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Sample records for mouth breathing children

  1. Walk test and school performance in mouth-breathing children.

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    Boas, Ana Paula Dias Vilas; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Sakano, Eulália; Conti, Patricia Blau Margosian; Toro, Adyléia Dalbo Contrera; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, many studies on mouth breathing (MB) have been published; however, little is known about many aspects of this syndrome, including severity, impact on physical and academic performances. Compare the physical performance in a six minutes walk test (6MWT) and the academic performance of MB and nasal-breathing (NB) children and adolescents. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective study with MB and NB children submitted to the 6MWT and scholar performance assessment. We included 156 children, 87 girls (60 NB and 27 MB) and 69 boys (44 NB and 25 MB). Variables were analyzed during the 6MWT: heart rate (HR), respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, distance walked in six minutes and modified Borg scale. All the variables studied were statistically different between groups NB and MB, with the exception of school performance and HR in 6MWT. MB affects physical performance and not the academic performance, we noticed a changed pattern in the 6MWT in the MB group. Since the MBs in our study were classified as non-severe, other studies comparing the academic performance variables and 6MWT are needed to better understand the process of physical and academic performances in MB children.

  2. Prevalence of malocclusion among mouth breathing children: do expectations meet reality?

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    Souki, Bernardo Q; Pimenta, Giovana B; Souki, Marcelo Q; Franco, Leticia P; Becker, Helena M G; Pinto, Jorge A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to report epidemiological data on the prevalence of malocclusion among a group of children, consecutively admitted at a referral mouth breathing otorhinolaryngological (ENT) center. We assessed the association between the severity of the obstruction by adenoids/tonsils hyperplasia or the presence of allergic rhinitis and the prevalence of class II malocclusion, anterior open bite and posterior crossbite. Cross-sectional, descriptive study, carried out at an Outpatient Clinic for Mouth-Breathers. Dental inter-arch relationship and nasal obstructive variables were diagnosed and the appropriate cross-tabulations were done. Four hundred and one patients were included. Mean age was 6 years and 6 months (S.D.: 2 years and 7 months), ranging from 2 to 12 years. All subjects were evaluated by otorhinolaryngologists to confirm mouth breathing. Adenoid/tonsil obstruction was detected in 71.8% of this sample, regardless of the presence of rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis alone was found in 18.7% of the children. Non-obstructive mouth breathing was diagnosed in 9.5% of this sample. Posterior crossbite was detected in almost 30% of the children during primary and mixed dentitions and 48% in permanent dentition. During mixed and permanent dentitions, anterior open bite and class II malocclusion were highly prevalent. More than 50% of the mouth breathing children carried a normal inter-arch relationship in the sagital, transversal and vertical planes. Univariate analysis showed no significant association between the type of the obstruction (adenoids/tonsils obstructive hyperplasia or the presence of allergic rhinitis) and malocclusions (class II, anterior open bite and posterior crossbite). The prevalence of posterior crossbite is higher in mouth breathing children than in the general population. During mixed and permanent dentitions, anterior open bite and class II malocclusion were more likely to be present in mouth breathers. Although more children showed

  3. Changes in the palatal dimensions of mouth breathing children caused by nasal obstruction

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    Indiarti, I. S.; Setyanto, D. B.; Kusumaningrum, A.; Budiardjo, S. B.

    2017-08-01

    During children’s growth and development, the breathing process plays an important role in craniofacial growth, especially of the palate. Nose breathing can stimulate the lateral growth of the maxilla, thus making the palate flat. Disturbances in nose breathing caused by nasal obstruction such as allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea can lead to a mouth breathing habit in children. This habit can cause palatal dimension changes such as a narrow V-shaped maxillary arch and a high palatal vault. This study analyzed the relationship between the mouth breathing habit in children who have nasal obstruction and palatal dimension changes. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted with a consecutive sampling method on children 7-18 years old with a history of allergic rhinitis, adenoid hypertrophy, rhinosinusitis, nasal polyps, and obstructive sleep apnea in the Pediatric Respirology and Pediatric Immunology Allergy Outpatient Clinic Kiara Maternal and Child Health Center at Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital in Jakarta. The palatal dimensions were measured by the height and transversal width of the hard palate of castings of each child’s upper dental arch using vernier calipers. Palatal dimension changes were found in children with a mouth breathing habit due to nasal obstruction.

  4. Body posture and pulmonary function in mouth and nose breathing children: cross-sectional study

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    Jovana de Moura Milanesi

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Mouth breathing can lead to changes in body posture and pulmonary function. However, the consequences are still inconclusive and a number of studies are controversial. Objective: Evaluate and correlate spirometric parameters and postural measures in mouth breathing children, and compare them to nose breathers. Methods: two groups of 6 to 12 year-old children were evaluated: mouth breathers (MB, n = 55 and nose breathers (NB, n = 45. Spirometry and body posture analysis using photogrammetry (SAPo 0.68® v were carried out. The following spirometric measures were evaluated: peak expiratory flow (PEF, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, FEV1/FVC ratio (% and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF 25-75%. Biophotogrammetric measures analyzed were: horizontal alignment of acromions (HAA and anterior superior iliac spine (HAASIS, Charpy angle, horizontal alignment of the head (HAH, cervical lordosis (CL, thoracic kyphosis (TK, lumbar lordosis (LL, cervical distance (CD and lumbar distance (LD. Results: There were no intergroup differences in spirometric and postural variables. Positive and moderate correlations were found between CL and CD measures with PEF, FEV1, FVC and FEF 25-75%, while weak correlations were observed between lumbar lordosis and PEF, FEV1 and FVC. Conclusion: The breathing mode had no influence on postural and respiratory measures. However, greater forward head posture, with smaller cervical lordosis, was related to higher lung volumes and flows in both groups.

  5. Deficits in working memory, reading comprehension and arithmetic skills in children with mouth breathing syndrome: analytical cross-sectional study.

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    Kuroishi, Rita Cristina Sadako; Garcia, Ricardo Basso; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha; Fukuda, Marisa Tomoe Hebihara

    2015-01-01

    Mouth breathing syndrome is very common among school-age children, and it is possibly related to learning difficulties and low academic achievement. In this study, we investigated working memory, reading comprehension and arithmetic skills in children with nasal and mouth breathing. Analytical cross-sectional study with control group conducted in a public university hospital. 42 children (mean age = 8.7 years) who had been identified as mouth breathers were compared with a control group (mean age = 8.4 years) matched for age and schooling. All the participants underwent a clinical interview, tone audiometry, otorhinolaryngological evaluation and cognitive assessment of phonological working memory (numbers and pseudowords), reading comprehension and arithmetic skills. Children with mouth breathing had poorer performance than controls, regarding reading comprehension (P = 0.006), arithmetic (P = 0.025) and working memory for pseudowords (P = 0.002), but not for numbers (P = 0.76). Children with mouth breathing have low academic achievement and poorer phonological working memory than controls. Teachers and healthcare professionals should be aware of the association of mouth breathing with children's physical and cognitive health.

  6. Deficits in working memory, reading comprehension and arithmetic skills in children with mouth breathing syndrome: analytical cross-sectional study

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    Rita Cristina Sadako Kuroishi

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Mouth breathing syndrome is very common among school-age children, and it is possibly related to learning difficulties and low academic achievement. In this study, we investigated working memory, reading comprehension and arithmetic skills in children with nasal and mouth breathing. DESIGN AND SETTING: Analytical cross-sectional study with control group conducted in a public university hospital. METHODS: 42 children (mean age = 8.7 years who had been identified as mouth breathers were compared with a control group (mean age = 8.4 years matched for age and schooling. All the participants underwent a clinical interview, tone audiometry, otorhinolaryngological evaluation and cognitive assessment of phonological working memory (numbers and pseudowords, reading comprehension and arithmetic skills. RESULTS: Children with mouth breathing had poorer performance than controls, regarding reading comprehension (P = 0.006, arithmetic (P = 0.025 and working memory for pseudowords (P = 0.002, but not for numbers (P = 0.76. CONCLUSION: Children with mouth breathing have low academic achievement and poorer phonological working memory than controls. Teachers and healthcare professionals should be aware of the association of mouth breathing with children's physical and cognitive health.

  7. Malocclusion and articulation disorders in mouth breathing children from public schools in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul

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    Ana Maria Toniolo da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify the occurrence and types of malocclusion and articulation disorders in mouth breathing children at public schools.Methods: An evaluation was made of 219 children of both genders, between 5 and 12 years of age, attending two public schools in the city of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; with 121 mouth breather children being selected for this study. Orthodontic and phonoaudiological evaluation were made to verify the breathing mode and presence or absence of malocclusion and articulation disorders.Results: It was observed that 100% of the mouth breather children presented malocclusion, 49.60% being Angle’s Class II, 48.76% ClassI and 1.65% Class III. It was also verified that 18.2% of the mouth breather children presented articulation disturbance. Conclusion: All mouth breathing children presented some type of malocclusion, the majority being Angle’s Class II, followed by Class I. The articulation disorders most frequently observed was anterior lisping.

  8. Craniocervical posture and hyoid bone position in children with mild and moderate asthma and mouth breathing.

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    Chaves, Thaís Cristina; de Andrade e Silva, Tatiana Simões; Monteiro, Solange Aparecida Caldeira; Watanabe, Plauto Christopher Aranha; Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Grossi, Débora Bevilaqua

    2010-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess the craniocervical posture and the positioning of the hyoid bone in children with asthma who are mouth breathers compared to non-asthma controls. The study was conducted on 56 children, 28 of them with mild (n=15) and moderate (n=13) asthma (14 girls aged 10.79+/-1.31 years and 14 boys aged 9.79+/-1.12 years), matched for sex, height, weight and age with 28 non-asthma children who are not mouth breathers. The sample size was calculated considering a confidence interval of 95% and a prevalence of 4% of asthma in Latin America. Eighteen variables were analyzed in two radiographs (latero-lateral teleradiography and lateral cervical spine radiography), both obtained with the head in a natural position. The independent t-test was used to compare means values and the chi-square test to compare percentage values (pasthma than in control children (106.38+/-7.66 vs. 111.21+/-7.40, p=0.02) and the frequency of asthma children with an absent or inverted hyoid triangle was found to be significantly higher compared to non-asthma children (36% vs. 7%, p=0.0001). The values of the inclination angles of the superior cervical spine in relation to the horizontal plane were significantly higher in moderate than in mild asthma children (CVT/Hor: 85.10+/-7.25 vs. 90.92+/-6.69, p=0.04 and C1/Hor: 80.93+/-5.56 vs. 85.00+/-4.20, p=0.04). These findings revealed that asthma children presented higher head extension and a higher frequency of changes in hyoid bone position compared to non-asthma children and that greater the asthma severity greater the extension of the upper cervical spine. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the voice of children with mouth breathing caused by four different etiologies using perceptual and acoustic analyses

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    Rosana Tiepo Arévalo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe vocal characteristics in children aged fiveto twelve years with mouth breathing caused by four etiologies:chronic rhinitis, hypertrophy, hypertrophy + chronic rhinitis andfunctional condition, using perceptual evaluation and acousticanalysis. Methods: Voice recordings of 120 mouth breathers judgedby four speech pathologists using the software Multi-Speech.Results: The perceptual evaluation of the voice revealed highincidence of breathy and hoarse voices, especially in the rhinitisgroup. Most cases were moderate, with low pitch and normalloudness. Hyponasality was found in over 50% of sample, asexpected, but we also found high occurrence of laryngealresonance, especially in the rhinitis group. Mean fundamentalfrequency was 24.81Hz, SD = 15.02; jitter = 2.17; shimmer =0.44, and HNR = 2.11. Values did not show statistically significantdifference among the groups. Conclusion: Perceptual evaluation ofthe voice revealed that most mouth breathers presented hoarseand breathy voice, low pitch, normal loudness and hyponasal andlaryngeal resonance. However, the acoustic analysis did not resultin any significant condition.

  10. Change in the nose areas in children with mouth breathing after nasal cleansing and massage.

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    Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira Camargo; Cunha, Daniele Andrade da; Lima, Sandro Júnior Henrique; Lima, Wigna Rayssa Pereira; Cunha, Renata Andrade da; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the changes occurred in the nasal cavity geometry, before and after nasal cleansing, through nasal aeration and acoustic rhinometry in children with oral breathing. Twenty children aged four to 12 years were included in the study. The gathering of participants was conducted at the Multifunctional Laboratory of the Speech Pathology Department of the Federal University of Pernambuco - UFPE. The following procedures were conducted: Identification Index of Signs and Symptoms of Oral Breathing; marking of nasal expiratory airflow using the graded mirror of Altmann, and examination of the Nasal Geometry by Acoustic Rhinometry. The same procedures were performed after nasal massage and cleansing with saline solution. Significant change was observed in the areas with respect to the nasal airflow on both sides after nasal cleansing and massage. As for nasal geometry, measured by acoustic rhinometry, comparison between the nostrils showed that the effect of cleansing and massage was discrete. Nasal aeration measures showed sensitivity to the cleansing and massage technique and measures of nasal geometry confirmed its effect on respiratory physiology.

  11. Padrão respiratório e movimento toracoabdominal de crianças respiradoras orais Breathing pattern and thoracoabdominal motion in mouth-breathing children

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    TCS Brant

    2008-12-01

    motion of mouth-breathing children aged between eight and ten years and to compare these characteristics with those of nose-breathing children of the same ages. METHODS: This observational study was carried out in a university laboratory. The sample size of 50 subjects was estimated based on the results of a pilot study with ten children in each group (total of 20 children and considering a significance level of 0.05 and statistical power of 0.80. Twenty-six mouth-breathing and 25 nose-breathing children participated. Calibrated respiratory inductive plethysmography was used to analyze the following variables, among others: respiratory frequency (f, rib cage contribution towards tidal volume (%RC/Vt, phase angle (PhAng and the ratio between time taken to reach peak inspiratory flow and total inspiratory time (PifT/Ti. Peripheral oxygen saturation of hemoglobin (SpO2 was measured using pulse oximetry. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t test for independent groups or the Mann-Whitney U test, according to the sample distribution of the variables. RESULTS: A total of 4,816 respiratory cycles were analyzed: 2,455 from mouth-breathers and 2,361 from nose-breathers, with a mean of 94 cycles per child. No statistically significant differences were observed between the groups, for the variables studied (f=20.00±2.68 versus 20.73±2.58, p=0.169; %RC/Vt=39.30±11.86 versus 38.36±10.93, p=0.769; PhAng=14.53±7.97 versus 13.31±7.74, p=0.583; PifT/Ti=57.40±7.16 versus 58.35±5.99, p=0.610; SpO2=96.42±1.52% versus 96.88± 1.01%, p=0.208; respectively. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that mouth-breathing children show breathing patterns and thoracoabdominal motion that are similar to those of nose-breathing children in the same age group.

  12. Distância interincisiva máxima em crianças respiradoras bucais Maximum interincisal distance in mouth breathing children

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    Débora Martins Cattoni

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a distância interincisiva máxima é um importante aspecto na avaliação miofuncional orofacial, pois distúrbios miofuncionais orofaciais podem limitar a abertura da boca. OBJETIVO: mensurar a distância interincisiva máxima de crianças respiradoras bucais, relacionando-a com a idade, e comparar as médias dessas medidas com as médias dessa distância em crianças sem queixas fonoaudiológicas. MÉTODOS: participaram 99 crianças respiradoras bucais, de ambos os gêneros, com idades entre 7 anos e 11 anos e 11 meses, leucodermas, em dentadura mista. O grupo controle foi composto por 253 crianças, com idades entre 7 anos e 11 anos e 11 meses, leucodermas, em dentadura mista, sem queixas fonoaudiológicas. RESULTADOS: os achados evidenciam que a média das distâncias interincisivas máximas das crianças respiradoras bucais foi, no total da amostra, de 43,55mm, não apresentando diferença estatisticamente significativa entre as médias, segundo a idade. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre as médias da distância interincisiva máxima dos respiradores bucais e as médias dessa medida das crianças do grupo controle. CONCLUSÕES: a distância interincisiva máxima é uma medida que não variou nos respiradores bucais, durante a dentadura mista, segundo a idade, e parece não estar alterada em portadores desse tipo de disfunção. Aponta-se, também, a importância do uso do paquímetro na avaliação objetiva da distância interincisiva máxima.INTRODUCTION: The maximum interincisal distance is an important aspect in the orofacial myofunctional evaluation, because orofacial myofunctional disorders can limit the mouth opening. AIM: To describe the maximum interincisal distance of the mouth breathing children, according to age, and to compare the averages of the maximum interincisal distance of mouth breathing children to those of children with no history of speech-language pathology disorders. METHODS

  13. Prevalência de respiradores bucais em crianças de idade escolar Prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school

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    Josiane Marques Felcar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pretende-se identificar a prevalência de respiradores bucais em crianças de uma escola do ensino fundamental. Foram aplicados 496 questionários aos pais ou responsáveis das crianças de 1ª à 4ª série de uma escola fundamental, para identificar respiradores bucais. O questionário incluía questões sobre hábitos, sono, comportamento, alimentação, cuidados pessoais e respiração. Para comparar as variáveis entre respiradores bucais e nasais, foi utilizado o teste de Mann-Whitney e qui-quadrado. Para medir o efeito da exposição das variáveis explicativas sobre o desfecho primário, foi utilizada regressão logística e sua magnitude foi calculada por meio do odds ratio. A significância estatística foi estipulada em 5%. A taxa de devolução dos questionários foi de 84,5%. A prevalência de respiração bucal nessa população foi 56,8%. A mediana de idade foi sete anos (6-9. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os gêneros, 49,1% masculino e 50,9% feminino. O modelo final de regressão logística identificou as variáveis baba, dorme bem (associação negativa e ronca como fatores que predizem a ocorrência da respiração bucal. A prevalência de respiradores bucais foi semelhante à encontrada na literatura pesquisada. As variáveis babar, roncar e dormir bem (associação negativa podem predizer a ocorrência da respiração bucal.The objective of this article is to identify the prevalence of mouth breathing in children from an elementary school. 496 questionnaires were answered by 1st and 4th grade children's parents or sponsors in order to identify mouth-breathing. There were questions about habits, sleeping, behavior, eating, personal care and breathing. Mann-Whitney and the Chi-square tests were used to compare the variables between mouth-breathing and nose-breathing among the groups. To measure the exposure effect of the explanatory variables on mouse breathing, the test of logistic regression was

  14. Association between respiratory and postural adaptations and self-perception of school-aged children with mouth breathing in relation to their quality of life

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    Suélen E. Uhlig

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the respiratory and postural adaptations associated with mouth and nasal breathing and to evaluate the associations of such adaptations in mouth breathers' self-perceived quality of life. Method: Cross-sectional study with mouth breathers (initial n=116 and final n=48 and nasal breathers (initial n=131 and final n=24 from elementary school, aged between 7 and 14 years. Chest expansion, using cirtometry, the breathing pattern and the use of accessory muscles, by means of clinical evaluations and photogrammetry, and flexibility tests were evaluated in both groups. Subsequently, the mouth breathers were asked to complete the quality of life questionnaire. Statistical tests: Chi-square, odds ratio, Mann-Whitney, and binomial tests were first applied followed by logistic regressions. Results: Thoracic breathing (p=0.04, using of accessory muscles (p=0.03 and reductions in flexibility (p=0.001 increased the chances of an individual being a mouth breather when compared to nasal breathers. Subsequently, using of accessory muscles decreased the chances of snoring among mouth breathers (p=0.03; the presence of shoulder asymmetry reduced the chances of experiencing quiet sleep (p=0.05 and increased the chances of coughing or being tired when playing or running (p=0.008. Finally, forward head position reduced the chances of waking up at night (p=0.04 and experiencing shortness of breath (p=0.05. Conclusions: Respiratory and postural adaptations increased the chances of individuals persisting with mouth breathing. Additionally, these adaptations could be associated with mouth breathers' self-perceived quality of life.

  15. Análise das habilidades auditivas de crianças com respiração oral Analysis of hearing abilities in mouth-breathing children

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    Bruna Machado Correa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: destacar possíveis relações entre respiração oral e o sistema auditivo central de crianças em idade escolar, a partir da análise das habilidades auditivas de resolução temporal integração e separação binaural, atenção dividida, memória auditiva e fechamento auditivo. MÉTODOS: estudo em 102 escolares, entre 8 e 12 anos. Grupo I composto por 52 crianças com respiração oral e 50 crianças formaram o grupo II, com respiração nasal. Foram utilizados testes de Fala Filtrada, Teste de Padrões de Freqüência e Dicótico de Dissílabos Alternados (SSW. Os resultados dos testes foram analisados em relação ao tipo de habilidade alterada e sua ocorrência em crianças com respiração oral. Além de uma análise quanto à possível relação entre os testes e as ocorrências de alterações mais freqüentes entre os mesmos. RESULTADOS: indivíduos do grupo I obtiveram maior freqüência de alterações de grau severo e moderado. Comprovou-se diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos para as condições de: orelhas esquerda e direita competitiva, alteração relacionada a organização e integração auditiva, fechamento auditivo e padrão temporal. Não ocorreu diferença estatisticamente significante nos resultados da relação entre testes. CONCLUSÃO: crianças com respiração oral apresentam desempenho inferior nas habilidades do processamento auditivo do que crianças com padrão respiratório normal.PURPOSE: to highlight the possible relationships between mouth breathing and central auditory system of school-age children, based on an analysis of the auditory abilities of temporal resolution, binaural separation and integration, divided attention, auditory memory and closure. METHODS: a study of 102 school children, between 8 and 12-year old. Group I was composed of 52 children with mouth breathing and group II was composed of 50 children with nose breathing. The evaluation was carried out using

  16. The effect of mouth breathing on chewing efficiency.

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    Nagaiwa, Miho; Gunjigake, Kaori; Yamaguchi, Kazunori

    2016-03-01

    To examine the effect of mouth breathing on chewing efficiency by evaluating masticatory variables. Ten adult nasal breathers with normal occlusion and no temporomandibular dysfunction were selected. Subjects were instructed to bite the chewing gum on the habitual side. While breathing through the mouth and nose, the glucide elution from the chewing gum, number of chewing strokes, duration of chewing, and electromyography (EMG) activity of the masseter muscle were evaluated as variables of masticatory efficiency. The durations required for the chewing of 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 250 strokes were significantly (P chewing stroke between nose and mouth breathings. The glucide elution rates for 1- and 3-minute chewing were significantly (P chewing between nose and mouth breathings. While chewing for 1, 3, and 5 minutes, the chewing stroke and EMG activity of the masseter muscle were significantly (P chewing to obtain higher masticatory efficiency when breathing through the mouth. Therefore, mouth breathing will decrease the masticatory efficiency if the duration of chewing is restricted in everyday life.

  17. A respiração oral em crianças e suas repercussões no estado nutricional Mouth breathing in children and its repercussions in the nutritional state

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    Daniele Andrade da Cunha

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: identificar o estado nutricional, função mastigatória, aeração nasal, dados sobre o sono, olfato e paladar de crianças respiradoras orais e compará-las com um grupo de crianças respiradoras nasais. MÉTODOS: avaliou-se estado nutricional, modo respiratório e mastigação de 77 crianças respiradoras orais e 154 respiradoras nasais entre seis e dez anos. RESULTADOS: os respiradores orais apresentaram alterações no padrão mastigatório, quando comparados aos respiradores nasais, porém não houve diferença estatisticamente significante em relação ao estado nutricional. CONCLUSÃO: em crianças respiradoras orais houve maior alteração no sono, diminuição da ingestão de carboidratos e aumento da ingestão de lipídeos, porém não foram encontrados dados consistentes que apontem a associação entre a respiração oral e o estado nutricional.PURPOSE: identify nutritional state, masticatory function, respiratory mode, sense of smell and sense of taste among mouth breathing children. METHODS: nasal aeration, mastication, nutritional state of 77 mouth breathing children and 154 nasal breathers children between six and ten years were evaluated. RESULTS: mouth breathers exhibited alterations in the masticatory pattern when compared to the nasal-breathers, but did not have statistical significance in nutritional state. CONCLUSION: the oral-breathing children had more alteration in sleep, reduction in the ingestion of carbohydrate and increase in ingestion of lipids, however, no consistent data were found pointing out the association between mouth breathing and nutritional condition.

  18. Acoustic rhinometry in mouth breathing patients: a systematic review.

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    Melo, Ana Carolina Cardoso de; Gomes, Adriana de Oliveira de Camargo; Cavalcanti, Arlene Santos; Silva, Hilton Justino da

    2015-01-01

    When there is a change in the physiological pattern of nasal breathing, mouth breathing may already be present. The diagnosis of mouth breathing is related to nasal patency. One way to access nasal patency is by acoustic rhinometry. To systematically review the effectiveness of acoustic rhinometry for the diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. Electronic databases LILACS, MEDLINE via PubMed and Bireme, SciELO, Web of Science, Scopus, PsycInfo, CINAHL, and Science Direct, from August to December 2013, were consulted. 11,439 articles were found: 30 from LILACS, 54 from MEDLINE via Bireme, 5558 from MEDLINE via PubMed, 11 from SciELO, 2056 from Web of Science, 1734 from Scopus, 13 from PsycInfo, 1108 from CINAHL, and 875 from Science Direct. Of these, two articles were selected. The heterogeneity in the use of equipment and materials for the assessment of respiratory mode in these studies reveals that there is not yet consensus in the assessment and diagnosis of patients with mouth breathing. According to the articles, acoustic rhinometry has been used for almost twenty years, but controlled studies attesting to the efficacy of measuring the geometry of nasal cavities for complementary diagnosis of respiratory mode are warranted. Copyright © 2014 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Teste de caminhada e rendimento escolar em crianças respiradoras bucais Walk test and school performance in mouth-breathing children

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    Ana Paula Dias Vilas Boas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nas últimas décadas, vários trabalhos sobre respiração bucal (RB têm surgido na literatura; em contrapartida, pouco se conhece sobre vários aspectos desta síndrome, incluindo gravidade, repercussões sobre o rendimento físico e escolar. OBJETIVO: Comparar o rendimento físico pelo teste de caminhada de seis minutos (TC6' e rendimento escolar de crianças e adolescentes com RB e respiradores nasais (RN. MÉTODO: Estudo de corte transversal descritivo e prospectivo em crianças RB e RN que foram submetidas ao TC6' e avaliação do rendimento escolar. RESULTADOS: Foram incluídos 156 escolares, 87 meninas (60 RN e 27 RB e 69 meninos (44 RN e 25 RB. Foram analisadas variáveis durante o TC6': frequência cardíaca (FC, frequência respiratória, saturação periférica de oxigênio, distância percorrida em seis minutos e escala de Borg modificada. Todos os valores das variáveis estudadas foram estatisticamente diferentes entre os grupos RB e RN, com exceção do rendimento escolar e FC no TC6'. CONCLUSÃO: A RB afeta o rendimento físico e não o rendimento escolar, sendo observado padrão alterado no TC6' no grupo RB. Uma vez que os RB desse estudo foram classificados como não graves outros estudos comparando as variáveis de rendimento escolar e TC6' são necessários para o melhor entendimento do processo dos desempenhos físico e escolar em crianças com RB.In recent decades, many studies on mouth breathing (MB have been published; however, little is known about many aspects of this syndrome, including severity, impact on physical and academic performances. OBJECTIVE: Compare the physical performance in a six minutes walk test (6MWT and the academic performance of MB and nasal-breathing (NB children and adolescents. METHOD: This is a descriptive, cross-sectional, and prospective study with MB and NB children submitted to the 6MWT and scholar performance assessment. RESULTS: We included 156 children, 87 girls (60 NB and 27 MB and 69

  20. Oral breathing and speech disorders in children

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    Silvia F. Hitos

    2013-07-01

    Conclusion: Mouth breathing can affect speech development, socialization, and school performance. Early detection of mouth breathing is essential to prevent and minimize its negative effects on the overall development of individuals.

  1. Salivary Markers and Microbial Flora in Mouth Breathing Late Adolescents

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    Stefano Mummolo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This is a 6-month observational case-control study that aims to estimate plaque index (PI, salivary flow, buffering capacity of saliva, and specific Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans and Lactobacillus rates in a mouth breathing late adolescents sample, after a professional oral hygiene procedure and home oral hygiene instructions. Subjects and Methods. A sample of 20 mouth breathing late adolescents/young adults (average: 19.2±2.5; range: 18–23 years and a matched control group of nose breathing subjects (average: 18.3±3.2; range 18–23 years were included in the study. All the participants were subjected to a professional oral hygiene procedure and appropriate home oral hygiene instructions (t0. After three months (t1 and six months (t2, the PI, salivary flow, buffering capacity of saliva, and S. mutans and Lactobacilli rates were recorded. Results. The mean buffering capacity of saliva and the salivary flow rate showed no significant difference between the two groups, all over the observational period. For PI, a significantly higher mode (score 1 of PI was observed in the study group at t1 (score 0 = 35% of subjects; score 1 = 60%; score 2 = 5% and t2 (score 1 = 65% of subjects, score 2 = 35%, with respect to control group. Furthermore, mouth breathing subjects show a significant 4 times higher risk to develop S. mutans CFU > 105 (CI lower limit: 0.95; CI upper limit: 9.48; chi-square: 4.28; p=0.03, with respect to the control subjects. Conclusions. Mouth breathing late adolescents show a significantly higher risk to develop S. mutans CFU > 105 and an increased level of PI. Interceptive orthodontic treatments in growing subjects, like palatal expansion, are encouraged to improve the nasal air flow. In older subjects, orthodontic treatments should be performed with removable appliances like clear aligners, in order to allow a better oral hygiene level.

  2. Ocorrência da síndrome da apneia obstrutiva do sono (SAOS em crianças respiradoras orais Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS in mouth breathing children

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    Suemy Cioffi Izu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available É bem estabelecido que a respiração oral em crianças está relacionada à hipertrofia adenoamigdaliana, que é a principal causa de apneia do sono nesta população. Apesar da importância deste tema, há poucos estudos que comprovam a relação entre SAOS e respiração oral. OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência de distúrbios respiratórios do sono em crianças respiradoras orais e sua correlação com achados otorrinolaringológicos. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados retrospectivamente 248 prontuários de crianças respiradoras orais do serviço de Otorrinolaringologia Pediátrica de uma grande instituição entre 2000 e 2006, analisando os achados otorrinolaringológicos, polissonografia, nasofibroscopia e/ou radiografia em perfil do Cavum. O principal dado polissonográfico utilizado foi o índice de apneia (IA. Classificou-se como ronco primário aqueles com IA1. Desenho Científico: Coorte retrospectivo. RESULTADOS: Dos 248 pacientes incluídos, 144 (58% apresentavam ronco primário e 104 (42% apresentavam SAOS. Os achados otorrinolaringológicos mais frequentes foram Hipertrofia adenoamigdaliana (n=152; 61,2%, Hipertrofia de tonsila palatina (n=17; 6,8% Hipertrofia da tonsila faríngea (n=37; 14,9%, Rinite Alérgica (n=155; 62,5% e Otite Secretora (36; 14,5%. CONCLUSÕES: Ronco Primário e SAOS são frequentes em crianças respiradoras orais. A afecção otorrinolaringológica mais encontrada em crianças com SAOS é a hipertrofia adenoamigdaliana acompanhada ou não de rinite alérgica.It is well known that mouth breathing is associated with adenotonsillar hypertrophy - which is the main cause of obstructive sleep apnea among children. Despite the importance of this matter, there are only a handful of studies showing the relationship between OSAS and mouth breathing. AIM: to determine the prevalence of obstructive sleep disorders in mouth breathing children and study its correlation with otorhinolaryngological findings. STUDY

  3. Estudio cefalométrico del hueso hioides en niños respiradores bucales de 11años (I parte Cephalometric study of the hyoid bone in mouth-breathing children aged 11 (first part

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    Dariel Carulla Martínez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: El presente trabajo se realizó con el propósito de describir el comportamiento de la posición del hueso hioides, en niños respiradores bucales y no respiradores bucales. Métodos: Se recogieron historias clínicas de 60 pacientes con edad de 11 años que acudieron a la consulta de Ortodoncia en el área de salud de la Facultad de Estomatología y nos propusimos comparar desde el punto de vista cefalométrico a un grupo de pacientes respiradores bucales, con el objetivo de determinar si existían diferencias en el comportamiento de la posición del hioides con ciertas variables cefalométricas (lineales y angulares, con respecto a pacientes no respiradores bucales (controles. Para cada una de las mediciones se calculó la media y la desviación estándar. Para determinar la posible diferencia de las mediciones para muestras independientes se realizó Prueba de t de Student para muestras independientes o su equivalente no paramétrico (Mann- Whitney y Kolmogorov- Smirnov. En todas las pruebas de hipótesis se utilizó un nivel de significación del 5 %. Resultados: El mayor número de pacientes se encuentra entre los rangos de 30-35 mm. Los valores y la frecuencia de las variables H-C3 y H-PPF tienen una distribución similar tanto en el grupo de Control como en el Grupo Respirador Bucal. La variable Gn-H muestra su mayor frecuencia en el rango de 40-45 mm. Conclusiones: Se encontró una resistencia de los músculos constrictor medio de la faringe, estilohioideo y vientre posterior del digástrico y del ligamento estilohioideo al traslado del hioides en sentido anterior, resistencia que ejercen los músculos milohioideo, genihioideo y vientre anterior digástrico en los respiradores bucales (descenso del huesoOBJECTIVE: this paper is aimed at describing the behavior of the position of the hyoid bone in mouth- and non-mouth breathing children. METHODS: the medical histories of 60 patients aged 11 that were seen at the Orthodontics

  4. Sensing the effects of mouth breathing by using 3-tesla MRI

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    Park, Chan-A.; Kang, Chang-Ki

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the effects of mouth breathing and typical nasal breathing on brain function by using blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The study had two parts: the first test was a simple contrast between mouth and nasal breathing, and the second test involved combined breathing modes, e.g., mouth inspiration and nasal expiration. Eleven healthy participants performed the combined breathing task while undergoing 3T fMRI. In the group-level analysis, contrast images acquired by using an individual participantlevel analysis were processed using the one-sample t test. We also conducted a region-of-interest analysis comparing signal intensity changes between the breathing modes; the region was selected using an automated anatomical labeling map. The results demonstrated that the BOLD signal in the hippocampus and brainstem was significantly decreased in mouth breathing relative to nasal breathing. On the other hand, both the precentral and postcentral gyri showed activation that was more significant in mouth breathing compared to nasal breathing. This study suggests that the BOLD activity patterns between mouth and nasal breathing may be induced differently, especially in the hippocampus, which could provide clues to explain the effects on brain cognitive function due to mouth breathing.

  5. Atividade eletromiográfica dos músculos temporal anterior e masseter em crianças respiradoras bucais e em respiradoras nasais Electrical Activity of the Anterior Temporal and Masseter Muscles in Mouth and Nasal Breathing Children

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    Aline Ferla

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available A respiração bucal tem sido estudada por causar sérios efeitos no desenvolvimento do sistema estomatognático. OBJETIVO: Estudar, através da análise eletromiográfica, o padrão de atividade elétrica dos músculos temporal anterior e masseter em crianças com respiração bucal, comparando-os com o de crianças com respiração nasal. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Foram estudados dois grupos de crianças: 17 respiradoras bucais (RB e 12 respiradoras nasais (RN. As crianças foram submetidas à avaliação eletromiográfica bilateral dos músculos supracitados nas situações de máxima intercuspidação e mastigação habitual. Utilizou-se o eletromiógrafo Myosystem Br-1, com 12 canais de aquisição, amplificação com ganho total de 5938, taxa de aquisição de 4000Hz e filtro passa-faixa de 20-1000Hz. O sinal foi processado em RMS, mensurado em µV e analisado e expresso em %, normalizado. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente através do Teste t (Student. RESULTADOS: Observou-se que o nível de atividade elétrica do grupo RB foi inferior para todos os músculos e estatisticamente significante somente para o temporal esquerdo; os respiradores bucais apresentaram predomínio de atividade elétrica no lado direito e no músculo temporal durante a mastigação habitual. CONCLUSÃO: A respiração bucal interferiu na atividade elétrica dos músculos estudados nas situações funcionais de máxima intercuspidação e mastigação habitual.Mouth breathing has been associated with severe impact on the development of the stomatognathic system. AIM: This paper aims to analyze the electromyographical findings and patterns of electrical activity of the anterior temporal and masseter muscles in mouth and nasal breathing children. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The patients were divided into two groups: mouth breathers (n=17 and nasal breathers (n=12. The children underwent bilateral electromyographic examination of the anterior temporal and masseter muscles at

  6. A postura corporal e as funções estomatognáticas em crianças respiradoras orais: uma revisão de literatura Body posture and the stomatognathic functions in mouth breathing children: a literature review

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    Patricia Girarde Machado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A postura corporal das crianças é objeto de crescente estudo na fisioterapia, assim como as crianças respiradoras orais o são na fonoaudiologia. Este estudo tem por objetivo verificar, na literatura científica, as funções estomatognáticas, a postura corporal e suas relações, em crianças respiradoras orais. Trata-se de uma revisão da literatura sobre a postura corporal, e o sistema estomatognático e suas relações em respiradores orais obstrutivos e funcionais. Buscou-se nas bases de dados eletrônicos MEDLINE, SCIELO e LILACS, e Googlecientífico, artigos que relacionassem esses temas nos últimos 10 anos. Os artigos selecionados foram organizados de acordo com os autores, o título, a origem, a faixa etária e o ano de publicação. Após a seleção dos textos, foram identificados apenas quatro trabalhos que relacionam postura, sistema estomatognático e respiração oral; dois que relacionam sistema estomatognático e postura; e a maioria, treze que estudam sistema estomatognático e respiração oral; dentre outros. Notou-se que há uma escassez de informações sobre a relação da postura corporal com o sistema estomatognático em respiradores orais. A escassez é ainda maior quando se compara o grupo de respiradores orais obstrutivos e respiradores orais funcionais relacionando a postura corporal com o sistema estomatognático.Children's body posture has been studied more and more by physical therapy, as well as mouth breather children have been studied by speech-language-hearing therapy. This study tries to check, through scientific literature, the relationship between stomatognathic functions and body posture in mouth breather children. This is a review of literature on body posture and the stomatognathic system in obstructive and functional mouth breathers. We searched, in electronic data basis such as MEDLINE, SCIELO and LILACS, and Google Scientific, articles related to these topics, published in the last 10. The

  7. Respiração oral na criança: repercussões diferentes de acordo com o diagnóstico Mouth breathing in children: different repercussions according to the diagnosis

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    Renata C. Di Francesco

    2004-10-01

    breathing is very common in children. Mouthbreathing syndrome is characterized by tiredness, daytime sleepiness, failure to thrive, restless sleep, nocturnal enuresis and poor school performance. However, this symptom has several causes and it is necessary to elucidate more details about this entity. AIM: Compare the findings of daytime sleepiness, headache, nocturnal enuresis, poor school performance and attention deficit and bruxism in subjects that present mouth breathing according to the following diagnosis: allergic rhinitis, adenoidal hyperplasia and adenotonsillar hyperplasia. STUDY DESIGN: Transversal cohort study. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This is a prospective study of 142 patients from 2 to 16 years old. After ENT evaluation, patients were classified in 3 groups according to the following diagnosis: allergic rhinitis, adenoidal hyperplasia, adenotonsillar hyperplasia. Parents and caregivers answered a questionnaire about night symptoms in order to describe the presence of sleep apnea and specific questions about: morning headaches, school performance and attention deficit, daytime sleepiness, restless sleep, nocturnal enuresis and bruxism. RESULTS: Mouth breathing is common in boys. Children with adenotonsillar hyperplasia are younger and present more snoring and sleep apnea. They present also poor school performance, bruxism, nocturnal enuresis and restless sleep, which are correlated to sleep apnea, differing from the allergic rhinitis group. Significant findings of daytime sleepiness and morning headaches were not found. CONCLUSION: Bruxism, enuresis, restless sleep and poor school performance are related to sleep apnea and more frequent in subjects with adenotonsillar hyperplasia. The investigation of sleep apnea in children with mouth breathing is mandatory, as well as the determination of its cause.

  8. IMPLICATIONS OF MOUTH BREATHING AND ATYPICAL SWALLOWING IN BODY POSTURE

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    Veronique Sousa

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: Statistically significant associations were established between the breathing pattern and the horizontal alignment of acromions, as well as the horizontal and vertical alignment of the head; between the pattern of breathing and swallowing with occlusal relationship anteroposterior and occlusal relationship vertical and also between breathing pattern and swallowing with digital sucking habits and pacifier use.

  9. The effect of mouth breathing on dentofacial morphology of growing child

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    S Malhotra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Backround: The oral mode of respiration cause postural adaptations of structures in the head and neck region producing the effect on the positional relationship of the jaws. Aim: The aim of this study is to verify the skeletal relationship of mouth and nose breathing child. Study design: A cross sectional study was performed to assess the association of changed mode of respiration with dentofacial growth. Materials and Methods : One hundred children among which 54 were mouth breathers and 46 were nasal breathers of 6-12 years of age were submitted to clinical examination and cephalometric radiographical analysis. Statistical analysis : Chi-square test for proportions and independent sample′s ′t′test for parametric data is used. Result: The mean values of N-Me (P<0.001 ANS-Me (P<0.001 and SN-GoGn (P<0.001 for mouth breathers is significantly higher. ArGo-GoMe (P=0.003 and (P<0.011 for 6-9 and 9-12 years age group, respectively, were significantly low in nasal breathers group. Conclusions: Changed mode of respiration was associated with increased facial height, mandibular plane angle and gonial angle.

