxate-enhanced T1-weighted MR cholangiography at magnetic field strengths of 1.5 T and 3.0 T. Materials and methods: a total of 40 patients with a non-dilated biliary system were retrospectively included in the study. T1-weighted MR cholangiography 20 min after IV administration of 0.025 mmol/kg gadoxate (Primovist trademark) was performed in 20 patients at 1.5 T and in another 20 patients at 3.0 T. Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of the biliary system (common bile duct - CBD, right hepatic duct - RHD, left hepatic duct - LHD) compared to the periductal tissue were measured. Two radiologists also qualitatively assessed the visibility of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary system using a six-point rating scale. The Mann-Whitney U-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient were used for statistical analysis. Results: the CNRs of the intrahepatic and extrahepatic hepatic bile ducts were significantly higher at 3.0 T. Qualitative analysis showed a significant superiority for 3.0 T in the delineation of the intrahepatic biliary system (RHD, LHD, segmental ducts). (orig.)

  4. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a 1.5-T MR imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Chang, Sun Ae; Ha, Choong Kun; Kim, Eun Sang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1995-01-01

    Most of recent MR imagings of cerebral cortex activation have been performed by using high field magnet above 2-T or echo-planar imaging technique. We report our experience on imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a widely available standard 1.5-T MR. Series of gradient-echo images (TR/TE/flip angle: 80/60/40 .deg. 64 x 128 matrix) were acquired alternatively during the periods of rest and task in five normal volunteers. Finger movement (n = 10;5 right, 5 left) and flashing photic stimulation (n 1) were used as a motor task and a visual task to activate the motor cortex and visual cortex, respectively. Activation images were obtained by subtracting sum of rest images from that of task images. Changes of signal intensity were analyzed over the periods of rest and task. Activation images were obtained in all cases. Changes of signal intensity between rest and task periods were 6.5-14.6%(mean, 10.5%) in the motor cortex and 4.2% in the visual cortex. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation could be performed with a widely available 1.5-T MR. Widespread applications of this technique to basic and clinical neuroscience are expected

  5. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a 1.5-T MR imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Hyoung; Chang, Sun Ae; Ha, Choong Kun; Kim, Eun Sang; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Sung Hoon [Gyeongsang National University, College of Medicine, Jeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-15

    Most of recent MR imagings of cerebral cortex activation have been performed by using high field magnet above 2-T or echo-planar imaging technique. We report our experience on imaging of cerebral cortex activation with a widely available standard 1.5-T MR. Series of gradient-echo images (TR/TE/flip angle: 80/60/40 .deg. 64 x 128 matrix) were acquired alternatively during the periods of rest and task in five normal volunteers. Finger movement (n = 10;5 right, 5 left) and flashing photic stimulation (n 1) were used as a motor task and a visual task to activate the motor cortex and visual cortex, respectively. Activation images were obtained by subtracting sum of rest images from that of task images. Changes of signal intensity were analyzed over the periods of rest and task. Activation images were obtained in all cases. Changes of signal intensity between rest and task periods were 6.5-14.6%(mean, 10.5%) in the motor cortex and 4.2% in the visual cortex. Functional imaging of cerebral cortex activation could be performed with a widely available 1.5-T MR. Widespread applications of this technique to basic and clinical neuroscience are expected.

  6. Value of new MR techniques in MR-PET; Stellenwert neuer MR-Techniken in der MR-PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attenberger, U.I.; Schoenberg, S.O. [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Medizinische Fakultaet Mannheim der Universitaet Heidelberg, Institut fuer klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Mannheim (Germany); Quick, H.H. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institut fuer Medizinische Physik, Erlangen (Germany); Guimaraes, A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Charlestown (United States); Catalano, O. [University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Morelli, J.N. [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore (United States)

    2013-12-15

    The unparalleled soft tissue contrast of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the functional information obtainable with 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) render MR-PET well-suited for oncological and psychiatric imaging. The lack of ionizing radiation with MRI also makes MR-PET a promising modality for oncology patients requiring frequent follow-up and pediatric patients. Lessons learned with PET computed tomography (CT) over the last few years do not directly translate to MR-PET. For example, in PET-CT the Hounsfield units derived from CT are used for attenuation correction (AC). As 511 keV photons emitted in PET examinations are attenuated by the patient's body CT data are converted directly to linear attenuation coefficients (LAC); however, proton density measured by MRI is not directly related to the radiodensity or LACs of biological tissue. Thus, direct conversion to LAC data is not possible making AC more challenging in simultaneous MRI-PET scanning. In addition to these constraints simultaneous MRI-PET acquisitions also improve on some solutions to well-known challenges of hybrid imaging techniques, such as limitations in motion correction. This article reports on initial clinical experiences with simultaneously acquired MRI-PET data, focusing on the potential benefits and limitations of MRI with respect to motion correction as well as metal and attenuation correction artefacts. (orig.) [German] Die klinische Implementierung der neuen Hybridtechnologie MR-Positronenemissionstomographie (MR-PET) bietet durch die Kombination aus hochaufloesender Morphologie, Funktion und Metabolismus bisher ungeahnte diagnostische Moeglichkeiten, die nicht nur fuer die Diagnose und die Verlaufskontrolle onkologischer und psychiatrischer Erkrankungen von hoher Bedeutung sind. Verglichen mit der PET-CT wird dies mit reduzierter Strahlenbelastung fuer den Patienten moeglich, was wiederum insbesondere fuer Patienten in der Tumornachsorge, die

  7. High-field MR imaging of tethered cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigal, R.; Bicetre, L.; Blass, C.; Doyon, D.; Pariente, D.

    1986-01-01

    MR imaging examinations of 12 patients with tethered cord syndrome have been performed on a 1.5-T MR imaging unit. Patients ranged in age from 3 to 60 years. MR findings were compared with those of myelography and metrizamide CT in all cases. Five patients underwent surgical control and postoperative MR imaging. Sagittal and axial sections were obtained using a spin-echo multisection, multiecho technique. T1-axial weighted images (SE 600/25) were sufficient to locate the position of the tip of the conus. They also allowed identification of extraspinal and intraspinal lipomas and clear-cut demarcation form associated tethered cord. Drawbacks of MR imaging were lack of precise depiction of the bone structures and the fact that clear identification of abnormal roots was problematic. The craniovertebral junction was always checked; two asymptomatic Chiari malformations were visualized. This study leads the authors to conclude that MR imaging should be used as the examination of first choice in the management of tethered cord syndrome

  8. Meniscal position on routine MR imaging of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.T.; Staron, R.B.; Feldman, F.; Cepel, E.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To determine the prevalence of meniscal protrusion (i.e. location of the outer edge of a meniscus beyond the tibial articular surface), and to determine its relationship with internal derangement, joint effusion, and degenerative arthropathy. Design and patients. Sagittal and coronal MR images of 111 abnormal and 46 normal knees were evaluated for the presence of meniscal protrusion. We set 25% as the minimum amount of displacement considered abnormal because this was the smallest amount of displacement we could confidently discern. Presence of meniscal tear, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, joint effusion, or osteophytosis was also recorded. Results and conclusion. Normal examinations demonstrated protrusion of the medial meniscus in 6.5% of sagittal images and 15% of coronal images, and of the lateral meniscus in 2% and 13%, respectively. Fisher's exact test demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the normal and abnormal groups for the medial meniscus on both sagittal (P 0.2). A protruding medial meniscus was associated with effusion and osteophytosis (P 0.1). Posterior protrusion of the lateral meniscus was only associated with ACL injury (P<0.0001); protruding anterior horns and bodies of lateral menisci were not associated with any of the four abnormalities. It is concluded that the medial meniscus may occasionally protrude more than 25% of its width, but protrusion is more often due to effusion and osteophytes. Protrusion of the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus is associated with ACL insufficiency, while protrusion of the body and anterior horn of the lateral meniscus is a normal variant. (orig.). With 4 figs

  9. Modular Carbon and Gold Nanoparticles for High Field MR Imaging and Theranostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, Nikhil

    The ability to track labeled cancer cells in vivo would allow researchers to study their distribution, growth and metastatic potential within the intact organism. Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging is invaluable for tracking cancer cells in vivo as it benefits from high spatial resolution and absence of ionizing radiation. However, many MR contrast agents (CAs) required to label cells either do not significantly accumulate in cells or are not biologically compatible for translational studies. Accordingly, we have developed carbon- and gold-nanoparticles coupled to gadolinium(III) [Gd(III)] chelates for T1-weighted MR imaging that demonstrated remarkable properties for cell tracking in vitro and in vivo.. We created nanodiamond-Gd(III) aggregates (NDG) by peptide coupling Gd(III) chelates to aminated nanodiamonds. NDG had high relaxivity independent of field strength (unprecedented for Gd(III)-nanoparticle conjugates), and demonstrated a 300-fold increase in cellular delivery of Gd(III) compared to clinical Gd(III) chelates. Further, we were able to monitor the tumor growth of NDG-labeled flank tumors by T1-weighted MRI for 26 days in vivo, longer than reported for other MR CAs or nuclear agents. Further, theranostic nanodiamond-gadolinium(III)-doxorubicin (ND-Gd-Dox) aggregates were generated by conjugating doxorubicin (ND-Gd-Dox), which enabled efficient cancer chemotherapy in breast cancer cells. Further, we synthesized Gd(III)-gold nanoconjugates (Gd AuNPs) with varied chelate structure and nanoparticle-chelate linker length. Significantly enhanced cell labeling was demonstrated compared to previous gadolinium-gold-DNA nanoconstructs. Differences in Gd(III) loading, surface packing and cell uptake were observed between four different Gd AuNP formulations suggesting that linker length and surface charge play an important role in cell labeling. The best performing Gd AuNPs afforded 23.6 +/- 3.6 fmol of Gd(III) per cell at an incubation concentration of 27.5 micro

  10. Comparison of (31)P saturation and inversion magnetization transfer in human liver and skeletal muscle using a clinical MR system and surface coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2015-02-01

    (31)P MRS magnetization transfer ((31)P-MT) experiments allow the estimation of exchange rates of biochemical reactions, such as the creatine kinase equilibrium and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. Although various (31)P-MT methods have been successfully used on isolated organs or animals, their application on humans in clinical scanners poses specific challenges. This study compared two major (31)P-MT methods on a clinical MR system using heteronuclear surface coils. Although saturation transfer (ST) is the most commonly used (31)P-MT method, sequences such as inversion transfer (IT) with short pulses might be better suited for the specific hardware and software limitations of a clinical scanner. In addition, small NMR-undetectable metabolite pools can transfer MT to NMR-visible pools during long saturation pulses, which is prevented with short pulses. (31)P-MT sequences were adapted for limited pulse length, for heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils with inhomogeneous B1 , for the need for volume selection and for the inherently low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on a clinical 3-T MR system. The ST and IT sequences were applied to skeletal muscle and liver in 10 healthy volunteers. Monte-Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the behavior of the IT measurements with increasing imperfections. In skeletal muscle of the thigh, ATP synthesis resulted in forward reaction constants (k) of 0.074 ± 0.022 s(-1) (ST) and 0.137 ± 0.042 s(-1) (IT), whereas the creatine kinase reaction yielded 0.459 ± 0.089 s(-1) (IT). In the liver, ATP synthesis resulted in k = 0.267 ± 0.106 s(-1) (ST), whereas the IT experiment yielded no consistent results. ST results were close to literature values; however, the IT results were either much larger than the corresponding ST values and/or were widely scattered. To summarize, ST and IT experiments can both be implemented on a clinical body scanner with heteronuclear transmit-receive surface coils; however, ST results are

  11. MR arthrography: how I do it

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankaoglu, M.

    2012-01-01

    detecting cartilage lesions,labral pathology in both shoulder and hip, extend of tears in suprasupinatus tendon in shoulder, scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments in wrist and talofibular ligaments in ankle. There are numerous articles about MR arthrography to prove its superiority to conventional MR imaging for a growing number of indications and, with further research and refinement of techniques, this trend is likely to continue. In one recent studies MR arthrography showed statistically significant increased sensitivity for detection of partial-thickness articular surface supraspinatus tears, anterior labral tears, and SLAP tears compared with conventional MRI at 3 Tesla in shoulder. So it is not hard to say that 3-T MR arthrography will sure be the next step of musculoskeletal radiologists choice in the near future

  12. Analysis of influence of heat exchange conditions on the outer surface of the lithium-ion battery to electrolyte temperature under the conditions of high current loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krasnoshlykov Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of thermal conditions of a lithium-ion battery using the software package ANSYS Electric and ANSYS Fluent has been carried out. Time dependence of the electrolyte temperature on the various heat exchange conditions on the outer surface has been obtained.

  13. Reduction of superoxide dismutase activity correlates with visualization of edema by T[sub 2]-weighted MR imaging in focal ischemic rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imaizumi, Shigeki; Chang, LeeHong; Cohen, Yoram; Chan, P H; Weinstein, P R; James, T L [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States); Yoshimoto, Takashi

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the correlation between in vivo serial T[sub 2]-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and changes in superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and water, sodium ion (Na[sup +]), and potassium ion (K[sup +]) contents measured in vitro using rat brain following right middle cerebral artery occlusion in conjunction with bilateral common carotid artery (CCA) occlusion. One hour later the left CCA was released. Serial MR images showed edema developed from the outer cortex towards the center. The T[sub 2] signal intensity of the injured right cortex increased with time compared to that of the contralateral cortex. Increased Na[sup +] and water and decreased K[sup +] contents occurred in the injured cortex, indicating that serial T[sub 2]-weighted MR imaging reflects the changes in water content and Na[sup +] and K[sup +] concentrations determined by biochemical techniques. GSH-Px activity was little changed. Total SOD in the injured cortex decreased 1 hour after ischemia and remained low throughout the experiment. In contrast, SOD activity in the noninfarcted left cortex also decreased after 1 hour but returned to normal after 2 hours of ischemia. Our results suggest that oxygen free radicals are important in developing ischemic brain edema and cerebral infarction. (author).

  14. The use of paraffin wax in a new solar cooker with inner and outer reflectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabacigil Bihter

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the potential use and effectiveness of paraffin wax in a new solar cooker was experimentally investigated during daylight and late evening hours. For these experiments, a cooker having an inner reflecting surface was designed, constructed by filling paraffin wax and metal shavings. The side- and sub-surface temperatures of the paraffin wax in the cooker are measured in the summer months of June and July. The thermal efficiency of the cooker was tested on different conditions. The results show that the optimum angle of the outer reflector is 30°. Here, the peak temperature of the paraffin wax in the solar cooker was 83.4 °C. The average solar radiation reflected makes a contribution of 9.26% to the temperature of paraffin wax with the outer reflector. The solar cooker with the outer reflector angle of 30° receives also reflected radiation from the inner reflectors. Besides, the heating time is decreased to approximately 1 hour. The designed solar cooker can be effectively used with 30.3% daily thermal efficiency and paraffin wax due to the amount of energy stored.

  15. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, M. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S. [Technical Univ. of Muenchen, (Germany). Childrens' Hospital; Auer, D.P. [Max-Planck-Institute of Psychiatry, Muenchen (Germany). NMR Study Group

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma.

  16. MR diffusion imaging and 1H spectroscopy in a child with medulloblastoma: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, M.; Eidenschink, A.; Mueller-Weihrich, S.; Auer, D.P.

    2000-01-01

    We report on a child with a metastasising medulloblastoma which was assessed by MR diffusion imaging and 1H MR spectroscopy (MRS). Reduced mean apparent diffusion coefficients and a high amount of taurine could be demonstrated. This is the first reported case of high taurine in medulloblastoma in vivo and confirms earlier in vitro findings. It is suggested that the changes on diffusion imaging, possibly reflecting the small-cell histology of the tumour and high taurine in MRS, are indicative of medulloblastoma

  17. Trypanosoma cruzi. Surface antigens of blood and culture forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogueira, N.; Chaplan, S.; Tydings, J.D.; Unkeless, J.; Cohn, Z.