  10. Postura, tônus e mobilidade de lábios e língua de crianças respiradoras orais Posture, lips and tongue tone and mobility of mouth breathing children

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    Marta Assumpção de Andrada e Silva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: caracterizar a postura, o tônus e a mobilidade dos lábios e da língua de crianças respiradoras orais. MÉTODO: participaram do estudo realizado em São Paulo, SP, Brasil, 40 crianças respiradoras orais, sendo 26 (65% do sexo masculino e 14 (35% do sexo feminino, com idades entre 7 e 10 anos. Utilizou-se o protocolo MBGR para avaliação dos aspectos analisados. RESULTADOS: foram encontrados os seguintes achados para postura dos lábios: entreabertos (32,5%, alternância entre abertos e fechados (27,5%, abertos (22,5% e fechados (17,5%. Em relação ao tônus do lábio superior: 90% apresentaram tônus normal, 10% diminuído e nenhuma com tônus aumentado. Quanto ao tônus de lábio inferior, 80,0% das crianças apresentaram tônus diminuído e 20,0% normal. No item mobilidade dos lábios, 100,0% apresentaram mobilidade mais próxima dos melhores escores. Em relação à postura habitual da língua, em 57,5% esta estrutura permaneceu no assoalho, em 32,5% não foi possível observar sua posição e em 10,0% se encontrava em posição interdental. Quanto ao tônus da língua, 52,5% apresentaram tônus diminuído e 47,5% normal. Na avaliação de mobilidade de língua, 100,0% apresentaram mobilidade mais próxima dos melhores escores. CONCLUSÃO: as características de postura, tônus e mobilidade dos lábios das crianças respiradoras orais estudadas foram: lábios entreabertos, lábio superior com tônus normal, lábio inferior com tônus diminuído e mobilidade normal. Em relação à língua: postura no assoalho da boca, tônus diminuído e mobilidade normal.PURPOSE: to characterize lips and tongue posture, tone and mobility of mouth breathing children. METHOD: the subjects of this study, conducted in São Paulo, SP, Brazil, were 40 mouth breathing children, 26 (65% male and 14 (35% female, aging between 7 and 10-year old. MBGR protocol was used to evaluate the aforementioned aspects. RESULTS: the following results were obtained

  11. Intraoral pH and temperature during sleep with and without mouth breathing.

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    Choi, J E; Waddell, J N; Lyons, K M; Kieser, J A

    2016-05-01

    To measure and compare the intraoral pH and temperature of individuals during sleep with and without mouth breathing. Ten healthy participants [mean age = 25·8 (± 4·3)] wore a custom-made appliance fitted with a pH probe and thermocouple for two sets of 48 h. Continuous pH and temperature measurements were taken from the palatal aspect of the upper central incisors. To simulate mouth breathing during sleep, participants wore a nose clip for two nights of the four, with the first group (n = 5) wearing the nose clip during the first night and the rest (n = 5) wearing the nose clip during the second night of sleep to balance any potential bias from the wearing sequence. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses were conducted. The mean intraoral pH during daytime was 7·3 (± 0·4) and during sleep was 7·0 (± 0·5). The mean intraoral pH during sleep with mouth breathing was 6·6 (± 0·5), which was statistically significant compared with the normal sleep condition (P pH decreased slowly over the hours of sleep in all participants. When sleeping with forced mouth breathing, intraoral pH showed a greater fall over a longer period of time. The mean intraoral temperature was 33·1 °C (± 5·2) during daytime and 33·3 °C (± 6·1) during sleep, with no statistical significance between sleep with and without mouth breathing (P > 0·05). The results suggest that mouth breathing during sleep is related to a decrease in intraoral pH compared with normal breathing during sleep, and this has been proposed as a causal factor for dental erosion and caries. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Association between breastfeeding and breathing pattern in children: a sectional study

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    Teresinha S.P. Lopes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to determine the prevalence of mouth breathing and to associate the history of breastfeeding with breathing patterns in children. METHODS: this was an observational study with 252 children of both genders, aged 30 to 48 months, who participated in a dental care program for mothers and newborns. As an instrument of data collection, a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to the children's mothers assessing the form and duration of breastfeeding and the oral habits of non-nutritive sucking. To determine the breathing patterns that the children had developed, medical history and clinical examination were used. Statistical analysis was conducted to examine the effects of exposure on the primary outcome (mouth breathing, and the prevalence ratio was calculated with a 95% confidence interval. RESULTS: of the total sample, 43.1% of the children were mouth breathers, 48.4% had been breastfed exclusively until six months of age or more, and 27.4% had non-nutritive sucking habits. Statistically significant associations were found for bottle-feeding (p < 0.001 and oral habits of non-nutritive sucking (p = 0.009, with an increased likelihood of children exhibiting a predominantly oral breathing pattern. A statistically significant association was also observed between a longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding and a nasal breathing pattern presented by children. CONCLUSION: an increased duration of exclusive breastfeeding lowers the chances of children exhibiting a predominantly oral breathing pattern.

  13. Relação entre a excursão do músculo diafragma e as curvaturas da coluna vertebral em crianças respiradoras bucais The relationship between excursion of the diaphragm and curvatures of the spinal column in mouth breathing children

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    Liu Chiao Yi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a relação entre a excursão do músculo diafragma e as curvaturas da coluna vertebral em crianças respiradoras bucais. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas 52 crianças de 5 a 12 anos de idade, de ambos os sexos. Por meio de avaliação otorrinolaringológica, foram divididas em dois grupos: respiradores bucais e respiradores nasais. Todos os participantes foram submetidos a exame de videofluoroscopia do músculo diafragma e a avaliação postural. A excursão do diafragma foi analisada pelo programa Adobe Photoshop®, e a avaliação postural através de fotografias em norma lateral esquerda, sendo analisadas pelo Software de Avaliação Postural. RESULTADOS: Os grupos estudados apresentaram diferença estatisticamente significante quanto ao comportamento das curvaturas da coluna vertebral (lordose cervical: p = 0,003; lordose lombar: p = 0,001; cifose torácica: p = 0,002; posição da pelve: p = 0,001 e da excursão do músculo diafragma (diafragma lado direito: p = 0,001; diafragma lado esquerdo: p = 0,001. O grupo respirador bucal apresentou diminuição da lordose cervical, aumento da cifose torácica, aumento da lordose lombar e anteversão da posição da pelve. A distância excursionada pelo músculo diafragma em crianças respiradoras bucais é menor que em crianças respiradoras nasais. Não houve significância estatística ao relacionar o comportamento das curvaturas da coluna vertebral com a excursão do músculo diafragma. CONCLUSÃO: Não há relação entre as curvaturas da coluna vertebral com a excursão do músculo diafragma nos grupos estudados.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between excursion of the diaphragm muscle and spinal curvatures in mouth breathing children. METHODS: A total of 52 children of both sexes, aged from 5 to 12 years, were studied. After otorhinolaryngological assessment, the children were divided into two groups: mouth breathers and nose breathers. All of the children underwent

  14. Estudio cefalométrico del hueso hioides en niños respiradores bucales de 11 años.: Segunda parte Cephalometry study of hyoid bone in children aged 11 mouth-breathing (second part

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    Dariel Carulla Martínez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una correlación entre el comportamiento de la posición del hioides con el crecimiento del maxilar y de la mandíbula, los ángulos cérvico-basio-hioideo y el espacio aéreo póstero-inferior, desde el punto de vista cefalométrico, a un grupo de pacientes respiradores bucales. Se analizaron las historias clínicas de 60 pacientes, de 11 años de edad, que acudieron a la consulta de Ortodoncia en el área de salud de la Facultad de Estomatología. Se utilizaron matrices de coeficiente de correlación lineal de Pearson, para evaluar la posición del hioides con respecto a dichas variables. Se encontró descenso del hueso, y relaciones significativas con las variables que reflejan el crecimiento maxilar y mandibular, así como la posición de la columna vertebral (segmento cervical y de la cabeza, además del espacio aéreo posterior de la faringe, con un nivel de significación del 5 %.A correlation between the behavior of hyoid bone location and the maxilla and the mandible growth, the cérvico-basio-hyoid angles and the lower posterior aerial space from the cephalometry point of view in a group of patients mouth-breathing. The medical records from 60 patients aged 11 seen in the Orthodontics consultation from the health area of Stomatology Faculty were reviewed. We used matrix of Pearson's linear correlation to assess the hyoid bone location regarding such variables; noting a bone drop and significant relations with above variables reflecting the maxillary and mandibular growth, the spinal column position (cervical segment and the head; as well ass the posterior aerial space of the pharynx with a 5 % significance level.

  15. Oral hygiene practices, periodontal conditions, dentition status and self-reported bad mouth breath among young mothers, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumghamba, E G S; Manji, K P; Michael, J

    2006-11-01

    To determine the oral hygiene practices, periodontal conditions, dentition status and self-reported bad mouth breath (S-BMB) among young mothers. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. A total of 302 postpartum mothers, aged 14-44 years, were interviewed on oral hygiene practices and S-BMB using structured questionnaire. Oral hygiene, dentition and periodontal status were assessed using the Community Periodontal Index probe and gingival recessions (GR) using Williams Periodontal probe. Tooth brushing practice was 99%; tongue brushing (95%), plastic toothbrush users (96%), chewing stick (1%), wooden toothpicks (76%), dental floss (oral health promotion and periodontal therapy are recommended. This study provides baseline information on oral health status and the complaint on bad mouth breath which necessitates in the future need for objective assessment, diagnosis and management of bad mouth breath for enhanced social and professional interaction without embarrassment.

  16. Mouth Problems in Infants and Children

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    ... mouth can be painful and worrisome. Follow this chart for more information about common causes of mouth ... as GINGIVITIS or PERIODONTITIS, usually caused by poor DENTAL HYGIENE. Self CareTake your child to the dentist. ...

  17. Efeito da fisioterapia sobre os parâmetros ventilatórios e a dinâmica tóraco-abdominal de crianças respiradoras bucais Effects of the physical therapy on ventilatory parameters and thoracoabdominal dynamics of mouth breathing children

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    Fabiana dos Santos Ferreira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou avaliar o efeito da fisioterapia nos parâmetros ventilatórios e na dinâmica tóraco-abdominal de crianças respiradoras bucais. Dez crianças respiradoras bucais foram submetidas a um programa de reeducação respiratória e correção postural durante 20 sessões de exercícios de alongamento e fortalecimento muscular sobre a bola suíça, estimulação diafragmática e alongamento dos músculos acessórios da inspiração. Os dados coletados foram as medidas de pressões inspiratórias e expiratórias máximas (PIM e PEM, capacidade inspiratória (CI, pico de fluxo expiratório (PFE, mobilidade torácica por meio do coeficiente respiratório (Cr nos níveis axilar (CrA, xifoide (CrX e umbilical (CrU e análise biofotogramétrica do ângulo de Charpy. Estes foram verificados antes e após 10 e 20 atendimentos. Os dados foram submetidos a uma análise de variância (ANOVA e, nas diferenças encontradas entre as médias, aplicou-se o Teste de Tukey com nível de significância de 5% (pThis study aimed to evaluate the effects of the physiotherapy on the ventilatory parameters and thoracoabdominal dynamics of mouth breathing children. Ten mouth breathing children were undergone to 20 sessions of respiratory reeducation and postural correction through stretching and strengthening exercises on Swiss ball, diaphragmatic stimulation and stretching of the inspiratory accessory muscles. The data collected were measurements of the maximum inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP and MEP, inspiratory capacity (IC, peak expiratory flow (PEF, the chest wall mobility measured by the respiratory coefficient (Rc at the levels of the axillary (RcA, xiphosternal (RcX and umbilical (RcU regions and biophotogrametry analysis of the Charpy angle. These were measured before and after 10 and 20 sessions. A 1-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to determine differences in variables among the three evaluations. Post

  18. Craniofacial changes and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Christina Thomé Pacheco

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The main cause of mouth breathing and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB in childhood is associated with upper airway narrowing to varying degrees. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of morphological and functional craniofacial changes and the main clinical symptoms of SDB in healthy children. METHODS: A cross-sectional observational study was conducted. A sample comprising 687 healthy schoolchildren, aged 7-12 years old and attending public schools, was assessed by medical history, clinical medical and dental examination, and respiratory tests. The self-perceived quality of life of mouth breathing children was obtained by a validated questionnaire. RESULTS: Out of the total sample, 520 children were nose breathers (NB while 167 (24.3% were mouth breathers (MB; 32.5% had severe hypertrophy of the palatine tonsils, 18% had a Mallampati score of III or IV, 26.1% had excessive overjet and 17.7% had anterior open bite malocclusion. Among the MB, 53.9% had atresic palate, 35.9% had lip incompetence, 33.5% reported sleepiness during the day, 32.2% often sneezed, 32.2% had a stuffy nose, 19.6% snored, and 9.4% reported having the feeling to stop breathing while asleep. However, the self-perception of their quality of life was considered good. CONCLUSION: High prevalence of facial changes as well as signs and symptoms of mouth breathing were found among health children, requiring early diagnosis and treatment to reduce the risk of SDB.

  19. Sleep disordered breathing in children with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffanello, Marco; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Piacentini, Giorgio; Gasperi, Emma; Nosetti, Luana; Cavarzere, Paolo; Ramaroli, Diego Alberto; Mittal, Aliza; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2017-02-01

    Children with achondroplasia often have breathing problems, especially during sleep. The most important treatments are adenotonsillectomy (for treating upper obstruction) and/or neurosurgery (for resolving cervicomedullar junction stenosis). We reviewed the scientific literature on polysomnographic investigations which assessed the severity of respiratory disorders during sleep. Recent findings have highlighted the importance of clinical investigations in patients with achondroplasia, differentiating between those that look for neurological patterns and those that look for respiratory problems during sleep. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and somatosensory evoked potentials are the main tools to evaluate necessary neurosurgery and over myelopathy, respectively. The use of polysomnography enables clinicians to identify children with upper airway obstruction and to quantify disease severity; it is not suitable for MRI and/or neurosurgery considerations.

  20. Children's exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) through mouthing toys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionas, Alin C; Ulevicus, Jocelyn; Gómez, Ana Ballesteros; Brandsma, Sicco H; Leonards, Pim E G; van de Bor, Margot; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have previously been detected in children toys, yet the risk of child exposure to these chemicals through the mouthing of toys or other items is still unknown. We aimed to expand on the current knowledge by investigating the impact of infants' mouthing activities on exposure to PBDEs present in toys. This was established by a leaching model for determining the amount PBDEs that can leach from toys into saliva in simulated conditions. The PBDE migration rate was at its highest for the 15 min low-exposure scenario incubations (198 pg/cm(2) × min) with the ERM EC-591 certified reference material (CRM) (0.17% w/w PBDEs). The leaching process was congener-dependent, since the percentage of lower brominated PBDE congeners that leached out was up to 4.5 times higher than for the heavier PBDEs. To study the scenario in which a child would mouth on a toy flame retarded with BDE 209 alone, a plastic item containing 7% BDE 209 (w/w) was also tested. The BDE 209 amounts leached out in only 15 min were higher than the amounts leached from the CRM after the 16 h incubation. For the Belgian population, the exposure scenario from mouthing on toys containing PBDEs in amounts similar to the REACH threshold was found to be lower than the exposure from mother's milk, but higher than the exposure through diet or even dust. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Analysis of breath, exhaled via the mouth and nose, and the air in the oral cavity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, T.; Pysanenko, A.; Dryahina, Kseniya; Španěl, Patrik; Smith, D.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, - (2008), , 037013-1-13 ISSN 1752-7155 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0776 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : analysis of breath * oral cavity * SIFT-MS Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  2. SIFT-MS Analysis of Nose-Exhaled Breath; Mouth Contamination and the Influence of Exercise

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Chippendale, T. W. E.; Dryahina, Kseniya; Španěl, Patrik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 2013 (2013), s. 565-575 ISSN 1573-4110 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry * breath analysis * nose exhalation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.194, year: 2013

  3. [Characteristics of tidal breathing pulmonary function in children with tracheobronchomalacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lan; Chen, Qaing; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Shuang-Gui; Hu, Ci-Lang; Wu, Ai-Min

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the characteristics of tidal breathing pulmonary function in children with tracheobronchomalacia (TBM). In this study, 30 children who were diagnosed with TBM using electronic bronchoscopy were enrolled in the observation group; 30 healthy children were recruited in the normal control group. For individuals in each group, the assessment of tidal breath pulmonary function was performed at diagnosis and 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after diagnosis. There were no significant differences in tidal volume, inspiratory time, expiratory time, and inspiratory to expiratory ratio between the two groups (P>0.05). Compared with the control group, the observation group had a significantly higher respiratory rate and significantly lower ratio of time to peak tidal expiratory flow to total expiratory time (TPTEF/TE) and ratio of volume to peak tidal expiratory flow to total expiratory volume (VPTEF/VE). There was a time-dependent increase in TPTEF/TE and VPTEF/VE for TBM children from the time of initial diagnosis to 12 months after diagnosis. Tidal breathing pulmonary function has characteristic changes in children with TBM. Tidal breathing pulmonary function tends to be recovered with increased age in children with TBM.

  4. Calming Children When Drawing Blood Using Breath-based Biofeedback

    OpenAIRE

    Sonne, T.; Merritt, T.; Marshall, P. E.; Lomholt, J.; Müller, J.; Grønbæk, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood sampling is a common and necessary procedure in the treatment and diagnosis of a variety of diseases. However, it often results in painful and stressful experiences for children. Designed together with domain experts, ChillFish is a breath-controlled biofeedback game technology with bespoke airflow sensor that aims to calm children during blood sampling procedures. An experimental pilot study was conducted in which 20 children aged 6-11 were assigned to one of two conditions involving e...

  5. Hand- and Object-Mouthing of Rural Bangladeshi Children 3–18 Months Old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura H. Kwong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Children are exposed to environmental contaminants by placing contaminated hands or objects in their mouths. We quantified hand- and object-mouthing frequencies of Bangladeshi children and determined if they differ from those of U.S. children to evaluate the appropriateness of applying U.S. exposure models in other socio-cultural contexts. We conducted a five-hour structured observation of the mouthing behaviors of 148 rural Bangladeshi children aged 3–18 months. We modeled mouthing frequencies using 2-parameter Weibull distributions to compare the modeled medians with those of U.S. children. In Bangladesh the median frequency of hand-mouthing was 37.3 contacts/h for children 3–6 months old, 34.4 contacts/h for children 6–12 months old, and 29.7 contacts/h for children 12–18 months old. The median frequency of object-mouthing was 23.1 contacts/h for children 3–6 months old, 29.6 contacts/h for children 6–12 months old, and 15.2 contacts/h for children 12–18 months old. At all ages both hand- and object-mouthing frequencies were higher than those of U.S. children. Mouthing frequencies were not associated with child location (indoor/outdoor. Using hand- and object-mouthing exposure models from U.S. and other high-income countries might not accurately estimate children’s exposure to environmental contaminants via mouthing in low- and middle-income countries.

  6. BREATHING EXERCISE RELAXATION INCREASE PHSYCOLOGICAL RESPONSE PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuni Sufyanti Arief

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Being hospitalize will be made the children become stress. Hospitalization response of the child particularly is afraid sense regard to painfull procedure and increase to attack the invasive procedure. The aimed of this study was to describe the influence of breathing exercise relaxation technique regarded to phsycological receiving responses in the preeliminary school chidren while they were receiving invasive procedure. Method: A quasy experimental purposive sampling design was used in this study. There were 20 respondents who met to the inclusion criteria. The independent variable was the breathing exercise relaxation technique and the dependent variable was phsycological receiving responses. Data for phsylogical response were collected by using observation form then analyzed by using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and Mann Whitney U Test with significance level α≤0.05. Result :  The result showed that breathing exercise relaxation technique had significance influence to phsycological response (p=0.000. Discussion: It,s can be concluded that breathing exercise relaxation technique has an effect to increase pshycological response in preeliminary school children who received invasive procedure.

  7. Clinical Efficacy of Piracetam on Breath Holding Spells in Children

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    F. Ashrafzadeh

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Breath holding spells (BHS is a type of syncope in children , most commonly encontered in the early years of life. Although these athacks don't damage the brain , if these are frequent or prolonged cause , parents frighten , so physician should intervent. In this study we evaluated clinical efficacy of piracetam on B.H.S of children in Mashhad Ghaem Hospital during 2001-2002.In this double blind placebo control study , piracetam or placebo on a randomized basis was administered to children with 40 mg/kg/day in 2 divided doses for 2 months. From the 41 children that were enrolled , 21 cases received piracetam and 20 cases received placebo. Parents denoted the numbers of spells two months before and two months after taking drug. Control of breath holding spells were observed in 90.5% of patients in the group taking piracetam as compared with 40% in the group taking placebo (P = 0.002. Of the all patients 10 cases had iron deficiency anemia so they had taken elemental Fe too. The side effects were the same in these two groups. The results of this study indicated that piracetam was efficient for the treatment of children with B.H.S without greater incidence adverse effects than placebo.

  8. Oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. Part two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, S; Chamley, C

    2013-04-01

    This is the second part of a two-part article on oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. This article covers basic oral hygiene and management of oral health problems: oral candidiasis, coated tongue/dirty mouth, dry mouth, hypersalivation, ulceration, painful mouth, stomatitis and mucositis. The article also covers treating patients who are immunocompromised and the need to educate families and carers in the basic principles of oral care, including the importance of preventing cross-infection. Part one outlined oral assessment and discussed the adaptation of the Nottingham Oral Health Assessment Tool (Freer 2000).

  9. Tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy versus non-surgical management for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, Roderick P; Hearne, Benjamin J; Chandrasekharan, Deepak; Blackshaw, Helen; Lim, Jerome; Schilder, Anne G M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) is a condition that encompasses breathing problems when asleep, due to an obstruction of the upper airways, ranging in severity from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). It affects both children and adults. In children,

  10. [Breath tests in children with suspected lactose intolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, P Ángela; Furió, C Simone; Arancibia, A Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Up to 70% of the world population is lactose intolerance. However, there are no epidemiological studies among Chilean pediatric population affected by this condition. Clinical characterization of a series of children who underwent the lactose intolerance breath test for lactose intolerance study, establishing intolerance and malabsorption frequencies, the most frequent symptoms, and test performance depending on the origin. Patients under 18 years old who took the lactose intolerance breath test in the Gastroenterology Laboratory of the Catholic University of Chile, and who were admitted due to clinically suspected lactose intolerance. Malabsorption was considered when there was as an increase of ≥20ppm above the baseline (H2) or ≥34ppm of H2 and methane (CH4) combined. Intolerance was considered when the above was associated with a symptom intensity score ≥7 during registration. The analysis included194 patients aged 1 to17 years of age. Of these, 102 (53%) presented with malabsorption, and 53 (27%) were intolerant. The frequency of lactose intolerance varied from 7.1 to 45.4%, and it occurred more frequently at older ages. The most common reported symptoms were abdominal pain, bloating and rumbling. Lactose malabsorption and intolerance can be investigated from the first years of life using the lactose breath test plus a symptom questionnaire. An increase in the frequency of intolerance with age, and a greater number of positive tests, if they were requested by a gastroenterologist, were observed. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Helicobacter pylori seroprevalence in children with sleep-disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewska, J; Klukowski, M; Debkowska, K; Kilon, J; Citko, D; Flisiak, M; Oleksinska, M; Kaczmarski, M

    2016-08-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is considered to be a factor involved in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). This cross-sectional study examined the seroprevalence of HP in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in respect to OSAS severity and in reference to other common pediatric medical conditions. Overnight polysomnography with pH-metry (PSG) was performed at a Sleep Laboratory (in the years 2008-2011). OSAS severity was determined based on Obstructive Apnea Index (OAI). Subjects were classified into primary snoring group (OAI system, food hypersensitivity, and gastrointestinal tract]. Analyses were performed by nonparametric statistical tests. HP seropositivity was 10.4% (12/115) in the SDB group and 11.6% (45/387) in the reference group. HP positive and negative subjects did not differ in PSG, acid gastro-esophageal reflux index nor in age, sex, nutritional status (BMI-z score), and hematological indices in the SDB group. Seropositivity was found in 16.7% of the primary snoring group, 10.2% of mild-moderate OSAS, and in 11.1% of severe OSAS (chi(2) p = 0.832). Children with SDB are not more predisposed to a chronic HP infection than children with other common chronic pediatric conditions. HP seropositivity does not influence OSAS severity but possible infection should none-the-less be considered on a case-by-case basis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Impaired memory consolidation in children with obstructive sleep disordered breathing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Maski

    Full Text Available Memory consolidation is stabilized and even enhanced by sleep (and particularly by 12-15 Hz sleep spindles in NREM stage 2 sleep in healthy children but it is unclear what happens to these processes when sleep is disturbed by obstructive sleep disordered breathing. This cross-sectional study investigates differences in declarative memory consolidation among children with primary snoring (PS and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA compared to controls. We further investigate whether memory consolidation group differences are associated with NREM stage 2 (N2 sigma (12-15 Hz or NREM slow oscillation (0.5-1 Hz spectral power bands. In this study, we trained and tested participants on a spatial declarative memory task with cued recall. Retest occurred after a period of daytime wake (Wake or a night of sleep (Sleep with in-lab polysomnography. 36 participants ages 5-9 years completed the protocol: 14 with OSA as defined by respiratory disturbance index (RDI > 1/hour, 12 with primary snoring (PS and 10 controls. OSA participants had poorer overall memory consolidation than controls across Wake and Sleep conditions [OSA: mean = -18.7% (5.8, controls: mean = 1.9% (7.2, t = -2.20, P = 0.04]. In contrast, PS participants and controls had comparable memory consolidation across conditions (t = 0.41; P = 0.38. We did not detect a main effect for condition (Sleep, Wake or group x condition interaction on memory consolidation. OSA participants had lower N2 sigma power than PS (P = 0.03 and controls (P = 0.004 and N2 sigma power inversely correlated with percentage of time snoring on the study night (r = -0.33, P<0.05. Across all participants, N2 sigma power modestly correlated with memory consolidation in both Sleep (r = 0.37, P = 0.03 and Wake conditions (r = 0.44, P = 0.009. Further observed variable path analysis showed that N2 sigma power mediated the relationship between group and mean memory consolidation across Sleep and Wake states [Bindirect = 6.76(3.5, z = 2

  13. Comparison of the Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus colony count changes in saliva following chlorhexidine (0.12% mouth rinse, combination mouth rinse, and green tea extract (0.5% mouth rinse in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul J Hegde

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Compounds present in green tea have been shown to inhibit the growth and activity of bacteria associated with oral infections. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of chlorhexidine (0.12% mouth rinse and combination (chlorhexidine and sodium fluoride mouth rinse to that of green tea extract (0.5% mouth rinse in reducing the salivary count of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus in children. Materials and Methods: The sample for the study consisted of 75 school children aged 8–12 years with four or more (decay component of decayed, missing, and filled teeth index. Children were divided randomly into three equal groups and were asked to rinse with the prescribed mouth rinse once daily for 2 weeks after breakfast under supervision. Nonstimulated whole salivary sample (2 ml was collected at baseline and postrinsing and tested for the colony forming units of S. mutans and Lactobacillus. Results: The results of the study indicate that there was a statistically significant reduction in S. mutans and lactobacilli count in all the three study groups. The statistically significant reduction in the mean S. mutans and lactobacilli counts were more in 0.12% chlorhexidine group than in the combination mouth rinse and 0.5% green tea mouth rinse group. There was no statistically significant difference in the reduction of S. mutans and lactobacilli count between combination mouth rinse group and 0.5% green tea mouth rinse group. Conclusion: Green tea mouth rinse can be a promising preventive therapy worldwide for the prevention of dental caries.

  14. EFFECT OF BODY SIZE ON BREATHING PATTERN AND FINE PARTICLE DEPOSITION IN CHILDREN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inter-child variability in breathing patterns may contribute to variability in fine particle, lung deposition and morbidity in children associated with those particles. Fractional deposition (DF) of fine particles (2um monodisperse, carnauba wax particles) was measured in healthy...

  15. Association of oral breathing with dental malocclusions and general health in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Emilio L; Barrios, Rocío; Calvo, Juan C; de la Rosa, Maria T; Campillo, José S; Bayona, José C; Bravo, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the association of oral breathing with dental malocclusions and aspects of general health such as acute illnesses, oxygen saturation in blood and its possible implication in the process of nutrition. A prevalence analytic study was carried out. Five dentists explored to children between 6 and 12 years and measured their oxygen saturation. Parents completed a questionnaire of 11 items about general health (colds, ear infections, tonsillitis and taking antibiotics) and the food preferences of their children. At the end, children were classified in oral breathing group (prevalence cases) or nasal breathing group (controls). There were statistical differences between cases (452 children) and controls (752 children) in the facial morphometric measurements. Oral breathing children had statistically less percentage of oxygen saturation than controls (92.3±3.3% versus 96.5±2.3%), took less time to have lunch and preferred less consistent and sugary food. Cases had had more prevalence of pathologies in the last year and of taking the antibiotics. This group also had higher prevalence of allergies compared with controls group (POral breathing is significantly associated with specific dental malocclusions and important aspects of general health such as oxygen saturation and the nutrition. On the same line, oral breathing is related to a significantly higher prevalence of allergies and a significantly more likely getting sick and taking medication.

  16. Prevalence of abnormal lactose breath hydrogen tests in children with functional abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neha; Basu, Srikanta; Singh, Preeti; Kumar, Ruchika; Sharma, Lokesh; Kumar, Praveen

    2017-05-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of abnormal lactose breath hydrogen test in children with non-organic chronic abdominal pain. Children with chronic abdominal pain were examined and investigated for organic causes. All children without a known organic cause underwent lactose and glucose breath hydrogen test. After a standard dose of 2 g/kg of lactose to a maximum of 50 g, hydrogen in breath was measured at 15 min intervals for 3 h. A rise of 20 ppm above baseline was considered suggestive of lactose malabsorption. Of 108 children screened, organic causes were found in 46 children. Sixty-two patients without any organic cause underwent hydrogen breath test. Lactose hydrogen breath test (HBT) was positive in 36 of 62 (58%), while 11 (17%) had positive HBT with glucose suggestive of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Twenty out of 34 (59%) improved on lactose free diet while 8 out of 11 (72%) children of SIBO improved on antibiotics. Lactose malabsorption was seen in 58% of children with non-organic chronic abdominal pain.

  17. Considerações teóricas sobre a relação entre respiração oral e disfonia Theoretical considerations on the relationship between mouth breathing and dysphonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Gomes Tavares

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sabe-se que a respiração oral pode ocasionar diversas alterações ósseas, posturais, musculares e funcionais, como também, alterações na qualidade e/ou comportamento vocal. Estas alterações podem comprometer a comunicação oral, na qual a voz não consegue desempenhar seu papel básico de transmissão da mensagem verbal e emocional do indivíduo. O indivíduo com respiração oral pode apresentar ressonância nasalizada e a voz pode apresentar alterações no traço de sonoridade, hiper ou hiponasal, ou rouca. A partir de pesquisa nas bases de dados LILACS, SciELO, livros, revistas especializadas sobre o tema, buscamos fazer uma revisão na literatura sobre a relação entre respiração oral e disfonia, analisando a influência das alterações causadas pela respiração oral na qualidade e/ou comportamento vocal. No entanto, foi possível observar que a respiração oral promove uma série de alterações estruturais significativas que refletem nas funções estomatognáticas, interferindo também na fonação. Contudo, poucos autores relatam a possível correlação entre esses dois parâmetros (respiração oral e disfonia.It is known that mouth breathing can lead to several bone, postural, muscular and functional alterations, and also changes on vocal quality and/or vocal behavior. These alterations can compromise oral communication, in which the voice cannot perform its basic role on the transmission of an individual's verbal and emotional message. Individuals with mouth breathing can present hiper or hiponasal resonance, changes on voicing features and hoarseness. From researches on LILACS and SciELO databases, books and specialized magazines about the subject, it was carried a literature review about the relationship between mouth breathing and dysphonia, analyzing the influence of alterations caused by mouth breathing on vocal quality and/or vocal behavior. It was possible observe that mouth breathing promotes several

  18. Oral parafunctional habits among preschool children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awrad Aloumi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Nail-biting habit was highly prevalent among preschool children in Riyadh, followed by mouth breathing, thumb sucking, and teeth clenching. Malocclusion was the main factor related to the habits of thumb sucking and pacifier sucking. Respiratory and tonsils problems were related to mouth breathing. Teeth clenching was highly related to the presence of carious teeth.

  19. Free-breathing cine CT for the diagnosis of tracheomalacia in young children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Tracheomalacia is characterized by excessive expiratory collapse of the trachea. To investigate the accuracy of free-breathing cine CT for diagnosis of tracheomalacia in young children with bronchoscopy as reference standard. In a retrospective study (May 2001-July 2008), a patient group (n = 27) of children with bronchoscopic evidence of tracheomalacia, and a control group (n = 320) underwent free-breathing cine CT. The tracheal shape on free-breathing cine CT was classified as round, lunate, elongated or crescentic. Cross-sectional area change of the trachea and age were compared between the groups and the diagnostic performance of free-breathing cine CT for tracheomalacia was evaluated. The patient group showed significantly greater cross-sectional area change of the trachea (57.2% ± 22.2% vs. 10.6% ± 11.2%, P < 0.001) than the control group. If a cross-sectional area change of the trachea of 31.6% was used as a cut-off value for the diagnosis of tracheomalacia, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of cine CT were 96.3% (26/27), 97.2% (311/320) and 97.1% (337/347), respectively. If a crescentic shape during the expiratory phase was used, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 51.9% (14/27), 98.8% (316/320) and 95.1% (330/347), respectively. Free-breathing cine CT has potential to provide the diagnosis of tracheomalacia in young children. (orig.)

  20. Evaluation of changes in sleep breathing patterns after primary palatoplasty in cleft children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justice E. Reilly

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a need to more clearly understand the characteristics of breathing patterns in children with cleft palate inthe first year of life, as there is little data available to guide current practice. Pierre Robin patients are known to have a higher incidence, however we hypothesised sleep breathing disturbance is not confined to this sub-group of cleft patient. Methods: We conducted a prospective observational study of sleep disordered breathing patterns in a cohort of infants with oronasal clefts (cleft palate with or without cleft lip to describe the spectrum of sleep breathing patterns both pre and post palate repair. Sleep breathing studies were performed pre- and post-operatively in sequential infants referred to a regional cleft lip andpalate unit. Results of sleep breathing studies were analysed according to American Academy of Sleep Medicine scoring guidelines and correlated with clinical history and details of peri-operative respiratory compromise. The degree of sleep disordered breathingwas characterised using desaturation indices (number of desaturations from baseline SpO2 of >=4%, per hour. Results: Thirty-nine infants were included in this study, twenty-five female and fourteen male. Twelve had isolated Cleft Palate aspart of an associated syndrome. Patients were categorised into Isolated Cleft Palate, Isolated Cleft Palate in the context of Pierre Robin Sequence, and those with Cleft Lip and Palate. All groups demonstrated some degree of sleep breathing abnormality. Not unsurprisingly the eight infants with Pierre Robin Sequence had a significantly higher desaturation index before surgicalintervention (p=0.043, and were more likely to require a pre-operative airway intervention (p=0.009. Palate repair in this group did not alter the relative distribution of patients in each severity category of sleep disorder breathing. Surgical repair ofthe secondary palate in the remaining children was associated with some

  1. Free-breathing motion-corrected late-gadolinium-enhancement imaging improves image quality in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivieri, Laura; O'Brien, Kendall J.; Cross, Russell; Xue, Hui; Kellman, Peter; Hansen, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The value of late-gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) imaging in the diagnosis and management of pediatric and congenital heart disease is clear; however current acquisition techniques are susceptible to error and artifacts when performed in children because of children's higher heart rates, higher prevalence of sinus arrhythmia, and inability to breath-hold. Commonly used techniques in pediatric LGE imaging include breath-held segmented FLASH (segFLASH) and steady-state free precession-based (segSSFP) imaging. More recently, single-shot SSFP techniques with respiratory motion-corrected averaging have emerged. This study tested and compared single-shot free-breathing LGE techniques with standard segmented breath-held techniques in children undergoing LGE imaging. Thirty-two consecutive children underwent clinically indicated late-enhancement imaging using intravenous gadobutrol 0.15 mmol/kg. Breath-held segSSFP, breath-held segFLASH, and free-breathing single-shot SSFP LGE sequences were performed in consecutive series in each child. Two blinded reviewers evaluated the quality of the images and rated them on a scale of 1-5 (1 = poor, 5 = superior) based on blood pool-myocardial definition, presence of cardiac motion, presence of respiratory motion artifacts, and image acquisition artifact. We used analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare groups. Patients ranged in age from 9 months to 18 years, with a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) of 13.3 +/- 4.8 years. R-R interval at the time of acquisition ranged 366-1,265 milliseconds (ms) (47-164 beats per minute [bpm]), mean +/- SD of 843+/-231 ms (72+/-21 bpm). Mean +/- SD quality ratings for long-axis imaging for segFLASH, segSSFP and single-shot SSFP were 3.1+/-0.9, 3.4+/-0.9 and 4.0+/-0.9, respectively (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). Mean +/- SD quality ratings for short-axis imaging for segFLASH, segSSFP and single-shot SSFP were 3.4+/-1, 3.8+/-0.9 and 4.3+/-0.7, respectively (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). Single-shot late

  2. Free-breathing motion-corrected late-gadolinium-enhancement imaging improves image quality in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivieri, Laura; O' Brien, Kendall J. [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Cross, Russell [Children' s National Health System, Division of Cardiology, Washington, DC (United States); Xue, Hui; Kellman, Peter; Hansen, Michael S. [National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The value of late-gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) imaging in the diagnosis and management of pediatric and congenital heart disease is clear; however current acquisition techniques are susceptible to error and artifacts when performed in children because of children's higher heart rates, higher prevalence of sinus arrhythmia, and inability to breath-hold. Commonly used techniques in pediatric LGE imaging include breath-held segmented FLASH (segFLASH) and steady-state free precession-based (segSSFP) imaging. More recently, single-shot SSFP techniques with respiratory motion-corrected averaging have emerged. This study tested and compared single-shot free-breathing LGE techniques with standard segmented breath-held techniques in children undergoing LGE imaging. Thirty-two consecutive children underwent clinically indicated late-enhancement imaging using intravenous gadobutrol 0.15 mmol/kg. Breath-held segSSFP, breath-held segFLASH, and free-breathing single-shot SSFP LGE sequences were performed in consecutive series in each child. Two blinded reviewers evaluated the quality of the images and rated them on a scale of 1-5 (1 = poor, 5 = superior) based on blood pool-myocardial definition, presence of cardiac motion, presence of respiratory motion artifacts, and image acquisition artifact. We used analysis of variance (ANOVA) to compare groups. Patients ranged in age from 9 months to 18 years, with a mean +/- standard deviation (SD) of 13.3 +/- 4.8 years. R-R interval at the time of acquisition ranged 366-1,265 milliseconds (ms) (47-164 beats per minute [bpm]), mean +/- SD of 843+/-231 ms (72+/-21 bpm). Mean +/- SD quality ratings for long-axis imaging for segFLASH, segSSFP and single-shot SSFP were 3.1+/-0.9, 3.4+/-0.9 and 4.0+/-0.9, respectively (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). Mean +/- SD quality ratings for short-axis imaging for segFLASH, segSSFP and single-shot SSFP were 3.4+/-1, 3.8+/-0.9 and 4.3+/-0.7, respectively (P < 0.01 by ANOVA). Single-shot late

  3. Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Cognitive Functioning in Preschool Children with and without Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, A.; Dimitriou, D.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sleep affects children's cognitive development, preparedness for school and future academic outcomes. People with Down syndrome (DS) are particularly at risk for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). To our knowledge, the association between SDB and cognition in preschoolers with DS is unknown. Methods: We assessed sleep by using…

  4. Critique: Can Children with AD/HD Learn Relaxation and Breathing Techniques through Biofeedback Video Games?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Craig; Conlon, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a critique on K. Amon and A. Campbell's "Can children with AD/HD learn relaxation and breathing techniques through biofeedback video games?". Amon and Campbell reported a successful trial of a commercially available biofeedback program, "The Wild Divine", in reducing symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)…

  5. 13C mixed triglyceride breath test: a noninvasive method to assess lipase activity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk-van Aalst, K; Van Den Driessche, M; van Der Schoor, S; Schiffelers, S; van't Westeinde, T; Ghoos, Y; Veereman-Wauters, G

    2001-05-01

    Results from the 13C mixed triglyceride (MTG) breath test correlate with duodenal lipase activity in adults. This noninvasive test is a potential screening and diagnostic tool for children with fat malabsorption. The aim of this study was to adapt the methodology of the MTG breath test to study test meals and sampling methods and to define normal values for healthy children of all age groups; premature and full-term infants have similar pancreatic lipase deficiencies. After parental consent was obtained, 12 premature infants ( 2 kg), 12 full-term infants (1-6 months old), 20 children (3-10 years old), and 20 teenagers (11-17 years old) were tested. All children were thriving well, had no gastrointestinal or respiratory problems, and had not received any medication that contained natural 13C. For the premature and full-term infants, a formula was prepared that had a low and stable natural 13C content mixed with 100 mg 13C-labeled MTG (1,3-distearyl, 2-[13C-carboxyl] octanoyl glycerol) and 1 g polyethylene-glycol 3350. The best accepted test meal for children over 3 years old was a slice of white bread with 5 g butter and 15 g chocolate paste, mixed with 250 mg 13C-labeled MTG, and a glass of 100 mL whole-fat milk. Children over 3 years old were able to blow through a straw in a vacutainer for collecting the breath samples. In children under 3 years old, expired air was collected by aspirating breath via a nasal prong. Carbon dioxide production was calculated according to weight, age, and sex. For healthy pediatric control participants, the mean values for cumulative excretion of 13CO2 as a percentage of the administered dose after 6 hours were 23.9 +/- 5.2% in premature infants, 31.9 +/- 7.7% in full-term infants, 32.5 +/- 5.3% in children, and 28.0 +/- 5.4% in teenagers. The mean value for healthy adults is 35.6% with a lower reference limit of 22.8%. Age-specific test meals and breath-sampling techniques for the MTG breath test were defined. The mean values for

  6. Radiographic cephalometry analysis of head posture and craniofacial morphology in oral breathing children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević Vladanka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nasal breathing plays an important role in overall physical growth and mental development, as well as in the growth of the craniofacial complex. Oral breathing over a long period of time, can cause changes in position of the head relative to the cervical spine and jaw relationship. It can cause an open bite and the narrowness of the maxillary arch due to increased pressure of strained face. The aim of this study was to analyze the position of the head and craniofacial morphology in oral breathing children, and compare the values obtained compared with those of the same parameters in nasal brething children. Methods. We analyzed the profile cephalometric radiographs of 60 patients who had various orthodontic problems. In the first group there were 30 patients aged 8–14 years, in which oral breathing is confirmed by clinical examination. In the second group there were 30 patients of the same age who had orthodontic problems, but did not show clinical signs of oral breathing. The analyses covered the following: craniocervical angle (NS/OPT, the length of the anterior cranial base (NS, anterior facial height (N-Me, posterior facial height (S-Go, the angle of maxillary prognathism (SNA, angle of mandibular prognathism (SNB, difference between angles SNA and SNB (ANB angle, the angle of the basal planes of the jaws (SpP/MP, cranial base angle (NSB, and the angle of facial convexity (NA/Apg. Results. The average value of the craniocervical angle (NS/OPT was significantly higher in OB children (p = 0.004. There were significantly different values of SNA (p < 0.001, ANB (p < 0.001, NA/APg (p < 0.001 and length of the anterior cranial base (NS (p = 0.024 between groups. Conclusion. Oral breathing children have pronounced retroflexion of the head in relation to the cervical spine compared to nasal breathing children, and the most prominent characteristics of the craniofacial morphology of skeletal jaw relationship of class II and

  7. ["Loss of breath" as a cause of postoperative hypoxia and bradycardia in children submitted to tonsillectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Eduardo Toshiyuki; Goulart, Alexandre Palmeira

    2015-01-01

    The "shortness of breath" or "breathing interruption" crisis can be considered a cause of hypoxia in childhood. It is characterized by the presence of a triggering factor followed by weeping and apnea in expiration accompanied by cyanosis or pallor. The sequence of events may include bradycardia, loss of consciousness, abnormal postural toneand even asystole. A review of the literature revealed only two reports of postoperative apneacaused by "shortness of breath". This article describes the case of a child with a history of "shortness of breath" undiagnosed before the adenotonsillectomy, but that represented the cause of episodes of hypoxemia and bradycardia in the postoperative period. the "shortness of breath" crisis should be considered as a possible cause of perioperative hypoxia in children, especially when there is a history suggestive of this problem. As some events may be accompanied by bradycardia, loss of consciousness, abnormal postural tone and even asystole, observation in a hospital setting should be considered. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. "Loss of breath" as a cause of postoperative hypoxia and bradycardia in children submitted to tonsillectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Eduardo Toshiyuki; Goulart, Alexandre Palmeira

    2015-01-01

    the "shortness of breath" or "breathing interruption" crisis can be considered a cause of hypoxia in childhood. It is characterized by the presence of a triggering factor followed by weeping and apnea in expiration accompanied by cyanosis or pallor. The sequence of events may include bradycardia, loss of consciousness, abnormal postural tone and even asystole. A review of the literature revealed only two reports of postoperative apnea caused by "shortness of breath". this article describes the case of a child with a history of "shortness of breath" undiagnosed before the adenotonsillectomy, but that represented the cause of episodes of hypoxemia and bradycardia in the postoperative period. the "shortness of breath" crisis should be considered as a possible cause of perioperative hypoxia in children, especially when there is a history suggestive of this problem. As some events may be accompanied by bradycardia, loss of consciousness, abnormal postural tone and even asystole, observation in a hospital setting should be considered. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Early Childhood: Quality of Life for Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Angela R.; Biggs, Sarah N.; Walter, Lisa M.; Embuldeniya, Upeka S.; Davey, Margot J.; Nixon, Gillian M.; Anderson, Vicki; Trinder, John; Horne, Rosemary S. C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To characterize health-related quality of life (QOL) in preschool children with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and their families compared with nonsnoring control patients in the community. It was hypothesized that children with SDB and their families would have poorer QOL than control children, that a relationship would be found between SDB severity and QOL, and that even children with mild SDB and their families would have reduced QOL. Participants and Methods: A clinical sample of preschool children (3-5 y) with SDB diagnosed by gold standard polysomnography (primary snoring, PS = 56, mild obstructive sleep apnea, OSA = 35, moderate/severe OSA = 24) and control children recruited from the community (n = 38) were studied. Parents completed health-related QOL and parenting stress questionnaires. Results: Children and families in the PS and mild OSA groups had consistently poorer QOL than control children (both P Biggs SN; Walter LM; Embuldeniya US; Davey MJ; Nixon GM; Anderson V; Trinder J; Horne RSC. Sleep disordered breathing in early childhood: quality of life for children and families. SLEEP 2013;36(11):1639-1646. PMID:24179296

  10. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide and multiple breath nitrogen washout in preschool healthy and asthmatic children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilmann, Lea; Buchvald, Frederik; Green, Kent

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Objectively assessing pulmonary disease is challenging in preschool children with asthma. We evaluated the feasibility of measuring fractional exhaled nitrogen oxide (FeNO) and multiple breath nitrogen washout (N2MBW) in children. We compared their capacities for discriminating between...... children with asthma and healthy controls. Methods We measured FeNO and N2MBW-derived indices of lung clearance (LCI2.5) and conductive and acinar ventilation heterogeneity (Scond and Sacin) in 65 preschool children; 35 with physician-diagnosed asthma and 30 healthy. FeNO was measured with a portable.......023), but similar FeNO, LCI2.5 and Sacinvalues. Conclusion The feasibility of measuring FeNO was highly age-dependent and not applicable in children under age 4. N2MBW was feasible in the majority of preschool children. Scond, but not FeNO, could discriminate between children with asthma and healthy controls....

  11. Influence of full mouth rehabilitation on oral health-related quality of life among disabled children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nowaiser, Abeer M; Al Suwyed, Abdulaziz S; Al Zoman, Khalid H; Robert, Asirvatham A; Al Brahim, Tarfa; Ciancio, Sebastian G; Al Mubarak, Sultan A; El Meligy, Omar A

    2017-10-01

    The efficacy of full mouth rehabilitation (FMR) on oral health-related quality of life of physically disabled children was assessed. This prospective study was performed at Dental Department of Sultan Bin Abdulaziz Humanitarian City, Riyadh, and King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, during May 2012 to September 2014. A total of 186 physically disabled children aged 11-14 years were assigned to a test group (n = 97) or a control group (n = 89). FMR was applied for test group children at baseline and 3 months' visits, whereas those in the control group did not receive FMR. Both group children received dental kits and oral hygiene instructions. Children were asked to complete the Child Perceptions Questionnaire, whereas Parental-Caregiver Perceptions Questionnaire and Family Distress Domain questionnaire were completed by the parents/caregivers at baseline and 6 months' visits. Children in both groups showed positive trends in oral symptoms at 6 months compared with those at baseline. However, when they were compared to control, significant improvement in oral symptoms was observed in the test group at 6 months' visit (p < .05). Also when they were compared to control, significant improvements were observed in the functional limitation, emotional, and social well-being subscales of the Child Perceptions Questionnaire and on the Parental-Caregiver Perceptions Questionnaire scales at the end of the study (p < .05). Compared to the parents/caregivers of the control children, the parents/caregivers of the test-group children reported insignificant but positive trends in Family Distress Domain at the end of the study (p < .05). FMR in children reduced oral-related problems subsequently to a better oral health-related quality of life.

  12. Lung function, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep-disordered breathing in children with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julliand, Sébastien; Boulé, Michèle; Baujat, Geneviève; Ramirez, Adriana; Couloigner, Vincent; Beydon, Nicole; Zerah, Michel; di Rocco, Federico; Lemerrer, Martine; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2012-08-01

    Children with achondroplasia are at risk of sleep-disordered breathing. The aim of the study was to evaluate lung function and sleep-disordered breathing in children with achondroplasia. An interview, clinical examination, lung function tests with blood gases, and a polygraphic sleep study were obtained as part of routine annual evaluation in consecutive children with achondroplasia. We included 30 children (median age 3.0 years, range: 0.4-17.1) over a period of 21 months. Habitual snoring and witnessed apneas were observed in 77% and 33% of the patients, respectively. Prior to the sleep study, 10/29 (34%) patients had undergone upper airway surgery and 5/29 (17%) craniocervical decompression operation. Arterial blood gases were abnormal in two (7%) patients. Sleep findings were abnormal in 28/30 (93%) patients. Eleven (37%) patients had an apnea index≥1 event/hr and 26 (87%) had an apnea-hypopnea index≥5 events/hr. The ≥3% desaturation index was >5/hr in 22 (73%) patients. Sixteen (53%) patients had a minimal pulse oximetry50 mmHg during sleep. As a consequence, the following therapeutic interventions were performed: upper airway surgery in four patients and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) in five other patients, resulting in an improvement in sleep studies in all nine patients. Systematic sleep studies are recommended in children with achondroplasia because of the high prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing. Upper airway surgery and NPPV are effective treatments of sleep-disordered breathing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Why does adenotonsillectomy not correct enuresis in all children with sleep disordered breathing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacevic, Larisa; Wolfe-Christensen, Cortney; Lu, Hong; Toton, Monika; Mirkovic, Jelena; Thottam, Prasad J; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Madgy, David; Lakshmanan, Yegappan

    2014-05-01

    We analyzed the outcome of nocturnal enuresis after adenotonsillectomy in children with sleep disordered breathing. We also evaluated differences in demographic, clinical, laboratory and polysomnography parameters between responders and nonresponders after adenotonsillectomy. We prospectively evaluated children 5 to 18 years old diagnosed with sleep disordered breathing (snoring or obstructive sleep apnea syndrome) on polysomnography and monosymptomatic primary nocturnal enuresis requiring adenotonsillectomy to release upper airway obstruction. Plasma antidiuretic hormone and brain natriuretic peptide were measured preoperatively and 1 month postoperatively. Sleep studies were done in 46 children and 32 also underwent blood testing preoperatively and postoperatively. Mean ± SD patient age was 8.79 ± 2.41 years and the mean number of wet nights weekly was 6.39 ± 1.26. Polysomnography revealed obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in 71.7% of patients and snoring in 28.3%. After adenotonsillectomy 43.5% of patients became dry. Preoperative polysomnography findings indicated that responders, who were dry, had significantly more arousals and obstructive apnea episodes but fewer awakenings than nonresponders, who were wet. Significant increases in plasma antidiuretic hormone and significant decreases in plasma brain natriuretic peptide were seen in all children with no difference between responders and nonresponders. No difference between the groups was noted in age, gender, race, body mass index, constipation, preoperative number of wet nights weekly or type of sleep disordered breathing. Nocturnal enuresis resolved after adenotonsillectomy in almost half of the children with sleep disordered breathing. Those who became dry had more frequent arousal episodes caused by apnea events than those who remained wet. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Trench mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gingivae). The term trench mouth comes from World War I, when this infection was common among soldiers " ... mouth include: Emotional stress Poor oral hygiene Poor nutrition Smoking Throat, tooth, or mouth infections Trench mouth ...

  15. Minimally invasive (13)C-breath test to examine phenylalanine metabolism in children with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Abrar; Murthy, Gayathri; Ueda, Keiko; Cheng, Barbara; Giezen, Alette; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Elango, Rajavel

    2015-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) leading to increased levels of phenylalanine in the plasma. Phenylalanine levels and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity monitoring are currently limited to conventional blood dot testing. 1-(13)C-phenylalanine, a stable isotope can be used to examine phenylalanine metabolism, as the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine occurs in vivo via PAH and subsequently releases the carboxyl labeled (13)C as (13)CO2 in breath. Our objective was to examine phenylalanine metabolism in children with PKU using a minimally-invasive 1-(13)C-phenylalanine breath test ((13)C-PBT). Nine children (7 M: 2 F, mean age 12.5 ± 2.87 y) with PKU participated in the study twice: once before and once after sapropterin supplementation. Children were provided 6 mg/kg oral dose of 1-(13)C-phenylalanine and breath samples were collected at 20 min intervals for a period of 2h. Rate of CO2 production was measured at 60 min post-oral dose using indirect calorimetry. The percentage of 1-(13)C-phenylalanine exhaled as (13)CO2 was measured over a 2h period. Prior to studying children with PKU, we tested the study protocol in healthy children (n = 6; 4M: 2F, mean age 10.2 ± 2.48 y) as proof of principle. Production of a peak enrichment (Cmax) of (13)CO2 (% of dose) in all healthy children occurred at 20 min ranging from 17-29% of dose, with a subsequent return to ~5% by the end of 2h. Production of (13)CO2 from 1-(13)C-phenylalanine in all children with PKU prior to sapropterin treatment remained low. Following sapropterin supplementation for a week, production of (13)CO2 significantly increased in five children with a subsequent decline in blood phenylalanine levels, suggesting improved PAH activity. Sapropterin treatment was not effective in three children whose (13)CO2 production remained unchanged, and did not show a reduction in blood phenylalanine levels and improvement

  16. Decision aid prototype development for parents considering adenotonsillectomy for their children with sleep disordered breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, Erin; Hong, Paul; Ritchie, Krista; Meier, Jeremy; Archibald, Karen; Chorney, Jill

    2016-01-01

    Background To describe the process involved in developing a decision aid prototype for parents considering adenotonsillectomy for their children with sleep disordered breathing. Methods A paper-based decision aid prototype was developed using the framework proposed by the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaborative. The decision aid focused on two main treatment options: watchful waiting and adenotonsillectomy. Usability was assessed with parents of pediatric patients and prov...

  17. The single-breath diffusing capacity of CO and NO in healthy children of European descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Astrid; Hanel, Birgitte; Marott, Jacob L; Buchvald, Frederik; Mortensen, Jann; Nielsen, Kim G

    2014-01-01

    The diffusing capacity (DL) of the lung can be divided into two components: the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane (Dm) and the pulmonary capillary volume (Vc). DL is traditionally measured using a single-breath method, involving inhalation of carbon monoxide, and a breath hold of 8-10 seconds (DL,CO). This method does not easily allow calculation of Dm and Vc. An alternative single-breath method (DL,CO,NO), involving simultaneous inhalation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide, and traditionally a shorter breath hold, allows calculation of Dm and Vc and the DL,NO/DL,CO ratio in a single respiratory maneuver. The clinical utility of Dm, Vc, and DL,NO/DL,CO in the pediatric age range is currently unknown but also restricted by lack of reference values. The aim of this study was to establish reference ranges for the outcomes of DL,CO,NO with a 5 second breath hold, including the calculated outcomes Dm, Vc, and the DL,NO/DL,CO ratio, as well as to establish reference values for the outcomes of the traditional DL,CO method, with a 10 second breath hold in children. DL,CO,NO and DL,CO were measured in healthy children, of European descent, aged 5-17 years using a Jaeger Masterscreen PFT. The data were analyzed using the Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) statistical method. A total of 326 children were eligible for diffusing capacity measurements, resulting in 312 measurements of DL,CO,NO and 297 of DL,CO, respectively. Reference equations were established for the outcomes of DL,CO,NO and DL,CO, including the calculated values: Vc, Dm, and the DL,NO/DL,CO ratio. These reference values are based on the largest sample of children to date and may provide a basis for future studies of their clinical utility in differentiating between alterations in the pulmonary circulation and changes in the alveolar membrane in pediatric patients.

  18. The single-breath diffusing capacity of CO and NO in healthy children of European descent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Thomas

    Full Text Available The diffusing capacity (DL of the lung can be divided into two components: the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane (Dm and the pulmonary capillary volume (Vc. DL is traditionally measured using a single-breath method, involving inhalation of carbon monoxide, and a breath hold of 8-10 seconds (DL,CO. This method does not easily allow calculation of Dm and Vc. An alternative single-breath method (DL,CO,NO, involving simultaneous inhalation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide, and traditionally a shorter breath hold, allows calculation of Dm and Vc and the DL,NO/DL,CO ratio in a single respiratory maneuver. The clinical utility of Dm, Vc, and DL,NO/DL,CO in the pediatric age range is currently unknown but also restricted by lack of reference values.The aim of this study was to establish reference ranges for the outcomes of DL,CO,NO with a 5 second breath hold, including the calculated outcomes Dm, Vc, and the DL,NO/DL,CO ratio, as well as to establish reference values for the outcomes of the traditional DL,CO method, with a 10 second breath hold in children.DL,CO,NO and DL,CO were measured in healthy children, of European descent, aged 5-17 years using a Jaeger Masterscreen PFT. The data were analyzed using the Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape (GAMLSS statistical method.A total of 326 children were eligible for diffusing capacity measurements, resulting in 312 measurements of DL,CO,NO and 297 of DL,CO, respectively. Reference equations were established for the outcomes of DL,CO,NO and DL,CO, including the calculated values: Vc, Dm, and the DL,NO/DL,CO ratio.These reference values are based on the largest sample of children to date and may provide a basis for future studies of their clinical utility in differentiating between alterations in the pulmonary circulation and changes in the alveolar membrane in pediatric patients.

  19. Multiple-Breath Washout Outcomes Are Sensitive to Inflammation and Infection in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Kathryn A; Foong, Rachel E; Grdosic, Jasmine; Harper, Alana; Skoric, Billy; Clem, Charles; Davis, Miriam; Turkovic, Lidija; Stick, Stephen M; Davis, Stephanie D; Ranganathan, Sarath C; Hall, Graham L

    2017-09-01

    The lung clearance index is a measure of ventilation distribution derived from the multiple-breath washout technique. The lung clearance index is increased in the presence of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection in infants with cystic fibrosis; however, the associations during the preschool years are unknown. We assessed the ability of the lung clearance index to detect the presence and extent of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection in preschool children with cystic fibrosis. Ventilation distribution outcomes were assessed at 82 visits with 58 children with cystic fibrosis and at 38 visits with 31 healthy children aged 3-6 years. Children with cystic fibrosis also underwent bronchoalveolar lavage fluid collection for detection of lower respiratory tract inflammation and infection. Associations between multiple-breath washout indices and the presence and extent of airway inflammation and infection were assessed using linear mixed effects models. Lung clearance index was elevated in children with cystic fibrosis (mean [SD], 8.00 [1.45]) compared with healthy control subjects (6.67 [0.56]). In cystic fibrosis, the lung clearance index was elevated in individuals with lower respiratory tract infections (difference compared with uninfected [95% confidence interval], 0.62 [0.06, 1.18]) and correlated with the extent of airway inflammation. These data suggest that the lung clearance index may be a useful surveillance tool for monitoring the presence and extent of lower airway inflammation and infection in preschool children with cystic fibrosis.

  20. How social media meet patients’ questions: YouTube™ review for mouth sores in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stasio, D; Romano, A; Paparella, R S; Gentile, C; Serpico, R; Minervini, G; Candotto, V; Laino, L

    2018-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is one of the most common causes of mouth sores in children so the management of this condition is a matter of great importance. YouTube™ is increasingly being used by patients to obtain health-related information. The aim of this work is to examine the quality of information offered by YouTube™ about mouth sores in children (MSC). Searching the term ‘mouth sores in children’, (MSC) displayed 12.300 results. Of the top 60 videos analyzed, 31 were excluded following exclusion criteria. The major source of upload was from healthcare information channels (HC-41,38%), followed by individual users (HP-25.59%), healthcare professionals (IU-17.24%) and generalist information channels (HC-13.78%); 20.69% of them deal with predisposing factors, and related pathologies, the majority of these propose home remedies (60.72%) rather than topical analgesic drugs (21.43%), antimicrobials (7.14%) and topical steroids (3.57). Most of the videos analyzed were slightly useful (68.97%). Information about mouth sores in children on YouTube™ was poor regardless of the upload source. Analyzing health content on social platforms is a starting point for providing greater quality of health-related information.

  1. Sleep-disordered breathing and its management in children with achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenconi, Rossana; Khirani, Sonia; Amaddeo, Alessandro; Michot, Caroline; Baujat, Geneviève; Couloigner, Vincent; De Sanctis, Livio; James, Syril; Zerah, Michel; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2017-04-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing is a common feature in children with achondroplasia. The aim of our study was to review the poly(somno)graphic (P(S)G) findings and consequent treatments in children with achondroplasia followed in the national reference center for skeletal dysplasia. A retrospective review of the clinical charts and P(S)G of 43 consecutive children (mean age 3.9 ± 3.5 years) with achondroplasia seen over a period of 2 years was performed. Twenty four (59%) children had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Thirteen children had an obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (OAHI) achondroplasia. The observation of a reduced prevalence of OSA after (adeno-)tonsillectomy is in favor of this type of surgery when possible. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Chest imaging characteristics of hand-foot-mouth disease in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Bo; Chen Ruigang; Dou Shewei; Zhu Xiaonian; Shi Dapeng

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study radiological characteristics of hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD) in children. Methods: The chest X-ray films of 1295 children patients of HFMD were analyzed, for the general X-ray manifestations and the evolution. Results: A total of 1427 films was obtained from all patients, in which 1203 cases were normal and 224 cases were abnormal. The interstitial changes characterized the abnormal group, mainly as increased and vague lung markings, increased hilar shadows (137 cases). The parenchyma changes appeared as patchy exudative shadows(49 cases). Short-term dynamic observation was applied in 62 cases, 38 cases pulmonary disease progression manifested as normal and the interstitial type changing into the parenchyma type and the mixed type, the localized type changing into the diffuse type. Conclusions: Most children patients of' HFMD showed normal chest films, while the abnormal patients were characterized by interstitial and parenchyma pulmonary edema. Serial chest X-ray examination and short-term dynamic observation were important to identify the severe cases and assess patients' condition. (authors)

  3. Efficacy of triphala mouth rinse (aqueous extracts) on dental plaque and gingivitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Ritesh; Nekkanti, Sridhar; Kumar, Nikesh G; Kapuria, Ketan; Acharya, Shashidhar; Pentapati, Kalyana C

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of triphala mouth rinse (aqueous) in the reduction of plaque and gingivitis among children. The study was a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial, with a total of 60 school children (n = 30 in each group; triphala and chlorhexidine groups). Plaque and gingival indices were used to evaluate baseline and follow-up plaque and gingivitis. A total of 57 children completed the study. Both chlorhexidine and triphala groups showed significantly lower mean gingival and plaque index scores at follow up than baseline (P gingival index between the two groups (P = 0.826). The percentage change in the mean plaque index was significantly higher in the chlorhexidine group compared to the triphala group (P = 0.048). The effectiveness of triphala in the reduction of plaque and gingivitis was comparable to chlorhexidine, and can be used for short-term purposes without potential side-effects. It is a cost-effective alternative in reducing plaque and gingivitis. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to zinc and “the prevention of bad breath by neutralising of volatile sulphur compounds in the mouth and oral cavity” pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claim related to zinc and “the prevention of bad breath by neutralising of volatile sulphur compounds in the mouth and oral cavity”. The scope of the application was proposed to fall under a health claim based on newly developed scientific evidence. The claimed effect is “prevents bad breath......Following an application from EJP Pharmaceutical ApS, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Denmark, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health...... by neutralising of volatile sulphur compounds in the mouth and oral cavity”. The target population, as proposed by the applicant, is adults over the age of 18 who wish to improve their bad breath. The Panel considers that the proposed claim is related to breath odour rather than to a function of the body...

  5. Effect of green tea mouth rinse on Streptococcus mutans in plaque and saliva in children: An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Goyal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This study was conducted to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of green tea catechin as a mouth wash on colony count of Streptococcus mutans in children. Materials and Methods: A sample size of thirty children was selected out of screened 290 children by simple random sampling between the age group of 7 and 12 years. The study was conducted over a period of 2 weeks. After 24 h of oral prophylaxis, the baseline samples were collected and each group was subjected to mouth rinsing with green tea mouth wash for 2 weeks and further plaque and saliva samples were collected at 1- and 2-week intervals from baseline. Microbiological analysis of plaque and saliva samples was done by Dentocult SM strip kit (Orion Diagnostica, Finland, and the results were statistically analyzed and tabulated. Results: Statistically, there was highly significant reduction in S. mutans count in plaque as well as in saliva for after 1- and 2-week intervals from baseline. Conclusion: Hence, finally, our study showed that green tea catechin is effective as a mouth wash against S. mutans and having better action in plaque as compared to saliva. It can be used as an adjunct to commercially available mouthwashes.

  6. Methacholine challenge test: Comparison of tidal breathing and dosimeter methods in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazi, Ahlam; Lands, Larry C; Zielinski, David

    2018-02-01

    Methacholine Challenge Test (MCT) is used to confirm, assess the severity and/or rule out asthma. Two MCT methods are described as equivalent by the American Thoracic Society (ATS), the tidal breathing and the dosimeter methods. However, the majority of adult studies suggest that individuals with asthma do not react at the same PC 20 between the two methods. Additionally, the nebulizers used are no longer available and studies suggest current nebulizers are not equivalent to these. Our study investigates the difference in positive MCT tests between three methods in a pediatric population. A retrospective, chart review of all MCT performed with spirometry at the Montreal Children's Hospital from January 2006 to March 2016. A comparison of the percentage positive MCT tests with three methods, tidal breathing, APS dosimeter and dose adjusted DA-dosimeter, was performed at different cutoff points up to 8 mg/mL. A total of 747 subjects performed the tidal breathing method, 920 subjects the APS dosimeter method, and 200 subjects the DA-dosimeter method. At a PC 20 cutoff ≤4 mg/mL, the percentage positive MCT was significantly higher using the tidal breathing method (76.3%) compared to the APS dosimeter (45.1%) and DA-dosimeter (65%) methods (P < 0.0001). The choice of nebulizer and technique significantly impacts the rate of positivity when using MCT to diagnose and assess asthma. Lack of direct comparison of techniques within the same individuals and clinical assessment should be addressed in future studies to standardize MCT methodology in children. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Exhaled breath profiling using broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy in healthy children and children with asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mastrigt, E; Reyes-Reyes, A; Brand, K; Bhattacharya, N; Urbach, H P; Stubbs, A P; de Jongste, J C; Pijnenburg, M W

    2016-04-08

    Exhaled breath analysis is a potential non-invasive tool for diagnosing and monitoring airway diseases. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and electrochemical sensor arrays are the main techniques to detect volatile organic compounds (VOC) in exhaled breath. We developed a broadband quantum cascade laser spectroscopy technique for VOC detection and identification. The objective of this study was to assess the repeatability of exhaled breath profiling with broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy and to explore the clinical applicability by comparing exhaled breath samples from healthy children with those from children with asthma or cystic fibrosis (CF). Healthy children and children with stable asthma or stable CF, aged 6-18 years, were included. Two to four exhaled breath samples were collected in Tedlar bags and analyzed by quantum cascade laser spectroscopy to detect VOCs with an absorption profile in the wavenumber region between 832 and 1262.55 cm(-1). We included 35 healthy children, 39 children with asthma and 15 with CF. Exhaled breath VOC profiles showed poor repeatability (Spearman's rho  =  0.36 to 0.46) and agreement of the complete profiles. However, we were able to discriminate healthy children from children with stable asthma or stable CF and identified VOCs that were responsible for this discrimination. Broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy detected differences in VOC profiles in exhaled breath samples between healthy children and children with asthma or CF. The combination of a relatively easy and fast method and the possibility of molecule identification makes broadband quantum cascade laser-based spectroscopy attractive to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic potential of volatiles in exhaled breath.

  8. Altered Nocturnal Cardiovascular Control in Children With Sleep-Disordered Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hamad, Fatima; Immanuel, Sarah; Liu, Xiao; Pamula, Yvonne; Kontos, Anna; Martin, James; Kennedy, Declan; Kohler, Mark; Porta, Alberto; Baumert, Mathias

    2017-10-01

    To assess cardiovascular control during sleep in children with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and the effect of adenotonsillectomy in comparison to healthy nonsnoring children. Cardiorespiratory signals obtained from overnight polysomnographic recordings of 28 children with SDB and 34 healthy nonsnoring children were analyzed. We employed an autoregressive closed-loop model with heart period (RR) and pulse transit time (PTT) as outputs and respiration as an external input to obtain estimates of respiratory gain and baroreflex gain. Mean and variability of PTT were increased in children with SDB across all stages of sleep. Low frequency power of RR and PTT were attenuated during non-rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Baroreflex sensitivity was reduced in children with SDB in stage 2 sleep, while respiratory gain was increased in slow wave sleep. After adenotonsillectomy, these indices normalized in the SDB group attaining values comparable to those of healthy children. In children with mild-to-moderate SDB, vasomotor activity is increased and baroreflex sensitivity decreased during quiet, event-free non-REM sleep. Adenotonsillectomy appears to reverse this effect. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Lateral facial profile may reveal the risk for sleep disordered breathing in children--the PANIC-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikävalko, Tiina; Närhi, Matti; Lakka, Timo; Myllykangas, Riitta; Tuomilehto, Henri; Vierola, Anu; Pahkala, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the lateral view photography of the face as a tool for assessing morphological properties (i.e. facial convexity) as a risk factor for sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in children and to test how reliably oral health and non-oral healthcare professionals can visually discern the lateral profile of the face from the photographs. The present study sample consisted of 382 children 6-8 years of age who were participants in the Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) Study. Sleep was assessed by a sleep questionnaire administered by the parents. SDB was defined as apnoeas, frequent or loud snoring or nocturnal mouth breathing observed by the parents. The facial convexity was assessed with three different methods. First, it was clinically evaluated by the reference orthodontist (T.I.). Second, lateral view photographs were taken to visually sub-divide the facial profile into convex, normal or concave. The photos were examined by a reference orthodontist and seven different healthcare professionals who work with children and also by a dental student. The inter- and intra-examiner consistencies were calculated by Kappa statistics. Three soft tissue landmarks of the facial profile, soft tissue Glabella (G`), Subnasale (Sn) and soft tissue Pogonion (Pg`) were digitally identified to analyze convexity of the face and the intra-examiner reproducibility of the reference orthodontist was determined by calculating intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs). The third way to express the convexity of the face was to calculate the angle of facial convexity (G`-Sn-Pg`) and to group it into quintiles. For analysis the lowest quintile (≤164.2°) was set to represent the most convex facial profile. The prevalence of the SDB in children with the most convex profiles expressed with the lowest quintile of the angle G`-Sn-Pg` (≤164.2°) was almost 2-fold (14.5%) compared to those with normal profile (8.1%) (p = 0.084). The inter-examiner Kappa values between the

  10. Analysis of breath volatile organic compounds in children with chronic liver disease compared to healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Katharine; Alkhouri, Naim; Cikach, Frank; Patel, Nishaben; Yan, Chen; Grove, David; Lopez, Rocio; Rome, Ellen; Dweik, Raed A

    2015-04-20

    Breath testing is increasingly being used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for disease states across medicine. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as measured by mass spectrometry in healthy children and children with chronic liver disease (CLD). Patients between the ages of 6 and 21 were recruited for the study. Control subjects were recruited from a general pediatric population during well-child visits, while patients with CLD were recruited from pediatric gastroenterology clinic visits. The diagnosis of CLD was confirmed by clinical, laboratory, and/or histologic data. A single exhaled breath was collected and analyzed by means of selected-ion flow-tube mass spectrometry per protocol. A total of 104 patients were included in the study (49 with CLD and 55 healthy controls). Of the patients with CLD, 20 had advanced liver fibrosis (F3-F4). In the CLD cohort, levels of exhaled 1-decene, 1-heptene, 1-octene and 3 methylhexane were found to be significantly higher when compared to the control population (p CLD patients when compared to controls (p CLD was excellent (AUROC = 0.97). Our study demonstrates that children with CLD have a unique pattern of exhaled VOCs. Utilization of a combination of these VOCs represents a promising non-invasive diagnostic tool and may provide further insight into the pathophysiologic processes and pathways leading to pediatric liver disease. Further analysis of these compounds in external cohorts are needed to validate our findings.

  11. Sleep-disordered breathing in children with asthma: a systematic review on the impact of treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sánchez T

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Trinidad Sánchez,1 José A Castro-Rodríguez,2 Pablo E Brockmann2,3 1Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, 2Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Pulmonology, Division of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, 3Sleep Medicine Center, Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile Background: The objective was to perform a systematic review in order to describe the relationship between asthma and sleep-disordered breathing (SDB in children, especially regarding the impact of treatment and management. Methods: We performed an electronic search in MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS database. Study inclusion criteria were the following: 1 studies that examined the relationship between asthma/wheezing and SDB/obstructive sleep apnea (OSA; and 2 studies conducted in children <18 years of age. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of asthma and SDB, the tests used for diagnosis, and the influence of their treatment and management. Results: One thousand and twenty studies were identified, among which 32 were selected (n=143,343 children; 51% males; age [mean ± standard deviation] 8.4±2.5 years. Most studies (n=26 diagnosed SDB using questionnaires or clinical history. Nine studies performed a sleep study for diagnosing OSA. The diagnosis of asthma was based on clinical history (n=16, previous medical diagnosis (n=4, questionnaires (n=12, and spirometry (n=5. Children with asthma were more likely to develop habitual snoring and OSA, and children with SDB were more likely to develop asthma. Moreover, asthma was associated with more severe OSA, and the presence of SDB was associated with severe asthma. Treatment of SDB with adenotonsillectomy was associated with significant asthma improvement. Conclusion: The relationship between asthma and SDB appears to be bidirectional, and adenotonsillectomy appears to improve asthma control. Future trials on how asthma treatment could impact on SDB are needed

  12. Kinetics of ethanol decay in mouth- and nose-exhaled breath measured on-line by selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry following varying doses of alcohol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Pysanenko, Andriy; Španěl, Patrik

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 7 (2010), s. 1066-1074 ISSN 0951-4198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0800 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : mass spectrometry * blood-alcohol * breath Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.846, year: 2010

  13. Dispersal kinetics of deuterated water in the lungs and airways following mouth inhalation: real-time breath analysis by flowing afterglow mass spectrometry (FA-MS)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tan, B. K.; Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Davies, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 1 (2010), 017109 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : mass spectrometry * breath analysis * pulmonary-edema Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.828, year: 2010

  14. Masticatory Changes in Oral Breath Secondary to Allergic Rhinitis: Integrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bezerra, Luciana Ângelo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The III Brazilian Consensus on Rhinitis (2012 defines allergic rhinitis as a nasal mucosa inflammation, mediated by immunoglobulin E, after exposure to allergens. The classic signs and symptoms of allergic rhinitis are nasal obstruction, watery rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nasal itching, often reversible either spontaneously or with treatment, and mouth breathing (breathing predominantly through the mouth, regardless of the cause, due to a nasal breathing impairment in some cases. Objective To evaluate the literature on masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing due to allergic rhinitis. Methods We conducted a search of the past 10 years, at Bireme and MEDLINE databases, for articles that covered masticatory changes in children with mouth breathing secondary to allergic rhinitis. Results We found 1,986 articles, including 15 repeated in databases, but only two articles met the inclusion criteria fully. Discussion We found few studies to answer the question raised in this review, and those studies have some methodological limitations. Most articles claimed no have statistically significant differences in masticatory changes in this population. Conclusion A better controlled study (isolating diseases, exposure time, with a larger sample (sample calculation appropriate, would be necessary to examine such changes.

  15. Age specific fast breathing in under-five diarrheal children in an urban hospital: Acidosis or pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzhat, Sharika; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Kawser, Chowdhury Ali; Khan, Azharul Islam; Islam, S M Rafiqul; Shahrin, Lubaba; Shahunja, K M; Shahid, Abu S M S B; Al Imran, Abdullah; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2017-01-01

    Children with diarrhea often present with fast breathing due to metabolic acidosis from dehydration. On the other hand, age specific fast breathing is the cornerstone for the diagnosis of pneumonia following classification of pneumonia recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Correction of metabolic acidosis by rehydrating the diarrheal children requires time, which delays early initiation of appropriate antimicrobials for pneumonia and thereby increases the risk of deaths. We need to further investigate the simple clinical features other than fast breathing which might help us in earliest diagnosis of pneumonia in children with diarrhea Thus, the objective of our study was to identify other contributing clinical features that may independently help for early diagnosis of pneumonia in diarrheal children who present with age specific fast breathing. This was an unmatched case-control study. Diarrheal children aged 0-59 months, admitted to Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) during January 2014 to December 2014 having age specific fast breathing (11-59 months ≥40 breaths/min) were studied. The study children with clinical and radiological pneumonia constituted the cases (n = 276) and those without pneumonia constituted the controls (n = 446). Comparison of clinical features and outcomes between the cases and the controls was made. The distribution of acidosis among the cases and the controls was comparable (35% vs. 41%, p = 0.12). The cases had proportionately higher deaths compared to the controls, however, the difference was not statistically significant (3% vs. 1%; p = 0.23). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, the cases were independently associated with cough (OR = 62.19, 95% CI = 27.79-139.19; ppneumonia. The results underscore the importance of early identification of these simple clinical features that may help to minimize potential delay due to

  16. Cardiometabolic risk is associated with the severity of sleep-disordered breathing in children with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isacco, Laurie; Roche, Johanna; Quinart, Sylvain; Thivel, David; Gillet, Valérie; Nègre, Véronique; Mougin, Fabienne

    2017-03-01

    The alarming progression of pediatric obesity is associated with the development of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), and both exhibit similar adverse cardiometabolic health outcomes. Physical activity level (PAL) may counteract sleep and metabolic disturbances. The present study investigates i) the association between the metabolic syndrome in childhood obesity and SDB, ii) the impact of SDB severity on cardiometabolic risk scores and PAL in children with obesity. Maturation status (Tanner stages), anthropometric (height, weight, body mass index, waist circumference, body adiposity index) and cardiometabolic characteristics (systolic and diastolic blood pressure, lipid and glycemic profiles) were assessed in 83 obese children (mean±SD, age: 10.7±2.7years). PAL and SDB were investigated with a step test and interviews, and an overnight sleep monitor, respectively. The presence or absence of metabolic syndrome (MS) was established and continuous cardiometabolic risk scores were calculated (MetScore BMI and MetScore WC ). Obese children with (61.4%) and without (38.6%) MS present similar SDB. SDB severity is associated with increased insulin concentrations, MetScore BMI and MetScore WC (pobese children. There is no association between SDB and PAL. In a context where no consensus exists for SDB diagnosis in children, our results suggest the influence of SDB severity on cardiometabolic risk factors. Further studies are needed to explore the association between PAL and both metabolic and sleep alterations in obese children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Relationship between High Flow Nasal Cannula Flow Rate and Effort of Breathing in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Thomas; Kamerkar, Asavari; Hotz, Justin; Ross, Patrick A; Newth, Christopher J L; Khemani, Robinder G

    2017-10-01

    To use an objective metric of effort of breathing to determine optimal high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) flow rates in children flow rates of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 L/kg/minute. For a subgroup of patients, 2 different HFNC delivery systems (Fisher & Paykel [Auckland, New Zealand] and Vapotherm [Exeter, New Hampshire]) were compared. Twenty-one patients (49 titration episodes) were studied. The most common diagnoses were bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Overall, there was a significant difference in the percent change in PRP from baseline (of 0.5 L/kg/minute) with increasing flow rates for the entire cohort (P flow rates were increased (P = .001) than patients >8 kg. The optimal HFNC flow rate to reduce effort of breathing in infants and young children is approximately 1.5-2.0 L/kg/minute with more benefit seen in children ≤8 kg. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Desmineralização dentária de pacientes respiradores orais submetidos à expansão maxilar Demineralization of teeth in mouth-breathing patients undergoing maxillary expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Fuerte Bakor

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A respiração oral pode causar deformações na arcada dentária e representar risco a cáries e doenças periodontais, podendo ser agravado pela utilização de aparelhos fixos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o grau de mineralização do esmalte dentário e a microbiota cariogênica bucal de respiradores orais que utilizaram disjuntores maxilares. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo com 20 pacientes respiradores orais com atresia maxilar, idades entre 9 e 13 anos. A mineralização do esmalte dentário foi medida pela técnica de fluorescência, antes da instalação do disjuntor maxilar e após sua remoção. A microbiota cariogênica foi avaliada pelo No Caries®. Na análise estatística utilizamos o teste "t" (pMouth breathing may cause deformities on the dental arch and be a risk factor for caries and periodontal disease; fixed orthodontic appliances compound the problem. AIM: to evaluate mineralization of tooth enamel and the oral cariogenic microbiota of mouth breathers that are using maxillary expanders. MATERIAL AND METHOD: a prospective study of 20 mouth-breathing patients with maxillary atresia, aged from 09 to 13 years. Enamel mineralization was measured using a fluorescence technique, before installing the expander and after its removal. The cariogenic microbiota was evaluated by the No Caries®. The t test (p<0.05 was applied for the statistical analysis, and the oral microbiota was analyzed by incidence. RESULTS: there was a statistically significant difference in the enamel mineralization level after maxillary expansion; the mean value was 3.08. The colorimetric test showed that the caries development potential was reduced in 45%, increased in 15%, and unaltered in 40% after maxillary expander use. CONCLUSION: there was a statistically significant difference in enamel mineralization after maxillary expansion; this difference was within the clinically normal range; the cariogenic potential increased in a small number of patients during

  19. Free-breathing quantification of hepatic fat in healthy children and children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease using a multi-echo 3-D stack-of-radial MRI technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Tess; Ly, Karrie V; Murthy, Smruthi; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Kim, Grace Hyun J; Calkins, Kara L; Wu, Holden H

    2018-05-04

    In adults, noninvasive chemical shift encoded Cartesian magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy (SVS) accurately quantify hepatic steatosis but require breath-holding. In children, especially young and sick children, breath-holding is often limited or not feasible. Sedation can facilitate breath-holding but is highly undesirable. For these reasons, there is a need to develop free-breathing MRI technology that accurately quantifies steatosis in all children. This study aimed to compare non-sedated free-breathing multi-echo 3-D stack-of-radial (radial) MRI versus standard breath-holding MRI and SVS techniques in a group of children for fat quantification with respect to image quality, accuracy and repeatability. Healthy children (n=10, median age [±interquartile range]: 10.9 [±3.3] years) and overweight children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (n=9, median age: 15.2 [±3.2] years) were imaged at 3 Tesla using free-breathing radial MRI, breath-holding Cartesian MRI and breath-holding SVS. Acquisitions were performed twice to assess repeatability (within-subject mean difference, MD within ). Images and hepatic proton-density fat fraction (PDFF) maps were scored for image quality. Free-breathing and breath-holding PDFF were compared using linear regression (correlation coefficient, r and concordance correlation coefficient, ρ c ) and Bland-Altman analysis (mean difference). Phepatic PDFF measurements and improved image quality, compared to standard breath-holding MR techniques.