    1981-01-01

    The surface polypeptides of both cultured and blood forms of Trypanosoma cruzi were iodinated by the glucose oxidase-lactoperoxidase technique. Blood-form trypomastigotes (BFT) isolated form infected mice displayed a major 90,000-Mr component. In contrast, both epimastigotes and trypomastigotes obtained form acellular cultures expressed a smaller 75,000-Mr peptide. Both major surface components were presumably glycoproteins in terms of their binding to concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B. Within a 3-h period, both blood and culture forms synthesized their respective surface glycoproteins (90,000 Mr and 75,000 Mr, respectively in vitro. [/sub 35/S]methionine-labeled surface peptides were immunoprecipitated with immune sera of both human and murine origin. A panel of sera form patients with chronic Chagas' disease and hyperimmunized mice recognized similar surface peptides. These immunogens were the same components as the major iodinated species. The major BFT surface peptide was readily removed by trypsin treatment of the parasites, although the procedure did not affect the 75,000-Mr peptide from the culture forms. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that the 90,000-Mr peptide found on BFT was an acidic protein of isoelectric point (pI) 5.0, whereas, the 75,000-Mr peptide form culture-form trypomastigotes has a pI of 7.2. The 90,000-Mr component is thought to be responsible for the anti-phagocytic properties of the BFT

  18. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, Claudius W.; Schott, Ulrich G.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Truebenbach, Jochen; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Schneider, Wilke [Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  19. MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, Claudius W.; Schott, Ulrich G.; Pereira, Philippe L.; Truebenbach, Jochen; Claussen, Claus D.; Duda, Stephan H.; Schneider, Wilke

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-guided lumbar sympathicolysis (LSL) in a non-selected patient population. One hundred one MR-guided LSL procedures were performed in 89 patients according to Haaga's technique using a horizontally open clinical MR system (0.2 T) and non-ferromagnetic 20-G cannulas (neurolysis, n=93; blockade, n=8). Only gradient-recalled sequences in either single or multislice mode [fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) and fast low-angle shot] were applied for anatomical survey and needle guiding. Bupivacaine injection was monitored with MR fluoroscopically. Fluid distribution was subsequently documented in a CT scan in 65 patients. Ninety-one LSL procedures could be successfully completed. Ten patients were not treated using MR due to patient inconvenience, severe motion artifacts (n=4 each), excessive spondylophytes, and retroperitoneal hematoma (n=1 each). One case of ureteral necrosis occurred. Motion artifacts were rated less severe in single-slice FISP sequences and in obese patients. An average of 3.48 sequence measurements were required for definitive needle placement. Average table time was 32.3 min. An MR-guided LSL is feasible and can be performed with acceptable safety and time effort. It can be recommended for repeated sympathetic blockades in younger patients to avoid cumulative irradiation associated with CT guidance. (orig.)

  20. Brain MR imaging in systemic lupus erythematous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Ae; Chang, Kee Hyun; Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Kyung Hwon; Kim, Sung Kwon; Lee, Jung Sang [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Sang Hoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-09-15

    To present MR imaging findings of intracranial lesions in systemic lupus erythematosus(SLE), a retrospective study was performed on MR images of 33 SLE patients with neurologic symptoms and signs. MR imaging was performed on either a 0.5 T (21 patients) or 2.0 T unit (12 patients), using T1-weighted, proton-density-weighted, and T2-weighted spin echo sequences in all patients. In seven patients, post-contrast T1-weighted images were also obtained after administration of gadopentetate dimeglumine. The main MR findings consisted of focal lesions suggesting ischemia/infarct (15 patients), diffuse brain atrophy (8), and findings associated with infection (4). The MR findings were normal in 11 patients (33%). The focal lesions suggesting ischemia/infarcts presumably secondary to vasculitis were distributed in the cortex or subcortical white matter (7 patients), deep periventricular white matter (3), or in both areas (5). Most of the focal lesions were multiple and small in size. The findings associated with infection were variable and included communicating hydrocephalus, meningeal enhancement, granuloma, etc. MR findings of SLE were non-specific and therefore clinical correlation is needed when evaluating SLE in MR.

  1. Quantitative 1H MR spectroscopy of the brain in patients with congestive heart failure before and after cardiac transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Lim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Jung Hee

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of cardiac transplantation on the brain in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), using quantitative 1 H MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS). Ten patients with CHF underwent MRI and quantitative 1 H-MRS before and 1-2 and 4-9 months after cardiac transplantation. MR spectra were obtained from parietal white matter (PWM) and occipital gray matter (OGM) using PROBE (PROton Brain Exam). Changes in MR signal intensity were evaluated, and the cerebral metabolic concentrations in PWM and OGM were compared. For comparative purposes, 20 normal volunteers were included. No abnormal MR signal intensity was seen in the brain before or after cardiac transplantation. Changes in cerebral metabolic concentrations were observed on 1 H-MRS; concentrations of creatine (Cr) in PWM, and of N-acetylacepartate (NAA), Cr and myo-Inositol(mI) in OGM were significantly lower before transplantation. After successful transplantation, Cr levels returned to their normal range in PWM and OGM, while a slightly increase choline (Cho) level was observed in PWM. Cerebral hypoperfusion in CHF can be evaluated using 1 H-MRS. MRS may play a substantial role in monitoring the effect of cardiac transplantation

  2. Nontraumatic spinal epidural hematomas. MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loevblad, K.O.; Baumgartner, R.W.; Zambaz, B.D.; Remonda, L.; Ozdoba, C.; Schroth, G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare clinical entity with a bleak outcome. The aim of our study was to establish the value of MR findings in the diagnosis of nontraumatic SEH. Material and Methods: Seven patients with nontraumatic SEH were examined by MR at 1.5 T. Two patients were under anticoagulation therapy with heparin, and 2 others were taking salicylic acid. One patient had lupus erythematodes with a marked thrombocytopenia. One patient had a spinal arteriovenous malformation. Results: MR imaging permitted the accurate localization of extradural intraspinal expansive lesions which exhibited the characteristic signal intensities of blood. Five patients underwent laminectomy and evacuation of the hematoma. In the acute phase, the hematomas appeared isointense when compared with the spinal cord on T1-weighted images and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. Later the hematomas were hyperintense on T1-weighted images and showed signals identical to those of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on T2-weighted images. Conclusion: MR imaging established the exact diagnosis and localization of SEH in all cases. MR also can provide useful information about the age of the hematomas. (orig.)

  3. MR imaging and histopathology of cartilage tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Hirokazu; Ohba, Satoru; Ohtsuka, Takanobu; Matui, Norio; Nakamura, Takaaki (Nagoya City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1994-05-01

    The MR imaging-pathologic correlation of cartilaginous bone tumors and the value of intravenously administered Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging was studied. The MR studies were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty-seven cases were examined with 0.5 T and 1.0 T scanner and all cases were pathologically proved. We discussed the following MR findings: signal intensities of tumors, Gd-DTPA features, morphological findings, and associated findings. Hyaline cartilage tumors showed low signal intensity on T[sub 1]-weighted images and very high signal intensity on T[sub 2]-weighted images. Lobulated marginal enhancements were recognized in chondrosarcomas. This may be an important finding to suspect chondrosarcoma. (author).

  4. Generation of structural MR images from amyloid PET: Application to MR-less quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hongyoon; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-12-07

    Structural magnetic resonance (MR) images concomitantly acquired with PET images can provide crucial anatomical information for precise quantitative analysis. However, in the clinical setting, not all the subjects have corresponding MR. Here, we developed a model to generate structural MR images from amyloid PET using deep generative networks. We applied our model to quantification of cortical amyloid load without structural MR. Methods: We used florbetapir PET and structural MR data of Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database. The generative network was trained to generate realistic structural MR images from florbetapir PET images. After the training, the model was applied to the quantification of cortical amyloid load. PET images were spatially normalized to the template space using the generated MR and then standardized uptake value ratio (SUVR) of the target regions was measured by predefined regions-of-interests. A real MR-based quantification was used as the gold standard to measure the accuracy of our approach. Other MR-less methods, a normal PET template-based, multi-atlas PET template-based and PET segmentation-based normalization/quantification methods, were also tested. We compared performance of quantification methods using generated MR with that of MR-based and MR-less quantification methods. Results: Generated MR images from florbetapir PET showed visually similar signal patterns to the real MR. The structural similarity index between real and generated MR was 0.91 ± 0.04. Mean absolute error of SUVR of cortical composite regions estimated by the generated MR-based method was 0.04±0.03, which was significantly smaller than other MR-less methods (0.29±0.12 for the normal PET-template, 0.12±0.07 for multiatlas PET-template and 0.08±0.06 for PET segmentation-based methods). Bland-Altman plots revealed that the generated MR-based SUVR quantification was the closest to the SUVR values estimated by the real MR-based method. Conclusion

  5. A Miniaturized Seismometer for Surface Measurements in the Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerdt, W. B.; Pike, W. T.

    2001-01-01

    Seismology is a powerful tool for investigating the inner structure and dynamic processes of a planetary body. The interior structure information derived from seismic measurements is complementary to other methods of probing the subsurface (such as gravity and electromagnetics), both in terms of spatial and depth resolution and the relevant types of material properties being sensed. The propagation of seismic waves is sensitive to composition (via density and elastic parameters), temperature (via attenuation) and physical state (solid vs. liquid). In addition, the seismicity (level and distribution in space and time of seismic activity) provides information on the impact flux and tectonic forces currently active within the body. The major satellites of the outer solar system provide obvious targets for seismic investigations. In addition, small bodies, such as asteroids and comets, can also benefit from seismic measurements. We have developed an extremely small, lightweight, low-power seismometer for planetary applications which is ideally suited for use in the outer solar system. This instrument has previously been proposed and selected for use on a comet (on the Rosetta Lander, subsequently deselected for programmatic reasons) and Mars (on the NetLander mission). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salgado, P; Zenteno, M A; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O

    1989-09-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.).

  7. Intracranial tuberculoma: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salgado, P.; Zenteno, M.A.; Rodriguez-Carbajal, J.; Brutto, O.H. del; Talamas, O.

    1989-01-01

    MR studies of 6 patients with intracranial tuberculoma are reviewed. All patients also underwent CT scans which showed hypo- or isodense lesions with abnormal enhancement following contrast administration. MR showed lesions with prolongation of the T1 relaxation time in every case. On the T2-weighted sequences, the signal properties of the tuberculoma varied according to the stage of evolution of the lesion. Incipient tuberculomas appeared as scattered areas of hypointensity surrounded by edema. Mature tuberculomas were composed of a dark necrotic center surrounded by an isointense capsule which was, in turn, surrounded by edema. In one patient, the center of the lesion was hyperintense probably because of liquefaction and pus formation (tuberculous abscess). While both, CT and MR, were equally sensitive in visualizing the intracranial tuberculoma in every patient, MR was slightly superior in demonstrating the extent of the lesion, especially for brainstem tuberculomas. Nevertheless, the potential role for MR diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma is limited by the fact that other infectious or neoplasic diseases may present similar findings. The diagnosis of intracranial tuberculoma should rest on a proper integration of data from clinical manifestations, cerebrospinal fluid analysis, and neuroimaging studies. (orig.)

  8. T2-weighted MR imaging of the liver: Qualitative and quantitative comparison of SPACE MR imaging with turbo spin-echo MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohan, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.dohan@lrb.aphp.fr [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière, AP-HP, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10 Rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); UMR INSERM 965, Hôpital Lariboisière, 2 Rue Amboise Paré, 75010 Paris (France); Gavini, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: jpgavini@gmail.com [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière, AP-HP, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10 Rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); Placé, Vinciane, E-mail: vinciane.place@gmail.com [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière, AP-HP, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Sebbag, Delphine, E-mail: delphinesebbag@gmail.com [Department of Body and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Lariboisière, AP-HP, 2 Rue Ambroise Paré, 75475 Paris Cedex 10 (France); Université Paris-Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 10 Rue de Verdun, 75010 Paris (France); Vignaud, Alexandre, E-mail: alexandre.vignaud@cea.fr [LRMN, Neurospin, CEA-SACLAY, Bâtiment 145, 91 191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2013-11-01

    Objective: To qualitatively and quantitatively compare T2-weighted MR imaging of the liver using volumetric spin-echo with sampling perfection with application-optimized contrast using different flip angle evolutions (SPACE) with conventional turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequence for fat-suppressed T2-weighted MR imaging of the liver. Materials and methods: Thirty-three patients with suspected focal liver lesions had SPACE MR imaging and conventional fat-suppressed TSE MR imaging. Images were analyzed quantitatively by measuring the lesion-to-liver contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of main focal hepatic lesions, hepatic and splenic parenchyma and qualitatively by evaluating the presence of vascular, respiratory motion and cardiac artifacts. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to search for differences between the two sequences. Results: SPACE MR imaging showed significantly greater CNR for focal liver lesions (median = 22.82) than TSE MR imaging (median = 14.15) (P < .001). No differences were found for SNR of hepatic parenchyma (P = .097), main focal hepatic lesions (P = .35), and splenic parenchyma (P = .25). SPACE sequence showed less artifacts than TSE sequence (vascular, P < .001; respiratory motion, P < .001; cardiac, P < .001) but needed a longer acquisition time (228.4 vs. 162.1 s; P < .001). Conclusion: SPACE MR imaging provides a significantly increased CNR for focal liver lesions and less artifacts by comparison with the conventional TSE sequence. These results should stimulate further clinical studies with a surgical standard of reference to compare the two techniques in terms of sensitivity for malignant lesions.

  9. Clinical Proton MR Spectroscopy in Central Nervous System Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Jeffry R.; Barker, Peter B.; Bartha, Robert; Bizzi, Alberto; Boesch, Chris; Bolan, Patrick J.; Brindle, Kevin M.; Cudalbu, Cristina; Dinçer, Alp; Dydak, Ulrike; Emir, Uzay E.; Frahm, Jens; González, Ramón Gilberto; Gruber, Stephan; Gruetter, Rolf; Gupta, Rakesh K.; Heerschap, Arend; Henning, Anke; Hetherington, Hoby P.; Howe, Franklyn A.; Hüppi, Petra S.; Hurd, Ralph E.; Kantarci, Kejal; Klomp, Dennis W. J.; Kreis, Roland; Kruiskamp, Marijn J.; Leach, Martin O.; Lin, Alexander P.; Luijten, Peter R.; Marjańska, Małgorzata; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Meyerhoff, Dieter J.; Mountford, Carolyn E.; Nelson, Sarah J.; Pamir, M. Necmettin; Pan, Jullie W.; Peet, Andrew C.; Poptani, Harish; Posse, Stefan; Pouwels, Petra J. W.; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Ross, Brian D.; Scheenen, Tom W. J.; Schuster, Christian; Smith, Ian C. P.; Soher, Brian J.; Tkáč, Ivan; Vigneron, Daniel B.; Kauppinen, Risto A.