  20. Development of a screening tool for sleep disordered breathing in children using the phone Oximeter™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Ainara; Dehkordi, Parastoo; Karlen, Walter; Wensley, David; Ansermino, J Mark; Dumont, Guy A

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) can lead to daytime sleepiness, growth failure and developmental delay in children. Polysomnography (PSG), the gold standard to diagnose SDB, is a highly resource-intensive test, confined to the sleep laboratory. To combine the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2) characterization and cardiac modulation, quantified by pulse rate variability (PRV), to identify children with SDB using the Phone Oximeter, a device integrating a pulse oximeter with a smartphone. Following ethics approval and informed consent, 160 children referred to British Columbia Children's Hospital for overnight PSG were recruited. A second pulse oximeter sensor applied to the finger adjacent to the one used for standard PSG was attached to the Phone Oximeter to record overnight pulse oximetry (SpO2 and photoplethysmogram (PPG)) alongside the PSG. We studied 146 children through the analysis of the SpO2 pattern, and PRV as an estimate of heart rate variability calculated from the PPG. SpO2 variability and SpO2 spectral power at low frequency, was significantly higher in children with SDB due to the modulation provoked by airway obstruction during sleep (p-value <0.01). PRV analysis reflected a significant augmentation of sympathetic activity provoked by intermittent hypoxia in SDB children. A linear classifier was trained with the most discriminating features to identify children with SDB. The classifier was validated with internal and external cross-validation, providing a high negative predictive value (92.6%) and a good balance between sensitivity (88.4%) and specificity (83.6%). Combining SpO2 and PRV analysis improved the classification performance, providing an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 88%, beyond the 82% achieved using SpO2 analysis alone. These results demonstrate that the implementation of this algorithm in the Phone Oximeter will provide an improved portable, at-home screening tool, with the capability of monitoring patients

  1. Profiling of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath as a strategy to find early predictive signatures of asthma in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Smolinska

    Full Text Available Wheezing is one of the most common respiratory symptoms in preschool children under six years old. Currently, no tests are available that predict at early stage who will develop asthma and who will be a transient wheezer. Diagnostic tests of asthma are reliable in adults but the same tests are difficult to use in children, because they are invasive and require active cooperation of the patient. A non-invasive alternative is needed for children. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs excreted in breath could yield such non-invasive and patient-friendly diagnostic. The aim of this study was to identify VOCs in the breath of preschool children (inclusion at age 2-4 years that indicate preclinical asthma. For that purpose we analyzed the total array of exhaled VOCs with Gas Chromatography time of flight Mass Spectrometry of 252 children between 2 and 6 years of age. Breath samples were collected at multiple time points of each child. Each breath-o-gram contained between 300 and 500 VOCs; in total 3256 different compounds were identified across all samples. Using two multivariate methods, Random Forests and dissimilarity Partial Least Squares Discriminant Analysis, we were able to select a set of 17 VOCs which discriminated preschool asthmatic children from transient wheezing children. The correct prediction rate was equal to 80% in an independent test set. These VOCs are related to oxidative stress caused by inflammation in the lungs and consequently lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, we showed that VOCs in the exhaled breath predict the subsequent development of asthma which might guide early treatment.

  2. Sleep Disordered Breathing in Children and Adolescents with Chiari Malformation Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losurdo, Anna; Dittoni, Serena; Testani, Elisa; Di Blasi, Chiara; Scarano, Emanuele; Mariotti, Paolo; Paternoster, Giovanna; Di Rocco, Concezio; Massimi, Luca; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep disordered breathing (SDB). The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of SDB in CM-I and its clinical correlates in a population of children and adolescents. Methods: Fifty-three consecutive children and adolescents affected by CM-I were enrolled (27 girls and 26 boys, mean age 10.3 ± 4.3, range: 3-18 years). All patients underwent neurological examination, MRI, and polysomnography (PSG). Otorhinolaryngologic clinical evaluation was performed in patients with polysomnographic evidence of sleep-related upper airway obstruction. Results: Mean size of the herniation was 9.5 ± 5.4 mm. Fourteen patients had syringomyelia, 5 had hydrocephalus, 31 presented neurological signs, 14 had epileptic seizures, and 7 reported poor sleep. PSG revealed SDB in 13 subjects. Patients with SDB, compared to those without SDB, had a higher prevalence hydrocephalus (p = 0.002), syringomyelia (p = 0.001), and neurological symptoms (p = 0.028). No significant difference was observed in age, gender, prevalence of epilepsy, and size of the herniation. Obstructive SDB was associated with syringomyelia (p = 0.004), whereas central SDB was associated with hydrocephalus (p = 0.034). Conclusions: In our population of CM-I patients the prevalence of SDB was 24%, lower than that reported in literature. Moreover, our findings suggest that abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in CM-I, particularly syringomyelia and hydro-cephalus, are associated with SDB. Citation: Losurdo A; Dittoni S; Testani E; Di Blasi C; Scarano E; Mariotti P; Paternoster G; Di Rocco C; Massimi L; Della Marca G. Sleep disordered breathing in children and adolescents with Chiari malformation Type I. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(4):371-377. PMID:23585753

  3. Comparison of breath gases, including acetone, with blood glucose and blood ketones in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaikie, Tom P J; Edge, Julie A; Hancock, Gus; Lunn, Daniel; Megson, Clare; Peverall, Rob; Richmond, Graham; Ritchie, Grant A D; Taylor, David

    2014-11-25

    Previous studies have suggested that breath gases may be related to simultaneous blood glucose and blood ketone levels in adults with type 2 and type 1 diabetes. The aims of this study were to investigate these relationships in children and young people with type 1 diabetes in order to assess the efficacy of a simple breath test as a non-invasive means of diabetes management. Gases were collected in breath bags and measurements were compared with capillary blood glucose and ketone levels taken at the same time on a single visit to a routine hospital clinic in 113 subjects (59 male, age 7 years 11 months-18 years 3 months) with type 1 diabetes. The patients were well-controlled with relatively low concentrations of the blood ketone measured (β hydroxybutyrate, 0-0.4 mmol l(-1)). Breath acetone levels were found to increase with blood β hydroxybutyrate levels and a significant relationship was found between the two (Spearman's rank correlation ρ = 0.364, p acetone (ρ = 0.16, p = 0.1), but led to the conclusion that single breath measurements of acetone do not provide a good measure of blood glucose levels in this cohort. This result suggests a potential to develop breath gas analysis to provide an alternative to blood testing for ketone measurement, for example to assist with the management of type 1 diabetes.

  4. A novel sidestream ultrasonic flow sensor for multiple breath washout in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Susanne I; Sturz, J; Junge, S; Ballmann, M; Gappa, M

    2008-08-01

    Inert gas multiple breath washout (MBW) for measuring Lung Clearance Index using mass spectrometry and 4% sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) as the tracer gas has been shown to be sensitive for detecting early Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease. However, mass spectrometry requires bulky equipment and is expensive to buy and maintain. A novel sidestream ultrasonic device may overcome this problem. The aims of this study were to assess the feasibility and clinical validity of measuring lung volume (functional residual capacity, FRC) and the LCI using the sidestream ultrasonic flow sensor in children and adolescents with CF in relation to spirometry and plain chest radiographs. MBW using the sidestream ultrasonic device and conventional spirometry were performed in 26 patients with CF and 22 healthy controls. In the controls (4.7-17.7 years) LCI was similar to that reported using mass spectrometry (mean (SD) 6.7 (0.5)). LCI was elevated in 77% of the CF children (6.8-18.9 years), whereas spirometry was abnormal in only 38.5%, 61.5%, and 26.9% for FEV(1), MEF(25), and FEV(1)/FVC, respectively. This was more marked in children ultrasonic MBW is a valid and simple alternative to mass spectrometry for assessing ventilation homogeneity in children. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Treatment response of airway clearance assessed by single-breath washout in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Chiara; Singer, Florian; Yammine, Sophie; Casaulta, Carmen; Latzin, Philipp

    2013-12-01

    We studied the ability of 4 single-breath gas washout (SBW) tests to measure immediate effects of airway clearance in children with CF. 25 children aged 4-16 years with CF performed pulmonary function tests to assess short-term variability at baseline and response to routine airway clearance. Tidal helium and sulfur hexafluoride (double-tracer gas: DTG) SBW, tidal capnography, tidal and vital capacity nitrogen (N2) SBW and spirometry were applied. We analyzed the gasses' phase III slope (SnIII--normalized for tidal volume) and FEV1 from spirometry. SnIII from tidal DTG-SBW, SnIII from vital capacity N2-SBW, and FEV1 improved significantly after airway clearance. From these tests, individual change of SnIII from tidal DTG-SBW and FEV1 exceeded short-term variability in 10 and 6 children. With the tidal DTG-SBW, an easy and promising test for peripheral gas mixing efficiency, immediate pulmonary function response to airway clearance can be assessed in CF children. Copyright © 2013 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Predicting the presence of sleep-disordered breathing in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehme, Joy; LaBerge, Robert; Pothos, Mary; Barrowman, Nick; Hoey, Lynda; Monsour, Andrea; Kukko, Madelaine; Katz, Sherri Lynne

    2017-08-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is highly prevalent in children with Down syndrome. Given the scarcity of resources and the presence of risk factors for SDB in this population, the objective of this study is to identify the clinical predictors of SDB, which would assist prioritization of children with Down syndrome for SDB evaluation. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on children enrolled in the Down syndrome clinic at CHEO who underwent polysomnography in 2004-2014. Total apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) or obstructive AHI (OAHI) > 5 events/hour was considered clinically significant. Associations between SDB and concurrent diagnoses, referral reasons, and sleep symptoms assessed by questionnaire were examined using Pearson's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to examine the predictors of SDB. SDB was present in 42.9% of 119 children, with its highest prevalence at age 8 years. Symptoms were not significantly associated with AHI > 5 events/hour or OAHI > 5 events/hour. Gastroesophageal reflux was associated with lower odds of OAHI > 5 events/hour on univariate testing (odds ratio 0.16, 95% CI 0.04-0.72; p = 0.02) and multivariate analysis (odds ratio 0.05, 95% CI 0.0006-0.50; p = 0.002). SDB is highly prevalent at all ages in children with Down syndrome. Symptoms did not predict SDB in this population, although gastroesophageal reflux may mimic SDB, which indicates that clinicians should continue to perform ongoing surveillance for SDB throughout the lifespan of children with Down syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Diagnostic value of a pattern of exhaled breath condensate biomarkers in asthmatic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloča Vuljanko, I; Turkalj, M; Nogalo, B; Bulat Lokas, S; Plavec, D

    Diagnosing asthma in children is a challenge and using a single biomarker from exhaled breath condensate (EBC) showed the lack of improvement in it. The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic potential of a pattern of simple chemical biomarkers from EBC in diagnosing asthma in children in a real-life setting, its association with lung function and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In 75 consecutive children aged 5-7 years with asthma-like symptoms the following tests were performed: skin prick tests, spirometry, impulse oscillometry (IOS), exhaled NO (F E NO), 24-hour oesophageal pH monitoring and EBC collection with subsequent analysis of pH, carbon dioxide tension, oxygen tension, and concentrations of magnesium, calcium, iron and urates. No significant differences were found for individual EBC biomarkers between asthmatics and non-asthmatics (p>0.05 for all). A pattern of six EBC biomarkers showed a statistically significant (p=0.046) predictive model for asthma (AUC=0.698, PPV=84.2%, NPV=38.9%). None to moderate association (R 2 up to 0.43) between EBC biomarkers and lung function measures and F E NO was found, with IOS parameters showing the best association with EBC biomarkers. A significantly higher EBC Fe was found in children with asthma and GERD compared to asthmatics without GERD (p=0.049). An approach that involves a pattern of EBC biomarkers had a better diagnostic accuracy for asthma in children in real-life settings compared to a single one. Poor to moderate association of EBC biomarkers with lung function suggests a complementary value of EBC analysis for asthma diagnosis in children. Copyright © 2016 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The analysis of volatile organic compounds in exhaled breath and biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate in children - clinical tools or scientific toys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mastrigt, E; de Jongste, J C; Pijnenburg, M W

    2015-07-01

    Current monitoring strategies for respiratory diseases are mainly based on clinical features, lung function and imaging. As airway inflammation is the hallmark of many respiratory diseases in childhood, noninvasive methods to assess the presence and severity of airway inflammation might be helpful in both diagnosing and monitoring paediatric respiratory diseases. At present, the measurement of fractional exhaled nitric oxide is the only noninvasive method available to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in clinical practice. We aimed to evaluate whether the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath (EB) and biomarkers in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is helpful in diagnosing and monitoring respiratory diseases in children. An extensive literature search was conducted in Medline, Embase and PubMed on the analysis and applications of VOCs in EB and EBC in children. We retrieved 1165 papers, of which nine contained original data on VOCs in EB and 84 on biomarkers in EBC. These were included in this review. We give an overview of the clinical applications in childhood and summarize the methodological issues. Several VOCs in EB and biomarkers in EBC have the potential to distinguish patients from healthy controls and to monitor treatment responses. Lack of standardization of collection methods and analysis techniques hampers the introduction in clinical practice. The measurement of metabolomic profiles may have important advantages over detecting single markers. There is a lack of longitudinal studies and external validation to reveal whether EB and EBC analysis have added value in the diagnostic process and follow-up of children with respiratory diseases. In conclusion, the use of VOCs in EB and biomarkers in EBC as markers of inflammatory airway diseases in children is still a research tool and not validated for clinical use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Ocorrência de rinite, respiração oral e alterações orofaciais em adolescentes asmáticos Occurrence of rhinitis, mouth breathing and orofacial alterations in adolescents with asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdenice Aparecida de Menezes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: determinar a ocorrência de rinite, respiração oral e alterações orofaciais em adolescentes asmáticos. MÉTODO: estudo do tipo transversal, realizado com 155 adolescentes asmáticos de 12 a 15 anos e de ambos os sexos, atendidos no Instituto Materno Infantil Professor Fernando Figueira. O levantamento de dados consistiu de duas etapas: a primeira para análise dos prontuários dos pacientes e da realização de dois testes para avaliação adicional da função respiratória. Sendo um com o auxílio do espelho de Glatzel e o outro com a contagem do tempo de permanência da água na boca. A segunda por meio de exame clínico para identificação das alterações orofaciais. RESULTADOS: a frequência de rinite alérgica foi elevada (80,6%, não existindo diferença significante entre o sexo feminino (80,9% e o masculino (80,5%. Quanto ao padrão de respiração 32,9% dos asmáticos apresentaram respiração oronasal. As alterações faciais mais frequentes para o sexo masculino foram: olheiras (93,1%, palato ogival (82,8%, lábios ressecados (70,1%, selamento labial inadequado (77,0%, olhos caídos (62,1% e face alongada (57,5%. O sexo feminino apresentou as maiores frequências para as seguintes características: olheiras (91,2%, palato ogival (85,3%, selamento labial inadequado (67,6%, lábios ressecados (63,2% face alongada (66,2% e lábio superior estreito (57,4%. CONCLUSÃO: em adolescentes asmáticos a frequência de rinite alérgica foi alta, bem como a ocorrência de respiração oral e de alterações faciais.PURPOSE: to determine the occurrence of rhinitis, mouth breathing and orofacial alterations in adolescents with asthma. METHOD: cross-sectional study was conducted with 155 adolescents with asthma from 12 to 15 years old and both sexes, treated at the Institute Professor Fernando Figueira. The survey consisted of two phases: the first to review patients' records and carrying out two tests for further evaluation of

  10. Correlações entre alterações de fala, respiração oral, dentição e oclusão Correlations between speech disorders, mouth breathing, dentition and occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lopes de Castro Martinelli

    2011-02-01

    ção. CONCLUSÕES: o ceceio anterior está correlacionado a alterações de dentição e à Classe III de Angle; olheira, eversão do lábio inferior e lábios entreabertos no repouso são adaptações presentes na Classe II-1, não caracterizando respiração oral neste grupo; o acúmulo de saliva nas comissuras labiais foi o sinal de respiração oral que se correlacionou às alterações de dentição.PURPOSE: to check the correlations among speech disorders and mouth breathing symptoms with the type of dentition and occlusion, using video recordings. METHODS: a retrospective study with 397 patients, by studying the shooting script - ROF. Types of speech disorders and mouth breathing symptoms were assessed by Orofacial Motricity Specialist Speech and Language Pathologists and compared with the occlusal types proposed by Angle and with the dentition parameters, both evaluated by an Orthodontist. For the statistical analysis we used the program SPSS (Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 13.0. For analyzing Spearman correlation, all assessment data were matched and analyzed. The adopted significance level was 5%. RESULTS: Considering speech disorders and dentition and occlusion data, we noted parallelism between distortion and crossbite, imprecision and bone deviation of lower midline line, locking and overjet, locking and overbite, frontal lisp and Angle Class III malocclusion, frontal lisp and malocclusion, frontal lisp and open bite, frontal lisp and crossbite; and frontal lisp and lower midline deviation. We also noted correlated opposition between locking and openbite, locking and bone deviation of lower bone midline, frontal lisp and Angle Class II-1 malocclusion, frontal lisp and overjet; and frontal lisp and overbite. Considering mouth breathing symptoms and dentition and occlusion data, we noted a symptom of parallelism between the protrusion of lower lip and overjet, accumulation of saliva on the labial commissures and crossbite, accumulation of saliva on

  11. Tidal breathing flow measurement in awake young children by using impedance pneumography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, Ville-Pekka; Pelkonen, Anna S; Kotaniemi-Syrjänen, Anne; Mäkelä, Mika J; Viik, Jari; Malmberg, L Pekka

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of tidal breathing (TB) relate to lung function and may be assessed even in young children. Thus far, the accuracy of impedance pneumography (IP) in recording TB flows in young children with or without bronchial obstruction has not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the agreement between IP and direct flow measurement with pneumotachograph (PNT) in assessing TB flow and flow-derived indices relating to airway obstruction in young children. Tidal flow was recorded for 1 min simultaneously with IP and PNT during different phases of a bronchial challenge test with methacholine in 21 wheezy children aged 3 to 7 years. The agreement of IP with PNT was found to be excellent in direct flow signal comparison, the mean deviation from linearity ranging from 2.4 to 3.1% of tidal peak inspiratory flow. Methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction or consecutive bronchodilation induced only minor changes in the agreement. Between IP and PNT, the obstruction-related tidal flow indices were equally repeatable, and agreement was found to be high, with intraclass correlation coefficients for T PTEF/T E, V PTEF/V E, and parameter S being 0.94, 0.91, and 0.68, respectively. Methacholine-induced changes in tidal flow indices showed significant associations with changes in mechanical impedance of the respiratory system assessed by the oscillometric technique, with the highest correlation found in V PTEF/V E (r = -0.54; P tidal airflow profiles in young children with wheezing disorders.

  12. Development of a screening tool for sleep disordered breathing in children using the phone Oximeter™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainara Garde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB can lead to daytime sleepiness, growth failure and developmental delay in children. Polysomnography (PSG, the gold standard to diagnose SDB, is a highly resource-intensive test, confined to the sleep laboratory. AIM: To combine the blood oxygen saturation (SpO2 characterization and cardiac modulation, quantified by pulse rate variability (PRV, to identify children with SDB using the Phone Oximeter, a device integrating a pulse oximeter with a smartphone. METHODS: Following ethics approval and informed consent, 160 children referred to British Columbia Children's Hospital for overnight PSG were recruited. A second pulse oximeter sensor applied to the finger adjacent to the one used for standard PSG was attached to the Phone Oximeter to record overnight pulse oximetry (SpO2 and photoplethysmogram (PPG alongside the PSG. RESULTS: We studied 146 children through the analysis of the SpO2 pattern, and PRV as an estimate of heart rate variability calculated from the PPG. SpO2 variability and SpO2 spectral power at low frequency, was significantly higher in children with SDB due to the modulation provoked by airway obstruction during sleep (p-value <0.01. PRV analysis reflected a significant augmentation of sympathetic activity provoked by intermittent hypoxia in SDB children. A linear classifier was trained with the most discriminating features to identify children with SDB. The classifier was validated with internal and external cross-validation, providing a high negative predictive value (92.6% and a good balance between sensitivity (88.4% and specificity (83.6%. Combining SpO2 and PRV analysis improved the classification performance, providing an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 88%, beyond the 82% achieved using SpO2 analysis alone. CONCLUSIONS: These results demonstrate that the implementation of this algorithm in the Phone Oximeter will provide an improved portable, at

  13. Clinical application of inert gas Multiple Breath Washout in children and adolescents with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitserloot, Annelies; Fuchs, Susanne I; Müller, Christina; Bisdorf, Kornelia; Gappa, Monika

    2014-09-01

    Children with asthma often have normal spirometry despite significant disease. The pathology of the small airways in asthma may be assessed using Multiple Breath Washout (MBW) and calculating the Lung Clearance Index (LCI). There are only few studies using MBW in children with asthma and existing data regarding bronchodilator effect are contradictory. The aim of the present pilot study was to compare LCI in asthma and controls and assess the effect of salbutamol in children with asthma on the LCI. Unselected patients with a diagnosis of asthma visiting the outpatient department of our hospital between 04-2010 and 03-2011 were recruited and compared to a healthy control group. MBW was performed as inert gas MBW using sulfurhexafluorid (SF6) as the tracer gas. Clinical data were documented and spirometry and MBW (EasyOne Pro, MBW module, NDD Switzerland) were performed before and after the use of salbutamol (200-400 μg). Healthy controls performed baseline MBW only. 32 children diagnosed with asthma (4.7-17.4 years) and 42 controls (5.3-20.8) were included in the analysis. LCI differed between patients and controls, with a mean LCI (SD) of 6.48 (0.48) and 6.21 (0.38) (P = 0.008). Use of salbutamol had no significant effect on LCI for the group. These pilot data show that clinically stable asthma patients and controls both have a LCI in the normal range. However, in patients the LCI is significantly higher indicating that MBW may have a role in assessing small airways disease in asthma. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of sleep related breathing disorders in children: 2007 to 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, A

    2015-03-01

    Sleep related breathing disorders (SRBD) have historically been under-recognised and under-treated. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) affects approximately 3% of children. In line with the increased recognition of SRBD there has been an increase in demand for diagnostic services. We determined the awareness of SRBD amongst Irish paediatricians, examined the provision of sleep services to children throughout the country between 2007 and 2011 and audited diagnostic sleep services in a tertiary centre in 2011. Amongst respondents there was an awareness of SRBD but a poor understanding of diagnostic evaluation with 31\\/46 (67) referring to inappropriate services. There has been a sharp increase in both diagnostic sleep tests (433-1793 [414]) and in the use of non-invasive ventilation (NIV) (31-186 [627]) for treatment of SRBD between 2007 and 2011. Paediatric sleep services are organized in an ad-hoc manner nationally with significant service variation. The use of domiciliary overnight oximetry reduced the requirement for more formal polysomnography by 70%.

  15. Body Fat Composition: A Predictive Factor for Sleep Related Breathing Disorder in Obese Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Rajeev; Lesser, Daniel J; Oliveira, Flavia G S A; Tran, Winston H; Keens, Thomas G; Khoo, Michael C K; Davidson Ward, Sally L

    2015-09-15

    The association between body fat composition as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning and pediatric sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD) is not well established. We investigated the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and DEXA parameters and their association with SRBD in obese children. Overnight polysomnography was performed on obese/overweight children (10-17 years) with habitual snoring. Total body fat mass (g), trunk fat mass (g), total body % fat, and trunk % fat were determined by DEXA. Forty-one subjects were studied. Logarithm (Log) total arousal index correlated with BMI (p fat mass (p fat mass (p fat mass (p fat mass (p fat mass (p fat (p fat mass (p fat (p fat mass and trunk fat mass as well as BMI correlated with total arousal index and desaturation index. BMI correlated with DEXA parameters in 10-12 year old males but not in 13-17 year old males. The value of using DEXA scanning to study the relationship between obesity and SRBD may depend on age and pubertal stage. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  16. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.

  17. New camera-based microswitch technology to monitor small head and mouth responses of children with multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Bellini, Domenico; Oliva, Doretta; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Green, Vanessa A; Furniss, Fred

    2014-06-01

    Assessing a new camera-based microswitch technology, which did not require the use of color marks on the participants' face. Two children with extensive multiple disabilities participated. The responses selected for them consisted of small, lateral head movements and mouth closing or opening. The intervention was carried out according to a multiple probe design across responses. The technology involved a computer with a CPU using a 2-GHz clock, a USB video camera with a 16-mm lens, a USB cable connecting the camera and the computer, and a special software program written in ISO C++ language. The new technology was satisfactorily used with both children. Large increases in their responding were observed during the intervention periods (i.e. when the responses were followed by preferred stimulation). The new technology may be an important resource for persons with multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior.

  18. Tonsillectomy or adenotonsillectomy versus non-surgical management for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venekamp, Roderick P; Hearne, Benjamin J; Chandrasekharan, Deepak; Blackshaw, Helen; Lim, Jerome; Schilder, Anne G M

    2015-10-14

    Obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) is a condition that encompasses breathing problems when asleep, due to an obstruction of the upper airways, ranging in severity from simple snoring to obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). It affects both children and adults. In children, hypertrophy of the tonsils and adenoid tissue is thought to be the commonest cause of oSDB. As such, tonsillectomy - with or without adenoidectomy - is considered an appropriate first-line treatment for most cases of paediatric oSDB. To assess the benefits and harms of tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy compared with non-surgical management of children with oSDB. We searched the Cochrane Register of Studies Online, PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Clinicaltrials.gov, ICTRP and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 5 March 2015. Randomised controlled trials comparing the effectiveness and safety of (adeno)tonsillectomy with non-surgical management in children with oSDB aged 2 to 16 years. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Three trials (562 children) met our inclusion criteria. Two were at moderate to high risk of bias and one at low risk of bias. We did not pool the results because of substantial clinical heterogeneity. They evaluated three different groups of children: those diagnosed with mild to moderate OSAS by polysomnography (PSG) (453 children aged five to nine years; low risk of bias; CHAT trial), those with a clinical diagnosis of oSDB but with negative PSG recordings (29 children aged two to 14 years; moderate to high risk of bias; Goldstein) and children with Down syndrome or mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) diagnosed with mild to moderate OSAS by PSG (80 children aged six to 12 years; moderate to high risk of bias; Sudarsan). Moreover, the trials included two different comparisons: adenotonsillectomy versus no surgery (CHAT trial and Goldstein) or versus

  19. Three-dimensional cine MRI in free-breathing infants and children with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael C.; Kramer, Ulrich; Bretschneider, Christiane; Doering, Joerg; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan [University of Tuebingen (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Greil, Gerald F. [St. Thomas Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences, King' s College London (United Kingdom); Martirosian, Petros [University of Tuebingen, Section of Experimental Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Sieverding, Ludger [University of Tuebingen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2009-12-15

    Patients with congenital heart disease frequently have complex cardiac and vascular malformations requiring detailed non-invasive diagnostic evaluation including functional parameters. To evaluate the morphological and functional information provided by a novel 3-D cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence. Twenty consecutive children (mean age 2.2 years, nine boys) were examined using a 1.5-T MR system including 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo sequences, static 3-D SSFP and 3-D cine SSFP sequences. Measurement of ventricular structures and volumes showed close agreement between the 3-D cine SSFP sequence and the 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo and static 3-D SSFP sequences (left ventricular volumes mean difference 1.0-1.9 ml and 8.8-11.4%, respectively; right ventricular volumes 1.7-2.1 ml and 9.9-16.9%, respectively). No systematic bias was observed. 3-D cine MRI provides anatomic as well as functional information with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution in free-breathing infants with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  20. Three-dimensional cine MRI in free-breathing infants and children with congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeger, Achim; Fenchel, Michael C.; Kramer, Ulrich; Bretschneider, Christiane; Doering, Joerg; Claussen, Claus D.; Miller, Stephan; Martirosian, Petros; Sieverding, Ludger

    2009-01-01

    Patients with congenital heart disease frequently have complex cardiac and vascular malformations requiring detailed non-invasive diagnostic evaluation including functional parameters. To evaluate the morphological and functional information provided by a novel 3-D cine steady-state free-precession (SSFP) sequence. Twenty consecutive children (mean age 2.2 years, nine boys) were examined using a 1.5-T MR system including 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo sequences, static 3-D SSFP and 3-D cine SSFP sequences. Measurement of ventricular structures and volumes showed close agreement between the 3-D cine SSFP sequence and the 2-D cine gradient-recalled-echo and static 3-D SSFP sequences (left ventricular volumes mean difference 1.0-1.9 ml and 8.8-11.4%, respectively; right ventricular volumes 1.7-2.1 ml and 9.9-16.9%, respectively). No systematic bias was observed. 3-D cine MRI provides anatomic as well as functional information with sufficient spatial and temporal resolution in free-breathing infants with congenital heart disease. (orig.)

  1. Abbreviation modalities of nitrogen multiple-breath washout tests in school children with obstructed lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Kent; Ejlertsen, Jacob S; Madsen, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    , the lung clearance index, calculated as lung volume turnovers required to reach 2.5% of the starting N2 concentration (LCI2.5 ). METHODS: Cross-sectional study of triplicate N2 MBW measurements obtained in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients (N = 60), primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) patients (N = 28......RATIONALE: Nitrogen multiple-breath washout (N2 MBW) is a promising tool for assessing early lung damage in children with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but it can be a time-consuming procedure. We compared alternative test-shortening endpoints with the most commonly reported N2 MBW outcome...... MBW runs in each session. N2 MBW endpoints were analyzed as z-scores calculated from healthy controls. RESULTS: In PCD, Cn@TO6 and LCI2.5 exhibited similar values (mean [95%CI] difference: 0.33 [-0.24; 0.90] z-scores), reducing the test duration by one-third (5.4 min; 95%CI: 4.0; 6.8). All other...

  2. Neurobehavioral morbidity associated with disordered breathing during sleep in children: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Dean W

    2006-09-01

    To comprehensively review research on the association between childhood sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) and neurobehavioral functioning. Qualitative and quantitative literature review. N/A. N/A. N/A. The findings of 61 studies of the relationship between childhood SDB and neurobehavioral functioning were critically evaluated and synthesized. There is strong evidence that childhood SDB is associated with deficits in behavior and emotion regulation, scholastic performance, sustained attention, selective attention, and alertness. There is also evidence that SDB has minimal association with a child's typical mood, expressive language skills, visual perception, and working memory. Findings have been insufficient to draw conclusions about intelligence, memory, and some aspects of executive functioning. Mechanisms by which SDB might result in neurobehavioral morbidity are being explored, but clinical symptoms such as chronic snoring remain the best predictors of morbidity. Short-term SDB treatment outcome studies are encouraging, but the long-term outcomes are not known. Failing to treat SDB appears to leave children at risk for long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Childhood SDB is associated with neurobehavioral morbidity. Applying commonly used guidelines for causal inference, even in the absence of a much-needed randomized clinical trial, there is strong evidence of association, consistent findings, and specificity of effect. There is suggestive evidence that this association fits the expected temporal pattern and that SDB is a biologically plausible cause of neurobehavioral deficits. Clinicians should be alert to the coexistence of SDB symptoms and concerns about a child's academic progress, attention, arousal, or behavior or emotion regulation.

  3. Mouth ulcers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gingivostomatitis Herpes simplex ( fever blister ) Leukoplakia Oral cancer Oral lichen planus Oral thrush A skin sore caused by histoplasmosis may ... mouth Images Oral thrush Canker sore (aphthous ulcer) Lichen planus on the oral mucosa Mouth sores References Daniels TE, Jordan RC. ...

  4. Age specific fast breathing in under-five diarrheal children in an urban hospital: Acidosis or pneumonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharika Nuzhat

    Full Text Available Children with diarrhea often present with fast breathing due to metabolic acidosis from dehydration. On the other hand, age specific fast breathing is the cornerstone for the diagnosis of pneumonia following classification of pneumonia recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO. Correction of metabolic acidosis by rehydrating the diarrheal children requires time, which delays early initiation of appropriate antimicrobials for pneumonia and thereby increases the risk of deaths. We need to further investigate the simple clinical features other than fast breathing which might help us in earliest diagnosis of pneumonia in children with diarrhea Thus, the objective of our study was to identify other contributing clinical features that may independently help for early diagnosis of pneumonia in diarrheal children who present with age specific fast breathing.This was an unmatched case-control study. Diarrheal children aged 0-59 months, admitted to Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b during January 2014 to December 2014 having age specific fast breathing (11-59 months ≥40 breaths/min were studied. The study children with clinical and radiological pneumonia constituted the cases (n = 276 and those without pneumonia constituted the controls (n = 446. Comparison of clinical features and outcomes between the cases and the controls was made.The distribution of acidosis among the cases and the controls was comparable (35% vs. 41%, p = 0.12. The cases had proportionately higher deaths compared to the controls, however, the difference was not statistically significant (3% vs. 1%; p = 0.23. In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, the cases were independently associated with cough (OR = 62.19, 95% CI = 27.79-139.19; p<0.01 and chest wall indrawing (OR = 31.05, 95%CI = 13.43-71.82; p<0.01 and less often had severe acute malnutrition (OR = 0.33, 95%CI = 0

  5. Short-term effects of meteorological factors on children hand, foot and mouth disease in Guangzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun; Lin, Hualiang; Li, Xiaoquan; Lang, Lingling; Xiao, Xincai; Ding, Peng; He, Peng; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Ming; Liu, Qiyong

    2014-09-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a contagious viral illness that commonly affects infants and children. The underlying risk factors have not yet been systematically examined. This study analyzed the short-term effects of meteorological factors on children HFMD in Guangzhou, China. Daily count of HFMD among children younger than 15 years and meteorological variables from 2009 to 2011 were collected to construct the time series. A generalized additive model was applied to estimate the effects of meteorological factors on HFMD occurrence, after adjusting for long-term trend, seasonal trend, day of week, and public holidays. A negative association between temperature and children HFMD occurrence was observed at lag days 1-3, with the relative risk (RR) for a 1 °C increase on lag day 2 being 0.983 (95 % confidence intervals (CI) 0.977 to 0.989); positive effect was found for temperature at lag days 5-9, with the highest effect at lag day 6 (RR = 1.014, 95 % CI 1.006 to 1.023). Higher humidity was associated with increased HFMD at lag days 3-10, with the highest effect at lag day 8 (RR = 1.009 for 1 % increase in relative humidity, 95 % CI 1.007 to 1.010). And we also observed significant positive effect for rainfall at lag days 4 and 8 (RR = 1.001, 95 % CI 1.000 to 1.002) for 1-mm increase. Subgroup analyses showed that the positive effects of temperature were more pronounced among younger children. This study suggests that meteorological factors might be important predictors of children HFMD occurrence in Guangzhou.

  6. Fitness, Sleep-Disordered Breathing, Symptoms of Depression, and Cognition in Inactive Overweight Children: Mediation Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojek, Monika M K; Montoya, Amanda K; Drescher, Christopher F; Newberry, Andrew; Sultan, Zain; Williams, Celestine F; Pollock, Norman K; Davis, Catherine L

    We used mediation models to examine the mechanisms underlying the relationships among physical fitness, sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), symptoms of depression, and cognitive functioning. We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the cohorts involved in the 2003-2006 project PLAY (a trial of the effects of aerobic exercise on health and cognition) and the 2008-2011 SMART study (a trial of the effects of exercise on cognition). A total of 397 inactive overweight children aged 7-11 received a fitness test, standardized cognitive test (Cognitive Assessment System, yielding Planning, Attention, Simultaneous, Successive, and Full Scale scores), and depression questionnaire. Parents completed a Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. We used bootstrapped mediation analyses to test whether SDB mediated the relationship between fitness and depression and whether SDB and depression mediated the relationship between fitness and cognition. Fitness was negatively associated with depression ( B = -0.041; 95% CI, -0.06 to -0.02) and SDB ( B = -0.005; 95% CI, -0.01 to -0.001). SDB was positively associated with depression ( B = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.32 to 1.67) after controlling for fitness. The relationship between fitness and depression was mediated by SDB (indirect effect = -0.005; 95% CI, -0.01 to -0.0004). The relationship between fitness and the attention component of cognition was independently mediated by SDB (indirect effect = 0.058; 95% CI, 0.004 to 0.13) and depression (indirect effect = -0.071; 95% CI, -0.01 to -0.17). SDB mediates the relationship between fitness and depression, and SDB and depression separately mediate the relationship between fitness and the attention component of cognition.

  7. Comparison of two single-breath-held 3-D acquisitions with multi-breath-held 2-D cine steady-state free precession MRI acquisition in children with single ventricles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atweh, Lamya A.; Dodd, Nicholas A.; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Chu, Zili D. [Texas Children' s Hospital, EB Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Pednekar, Amol [Philips Healthcare, Houston, TX (United States); Krishnamurthy, Rajesh [Texas Children' s Hospital, EB Singleton Department of Pediatric Radiology, Cardiovascular Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Houston, TX (United States); Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Breath-held two-dimensional balanced steady-state free precession cine acquisition (2-D breath-held SSFP), accelerated with parallel imaging, is the method of choice for evaluating ventricular function due to its superior blood-to-myocardial contrast, edge definition and high intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio throughout the cardiac cycle. The purpose of this study is to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the two different single-breath-hold 3-D cine SSFP acquisitions using 1) multidirectional sensitivity encoding (SENSE) acceleration factors (3-D multiple SENSE SSFP), and 2) k-t broad-use linear acceleration speed-up technique (3-D k-t SSFP) with the conventional 2-D breath-held SSFP in non-sedated asymptomatic volunteers and children with single ventricle congenital heart disease. Our prospective study was performed on 30 non-sedated subjects (9 healthy volunteers and 21 functional single ventricle patients), ages 12.5 +/- 2.8 years. Two-dimensional breath-held SSFP with SENSE acceleration factor of 2, eight-fold accelerated 3-D k-t SSFP, and 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP with total parallel imaging factor of 4 were performed to evaluate ventricular volumes and mass in the short-axis orientation. Image quality scores (blood myocardial contrast, edge definition and interslice alignment) and volumetric analysis (end systolic volume, end diastolic volume and ejection fraction) were performed on the data sets by experienced users. Paired t-test was performed to compare each of the 3-D k-t SSFP and 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP clinical scores against 2-D breath-held SSFP. Bland-Altman analysis was performed on left ventricle (LV) and single ventricle volumetry. Interobserver and intraobserver variability in volumetric measurements were determined using intraclass coefficients. The clinical scores were highest for the 2-D breath-held SSFP images. Between the two 3-D sequences, 3-D multiple SENSE SSFP performed better than 3-D k-t SSFP. Bland-Altman analysis for volumes

  8. Mouth Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as sores, are very common. Follow this chart for more information about mouth problems in adults. ... cancers. See your dentist if sharp or rough teeth or dental work are causing irritation. Start OverDiagnosisThis ...

  9. Mouth Rinses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with more severe oral problems, such as cavities, periodontal disease, gum inflammation, and xerostomia (dry mouth). Therapeutic ... fight up to 50 percent more of the bacteria that cause cavities, and most rinses are effective ...

  10. Breath-Holding Spells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reviewed: October 2016 More on this topic for: Parents Is It Normal for Children to Hold Their Breath? Taming Tempers Disciplining Your Child Disciplining Your Toddler Temper Tantrums Separation Anxiety View more About Us Contact Us Partners ...

  11. Influence of the breathing pattern on the learning process: a systematic review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genef Caroline Andrade Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Mouth breathing leads to negative consequences on quality of life, especially in school-age children. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the breathing pattern influences children's learning process. METHODS: This systematic review was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA instructions, with no restrictions regarding the year of publication and language, created based on the clinical question formulation according to the Problem/Patient/Population, Intervention/Indicator, Comparison, Outcome (PICO strategy: "Is the mouth-breathing child more likely to have learning disabilities when compared to nasal breathers?" in the SciELO, PubMed, LILACS, and Scopus electronic databases. Google Scholar was used to search the gray literature. The keywords "learning," "mouth breathing," and their equivalent terms in Portuguese were used in an integrated manner. The studies included in the review were observational, conducted with schoolchildren aged 7-11 years. Afterwards, the studies were evaluated regarding their methodological quality. The research was performed by two eligible reviewers. RESULTS: A total of 357 records were obtained, of which 43 records were duplicate. After applying the eligibility criteria, ten articles were included in the research scope. Half of the studies used a control group and otorhinolaryngological assessment, whereas a minority used validated (20% and sample calculation protocols (10%. The evaluation procedures were varied. Overall, 80% of the articles showed a higher incidence of learning disabilities among mouth breathers. CONCLUSION: This systematic review has shown that mouth breathers are more likely to have learning difficulties than nasal breathers.

  12. Influence of the breathing pattern on the learning process: a systematic review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Genef Caroline Andrade; Dos Santos, Isadora Diniz; Santos, Ana Claudia Nascimento; Paranhos, Luiz Renato; César, Carla Patrícia Hernandez Alves Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    Mouth breathing leads to negative consequences on quality of life, especially in school-age children. To determine whether the breathing pattern influences children's learning process. This systematic review was carried out according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) instructions, with no restrictions regarding the year of publication and language, created based on the clinical question formulation according to the Problem/Patient/Population, Intervention/Indicator, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) strategy: "Is the mouth-breathing child more likely to have learning disabilities when compared to nasal breathers?" in the SciELO, PubMed, LILACS, and Scopus electronic databases. Google Scholar was used to search the gray literature. The keywords "learning," "mouth breathing," and their equivalent terms in Portuguese were used in an integrated manner. The studies included in the review were observational, conducted with schoolchildren aged 7-11 years. Afterwards, the studies were evaluated regarding their methodological quality. The research was performed by two eligible reviewers. A total of 357 records were obtained, of which 43 records were duplicate. After applying the eligibility criteria, ten articles were included in the research scope. Half of the studies used a control group and otorhinolaryngological assessment, whereas a minority used validated (20%) and sample calculation protocols (10%). The evaluation procedures were varied. Overall, 80% of the articles showed a higher incidence of learning disabilities among mouth breathers. This systematic review has shown that mouth breathers are more likely to have learning difficulties than nasal breathers. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Out of the Mouths of Babes: Vocal Production in Infant Siblings of Children with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rhea; Fuerst, Yael; Ramsay, Gordon; Chawarska, Kasia; Klin, Ami

    2011-01-01

    Background: Younger siblings of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at higher risk for acquiring these disorders than the general population. Language development is usually delayed in children with ASD. The present study examines the development of pre-speech vocal behavior in infants at risk for ASD due to the presence of an older…

  14. Relationship between serologic response and clinical symptoms in children with enterovirus 71-infected hand-foot-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jun; Zhao, Chao; Cao, Ping; Shi, Peng; Cao, Lingfeng; Zhu, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the correlation between clinical symptoms, including rash and fever, and serum antibody reaction to enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection in children hospitalized due to hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD). From May 2014 to July 2014, a total of 547 children hospitalized due to HFMD in Children's Hospital of Fudan University were enrolled retrospectively. RNA levels of EV71 and CA16 in fecal, serum, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens were measured using quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and EV71-IgM antibody in the serum was detected using immune colloidal gold assays. Of the 547 fecal specimens, 296 were EV71 RNA positive, 109 were CA16 RNA positive, and 8 were positive for both EV71 RNA and CA16 RNA. The total positive rate for either EV71 or CA16 in feces was 72.58% (397/547). Additionally, 544 serum specimens were collected, and 409 were EV71-IgM positive (75.18%). The duration of rash and fever was found to be correlated to the positive rate of serum EV71-IgM, and the positive rate of serum EV71-IgM plus EV71 RNA in feces. The positive rates of serum EV71-IgM and serum EV71-IgM plus EV71 RNA in fecal collected at day 3 of fever were 79.7% and 52.8%, respectively. In conclusion, EV71 and CA16 were found to be the major pathogens responsible for the epidemics of HFMD in children during May to July 2014 in Shanghai, China. There is a close relationship between the positive rate of serum EV71-IgM and the duration of fever and rash.

  15. Oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. Part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Stephanie; Chamley, Carol

    2013-03-01

    This is the first part of two articles exploring oral health problems and treatments for children receiving palliative care, successful management of which can improve considerably the quality of life for this group of children and young people. Part one includes an adapted oral health assessment tool for use in children and young people with complex and palliative healthcare needs that has the potential to help nurses identify and monitor oral health problems and prevent or minimise oral problems from developing. Part two--to be published next month--focuses on basic oral hygiene and the management of specific oral health problems.

  16. Topical review: sleep bruxism, headaches, and sleep-disordered breathing in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra, Maria Clotilde; Bruni, Olivero; Huynh, Nelly

    2012-01-01

    Sleep bruxism, a well-known burden for dentists, is commonly observed in pediatric populations. Dentists are responsible for the detection and prevention of the detrimental consequences on the stomatognathic system that may occur in some patients with sleep bruxism. However, sleep bruxism is much more than tooth wear, since it is frequently associated with orofacial pain, headaches, and other more severe sleep disorders, such as sleep-disordered breathing. Although the mechanisms underlying the possible interactions among sleep bruxism, headaches, and sleep-disordered breathing need further research, these conditions are often concomitant. A literature search was performed to identify relevant publications related to the topic, which have been integrated in this topical review. The aim of this article was to provide a brief overview on sleep bruxism, headaches, and sleep-disordered breathing in pediatric patients and to promote a multispecialist approach (including dentists, sleep specialist physicians, and psychologists) in the diagnosis and management of these frequently associated disorders.

  17. Association of Sleep Disordered Breathing with Mono-Symptomatic Nocturnal Enuresis: A Study among School Children of Central India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Bharat; Patil, Rajesh; Bhatt, Girish Chandra; Pakhare, Abhijit P; Goyal, Abhishek; P, Aswin; Dhingra, Bhavna; Tamaria, K C

    2016-01-01

    To study the prevalence of primary monosymptopomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) in children aged 5-10 year and to find its association with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) by using a 22 item pediatric sleep related breathing disorder (SRBD) scale. This was a school based cross sectional epidemiological study from July 2015 to November 2015. A questionnaire seeking information on socio-demographic variables, nocturnal enuresis (NE) frequency, school performance and a validated 22 item pediatric sleep related breathing disorder scale (SRBDs) was distributed to 1820 pupils in three primary schools. A total of 1528(83.95%) questionnaires were retrieved. Out of 1528 forms, 182(11.9%) forms were incomplete for requested information and hence 1346 (73.9%) questionnaires were finally analyzed. The prevalence of NE was found to be 12.7% (95% CI; 11-14.6), whereas prevalence of primary nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) was 8.2% (95% CI; 7.1-10.1). SRBD scale score >0.33 (adjusted OR: 2.87; 95%CI: 1.67-4.92), paternal history of enuresis in childhood (adjusted OR:4.96; 95% CI: 2.36-10.45), and inappropriate toilet training (adjusted OR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.01-2.66) were independently associated with PMNE. Sleep disordered breathing, inappropriate toilet training and a history of childhood NE in father were found to be significant risk factors for PMNE in the present study. Thus, these findings suggest that it is imperative to rule out SDB in PMNE patients as they may require different therapeutic interventions.

  18. SERS spectroscopy for detection of hydrogen cyanide in breath from children colonised with P. aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Skou, Peter Bæk; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    ) nanochip optimised for detection of trace amounts of the P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was mounted inside a Tedlar bag, which the patient breathed into. The SERS chip was then analysed in a Raman spectrometer, investigating the C≡N peak at 2131 cm-1 and correlated with sputum cultures. One...... new P. aeruginosa colonisation occurred during the trial period. The C≡N peak intensity was enhanced in this sample in contrast to the subject's 3 other samples. Three additional patients had intense C≡N SERS signals from their breath, but no P. aeruginosa was cultured from their sputum...

  19. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-08-08

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease is a contagious illness that mainly affects children under five. In this podcast, Dr. Eileen Schneider talks about the symptoms of hand, foot, and mouth disease, how it spreads, and ways to help protect yourself and your children from getting infected with the virus.  Created: 8/8/2013 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 8/8/2013.

  20. Putting your money where your mouth is: parents' valuation of good oral health of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaire, J H; van Exel, N J A; van Loveren, C; Brouwer, W B F

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the parental willingness to invest in good oral health for their child in terms of money and time and to relate this to oral health related knowledge and behavioral aspects. 290 parents of 6-year-old children, participating in a RCT on caries preventive strategies in The Netherlands were asked to provide information on education, oral health habits, dietary habits, knowledge on dental topics, willingness to pay and perceived resistance against investing in preventive oral health actions for their children. Despite the fact that parents overall valued oral health for their child highly, still 12% of the parents were unwilling to spend any money, nor to invest any time by brushing their children's teeth to maintain good oral health for their child. Additionally, they indicated that they were unwilling to visit the dentist for preventive measures more than once a year. These children may certainly be considered at higher risk of developing oral diseases because worse oral hygiene habits and dietary habits were found in this group. Given the results, it may be necessary to differentiate in allocating caries prevention programmes to target parents or (school-based) children directly. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Putting your money where your mouth is: parents' valuation of good oral health of their children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermaire, J.H.; van Exel, N.J.A.; van Loveren, C.; Brouwer, W.B.F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the parental willingness to invest in good oral health for their child in terms of money and time and to relate this to oral health related knowledge and behavioral aspects. 290 parents of 6-year-old children, participating in a RCT on caries preventive

  2. Mouth sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... To help cold sores or fever blisters, you can also apply ice to the sore. You may reduce your chance of getting common mouth sores by: Avoiding very hot foods or beverages Reducing stress and practicing relaxation techniques like yoga or meditation ...

  3. Long-term changes in neurocognition and behavior following treatment of sleep disordered breathing in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Sarah N; Vlahandonis, Anna; Anderson, Vicki; Bourke, Robert; Nixon, Gillian M; Davey, Margot J; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in children is associated with detrimental neurocognitive and behavioral consequences. The long term impact of treatment on these outcomes is unknown. This study examined the long-term effect of treatment of SDB on neurocognition, academic ability, and behavior in a cohort of school-aged children. Four-year longitudinal study. Children originally diagnosed with SDB and healthy non-snoring controls underwent repeat polysomnography and age-standardized neurocognitive and behavioral assessment 4y following initial testing. Melbourne Children's Sleep Centre, Melbourne, Australia. Children 12-16 years of age, originally assessed at 7-12 years, were categorized into Treated (N = 12), Untreated (N = 26), and Control (N = 18) groups. Adenotonsillectomy, Tonsillectomy, Nasal Steroids. Decision to treat was independent of this study. Changes in sleep and respiratory parameters over time were assessed. A decrease in obstructive apnea hypopnea index (OAHI) from Time 1 to Time 2 was seen in 63% and 100% of the Untreated and Treated groups, respectively. The predictive relationship between change in OAHI and standardized neurocognitive, academic, and behavioral scores over time was examined. Improvements in OAHI were predictive of improvements in Performance IQ, but not Verbal IQ or academic measures. Initial group differences in behavioral assessment on the Child Behavior Checklist did not change over time. Children with SDB at baseline continued to exhibit significantly poorer behavior than Controls at follow-up, irrespective of treatment. After four years, improvements in SDB are concomitant with improvements in some areas of neurocognition, but not academic ability or behavior in school-aged children.

  4. New method for single-breath fraction of exhaled nitric oxide measurement with improved feasibility in preschool children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijkenskjöld-Rentzhog, Charlotte; Kalm-Stephens, Pia; Nordvall, Lennart; Malinovschi, Andrei; Alving, Kjell

    2015-11-01

    Respiratory societies recommend use of standardized methodologies for fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) measurements in adults and children, but in preschoolers, feasibility remains a problem. The exhalation time needed to obtain steady-state FeNO is unclear. Our primary aim was to study the feasibility of an adapted single-breath FeNO method with age-adjusted exhalation times. We also studied the association between time to steady-state NO level and height, as well as FeNO in relation to asthma and current treatment with inhaled corticosteroids (ICS). Sixty-three children aged 3-10 years performed FeNO measurements with a hand-held electrochemical device with a newly developed flow-control unit. Exhalation times were pre-adapted to age. Exhaled air was simultaneously sampled to a chemiluminescence analyzer to measure time to steady-state NO level. Eighty-one percent of the children achieved at least one approved measurement. From 4 years upwards, success rate was high (96%). Time to steady-state [NO] (median and interquartile range) was 2.5 s (2.4-3.5) at the age of 3-4 years and 3.5 s (2.7-3.8) at the age of 5-6 years. Height was associated with time to steady state (r(2) = 0.13, p = 0.02). FeNO (geometric mean [95% CI]) was higher in ICS-naïve asthmatic children (n = 19): 15.9 p.p.b. (12.2-20.9), than in both healthy controls (n = 8) 9.1 p.p.b. (6.6-12.4) and asthmatic subjects on treatment (n = 24) 11.5 p.p.b. (9.7-13.6). We found this adapted single-breath method with age-adjusted exhalation times highly feasible for children aged 4-10 years. ICS-naïve asthmatic children had FeNO levels under the current guideline cutoff level (20 p.p.b.), highlighting the importance of taking age into account when setting reference values. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Reduced breath condensate pH in asymptomatic children with prior wheezing as a risk factor for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Jagwitz, Marie; Pessler, Frank; Akmatov, Manas; Li, Jialiang; Range, Ursula; Vogelberg, Christian

    2011-07-01

    Early noninvasive detection of increased risk of asthma with exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH measurement has not been applied to preschool children. We sought to evaluate the ability of EBC pH measurement to identify young asymptomatic children at risk of asthma using the combination of recurrent wheezing and atopic sensitization as a proxy for a high risk of asthma. pH values were measured in deaerated EBC from 191 children (median age, 4.4 years [interquartile range, 2.2 years]). Children were divided into one of 5 groups: asymptomatic children with recurrent wheezy bronchitis with (group 1, n = 34) or without (group 2, n = 64) allergic sensitization, acute wheezy bronchitis (group 3, n = 18), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis without recurrent wheezy bronchitis (group 4, n = 15), and healthy control subjects (group 5, n = 60). The Asthma Predictive Index score was calculated for groups 1 and 2. Statistical significance was evaluated with the appropriate nonparametric tests, and the discriminatory accuracy was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Deaerated EBC pH values were significantly lower in groups 1 and 3 than in groups 2, 4, and 5 (median, 7.49 [interquartile range, 0.94] and 7.44 [interquartile range, 0.70] vs 7.93 [interquartile range, 0.23], 8.02 [interquartile range, 0.17], and 7.96 [interquartile range, 0.25], respectively; P < .001 and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve ≥0.80 in all comparisons). The area under the curve for the differentiation between groups 1 and 2 improved from 0.80 to 0.94 (sensitivity, 0.94; specificity, 0.84; positive predictive value, 0.76) when breath condensate pH values and Asthma Predictive Index scores were combined. A reduced deaerated EBC pH value might help identify young asymptomatic children at high risk of asthma. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Extent of tooth decay in the mouth and increased need for replacement of dental restorations: the New England Children's Amalgam Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Felicia; Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Tavares, Mary; Soncini, Jennifer Ann; Hayes, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between baseline caries experience and the restoration replacement rate in children. The 5-year New England Children's Amalgam Trial recruited 534 6- to 10-year-old children with 2 or more carious posterior teeth. The association between decoy and longevity of restorations was assessed. Restorations with no follow-up (N = 391) were excluded from analysis. The average follow-up was 3.0 +/- 1.6 years in 489 children. Restorations with follow-up (N = 3,604) were placed in mouths with a median of 15 dfs/DFS and 8 dft/DFT. The need for replacement increased significantly (P or = 14 dfs/DFS needed replacement, compared to 9% for 2 to 5 dfs/DFS. Comparing dft/DFT after 5 years of follow-up, there was a 23% replacement rate for > or = 12 dft/DFT compared to 10% for 2 to 3 dft/DFT. Decoy in the mouth had a greater association with the need for replacement due to new caries compared to replacement due to recurrent caries. Children with more decoy at the time of restoration placement were at higher risk for replacement of restorations.

  7. Visualizing Breath using Digital Holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, P. R.; Reid, I. D.; Wilton, J. B.

    2013-02-01

    Artist Jayne Wilton and physicists Peter Hobson and Ivan Reid of Brunel University are collaborating at Brunel University on a project which aims to use a range of techniques to make visible the normally invisible dynamics of the breath and the verbal and non-verbal communication it facilitates. The breath is a source of a wide range of chemical, auditory and physical exchanges with the direct environment. Digital Holography is being investigated to enable a visually stimulating articulation of the physical trajectory of the breath as it leaves the mouth. Initial findings of this research are presented. Real time digital hologram replay allows the audience to move through holographs of breath-born particles.

  8. MRI and associated clinical characteristics of EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis in children with hand-foot-mouth disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Hongwu; Gan, Yungen [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Shenzhen (China); Wen, Feiqiu [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Neurology, Shenzhen (China); Huang, Wenxian [Shenzhen Children' s Hospital, Department of Respiratory, Shenzhen (China)

    2012-06-15

    This study was conducted to investigate MRI and associated clinical characteristics of brainstem encephalitis induced by enterovirus 71 (EV71) in children with hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD). We analyzed clinical and imaging data from 42 HFMD cases with EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis. All patients underwent plain and enhanced MRI cranial scans and were placed into one of two groups according to MRI enhancement results, an enhanced group or a nonenhanced group. Thirty-two cases were positive on MRI exam. The primary location of the lesion for brainstem encephalitis was the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata (32 cases), followed by the cerebellar dentate nucleus (8 cases), midbrain (5 cases), and thalamus (2 cases). Plain T1-weighted images showed isointense or hypointense signals, and T2-weighted images showed isointense and hyperintense signals. Enhanced MRI scans showed that 12 cases had slight to moderate enhancement; 4 of these were normal on plain scan. The time from MRI examination to disease onset was statistically different between the enhanced (n = 12) and nonenhanced (n = 21) groups with a mean of 7.67 days (SD = 1.07) vs 11.95 days (SD = 5.33), respectively. The most common neurological symptoms for brainstem encephalitis were myoclonus and tremor. The greater the area of affected brain, the more severe the clinical symptoms were. The locations of EV71-induced HFMD-associated brainstem encephalitis lesions are relatively specific. Enhanced MRI scans could also identify the lesions missed by early plain scans. MRI scans can provide important information for clinical evaluation and treatment. (orig.)

  9. MRI and associated clinical characteristics of EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis in children with hand-foot-mouth disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, Hongwu; Gan, Yungen; Wen, Feiqiu; Huang, Wenxian

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate MRI and associated clinical characteristics of brainstem encephalitis induced by enterovirus 71 (EV71) in children with hand-foot-mouth disease (HFMD). We analyzed clinical and imaging data from 42 HFMD cases with EV71-induced brainstem encephalitis. All patients underwent plain and enhanced MRI cranial scans and were placed into one of two groups according to MRI enhancement results, an enhanced group or a nonenhanced group. Thirty-two cases were positive on MRI exam. The primary location of the lesion for brainstem encephalitis was the dorsal pons and medulla oblongata (32 cases), followed by the cerebellar dentate nucleus (8 cases), midbrain (5 cases), and thalamus (2 cases). Plain T1-weighted images showed isointense or hypointense signals, and T2-weighted images showed isointense and hyperintense signals. Enhanced MRI scans showed that 12 cases had slight to moderate enhancement; 4 of these were normal on plain scan. The time from MRI examination to disease onset was statistically different between the enhanced (n = 12) and nonenhanced (n = 21) groups with a mean of 7.67 days (SD = 1.07) vs 11.95 days (SD = 5.33), respectively. The most common neurological symptoms for brainstem encephalitis were myoclonus and tremor. The greater the area of affected brain, the more severe the clinical symptoms were. The locations of EV71-induced HFMD-associated brainstem encephalitis lesions are relatively specific. Enhanced MRI scans could also identify the lesions missed by early plain scans. MRI scans can provide important information for clinical evaluation and treatment. (orig.)

  10. Detection of human enterovirus 71 and coxsackievirus A16 in children with hand, foot and mouth disease in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Mou, Xiaozhou; Zhang, Qiong; Li, Yifei; Lin, Jian; Liu, Fanlong; Yuan, Li; Tang, Yiming; Xiang, Charlie

    2012-04-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the genetic characteristics of enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) strains in China and to evaluate the relationship between the genotypes of CVA16 and EV71 and their geographical distribution. A total of 399 stool specimens were collected from children with symptoms of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in Zhejiang Province. The presence of enteroviruses was determined using reverse transcription-semi-nested PCR targeted to the VP1 gene of all human enteroviruses and DNA sequencing. EV71 and CVA16, the major etiological agents of HFMD, were detected in 38.4% (38/99) and 35.4% (35/99) of HEV-A species-positive cases, respectively. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene, EV71 strains identified in this study belong to subgenotype C4, and CVA16 strains herein were classified into clusters B2a and B2b within the genotype B2. Taking into consideration other published data, we conclude that the genetic characteristics of enteroviruses in China reflect the pattern of the endemic circulation of the subgenotype C4 to EV71 and clusters B2a and B2b within genotype B2 to CVA16, which have been continuously circulating in China since 1997. This observation indicates that the genetic characteristics of enteroviruses in China seem to depend on their special geographical and climatical features allowing them to be sustained with little external effect.

  11. Combined electrocardiography- and respiratory-triggered CT of the lung to reduce respiratory misregistration artifacts between imagining slabs in free-breathing children: Initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Allmendinger, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, GmbH, Computed Tomography Division, Forchheim (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children.

  12. Combined electrocardiography- and respiratory-triggered CT of the lung to reduce respiratory misregistration artifacts between imagining slabs in free-breathing children: Initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months–8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children

  13. The Impact of Altitude on Sleep-Disordered Breathing in Children Dwelling at High Altitude: A Crossover Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Benjamin H; Brinton, John T; Ingram, David G; Halbower, Ann C

    2017-09-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is prevalent among children and is associated with adverse health outcomes. Worldwide, approximately 250 million individuals reside at altitudes higher than 2000 meters above sea level (masl). The effect of chronic high-altitude exposure on children with SDB is unknown. This study aims to determine the impact of altitude on sleep study outcomes in children with SDB dwelling at high altitude. A single-center crossover study was performed to compare results of high-altitude home polysomnography (H-PSG) with lower altitude laboratory polysomnography (L-PSG) in school-age children dwelling at high altitude with symptoms consistent with SDB. The primary outcome was apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), with secondary outcomes including obstructive AHI; central AHI; and measures of oxygenation, sleep quality, and pulse rate. Twelve participants were enrolled, with 10 included in the final analysis. Median altitude was 1644 masl on L-PSG and 2531 masl on H-PSG. Median AHI was 2.40 on L-PSG and 10.95 on H-PSG. Both obstructive and central respiratory events accounted for the difference in AHI. Oxygenation and sleep fragmentation were worse and pulse rate higher on H-PSG compared to L-PSG. These findings reveal a clinically substantial impact of altitude on respiratory, sleep, and cardiovascular outcomes in children with SDB who dwell at high altitude. Within this population, L-PSG underestimates obstructive sleep apnea and central sleep apnea compared to H-PSG. Given the shortage of high-altitude pediatric sleep laboratories, these results suggest a role for home sleep apnea testing for children residing at high altitude. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Parents of children referred to a sleep laboratory for disordered breathing reported anxiety, daytime sleepiness and poor sleep quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadart, Marion; De Sanctis, Livio; Khirani, Sonia; Amaddeo, Alessandro; Ouss, Lisa; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2018-07-01

    We evaluated the impact that having a child with sleep-disordered breathing had on their parents, including their own sleep quality. Questionnaires were completed by 96 parents of 86 children referred for a sleep study or control of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or noninvasive ventilation (NIV) at the sleep laboratory of the Necker Hospital, Paris, France, between October 2015 and January 2016. The questionnaires evaluated anxiety and depression, family functioning, the parents' quality of life, daytime sleepiness and sleep quality. The children had a mean age of seven ±five years and most of the responses (79%) came from their mothers. These showed that 26% of parents showed moderate-to-severe anxiety, 8% moderate-to-severe depression, 6% complex family cohesion, 59% moderate-to-severe daytime sleepiness and 54% poor sleep quality. Anxiety was higher in mothers than in fathers (p parents of children referred to a sleep laboratory reported frequent anxiety, daytime sleepiness and poor sleep quality. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Children with a history of prematurity presenting with snoring and sleep-disordered breathing: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Anura; Witmans, Manisha; El-Hakim, Hamdy

    2013-08-01

    To report on the prevalence of premature (PM) birth in a consecutive series of children treated for snoring and sleep-disordered breathing (S/SDB), the parameters specific to their management and variables predictive of disease severity. A retrospective study was undertaken at a tertiary pediatric hospital. Children with history of PM and presenting with S/SDB were identified from a prospectively kept surgical database. We set out to determine the prevalence of PM among the patients presenting with S/SDB who required airway evaluations and surgery. Pulse oximetry is overnight recordable oxygen saturation and heart rate tracing that provides information about hypoxemia during sleep. This was performed on all children preoperatively. The pulse oximetry findings were used to plan for perioperative monitoring and care. A multivariable analysis was used to identify factors predictive of abnormal pulse oximetry studies. We evaluated the associated diagnoses, surgical procedures required, and response to treatment in these selected children. Fifty-seven out of 1,038 patients were PM (33 males; mean age, 62.09 ± 34.91 months; range, 4-190 months). The mean gestational age was 30.3 ± 4.0 weeks. The prevalence rate of PM among patients treated surgically for SDB is 5.5% (95% CI 5.2-5.8) at our center. Comorbid pulmonary and gastrointestinal disorders were encountered on 23 (40%) and 17 (29.8%) occasions, respectively, and were the most commonly encountered comorbid diagnostic categories. Large airway abnormalities were encountered in 11 (19.3%) children, and the most common were subglottic stenosis (four) and laryngeal paralysis (four). Comorbid respiratory disease was negatively predictive of abnormal pulse oximetry (coefficient -0.35, P<.05). Postoperative respiratory outcomes correlated with abnormal pulse oximetry (coefficient 0.3; P<.05). Our findings suggest children with PM presenting to pediatric otolaryngology require a comprehensive evaluation for S/SDB. A

  16. Global impact of asthma on children and adolescents' daily lives : The room to breathe survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildhaber, Johannes; Carroll, William D.; Brand, Paul L. P.

    Objective: To establish children and adolescents' perspectives regarding their asthma and its impact upon their daily lives. Design: A 14-item questionnaire. Setting: Canada, Greece, Hungary, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and South Africa. Participants: Children/adolescents (aged 8-15 years)

  17. Complete genome sequence analysis of enterovirus 71 isolated from children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Thailand, 2012-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauleekoonphairoj, John; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Puenpa, Jiratchaya; Korkong, Sumeth; Poovorawan, Yong

    2015-10-01

    The complete genomic sequences of 14 enterovirus 71 (EV71) strains isolated from children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Thailand from 2012 to 2014 were determined and compared to enterovirus group A prototypes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 13 strains resembled the B5 subgroup, while one strain from a fatal case designated THA_1219 belonged to the C4 subgroup. Similarity plot and bootscan analyses suggested that THA_1219 underwent recombination in the P2 and P3 regions. Full-genome data from this work will contribute to the study of evolution dynamics of EV71.

  18. Comparison of trapezius squeeze test and jaw thrust as clinical indicators for laryngeal mask airway insertion in spontaneously breathing children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesh Kumar, K. K.; Bhardwaj, Neerja; Yaddanapudi, Sandhya

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims: It is not known whether trapezius squeeze test (TPZ) is a better clinical test than jaw thrust (JT) to assess laryngeal mask airway (LMA) insertion conditions in children under sevoflurane anesthesia. Material and Methods: After the Institutional Ethics Committee approval and written informed parental consent, 124 American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II children of 2–8 years of age undergoing minor surgical procedures were randomized into TPZ and JT groups. The children were induced with 8% sevoflurane in oxygen at a fresh gas flow of 4 L/min. TPZ or JT was performed after 1 min of start of sevoflurane and then every 20 s till the test was negative, when end-tidal (ET) sevoflurane concentration was noted. Classic LMA of requisite size was inserted by a blinded anesthetist and conditions at the insertion of LMA, insertion time, and the number of attempts of LMA insertion were recorded. Results: The mean LMA insertion time was significantly longer (P < 0.001) for TPZ (145 ± 28.7 sec) compared to JT group (111.8 ± 31.0 sec). ET sevoflurane concentration at the time of LMA insertion was comparable in the two groups. LMA insertion conditions were similar in the two groups. There was no difference between the two groups regarding total number of attempts of LMA insertion. Heart rate (HR) decreased in both groups after LMA insertion (P < 0.001) but TPZ group had significantly lower HR compared with the JT group up to 5 min after LMA insertion (P = 0.03). Conclusion: Both JT and TPZ are equivalent clinical indicators in predicting the optimal conditions of LMA insertion in spontaneously breathing children; however, it takes a longer time to achieve a negative TPZ squeeze test. PMID:28413275

  19. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Home Health Info Health Topics Burning Mouth Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a painful, complex condition often described ... or other symptoms. Read More Publications Cover image Burning Mouth Syndrome Publication files Download Language English PDF — Number of ...

  20. Association between sleep-related breathing disorders and academic performance among children from Concepción, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatica, Darwin; Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Zenteno, Daniel; Elso, María J; Montesinos, Juan J; Manterola, Carlos

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to establish an association between academic performance in Math, Language Arts, and Science and the presence of sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) among healthy schoolchildren from the city of Concepción, Chile. Healthy children were defined as those without comorbidities. Outcome measures of interest included the analysis of academic performance in Math, Language Arts, and Science and the presence of SRBD assessed using the Pediatric Sleep Questionnaire. Two-hundred and fifty-six children were included in the study (59.8% were boys). In the studied sample, SRBD prevalence was 24.6%. A significant association was observed between SRBD and a low performance in Math (odds ratio |-#91;OR|-#93;: 3.1, 1.5-6.8), Language Arts (OR:2.5, 1.1-5.5), and Science (OR: 4.2, 1.7-10.0). To conclude, in the studied sample, the presence of SRBD was associated with a low academic performance in Language Arts, Math, and Science. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  1. Anti-microbial efficacy of green tea and chlorhexidine mouth rinses against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacilli spp. and Candida albicans in children with severe early childhood caries: A randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Green tea is a beverage which is consumed worldwide and is reported to have anti-cariogenic effect. So, if it was as effective as chlorhexidine (CHX mouth rinse against cariogenic microbes it could be considered a natural, economical alternative. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the anti-microbial efficacy of 0.5% green tea and 0.2% CHX mouth rinses against Streptococcus Mutans, Lactobacilli spp. and Candida Albicans. Materials and Methods: 30 children aged 4-6 years with S-ECC (based ondefs score were selected. Children were divided randomly into 2 equal groups and were asked to rinse with the prescribed mouth rinse once daily for 2 weeks after breakfast under supervision. A base-line and post rinsing non-stimulated whole salivary sample (2 ml was collected and tested for the number of colony forming units. The data was statistically analyzed using SPSS v16.0 software with one-way ANOVA and Tukey′sPOSTHOC test. Results: A statistically significant fall in colony count was found with both the mouth rinses in Streptococcus Mutans (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 and lactobacilli (P < 0.001, P < 0.001 but not against Candida albicans (P = 0.264, P = 0.264. Against Streptococcus Mutans, green tea mouth rinse was found to be significantly better than CHX mouth rinse (P = 0.005. Against lactobacilli spp, CHX mouth rinse was significantly better than green tea mouth rinse (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Green tea mouth rinse can be considered safe, economical and used without much concern. However, further studies are recommended.

  2. Camera-based microswitch technology to monitor mouth, eyebrow, and eyelid responses of children with profound multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancioni, G.E.; Bellini, D.; Oliva, D.; Singh, N.N.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Sigafoos, J.; Lang, R.B.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    A camera-based microswitch technology was recently used to successfully monitor small eyelid and mouth responses of two adults with profound multiple disabilities (Lancioni et al., Res Dev Disab 31:1509-1514, 2010a). This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for

  3. Tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in children with sleep-related breathing disorders: consensus statement of a UK multidisciplinary working party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, P J; Bew, S; Kubba, H; Murphy, N; Primhak, R; Rollin, A-M; Tremlett, M

    2009-07-01

    During 2008, ENT-UK received a number of professional enquiries from colleagues about the management of children with upper airway obstruction and uncomplicated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). These children with sleep-related breathing disorders (SRBDs) are usually referred to paediatricians and ENT surgeons. In some district general hospitals, (DGHs) where paediatric intensive care (PICU) facilities to ventilate children were not available, paediatrician and anaesthetist colleagues were expressing concern about children with a clinical diagnosis of OSA having routine tonsillectomy, with or without adenoidectomy. As BAPO President, I was asked by the ENT-UK President, Professor Richard Ramsden, to investigate the issues and rapidly develop a working consensus statement to support safe but local treatment of these children. The Royal Colleges of Anaesthetists and Paediatrics and Child Health and the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists nominated expert members from both secondary and tertiary care to contribute and develop a consensus statement based on the limited evidence base available. Our terms of reference were to produce a statement that was brief, with a limited number of references, to inform decision-making at the present time. With patient safety as the first priority, the working party wished to support practice that facilitated referral to a tertiary centre of those children who could be expected, on clinical assessment alone, potentially to require PICU facilities. In contrast, the majority of children who could be safely managed in a secondary care setting should be managed closer to home in a DGH. BAPO, ENT-UK, APA, RCS-CSF and RCoA have endorsed the consensus statement; the RCPCH has no mechanism for endorsing consensus statements, but the RCPCH Clinical Effectiveness Committee reviewed the statement, concluding it was a 'concise, accurate and helpful document'. The consensus statement is an interim working tool, based on level-five evidence. It

  4. Using the caffeine breath test to study drug metabolism in protein-energy malnourished children

    OpenAIRE

    Oshikoya, Kazeem Adeola

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a global health problem that affects infants and young children. It is frequently associated with infections and commonly affects children in developing countries. Malnutrition is the cellular imbalance between the supply of energy from macronutrients and micronutrients and the demand of the body for them in order to achieve normal growth, maintenance, and specific functions. Underweight (mild to moderate) and marasmus, marasmic-kwashiorkor, and kwashiorkor (severe) are the sp...

  5. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  6. Long-Term Cognitive and Behavioral Outcomes following Resolution of Sleep Disordered Breathing in Preschool Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah N Biggs

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the long term effects of resolution of SDB in preschool children, either following treatment or spontaneous recovery, on cognition and behavior. Children diagnosed with SDB at 3-5y (N = 35 and non-snoring controls (N = 25, underwent repeat polysomnography (PSG and cognitive and behavioral assessment 3 years following a baseline study. At follow-up, children with SDB were grouped into Resolved and Unresolved. Resolution was defined as: obstructive apnea hypopnea index (OAHI ≤1 event/h; no snoring detected on PSG; and no parental report of habitual snoring. 57% (20/35 of children with SDB received treatment, with SDB resolving in 60% (12/20. 43% (15/35 were untreated, of whom 40% (6/15 had spontaneous resolution of SDB. Cognitive reduced between baseline and follow-up, however this was not related to persistent disease, with no difference in cognitive outcomes between Resolved, Unresolved or Control groups. Behavioral functioning remained significantly worse in children originally diagnosed with SDB compared to control children, regardless of resolution. Change in OAHI did not predict cognitive or behavioral outcomes, however a reduction in nocturnal arousals, irrespective of full resolution, was associated with improvement in attention and aggressive behavior. These results suggest that resolution of SDB in preschool children has little effect on cognitive or behavioral outcomes over the long term. The association between sleep fragmentation and behavior appears independent of SDB, however may be moderated by concomitant SDB. This challenges the assumption that treatment of SDB will ameliorate associated cognitive and behavioural deficits and supports the possibility of a SDB phenotype.

  7. Global impact of asthma on children and adolescents' daily lives: the room to breathe survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhaber, Johannes; Carroll, William D; Brand, Paul L P

    2012-04-01

    To establish children and adolescents' perspectives regarding their asthma and its impact upon their daily lives. A 14-item questionnaire. Canada, Greece, Hungary, The Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and South Africa. Children/adolescents (aged 8-15 years) with physician-diagnosed asthma. Interviews were conducted by telephone (Canada, Greece, Hungary, The Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) or face-to-face (South Africa). Asthma symptoms, impact on activities, and quality of life. Of the 943 children/adolescents interviewed, 60% were male. Most (81%) described their asthma as "not too bad" or "I only get it every now and then," with only 4% reporting their asthma as being "very bad"; however, 92% experienced asthma-related coughing and 59% reported nocturnal awakening. Over half (57%) of children/adolescents believed they could predict when their asthma would make them ill; the most common initial symptoms being breathlessness (41%) and bad cough (33%). They considered the worst things about having asthma to be the symptoms of an asthma attack (32%) and not being able to play sport (25%). Almost half (47%) of children/adolescents felt that their asthma affected their ability to play sport or engage in physical activity. One in ten reported they had suffered asthma-related bullying. Children/adolescents underestimate the severity of their asthma, and overestimate its control, indicating that they expect their illness to be symptomatic. Asthma has a substantial impact on their daily lives, particularly on physical activity and social functioning. Efforts are required to improve asthma control and expectations of health in children/adolescents. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. DIAGNOSTIC ACCURACY OF UREA BREATH TEST FOR HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION IN CHILDREN WITH DYSPEPSIA IN COMPARISON TO HISTOPATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naser HONAR

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background - Helicobacter pylori infection is the gram negative bacillus with the close association with chronic antral gastritis. Objective - In this study, we evaluate the accuracy of urea breath test (UBT with carbon isotope 13 in comparison with histopathology of gastric antrum for detection of H. pylori infection in children with dyspepsia. Methods - This cross-sectional study was performed at specialized laboratory of Shiraz Gastroenterohepatology Research Center and Nemazee Hospital, Iran, during a 12-months period. This study investigated the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of UBT in comparison with biopsy-based tests. We included a consecutive selection of 60 children who fulfilled Rome III criteria for dyspepsia. All children were referred for performing UBT with carbon isotope 13 (C13 as well as endoscopy. Biopsies were taken from antrum of stomach and duodenum. The pathologic diagnosis was considered as the standard test. Results - The mean age of the participants was 10.1±2.6 (range 7-17 years. From our total 60 patients, 28 (46.7% had positive UBT results and 32 (53.3% had negative UBT results. Pathologic report of 16 (57.1% out of 28 patients who had positive UBT were positive for H. pylori and 12 (42.9% ones were negative. Sensitivity and specificity of C13-UBT for detection of H. pylori infection were 76.2% and 69.2% respectively. Conclusion - Sensitivity and specificity of C13-UBT for detection of H. pylori infection were 76.2% and 69.2% respectively. Another multicenter study from our country is recommended.

  9. Exhaled breath condensate pH does not discriminate asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux or the response to lansoprazole treatment in children with poorly controlled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Holbrook, Janet T; Wei, Christine Y; Brown, Meredith S; Wise, Robert A; Teague, W Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Although exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH has been identified as an "emerging" biomarker of interest for asthma clinical trials, the clinical determinants of EBC pH remain poorly understood. Other studies have associated acid reflux-induced respiratory symptoms, for example, cough, with transient acidification of EBC. We sought to determine the clinical and physiologic correlates of EBC acidification in a highly characterized sample of children with poorly controlled asthma. We hypothesized that (1) children with asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux determined by 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring would have a lower EBC pH than children without gastroesophageal reflux, (2) treatment with lansoprazole would alter EBC pH in those children, and (3) EBC acidification would be associated with increased asthma symptoms, poorer asthma control and quality of life, and increased formation of breath nitrogen oxides (NOx). A total of 110 children, age range 6 to 17 years, with poor asthma control and esophageal pH data enrolled in the Study of Acid Reflux in Children with Asthma (NCT00442013) were included. Children submitted EBC samples for pH and NOx measurement at randomization and at study weeks 8, 16, and 24. Serial EBC pH measurements failed to distinguish asymptomatic gastroesophageal reflux and was not associated with breath NOx formation. EBC pH also did not discriminate asthma characteristics such as medication and health care utilization, pulmonary function, and asthma control and quality of life both at baseline and across the study period. Despite the relative ease of EBC collection, EBC pH as a biomarker does not provide useful information of children with asthma who were enrolled in asthma clinical trials. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A relação da postura corporal, da respiração oral e do estado nutricional em crianças: uma revisão de literatura Relation of body posture, oral breath and nutritional status in children: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Girarde Machado

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available TEMA: a relação entre o estado nutricional, a respiração oral e a postura corporal. Uma alimentação balanceada capaz de proporcionar um adequado estado nutricional, certamente, contribui para uma desejável condição postural e a respiração nasal do indivíduo. Sob o aspecto respiratório, em crianças respiradoras orais por haver maior alteração no sono, diminuição da ingestão de carboidratos e aumento da ingestão de lipídeos, pode haver a associação entre a respiração oral e o estado nutricional também. OBJETIVO:apresentar as possíveis relações entre estado nutricional, respiração oral e a postura corporal em crianças, por meio de um estudo teórico. CONCLUSÃO: segundo os artigos pesquisados é a obesidade, dentre os distúrbios nutricionais, o que gera maior número de problemas musculoesqueléticos, pois dificulta o controle da postura corporal. Conclui-se que apesar de haver fortes argumentos teóricos buscando explicar uma possível influência da respiração oral sobre o estado nutricional, os estudos de campo até o momento não conseguiram confirmar tal hipótese, por esta razão torna-se relevante continuar pesquisando sobre estas relações.BACKGROUND: the relationship between nutritional status, oral breathing and body posture. A balanced diet can provide adequate nutritional status that certainly contributes to a desirable condition of posture and nasal breathing for the subject. With regard the respiratory and breathing in children, since there is more change in sleep, decreased carbohydrate intake and increased intake of lipids, there may be also an association between oral breathing and nutritional status. PURPOSE: to illustrate the possible relationships between nutritional status, body posture and oral breathing in children, through a theoretical study. CONCLUSION: according to the reviewed studies, it is obesity, among nutritional disturbances, which generates a larger number of musculoskeletal

  11. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... garlic, onions, cheese, orange juice, and soda poor dental hygiene (say: HI-jeen), meaning not brushing and flossing regularly smoking and other tobacco use Poor oral hygiene leads to bad breath because when food particles ...

  12. Breathing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms. Symptoms associated with weak respiratory muscles: Air “hunger” (gasping, labored breathing) with an without activity Fatigue ... Start your own fundraising event & help create a world without ALS Start an Event Site Map | Press ...