    2014-01-01

    A large body of published work shows that proton (hydrogen 1 [1H]) magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy has evolved from a research tool into a clinical neuroimaging modality. Herein, the authors present a summary of brain disorders in which MR spectroscopy has an impact on patient management, together with a critical consideration of common data acquisition and processing procedures. The article documents the impact of 1H MR spectroscopy in the clinical evaluation of disorders of the central nervous system. The clinical usefulness of 1H MR spectroscopy has been established for brain neoplasms, neonatal and pediatric disorders (hypoxia-ischemia, inherited metabolic diseases, and traumatic brain injury), demyelinating disorders, and infectious brain lesions. The growing list of disorders for which 1H MR spectroscopy may contribute to patient management extends to neurodegenerative diseases, epilepsy, and stroke. To facilitate expanded clinical acceptance and standardization of MR spectroscopy methodology, guidelines are provided for data acquisition and analysis, quality assessment, and interpretation. Finally, the authors offer recommendations to expedite the use of robust MR spectroscopy methodology in the clinical setting, including incorporation of technical advances on clinical units. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:24568703

  10. MR imaging reflects cartilage proteoglycan degradation in the rabbit knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, P.K.; O'Byrne, E.M.; Blancuzzi, V.; Wilson, D.; Douglas, F.L.; Mezrich, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Depletion of proteoglycan (PG) from articular cartilage is an early feature of osteoarthritis (OA). Noninvasive assessment of joint morphology corresponding to changes in cartilage PG is crucial for early diagnosis of OA and for demonstration of efficacy of drugs for OA. Intraarticular injection of papain causes a reversible loss of cartilage PG in intact joints. Both knees of NZW rabbits were scanned with a 1.5-T Signa MR imager with a 3-inch surface coil. A spin-echo technique was used, and coronal and sagittal MR images were obtained at 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours after injection of 5 U papain. An 8-cm field of view, a 3-mm section thickness, and a 128 x 256 matrix was used to obtain T1-, proton density-, and T2-weighted images. Cartilage was dissected from the femur for measurement of PG with 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue. Results are presented

  11. MR imaging and MR spectroscopy for characterization of cardiomyopathies in adolescents - preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beer, M.; Buchner, S.; Fuchs, J.; Machann, W.; Ritter, C.O.; Beissert, M.; Darge, K.; Hahn, D.; Koestler, H.; Wirbelauer, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Cardiomyopathy is a rare but life-threatening disease in children and adolescents. Recent studies reported morphological, functional or metabolic alterations of the heart. We discuss a combined MR imaging and 31 P MR spectroscopy (MRS) protocol allowing the analysis of interdependencies between these parameters. Since normal values of cardiac MR parameters in this age group are not available, we included studies of age-matched healthy adolescents. Materials and Methods: 2D-CINE was used to assess left ventricular (LV) parameters. Additional 3D-Chemical Shift Imaging (3D-CSI) and Spectral Localization with Optimal Pointspread Function (SLOOP) reconstruction allowed quantification of the cardiac energy metabolism. Patients (n = 4; all male; age 16.8 ± 2.9 years) were included on the basis of an echocardiographic diagnosis of possible cardiomyopathy. The same protocol was applied to healthy young volunteers (n = 4; 1 female, 3 male; age 15.5 ± 0.6 years). Results: The patients had a significantly higher LV mass index compared to the control group (147 ± 41 g/m2 versus 97 ± 16 g/m2; p = 0.04). The other LV parameters (including LV EF with 59 ± 22 % versus 67 ± 10 %) showed no significant differences. The phosphocreatine to adenosine triphosphate ratio (PCr/ATP-ratio) of the patients was reduced to 1.71 ± 0.40 versus 2.44 ± 0.30 (p = 0.01), combined with a tendency towards decreased PCr concentrations of 9.1 ± 2.5 versus 7.9 ± 1.0 mmol/kg. Conclusion: The combination of 31 P MR spectroscopy and MR imaging allows quantitative determination of morphologic, functional and metabolic alterations in adolescents with suspected cardiomyopathy in one examination procedure. The reduction of energy metabolism combined with unaltered global function may indicate a primary role of metabolism in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies in adolescents. (orig.)

  12. Breast MR imaging: correlation of high resolution dynamic MR findings with prognostic factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Shin Ho; Cho, Nariya; Chung, Hye Kyung; Kim, Seung Ja; Cho, Kyung Soo; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Joo Hee

    2005-01-01

    We wanted to correlate the kinetic and morphologic MR findings of invasive breast cancer with the classical and molecular prognostic factors. Eighty-seven patients with invasive ductal carcinoma NOS underwent dynamic MR imaging at 1.5 T, and with using the T1-weighted 3D FLASH technique. The morphologic findings (shape, margin, internal enhancement of the mass or the enhancement distribution and the internal enhancement of any non-mass lesion) and the kinetic findings (the initial phase and the delayed phase of the time-signal. Intensity curve) were interpreted using a ACR BI-RADS-MRI lexicon. We correlate MR findings with histopathologic prognostic factors (tumor size, lymph node status and tumor grade) and the immunohistochemically detected biomarkers (ER, PR, ρ 53, c-erbB-2, EGFR and Ki-67). Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were than performed. Among the MR findings, a spiculated margin, rim enhancement and washout were significantly correlated with the prognostic factors. A spiculated margin was independently associated with the established predictors of a good prognosis (a lower histologic and nuclear grade, positive ER and PR) and rim enhancement was associated with a poor prognosis (a higher histologic and nuclear grade, negative ER and PR). Wash out was a independent predictor of Ki-67 activity. Some of the findings of high resolution dynamic MR imaging were associated with the prognostic factors, and these findings may predict the prognosis of breast cancer

  13. High-field-strength MR imaging of endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawin, M.; McCarthy, S.M.; Comite, F.

    1987-01-01

    Twelve women with proven endometriosis were evaluated with MR imaging, utilizing a 1.5-T system. Axial and sagittal T1, proton density, and T2-weighted images were acquired. Laparoscopies were performed within a 1-month interval of the study in all cases. MR imaging accurately identified seven endometriomas but missed lesions in two cases. Areas with endometriotic implants were accurately localized five cases. The authors conclude that MR imaging is extremely useful in identifying sites of endometriosis and, therefore, promises to obviate repeated laparoscopies to monitor patients' response to therapy

  14. Gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography: comparison with MR urography using HASTE technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Lee, Jeong Min; Han, Young Min; Cheong, Gyung Ho; Oh, Hee Sul; Kim, Chong Soo; Park, Sung Kwang; Kim, Young Gon

    2000-01-01

    To compare the feasibility of gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography (GEMRU) and conventional MR urography using the half-Fourier acquisition single-shot turbo spin-echo (HASTE) sequence in patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney. Fifteen patients with hydronephrosis or non-visualized kidney, as demonstrated by ultrasonography or intravenous urography, were enrolled in this study. Nine were men and six were women, and their age ranged from 18 to 77 (mean, 60.6) years. For all MR examinations, a 1.5T MR unit was employed. For breath-hold MR urography, the HASTE technique (MRU) was used, and reconstruction involved the use of a maximum intensity-projection (MIP) algorithm. For gadolinium-enhanced excretory MR urography, the fast low angle shot (FLASH) 3-D method was used and images were obtained at 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes, and reconstruction again involved the use of MIP algorithm. In some cases, additional GEMRU was obtained 24 hour after contrast material injection, and an MIP algorithm was used for reconstruction. MRU and GEMRU were independently interpreted by two radiologists who for quantitative analysis compared SNR with CNR, and at each anatomic level qualitatively analyzed morphologic accuracy and diagnostic value of the lesions. In quantitative analysis, SNR and CNR differences between the two sequences at the renal pelvis and the level of the ureter were not significant (p greater than 0.05). In qualitative analysis, GEMRU was superior to MRU for the assessment of evaluated ureter at each level (p less than 0.05), anatomic anomaly and intrinsic tumor. Ureteral stones, however, were more easily diagnosed with MRU. For assessment of the ureter GEMRU is superior to MRU and has the advantage of evaluating renal function. We believe that for evaluation of the urinary tract, especially the distal ureter, GEMRU may be a valuable adjunct to routine MR urography. (author)

  15. CT and MR imaging of craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuda, M. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Takahashi, S. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Higano, S. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Kurihara, N. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Ikeda, H. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Sakamoto, K. [Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1997-05-01

    We reviewed imaging findings of CT and MR imaging in 20 cases of surgically confirmed craniopharyngioma in an attempt to determine their relation to patterns of tumor extent. The relationship between these patterns and the frequency of preoperative CT diagnosis and MR imaging diagnosis according to the surgical diagnosis were determined. The CT technique was superior to MR imaging in the detection of calcification. The MR imaging technique was superior to CT for determining tumor extent and provided valuable information about the relationships of the tumor to surrounding structures. Thus, CT and MR imaging have complementary roles in the diagnosis of craniopharyngiomas. In cases of possible craniopharyngioma, noncontrast sagittal T1-weighted images may enable the identification of the normal pituitary, possibly leading to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. CT and MR imaging of craniopharyngioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, M.; Takahashi, S.; Higano, S.; Kurihara, N.; Ikeda, H.; Sakamoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    We reviewed imaging findings of CT and MR imaging in 20 cases of surgically confirmed craniopharyngioma in an attempt to determine their relation to patterns of tumor extent. The relationship between these patterns and the frequency of preoperative CT diagnosis and MR imaging diagnosis according to the surgical diagnosis were determined. The CT technique was superior to MR imaging in the detection of calcification. The MR imaging technique was superior to CT for determining tumor extent and provided valuable information about the relationships of the tumor to surrounding structures. Thus, CT and MR imaging have complementary roles in the diagnosis of craniopharyngiomas. In cases of possible craniopharyngioma, noncontrast sagittal T1-weighted images may enable the identification of the normal pituitary, possibly leading to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. MR imaging of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spickler, E.; Lufkin, R.B.; Frazee, J.; Lylyk, P.; Vinuela, F.; Bentson, J.R.; Dion, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage was produced in four Macaca nemestrina monkeys using the technique of Frazee. CT and MR imaging were performed immediately after the procedure and at frequent intervals up to 2 weeks after hemorrhage. The imaging studies were compared with clinical evaluations and pathologic specimens of all animals. Additional human clinical CT/MR studies of subarachnoid hemorrhage were also studied. Acute hemorrhage was recognized on MR as an increase in signal in the region of clot compared with surrounding cerebrospinal fluid. This most likely reflects T1 shortening due to proton binding rather than a pure paramagnetic effect. While CT is sensitive to the hemoglobin protein in acute hemorrhage, the superior resolution of the basal cisterns on MR images results in equal or better definition of acute subarachnoid hemorrhage on MR in many cases

  18. Malalignment at the Lisfranc joint: MR features in asymptomatic patients and cadaveric specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfaut, Emmanuelle M. [Radiology Department, Hospital Roger Salengro, CHRU of Lille, Bd du Professeur Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Rosenberg, Zehava Sadka [Radiology Department, Hospital for Joint Diseases, 301 17th East Street, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Demondion, Xavier [Radiology Department, Hospital Roger Salengro, CHRU of Lille, Bd du Professeur Jules Leclercq, 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Anatomy Department, Faculty of Medicine, Place de Verdun, 59037 Lille Cedex (France)

    2002-09-01

    Abstract Objective. To assess the frequency of malalignment in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd tarso-metatarsal joints (Lisfranc joint) in cadaveric specimen and asymptomatic individuals utilizing oblique axial MR images.Design and patients. Four fresh frozen cadaveric feet were dissected in the oblique axial plane at 5 mm slice thickness. Thirty MR studies in 29 patients who had no history of pain, trauma or surgery at the tarso-metatarsal area were included in our study. The 1st to 3rd tarso-metatarsal joints were evaluated on the MR studies and cadaveric slices by two musculoskeletal radiologists for (1) the presence of a medial and/or lateral step-off and (2) articular surface divergence.Results. In the cadaveric dissections there were lateral step-offs in the 1st (n=3) and in the 2nd ray (n=3) respectively. No joint incongruity was evidenced. The MR studies in the patients population depicted 28 step-offs (9 medial, 19 lateral) in the 1st ray, 16 (2 medial, 14 lateral) in the 2nd ray and two in the 3rd ray. Joint incongruity was present in the 2nd ray (n=6) and in the 3rd ray (n=12). All the above findings were limited to a few images.Conclusions. Isolated joint malalignment with otherwise normal findings (no ligamentous injury, no fracture and no bone marrow edema) might reflect normal anatomic features at the tarso-metatarsal joints and must be interpreted carefully. (orig.)

  19. An experimental study on renal functional disturbance in rabbits after acute ureteral obstruction with dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kyoung Ja [Seoul Red Cross Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Eun Chul; Rlee, Chung Sik [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To evaluate the anatomic and functional change in acutely obstructed kidneys, and probability of functional recovery after resolving the obstruction. There were 5 animal groups (6 rabbits in each group)-normal control group, 4 acute ureteral obstruction group. Each of the latter group was imaged with Gd-DTPA enhanced dynamic MR 2, 6, 24, and 48 hours after ligation of the left proximal urter, respectively. We compared the findings of dynamic MR imaging and histopathological findings. We could observe centripetal movement of dark band pattern which could be defined as 3 phases renal cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla in normal rabbits. The appearance of the dark band pattern was delayed or absent in ureteral obstruction group with linear relationship to the duration of the obstruction. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR can be used to differentiate acute obstructive nephropathy from other causes of nephropathy and foretell the prognosis of the obstruction.

  20. An experimental study on renal functional disturbance in rabbits after acute ureteral obstruction with dynamic Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Kyoung Ja; Chung, Eun Chul; Rlee, Chung Sik

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the anatomic and functional change in acutely obstructed kidneys, and probability of functional recovery after resolving the obstruction. There were 5 animal groups (6 rabbits in each group)-normal control group, 4 acute ureteral obstruction group. Each of the latter group was imaged with Gd-DTPA enhanced dynamic MR 2, 6, 24, and 48 hours after ligation of the left proximal urter, respectively. We compared the findings of dynamic MR imaging and histopathological findings. We could observe centripetal movement of dark band pattern which could be defined as 3 phases renal cortex, outer medulla, and inner medulla in normal rabbits. The appearance of the dark band pattern was delayed or absent in ureteral obstruction group with linear relationship to the duration of the obstruction. Gd-DTPA enhanced MR can be used to differentiate acute obstructive nephropathy from other causes of nephropathy and foretell the prognosis of the obstruction

  1. Origin of Outer Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Matthew J.; Lindstrom, David (Technical Monitor)

    2005-01-01

    Our ongoing research program combines extensive deep and wide-field observations using a variety of observational platforms with numerical studies of the dynamics of small bodies in the outer solar system in order to advance the main scientific goals of the community studying the Kuiper belt and the outer solar system. These include: (1) determining the relative populations of the known classes of KBOs as well as other possible classes; ( 2 ) determining the size distributions or luminosity function of the individual populations or the Kuiper belt as a whole; (3) determining the inclinations distributions of these populations; (4) establishing the radial extent of the Kuiper belt; ( 5 ) measuring and relating the physical properties of different types of KBOs to those of other solar system bodies; and, (6) completing our systematic inventory of the satellites of the outer planets.

  2. MR imaging of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Scheidler, J.; Sommer, B.; Graser, A.; Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Massmann, J.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer (PC) is developing into an important health care issue in light of the high incidence of PC and the improvements in stage-adapted therapy. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the current role of MR imaging and MR spectroscopy in the diagnosis and staging of PC.Material and methods Pertinent literature was searched and evaluated to collect information on current clinical indications, study techniques, diagnostic value, and limitations of magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. Major indications for MR imaging of patients with supected PC are to define tumor location before biopsy when clinical or TRUS findings are inconclusive, and to provide accurate staging of histologically proven PC to ascertain effective therapy. Current MR imaging techniques for the evaluation of PC include multiplanar high-resolution T2-weighted FSE and T1-weighted SE sequences using combined endorectal and phased-array coils. Using these techniques, the reported accuracy of MR imaging for the diagnosis of extracapsular tumor extension ranges between 82 and 88% with sensitivities between 80 and 95%, and specificities between 82 and 93%. Typical MR findings of PC in different stages of disease, as well as diagnostic problems, such as chronic prostatitis, biopsy-related hemorrhage and therapy-related changes of prostatic tissue are discussed. In addition, the current perspectives and limitations of MR spectroscopy in PC are summarized. Current MR imaging techniques provide important diagnostic information in the pretherapeutic workup of PC including a high staging accuracy, and is superior to TRUS. (orig.) [de

  3. MR findings of wernicke encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Goo; Han, Moon Hee; Park, Sung Ho; Na, Duk Yull; Song, Chi Sung

    1991-01-01

    Seven patients (33 to 58 years old) with clinical diagnoses of Wernicke encephalopathy were examined with MR on either a 2.0T (5 cases) or a 0.5T scanner (2 cases) using spin-echo pulse sequences. In 2 patients, follow-up MR studies were performed 1 and 5 weeks after thiamine (vitamine B1) treatment. Five patients (4 chronic alcoholics and 1 with hyperemesis gravidarum) showed atrophy of both mamillary bodies, along with patchy lesions around the third ventricle, medial thalami, tectum of the midbrain, and periaqueductal gray matter. Another patient with hyperemesis of gravidrum demonstrated only slightly atrophic mamillary bodies, and the last patient with severe vomiting after gastrojejunostomy showed only diencephaic/mesencephalic lesions with apparently normal mamillary bodies. A follow-up MR showed a decrease in previously-noted diencephalic/-/mesencephalic lesions but no change in the size of the mamillary bodies. Diencephalic/mesencephalic lesions were well seen as a high-signal intensity on proton-and T2-weighted axial images, while atrophy of the mamillary bodies was seen best on T1-weighted sagittal images. MR imaging is very useful in demonstrating the characteristic lesions of Wernicke encephalopathy and in evaluating the result of treatment on follow-up study