  13. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cabbage. And of course smoking causes its own bad smell. Some diseases and medicines can cause a specific breath odor. Having good dental habits, like brushing and flossing regularly, help fight bad ...

  14. Exhaled nitric oxide in healthy young children during tidal breathing through a facemask

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniel, Peter F; Klug, Bent; Valerius, Niels H

    2007-01-01

    .p.b. respectively. Twenty-three children completed measurements of within-day and day-to-day variations, none of which showed significant variation. In conclusion, the established reference values and data on variability within and between days may facilitate the clinical application for measurement of eNO during...

  15. The single-breath diffusing capacity of CO and NO in healthy children of European descent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, Astrid; Hanel, Birgitte; Marott, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    a Jaeger Masterscreen PFT. The data were analyzed using the Generalized Additive Models for Location Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) statistical method. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A total of 326 children were eligible for diffusing capacity measurements, resulting in 312 measurements of DL,CO,NO and 297 of DL...

  16. Sleep disordered breathing and autonomic function in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies Van Eyck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA, common in children with obesity, is associated with cardiovascular morbidity. Autonomic dysfunction has been suggested to be a key player in the development of these complications. We investigated the relationship between obesity, OSA and sympathetic activity in children. 191 children with obesity were included and distributed into two groups: 131 controls and 60 with OSA. Beat-to-beat RR interval data were extracted from polysomnography for heart rate variability analysis. Urinary free cortisol levels were determined. Urinary free cortisol did not differ between groups and was not associated with OSA, independent of the level of obesity. Differences in heart rate variability measures were found: mean RR interval decreased with OSA, while low/high-frequency band ratio and mean heart rate increased with OSA. Heart rate variability measures correlated with OSA, independent of obesity parameters and age: oxygen desaturation index correlated with mean heart rate (r=0.19, p=0.009 and mean RR interval (r= −0.18, p=0.02, while high-frequency bands and low/high-frequency band ratio correlated with arterial oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2 (r= −0.20, p=0.008 and r= −0.16, p=0.04 and SpO2 nadir (r=0.23, p=0.003 and r= −0.19, p=0.02. These results suggest that sympathetic heart activity is increased in children with obesity and OSA. Measures of hypoxia were related to increased sympathetic tone, suggesting that intermittent hypoxia is involved in autonomic dysfunction.

  17. Is there a correlation between sleep disordered breathing and foramen magnum stenosis in children with achondroplasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Klane K; Parnell, Shawn E; Kifle, Yemiserach; Blackledge, Marcella; Bompadre, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Children with achondroplasia have midface hypoplasia, frontal bossing, spinal stenosis, rhizomelia, and a small foramen magnum. Central sleep apnea, with potential resultant sudden death, is thought to be related to compression of the spinal cord at the cervicomedullary junction in these patients. Screening polysomnography and/or cervical spine MRI are often performed for infants with achondroplasia. Decompressive suboccipital craniectomy has been performed in selected cases. We aim to better delineate the relationship between polysomnography, cervical spine MRI, and indications for surgical decompression in achondroplasia.We retrospectively review electronic medical records of all children with achondroplasia in our IRB-approved skeletal dysplasia registry who had received screening polysomnography and cervical spine MRI examination was performed. We explored correlations of polysomnography, MRI parameters, and need for decompressive surgery. Seventeen patients with both polysomnography and MRI of the cervical spine met inclusion criteria. The average age at time of the sleep study was 2.4 ± 3.6 years. An abnormal apnea-hypopnea index was found in all patients, with central sleep apnea found in 6/17. Five patients (29%) required foramen magnum decompression. We found no statistically significant correlation between central sleep apnea and abnormal MRI findings suggestive of foramen magnum stenosis. Screening polysomnography is an important tool but does not appear to correlate with MRI findings of foramen magnum stenosis. Cord compression, with either associated T2 cord signal abnormality or clinical findings of clonus, was most predictive of subsequent surgical decompression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Comparative Assessment of Oral Health Related Quality of Life of Children Before and After Full Mouth Rehabilitation under General Anaesthesia and Local Anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Jaai Vinod; Winnier, Jasmin; Bhatia, Rupinder

    2017-01-01

    Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is an aggressive form of caries in a child who is 71 months of age or younger. If the child is cooperative, the treatment may be completed under Local Anaesthesia (LA). General Anaesthesia (GA) is considered if the child is uncooperative, medically compromised or if the parents are unable to return for regular visits and requests treatment under GA. Improved Oral health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) has been reported after dental treatment under GA. To assess and compare the improvements in OHRQoL of children who have undergone dental treatment under GA or LA. To study the preoperative severity of events that may prompt the parents to consider treatment under GA. Parents of paediatric patients who had to undergo full mouth rehabilitation under GA and LA were selected for this study. Parents were given a questionnaire to evaluate OHRQoL of children before and after completion of treatment. Preoperative and postoperative assessments were analyzed using paired t-test. Dental disease was found to have a significant impact on children's overall well being. There was a considerable improvement with relation to eating preferences, amount of food intake, sleep and pain relief before and after dental treatment. There was no significant difference if the child was treated under GA or LA. Severe caries affects the quality of life of preschool children and improvement on quality of life is significant regardless of treatment performed under GA or LA.

  19. Bad Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... floss correctly. Flossing can remove tiny bits of food that can rot and smell bad. Replace your toothbrush every three to four months. Visit your dentist twice a year. He or she will help keep your teeth and your mouth healthy. Eat smart. Avoid foods and drinks that can leave behind strong smells, ...

  20. Identification and validation of clinical predictors for the risk of neurological involvement in children with hand, foot, and mouth disease in Sarawak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Sel Sylvia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human enterovirus 71 (HEV71 can cause Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD with neurological complications, which may rapidly progress to fulminant cardiorespiratory failure, and death. Early recognition of children at risk is the key to reduce acute mortality and morbidity. Methods We examined data collected through a prospective clinical study of HFMD conducted between 2000 and 2006 that included 3 distinct outbreaks of HEV71 to identify risk factors associated with neurological involvement in children with HFMD. Results Total duration of fever ≥ 3 days, peak temperature ≥ 38.5°C and history of lethargy were identified as independent risk factors for neurological involvement (evident by CSF pleocytosis in the analysis of 725 children admitted during the first phase of the study. When they were validated in the second phase of the study, two or more (≥ 2 risk factors were present in 162 (65% of 250 children with CSF pleocytosis compared with 56 (30% of 186 children with no CSF pleocytosis (OR 4.27, 95% CI2.79–6.56, p rd or later day of febrile illness, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of ≥ 2 risk factors predictive of CSF pleocytosis were 75%(57/76, 59%(27/46, 75%(57/76 and 59%(27/46, respectively. Conclusion Three readily elicited clinical risk factors were identified to help detect children at risk of neurological involvement. These risk factors may serve as a guide to clinicians to decide the need for hospitalization and further investigation, including cerebrospinal fluid examination, and close monitoring for disease progression in children with HFMD.

  1. An international comparison of asthma, wheeze, and breathing medication use among children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Joshua A; Brozek, Grzegorz; Shpakou, Andrei; Fedortsiv, Olga; Vlaski, Emilija; Beridze, Vakhtangi; Rennie, Donna C; Afanasieva, Anna; Beridze, Sophio; Zejda, Jan

    2017-12-01

    There is variation in childhood asthma between countries with typically higher prevalence in "Westernized" nations. We compared asthma, respiratory symptoms, and medication prevalence in Eastern and Central European regions and Canada. We conducted a cross-sectional survey study of children (5-15 years) from one urban centre in each of Canada, Belarus, Poland, Republic of Georgia (Adjara), Republic of Macedonia, and Ukraine. Surveys were distributed through randomly selected schools to parents (2013-2015). The prevalence of asthma differed by country from 20.6% in Canada to 1.5% in Ukraine (p year. Finally, except for Georgia (12.1%), all countries had a prevalence of ever wheeze above 20% (23.8% in Poland to 30.9% in Macedonia). Despite large differences in asthma prevalence, respiratory morbidity was more comparable suggesting asthma prevalence may be underestimated. Further validation of asthma diagnosis is needed. It is important to promote best diagnostic practices among first contact physicians. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Medical Issues: Breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Packets Equipment Pool Living With SMA Medical Issues Palliative Breathing Orthopedics Nutrition Equipment Daily Life At ... curesma.org > support & care > living with sma > medical issues > breathing Breathing Breathing problems are the most common ...

  3. Comparison of 72-hour fecal fat quantification and the 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test in assessing pancreatic exocrine sufficiency in children with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wejnarska, Karolina; Kołodziejczyk, Elwira; Ryżko, Józef; Oracz, Grzegorz

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) in children is still a rare, although increasingly recognized entity. Over the duration of the disease several complications can be observed, two of which are major ones: endo- and exocrine insufficiency. In the medical care of children with CP it is crucial to diagnose the decreased endo- and exocrine function of the pancreas, in order to preserve patients from malnutrition and the failure to thrive. The aim of the study was to compare the usefulness of two indirect methods of assessing the pancreas exocrine function in children with CP. Ninety one patients with CP were enrolled in the study (41 boys, 50 girls, aged 2-17.8 years). Only Patients who had had both the 72-hour fecal fat quantification and the 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTBT) performed were selected. We compared the results of both tests for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) in detecting exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Out of 91 patients, 12 were diagnosed with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). The sensitivity of the fecal fat quantification was 50%, the specificity for the test was 100%. PPV and NPV were 100% and 93%, respectively. 13C-MTBT had the sensitivity of 42% and the specificity of 99%. PPV and NPV for the breath test were of 83% and 92%, respectively. No statistically significant discrepancy between the values obtained was found. Although the 72-hour fecal fat quantification remains the gold standard in detecting EPI, both of the methods that had been investigated were shown to be comparable regarding sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV in assessing pancreas exocrine sufficiency in children with CP. Due to the easier execution of the breath test, both for the patient and for medical personnel, its importance may increase.

  4. Fractionated breath condensate sampling: H2O2 concentrations of the alveolar fraction may be related to asthma control in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trischler Jordis

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways but recent studies have shown that alveoli are also subject to pathophysiological changes. This study was undertaken to compare hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentrations in different parts of the lung using a new technique of fractioned breath condensate sampling. Methods In 52 children (9-17 years, 32 asthmatic patients, 20 controls measurements of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO, lung function, H2O2 in exhaled breath condensate (EBC and the asthma control test (ACT were performed. Exhaled breath condensate was collected in two different fractions, representing mainly either the airways or the alveoli. H2O2 was analysed in the airway and alveolar fractions and compared to clinical parameters. Results The exhaled H2O2 concentration was significantly higher in the airway fraction than in the alveolar fraction comparing each single pair (p = 0.003, 0.032 and 0.040 for the whole study group, the asthmatic group and the control group, respectively. Asthma control, measured by the asthma control test (ACT, correlated significantly with the H2O2 concentrations in the alveolar fraction (r = 0.606, p = 0.004 but not with those in the airway fraction in the group of children above 12 years. FENO values and lung function parameters did not correlate to the H2O2 concentrations of each fraction. Conclusion The new technique of fractionated H2O2 measurement may differentiate H2O2 concentrations in different parts of the lung in asthmatic and control children. H2O2 concentrations of the alveolar fraction may be related to the asthma control test in children.

  5. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Finding Dental Care Home Health Info Health Topics Dry Mouth Saliva, or spit, is made by the salivary ... help keep teeth strong and fight tooth decay. Dry mouth, also called xerostomia (ZEER-oh-STOH-mee-ah), ...

  6. Blue breath holding is benign.

    OpenAIRE

    Stephenson, J B

    1991-01-01

    In their recent publication in this journal, Southall et al described typical cyanotic breath holding spells, both in otherwise healthy children and in those with brainstem lesions and other malformations. Their suggestions regarding possible autonomic disturbances may require further study, but they have adduced no scientific evidence to contradict the accepted view that in the intact child blue breath holding spells are benign. Those families in which an infant suffers an 'apparently life t...

  7. Dry Mouth (Xerostomia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mouth Trouble chewing, swallowing, tasting, or speaking A burning feeling in the mouth A dry feeling in the throat Cracked lips ... Food and Drug Administration provides information on dry mouth and offers advice for ... Syndrome Clinic NIDCR Sjogren’s Syndrome Clinic develops new therapies ...

  8. A better state-of-mind: deep breathing reduces state anxiety and enhances test performance through regulating test cognitions in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khng, Kiat Hui

    2017-11-01

    A pre-test/post-test, intervention-versus-control experimental design was used to examine the effects, mechanisms and moderators of deep breathing on state anxiety and test performance in 122 Primary 5 students. Taking deep breaths before a timed math test significantly reduced self-reported feelings of anxiety and improved test performance. There was a statistical trend towards greater effectiveness in reducing state anxiety for boys compared to girls, and in enhancing test performance for students with higher autonomic reactivity in test-like situations. The latter moderation was significant when comparing high-versus-low autonomic reactivity groups. Mediation analyses suggest that deep breathing reduces state anxiety in test-like situations, creating a better state-of-mind by enhancing the regulation of adaptive-maladaptive thoughts during the test, allowing for better performance. The quick and simple technique can be easily learnt and effectively applied by most children to immediately alleviate some of the adverse effects of test anxiety on psychological well-being and academic performance.

  9. The effect of time-of-day and chest physiotherapy on multiple breath washout measures in children with clinically stable cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voldby, Christian; Green, Kent; Rosthøj, Susanne; Kongstad, Thomas; Philipsen, Lue; Buchvald, Frederik; Skov, Marianne; Pressler, Tania; Gustafsson, Per; Nielsen, Kim G

    2018-01-01

    In this pilot study we investigated daytime variation of multiple breath nitrogen washout (N2MBW) measures in children with clinically stable cystic fibrosis. To our knowledge the effect of time-of-day on multiple breath washout measures in patients with cystic fibrosis has not previously been reported. Furthermore, we assessed the influence of chest physiotherapy on N2MBW measures. Ten school children with cystic fibrosis performed N2MBW followed by spirometry and plethysmography in the morning and afternoon at three visits that were one month apart. Chest physiotherapy was performed immediately before the afternoon measurements at visit 2 and immediately before morning and afternoon measurements at visit 3. The influence of time-of-day and chest physiotherapy on the measures was evaluated using linear mixed models. There were adequate quality data from 8 children with median age (range) 9.6 (6.0; 15.1) years. Baseline lung clearance index (LCI) (range) was 9.0 (7.1; 13.0) and baseline FEV1% predicted was 97.5 (78.5; 117.9). No N2MBW measures were significantly influenced by time-of-day or chest physiotherapy. LCI (95% confidence interval) decreased non-significantly 0.05 (-0.32; 0.22) during the day and increased non-significantly 0.08 (-0.26; 0.42) after chest physiotherapy. All spirometric measures were unaffected by time-of-day and chest physiotherapy. For plethysmographic measures FRCpleth decreased significantly (pphysiotherapy performed immediately prior to N2MBW had no consistent or significant influence on N2MBW measures. However, we emphasize that further studies of the effect of both daytime variation and the effect of chest physiotherapy on multiple breath washout measures are warranted.

  10. The Effect of Full-Mouth Rehabilitation on Oral Health-Related Quality of Life for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Meligy, Omar; Maashi, Manal; Al-Mushayt, Abdullah; Al-Nowaiser, Abeer; Al-Mubark, Sultan

    2016-01-01

    Changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among 40 children with special health care needs (CSHCN) aged 5-14 years before and 12 months after full-mouth rehabilitation (FMR) under general anesthesia (GA) in two hospitals in Jeddah city were assessed. The questionnaire was delivered to the parents/caregivers at baseline (pre-operative) and at the 12-month post-operative follow-up visit. Medical and dental histories and clinical findings were correlated accordingly. The follow-up response rate was 87.5% with 35 children completing a 12-month follow-up visit. The age range was from 5 to 12 years with a mean of 7.3 ± 2.4 years. More than half of the study sample was boys (63%) in the 5-8 year age-group (69%). The impact on OHRQoL was reportedly negative before FMR under GA, with overall scores ranging from 12 to 68 and a mean of 43.34 ± 14.83. OHRQoL improved significantly in all aspects evaluated (P<0.05) following FMR under GA with overall scores ranging from 4 to 41 and a mean of 18.86 ± 8.54. Treating CSHCN under GA, with 3-month recall visits for the patients, had a significant long-term effect on their OHRQoL extending up to 12 months postoperatively.

  11. Impact of constant and breath-synchronized nebulization on inhaled mass of nebulized budesonide in infants and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikander, K; Bisgaard, H

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the output of a breath-synchronized jet nebulizer to a conventional constant output nebulizer over a fixed period of time in terms of inhaled mass of budesonide, i.e., the amount of budesonide deposited on a filter interposed between the nebulizer and t...... resulted in reduced waste of drug during expiration....

  12. Spatiotemporal risk mapping of hand, foot and mouth disease and its association with meteorological variables in children under 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C D; Xiao, G X

    2017-10-01

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) risk has become an increasing concern in the Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region, which is the biggest urban agglomeration in north-eastern Asia. In the study, spatiotemporal epidemiological features of HFMD were analysed, and a Bayesian space-time hierarchy model was used to detect local spatial relative risk (RR) and to assess the effect of meteorological factors. From 2009 to 2013, there was an obvious seasonal pattern of HFMD risk. The highest risk period was in the summer, with an average monthly incidence of 4·17/103, whereas the index in wintertime was 0·16/103. Meteorological variables influenced temporal changes in HFMD. A 1 °C rise in air temperature was associated with an 11·5% increase in HFMD (corresponding RR 1·122). A 1% rise in relative humidity was related to a 9·51% increase in the number of HFMD cases (corresponding RR 1·100). A 1 hPa increment in air pressure was related to a 0·11% decrease in HFMD (corresponding RR 0·999). A 1 h increase in sunshine was associated with a 0·28% rise in HFMD cases (corresponding RR 1·003). A 1 m/s rise in wind speed was related to a 6·2% increase in HFMD (corresponding RR 1·064). High-risk areas were mainly large cities, such as Beijing, Tianjin, Shijiazhuang and their neighbouring areas. These findings can contribute to risk control and implementation of disease-prevention policies.

  13. Effects of Oral Breathing on the Nutritional Status: Why does it Happen?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunha, Daniele Andrade da

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some children who breathe through the mouth and present nocturnal obstructive apnea can present a delay in the pondero-statural growth. Objective: The objective of this article is to analyze the orofacial myofunctional alterations found in oral breathers and the effects on their nutritional status. It focuses on the importance of the interdisciplinary team following up with the overall oral breathing alterations. Method: The used method was a literature's revision based on articles published in indexed scientific magazines, books and post-graduation works. Most articles were identified on LILACS, MEDLINE, and SCIELO databases. Results: A relation between oral breathing and an alteration in the general feeding process is noticeable and associated with difficulties in smelling, tasting, and orofacial myofunctional disorders, what comes to have an effect on the nutritional status. Final commentaries: The wide range of causes involved in oral breathing requires an interdisciplinary team trained to identify such alterations, enabling preventive measures to be undertaken, in order to avoid alterations in the general health, regular development of the face, as well as in the nutritional status in these individuals' relevant growth stages.

  14. Contamination by Helicobacter pylori measured by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test and nutritional status of children with chronic diarrhoea syndrome in Havana City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Triana, M.H.; Cabrera, A.; Sanchez, M. A.; Herrera, X.; Pawong, M.; Moreno, R.; Reyes, D.; Serrano, G.; Diaz, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    Diarrhoea morbidity shows a slow increasing tendency during the last 10 years in Cuba. In young children the compromise of the gastric acid barrier after a chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is discussed in pathogenic relation to gastritis, duodenal ulcer, chronic diarrhoea, short stature, malabsorption of the B-complex vitamins and malnutrition. The Hp contamination level of the population of the developing world is estimated to be considerably high. Endoscopic studies carried out in Cuban subjects with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of 60 to 100%. The current treatment of chronic diarrhoea does not include the elimination of Hp. Cuban children with upper gastrointestinal symptoms show contamination values of more than 60%. There are not available data on the contamination level in apparently healthy Cuban children or those with chronic diarrhoea. In March-April 2000 the prevalence of Hp infection measured in serum by chromatographic immunoassay for detection of Hp IgG antibodies was found to be 94 % in 20 infants and young children with persistent chronic diarrhoea and 100% in 11 apparently healthy children in Havana City. Children with diarrhoea showed a more evident affection of their nutritional status and a higher percentage of positive personal or familiar history of parasitism, giardiasis, gastritis, ulcer, stomatitis and glositis. The validity of the immunological tests in infants is discussed from the point of view of the antibody transference with breast milk. In a sample of 16 different children studied by the 13C-Urea-Breath-Test the contamination level was 50% of the children not affected by diarrhoea and only one of the 6 children with diarrhoea showed positive values

  15. Respiratory disorders in paediatric age: orthodontic diagnosis and treatment in dysmetabolic obese children and allergic slim children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favero, L; Arreghini, A; Cocilovo, F; Favero, V

    2013-09-01

    Obesity and allergic susceptibility are worsening problems in the most industrialised countries. With different mechanisms, they both lead to a deterioration of children's life quality because they affect the respiratory system, leading to asthma and respiratory disorders such as mouth breathing and obstructive sleep apnoea. The latter are related to specific types of malocclusions that require an early diagnosis and specific multidisciplinary treatment. The purpose of this work is to show the characteristic signs and symptoms of these disorders in children of the two phenotypes (allergic and slim, obese and dysmetabolic). Intercepting such issues allows both pediatricians and paediatric dentists to refer the child to a multidisciplinary team of specialists able to deal, in a holistic way, with both the physical and behavioural causes, and also with the consequences on systemic and craniofacial development in particular. The literature available on this topic in the years between 1997 and 2011 was reviewed, paying special attention to prevention, paediatric visits, diagnostic tools and treatment options for each of the two conditions. Dysmetabolic obese children and allergic slim children have specific respiratory problems during rest and exercise. Mouth breathing and obstructive sleep apnoea are due to an abnormal craniofacial development and can cause serious systemic problems in adulthood. Intercepting early signs of pathognomonic symptoms of sleep aponea and mouth breathing permits to treat children with an early multidisciplinary approach, and allows for proper physical and psychological development of the child.

  16. Rapid shallow breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachypnea; Breathing - rapid and shallow; Fast shallow breathing; Respiratory rate - rapid and shallow ... Shallow, rapid breathing has many possible medical causes, including: Asthma Blood clot in an artery in the ...

  17. Role of the gluten-free diet on neurological-EEG findings and sleep disordered breathing in children with celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, P; Pietropaoli, N; Ferretti, A; Nenna, R; Mastrogiorgio, G; Del Pozzo, M; Principessa, L; Bonamico, M; Villa, M P

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether celiac children are at risk for EEG-neurological features and sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and whether an appropriate gluten-free diet (GFD) influences these disorders. We consecutively enrolled 19 children with a new biopsy-proven celiac disease (CD) diagnosis. At CD diagnosis and after 6 months of GFD, each patient underwent a general and neurological examination, an electroencephalogram, a questionnaire about neurological features, and a validated questionnaire about SDB: OSA (obstructive sleep apnea) scores0 predict OSA. At CD diagnosis, 37% of patients complained headache that affected daily activities and 32% showed positive OSA score. The EEG examinations revealed abnormal finding in 48% of children. After 6 months of GFD headache disappeared in 72% of children and EEG abnormalities in 78%; all children showed negative OSA score. According to our preliminary data, in the presence of unexplained EEG abnormalities and/or other neurological disorders/SDB an atypical or silent CD should also be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aspiration tests in aqueous foam using a breathing simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-12-01

    Non-toxic aqueous foams are being developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) for use in crowd control, cell extractions, and group disturbances in the criminal justice prison systems. The potential for aspiration of aqueous foam during its use and the resulting adverse effects associated with complete immersion in aqueous foam is of major concern to the NIJ when examining the effectiveness and safety of using this technology as a Less-Than-Lethal weapon. This preliminary study was designed to evaluate the maximum quantity of foam that might be aspirated by an individual following total immersion in an SNL-developed aqueous foam. A.T.W. Reed Breathing simulator equipped with a 622 Silverman cam was used to simulate the aspiration of an ammonium laureth sulfate aqueous foam developed by SNL and generated at expansion ratios in the range of 500:1 to 1000:1. Although the natural instinct of an individual immersed in foam is to cover their nose and mouth with a hand or cloth, thus breaking the bubbles and decreasing the potential for aspiration, this study was performed to examine a worst case scenario where mouth breathing only was examined, and no attempt was made to block foam entry into the breathing port. Two breathing rates were examined: one that simulated a sedentary individual with a mean breathing rate of 6.27 breaths/minute, and one that simulated an agitated or heavily breathing individual with a mean breathing rate of 23.7 breaths/minute. The results of this study indicate that, if breathing in aqueous foam without movement, an air pocket forms around the nose and mouth within one minute of immersion.

  19. Can We Predict Oral Antibiotic Treatment Failure in Children with Fast-Breathing Pneumonia Managed at the Community Level? A Prospective Cohort Study in Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina King

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is the leading cause of infectious death amongst children globally, with the highest burden in Africa. Early identification of children at risk of treatment failure in the community and prompt referral could lower mortality. A number of clinical markers have been independently associated with oral antibiotic failure in childhood pneumonia. This study aimed to develop a prognostic model for fast-breathing pneumonia treatment failure in sub-Saharan Africa.We prospectively followed a cohort of children (2-59 months, diagnosed by community health workers with fast-breathing pneumonia using World Health Organisation (WHO integrated community case management guidelines. Cases were followed at days 5 and 14 by study data collectors, who assessed a range of pre-determined clinical features for treatment outcome. We built the prognostic model using eight pre-defined parameters, using multivariable logistic regression, validated through bootstrapping.We assessed 1,542 cases of which 769 were included (32% ineligible; 19% defaulted. The treatment failure rate was 15% at day 5 and relapse was 4% at day 14. Concurrent malaria diagnosis (OR: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.06, 2.47 and moderate malnutrition (OR: 1.88; 95% CI: 1.09, 3.26 were associated with treatment failure. The model demonstrated poor calibration and discrimination (c-statistic: 0.56.This study suggests that it may be difficult to create a pragmatic community-level prognostic child pneumonia tool based solely on clinical markers and pulse oximetry in an HIV and malaria endemic setting. Further work is needed to identify more accurate and reliable referral algorithms that remain feasible for use by community health workers.

  20. From the mouths of babes: dental caries in infants and children and the intensification of agriculture in mainland Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halcrow, S E; Harris, N J; Tayles, N; Ikehara-Quebral, R; Pietrusewsky, M

    2013-03-01

    Many bioarchaeological studies have established a link between increased dental caries prevalence and the intensification of agriculture. However, research in Southeast Asia challenges the global application of this theory. Although often overlooked, dental health of infants and children can provide a sensitive source of information concerning health and subsistence change. This article investigates the prevalence and location of caries in the dentition of infants and children (less than 15 years of age) from eight prehistoric mainland Southeast Asian sites collectively spanning the Neolithic to late Iron Age, during which time rice agriculture became an increasingly important subsistence mode. Caries prevalence varied among the sites but there was no correlation with chronological change. The absence of evidence of a decline in dental health over time can be attributed to the relative noncariogenicity of rice and retention of broad-spectrum subsistence strategies. No differences in caries type indicating differences in dental health were found between the sites, apart from the Iron Age site of Muang Sema. There was a higher prevalence of caries in the deciduous dentition than the permanent dentition, likely due to a cariogenic weaning diet and the higher sensitivity of deciduous teeth to decay. The level of caries in the permanent dentition suggests an increased reliance on less cariogenic foods during childhood, including rice. The absence of a temporal decline in dental health of infants and children strengthens the argument that the relationship between caries and agricultural intensification in Southeast Asia was more complex than the general model suggests. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Assessing the efficacy of immunotherapy with a glutaraldehyde-modified house dust mite extract in children by monitoring changes in clinical parameters and inflammatory markers in exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Jaime; Cruz, María-Jesús; Piquer, Mónica; Giner, Maria-Teresa; Plaza, Ana María

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of specific immunotherapy (SIT) management with allergoids in children with allergic asthma by monitoring changes in clinical parameters and inflammatory markers in exhaled breath. The study population included 43 patients (24 males) of 6-14 years of age, who had allergic asthma and were sensitized to mites. Twenty-three individuals were treated with subcutaneous SIT (PURETHAL® Mites, HAL Allergy) for 8 months, i.e. the SIT group, and 20 were given medication to treat symptoms only, i.e. the control group. Before treatment and after 4 and 8 months, several clinical parameters, the levels of exhaled nitric oxide and the pH of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) were determined. The SIT group presented with an improvement in asthma classification, a reduction in maintenance drug therapy and improved scores on the quality-of-life questionnaire. These changes were not observed in the control group. Both groups presented significant decreases in EBC pH values at 4 and 8 months after treatment compared to at baseline. However, analysis of the variable 'ratio' showed an increase in the EBC pH values after 8 months of treatment in the SIT group compared with the values at 4 months. SIT with standardized mite extract reduces asthma symptoms in children. A decrease in EBC pH values was observed in both groups, although the SIT group presented a tendency of recovered values after 8 months. Future studies of EBC pH monitoring in the longer term are needed to determine the effectiveness of this marker. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Fourteen types of co-circulating recombinant enterovirus were associated with hand, foot, and mouth disease in children from Wenzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wen-Ping; Lin, Xian-Dan; Chen, Yi-Ping; Liu, Qi; Wang, Wen; Wang, Cai-Qiao; Li, Ming-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C; Zhang, Yong-Zhen

    2015-09-01

    Although hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) is a major public concern in China, the prevalence and clinical symptoms associated with the different agents of HFMD in this country remain poorly understood. We investigated the clinical and molecular characteristics of enteroviruses in patients with HFMD from Wenzhou, China. Patients with laboratory-confirmed HFMD admitted to the Yuying Children's Hospital in Wenzhou, China during 2013 were included in this study. Viral RNA sequences were amplified using RT-PCR, determined by sequencing, and compared by phylogenetic analysis. A total of 955 clinically diagnosed HFMD cases were determined using PCR, with whole viral genomes obtained for each enterovirus type. 14 types of enterovirus belonging to two viral species were identified. Notably, Coxsackievirus A6 (CV-A6) was the most common species detected (77.8%), followed by EV-A71 (8.2%) and CV-A10 (8.1%). Phylogenetic analysis revealed multiple independent introductions of these viruses into Wenzhou. In addition, the enterovirus observed in Wenzhou had a recombinant history, with two or three recombination breakpoints. Although the illness associated with CV-A6 was milder than that of EV-A71, CV-A6 infection caused more widespread rash, larger blisters, and subsequent skin peeling and/or nail shedding. Our study revealed the co-circulation of 14 types of enteroviruses in a single location - Wenzhou, China - with CV-A6 virus the predominant agent of HFMD. This work highlights the need to perform larger-scale surveillance to fully understand the epidemiology of enteroviruses in China and the wider Asia-Pacific region. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantifying the adverse effect of excessive heat on children: An elevated risk of hand, foot and mouth disease in hot days.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangjian; Du, Zhicheng; Zhang, Dingmei; Yu, Shicheng; Hao, Yuantao

    2016-01-15

    Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is a common childhood infection and has become a major public health issue in China. Considerable research has focused on the role of meteorological factors such as temperature and relative humidity in HFMD development. However, no studies have specifically quantified the impact of another major environmental agent, excessive heat, on HFMD. The current study was designed to help address this research gap. Case-based HFMD surveillance data and daily meteorological data collected between 2010 and 2012 was obtained from China CDC and the National Meteorological Information Center, respectively. Distributed lag nonlinear models were applied to assess the impact of excessive heat on HFMD and its variability across social-economic status and age groups. After controlling the effects of several potential confounders, the commonly hot days were found to positively affect the HFMD burdens with the relative risk (RR) peaking at around 6 days of lag. The RR of HFMD in the Pearl-River Delta Region was generally higher and persisted longer than that in the remaining developing areas. Regarding the inter-age group discrepancy, children aged 3-6 years old had the highest risk of HFMD under conditions of excessive heat whereas those greater than 6 years old had the lowest. The lag structure of the impact of the extremely hot days was quite similar to that of the commonly hot days, although the relative effect of these two kinds of conditions of excessive heat might vary across regions. This study indicated significantly facilitating effects of excessive heat on HFMD especially among those aged 3-6 and from developed areas. Results from the current study were particularly practical and important for developing area-and-age-targeted control programs in the context of climate change and urbanization. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative study of the cytokine/chemokine response in children with differing disease severity in enterovirus 71-induced hand, foot, and mouth disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection can lead to a rapidly progressing, life-threatening, and severe neurological disease in young children, including the development of human hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD. This study aims to further characterize the specific immunological features in EV71-mediated HFMD patients presenting with differing degrees of disease severity. METHODOLOGY: Comprehensive cytokine and chemokine expression were broadly evaluated by cytokine antibody array in EV71-infected patients hospitalized for HFMD compared to Coxsackievirus A16-infected patients and age-matched healthy controls. More detailed analysis using Luminex-based cytokine bead array was performed in EV71-infected patients stratified into diverse clinic outcomes. Additionally, immune cell frequencies in peripheral blood and EV71-specific antibodies in plasma were also examined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Expression of several cytokines and chemokines were significantly increased in plasma from EV71-infected patients compared to healthy controls, which further indicated that: (1 GM-CSF, MIP-1β, IL-2, IL-33, and IL-23 secretion was elevated in patients who rapidly developed disease and presented with uncomplicated neurological damage; (2 G-CSF and MCP-1 were distinguishably secreted in EV71 infected very severe patients presenting with acute respiratory failure; (3 IP-10, MCP-1, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF levels were much higher in cerebrospinal fluid than in plasma from patients with neurological damage; (4 FACS analysis revealed that the frequency of CD19(+HLADR(+ mature B cells dynamically changed over time during the course of hospitalization and was accompanied by dramatically increased EV71-specific antibodies. Our data provide a panoramic view of specific immune mediator and cellular immune responses of HFMD and may provide useful immunological profiles for monitoring the progress of EV71-induced fatal neurological symptoms with acute respiratory failure.

  5. [Dehydration due to "mouth broken"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijler, D P M; van Mossevelde, P W J; van Beek, R H T

    2012-09-01

    Two children were admitted to a medical centre due to dehydration after an oral injury and the extraction of a tooth. One child complained of "mouth broken". Dehydration is the most common water-electrolyte imbalance in children. Babies and young children are prone to dehydration due to their relatively large body surface area, the high percentage extracellular fluid, and the limited ability of the kidneys to conserve water. After the removal ofa tooth, after an oral trauma or in case of oral discomfort, a child is at greater risk of dehydration by reduced fluid and food intake due to oral pain and/or discomfort and anxiety to drink. In those cases, extra attention needs to be devoted to the intake of fluids.

  6. Mouth Problems and HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... teeth (periodontitis), canker sores, oral warts, fever blisters, oral candidiasis (thrush), hairy leukoplakia (which causes a rough, white patch on the tongue), and dental caries. Read More Publications Cover image Mouth Problems + HIV Publication files Download Language English PDF — ...

  7. Experiments on the Microenvironment and Breathing of a Person in Isothermal and Stratified Surroundings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Jensen, Rasmus Lund; Litewnicki, Michal

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the characteristics of human exhalation. Experiments are performed on a breathing thermal manikin in a test room. The manikin is heated, and an artificial lung is used to generate varying air flows with specific flow rates and temperatures for breathing. Smoke visualisation...... is used to show the formation, movement and disappearance of the exhalation jets from both nose and mouth. The exhalation of breathing without ventilation in the room, and with stratified surroundings (displacement ventilation) is analysed....

  8. Burning mouth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Zakrzewska, Joanna; Buchanan, John A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a debilitating medical condition affecting nearly 1.3 million of Americans. Its common features include a burning painful sensation in the mouth, often associated with dysgeusia and xerostomia, despite normal salivation. Classically, symptoms are better in the morning, worsen during the day and typically subside at night. Its etiology is largely multifactorial, and associated medical conditions may include gastrointestinal, urogenital, psychiatric, neurologic and met...

  9. NASOPHARYNGEAL CONCENTRATIONS IN THE HUMAN VOLUNTEER BREATHING ACETONE

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to examine the absorption of a common chemical into the nasopharyngeal region in humans, a 57 year old male volunteer inhaled uniformly labeled 13C-acetone at 1.4 ppm for 30 min while performing different breathing maneuvers; nose inhale, nose exhale (NINE); mouth ...

  10. Impact of sleep disordered breathing on behaviour among elementary school-aged children: a cross-sectional analysis of a large community-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dale L; Gozal, David; Hunter, Scott J; Philby, Mona F; Kaylegian, Jaeson; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2016-12-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in children has been associated with inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity, but the associations between SDB severity and the type and severity of behavioural disruption are unclear.1022 children aged 5-7 years old prospectively underwent sleep studies and behavioural assessments through completion of standardised instruments. Participants were subdivided into four categorical groups based on the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI; measured per hour of total sleep time (hTST)), i.e. Group 1: nonsnoring and AHI hTST -1 ; Group 2: habitual snoring and AHI hTST -1 ; Group 3: habitual snoring and AHI 1-5 hTST -1 ; and Group 4: habitual snoring and AHI >5 hTST -1 , followed by comparisons of behavioural functioning across the groups.All 10 behavioural variables differed significantly between Group 1 and all other groups. Post hoc comparisons indicated that Group 2 was the most impaired for most behavioural measures. Furthermore, differences between Group 2 and more severe sleep pathology conditions were rarely significant.This large community-based paediatric cohort confirms earlier findings highlighting a significant impact of SDB on behavioural regulation, with the greatest impact being already apparent among habitually snoring children. Thus, a likely low asymptote exists regarding SDB behavioural impact, such that further increases in severity do not measurably increase parent-rated difficulties with behavioural regulation relative to controls. Our findings do support the need for considering early intervention, particularly among those children manifesting a behavioural impact of SDB. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  11. Time course of EEG slow-wave activity in pre-school children with sleep disordered breathing: a possible mechanism for daytime deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Sarah N; Walter, Lisa M; Nisbet, Lauren C; Jackman, Angela R; Anderson, Vicki; Nixon, Gillian M; Davey, Margot J; Trinder, John; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne; Horne, Rosemary S C

    2012-09-01

    Daytime deficits in children with sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are theorized to result from hypoxic insult to the developing brain or fragmented sleep. Yet, these do not explain why deficits occur in primary snorers (PS). The time course of slow wave EEG activity (SWA), a proxy of homeostatic regulation and cortical maturation, may provide insight. Clinical and control subjects (N=175: mean age 4.3±0.9 y: 61% male) participated in overnight polysomnography (PSG). Standard sleep scoring and power spectral analyses were conducted on EEG (C4/A1; 0.5-sleep stages and respiratory parameters. Repeated-measures ANCOVA evaluated group differences in the time course of SWA. Four groups were classified: controls (OAHI ≤ 1 event/h; no clinical history); PS (OAHI ≤ 1 event/h; clinical history); mild OSA (OAHI=1-5 events/h); and moderate to severe OSA (MS OSA: OAHI>5 events/h). Group differences were found in the percentage of time spent in NREM Stages 1 and 4 (psleep pressure but impaired restorative sleep function in pre-school children with SDB, providing new insights into the possible mechanism for daytime deficits observed in all severities of SDB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Breathing pattern and head posture: changes in craniocervical angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatucci, A; Raffaeli, F; Mastrovincenzo, M; Luchetta, A; Giannone, A; Ciavarella, D

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the influence of oral breathing on head posture and to establish possible postural changes observing the variation of craniocervical angles NSL/OPT and NSL/CVT between oral breathing subjects and physiological breathing subjects. A cross-sectional study was conducted. The sample included 115 subject, 56 boys and 59 girls, 5-22-year-old. Among these, 80 were classified as oral breathers and 35 as physiological breathers. The diagnosis of oral breathing was carried out thanks to characteristic signs and symptoms evaluated on clinical examination, the analysis of characteristic X-ray images, ENT examination with active anterior rhinomanometric (AAR) test. The structural and postural analysis was carried out, calculating the craniofacial angles NSL/OPT and NSL/CVT. Both NSL/OPT and NSL/CVT appear to be significantly greater to those observed in physiological breathing patients. This means that patients who tend to breathe through the mouth rather than exclusively through the nose show a reduction of cervical lordosis and a proinclination of the head. Our study confirms that the oral breathing modifies head position. The significant increase of the craniocervical angles NSL/OPT and NSL/CVT in patients with this altered breathing pattern suggests an elevation of the head and a greater extension of the head compared with the cervical spine. So, to correct the breathing pattern early, either during childhood or during adolescence, can lead to a progressive normalization of craniofacial morphology and head posture.