  4. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography in Leriche's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, J.; Steffens, J.C.; Brossmann, J.; Heller, M.; Loose, R.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the usefulness of contrast-enhanced MR angiography for the diagnosis of Leriche's syndrome. Material and methods: Leriche's syndrome was seen in 7 patients via DSA. In [dition, contrast-enhanced MR angiography was performed (T R 7.8 ms/T E 2.1 ms, flip angle 30 , slab thickness 116 mm, slice thickness 1.82 mm, 64 partitions, FOV 500x438 mm, matrix 224x512). Results: Diagnosis of Leriche's syndrome was possible by contrast-enhanced MR angiography in each case. Visualisation of the femoral arteries was not possible in two patients by intraarterial DSA, in three other patients there was an insufficient contrast in the femoral arteries with DSA. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography revealed good visualisation of the femoral arteries in these patients. In [dition, contrast-enhanced MR angiography allowed complete visualisation of the patent lower limb arteries. In intraarterial DSA visualisation of the lower limb arteries was achieved reached in only one patient, but was incomplete. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MR angiography yielded the correct diagnosis of Leriche's syndrome in all 7 patients. Contrast-enhanced MR angiography was superior to DSA in the assessment of the distal run-off vessels in five of seven patients. (orig.) [de

  5. Formation of the outer layer of the Dictyostelium spore coat depends on the inner-layer protein SP85/PsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Talibah; Kelley, Karen; Erdos, Gregory W; Kaplan, Lee; West, Christopher M

    2003-02-01

    The Dictyostelium spore is surrounded by a 220 microm thick trilaminar coat that consists of inner and outer electron-dense layers surrounding a central region of cellulose microfibrils. In previous studies, a mutant strain (TL56) lacking three proteins associated with the outer layer exhibited increased permeability to macromolecular tracers, suggesting that this layer contributes to the coat permeability barrier. Electron microscopy now shows that the outer layer is incomplete in the coats of this mutant and consists of a residual regular array of punctate electron densities. The outer layer is also incomplete in a mutant lacking a cellulose-binding protein associated with the inner layer, and these coats are deficient in an outer-layer protein and another coat protein. To examine the mechanism by which this inner-layer protein, SP85, contributes to outer-layer formation, various domain fragments were overexpressed in forming spores. Most of these exert dominant negative effects similar to the deletion of outer-layer proteins, but one construct, consisting of a fusion of the N-terminal and Cys-rich C1 domain, induces a dense mat of novel filaments at the surface of the outer layer. Biochemical studies show that the C1 domain binds cellulose, and a combination of site-directed mutations that inhibits its cellulose-binding activity suppresses outer-layer filament induction. The results suggest that, in addition to a previously described early role in regulating cellulose synthesis, SP85 subsequently contributes a cross-bridging function between cellulose and other coat proteins to organize previously unrecognized structural elements in the outer layer of the coat.

  6. Outer boundary as arrested history in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Stephen R

    2002-01-01

    We present explicit outer boundary conditions for the canonical variables of general relativity. The conditions are associated with the causal evolution of a finite Cauchy domain, a so-called quasilocal boost, and they suggest a consistent scheme for modelling such an evolution numerically. The scheme involves a continuous boost in the spacetime orthogonal complement 'orthogonal' T p (B) of the tangent space T p (B) belonging to each point p on the system boundary B. We show how the boost rate may be computed numerically via equations similar to those appearing in canonical investigations of black-hole thermodynamics (although here holding at an outer two-surface rather than the bifurcate two-surface of a Killing horizon). We demonstrate the numerical scheme on a model example, the quasilocal boost of a spherical three-ball in Minkowski spacetime. Developing our general formalism with recent hyperbolic formulations of the Einstein equations in mind, we use Anderson and York's 'Einstein-Christoffel' hyperbolic system as the evolution equations for our numerical simulation of the model

  7. Outer boundary as arrested history in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephen R.

    2002-06-01

    We present explicit outer boundary conditions for the canonical variables of general relativity. The conditions are associated with the causal evolution of a finite Cauchy domain, a so-called quasilocal boost, and they suggest a consistent scheme for modelling such an evolution numerically. The scheme involves a continuous boost in the spacetime orthogonal complement ⊥Tp(B) of the tangent space Tp(B) belonging to each point p on the system boundary B. We show how the boost rate may be computed numerically via equations similar to those appearing in canonical investigations of black-hole thermodynamics (although here holding at an outer two-surface rather than the bifurcate two-surface of a Killing horizon). We demonstrate the numerical scheme on a model example, the quasilocal boost of a spherical three-ball in Minkowski spacetime. Developing our general formalism with recent hyperbolic formulations of the Einstein equations in mind, we use Anderson and York's 'Einstein-Christoffel' hyperbolic system as the evolution equations for our numerical simulation of the model.

  8. MR-guided biopsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehl, H.B.; Frahm, C.

    1998-01-01

    Biopsies were the first 'intervention' under MR guidance. After initial difficulties concerning ferromagnetic biopsy instruments and the design of MR scanners, the latest technological improvements rendered MR guidance for biopsies more feasible. In this article we illustrate present-day clinical experience in the field of abdominal, breast and bone biopsy. Important aspects regarding the different designs of 'interventional' MR scanners and the visualization of instruments for biopsy are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Hippocampal MR volumetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, John W.; Botteron, K.; Brunsden, Barry S.; Sheline, Yvette I.; Walkup, Ronald K.; Black, Kevin J.; Gado, Mokhtar; Vannier, Michael W.

    1994-09-01

    Goal: To estimate hippocampal volumes from in vivo 3D magnetic resonance (MR) brain images and determine inter-rater and intra- rater repeatability. Objective: The precision and repeatability of hippocampal volume estimates using stereologic measurement methods is sought. Design: Five normal control and five schizophrenic subjects were MR scanned using a MPRAGE protocol. Fixed grid stereologic methods were used to estimate hippocampal volumes on a graphics workstation. The images were preprocessed using histogram analysis to standardize 3D MR image scaling from 16 to 8 bits and image volumes were interpolated to 0.5 mm3 isotropic voxels. The following variables were constant for the repeated stereologic measures: grid size, inter-slice distance (1.5 mm), voxel dimensions (0.5 mm3), number of hippocampi measured (10), total number of measurements per rater (40), and number of raters (5). Two grid sizes were tested to determine the coefficient of error associated with the number of sampled 'hits' (approximately 140 and 280) on the hippocampus. Starting slice and grid position were randomly varied to assure unbiased volume estimates. Raters were blind to subject identity, diagnosis, and side of the brain from which the image volumes were extracted and the order of subject presentation was randomized for each of the raters. Inter- and intra-rater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were determined. Results: The data indicate excellent repeatability of fixed grid stereologic hippocampal volume measures when using an inter-slice distance of 1.5 mm and a 6.25 mm2 grid (inter-rater ICCs equals 0.86 - 0.97, intra- rater ICCs equals 0.85 - 0.97). One major advantage of the current study was the use of 3D MR data which significantly improved visualization of hippocampal boundaries by providing the ability to access simultaneous orthogonal views while counting stereological marks within the hippocampus. Conclusion: Stereological estimates of 3D volumes from 2D MR

  10. Initial study of quantitative analysis of fatty liver by 1H-MR spectroscopy imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Changhong; Liu Yubao; Zhang Zhonglin; Xie Shufei; Wang Qiushi

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility of 1 H-MR spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) imaging to quantitatively detect fatty liver. Methods: Twenty patients with fatty liver and 11 healthy volunteers underwent plain CT scan, conventional MR imaging and 1 H-MRS analysis. The blood lipid and liver function were tested on the same day as the MR examination. 1 H-MRS sequence measured the peaks of H 2 O and lipid, and the areas under the peaks. The relative contents of the lipid compound were calculated, and compared with the results of CT scan and liver function tests. Results: The CT values of the normal group and the fatty liver group were (59 ± 9) HU and (24 ± 11) HU respectively. On 1 H-MRS a protruding high H 2 O peak and a flat low lipid peak were observed in the normal group, while the protruding high H 2 O peak and a high lipid peak appeared in the fatty liver group. The values of lipid peak in the normal group and the fatty liver group were (0.05 ± 0.01) x l0 5 , (0.70 ± 0.24) x l0 5 respectively (t=4.32, P 5 , (1.85 ± 0.47) x l0 5 respectively (t=1.26, P>0.05), the areas under the lipid peak were (1.36 ± 0.73) x 10 9 , (2.35 ± 1.15) x 10 9 respectively (t=5.21, P 2 O peak were (4.33 ± 1.28) x 10 11 , (3.55 ± 0.94) x 10 11 respectively (t=2.04, P>0.05). Conclusion: 1 H-MRS imaging is feasible to quantitatively detect liver fat and is a non-invasive method for detecting early fatty liver. (authors)

  11. 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle: Axial traction for morphological cartilage evaluation, quantitative T2 mapping and cartilage diffusion imaging—A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jungmann, Pia M.; Baum, Thomas; Schaeffeler, Christoph; Sauerschnig, Martin; Brucker, Peter U.; Mann, Alexander; Ganter, Carl; Bieri, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Axial traction is applicable during high resolution MR imaging of the ankle. • Axial traction during MR imaging oft the ankle improves cartilage surface delineation of the individual tibial and talar cartilage layer for better morphological evaluation without the need of intraarticular contrast agent application. • Coronal T1-weighted MR images with a driven equilibrium pulse performed best. • Axial traction during MR imaging of the ankle facilitates compartment discrimination for segmentation purposes resulting in better reproducibility. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the impact of axial traction during high resolution 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle on morphological assessment of articular cartilage and quantitative cartilage imaging parameters. Materials and Methods: MR images of n = 25 asymptomatic ankles were acquired with and without axial traction (6 kg). Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted (w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences with a driven equilibrium pulse and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w (IMfs) TSE sequences were acquired for morphological evaluation on a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = worst). For quantitative assessment of cartilage degradation segmentation was performed on 2D multislice-multiecho (MSME) SE T2, steady-state free-precession (SSFP; n = 8) T2 and SSFP diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n = 8) images. Wilcoxon-tests and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: With axial traction, joint space width increased significantly and delineation of cartilage surfaces was rated superior (P < 0.05). Cartilage surfaces were best visualized on coronal T1-w images (P < 0.05). Differences for cartilage matrix evaluation were smaller. Subchondral bone evaluation, motion artifacts and image quality were not significantly different between the acquisition methods (P > 0.05). T2 values were lower at the tibia than at the talus (P < 0.001). Reproducibility was better for images with axial traction. Conclusion

  12. 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle: Axial traction for morphological cartilage evaluation, quantitative T2 mapping and cartilage diffusion imaging—A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungmann, Pia M., E-mail: pia.jungmann@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Baum, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.baum@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Schaeffeler, Christoph, E-mail: schaeffeler@me.com [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Musculoskeletal Imaging, Kantonsspital Graubuenden, Loestrasse 170, CH-7000 Chur (Switzerland); Sauerschnig, Martin, E-mail: martin.sauerschnig@mri.tum.de [Department of Trauma Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Brucker, Peter U., E-mail: peter.brucker@lrz.tu-muenchen.de [Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Mann, Alexander, E-mail: abmann@onlinemed.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Department of Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Ganter, Carl, E-mail: cganter@tum.de [Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ismaninger Strasse 22, 81675 Munich (Germany); Bieri, Oliver, E-mail: oliver.bieri@unibas.ch [Division of Radiological Physics, Department of Radiology, University of Basel Hospital, Petersgraben 4, 4031 Basel (Switzerland); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Axial traction is applicable during high resolution MR imaging of the ankle. • Axial traction during MR imaging oft the ankle improves cartilage surface delineation of the individual tibial and talar cartilage layer for better morphological evaluation without the need of intraarticular contrast agent application. • Coronal T1-weighted MR images with a driven equilibrium pulse performed best. • Axial traction during MR imaging of the ankle facilitates compartment discrimination for segmentation purposes resulting in better reproducibility. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine the impact of axial traction during high resolution 3.0 T MR imaging of the ankle on morphological assessment of articular cartilage and quantitative cartilage imaging parameters. Materials and Methods: MR images of n = 25 asymptomatic ankles were acquired with and without axial traction (6 kg). Coronal and sagittal T1-weighted (w) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences with a driven equilibrium pulse and sagittal fat-saturated intermediate-w (IMfs) TSE sequences were acquired for morphological evaluation on a four-point scale (1 = best, 4 = worst). For quantitative assessment of cartilage degradation segmentation was performed on 2D multislice-multiecho (MSME) SE T2, steady-state free-precession (SSFP; n = 8) T2 and SSFP diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI; n = 8) images. Wilcoxon-tests and paired t-tests were used for statistical analysis. Results: With axial traction, joint space width increased significantly and delineation of cartilage surfaces was rated superior (P < 0.05). Cartilage surfaces were best visualized on coronal T1-w images (P < 0.05). Differences for cartilage matrix evaluation were smaller. Subchondral bone evaluation, motion artifacts and image quality were not significantly different between the acquisition methods (P > 0.05). T2 values were lower at the tibia than at the talus (P < 0.001). Reproducibility was better for images with axial traction. Conclusion

  13. Heating of the outer solar atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, E.N.

    1983-01-01

    The author discusses the idea that there must be a source of magnetic fields somewhere below the solar surface. He starts by considering present day ideas about the sun's internal structure. The sun has a radius of approximately 700,000 km, of which the outer 100,000 km or so is the convective zone, according to mixing-length models. The dynamo is believed to operate in the convective zone, across which there may be a 5-10% variation in the angular velocity. There are the stretched east-west fields similar to the ones in the earth's core. Associated with these are poloidal fields which contribute to a net dipole moment of the sun and are generated by a dynamo. The author shows that essentially no magnetic field configuration has an equilibrium; they dissipate quickly in spite of the high conductivity in fluid motions and heating. This is probably the major part of the heating of the sun's outer atmosphere. (Auth.)

  14. Abdominopelvic 1.5-T and 3.0-T MR Imaging in Healthy Volunteers: Relationship to Formation of DNA Double-Strand Breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntharalingam, Saravanabavaan; Mladenov, Emil; Sarabhai, Theresia; Wetter, Axel; Kraff, Oliver; Quick, Harald H; Forsting, Michael; Iliakis, Georg; Nassenstein, Kai

    2018-05-01

    Purpose To investigate the relationship between abdominopelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in peripheral blood lymphocytes among a cohort of healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods Blood samples were obtained from 40 healthy volunteers (23 women and 17 men; mean age, 27.2 years [range, 21-37 years]) directly before and 5 and 30 minutes after abdominopelvic MR imaging performed at 1.5 T (n = 20) or 3.0 T (n = 20). The number of DNA DSBs in isolated blood lymphocytes was quantified after indirect immunofluorescent staining of a generally accepted DSB marker, γ-H2AX, by means of high-throughput automated microscopy. As a positive control of DSB induction, blood lymphocytes from six volunteers were irradiated in vitro with x-rays at a dose of 1 Gy (70-90 keV). Statistical analysis was performed by using a Friedman test. Results No significant alteration in the frequency of DNA DSB induction was observed after MR imaging (before imaging: 0.22 foci per cell, interquartile range [IQR] = 0.54 foci per cell; 5 minutes after MR imaging: 0.08 foci per cell, IQR = 0.39 foci per cell; 30 minutes after MR imaging: 0.09 foci per cell, IQR = 0.63 foci per cell; P = .057). In vitro radiation of lymphocytes with 1 Gy led to a significant increase in DSBs (0.22 vs 3.43 foci per cell; P = .0312). The frequency of DSBs did not differ between imaging at 1.5 T and at 3.0 T (5 minutes after MR imaging: 0.23 vs 0.06 foci per cell, respectively [P = .57]; 30 minutes after MR imaging: 0.12 vs 0.08 foci per cell [P = .76]). Conclusion Abdominopelvic MR imaging performed at 1.5 T or 3.0 T does not affect the formation of DNA DSBs in peripheral blood lymphocytes. © RSNA, 2018.

  15. Functional-anatomic evaluation of dilated uropathies in children using combined MR-nephrography and MR-urography compared to renal scintigraphy; Funktionell-anatomische Diagnostik dilatierter Uropathien bei Kindern mit kombinierter MR-Nephrographie und MR-Urographie im Vergleich zur renalen Isotopennephrographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M. [Abt. fuer bildgebende Diagnostik am Kinderkrankenhaus Park Schoenfeld, Kassel (Germany); Tuerkay, S. [GE Medical Systems Deutschland GmbH, Solingen (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    Purpose: to evaluate MR-tomographic assessment of split renal function and degree of obstruction compared to diuretic renal scintigraphy, and pathoanatomic imaging of the urinary tract as all in one exam. Patients and methods: in a prospective study 62 children, aged 1 month to 9.5 years, mean 2.8 years, underwent diuretic renal scintigraphy and dynamic MR-nephrography at the same day except for 7 patients with a time interval of 1 day. In all patients we did T2w (water-technique) MR-urography additionally. Results: comparing spilt renal function we found a very close correlation in 54 out of 62 patients (correlation coefficient = 0.95). Due to technical failures 8 cases couldn't be calculated. Comparing degrees of obstruction there was an agreement in 57 out of 62 patients, 3 studies were gradually over-, 2 underestimated. All but one morphologic diagnoses in advance obtained by ultrasound and completed by other imaging modalities later on were confirmed MR-urographically. Though correctly imaged the functionless upper moiety in a renal duplication with ureterocele was misinterpreted at a first glance. (orig.) [German] Ziel: Es sollte geprueft werden, ob die Berechnung der seitengetrennten Nierenfunktion, die Bestimmung des Obstruktionsgrades und die pathoanatomische Darstellung des Harntraktes im Vergleich zur Diurese-Szintigraphie in einem Untersuchungsgang MR-tomographisch zuverlaessig moeglich ist. Patienten und Methode: In einer prospektiven Studie wurden bei 62 Kindern im Alter von 1 Monat bis 9,5 Jahren, Mittelwert 2,8 Jahre, ein Diurese-Szintigramm und eine dynamische MR-Nephrographie am gleichen Tag durchgefuehrt; lediglich bei 7 Patienten lag 1 Tag zwischen beiden Untersuchungen. Alle Patienten erhielten zusaetzlich eine T2w-MR-Urographie in ''Wasserbild''-Technik. Ergebnisse: Beim Vergleich der seitengetrennten Nierenfunktion fand sich eine sehr enge Korrelation bei 54 von insgesamt 62 Patienten (Korrelationskoeffizient = 0

  16. MR urography in children. Pt. 1. How we do the F0 technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivier, Pierre-Hugues; Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); University of Rouen, LITIS Laboratory EA 4108, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); Dolores, Michael [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); Taylor, Melissa [Ambroise Pare Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Boulogne Billancourt (France); Elbaz, Frederic; Liard, Agnes [University Hospital of Rouen, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Rouen (France)

    2010-05-15

    MR urography (MRU) has been widely accepted as a substitute to intravenous urography for investigating children with a dilated urinary tract after preliminary assessment by US and voiding cystourethrography. Hydronephrosis is by far the main indication for MRU because upper tract dilatation is a frequent condition in infants and children. Recent advances in technology have allowed MR to go beyond morphology and to assess renal function parameters such as split renal function and drainage. In this article we report our routine practice of the F0 MRU technique. The main advantages of our protocol are no requirement for general anaesthesia, no bladder catheterization, use of low-dose gadolinium-based contrast agent (0.05-0.1 mmol/kg) and total acquisition time of 30 min or less. (orig.)

  17. Correction of distortion of MR pictures for MR-guided robotic sterotactic procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonckheere, E.A.; Kwoh, Y.S.

    1988-01-01

    Ever since magnetic resonance (MR) invaded the medical imaging field, it has played an increasingly important role and is even currently being considered for stereotactic guidance of probes in the brain. While MR pictures indeed convey more clinical information than CT, the geometry of MR pictures is, unfortunately, not as accurate as the geometry of CT pictures. In other words, if a square grid phantom is scanned, then the CT picture will show a square grid, while the MR picture will rather reveal a distorted grid. This distortion is primarily due to small variations in the static magnetic field. This small distortion does not impede radiological diagnosis; however, it is a source of concern if one contemplates utilizing the MR pictures for accurate stereotactic positioning of a probe at a very precise point in the brain. Another area of application where the distortion of the MR picture should be compensated for is the superposition of CT and MR pictures so that both informations could be used for diagnosis or stereotactic purposes. This paper essentially addresses the nonlinear distortion of MR pictures and how it could be compensated for through software manipulation of the MR picture

  18. MR imaging of the hip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: MRI has been shown to gain increasing importance in recent years in the evaluation of disorders of the hip and pelvis. Nowadays, conventional or fast spin echo (T1, Turbo (Fast) T2 (or PD)) MR imaging sequences are used most commonly to examine the hip and pelvis. Three dimensional (3D) gradient echo (GE) imaging allows acquisition of very thin (1 mm) sections. MR imaging with fat suppression technique (STIR, TIRM, FAT SAT T2) represent an effective screening technique for the assessment of fluid, hemorrhage, pus, or tumor in the marrow, joint or soft tissues. These techniques increase the sensitivity for the detection of a variety of pathologic processes. Fat suppression MR imaging, when combined with intravenous (or intraarticular) administration of a gadolinium compound, also is effective and often is employed when evaluating neoplastic or infectious diseases (intravenous injection), abnormalities of articular cartilage or labrum, or possible intraarticular osteocartilaginous bodies (intraarticular injection). A lesion of the acetabular labrum based is one cause of chronic hip pain in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hips, as well as in patients with a history of hip trauma or femoroacetabular impingement. MR imaging and, in particular, MR arthrography, however, have been shown to be highly accurate in the detection of subtle intraarticular abnormalities such as labral lesion. Conventional MR imaging has shown poor accuracy in detecting labral lesions, due to its inability to depict small tears and the difficulty in determining if intralabral signal abnormalities extend to the surface of the labrum. MR arthrography, however has been shown to overcome these difficulties and to have excellent accuracy in detecting labral pathology. As labral abnormalities are believed to be a precursor of osteoarthritis, orthopedic surgeons believe that surgical intervention will be influenced substantially by the type, extension and location of labral

  19. Workflow efficiency of two 1.5 T MR scanners with and without an automated user interface for head examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenninghoff, Christoph; Umutlu, Lale; Kloeters, Christian; Ringelstein, Adrian; Ladd, Mark E; Sombetzki, Antje; Lauenstein, Thomas C; Forsting, Michael; Schlamann, Marc

    2013-06-01

    Workflow efficiency and workload of radiological technologists (RTs) were compared in head examinations performed with two 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanners equipped with or without an automated user interface called "day optimizing throughput" (Dot) workflow engine. Thirty-four patients with known intracranial pathology were examined with a 1.5 T MR scanner with Dot workflow engine (Siemens MAGNETOM Aera) and with a 1.5 T MR scanner with conventional user interface (Siemens MAGNETOM Avanto) using four standardized examination protocols. The elapsed time for all necessary work steps, which were performed by 11 RTs within the total examination time, was compared for each examination at both MR scanners. The RTs evaluated the user-friendliness of both scanners by a questionnaire. Normality of distribution was checked for all continuous variables by use of the Shapiro-Wilk test. Normally distributed variables were analyzed by Student's paired t-test, otherwise Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare means. Total examination time of MR examinations performed with Dot engine was reduced from 24:53 to 20:01 minutes (P user interface (P = .001). According to this preliminary study, the Dot workflow engine is a time-saving user assistance software, which decreases the RTs' effort significantly and may help to automate neuroradiological examinations for a higher workflow efficiency. Copyright © 2013 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendall, Matthew L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Luong, Khai [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wetmore, Kelly M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Blow, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Korlach, Jonas [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutschbauer, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Malmstrom, Rex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  1. MR imaging of pleural and peritoneal effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiono, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Kohki; Takenaka, Eiichi; Hisamatsu, Katsuji

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of MR imaging in predicting the quality of ascites and pleural effusion. MR examinations of 20 patients with different benign or malignant diseases accompanied with ascites or pleural effusion were retrospectively studied. Results were compared with histopathological findings. On T 1 - and T 2 -weighted images, the MR intensity of the effusion depended mainly on the concentration of protein, whereas on gradient echo images, it depended mainly on the concentration of blood. MR examination was useful in non-invasively differentiating exudative or hemorrhagic effusion from serous effusion. Knowledge or inference of the quality of effusion can direct MR interpretation and may improve diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  2. Drug-induced MR urography: the effects of furosemide and intravenous saline injection on MR urography of obstructed and non-obstructed urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Ha; Lee, Myung Jun; Lee, Chang Joon [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    To determine the usefulness of MR urography technique for the evaluation of urinary systems in patients with obstructed urinary tract and normal volunteers with non-obstructed urinary tract after intravenous normal saline and diuretic injection. Three normal volunteers and 12 patients with urinary tract obstruction [ureteral calculi (n=8), extraurinary mass (n=1), ureteral tumor invasion (n=3)] underwent MR urography using a 1.0T scanner and a 2D non-breath-hold heavily T2-weighted fast spin-cho sequence. These acquisition were post-processed with a maximum intensity projection (MIP) algorithm. Two acquisitions were performed, the first prior to saline solution infusion following standard MR urography procedures, and the second, within 2-3 minutes of the infusion of 250 ml saline solution followed by 20 mg of Lasix administered intravenously. For this latter, drug-induced MR urography procedures were followed. In healthy volunteer (n=3) and those experiencing partial obstruction (n=4) by a urinary stone, drug-induced MR urography provided better images of the urinary tract than did standard MR urography. In those in whom a urinary stone or tumor had caused complete obstruction (n=8), standard MR urography provided good images, as did drug-induced MR urography. In patients with a partially or non-obstructed urinary tract, drug-induced MR urography provided better anatomic and functional details of the kidney and urinary tract than did standard MR urography. In those experiencing complete obstruction of the urinary tract, however, standard or drug-induced MR urography permitted very adequate evaluation of the tract, and drug-induced MR urography was unnecessary.

  3. Abdominal applications of 3.0-T MR imaging: comparative review versus a 1.5-T system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Young; Kim, Myeong-Jin; Chung, Yong Eun; Kim, Ji Youn; Jones, Alun C; de Becker, Jan; van Cauteren, Marc

    2008-01-01

    With the development of dedicated receiver coils and increased gradient performance, 3.0-T magnetic resonance (MR) systems are gaining wider acceptance in clinical practice. The expected twofold increase in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) compared with that of 1.5-T MR systems may help improve spatial resolution or increase temporal resolution when used with parallel acquisition techniques. Several issues must be considered when applying 3.0-T MR in the abdomen, including the alteration of the radiofrequency field and relaxation time, increase in energy deposition and susceptibility effects, and problems associated with motion artifacts. For the evaluation of liver lesions, higher SNR and greater resolution achieved with the 3.0-T system could translate into better detection of malignant lesions on T2-weighted images obtained with adjusted imaging parameters. For the evaluation of pancreatic and biliary diseases, high-resolution T2-weighted imaging using single-shot turbo spin-echo sequences is useful; improvement in SNR was noticeable on two-dimensional MR cholangiopancreatographic images. For the preoperative imaging of rectal cancer, a single-shot sequence is useful for dramatically decreasing imaging time while maintaining image quality. Substantial modification of examination protocols, with optimized imaging parameters and sequence designs along with ongoing development of hardware, could contribute to an increased role of the 3.0-T system for abdominal MR examinations.

  4. MR findings of cerebral arteriovenous malformations associated with hemorrhage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro (National Defence Medical Coll., Tokorozawa, Saitama (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    This study was developed to assess the role of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the diagnosis of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) associated with hemorrhage. MR images were retrospectively reviewed in 10 patients (age 8 to 60 years) who had an AVM with intracerebral or intraventricular hemorrhage. MR imaging was performed at 1.5 T obtaining T{sub 1}- and T{sub 2}-weighted spin-echo images with a slice thickness of 5 mm, and a slice interval of 0-5 mm. The AVM was detected on MR in seven patients (70%), while enhanced CT was positive in six of eight patients (75%). In six patients in whom both the AVM and intracerebral hematoma (ICH) were depicted on MR, the nidi were located not inside but adjacent to the ICH. In three patients, MR disclosed a thin subdural hematoma (SDH) which was not noted on CT. There is little difference in the detectability of AVMs by MR and enhanced CT. However, MR clearly demonstrates the anatomic relationship to associated ICH. A non-traumatic SDH with an ICH demonstrated on MR may indicate the presence of an AVM even when the AVM itself is not apparent. (author).

  5. Quantitative {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of the brain in patients with congestive heart failure before and after cardiac transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Soo Mee; Lee, Ho Kyu; Choi, Choong Gon; Lim, Tae Hwan [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Hee [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    To evaluate the effects of cardiac transplantation on the brain in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), using quantitative {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS). Ten patients with CHF underwent MRI and quantitative {sup 1}H-MRS before and 1-2 and 4-9 months after cardiac transplantation. MR spectra were obtained from parietal white matter (PWM) and occipital gray matter (OGM) using PROBE (PROton Brain Exam). Changes in MR signal intensity were evaluated, and the cerebral metabolic concentrations in PWM and OGM were compared. For comparative purposes, 20 normal volunteers were included. No abnormal MR signal intensity was seen in the brain before or after cardiac transplantation. Changes in cerebral metabolic concentrations were observed on {sup 1}H-MRS; concentrations of creatine (Cr) in PWM, and of N-acetylacepartate (NAA), Cr and myo-Inositol(mI) in OGM were significantly lower before transplantation. After successful transplantation, Cr levels returned to their normal range in PWM and OGM, while a slightly increase choline (Cho) level was observed in PWM. Cerebral hypoperfusion in CHF can be evaluated using {sup 1}H-MRS. MRS may play a substantial role in monitoring the effect of cardiac transplantation.

  6. Proton MR spectroscopy in solitary pulmonary nodules: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Chunshan; Xiao Xiangsheng; Li Huimin; Liu Shiyuan; Li Chengzhou; Li Shenjiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the characteristics and the regularities of the metabolites in solitary pulmonary nodules with proton MR spectroscopy, and to investigate the clinical value of MR spectroscopy in differentiating benign from malignant pulmonary nodules. Methods: Sixty-nine patients with solitary pulmonary nodules underwent routine MRI and single-voxel MR spectroscopy using Siemens Vision 1.5 T MR system. MR spectroscopy characteristics and parameters of the metabolites were observed and recorded. Ten pathologic specimens were examined with single-voxel MR spectroscopy. The MR spectroscopy results of the pathologic specimens were compared with those of the solitary pulmonary nodules in vivo. Results: The Cho peak (2.86 ± 1.89) of the malignant nodules was higher than that of the inflammatory (0.87 ± 0.74), tuberculous nodules (0.97 ± 1.09), and hamartoma (0.42 ± 0.53) (P 0.05). Conclusion: MR spectroscopy is reliable in evaluating pulmonary nodules in vivo. The Cho peak, Cho/Cr, and Lac peak of the malignant nodules were higher than those of inflammatory, tuberculous nodules, and hamartoma. MR spectroscopy is helpful in differentiating benign from malignant pulmonary nodules. (authors)

  7. MR imaging of acute transverse myelitis (myelopathy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isoda, Haruo [Hamamatsu Univ., Shizuoka (Japan). School of Medicine; Ramsey, R.G.