  13. Qualidade de vida em crianças com distúrbios respiratórios do sono Quality of life in children with sleep-disordered breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaury de Machado Gomes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Crianças podem apresentar distúrbios respiratórios do sono (DRS com repercussões na qualidade de vida. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade de vida de crianças com DRS, comparar crianças com Síndrome da Apneia Obstrutiva do Sono (SAOS e Ronco Primário (RP e identificar quais os domínios do OSA-18 estão mais comprometidos. MÉTODOS: Estudo de coorte histórica com corte transversal em crianças com história de ronco e hiperplasia adenotonsilar. Para avaliar qualidade de vida foi aplicado o questionário OSA-18 aos cuidadores e realizado polissonografia para diagnóstico. RESULTADOS: Participaram 59 crianças com média de idade de 6,7 ± 2,26 anos. O escore médio do OSA-18 foi 77,9 ± 13,22 e os domínios mais afetados foram: "preocupação dos responsáveis" (21,8 ± 4,25, "perturbação do sono" (18,8 ± 5,19, "sofrimento físico" (17,3 ± 5,0. O impacto foi pequeno em seis crianças (10,2%, moderado em 33 (55,9% e grande em 20 (33,9%. RP foi encontrado em 44 crianças (74,6%, SAOS em 15 (25,6%. SAOS tem escore maior no domínio "sofrimento físico" que RP (p = 0,04. CONCLUSÃO: Distúrbios respiratórios do sono na infância causam comprometimento na qualidade de vida e os domínios mais comprometidos do OSA-18 foram: "preocupação dos responsáveis", "perturbação do sono" e "sofrimento físico". SAOS tem o domínio "sofrimento físico" mais afetado que roncadores primários.Children may present sleep-disordered breathing (SDB and suffer with adverse effects upon their quality of life. OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the quality of life of children with SDB, compared subjects with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and primary snoring (PS, and identified which areas in the OSA-18 questionnaire are more affected. METHODS: This is a historical cohort cross-sectional study carried out on a consecutive sample of children with history of snoring and adenotonsillar hyperplasia. The subject's quality of life was assessed based on the

  14. Study of the correlations between fractional exhaled nitric oxide in exhaled breath and atopic status, blood eosinophils, FCER2 mutation, and asthma control in Vietnamese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen-Thi-Bich H

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hanh Nguyen-Thi-Bich,1 Huong Duong-Thi-Ly,2 Vu Thi Thom,2 Nhung Pham-Thi-Hong,2 Long Doan Dinh,2 Huong Le-Thi-Minh,1 Timothy John Craig,3 Sy Duong-Quy3,4 1Department of Immunology, Allergology, and Rheumatology, National Hospital of Pediatrics, Hanoi, Vietnam; 2School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vietnam National University Hanoi, Vietnam; 3Department of Medicine, Penn State University, Hershey, PA, USA; 4Department of Respiratory Diseases, Lam Dong Medical College, Dalat, Vietnam Introduction: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO is a biomarker of airway inflammation in asthma. The measurement of FENO is utilized to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of children with asthma, especially for those treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Objectives: The aims of this study were to evaluate the correlations between FENO and atopic status, blood eosinophil levels, FCER2 mutation, and asthma control in Vietnamese children. Subjects and methods: This was a prospective and descriptive study approved by the local Ethical Board. All children with uncontrolled asthma, seen in the National Hospital of Pediatrics (Hanoi, Vietnam, were included. Exhaled breath FENO, blood eosinophils, skin prick test, total IgE, asthma control test (ACT, and FCER2 gene polymorphism were performed at inclusion. They were followed up at 3 months to evaluate clinical status, FENO levels, and ACT. Results: Forty-two children with uncontrolled asthma with a mean age of 10±3 years (6–16 years were included. The male/female ratio was 2.5/1. The mean FENO levels were 26±25 ppb. FENO was significantly higher in patients with a positive skin prick test for respiratory allergens (P<0.05. FENO was significantly correlated with blood eosinophil levels (r=0.5217; P=0.0004. Five of the 32 subjects (15.6% had a mutation of FCER2 gene (rs28364072 SNP. In this group, the levels of FENO were highest (37±10 ppb; P<0.05. The levels of FENO were significantly decreased after 3 months of

  15. What Causes Bad Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español What Causes Bad Breath? KidsHealth / For Teens / What Causes Bad Breath? Print en español ¿Qué es lo que provoca el mal aliento? Bad breath, or halitosis , can be a major problem, ...

  16. Gender discrimination of eyes and mouths by individuals with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Catherine A; Minshew, Nancy J; Strauss, Mark S

    2010-04-01

    Evidence remains mixed about whether individuals with autism look less to eyes and whether they look more at mouths. Few studies have examined how spontaneous attention to facial features relates to face processing abilities. This study tested the ability to discriminate gender from facial features, namely eyes and mouths, by comparing accuracy scores of 17 children with autism and 15 adults with autism to 17 typically developing children and 15 typically developing adults. Results indicated that all participants regardless of diagnosis discriminated gender more accurately from eyes than from mouths. However, results indicated that compared to adults without autism, adults with autism were significantly worse at discriminating gender from eyes.

  17. Word of mouth komunikacija

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žnideršić-Kovač Ružica

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumers' buying decision is very complex multistep process in which a lot of factors have significant impact. Traditional approach to the problem of communication between a company and its consumers, implies usage of marketing mix instruments, mostly promotion mix, in order to achieve positive purchase decision. Formal communication between company and consumers is dominant comparing to informal communication, and even in marketing literature there is not enough attention paid to this type of communication such as Word of Mouth. Numerous of research shows that consumers emphasize crucial impact of Word of Mouth on their buying decision. .

  18. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children with congenital heart disease on cardiac 64-slice CT: dual-source ECG-triggered sequential scan vs. single-source non-ECG-synchronized spiral scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Yang, Dong Hyun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The potential impact of dual-source ECG-triggered sequential CT scan on coronary artery visibility has not been evaluated in free-breathing young children. To compare coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children with congenital heart disease on cardiac 64-slice CT between dual-source ECG-triggered sequential (DSET) scan and single-source non-ECG-synchronized spiral (SSNE) scan. In 93 young children, 108 cardiac 64-slice CT examinations were performed during free-breathing. Visibility of coronary arteries and side branches was compared between SSNE and DSET scans. Heart rates and trigger delays for DSET scan were recorded. Effective dose of each scan technique was calculated. Visual grades were significantly higher (P < 0.001 or =0.011) on DSET scan than on SSNE scan except for the distal left anterior descending artery. Coronary arteries were traceable in 79.3% on DSET scan and 54.3% on SSNE scan in the overlapped scan range (P < 0.0001), and 97.1% and 71.9% for the origins and proximal segments (P < 0.0001). Visibility of side branches was improved on DSET scan by a factor of 2.0. Heart rates and trigger delays for DSET scan were 131 {+-} 24 beats per min and 199 {+-} 44 ms, respectively. Effective doses of DSET and SSNE scans were 0.36 {+-} 0.12 mSv and 0.99 {+-} 0.23 mSv, respectively. DSET scan improves visibility of coronary arteries on cardiac 64-slice CT in free-breathing young children with congenital heart disease, compared with SSNE scan. (orig.)

  19. Mouth and dental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, C.; van der Waal, I.; Jackson, S.H.D.; Jansen, P.A.F.; Mangoni, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This chapter contains sections titled: • Introduction • Periodontal disease • Dental caries • Odontogenic infections • Alveolar osteitis • Xerostomia and hyposalivation • Candidiasis • Angular cheilitis • Denture stomatitis • Burning mouth syndrome • Recurrent aphthous stomatitis • Recurrent

  20. Parent-Reported Behavioral and Psychiatric Problems Mediate the Relationship between Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Cognitive Deficits in School-Aged Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale L. Smith

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNumerous studies over the past several decades have illustrated that children who suffer from sleep-disordered breathing (SDB are at greater risk for cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric problems. Although behavioral problems have been proposed as a potential mediator between SDB and cognitive functioning, these relationships have not been critically examined.MethodsThis analysis is based on a community-based cohort of 1,115 children who underwent overnight polysomnography, and cognitive and behavioral phenotyping. Structural model of the relationships between SDB, behavior, and cognition, and two recently developed mediation approaches based on propensity score weighting and resampling were used to assess the mediational role of parent-reported behavior and psychiatric problems in the relationship between SDB and cognitive functioning. Multiple models utilizing two different SDB definitions further explored direct effects of SDB on cognition as well as indirect effects through behavioral pathology. All models were adjusted for age, sex, race, BMI z-score, and asthma status.ResultsIndirect effects of SDB through behavior problems were significant in all mediation models, while direct effects of SDB on cognition were not. The findings were consistent across different mediation procedures and remained essentially unaltered when different criteria for SDB, behavior, and cognition were used.ConclusionPotential effects of SDB on cognitive functioning appear to occur through behavioral problems that are detectable in this pediatric population. Thus, early attentional or behavioral pathology may be implicated in the cognitive functioning deficits associated with SDB, and may present an early morbidity-related susceptibility biomarker.

  1. Dry mouth during cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000032.htm Dry mouth during cancer treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Some cancer treatments and medicines can cause dry mouth. Symptoms you ...

  2. Mouth and neck radiation - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DO NOT eat spicy foods, acidic foods, or foods that are very hot or cold. These will bother your mouth and throat. Use lip care products to keep your lips from drying out and cracking. Sip water to ease mouth ...

  3. Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Charleston, Bryan; Jackson, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Foot‐and‐mouth disease (FMD) is an economically important, highly contagious disease of cloven‐hoofed animals characterised by the appearance of vesicles (blisters) on the feet and in, and around, the mouth. The causative agent, foot‐and‐mouth disease virus (FMDV), was the first mammalian virus...

  4. Foot-and-mouth disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belsham, Graham; Charleston, Bryan; Jackson, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease is an economically important, highly contagious, disease of cloven-hoofed animals characterized by the appearance of vesicles (blisters) on the feet and in and around the mouth. The causative agent, foot-and-mouth disease virus, was the first mammalian virus to be discovered...

  5. Coronary artery visibility in free-breathing young children on non-gated chest CT: impact of temporal resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridoux, Alexandre; Hutt, Antoine; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Pagniez, Julien; Remy, Jacques; Remy-Jardin, Martine [CHRU et Universite de Lille, Department of Thoracic Imaging, Hospital Calmette (EA 2694), 59037 Lille Cedex (France); Flohr, Thomas [Siemens Healthcare, Department of Research and Development in CT, Forchheim (Germany); Duhamel, Alain [Universite de Lille, Department of Biostatistics, Lille (France)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-source CT allows scanning of the chest with high pitch and high temporal resolution, which can improve the detection of proximal coronary arteries in infants and young children when scanned without general anesthesia, sedation or beta-blockade. To compare coronary artery visibility between higher and standard temporal resolution. We analyzed CT images in 93 children who underwent a standard chest CT angiographic examination with reconstruction of images with a temporal resolution of 75 ms (group 1) and 140 ms (group 2). The percentage of detected coronary segments was higher in group 1 than in group 2 when considering all segments (group 1: 27%; group 2: 24%; P = 0.0004) and proximal segments (group 1: 37%; group 2: 32%; P = 0.0006). In both groups, the highest rates of detection were observed for the left main coronary artery (S1) (group 1: 65%; group 2: 58%) and proximal left anterior descending coronary artery (S2) (group 1: 43%; group 2: 42%). Higher rates of detection were seen in group 1 for the left main coronary artery (P = 0.03), proximal right coronary artery (P = 0.01), proximal segments of the left coronary artery (P = 0.02) and proximal segments of the left and right coronary arteries (P = 0.0006). Higher temporal resolution improved the visibility of proximal coronary arteries in pediatric chest CT. (orig.)

  6. Improved abdominal MRI in non-breath-holding children using a radial k-space sampling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Young Hun; Cheon, Jung Eun; Lee, So Mi; Cho, Hyun Hae; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One [Seoul National University Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Su Mi [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Radial k-space sampling techniques have been shown to reduce motion artifacts in adult abdominal MRI. To compare a T2-weighted radial k-space sampling MRI pulse sequence (BLADE) with standard respiratory-triggered T2-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) in pediatric abdominal imaging. Axial BLADE and respiratory-triggered turbo spin echo sequences were performed without fat suppression in 32 abdominal MR examinations in children. We retrospectively assessed overall image quality, the presence of respiratory, peristaltic and radial artifact, and lesion conspicuity. We evaluated signal uniformity of each sequence. BLADE showed improved overall image quality (3.35 ± 0.85 vs. 2.59 ± 0.59, P < 0.001), reduced respiratory motion artifact (0.51 ± 0.56 vs. 1.89 ± 0.68, P < 0.001), and improved lesion conspicuity (3.54 ± 0.88 vs. 2.92 ± 0.77, P = 0.006) compared to respiratory triggering turbo spin-echo (TSE) sequences. The bowel motion artifact scores were similar for both sequences (1.65 ± 0.77 vs. 1.79 ± 0.74, P = 0.691). BLADE introduced a radial artifact that was not observed on the respiratory triggering-TSE images (1.10 ± 0.85 vs. 0, P < 0.001). BLADE was associated with diminished signal variation compared with respiratory triggering-TSE in the liver, spleen and air (P < 0.001). The radial k-space sampling technique improved the quality and reduced respiratory motion artifacts in young children compared with conventional respiratory-triggered turbo spin-echo sequences. (orig.)

  7. More Relaxation by Deep Breath on Methacholine- Than on Exercise-Induced bronchoconstriction during the Routine Testing of Asthmatic Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Ioan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep inspiration (DI dilates normal airway precontracted with methacholine. The fact that this effect is diminished or absent in asthma could be explained by the presence of bronchial inflammation. The hypothesis was tested that DI induces more relaxation in methacholine induced bronchoconstriction—solely determined by the smooth muscle contraction—than in exercise induced bronchoconstriction, which is contributed to by both smooth muscle contraction and airway wall inflammation. The respiratory conductance (Grs response to DI was monitored in asthmatic children presenting a moderately positive airway response to challenge by methacholine (n = 36 or exercise (n = 37, and expressed as the post- to pre-DI Grs ratio (GrsDI. Both groups showed similar change in FEV1 after challenge and performed a DI of similar amplitude. GrsDI however was significantly larger in methacholine than in exercise induced bronchoconstriction (p < 0.02. The bronchodilatory effect of DI is thus less during exercise- than methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. The observation is consistent with airway wall inflammation—that characterizes exercise induced bronchoconstriction—rendering the airways less responsive to DI. More generally, it is surmised that less relief of bronchoconstriction by DI is to be expected during indirect than direct airway challenge. The current suggestion that airway smooth muscle constriction and airway wall inflammation may result in opposing effects on the bronchomotor action of DI opens important perspective to the routine testing of asthmatic children. New crossover research protocols comparing the mechanical consequences of the DI maneuver are warranted during direct and indirect bronchial challenges.

  8. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, BJ; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  9. Burning mouth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    K A Kamala; S Sankethguddad; S G Sujith; Praveena Tantradi

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to different...

  10. Burning mouth syndrome: update

    OpenAIRE

    Cassol Spanemberg, Juliana; Rodríguez de Rivera Campillo, Ma Eugenia; Jané Salas, Enric; López López, José, 1958-

    2014-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder that predominately affects middle-aged women in the postmenopausal period. The condition is distinguished by burning symptoms of the oral mucosa and the absence of any clinical signs. The etiology of BMS is complex and it includes a variety of factors. Local, systemic and psychological factors such as stress, anxiety and depression are listed among the possible causes of BMS. BMS may sometimes be classified as BMS Type I, II or III. Although ...

  11. Burning mouth syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jimson, Sudha; Rajesh, E.; Krupaa, R. Jayasri; Kasthuri, M.

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a...

  12. Respiratory muscle strength in children with mild bronchial asthma disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Neumannová

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory muscle strength can be decreased in patients with asthma; however, it is not well-documented whether a mild bronchial asthma disease can affect respiratory muscle strength in children and can be associated with higher presence of breathing difficulties. Objective: The main aim of the present study was to compare respiratory muscle strength between children with asthma and age-matched healthy children. The next aim of this study was to assess the incidence of decreased respiratory muscle strength in children with asthma and healthy children and assess the effect of decreased respiratory muscle strength on the incidence of breathing difficulties. Methods: Children with mild bronchial asthma (n = 167 and age-matched, healthy children (n = 100 were recruited into this study. Pulmonary function tests, maximal inspiratory (PImax and expiratory (PEmax mouth pressures and the incidence of breathing difficulty were evaluated in children with asthma and healthy controls. Results: The inspiratory muscle strength was similar between children with asthma and healthy children. Conversely, the expiratory muscle strength was lower in asthmatic children. There was a statistically significant difference between girls with asthma and healthy girls (PEmax = 81.7 ± 29.8% vs. 100.1 ± 23.7% of predicted, p < .001. PEmax was significantly higher in boys with asthma than in girls with asthma (PEmax = 92.9 ± 26.4 % vs. 81.7 ± 29.8% of predicted, p = .03. A higher incidence of breathing difficulties during physical activity (uphill walking, running, swimming was confirmed in children with asthma with lower respiratory muscle strength. Conclusions: There was a higher prevalence of decreased expiratory muscle strength in children with asthma; therefore, respiratory muscle strength should be tested in these children, especially in those who are symptomatic.

  13. Inflammatory bowel disease and patterns of volatile organic compounds in the exhaled breath of children: A case-control study using Ion Molecule Reaction-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monasta, Lorenzo; Pierobon, Chiara; Princivalle, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Pasini, Francesco; Perbellini, Luigi

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) profoundly affect quality of life and have been gradually increasing in incidence, prevalence and severity in many areas of the world, and in children in particular. Patients with suspected IBD require careful history and clinical examination, while definitive diagnosis relies on endoscopic and histological findings. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the alveolar air of pediatric patients with IBD presents a specific volatile organic compounds' (VOCs) pattern when compared to controls. Patients 10-17 years of age, were divided into four groups: Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), controls with gastrointestinal symptomatology, and surgical controls with no evidence of gastrointestinal problems. Alveolar breath was analyzed by ion molecule reaction mass spectrometry. Four models were built starting from 81 molecules plus the age of subjects as independent variables, adopting a penalizing LASSO logistic regression approach: 1) IBDs vs. controls, finally based on 18 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 95%, specificity = 69%, AUC = 0.925); 2) CD vs. UC, finally based on 13 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 76%, AUC = 0.934); 3) IBDs vs. gastroenterological controls, finally based on 15 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 65%, AUC = 0.918); 4) IBDs vs. controls, built starting from the 21 directly or indirectly calibrated molecules only, and finally based on 12 VOCs plus age (sensitivity = 94%, specificity = 71%, AUC = 0.888). The molecules identified by the models were carefully studied in relation to the concerned outcomes. This study, with the creation of models based on VOCs profiles, precise instrumentation and advanced statistical methods, can contribute to the development of new non-invasive, fast and relatively inexpensive diagnostic tools, with high sensitivity and specificity. It also represents a crucial step towards gaining further insights on the etiology of IBD through the

  14. [Polymorphisms of TLR7 rs3853839 and rs179010 are associated with susceptibility to and severity of hand, foot and mouth disease caused by enterovirus 71 in male children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Zhai, Song; Li, Mei; Wang, Yuan; Lu, Tong; Deng, Huiling; Zhang, Xin; Dang, Shuangsuo

    2017-07-01

    Objective To investigate whether the polymorphisms of TLR7/MyD88 signaling pathway is associated with the susceptibility to and severity of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enterovirus 71 (EV71) in children. Methods We collected 180 EV71 HFMD cases and 201 healthy controls from both the Second Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University and Xi'an Children's Hospital. The genotypes including rs3853839, rs179010 of TLR7, and rs7744 of MyD88 were detected in the 381 samples by SNPscan kit. Results The susceptibility risk (OR=2.343, 95%CI:1.516-3.621) and severity risk (OR=1.939, 95%CI: 1.064-3.521) of TLR7 rs3853839 allele C significantly increased in the male children with EV71 HFMD. Also, the susceptibility risk (OR=1.701, 95%CI: 1.142-2.535) and severity risk (OR=1.852, 95%CI: 1.038-3.305) of TLR7 rs179010 allele T significantly increased in the male children with EV71 HFMD. But there was no significant difference in the distribution of TLR7 rs179010 and rs3853839 genes between female children with EV71 HFMD and female controls. There was no correlation between the genetic polymorphisms of MyD88 rs7744 and the susceptibility to and severity of EV71 HFMD in the children. Conclusion Polymorphisms of TLR7 rs3853839 and rs179010 are correlated to the susceptibility to and severity of EV71 HFMD in male children.

  15. The use of active breathing control (ABC) to reduce margin for breathing motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, John W.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Jaffray, David A.; Kini, Vijay R.; Robertson, John M.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alavro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: For tumors in the thorax and abdomen, reducing the treatment margin for organ motion due to breathing reduces the volume of normal tissues that will be irradiated. A higher dose can be delivered to the target, provided that the risk of marginal misses is not increased. To ensure safe margin reduction, we investigated the feasibility of using active breathing control (ABC) to temporarily immobilize the patient's breathing. Treatment planning and delivery can then be performed at identical ABC conditions with minimal margin for breathing motion. Methods and Materials: An ABC apparatus is constructed consisting of 2 pairs of flow monitor and scissor valve, 1 each to control the inspiration and expiration paths to the patient. The patient breathes through a mouth-piece connected to the ABC apparatus. The respiratory signal is processed continuously, using a personal computer that displays the changing lung volume in real-time. After the patient's breathing pattern becomes stable, the operator activates ABC at a preselected phase in the breathing cycle. Both valves are then closed to immobilize breathing motion. Breathing motion of 12 patients were held with ABC to examine their acceptance of the procedure. The feasibility of applying ABC for treatment was tested in 5 patients by acquiring volumetric scans with a spiral computed tomography (CT) scanner during active breath-hold. Two patients had Hodgkin's disease, 2 had metastatic liver cancer, and 1 had lung cancer. Two intrafraction ABC scans were acquired at the same respiratory phase near the end of normal or deep inspiration. An additional ABC scan near the end of normal expiration was acquired for 2 patients. The ABC scans were also repeated 1 week later for a Hodgkin's patient. In 1 liver patient, ABC scans were acquired at 7 different phases of the breathing cycle to facilitate examination of the liver motion associated with ventilation. Contours of the lungs and livers were outlined when applicable

  16. The Effect of Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer Vapors on Evidential Breath Alcohol Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawsine, Ellen; Lutmer, Brian

    2017-11-16

    This study was undertaken to determine if the application of alcohol-based hand sanitizers (ABHSs) to the hands of a breath test operator will affect the results obtained on evidential breath alcohol instruments (EBTs). This study obtained breath samples on three different EBTs immediately after application of either gel or foam ABHS to the operator's hands. A small, but significant, number of initial analyses (13 of 130, 10%) resulted in positive breath alcohol concentrations, while 41 samples (31.5%) resulted in a status code. These status codes were caused by ethanol vapors either in the room air or their inhalation by the subject, thereby causing a mouth alcohol effect. Replicate subject samples did not yield any consecutive positive numeric results. As ABHS application can cause a transitory mouth alcohol effect via inhalation of ABHS vapors, EBT operators should forego the use of ABHS in the 15 min preceding subject testing. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Jimson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a complex disorder that is characterized by warm or burning sensation in the oral mucosa without changes on physical examination. It occurs more commonly in middle-aged and elderly women and often affects the tip of the tongue, lateral borders, lips, hard and soft palate. This condition is probably of multi-factorial origin, often idiopathic, and its etiopathogensis is unknown. BMS can be classified into two clinical forms namely primary and secondary BMS. As a result, a multidisciplinary approach is required for better control of the symptoms. In addition, psychotherapy and behavioral feedback may also help eliminate the BMS symptoms.

  18. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    Bruning mouth syndrome is a burning sensation of one or several oral soft tissues with the tongue being affected the most, and may be associated with some other symptoms outside the oral structures. The oral symptoms may appear suddenly or gradually within a time course, may be persistent throughout the day or get more intense as the day progresses in a complaint-free patient in the morning. The syndrome affects mostly women and those over 50 years old, and usually caused by multiple factors....

  19. Non-enhanced ECG-gated respiratory-triggered 3-D steady-state free-precession MR angiography with slab-selective inversion: initial experience in visualisation of renal arteries in free-breathing children without renal artery abnormality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klee, Dirk; Lanzman, Rotem Shlomo; Blondin, Dirk; Antoch, Gerald; Schaper, Joerg; Schmitt, Peter; Oh, Jun; Salgin, Burak; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2012-01-01

    ECG-gated non-enhanced balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) MR angiography requires neither breath-holding nor administration of contrast material. To investigate the image quality of free-breathing ECG-gated non-enhanced bSSFP MR angiography of renal arteries in children. Fourteen boys and seven girls (mean age, 9.7 years; range, 7 weeks-17 years) with no history of renovascular disease were included. MRI was performed at 1.5 T. Subjective image quality of axial and coronal maximum-intensity-projection reconstructions of four segments (I, aorta and renal artery ostium; II, main renal artery; III, segmental branches; IV, intrarenal vessels) was evaluated using a 4-point scale (4 = excellent, 3 = good, 2 = acceptable, 1 = non-diagnostic). Image quality was excellent for segments I (mean ± SD, 3.9 ± 0.3) and II (4.0 ± 0.1), good for segment III (3.4 ± 0.9) and acceptable for segment IV (2.3 ± 1.1). Mean image quality did not differ between sedated and non-sedated children. bSSFP MR angiography enables visualisation of renal arteries in children. (orig.)

  20. Breath biomarkers in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D

    2016-11-01

    Exhaled breath has joined blood and urine as a valuable resource for sampling and analyzing biomarkers in human media for assessing exposure, uptake metabolism, and elimination of toxic chemicals. This article focuses current use of exhaled gas, aerosols, and vapor in human breath, the methods for collection, and ultimately the use of the resulting data. Some advantages of breath are the noninvasive and self-administered nature of collection, the essentially inexhaustible supply, and that breath sampling does not produce potentially infectious waste such as needles, wipes, bandages, and glassware. In contrast to blood and urine, breath samples can be collected on demand in rapid succession and so allow toxicokinetic observations of uptake and elimination in any time frame. Furthermore, new technologies now allow capturing condensed breath vapor directly, or just the aerosol fraction alone, to gain access to inorganic species, lung pH, proteins and protein fragments, cellular DNA, and whole microorganisms from the pulmonary microbiome. Future applications are discussed, especially the use of isotopically labeled probes, non-targeted (discovery) analysis, cellular level toxicity testing, and ultimately assessing "crowd breath" of groups of people and the relation to dose of airborne and other environmental chemicals at the population level.

  1. Burning mouth disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Bala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth disorder (BMD is a burning or stinging sensation affecting the oral mucosa, lips and/or tongue, in the absence of clinically visible mucosal lesions. There is a strong female predilection, with the age of onset being approximately 50 years. Affected patients often present with multiple oral complaints, including burning, dryness and taste alterations. The causes of BMD are multifactorial and remain poorly understood. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in this disorder with the discovery that the pain of burning mouth syndrome (BMS may be neuropathic in origin and originate both centrally and peripherally. The most common sites of burning are the anterior tongue, anterior hard palate and lower lip, but the distribution of oral sites affected does not appear to affect the natural history of the disorder or the response to treatment BMS may persist for many years. This article provides updated information on BMS and presents a new model, based on taste dysfunction, for its pathogenesis.

  2. Effect of xylitol, sodium fluoride and triclosan containing mouth rinse on Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Subramaniam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Prevention of dental caries is one of the main strategies in contemporary pediatric dental practice. Mouth rinses are widely used as an adjunct to maintain oral hygiene. It is important for these products to be effective and safe for regular use in children. Objective : The aim of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a newly introduced xylitol, sodium fluoride and triclosan containing mouth rinse in reducing levels of plaque Streptococcus mutans and to compare it with that of a 0.12% chlorhexidine mouth rinse. Materials and Methods : Thirty children were randomly divided into two groups of 15 children each. Group I (study group was given a mouth rinse containing xylitol (5%, sodium fluoride (0.05% and triclosan (0.03% and Group II (control group was given a chlorhexidine (0.12% mouth rinse. Both mouth rinses were alcohol free. Mouth rinsing was carried out twice daily, half an hour after breakfast and half an hour following dinner, for a period of 21 days under the supervision of the investigator. Results: In both groups, there was a significant reduction in the mean S. mutans count at the end of 21 days (P < 0.001. No significant difference was observed between the two mouth rinses. Conclusion: The use of a low fluoride-xylitol based mouth rinse appears to be a suitable choice for regular use in children.

  3. Assessment and management of children aged 1-59 months presenting with wheeze, fast breathing, and/or lower chest indrawing; results of a multicentre descriptive study in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazir, T; Qazi, S; Nisar, Y B; Ansari, S; Maqbool, S; Randhawa, S; Kundi, Z; Asghar, R; Aslam, S

    2004-11-01

    Using current WHO guidelines, children with wheezing are being over prescribed antibiotics and bronchodilators are underutilised. To improve the WHO case management guidelines, more data is needed about the clinical outcome in children with wheezing/pneumonia overlap. In a multicentre prospective study, children aged 1-59 months with auscultatory/audible wheeze and fast breathing and/or lower chest indrawing were screened. Response to up to three cycles of inhaled salbutamol was recorded. The responders were enrolled and sent home on inhaled bronchodilators, and followed up on days 3 and 5. A total of 1622 children with wheeze were screened from May 2001 to April 2002, of which 1004 (61.8%) had WHO defined non-severe and 618 (38.2%) severe pneumonia. Wheeze was audible in only 595 (36.7%) of children. Of 1004 non-severe pneumonia children, 621 (61.8%) responded to up to three cycles of bronchodilator. Of 618 severe pneumonia children, only 166 (26.8%) responded. Among responders, 93 (14.9%) in the non-severe and 63 (37.9%) children in the severe pneumonia group showed subsequent deterioration on follow ups. No family history of wheeze, temperature >100 degrees F, and lower chest indrawing were identified as predictors of subsequent deterioration. Two third of children with wheeze are not identified by current WHO ARI (acute respiratory infections) guidelines. Antibiotics are over prescribed and bronchodilators under utilised in children with wheeze. Children with wheeze constitute a special ARI group requiring a separate management algorithm. In countries where wheeze is common it would be worthwhile to train health workers in use of the stethoscope to identify wheeze.

  4. Breathing and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find a Doctor Relaxation is the absence of tension in muscle groups and a minimum or absence ... Drill Meditation Progressive Muscle Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath Visualization This information has been approved by Shelby ...

  5. Learn More Breathe Better

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that makes breathing very difficult and can affect your quality of life. Learn the causes of COPD and what you can do to prevent it.

  6. Shortness of Breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... filled with air (called pneumotho- rax), it will hinder expansion of the lung, resulting in shortness of ... of Chest Physi- cians. Shortness of Breath: Patient Education. http: / / www. onebreath. org/ document. doc? id= 113. ...

  7. Burning mouth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is multifactorial in origin which is typically characterized by burning and painful sensation in an oral cavity demonstrating clinically normal mucosa. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. An interdisciplinary and systematic approach is required for better patient management. The purpose of this study was to provide the practitioner with an understanding of the local, systemic, and psychosocial factors which may be responsible for oral burning associated with BMS, and review of treatment modalities, therefore providing a foundation for diagnosis and treatment of BMS.

  8. Breath in the technoscientific imaginary

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Breath has a realist function in most artistic media. It serves to remind the reader, the viewer or the spectator of the exigencies of the body. In science fiction (SF) literature and films, breath is often a plot device for human encounters with otherness, either with alien peoples, who may not breathe oxygen, or environments, where there may not be oxygen to breathe. But while there is a technoscientific quality to breath in SF, especially in its attention to physiological systems, concentr...

  9. Impact of breathing on the thermal plume above a human body

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Popiolek, Zbigniew

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of the thermal plume above a human body should be well-defined in order to properly design the indoor environment and allow correct simulation of the indoor conditions by CFD or experimentally. The objective of the presented study was to investigate the influence of breathing....... A thermal manikin with female body shape equipped with an artificial lung was used to simulate the dry heat loss and breathing process of a sitting occupant. Three cases were examined: non-breathing, exhalation through nose, and exhalation through mouth. Measurements of the air temperature and speed...

  10. Breath tests: principles, problems, and promise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, C.W.; Carter, E.A.; Walker, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Breath tests rely on the measurement of gases produced in the intestine, absorbed, and expired in the breath. Carbohydrates, such as lactose and sucrose, can be administered in ysiologic doses; if malabsorbed, they will be metabolized to hydrogen by colonic bacteria. Since hydrogen is not produced by human metabolic reactions, a rise in breath hydrogen, as measured by gas chromatography, is evidence of carbohydrate malabsorption. Likewise, a rise in breath hydrogen marks the transit time of nonabsorbable carbohydrates such as lactulose through the small intestine into the colon. Simple end-expiratory interval collection into nonsiliconized vacutainer tubes has made these noninvasive tests quite convenient to perform, but various problems, including changes in stool pH intestinal motility, or metabolic rate, may influence results. Another group of breath tests uses substrates labeled with radioactive or stable isotopes of carbon. Labeled fat substrates such as trioctanoin, tripalmitin, and triolein do not produce the expected rise in labeled breath CO 2 if there is fat malabsorption. Bile acid malabsorption and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth can be measured with labeled cholylglycine or cholyltaurine. Labeled drugs such as aminopyrine, methacetin, and phenacetin can be used as an indication of drug metabolism and liver function. Radioactive substrates have been used to trace metabolic pathways and can be measured by scintillation counters. The availability of nonradioactive stable isotopes has made these ideal for use in children and pregnant women, but the cost of substrates and the mass spectrometers to measure them has so far limited their use to research centers. It is hoped that new techniques of processing and measurement will allow further realization of the exciting potential breath analysis has in a growing list of clinical applications

  11. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D; Obeid, Andy

    2013-01-01

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min –1 . A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min –1 , and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn. (note)

  12. Imposed Work of Breathing and Breathing Comfort of Nonintubated Volunteers Breathing with Three Portable Ventilators and a Critical Care Ventilator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Austin, Paul

    2001-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to assess the imposed inspiratory work of breathing and breathing comfort of nonintubated healthy volunteers breathing spontaneously through three portable ventilators...

  13. Burning mouth syndrome: etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerchiari, Dafne Patrícia; de Moricz, Renata Dutra; Sanjar, Fernanda Alves; Rapoport, Priscila Bogar; Moretti, Giovana; Guerra, Marja Michelin

    2006-01-01

    The Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is an oral mucosa pain--with or without inflammatory signs--without any specific lesion. It is mostly observed in women aged 40-60 years. This pain feels like a moderate/severe burning, and it occurs more frequently on the tongue, but it may also be felt at the gingiva, lips and jugal mucosa. It may worsen during the day, during stress and fatigue, when the patient speaks too much, or through eating of spicy/hot foods. The burning can be diminished with cold food, work and leisure. The goal of this review article is to consider possible BMS etiologies and join them in 4 groups to be better studied: local, systemic, emotional and idiopathic causes of pain. Knowing the different diagnoses of this syndrome, we can establish a protocol to manage these patients. Within the local pain group, we must investigate dental, allergic and infectious causes. Concerning systemic causes we need to look for connective tissue diseases, endocrine disorders, neurological diseases, nutritional deficits and salivary glands alterations that result in xerostomia. BMS etiology may be of difficult diagnosis, many times showing more than one cause for oral pain. A detailed interview, general physical examination, oral cavity and oropharynx inspection, and lab exams are essential to avoid a try and error treatment for these patients.

  14. Burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Woda, Alain

    2017-06-01

    Objective To review the clinical entity of primary burning mouth syndrome (BMS), its pathophysiological mechanisms, accurate new diagnostic methods and evidence-based treatment options, and to describe novel lines for future research regarding aetiology, pathophysiology, and new therapeutic strategies. Description Primary BMS is a chronic neuropathic intraoral pain condition that despite typical symptoms lacks clear clinical signs of neuropathic involvement. With advanced diagnostic methods, such as quantitative sensory testing of small somatosensory and taste afferents, neurophysiological recordings of the trigeminal system, and peripheral nerve blocks, most BMS patients can be classified into the peripheral or central type of neuropathic pain. These two types differ regarding pathophysiological mechanisms, efficacy of available treatments, and psychiatric comorbidity. The two types may overlap in individual patients. BMS is most frequent in postmenopausal women, with general population prevalence of around 1%. Treatment of BMS is difficult; best evidence exists for efficacy of topical and systemic clonazepam. Hormonal substitution, dopaminergic medications, and therapeutic non-invasive neuromodulation may provide efficient mechanism-based treatments for BMS in the future. Conclusion We present a novel comprehensive hypothesis of primary BMS, gathering the hormonal, neuropathic, and genetic factors presumably required in the genesis of the condition. This will aid in future research on pathophysiology and risk factors of BMS, and boost treatment trials taking into account individual mechanism profiles and subgroup-clusters.

  15. Metano no ar expirado de crianças com constipação crônica funcional Breath methane in children with chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Fontenele SOARES

    2002-03-01

    with functional chronic constipation aged from 3 to 13 years were studied. Methane concentration in the expired air was determined using a gas chromatograph (Quintron, model 12i. Methane production was considered present if the breath methane concentration was equal or greater than 3 ppm. Results -Methane production was present in 44 (86,3% of 51 patients with constipation and fecal soiling versus only 7 (29,2% of 24 patients with constipation without fecal soiling. After six weeks of therapy for constipation, the number of methane producers decreased by 65,2%. None of the 10 children with normal intestinal habit produced methane. Expired air methane concentration was determined before and after a bowel movement induced by a phosphate enema in 20 patients with impacted stool. From these 20 patients, 12 were methane producers. The median (percentiles 25 and 75 between parenthesis of methane concentration decreased from 21.5 (15.0-25.5 ppm before to 11.0 (4.0-12.5 ppm after the bowel movement. Conclusion - Methane production was associated with chronic constipation with soiling and decreased when impacted stool decreased.

  16. Dry Mouth or Xerostomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Considerations How Cancer is Treated Side Effects Dating, Sex, and Reproduction Advanced Cancer For Children For Teens For Young Adults For Older Adults Prevention and Healthy Living Cancer.Net Videos Coping With Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog ...

  17. Burning mouth syndrome: Present perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Ramesh Parajuli

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa in the absence of obvious visible mucosal lesions. Patient presenting with the burning mouth sensation or pain is frequently encountered in clinical practice which poses a challenge to the treating clinician. Its exact etiology remains unknown which probably has multifactorial origin. It often affects middle or old age women and it may be accompanied by xerostomia and alte...

  18. Dry mouth and older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, W M

    2015-03-01

    Dry mouth is more common among older people than in any other age group. Appropriate definition and accurate measurement of dry mouth is critical for better understanding, monitoring and treatment of the condition. Xerostomia is the symptom(s) of dry mouth; it can be measured using methods ranging from single questions to multi-item summated rating scales. Low salivary flow (known as salivary gland hypofunction, or SGH) must be determined by measuring that flow. The relationship between SGH and xerostomia is not straightforward, but both conditions are common among older people, and they affect sufferers' day-to-day lives in important ways. The major risk factor for dry mouth is the taking of particular medications, and older people take more of those than any other age group, not only for symptomatic relief of various age-associated chronic diseases, but also in order to reduce the likelihood of complications which may arise from those conditions. The greater the number taken, the greater the associated anticholinergic burden, and the more likely it is that the individual will suffer from dry mouth. Since treating dry mouth is such a challenge for clinicians, there is a need for dentists, doctors and pharmacists to work together to prevent it occurring. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  19. Cost-effectiveness of preventing dental caries and full mouth dental reconstructions among Alaska Native children in the Yukon–Kuskokwim delta region of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Charisma Y.; Thomas, Timothy K.; Lenaker, Dane; Day, Gretchen M.; Hennessy, Thomas W.; Meltzer, Martin I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis of five specific dental interventions to help guide resource allocation. Methods We developed a spreadsheet-based tool, from the healthcare payer perspective, to evaluate the cost effectiveness of specific dental interventions that are currently used among Alaska Native children (6-60 months). Interventions included: water fluoridation, dental sealants, fluoride varnish, tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste, and conducting initial dental exams on children caries treatments completed by a dental provider in the dental chair, while 161 children received FMDRs completed by a dental surgeon in an operating room. The average cost of treating dental caries in the dental chair was $1,467 (~258,000 per year); while the cost of treating FMDRs was $9,349 (~1.5 million per year). All interventions were shown to prevent caries and FMDRs; however tooth brushing prevented the greatest number of caries at minimum and maximum effectiveness with 1,433 and 1,910, respectively. Tooth brushing also prevented the greatest number of FMDRs (159 and 211) at minimum and maximum effectiveness. Conclusions All of the dental interventions evaluated were shown to produce cost savings. However, the level of that cost saving is dependent on the intervention chosen. PMID:26990678

  20. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  1. Breathing, feeding, and neuroprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Homma, Ikuo; Shioda, S

    2006-01-01

    ... of knowledge of brain functions and morphology. Akiyoshi Hosoyamada, M.D., Ph.D. President Showa University, Tokyo 142-8555, Japan December 2005Preface Brain research is on the march, with several advanced technical developments and new findings uncovered almost daily. Within the brain-research fields, we focus on breathing, neuroprotection, an...

  2. Breathing Like a Fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2010-01-01

    Being able to dive and breathe underwater has been a challenge for thousands of years. In 1980, Fuji Systems of Tokyo developed a series of prototype gills for divers as a way of demonstrating just how good its membranes are. Even though gill technology has not yet reached the point where recipients can efficiently use implants to dive underwater,…

  3. Breathing difficulty - lying down

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other conditions that lead to it) Panic disorder Sleep apnea Snoring Home Care Your health care provider may recommend self-care measures. For example, weight loss may be suggested if you are obese. When to Contact a Medical Professional If you have any unexplained difficulty in breathing ...

  4. The Breath of Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josephsen, Jens

    The present preliminary text is a short thematic presentation in biological inorganic chemistry meant to illustrate general and inorganic (especially coordination) chemistry in biochemistry. The emphasis is on molecular models to explain features of the complicated mechanisms essential to breathing...