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of our study was to review the MR characteristics of acute transverse myelitis (ATM) retrospectively and to review the literature. The subjects were 26 patients (two males, 24 females). MR examinations were carried out using a 1.5 Tesla scanner. MR imaging in eight of 16 lesions in nine subjects with preexisting MS showed multiple areas of increased signal intensity on T{sub 2}-weighted sagittal images, and 11 lesions had no cord swelling. Twelve of 16 lesions showed heterogeneous enhancement. MR imaging in 10 of 13 lesions in 12 subjects with preexisting HTLV-1 infection, mycoplasma pneumonia infection, hepatitis B vaccinations, and uncertain etiologies revealed fusiform increased signal intensity areas on T{sub 2}-weighted sagittal images and cord swelling. Seven of 11 lesions in the patients who underwent injection of contrast medium showed heterogeneous enhancement, whereas others showed no enhancement. MR examination is recommended for the evaluation of ATM. (author)

  8. MR imaging of the female urethra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricak, H.; Secaf, E.; Buckley, D.; Brown, J.J.; McAninch, J.W.; Tanagho, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the appearance of the female urethra on noncontrast and contrast-enhanced MR images and to evaluate the potential of MR imaging in the diagnosis of various urethral conditions and the staging of urethral tumors. Sixty-four patients (mean age, 54.6 years) were studied. Normal urethra was assessed in 36 patients, and urethral pathology (including urethral diverticula, inflammatory granuloma, and primary and metastatic neoplasms) in 28. MR imaging was performed on a 1.5-T magnet (General Electric Signa). T1-weighted (500/20) and T2-weighted (2,500/80) images were obtained, with a section thickness of 5 mm (20% gap), a 192 x 256 matrix, and two excitations. In 27 patients, T1-weighted images were repeated after intravenous injection of 0.1 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA

  9. Outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, A.W.; Behannon, K.W.; Lepping, R.P.; Carbary, J.F.; Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Similarities between the Saturnian and terrestrial outer magnetosphere are examined. Saturn, like earth, has a fully developed magnetic tail, 80 to 100 RS in diameter. One major difference between the two outer magnetospheres is the hydrogen and nitrogen torus produced by Titan. This plasma is, in general, convected in the corotation direction at nearly the rigid corotation speed. Energies of magnetospheric particles extend to above 500 keV. In contrast, interplanetary protons and ions above 2 MeV have free access to the outer magnetosphere to distances well below the Stormer cutoff. This access presumably occurs through the magnetotail. In addition to the H+, H2+, and H3+ ions primarily of local origin, energetic He, C, N, and O ions are found with solar composition. Their flux can be substantially enhanced over that of interplanetary ions at energies of 0.2 to 0.4 MeV/nuc

  10. Unusual MR manifestations of neurocysticercosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, D.C. (Seoul National Univ. (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology; Woolsan Medical Coll., Seoul (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology); Chang, K.H.; Han, M.H.; Han, M.C.; Kim, C.W. (Seoul National Univ. (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology); Lee, S.R. (Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-11-01

    MR and CT features of neurocysticercosis are variable and depend fundamentally on the stage in evolution of the infection, location, number and size of the worm. The authors retrospectively evaluated MR images obtained on a 2.0T superconducting unit in 22 neurocysticercosis patients and observed various MR features including some new findings. A variety of MR findings are presented with special reference to six case reports. The features include: (1) A large simple cyst containing both internal septations and a scolex; (2) suprasellar racemose cysts mimicking other cysts, (3) a fourth ventricular cyst readily depicted by aid of CSF flow-void in the sagittal plane; (4) degenerating cysts showing 'white target' appearance; (5) granulomatous lesions having a 'black target' appearance; and (6) a meningitic form showing Gd-DTPA enhancement of basal cisterns and of a subacute infarct. (orig.).

  11. Urinary bladder cancer T-staging from T2-weighted MR images using an optimal biomarker approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuang; Udupa, Jayaram K.; Tong, Yubing; Chen, Jerry; Venigalla, Sriram; Odhner, Dewey; Guzzo, Thomas J.; Christodouleas, John; Torigian, Drew A.

    2018-02-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is often used in clinical practice to stage patients with bladder cancer to help plan treatment. However, qualitative assessment of MR images is prone to inaccuracies, adversely affecting patient outcomes. In this paper, T2-weighted MR image-based quantitative features were extracted from the bladder wall in 65 patients with bladder cancer to classify them into two primary tumor (T) stage groups: group 1 - T stage T2, with primary tumor locally confined to the bladder, and group 2 - T stage T2, with primary tumor locally extending beyond the bladder. The bladder was divided into 8 sectors in the axial plane, where each sector has a corresponding reference standard T stage that is based on expert radiology qualitative MR image review and histopathologic results. The performance of the classification for correct assignment of T stage grouping was then evaluated at both the patient level and the sector level. Each bladder sector was divided into 3 shells (inner, middle, and outer), and 15,834 features including intensity features and texture features from local binary pattern and gray-level co-occurrence matrix were extracted from the 3 shells of each sector. An optimal feature set was selected from all features using an optimal biomarker approach. Nine optimal biomarker features were derived based on texture properties from the middle shell, with an area under the ROC curve of AUC value at the sector and patient level of 0.813 and 0.806, respectively.

  12. Retrospective 5-year analysis of MR-guided biopsies in a low-field MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangos, Stephan; Mueller, C.; Mayer, F.; Naguib, N.N.; Nour-Eldin, N.E.A.; Herzog, C.; Hammerstingl, R.M.; Thalhammer, A.; Mack, M.G.; Vogl, T.J.; Eichler, K.; Hansmann, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and clinical value of MR-guided biopsies in an open 0.2 T low-field system. Materials and methods: A total of 322 patients with suspicious lesions of different body regions were biopsied in a low-field MRI system (0.2 T, Concerto, Siemens). The procedures were guided using T1-weighted Flash sequences (TR/TE = 100/9; 70 ). The lesions were repeatedly biopsied using the coaxial technique with a 15-gauge (diameter 2 mm) puncture needle. Complications and biopsy findings were analyzed retrospectively. Results: In all cases the biopsy procedures were successfully performed with MR guidance. In 298 patients diagnosis was able to be confirmed on the basis of the probes. The clinical follow-up showed that in 24 patients the lesions were missed by MR-guided biopsy. From this a sensitivity of 86%, a specificity of 87% and an accuracy of 93% were calculated. In two patients major complications were observed (morbidity rate 0.6%). Conclusion: MR-guided biopsy can be performed safely and precisely in a low-field MR system and are a supplement to US or CT-guided biopsies. (orig.)

  13. MR differentiation of cystic lesions in the maxillomandibular region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, M.; Kaneda, T.; Ozawa, K.; Ozawa, M.; Itaz, Y.; Sasaki, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the capability of MR imaging in differentiating cystic lesions in the maxillomandibular region. MR imaging of 34 patients with cystic lesions in the maxillomandibular region was performed prospectively. After T1-weighted axial imaging, T1-weighted axial and sagittal/coronal imaging with Gd-DTPA and T2-weighted axial imaging was performed. The pathologic examinations of the cases showed 9 ameloblastomas, 13 odontogenic keratocysts, and 11 other types of cysts. MR differentiation between ameloblastoma and cysts was possible in all cases but one. MR images of ameloblastoma showed solid and cystic components, multilocularity, irregularly thickened walls, mural nodules, marked Gd-DTPA enhancement of the wall, and low T1-weighted signal fluids. MR differentiation between various kinds of cysts was difficult without information from conventional radiography, except odontogenic keratocysts. MR images of 17 keratocysts showed cystic patterns, regularly thin walls monolocular cysts, weak Gd-DTPA enhancement of the walls, and inhomogeneous intensity of the contents

  14. MR Imaging-Guided Attenuation Correction of PET Data in PET/MR Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Catana, Ciprian

    2016-04-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) is one of the most important challenges in the recently introduced combined PET/magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. PET/MR AC (MR-AC) approaches aim to develop methods that allow accurate estimation of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissues and other components located in the PET field of view. MR-AC methods can be divided into 3 categories: segmentation, atlas, and PET based. This review provides a comprehensive list of the state-of-the-art MR-AC approaches and their pros and cons. The main sources of artifacts are presented. Finally, this review discusses the current status of MR-AC approaches for clinical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Solid models for CT/MR image display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ManKovich, N.J.; Yue, A.; Kioumehr, F.; Ammirati, M.; Turner, S.

    1991-01-01

    Medical imaging can now take wider advantage of Computer-Aided-Manufacturing through rapid prototyping technologies (RPT) such as stereolithography, laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing to directly produce solid models of patient anatomy from processed CT and MR images. While conventional surgical planning relies on consultation with the radiologist combined with direct reading and measurement of CT and MR studies, 3-D surface and volumetric display workstations are providing a more easily interpretable view of patient anatomy. RPT can provide the surgeon with a life size model of patient anatomy constructed layer by layer with full internal detail. The authors have developed a prototype image processing and model fabrication system based on stereolithography, which provides the neurosurgeon with models of the skull base. Parallel comparison of the mode with the original thresholded CT data and with a CRT displayed surface rendering showed that both have an accuracy of >99.6 percent. The measurements on the surface rendered display proved more difficult to exactly locate and yielded a standard deviation of 2.37 percent. This paper presents an accuracy study and discusses ways of assessing the quality of neurosurgical plans when 3-D models re made available as planning tools

  16. CALiPER Report 22.1: Photoelectric Performance of LED MR16 Lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Royer, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poplawski, Michael E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Brown, Charles C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Merzouk, Massine B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report is a follow-up to CALiPER Application Summary Report 22, which investigated the photometric performance of LED MR16 lamps. The initial report found that many of the LED MR16 lamps did not perform as required by ENERGY STAR based on their equivalency claims, although they generally did provide substantial efficacy advantages compared to halogen MR16 lamps. All testing was completed using laboratory power supplies, with all but one product tested at 12 V AC. In contrast, this report examined the photoelectric performance of the same set of lamps, using commercially available transformers and dimmers as well as laboratory power supplies providing both AC and DC power.

  17. Calculation of plastic deformation of a conical shell with the transformation of inner surface into outer one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Uvarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical model of plastic deformation of a conical shell with the transformation of internal surface into outer one was developed with a use of the kinematic method. The shell material was assumed to be perfectly plastic. The theory of thin shells and the kinematic theorem of limit equilibrium were utilized in this work. Both geometric and physical nonlinearities were taken into account. Dependences for calculating radius of curvature of the intensive deformation zones, value of chain ring deformation and values of the deforming force as a function of axial displacement were determined. Analysis showed the possibility of using a conical shell to absorb energy with high efficiency. Obtained results could be used for calculation and selection of optimal parameters of the energy-absorbing elements in shock absorbers.

  18. Apatite fission track and (U-Th)/He dating of teschenite intrusions gives time constraints on accretionary processes and development of planation surfaces in the Outer Western Carpathians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danisik, Martin; Frisch, Wolfgang [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Geosciences; Panek, Tomas [Ostrava Univ. (Czech Republic). Dept. of Physical Geography and Geoecology; Matysek, Dalibor [Technical Univ. of Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Geological Engineering; Dunkl, Istvan [Geoscience Center Goettingen (Germany). Sedimentology and Environmental Geology

    2008-09-15

    The age of planation surfaces in the Podbeskydska pahorkatina Upland in the Outer Western Carpathians (OWC, Czech Republic) is constrained by low-temperature thermochronological dating methods for the first time. Our apatite fission track and apatite (U-Th)/He data measured on teschenite intrusions show that planation surfaces in the study area formed in post-Pannonian time (>7.1 Ma) and are therefore younger than traditionally believed. This contradicts the classical concepts, which stipulate that a large regional planation surface of Pannonian age (the so-called ''midmountain level'') developed in the whole Western Carpathians. Geodynamic implications of our data are the following: (i) the investigated Tesin and Godula nappes of the OWC were buried and thermally overprinted in the accretionary wedge in different ways, and consequently experienced different cooling histories. This indicates a dynamic basin setting with an active accretionary process in a subduction zone; (ii) accretionary processes in the OWC were active already during Late Eocene times. (orig.)

  19. Outer brain barriers in rat and human development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøchner, Christian B; Holst, Camilla Bjørnbak; Møllgård, Kjeld

    2015-01-01

    Complex barriers at the brain's surface, particularly in development, are poorly defined. In the adult, arachnoid blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier separates the fenestrated dural vessels from the CSF by means of a cell layer joined by tight junctions. Outer CSF-brain barrier provides...... diffusion restriction between brain and subarachnoid CSF through an initial radial glial end feet layer covered with a pial surface layer. To further characterize these interfaces we examined embryonic rat brains from E10 to P0 and forebrains from human embryos and fetuses (6-21st weeks post...

  20. MR findings of medulloblastomas and the significance of contrast enhanced MR of brain and spine for the staging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jae Joon; Kim, Dong Ik; Chung, Tae Sub; Lee, Yeon Hee; Suh, Jung Ho

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study were to analyze the MR findings of medulloblastoma, and to evaluate the subarachnoid dissemination and the significance of contrast enhanced MR of brain and spine for tumor staging. The preoperative brain MR studies of 18 patients (9 males, 9 females; mean age, 9.4 years) with surgically proved medulloblastomas were retrospectively reviewed to characterize these neoplasms with regard to their location, size, MR signal intensity, appearance after contrast enhancement, presence of cyst and necrosis, subarachnoid dissemination, and other associated findings. In 14 patients postoperative spine MR studies were evaluated for staging and therapeutic planning. The most frequent location of medulloblastoma was the inferior vermis and the mean tumor size was 4.1 x 3.6 x 3.9 cm. On T1-weighted image, medulloblastomas generally had low to intermediate signal, predominantly hypointense relative to white matter. On T2-weighted image, medulloblastomas showed moderately high signal, hyperintense relative to white matter. Inhomogeneous contrast enhancement was demonstrated in 13 patients(72.2%) after injection of gadopentetate dimeglumine(Gadolinium). Cyst and necrosis within the tumor were visualized in 15 patients(83.3%). Subarachnoid disseminations of medulloblastomas were noted in 11 patients(61.1%), of which 6 demonstrated intracranial and 2 intraspinal dissemination. Three had both intracranial and intraspinal dissemination. In nine cases with intracranial lesions, there were intraparenchymal mass formation(7), subarachnoid nodules(5), infundibular lesions(2) and diffuse gyral enhancement(1). In five cases with intraspinal lesions, there were extramedullary intradural small nodules(3), central canal nodules(2), intradural masses(1) and fine nodular and sheet-like leptomeningeal enhancement(1). Other associated findings included intratumoral hemorrhage(11.1%), peritumoral edema(44.4%), tonsillar herniation(44.4%), hydrocephalus(88.9%) and

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane vesicles triggered by human mucosal fluid and lysozyme can prime host tissue surfaces for bacterial adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Maria Emiliano Metruccio

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of human morbidity and mortality that often targets epithelial surfaces. Host immunocompromise, or the presence of indwelling medical devices, including contact lenses, can predispose to infection. While medical devices are known to accumulate bacterial biofilms, it is not well understood why resistant epithelial surfaces become susceptible to P. aeruginosa. Many bacteria, including P. aeruginosa, release Outer Membrane Vesicles (OMVs in response to stress that can fuse with host cells to alter their function. Here, we tested the hypothesis that mucosal fluid can trigger OMV release to compromise an epithelial barrier. This was tested using tear fluid and corneal epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. After 1 h both human tear fluid, and the tear component lysozyme, greatly enhanced OMV release from P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 compared to PBS controls (~100 fold. TEM and SDS-PAGE showed tear fluid and lysozyme-induced OMVs were similar in size and protein composition, but differed from biofilm-harvested OMVs, the latter smaller with fewer proteins. Lysozyme-induced OMVs were cytotoxic to human corneal epithelial cells in vitro and murine corneal epithelium in vivo. OMV exposure in vivo enhanced Ly6G/C expression at the corneal surface, suggesting myeloid cell recruitment, and primed the cornea for bacterial adhesion (~4-fold, P < 0.01. Sonication disrupted OMVs retained cytotoxic activity, but did not promote adhesion, suggesting the latter required OMV-mediated events beyond cell killing. These data suggest that mucosal fluid induced P. aeruginosa OMVs could contribute to loss of epithelial barrier function during medical device-related infections.

  2. Identification of outer membrane proteins of Yersinia pestis through biotinylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smither, S.J.; Hill, J.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Hulst, A.G.; Jong, A.L. de; Titball, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria contains proteins that might be good targets for vaccines, antimicrobials or detection systems. The identification of surface located proteins using traditional methods is often difficult. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, was labelled with

  3. Virtual endoscopy of the upper urinary tract based on contrast material-enhanced MR urography data sets; Virtuelle Endoskopie des oberen Harntraktes auf der Basis kontrastangehobener MR-Urographie Datensaetze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Krombach, G.; Staatz, G.; Kilbinger, M.; Adam, G.B.; Guenther, R.W. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1999-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of reconstructing a virtual endoscopy from MR imaging data sets of the upper urinary tract. Method: The data obtained from 28 contrast-enhanced MR urographic examinations (5 normal; 23 pathologic) were post-processed to reconstruct a virtual ureterorenoscopy (VURS) using a threshold image segmentation. The visualization of the upper urinary tract was based on the acquisition of T{sub 1}-weighted 3D gradient-echo sequences after intravenous administration of gadolinium-DTPA and a prior injection of low-dose furosemide. Results: The employed MR urography technique created in all 28 cases a complete and strong contrast enhancement of the urinary tract. These 3D sequence data allowed the reconstruction of a VURS, even when the collecting system was not dilated. The best accuracy was provided by the MR urography sequences with the smallest voxel size. Moreover, the data acquisition based on a breath-hold technique has proved superior to that using a respiratory gating. Inside the renal pelvis, all calices could be assessed by turning the virtual endoscope in the appropriate direction. The visualization of the ureteral orifices in the bladder was also possible. All filling defects that were diagnosed by MR urography could be evaluated from the endoluminal view using the VURS. The exact characterization of the lesions based only on the assessment of the surface structure was difficult. Conclusion: A virtual endoscopy of the upper urinary tract can be successfully reconstructed using the data sets of high-resolution 3D MR urography sequences. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Untersuchungen zur Anwendung der virtuellen Endoskopie auf MR-tomographische Datensaetze des oberen Harntraktes. Methoden: Die Daten von 28 kontrastangehobenen MR-Urographien (5 normal; 23 pathologisch) wurden zur Erstellung einer virtuellen Ureterorenoskopie (VURS) mittels Schwellenwert-Bildsegmentierung nachverarbeitet. Als Grundlage fuer die Darstellung des Harntraktes

  4. MR and pathologic correlation of rabbit VX-2 carconoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, H.S.; Kim, S.M.; Im, J.G.; Kim, C.W.; Han, M.C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper evaluates the reliability of MR imaging in tissue characterization and depiction of tumor boundaries. The authors performed MR-pathologic correlation using parosteally implanted VX-2 carcinoma in 17 rabbit thighs. T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted axial images were obtained 10-20 days after tumor implantation. After the animals were killed, freezing, sectioning along the MR imaging planes, and histopathologic examination were done. For accurate MR-pathologic correlation, rabbits were fixed on the cardboard plate to minimize position change during the procedures. Tumor boundaries depicted on MR images were larger than those depicted on the specimen. Small tumors were surrounded by capsule-like, hypervascular (mainly lymphatics), loose connective tissue. Loose connective tissue became compact with tumor growth. This connective tissue showed high signal intensity on both T2-weighted and Gd-DTPA-enhanced T1-weighted images. Muscle atrophy with development of lymphatics around the tumor also contributed high signal intensity on MR images. Peritumoral edema and inflammatory reaction were not remarkable. Peritumoral lymphatics, rich connective tissue, and muscle atrophy exaggerated the size of experimentally induced malignant musculoskeletal tumors on MR images

  5. T1ρ-weighted Dynamic Glucose-enhanced MR Imaging in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paech, Daniel; Schuenke, Patrick; Koehler, Christina; Windschuh, Johannes; Mundiyanapurath, Sibu; Bickelhaupt, Sebastian; Bonekamp, David; Bäumer, Philipp; Bachert, Peter; Ladd, Mark E; Bendszus, Martin; Wick, Wolfgang; Unterberg, Andreas; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Zaiss, Moritz; Radbruch, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To evaluate the ability to detect intracerebral regions of increased glucose concentration at T1ρ-weighted dynamic glucose-enhanced (DGE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at 7.0 T. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Nine patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and four healthy volunteers were included in this study from October 2015 to July 2016. Adiabatically prepared chemical exchange-sensitive spin-lock imaging was performed with a 7.0-T whole-body unit with a temporal resolution of approximately 7 seconds, yielding the time-resolved DGE contrast. T1ρ-weighted DGE MR imaging was performed with injection of 100 mL of 20% d-glucose via the cubital vein. Glucose enhancement, given by the relative signal intensity change at T1ρ-weighted MR imaging (DGEρ), was quantitatively investigated in brain gray matter versus white matter of healthy volunteers and in tumor tissue versus normal-appearing white matter of patients with glioblastoma. The median signal intensities of the assessed brain regions were compared by using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results In healthy volunteers, the median signal intensity in basal ganglia gray matter (DGEρ = 4.59%) was significantly increased compared with that in white matter tissue (DGEρ = 0.65%) (P = .028). In patients, the median signal intensity in the glucose-enhanced tumor region as displayed on T1ρ-weighted DGE images (DGEρ = 2.02%) was significantly higher than that in contralateral normal-appearing white matter (DGEρ = 0.08%) (P brain glucose physiology and pathophysiologically increased glucose uptake and may have the potential to provide information about glucose metabolism in tumor tissue. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  6. Transcriptome and metabolome responses of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to methyl orange under microaerophilic and aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinhua; Qi, Yueling; Xu, Chen; Yang, Yuyi; Wang, Jun

    2017-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 degrades various azo dyes under microaerophilic and anaerobic conditions, but this process is inhibited under aerobic conditions. The mechanisms underlying azo dye biodegradation and inhibition remain unknown. Therefore, we investigated metabolic and transcriptional changes in strain MR-1, which was cultured under different conditions, to elucidate these mechanisms. At the transcriptional level, genes involved in certain metabolic processes, particularly the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, amino acid biodegradation, and the electron transfer system, were significantly altered (M ≧ 2, p > 0.8 ) in the presence of methyl orange (MO). Moreover, a high concentration of dissolved oxygen heavily impacted the expression levels of genes involved in fatty acid biodegradation. Metabolome analysis revealed significant alteration (p < 0.05) in the concentrations of nine metabolites when strain MR-1 was cultured under aerobic conditions; the majority of these metabolites were closely associated with amino acid metabolism and DNA replication. Accordingly, we propose a possible pathway for MO biodegradation and discuss the most likely causes of biodegradation inhibition due to dissolved oxygen.

  7. MR imaging of sacral and perisacral lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzel, L.H.; Levine, E.; Murphey, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This exhibit demonstrates the utility of MR imaging in evaluating sacral and perisacral lesions. Thirty-two lesions were studied using a superconducting 1.0-T MR imager. Eleven primary and 13 metastatic tumors, four congenital lesions, and four arachnoid cysts were evaluated. MR did not usually enable a more specific histologic diagnosis than other imaging techniques. However, extraosseous and proximal spinal extent of tumors was well defined without use of oral or intravenous contrast material. MR imaging is an excellent noninvasive technique for evaluating most sacral and perisacral lesions and is particularly helpful when precise tumor extent must be determined for treatment planning

  8. Measurement of skeletal muscle area: Comparison of CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinelnikov, Andrey, E-mail: sinelnikovas@upmc.edu [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Qu, Chuanxing [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Fetzer, David T. [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Pelletier, Jean-Sébastien [Department of Surgery, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dunn, Michael A. [Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tsung, Allan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Furlan, Alessandro [Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Objective: To investigate the intra- and inter-observer agreement and correlation between CT and MR measurements of skeletal muscle area (SMA) in the abdomen. Methods: CT and MR images from twelve patients were analyzed by two blinded observers using segmentation software (MITK-3M3, Mint Medical and Slice-O-Matic, Tomovision) to quantify SMA. MR images included T1w “in-phase”, T1w “out-of-phase”, and T2w sequences. Inter- and intra-observer agreement was assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to correlate measurements obtained on MR with CT. CT and MR measurements were compared with Bland-Altman plots. Results: Intra- and inter-observer agreement for SMA was high for CT and MR. For MR, the measurements on T2w images showed the highest inter-observer agreement (ICC = 0.96). CT SMA correlated closely with MR, with T2w images showing the highest correlation (r = 0.98; P < 0.01). Bland-Altman plots showed a 1.7%–3.9% bias between CT and MR measurements, lowest for T2w images. Conclusions: MR SMA measurements are reproducible and correlate closely with CT. The T2w sequence is recommended to quantify SMA on MR images.

  9. The use of MR B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging for validation of FDTD electromagnetic simulations of human anatomies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Cornelis A T van den [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Bartels, Lambertus W [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Bergen, Bob van den [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Kroeze, Hugo [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Leeuw, Astrid A C de [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands); Kamer, Jeroen B van de [Department of Radiotherapy, Amsterdam Medical Center, Amsterdam, PO Box 22660, 1100 DD Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lagendijk, Jan J W [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, HP Q.00.118 3508 GA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-10-07

    In this study, MR B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging is employed to experimentally verify the validity of FDTD simulations of electromagnetic field patterns in human anatomies. Measurements and FDTD simulations of the B{sup +}{sub 1} field induced by a 3 T MR body coil in a human corpse were performed. It was found that MR B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging is a sensitive method to measure the radiofrequency (RF) magnetic field inside a human anatomy with a precision of approximately 3.5%. A good correlation was found between the B{sup +}{sub 1} measurements and FDTD simulations. The measured B{sup +}{sub 1} pattern for a human pelvis consisted of a global, diagonal modulation pattern plus local B{sup +}{sub 1} heterogeneties. It is believed that these local B{sup +}{sub 1} field variations are the result of peaks in the induced electric currents, which could not be resolved by the FDTD simulations on a 5 mm{sup 3} simulation grid. The findings from this study demonstrate that B{sup +}{sub 1} imaging is a valuable experimental technique to gain more knowledge about the dielectric interaction of RF fields with the human anatomy.

  10. MR urography: examination techniques and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolte-Ernsting, C.C.A.; Adam, G.B.; Guenther, R.W. [Technische Hochschule Aachen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    2001-03-01

    Modern MR urography is performed on the basis of two different imaging strategies, which can be used complementarily to cover almost all aspects in the diagnosis of upper urinary tract diseases. The first technique utilizes unenhanced, heavily T2-weighted pulse sequences to obtain static-fluid images of the urinary tract. T2-weighted MR urograms have proved to be excellent in the visualization of the markedly dilated urinary tract, even if the renal excretory function is quiescent. Static-fluid MR urography is less suitable for imaging of disorders that occur in the nondilated collecting system. The second MR urography technique is analogous to the methodology of conventional intravenous pyelography and is, therefore, designated as excretory MR urography. For this purpose, a non-nephrotoxic gadolinium chelate is intravenously administered and after its renal excretion, the gadolinium-enhanced urine is visualized using fast T1-weighted gradient-echo sequences. The combination of gadolinium and low-dose furosemide (5-10 mg) is the key for achieving a uniform distribution of the contrast material inside the entire urinary tract and, secondly, to avoid high endoluminal gadolinium concentrations, which cause signal loss of the urine due to T2{sup *} effects. Gadolinium excretory MR urography allows to obtain high-quality images of both nondilated and obstructed urinary tracts in patients with normal or moderately impaired renal function. This article reviews the principles of T2- and T1-weighted MR urography in detail and informs how to use these techniques safely in potential clinical applications such as chronic urolithiasis, intrinsic and extrinsic tumor diseases, and congenital anomalies. Magnetic resonance urography performed in combination with standard MR imaging offers a potential to reduce the need for invasive retrograde pyelography. Although the economic aspect is still problematic, it is obvious that MR urography will continue to increase its role in

  11. CT and MR imaging of the kidney and adrenal glands: MR imaging of the kidney and adrenal glands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.K.T.

    1987-01-01

    The normal anatomy of the kidney is clearly demonstrated with MR imaging. The renal cortex can be differentiated from the renal medulla; renal vessels can also be identified. MR imaging can differentiate cystic from solid lesions. The signal intensity of a renal cell carcinoma varies and overlaps with the signal intensities of renal neoplasms of other etiologies. MR imaging is superior to CT in distinguishing vascular from nonvascular structures. It can distinguish collateral vessels from lymph nodes and can disclose tumoral thrombi. MR imaging can also aid in the differentiation of acute rejection from acute tubular necrosis in renal transplant recipients. Both normal and abnormal adrenal glands can be seen on MR imaging. A normal adrenal gland has a signal intensity higher than or equal to that of muscle but lower than that of fat. T1-weighted images offer excellent antomic resolution; T2-weighted images provide additional information about internal characteristics of adrenal neoplasms. Preliminary data indicate that MR imaging is useful in distinguishing nonfunctioning adenomas from adrenal metastases. The role of MR imaging of the kidney and adrenal gland is discussed

  12. Colours of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Fraser, Wesley C.; Pike, Rosemary E.; Bannister, Michele T.; Marsset, Michaël; Kavelaars, J. J.; Benecchi, Susan; Delsanti, Audrey C.; Lehner, Matthew J.; Wang, Shiang-Yu; Thirouin, Audrey; Nesvorný, David

    2018-01-01

    The vast majority of the known dwarf-planet sized bodies are bright enough to be studied through optical and infrared spectroscopy. As a result, we have an understanding of the surface properties for the largest Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) which retain their primordial inventory of volatile ices. For the typically smaller > 22 mag KBO, we must rely instead on what colors reveal by proxy; yet this picture remains incomplete. Most KBO physical property studies examine the hodgepodge set of objects discovered by various surveys with different and varying detection biases that make it difficult if not impossible to reliably estimate the sizes of the different surface color groupings (compositional classes) residing in the modern-day Kuiper belt.The Colours of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (Col-OSSOS) probes the surface properties within the Kuiper belt primarily through near simultaneous g,r and J colors with the Gemini North Telescope and u-band with Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The project aims to target ~100 KBOs brighter than 23.6 r‧ mag found by the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS), a survey with a well-measured detection efficiency. Thus, Col-OSSOS provides the first brightness-complete, compositional-dynamical map of the Outer Solar System, probing in a new light the radial color distribution in the primordial planetesimal disk from which KBOs originated. We will provide an update on the current status of the program highlighting results from the first two years of the survey; including size estimates of the two color KBO subgroups (the red and neutral surfaces) within the dynamically excited Kuiper belt and implications for the early planetesimal disk composition based on neutral-colored binaries found in the cold classical Kuiper belt.

  13. Fibrolipomatous hamartoma: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Maeseneer, M.; Jaovisidha, S.; Lenchik, L.; Witte, D.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Sartoris, D.J.; Resnick, D.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the MR imaging features of fibrolipomatous hamartoma (FLH) of nerves. Design and patients. MR imaging studies from six patients (three men and three women) were retrospectively reviewed by three musculoskeletal radiologists. In four patients, a biopsy of the nerve lesion was performed. In two patients, biopsy data were unavailable and the diagnosis was based on the clinical history combined with the MR imaging findings. Results and conclusion. MR imaging demonstrated fusiform nerve enlargement that was caused by fatty proliferation and thickening of nerve bundles. Nerve bundles appeared as serpentine tubular structures, hypointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images. The degree of fatty proliferation varied among patients. In addition, significant variation in the distribution of fat along the course of the nerves was noted. In three patients, FLH followed the branching pattern of the nerves, a characteristic pathologic finding. In two patients, intramuscular fat deposition (biceps and tibialis posterior muscles) was present. MR imaging findings of FLH are typical, allowing a confident diagnosis. The variation of fatty proliferation among patients and involved nerves as well as the tendency of the abnormalities to follow the branching pattern of the nerves is well demonstrated with MR imaging. FLH may present as an isolated nerve lesion, may be associated with intramuscular fat deposition, or may occur as a feature of macrodystrophia lipomatosa (MDL). (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Soft-tissue and bone lesions examined with 1.5-T MR imaging and Gd-DOTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VonSchulthess, G.K.; Kuoni, W.; Wuthrich, R.; Duewell, S.; Thurnher, S.; Marincek, B.

    1988-01-01

    Fifteen patients with soft-tissue masses or bone lesions underwent 16 MR imaging examinations with gadolinium-DOTA, a new MR contrast agent. T1- and T2-weighted precontrast sequences were obtained. The contrast agent was injected in a concentration of 0.1 mmol/kg without any untoward effects. After contrast examination, one or two T1-weighted sequences were obtained. Contrast medium application improved the distinction between lesion and edema in four of seven cases, between the lesion and central necrosis in seven of eight cases, and between the lesion, and the surrounding tissues in four of 12 cases. In eight of 12 cases, additional structures within the lesion were noted after Gd-DOTA enhancement. Of particular benefit was the use of contrast media to evaluate the vascularization of the lesion (in 12 of 14 cases)

  15. MR imaging of the flexed knee: comparison to the extended knee in delineation of meniscal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y.; Endo, H.; Ikeda, K.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain MR images in the flexed-knee position and to compare the diagnostic value to the extended position in delineation of the menisci. With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semi-flexed position (average 45 of flexion) within a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Sets of sagittal MR images were obtained for both the extended- and flexed-knee positions. Using the arthroscopic results as gold standards, 97 menisci were evaluated. Two observers interpreted each MR image of the extended and flexed positions independently without knowledge of the arthroscopic results. Flexed-knee MR images revealed 22 of the 27 arthroscopically proven torn menisci and 69 of the 70 intact menisci, for a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 98.6 %, and an accuracy of 93.8 %. Extended-knee MR images indicated a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 92.9 %, and an accuracy of 89.7 %. No statistically significant difference was found between the two positions. To enhance MR visualization of all the knee components, we recommend examining the knee in a flexed position within the magnet. (orig.)

  16. MR imaging of the flexed knee: comparison to the extended knee in delineation of meniscal lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niitsu, M.; Itai, Y. [Dept. of Radiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Endo, H. [Tsukuba Medical Center Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Ikeda, K. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Tsukuba Tennodai, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain MR images in the flexed-knee position and to compare the diagnostic value to the extended position in delineation of the menisci. With a mobile knee brace and a flexible surface coil, the knee joint was either fully extended or bent to a semi-flexed position (average 45 of flexion) within a 1.5-T superconducting magnet. Sets of sagittal MR images were obtained for both the extended- and flexed-knee positions. Using the arthroscopic results as gold standards, 97 menisci were evaluated. Two observers interpreted each MR image of the extended and flexed positions independently without knowledge of the arthroscopic results. Flexed-knee MR images revealed 22 of the 27 arthroscopically proven torn menisci and 69 of the 70 intact menisci, for a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 98.6 %, and an accuracy of 93.8 %. Extended-knee MR images indicated a sensitivity of 81.5 %, a specificity of 92.9 %, and an accuracy of 89.7 %. No statistically significant difference was found between the two positions. To enhance MR visualization of all the knee components, we recommend examining the knee in a flexed position within the magnet. (orig.)

  17. How to perform and interpret cine MR enterography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnorowski, Amelia M; Guglielmo, Flavius F; Mitchell, Donald G

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography has become a fundamental tool for small bowel evaluation. Multiphasic cine imaging is a useful component of MR enterography evaluation because it provides functional information about bowel motility. Cine MR enterography can be used to evaluate for strictures and adhesions. Bowel motility evaluation has been shown to increase pathologic lesion detection in Crohn's disease and has been incorporated into disease activity scoring systems. Currently, cine MR enterography remains underutilized. The purpose of this article is to outline how to perform and interpret cine MR enterography. The authors describe how to perform a multiphasic balanced steady state free precession sequence using different MR systems and give practical advice on how to display and interpret the cine sequence. Sample cases illustrate how the cine sequence complements standard MR enterography evaluation with T2 -weighted, contrast-enhanced T1 -weighted, and diffusion-weighted imaging. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Valuation of dynamic MR imaging for diagnosis of pituitary microadenomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Wu; Zhou Shengli; Liu Yusheng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of keyhole dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in evaluation of pituitary microadenomas. Methods: Fifty-three patients with pituitary microadenomas proved by operation or clinical findings such as headache, amenorrhea, lactating, fat or acromegaly were retrospectively studied on dynamic MR, conventional contrast enhanced MR, and unenhanced MR. Then the image data were analyzed by two experienced doctors who didn't know the details and three degrees were made as follows: grade 0, no evidence of the tumor; grade I, asymmetry signals in the pituitary; and grade II, nodulated or sheets signals in the pituitary. The grading data were compared with statistical methods. Results: In dynamic MR grading system: grade 0 was revealed in 1 patient, grade I in 29 patients and grade II in 23 patients. In conventional enhanced MR: grade 0 in 26 patients, grade I in 17 patients and grade II in 10 patients. In conventional unenhanced MR: grade 0 in 39 patients, grade I in 10 patients and grade II in 4 patients. The diagnostic rate of dynamic MR, conventional enhanced MR, and unenhanced MR was 98.1%, 51.9%, and 26.4%, respectively. (P < 0.005). Dynamic MR can increase the grade of tumor compared to the other two, which is significant statistically. Conclusion: Keyhole dynamic MR can increase the diagnostic accuracy of pituitary microadenomas while decreasing the uncertainty. So dynamic MR should become a routine examination for pituitary microadenoma when suspected by clinical findings but negative in conventional MR

  19. MR-Guided PTA in Experimental Bilateral Rabbit Renal Artery Stenosis and MR Angiography Follow-Up Versus Histomorphometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Blanche, Alain-Ferdinand; Rossert, Jerome; Wassef, Michel; Levy, Bernard; Bigot, Jean-Michel; Boudghene, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To assess in vivo 1) MR-guided percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) in experimental bilateral rabbit renal artery stenosis (RAS); 2) postprocedural follow-up by gadolinium-enhanced MR angiography versus histomorphometry.Methods: Fifteen male NZW rabbits of mean weight 4.0 kg (range 3.5-4.2 kg) underwent bilateral RAS induction by combined overdilation-deendothelialization with a gadolinium-filled balloon, passively MR-guided by the artifact of a 0.014-inch guidewire. After 4 weeks the rabbits were randomized into two groups: group A (n = 8) underwent right-sided PTRA for treatment of RAS, group B (n = 7) underwent left-sided PTRA. After another 4 weeks the rabbits were killed to assess by histomorphometry recurrent stenosis and contralateral induction injury stenosis lesions. Each step was preceded by gadolinium-enhanced three-dimensional MR angiography, and the cortex-to-aorta (C/A) signal intensity ratio was calculated.Results: RAS induction was successful in all cases. Fourteen arteries developed restenosis and 13 only initial stenosis. MR-guided PTRAs were feasible in 22 arteries (73%). For a successful catheterization of the ostium (20 arteries, 66% success rate), 10-25 steps were required. Five to eight steps were required for balloon localization and inflation for each PTRA. The restenosis effect was reflected by a 16% (12%-27%) decrease in C/A values on MR angiograms (p < 0.05).Conclusion: MR guidance and MR angiography represent a feasible, less invasive alternative for performing and assessing experimental PTRA in RAS

  20. MR imaging of posttraumatic spinal ligament injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathria, M.N.; Emery, S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Wilber, R.G.; Bohlman, H.

    1988-01-01

    The accuracy of MR imaging in the detection of ligamentous injury was evaluated in 29 patients (24 male, five female) with spinal injury resulting in fractures (n=27), evidence of instability (n=11), or neurologic deficit (n=2). MR examinations were performed acutely (average, 7.5 days posttrauma) with T1- and T2-weighted imaging and were blindly evaluated. Subsequently, plain films (n=27), tomograms (n=10), and CT scans (n=22) were evaluated. Eighteen patients underwent surgery. Fourteen patients had torn ligaments as indicated by clinical and surgical findings. MR imaging demonstrated ligament damage in 13. One case imaged 40 days following trauma was not detected. No patients with intact ligaments had evidence of ligamentous damage on MR images. MR imaging demonstrated retropulsed fractures in six patients in whom the posterior longitudinal ligament was intact but displaced from the vertebra. MR imaging was more reliable than radiography and CT for detection of ligamentous injury, and T2- weighted sequences are essential in such cases

  1. MR guided spatial normalization of SPECT scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouch, B.; Barnden, L.R.; Kwiatek, R.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In SPECT population studies where magnetic resonance (MR) scans are also available, the higher resolution of the MR scans allows for an improved spatial normalization of the SPECT scans. In this approach, the SPECT images are first coregistered to their corresponding MR images by a linear (affine) transformation which is calculated using SPM's mutual information maximization algorithm. Non-linear spatial normalization maps are then computed either directly from the MR scans using SPM's built in spatial normalization algorithm, or, from segmented TI MR images using DARTEL, an advanced diffeomorphism based spatial normalization algorithm. We compare these MR based methods to standard SPECT based spatial normalization for a population of 27 fibromyalgia patients and 25 healthy controls with spin echo T 1 scans. We identify significant perfusion deficits in prefrontal white matter in FM patients, with the DARTEL based spatial normalization procedure yielding stronger statistics than the standard SPECT based spatial normalization. (author)

  2. Fast generation of 4D PET-MR data from real dynamic MR acquisitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoumpas, C; Buerger, C; King, A P; Schleyer, P; Schaeffter, T; Marsden, P K; Mollet, P; Keereman, V; Vandenberghe, S; Schulz, V

    2011-01-01

    We have implemented and evaluated a framework for simulating simultaneous dynamic PET-MR data using the anatomic and dynamic information from real MR acquisitions. PET radiotracer distribution is simulated by assigning typical FDG uptake values to segmented MR images with manually inserted additional virtual lesions. PET projection data and images are simulated using analytic forward projections (including attenuation and Poisson statistics) implemented within the image reconstruction package STIR. PET image reconstructions are also performed with STIR. The simulation is validated with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo (GATE) which uses more accurate physical modelling, but has 150x slower computation time compared to the analytic method for ten respiratory positions and is 7000x slower when performing multiple realizations. Results are validated in terms of region of interest mean values and coefficients of variation for 65 million coincidences including scattered events. Although some discrepancy is observed, agreement between the two different simulation methods is good given the statistical noise in the data. In particular, the percentage difference of the mean values is 3.1% for tissue, 17% for the lungs and 18% for a small lesion. The utility of the procedure is demonstrated by simulating realistic PET-MR datasets from multiple volunteers with different breathing patterns. The usefulness of the toolkit will be shown for performance investigations of the reconstruction, motion correction and attenuation correction algorithms for dynamic PET-MR data.

  3. Outer- and middle-ear contributions to presbycusis in the Brown Norway rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratton, Michael Anne; Bateman, Kristin; Cannuscio, Joseph F; Saunders, James C

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the contribution of the outer and middle ears to the hearing loss associated with presbycusis in Brown Norway rats. Animals were formed into two groups; young adults (2-3 months old) and aged animals (approximately 34 months old). Auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds were obtained with the outer ear intact or surgically removed. Tympanic membrane (TM) velocity transfer functions were measured from the umbo with the outer ear removed. The length of the auditory meatus, TM surface area, and TM thickness were quantified. The ABR thresholds were 17-26 dB less sensitive in the aged animals between 8.0 and 40.0 kHz when the outer ear was intact. A significant and reliable reduction in the aged rat velocity transfer function of 5-8 dB occurred between 10.0 and 32.0 kHz, while the low frequency velocity response was only a few decibels greater in the younger animals. The ABR threshold differences between young adult and aged ears were compensated by removing the outer/middle ear effects of aging to reveal a purely sensorineural component of presbycusis. The outer and middle ear effects were calculated directly when the ABR and TM velocity data were obtained with the outer ear removed. The outer ear intact condition was modeled in order to compare the ABR data obtained with the outer ear intact with the TM velocity data obtained with the outer removed. With either procedure, removal of the age-related contributions of the outer and middle ear to the ABR threshold resulted in similar age-related ABR threshold shifts between the two age groups. The pure sensorineural threshold shift component of the ABR response was restricted to frequencies between 5.0 and 20.0 kHz and reached a maximum of approximately 15 dB. These results support the conclusion that there is an outer- and middle-ear contribution to the threshold loss defining presbycusis. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Sacrococcygeal chordoma: MR imaging in 30 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Mi Sook; Chung, Myung Hee [Catholic University of Korea, Holy Family Hospital, Department of Radiology, Pucheon (Korea); Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Kwon, Soon Tae [Chungnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taejun (Korea); Park, Jin Gyoon [Chunnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kwangju (Korea); Suh, Jin Suk [Yonsei University, Severans Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Cho, Gil Ho [Yeungnam University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taegu (Korea); Lee, Sung Moon [Kaemyung University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Taeku (Korea); Resnick, Donald [VA Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2005-02-01

    To evaluate MR imaging of sacrococcygeal chordoma. Thirty patients (age range 22-80 years) underwent MR imaging for the diagnosis and preoperative evaluation of sacrococcygeal chordomas. Eight patients had follow-up MR examination after treatment. The MR images were performed with T1- and T2-weighted imaging, and gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced imaging. The MR images were analyzed for the signal intensity, enhancing pattern, tumor size, growth pattern of the soft tissue component, and tumor extension. T1-weighted images showed low signal masses with foci of high signal intensity in 73% of cases. Tumors enhanced in a variety of patterns after the administration of Gd. Soft tissue masses extending anteriorly were seen in all cases with posterior extension in 77% of cases. The posterior masses involved the surrounding muscles and extended toward the greater sciatic notch, appearing with pseudopodia (87%). Sacroiliac joints were involved in 23% of cases. Four lesions showed intraspinal extension and involvement of the posterior spinal muscles above the level of bony involvement. In 6 patients recurrent tumors were found at or around the surgical margin of the tumor 6 months to 5 years after resection of the sacral tumor. In two of the patients, nodular metastases to the pelvic bones and femur were found 1-4 years after initial examination. In conclusion, MR imaging is useful in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of sacrococcygeal chordoma. Characteristic findings included sacral mass with heterogeneously high signal intensity with crisscrossing septa on long-repetition-time imaging, well-encapsulated pseudopodia-like or lobulated appearance, and gluteal muscle infiltration. Follow-up MR imaging is helpful to assess for recurrent or metastatic lesions of chordomas. (orig.)

  5. Alternative way to dispose of high-level waste in outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Chen, Xinyi.

    1994-01-01

    We propose a new approach to dispose of Long-Lived Fission Products (LLFPs) of type II such as 99 T c and 129 I into outer solar space by providing an escape velocity from the solar system of 42 km/sec from a parking orbit or the moon's surface using a electrostatic accelerator and neutralizing the charged ions. LLFPs disposed uniformly in outer solar space pose no hazard as do LLFPs packages in Earth orbit, and have no effects on astronomical observations. This mode of disposition requires energy in the order of 1 keV for each nucleus, which is far smaller than the propulsion energy needed for launching a LLFPs package by rocket. Further, the power required of an accelerator ejecting most of the LLFPs generated by one LWR is 2.2 kW, which is much smaller than a medium-energy proton accelerator, a few tens of MW, which would be necessary to transmute these LLFPs using spallation neutrons created by protons

  6. MR pancreatography (MRP) for mucin-producing pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usuki, Noriaki; Nishimoto, Masaoki; Shima, Tomoko; Hirokawa, Keiko; Tashiro, Takahiko; Saiwai, Shigeo; Miyamoto, Takeshi; Okabe, Sumihiro

    1997-01-01

    MR pancreatography was performed in 11 patients with mucin-producing pancreatic tumor (main duct type: four and branch duct type: seven) using HASTE with a body phased array coil on a 1.5-T unit. The results of MR pancreatography were compared with imaging of endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP). In all cases, MR pancreatography demonstrated all dilated pancreatic ducts and cysts. ERP did not completely demonstrate dilated ducts and cysts because of mucinous materials. Conspicuity of an intraductal tumor was more excellent by ER pancreatography than MR pancreatography. Therefore MR pancreatography and ER pancreatography are complementary methods in diagnosis for mucin-producing pancreatic tumors. (author)

  7. MR imaging of medullary compression due to vertebral metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooms, G.C.; Mathurin, P.; Maldague, B.; Cornelis, G.; Malghem, J.; Demeure, R.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective study was performed to assess the value of MR imaging for demonstrating medullary compression due to vertebral metastases in cancer patients clinically suspected of presenting with that complication. Twenty-five consecutive unselected patients were studied, and the MR imaging findings were confirmed by myelography, CT, and/or surgical and autopsy findings for each patient. The MR examinations were performed with a superconducting magnet (Philips Gyroscan S15) operating at 0.5-T. MR imaging demonstrated the metastases (single or multiple) mainly on T1- weighted images (TR = 0.45 sec and TE = 20 msec). Soft-tissue tumoral mass and/or deformity of a vertebral body secondary to metastasis, compressing the spinal cord, was equally demonstrated on T1- and heavily T2-weighted images (TR = 1.65 sec and TE = 100 msec). In the sagittal plane, MR imaging demonstrated the exact level of the compression (one or multiple l