  5. Breath-Hold Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitz-Clarke, John R

    2018-03-25

    Breath-hold diving is practiced by recreational divers, seafood divers, military divers, and competitive athletes. It involves highly integrated physiology and extreme responses. This article reviews human breath-hold diving physiology beginning with an historical overview followed by a summary of foundational research and a survey of some contemporary issues. Immersion and cardiovascular adjustments promote a blood shift into the heart and chest vasculature. Autonomic responses include diving bradycardia, peripheral vasoconstriction, and splenic contraction, which help conserve oxygen. Competitive divers use a technique of lung hyperinflation that raises initial volume and airway pressure to facilitate longer apnea times and greater depths. Gas compression at depth leads to sequential alveolar collapse. Airway pressure decreases with depth and becomes negative relative to ambient due to limited chest compliance at low lung volumes, raising the risk of pulmonary injury called "squeeze," characterized by postdive coughing, wheezing, and hemoptysis. Hypoxia and hypercapnia influence the terminal breakpoint beyond which voluntary apnea cannot be sustained. Ascent blackout due to hypoxia is a danger during long breath-holds, and has become common amongst high-level competitors who can suppress their urge to breathe. Decompression sickness due to nitrogen accumulation causing bubble formation can occur after multiple repetitive dives, or after single deep dives during depth record attempts. Humans experience responses similar to those seen in diving mammals, but to a lesser degree. The deepest sled-assisted breath-hold dive was to 214 m. Factors that might determine ultimate human depth capabilities are discussed. © 2018 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 8:585-630, 2018. Copyright © 2018 American Physiological Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Early Childhood Dental Caries, Mouth Pain, and Malnutrition in the Ecuadorian Amazon Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Marvin; Ellenikiotis, Yianni A; Husby, Hannah M; Paz, Cecilia Leonor; Seymour, Brittany; Sokal-Gutierrez, Karen

    2017-05-22

    Malnutrition and dental caries in early childhood remain persistent and intertwined global health challenges, particularly for indigenous and geographically-remote populations. To examine the prevalence and associations between early childhood dental caries, parent-reported mouth pain and malnutrition in the Amazonian region of Ecuador, we conducted a cross-sectional study of the oral health and nutrition status of 1407 children from birth through age 6 in the "Alli Kiru" program (2011-2013). We used multivariate regression analysis to examine relationships between severe caries, parent-reported mouth pain measures, and nutritional status. The prevalence of dental caries was 65.4%, with 44.7% of children having deep or severe caries, and 33.8% reporting mouth pain. The number of decayed, missing and filled teeth (dmft) increased dramatically with age. Malnutrition was prevalent, with 35.9% of children stunted, 1.1% wasted, 7.4% underweight, and 6.8% overweight. As mouth pain increased in frequency, odds for severe caries increased. For each unit increase in mouth pain frequency interfering with sleeping, children had increased odds for being underweight (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 1.27; 95% CI: 1.02-1.54) and decreased odds for being overweight (AOR: 0.76; 95% CI: 0.58-0.97). This relationship was most pronounced among 3-6 year-olds. Early childhood caries, mouth pain and malnutrition were prevalent in this sample of young children. Parent-reported mouth pain was associated with severe caries, and mouth pain interfering with sleeping was predictive of poor nutritional status. We demonstrate the utility of a parsimonious parent-reported measure of mouth pain to predict young children's risk for severe early childhood caries and malnutrition, which has implications for community health interventions.

  7. Prevalence of oral habits in homeless children under care of Yayasan Bahtera Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildasya Gildasya

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Oral habits, comprising of thumb and lip sucking, lip and nail biting, tongue thrusting and mouth breathing are commonly caused by disturbance in mental development. These persistent habits may lead to disturbance in physical growth, causing disorders such as malocclusion. Homeless children are prone to this condition. The purpose of this descriptive research was to present the prevalence of oral habits in homeless children under care of Yayasan Bahtera Bandung, by survey technique. The sample consisted of 92 children collected by purposive sampling. This research was conducted through interviews and clinical examnations of the oral cavity to elucidate signs of oral habits. The result showed 50% of homeless children performed oral habits, consisting of 26 boys (55,32% and 20 girls (44.44%. The prevalence of thumb sucking habit was 21.74%, lip sucking or biting was 17.37%, tongue thrusting was 4,35%, nail biting and mouth breathing tied at 3,26%. The research concluded that a part of homeless children had oral habits, with boys as slight majority, and thumb sucking was the most performed.

  8. Burning mouth syndrome: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra G Patil

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome is a condition characterized by chronic orofacial pain without any mucosal abnormalities or other organic disease. There are numerous synonyms for this ailment such as stomatodynia, stomatopyrosis, glossodynia, glossopyrosis, sore mouth, sore tongue, oral dysesthesia, and scalding mouth syndrome. Patients usually present with burning, stinging, or numbness on the tongue or other areas of oral mucosa. The complex etiology and lack of characteristic signs and symptoms makes the diagnosis difficult. As a result of which managing such patients become a herculean task. Moreover, lack of understanding of the disease leads to misdiagnosis and unnecessary referral of patients. In this article, the authors have described the etiopathogenesis, diagnostic algorithm and management of this confusing ailment.

  9. Measurement and prediction of indoor air quality using a breathing thermal manikin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikov, A; Kaczmarczyk, J

    2007-02-01

    The analyses performed in this paper reveal that a breathing thermal manikin with realistic simulation of respiration including breathing cycle, pulmonary ventilation rate, frequency and breathing mode, gas concentration, humidity and temperature of exhaled air and human body shape and surface temperature is sensitive enough to perform reliable measurement of characteristics of air as inhaled by occupants. The temperature, humidity, and pollution concentration in the inhaled air can be measured accurately with a thermal manikin without breathing simulation if they are measured at the upper lip at a distance of measured inhaled air parameters. Proper simulation of breathing, especially of exhalation, is needed for studying the transport of exhaled air between occupants. A method for predicting air acceptability based on inhaled air parameters and known exposure-response relationships established in experiments with human subjects is suggested. Recommendations for optimal simulation of human breathing by means of a breathing thermal manikin when studying pollution concentration, temperature and humidity of the inhaled air as well as the transport of exhaled air (which may carry infectious agents) between occupants are outlined. In order to compare results obtained with breathing thermal manikins, their nose and mouth geometry should be standardized.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Włodarska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Sleep-related breathing disorders in children are a clinical problem which is more and more often diagnosed by doctors nowadays. They can be the basis for diagnosing obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome that causes a number of complications: lowering the quality of life, behavioural problems, complications involving cardiovascular system. The incidence of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in the paediatric population is estimated to be at the level of 2%. The symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome can be divided into daytime and night ones. Night symptoms in children include: snoring, apnoea, breathing with open mouth (both during the day and at night, dry tongue and mouth during sleep, agitated sleep in unnatural positions. Among daytime symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome there are: irritability, aggressiveness, hyperactivity, attention deficit disorder, delayed development and growth pattern (mainly failure to thrive, learning problems, morning headaches. Parents often do not connect the night and daytime symptoms with the possible development of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in their children. The main predisposing factor of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children is adenotonsillar hypertrophy. Effective and in most cases preferred treatment for the management of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children is adenotonsillectomy. Polysomnography and polygraphy are diagnostic tools helpful in the study of sleep-related disorders. The objective of this study was to systematise the knowledge on the epidemiology, aetiology, clinical image and prevention of obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome in children.

  11. Mapleson's Breathing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Tej K; Mittal, Geeta

    2013-09-01

    Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where as Mapleson D and its Bains modifications are best available circuits for controlled ventilation. For neonates and paediatric patients Mapleson E and F (Jackson Rees modification) are the best circuits. In this review article, we will discuss the structure of the circuits and functional analysis of various types of Mapleson systems and their advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Learn More Breathe Better

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that makes breathing very difficult and can affect your quality of life. Learn the causes of COPD and what you can do to prevent it.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Division of Adult and Community Health (NCCDPHP, DACH).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  13. [Detection of cerebrospinal fluid anti-enterovirus 71 IgM in children with severe hand, food and mouth disease induced by enterovirus 71 infection and its clinical significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yidong; Chen, Dong; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Jie; Zhao, Shiyong; Shao, Qimin; Wei, Yi

    2015-05-01

    To detect the anti-enterovirus 71 (EV71) IgM level in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children with severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) induced by EV71 and then analyze the relationships among the IgM antibody levels, CSF routine examination and patients' clinical features, and thus to evaluate the clinical significance of anti-EV71 IgM as a new indicator for early diagnosis of children with severe HFMD induced by EV71. A total of 294 laboratory-confirmed cases of children with severe HFMD infected with EV71 were enrolled into the research group from March 2014 to June 2014, consisting of 53 fatal cases and 241 severe cases, and their CSF samples underwent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-EV71 IgM levels, CSF routine and biochemical tests. Forty-one cases of children with severe HFMD induced by other enteroviruses were collected as antibody-testing control group during the same period. In the research group, the total positive rate of anti-EV71 IgM in 294 CSF samples of children with severe HFMD infected by EV71 was 60.2% (177/294); the positive rate of anti-EV71 IgM in the fatal HFMD subgroup was 62.3% (33/53); the positive rate of anti-EV71 IgM in the severe HFMD subgroup was 59.8% (144/241). In the control group, the results of CSF anti-EV71 IgM tests were all negative (0/41). In the research group, patients in antibody-positive subgroup (2.5±1.2) years old were younger than those in antibody-negative subgroup (2.9±1.1) years old (t=2.595, P=0.010). And within the antibody-positive subgroup, the patients ((1.9±0.7) years old) with fatal type disease were younger than those ((2.6±1.2) years old) with severe type disease (t=3.150, P=0.002). The CSF nucleated cells count and positive rates (105 (56,180) ×10(6) /L; 97.7% (173/177)) in antibody-positive subgroup were higher than those (62(30,150) ×10(6) /L; 83.8% (98/117)) in antibody-negative subgroup (Z=3.663, P=0.000; χ(2)=19.089, P=0.000). In antibody-positive subgroup, the percentage

  14. Deep breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure in patients with multiple sclerosis - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerdahl, Elisabeth; Wittrin, Anna; Kånåhols, Margareta; Gunnarsson, Martin; Nilsagård, Ylva

    2016-11-01

    Breathing exercises with positive expiratory pressure are often recommended to patients with advanced neurological deficits, but the potential benefit in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with mild and moderate symptoms has not yet been investigated in randomized controlled trials. To study the effects of 2 months of home-based breathing exercises for patients with mild to moderate MS on respiratory muscle strength, lung function, and subjective breathing and health status outcomes. Forty-eight patients with MS according to the revised McDonald criteria were enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Patients performing breathing exercises (n = 23) were compared with a control group (n = 25) performing no breathing exercises. The breathing exercises were performed with a positive expiratory pressure device (10-15 cmH 2 O) and consisted of 30 slow deep breaths performed twice a day for 2 months. Respiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure at the mouth), spirometry, oxygenation, thoracic excursion, subjective perceptions of breathing and self-reported health status were evaluated before and after the intervention period. Following the intervention, there was a significant difference between the breathing group and the control group regarding the relative change in lung function, favoring the breathing group (vital capacity: P < 0.043; forced vital capacity: P < 0.025). There were no other significant differences between the groups. Breathing exercises may be beneficial in patients with mild to moderate stages of MS. However, the clinical significance needs to be clarified, and it remains to be seen whether a sustainable effect in delaying the development of respiratory dysfunction in MS can be obtained. © 2015 The Authors. The Clinical Respiratory Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. FeNO measured at fixed exhalation flow rate during controlled tidal breathing in children from the age of 2 yr

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchvald, F; Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    it with NO in mixed exhaled air collected in a bag (FeNO [mixed]). Sixty-seven children were studied: 16 school children and 51 children aged 2-5 yr; 14 of the young children were healthy, 22 had asthma treated with regular inhaled budesonide, and 15 had mild episodic wheeze treated with inhaled terbutaline...... dose of budesonide was tapered in nine young children with asthma. FeNO(controlled) is feasible in young children from age 2 and shows better agreement with FeNO(SBOL) than FeNO(mixed). FeNO(controlled) covaries with asthma disease severity and steroid dose. FeNO(controlled) is therefore suggested...... as necessary. FeNO (controlled) showed good agreement with FeNO(SBOL) (factor difference 0.7-1.4), whereas FeNO(mixed) showed poor agreement with FeNO(SBOL) (factor difference 0.51-5.37). FeNO(controlled) (mean [95% confidence interval]) was 6 ppb (4-8 ppb) in young children with asthma, 5 ppb (3-7 ppb...

  16. Análise quantitativa do palato duro em diferentes tipologias faciais de respiradores nasais e orais Quantitative analysis of the hard palate in different facial typologies in nasal and mouth breathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cristina Berwig

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: comparar as dimensões do palato duro em diferentes tipologias faciais de crianças respiradoras nasais e orais. MÉTODO: a amostra foi constituída por 54 crianças, na faixa etária entre sete e 11 anos, distribuídas em grupos conforme o tipo facial e o modo respiratório. O tipo facial foi obtido por meio da análise cefalométrica de Ricketts, e o modo respiratório foi determinado a partir da avaliação fonoaudiológica e do diagnóstico otorrinolaringológico. Para realização de medidas transversais, verticais e do comprimento anteroposterior do palato duro, foram obtidos modelos em gesso do arco dental maxilar. Para comparação das dimensões do palato duro entre os grupos, foram utilizados testes paramétricos e não paramétricos, ao nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: não foi verificada diferença estatisticamente significante nas medidas do palato duro entre as crianças braquifaciais, mesofaciais e dolicofaciais. Verificou-se diferença estatisticamente significante na distância entre os segundos pré-molares nos diferentes tipos faciais das crianças respiradoras nasais e orais, sendo que esta diferença não foi detectada nas comparações múltiplas. CONCLUSÃO: as dimensões do palato duro não diferiram quando analisadas em diferentes tipos faciais independente do modo respiratório. Porém, evidenciou-se diferença na distância entre os segundos pré-molares quando o tipo facial foi analisado nos respiradores nasais e orais.PURPOSE: to compare the hard palate dimensions in nasal and mouth breathing children of different facial typologies. METHOD: the sample comprised 54 children between seven and 11 year old, divided in two groups according to the facial type and breathing mode. The facial type was obtained through the Ricketts cephalometric analysis, and the breathing mode was determined from speech-language evaluation and otorhynolaryngologic diagnosis. In order to measure the transverse, vertical

  17. The air-breathing cycle of Hoplosternum littorale (Hancock, 1828(Siluriformes: Callichthyidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Jucá-Chagas

    Full Text Available Hoplosternum littorale is a continuous air breather, which uses a portion of its intestine to extract oxygen from inspired air. Its air-breathing behavior occurs in four phases: 1 ascent to the water surface; 2 mouth emergence with expansion of the oral cavity for air inspiration; 3 downward swimming and oral cavity compression resulting in air swallowing and the expiration of old air from the anus; 4 return to bottom. The time required to complete the air-breathing cycle was significantly shorter for small fish compared to large fish.

  18. Efficacy of a probiotic and chlorhexidine mouth rinses: A short-term clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harini P

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Probiotic technology represents a breakthrough approach to maintaining oral health by utilizing natural beneficial bacteria commonly found in healthy mouths to provide a natural defense against those bacteria thought to be harmful to teeth and gums. However, data are still sparse on the probiotic action in the oral cavity. The review article on probiotics in children published by Twetman and Stecksen- Blicks in 2008 showed only one study of dental interest on probiotics in children. Aim and Objectives: The present study evaluated clinically the efficacy of a probiotic and chlorhexidine mouth rinses on plaque and gingival accumulation in children. The trial design is a double-blind parallel group, 14 days comparative study between a probiotic mouth rinse and a chlorhexidine mouth rinse, which included 45 healthy children in the age group of 6-8 years. Results: The Probiotic and Chlorhexidine groups had less plaque accumulations compared with the Control group at the end of 14 years (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively. But, unlike the plaque score, there was a significant difference in the Gingival Index between the Probiotic and the Chlorhexidine groups (P = 0.009, Probiotic group being better than the Chlorhexidine group (mean = 0.2300 and 0.6805, respectively. Conclusion: The Probiotic mouth rinse was found effective in reducing plaque accumulation and gingival inflammation. Therefore, probiotic mouth rinse obviously has a potential therapeutic value and further long-term study is recommended to determine its efficacy.

  19. Impacts of online peer support for children with asthma and allergies: It just helps you every time you can't breathe well".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Miriam; Letourneau, Nicole; Masuda, Jeffrey R; Anderson, Sharon; McGhan, Shawna

    2013-01-01

    Children with asthma and allergies experience social isolation and gaps in social support particularly from peers. The objective of this pilot study was to design and test an accessible online support intervention for these children. Support was delivered by peer mentors with asthma and allergies and a professional. Weekly support groups were conducted over 8 weeks using Go to Meeting and Club Penguin. Quantitative measures and a qualitative interview were administered. Significant increases in perceived support and support-seeking coping and trends in decreased loneliness emerged at post-test. Participants also reported increased self-confidence and satisfaction with the intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Foot-and-Mouth Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Grubman, Marvin J.; Baxt, Barry

    2004-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. The disease was initially described in the 16th century and was the first animal pathogen identified as a virus. Recent FMD outbreaks in developed countries and their significant economic impact have increased the concern of governments worldwide. This review describes the reemergence of FMD in developed countries that had been disease free for many years and the effect that this has had on disease control s...

  1. Burning mouth syndrome: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage; Jaishankar Homberhalli Puttabuddi; Purnachandrarao Naik Nunsavath

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterized by an oral burning sensation in the absence of any organic disorders of the oral cavity. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and is characterized by an intense burning type of pain, preferably on the tongue and in other areas of the ...

  2. Burning mouth syndrome: Clinical dilemma?

    OpenAIRE

    Kanchan R Patil; R S Sathawane

    2008-01-01

    Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a chronic orofacial burning pain condition usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings that affects many adults worldwide, yet its etiology and treatment remain poorly understood. Though it has been associated with numerous oral and systemic conditions, there has been no clear consensus on its etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. As a result, patients with inexplicable oral complaints are often referred from one health care professional to anoth...

  3. Body composition variation following diaphragmatic breathing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Body composition variation following diaphragmatic breathing. ... effect of commonly prescribed diaphragmatic breathing training on the body composition ... a non-exercising control (NE) group (n = 22) or diaphragmatic breathing (DB) group.

  4. Oral breathing: new early treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Denotti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral breathing is a respiratory dysfunction that affects approximately 10-15% of child population. It is responsable of local effects and systemic effects, both immediate and long-term. They affect the growth of the subject and his physical health in many ways: pediatric, psycho-behavioral and cognitive. The etiology is multifactorial. It’s important the establishment of a vicious circle involving more areas and it is essential to stop it as soon as possible. In order to correct this anomaly, the pediatric dentist must be able to make a correct diagnosis to treat early the disfunction and to avoid the onset of cascade mechanisms. Who plays a central role is the pediatrician who first and frequently come into contact with little patients. He can identify the anomalies, and therefore collaborate with other specialists, including the dentist. The key aspect that guides us in the diagnosis, and allows us to identify the oral respirator, is the “adenoid facies”. The purpose of the study is to highlight the importance and benefits of an early and multidisciplinary intervention (pediatric, orthopedic-orthodontic-functional. A sample of 20 patients was selected with the following inclusion criteria: mouth breathing, transverse discrepancy > 4 mm, early mixed dentition, central and lateral permenent incisors, overjet increased, lip and nasal incompetence, snoring and/or sleep apnea episodes. The protocol of intervention includes the use of the following devices and procedures: a maxillary rapid expander (to correct the transverse discrepancy, to increase the amplitude of the upper respiratory airway and to reduce nasal resistances tract in association with myo-functional devices (nasal stimulator and oral obturator. They allow the reconstruction of a physiological balance between the perioral musculature and tongue, the acquisition of nasal and lips competence and the reduction of overjet. This protocol speeds up and stabilizes the results. The

  5. BREATHE to Understand©

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisa, Maxine

    2015-01-01

    BREATHE is an acronym for Breathe, Reflect, Empathize, Accept, Thank, Hearten, Engage. The addition of Understand allows for a holistic approach to living a healthy and balanced life both inside and outside the classroom. This paper took form as a result of my personal, spiritual journey, as well as my teaching practice. I noticed that the…

  6. Breath in the technoscientific imaginary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Arthur

    2016-12-01

    Breath has a realist function in most artistic media. It serves to remind the reader, the viewer or the spectator of the exigencies of the body. In science fiction (SF) literature and films, breath is often a plot device for human encounters with otherness, either with alien peoples, who may not breathe oxygen, or environments, where there may not be oxygen to breathe. But while there is a technoscientific quality to breath in SF, especially in its attention to physiological systems, concentrating on the technoscientific threatens to occlude other, more affective aspects raised by the literature. In order to supplement the tendency to read SF as a succession of technoscientific accounts of bodily experience, this paper recalls how SF texts draw attention to the affective, non-scientific qualities of breath, both as a metonym for life and as a metaphor for anticipation. Through an engagement with diverse examples from SF literature and films, this article considers the tension between technoscientific and affective responses to breath in order to demonstrate breath's co-determinacy in SF's blending of scientific and artistic discourses. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Patient's breath controls comfort devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, M.; Carpenter, B.; Nichols, C. D.

    1972-01-01

    Patient assist system for totally disabled persons was developed which permits a person, so paralyzed as to be unable to move, to activate by breathing, a call system to summon assistance, turn the page of a book, ajust his bed, or do any one of a number of other things. System consists of patient assist control and breath actuated switch.

  8. FMWC Radar for Breath Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Lau Frejstrup; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    We report on the experimental demonstration of an FMCW radar operating in the 25.7 - 26.6 GHz range with a repetition rate of 500 sweeps per second. The radar is able to track the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance of 1 meter. The experiments have utilized a 50 second recording window...... to accurately track the breathing rate. The radar utilizes a saw tooth modulation format and a low latency receiver. A breath tracking radar is useful both in medical scenarios, diagnosing disorders such as sleep apnea, and for home use where the user can monitor its health. Breathing is a central part of every...... radar chip which, through the use of a simple modulation scheme, is able to measure the breathing rate of an adult human from a distance. A high frequency output makes sure that the radar cannot penetrate solid obstacles which is a wanted feature in private homes where people therefore cannot measure...

  9. prevalence of sleep disorders in khorramabad 7-12 year old elementary school children in school year 2006-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azam Mohsenzadeh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The most important consequence of sleep disorders in children is cognitive dysfunction that leads to study, family and social disturbances. This study was carried out to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disorders in Khorramabad 7-12 year old elementary school children in school year 2006-2007. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 364 students were selected randomly in both sexes male and female with equal numbers. Data were collected using TUCASA questionnaire. Results: Results showed the revalence of sleep disorders as follows: mouth breathing 35/7%, sleep talking 24/7%, habitual snoring 20/3%, nightmare 19/8%, sleep teeth grinding 15/9%, secondary enuresis 8/2%, primary nocturnal enuresis 7/1%, sleep apnea 6/6%, sleep walking 6/6% and excessive daytime sleepiness 10%. Statistical tests showed that there is a significant relation between primary and secondary nocturnal enuresis and male sex, and both disorders were more in boys (p-value=0. 004. Between other disorders, and sex and age there was not significant relation. In this study between teeth grinding and snoring, sleep apnea and snoring, open mouth breathing and snoring, excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep apnea, sleep duration and time of sleep of parents, there was significant relation (p-value<0. 001. Conclusion: According to findings, mouth breathing was the most common sleep disorder in our subjects and had a significant relation with sleep snoring. So due to treating ability of nonmedical therapy in sleep disorders, it is recommended to increase parents information about necessity of medication and its effect on children cognition.

  10. Breath of hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škof, Lenart

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we outline the possibilities of an ethic of care based on our self-affection and subjectivity in the ethical spaces between-two. In this we first refer to three Irigarayan concepts - breath, silence and listening from the third phase of her philosophy, and discuss them within the methodological framework of an ethics of intersubjectivity and interiority. Together with attentiveness, we analyse them as four categories of our ethical becoming. Furthermore, we argue that self-affection is based on our inchoate receptivity for the needs of the other(s) and is thus dialectical in its character. In this we critically confront some epistemological views of our ethical becoming. We wind up this paper with a proposal for an ethics towards two autonomous subjects, based on care and our shared ethical becoming - both as signs of our deepest hospitality towards the other.

  11. The characteristics of autonomic nervous system disorders in burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszewicz, Magdalena; Mendak, Magdalena; Konopka, Tomasz; Koziorowska-Gawron, Ewa; Budrewicz, Sławomir

    2012-01-01

    To conduct a clinical electrophysiologic evaluation of autonomic nervous system functions in patients with burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease and estimate the type and intensity of the autonomic dysfunction. The study involved 83 subjects-33 with burning mouth syndrome, 20 with Parkinson disease, and 30 controls. The BMS group included 27 women and 6 men (median age, 60.0 years), and the Parkinson disease group included 15 women and 5 men (median age, 66.5 years). In the control group, there were 20 women and 10 men (median age, 59.0 years). All patients were subjected to autonomic nervous system testing. In addition to the Low autonomic disorder questionnaire, heart rate variability (HRV), deep breathing (exhalation/inspiration [E/I] ratio), and sympathetic skin response (SSR) tests were performed in all cases. Parametric and nonparametric tests (ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis, and Scheffe tests) were used in the statistical analysis. The mean values for HRV and E/I ratios were significantly lower in the burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease groups. Significant prolongation of SSR latency in the foot was revealed in both burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease patients, and lowering of the SSR amplitude occurred in only the Parkinson disease group. The autonomic questionnaire score was significantly higher in burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease patients than in the control subjects, with the Parkinson disease group having the highest scores. In patients with burning mouth syndrome, a significant impairment of both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems was found but sympathetic/parasympathetic balance was preserved. The incidence and intensity of autonomic nervous system dysfunction was similar in patients with burning mouth syndrome and Parkinson disease, which may suggest some similarity in their pathogeneses.

  12. Clinical validation of free breathing respiratory triggered retrospectively cardiac gated cine balanced steady-state free precession cardiovascular magnetic resonance in sedated children

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Pednekar, Amol; Atweh, Lamya A; Vogelius, Esben; Chu, Zili David; Zhang, Wei; Maskatia, Shiraz; Masand, Prakash; Morris, Shaine A; Krishnamurthy, Ramkumar; Muthupillai, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Background Cine balanced steady-state free precession (SSFP), the preferred sequence for ventricular function, demands uninterrupted radio frequency (RF) excitation to maintain the steady-state during suspended respiration. This is difficult to accomplish in sedated children. In this work, we validate a respiratory triggered (RT) SSFP sequence that drives the magnetization to steady-state before commencing retrospectively cardiac gated cine acquisition in a sedated pediatric population. Metho...

  13. Amphioxus mouth after dorso-ventral inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Takao; Reimer, James D; Morov, Arseniy R; Kuratani, Shigeru; Yasui, Kinya

    2016-01-01

    Deuterostomes (animals with 'secondary mouths') are generally accepted to develop the mouth independently of the blastopore. However, it remains largely unknown whether mouths are homologous among all deuterostome groups. Unlike other bilaterians, in amphioxus the mouth initially opens on the left lateral side. This peculiar morphology has not been fully explained in the evolutionary developmental context. We studied the developmental process of the amphioxus mouth to understand whether amphioxus acquired a new mouth, and if so, how it is related to or differs from mouths in other deuterostomes. The left first somite in amphioxus produces a coelomic vesicle between the epidermis and pharynx that plays a crucial role in the mouth opening. The vesicle develops in association with the amphioxus-specific Hatschek nephridium, and first opens into the pharynx and then into the exterior as a mouth. This asymmetrical development of the anterior-most somites depends on the Nodal-Pitx signaling unit, and the perturbation of laterality-determining Nodal signaling led to the disappearance of the vesicle, producing a symmetric pair of anterior-most somites that resulted in larvae lacking orobranchial structures. The vesicle expressed bmp2/4, as seen in ambulacrarian coelomic pore-canals, and the mouth did not open when Bmp2/4 signaling was blocked. We conclude that the amphioxus mouth, which uniquely involves a mesodermal coelomic vesicle, shares its evolutionary origins with the ambulacrarian coelomic pore-canal. Our observations suggest that there are at least three types of mouths in deuterostomes, and that the new acquisition of chordate mouths was likely related to the dorso-ventral inversion that occurred in the last common ancestor of chordates.

  14. Ventilatory muscle endurance training in quadriplegia: effects on breathing pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveridge, B; Badour, M; Dubo, H

    1989-10-01

    We examined the effects of ventilatory muscle endurance training on resting breathing pattern in 12 C6-C7 traumatic quadriplegics at least 1 year post-injury. All subjects had complete motor loss below the lesion level. Subjects were randomly assigned to a training (N = 6), or a control group (N = 6). Baseline tests included measurement of resting ventilation and breathing pattern using mercury in rubber strain gauges for 20 minutes in a seated position; maximum inspiratory mouth pressure (MIP) at FRC, and sustainable inspiratory mouth pressure for 10 minutes (SIP); lung volumes, and arterial blood gases (ABG's). The training protocol consisted of breathing through an inspiratory resistor equivalent to 85% SIP for 15 minutes twice daily, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. Both trainers and controls attended the lab every 2 weeks for reassessment of MIP and SIP and the inspiratory resistance was increased in the training group as SIP increased. At the end of 8 weeks, baseline tests were repeated. All subjects had normal ABG's. There was a significant increase in mean MIP and SIP in both the control group (30% +/- 19% and 31% +/- 18% respectively), and in the training group (42% +/- 24% and 78% +/- 49% respectively). Although the absolute values for both MIP and SIP were greater in the training group than in the control group, the differences were not significant. The alterations in resting breathing pattern were also the same in both groups. Mean frequency decreased significantly in the control group (20.2/minute to 16.9/minute) and, while insignificant, the change in frequency in the training group was the same, 19.4/minute to 16.4/minute. Mean tidal volume (Vt) increased 18.2% of baseline Vt in the control group and 17.0% baseline in the trainers, resulting in no change in minute ventilation. As MIP and SIP increased similarly in both groups, the data from the control and trainers was pooled and timing changes re-evaluated pre- and post-study. A significant decrease in

  15. How to breathe when you are short of breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you: Watch TV Use your computer Read a newspaper How to do Pursed lip Breathing The steps ... of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also ...

  16. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also rep...

  17. The effect of time-of-day and chest physiotherapy on multiple breath washout measures in children with clinically stable cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voldby, Christian; Green, Kent; Rosthøj, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    not previously been reported. Furthermore, we assessed the influence of chest physiotherapy on N2MBW measures. METHODS: Ten school children with cystic fibrosis performed N2MBW followed by spirometry and plethysmography in the morning and afternoon at three visits that were one month apart. Chest physiotherapy...... was performed immediately before the afternoon measurements at visit 2 and immediately before morning and afternoon measurements at visit 3. The influence of time-of-day and chest physiotherapy on the measures was evaluated using linear mixed models. RESULTS: There were adequate quality data from 8 children...... with median age (range) 9.6 (6.0; 15.1) years. Baseline lung clearance index (LCI) (range) was 9.0 (7.1; 13.0) and baseline FEV1% predicted was 97.5 (78.5; 117.9). No N2MBW measures were significantly influenced by time-of-day or chest physiotherapy. LCI (95% confidence interval) decreased non-significantly 0...

  18. ROHHAD syndrome and evolution of sleep disordered breathing

    OpenAIRE

    Reppucci, Diana; Hamilton, Jill; Yeh, E Ann; Katz, Sherri; Al-Saleh, Suhail; Narang, Indra

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare disease with a high mortality rate. Although nocturnal hypoventilation (NH) is central to ROHHAD, the evolution of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is not well studied. The aim of the study was to assess early manifestations of SDB and their evolution in ROHHAD syndrome. Methods Retrospective study of children with ROHHAD at two Canadian centers. All children with suspe...

  19. Burning mouth syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS, which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder.

  20. Burning Mouth Syndrome and Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Kumar, Mukesh; Niti; Gupta, Rajan; Chaudhary, Karun

    2013-01-01

    Menopause is a physiological process typically occurring in the fifth decade of life. One of the most annoying oral symptoms in this age group is the burning mouth syndrome (BMS), which may be defined as an intraoral burning sensation occurring in the absence of identifiable oral lesion or laboratory findings. Pain in burning mouth syndrome may be described as burning, tender, tingling, hot, scalding, and numb sensation in the oral mucosa. Multiple oral sites may be involved, but the anterior two-third part and the tip of tongue are most commonly affected site. There is no definite etiology for BMS other than the precipitating causative factors, and it is still considered idiopathic. Various treatment options like use of benzodiazepine, anti-depressants, analgesics, capsaicin, alpha lipoic acids, and cognitive behavioral therapy are found to be effective, but definite treatment is still unknown. The present article discusses some of the recent concepts of etiopathogenesis of BMS as well as the role of pharmacotherapeutic management in this disorder. PMID:23411996

  1. Model of oronasal rehabilitation in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome undergoing rapid maxillary expansion: Research review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Levrini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid maxillary expansion (RME is a widely used practice in orthodontics. Scientific evidence shows that RME can be helpful in modifying the breathing pattern in mouth-breathing patients. In order to promote the restoration of physiological breathing we have developed a rehabilitation program associated with RME in children. The aim of the study was a literature review and a model of orofacial rehabilitation in children with obstructive sleep apnea undergoing treatment with rapid maxillary expansion. Muscular training (local exercises and general ones is the key factor of the program. It also includes hygienic and behavior instructions as well as other therapeutic procedures such as rhinosinusal washes, a postural re-education (Alexander technique and, if necessary, a pharmacological treatment aimed to improve nasal obstruction. The program should be customized for each patient. If RME is supported by an adequate functional rehabilitation, the possibility to change the breathing pattern is considerably amplified. Awareness, motivation and collaboration of the child and their parents, as well as the cooperation among specialists, such as orthodontist, speech therapist, pediatrician and otolaryngologist, are necessary conditions to achieve the goal.

  2. Influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature in a bench model of neonatal continuous positive airway pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hendrik S; Ullrich, Tim L; Bührer, Christoph; Czernik, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2017-02-01

    Clinical studies show that non-invasive respiratory support by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) affects gas conditioning in the upper airways, especially in the presence of mouth leaks. Using a new bench model of neonatal CPAP, we investigated the influence of mouth opening on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. The model features the insertion of a heated humidifier between an active model lung and an oropharyngeal head model to simulate the recurrent expiration of heated, humidified air. During unsupported breathing, physiological temperature and humidity were attained inside the model oropharynx, and mouth opening had no significant effect on oropharyngeal temperature and humidity. During binasal CPAP, the impact of mouth opening was investigated using three different scenarios: no conditioning in the CPAP circuit, heating only, and heated humidification. Mouth opening had a strong negative impact on oropharyngeal humidification in all tested scenarios, but heated humidification in the CPAP circuit maintained clinically acceptable humidity levels regardless of closed or open mouths. The model can be used to test new equipment for use with CPAP, and to investigate the effects of other methods of non-invasive respiratory support on gas conditioning in the presence of leaks. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential impact of flow and mouth leak on oropharyngeal humidification during high-flow nasal cannula: a neonatal bench study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Tim Leon; Czernik, Christoph; Bührer, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd; Fischer, Hendrik Stefan

    2018-03-09

    Heated humidification is paramount during neonatal high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy. However, there is little knowledge about the influence of flow rate and mouth leak on oropharyngeal humidification and temperature. The effect of the Optiflow HFNC on oropharyngeal gas conditioning was investigated at flow rates of 4, 6 and 8 L min -1 with and without mouth leak in a bench model simulating physiological oropharyngeal air conditions during spontaneous breathing. Temperature and absolute humidity (AH) were measured using a digital thermo-hygrosensor. Without mouth leak, oropharyngeal temperature and AH increased significantly with increasing flow (P < 0.001). Mouth leak did not affect this increase up to 6 L min -1 , but at 8 L min -1 , temperature and AH plateaued, and the effect of mouth leak became statistically significant (P < 0.001). Mouth leak during HFNC had a negative impact on oropharyngeal gas conditioning when high flows were applied. However, temperature and AH always remained clinically acceptable.

  4. Heat and moisture exchange capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheenstra, Renske J; Muller, Sara H; Vincent, Andrew; Hilgers, Frans J M

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the heat and moisture exchange (HME) capacity of the upper respiratory tract and the effect of tracheotomy breathing on endotracheal climate in patients with head and neck cancer. We plotted the subglottic temperature and humidity measurements in 10 patients with head and neck cancer with a temporary precautionary tracheotomy during successive 10-minute periods of nose, mouth, and tracheotomy breathing in a randomized sequence. End-inspiratory temperatures of nose, mouth, and tracheotomy breathing were 31.1, 31.3, and 28.3°C, respectively. End-inspiratory humidity measurements of nose, mouth, and tracheotomy breathing were 29.3, 28.6, and 21.1 mgH₂O/L, respectively. There was a trend toward lower end-inspiratory humidity in patients with radiotherapy or with large surgery-induced oropharyngeal mucosal defects, whereas temperatures were similar. This study gives objective information about the HME capacity of the upper respiratory tract in patients with head and neck cancer with precautionary tracheotomy, and thus provides target values for HMEs for laryngectomized and tracheotomized patients. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2011.

  5. Language Abstraction in Word of Mouth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A.C. Schellekens (Gaby)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn word of mouth, consumers talk about their experiences with products and services with other consumers. These conversations are important sources of information for consumers. While word of mouth has fascinated researchers and practitioners for many years, little attention has been

  6. Influence of mandibular length on mouth opening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, PU; Hof, AL; Stegenga, B; De Bont, LGM

    Theoretically, mouth opening not only reflects the mobility of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) but also the mandibular length. Clinically, the exact relationship between mouth opening, mandibular length, and mobility of TMJs is unclear. To study this relationship 91 healthy subjects, 59 women

  7. Pediatras e os distúrbios respiratórios do sono na criança Pediatricians and sleep-disordered breathing in the child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aracy Pereira Silveira Balbani

    2005-04-01

    state of São Paulo, Brazil. A survey mailed to them included questions regarding: their professional profile, knowledge about SDB in childhood, opinions and practices for diagnosis and treatment of these diseases. RESULTS: 112 anonymous completed surveys were returned (21.7%. The teaching of SDB during medical school and pediatric residency raining was considered unsatisfactory respectively by 65.2% and 34.8% of the pediatricians. Forty-nine respondents (43.8% rated their knowledge about SDB in children as regular, 39 (34.8% as good and 17 (15.2% as unsatisfactory. The most important sleep-related questions were: mouth breathing, breathing pauses, sleep amount, excessive daytime sleepiness and nocturnal wheezing. Clinical aspects regarded as the most significant for suspecting obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS were: breathing pauses, adenoid hypertrophy, mouth breathing, craniofacial anomaly and snoring. The most frequent practices for evaluation of OSAS in children were: cavum radiography with referral to an otorhinolarnygologist (25% and nocturnal pulse oximetry (14.2%. Only 11.6% of pediatricians recommended overnight polysomnography and 4.5%, nap polysomnography. The most effective practices for SDB were considered to be: adenoidectomy and adenotonsillectomy, parents counseling, weight loss and sleep hygiene. CONCLUSIONS: there is a gap between research on SDB in childhood and pediatric practice.

  8. Burning mouth syndrome: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ambaldhage

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is characterized by an oral burning sensation in the absence of any organic disorders of the oral cavity. Although the cause of BMS is not known, a complex association of biological and psychological factors has been identified, suggesting the existence of a multifactorial etiology. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and is characterized by an intense burning type of pain, preferably on the tongue and in other areas of the oral mucosa. As the symptom of oral burning is seen in various pathological conditions, it is essential for a clinician to be aware of how to differentiate between symptom of oral burning and BMS. This article provides an overview of the literature on this syndrome with special reference to the etiological factors, clinical aspects, diagnostic criteria that should be followed and the therapeutic management with reference to the most recent studies.

  9. Oral health status of children with treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Dalben, Gisele; Teixeira das Neves, Lucimara; Ribeiro Gomide, Marcia

    2006-01-01

    There is a lack of data on the oral health status of individuals with craniofacial syndromes. A group of 15 children with Treacher Collins syndrome, aged 5 to 15 years old, was examined and evaluated for plaque, caries and gingival problems. The ability of the patients to clean their teeth was also investigated. A high plaque index and poor efficacy of tooth-brushing was recorded. The caries and gingival indexes were not proportionally as high as the plaque accumulation. There was no association between the gingival index and presence of mouth breathing. There was predominance of the D component in both the dmft and DMFT indexes; this was associated with a need for restorative dental treatment in 60% of the patients, which indicated the need for dental care for these patients. Caretakers should be informed of the importance of oral health and oral hygiene and encouraged to take responsibility for the oral care of the children living at home.

  10. Fractured Tracheostomy Tube in Left Main Bronchus with No Mouth Opening: An Anaesthetic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arghya Mukherjee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body aspiration is a serious medical condition that demands prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent fatal complications. This is a case report of a 42 year male with history of surgery for carcinoma tongue, hemiglossectomy and tracheostomy. He presented with dislodged fractured metallic tracheostomy tube in left main bronchus. Patient was breathing through stenosed tracheostomy stoma with bilateral normal air entry in chest. He was haemodynamically stable. Rigid bronchoscopic removal was impossible due to no mouth opening. After securing airway, general anaesthesia was induced and thoracotomy was performed to remove dislodged tube. Proper planning and coordinated team work resulted in good outcome.

  11. 49 CFR 40.245 - What is the procedure for an alcohol screening test using a saliva ASD or a breath tube ASD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... process, take the device from the employee (or if you were holding it, remove it from the employee's mouth... direct the employee to take a new test immediately, using another type of ASD (e.g., saliva device) or an... a breath tube ASD? (a) As the STT or BAT, you must take the following steps when using the saliva...

  12. Microsoft Kinect Visual and Depth Sensors for Breathing and Heart Rate Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleš Procházka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to a new method of using Microsoft (MS Kinect sensors for non-contact monitoring of breathing and heart rate estimation to detect possible medical and neurological disorders. Video sequences of facial features and thorax movements are recorded by MS Kinect image, depth and infrared sensors to enable their time analysis in selected regions of interest. The proposed methodology includes the use of computational methods and functional transforms for data selection, as well as their denoising, spectral analysis and visualization, in order to determine specific biomedical features. The results that were obtained verify the correspondence between the evaluation of the breathing frequency that was obtained from the image and infrared data of the mouth area and from the thorax movement that was recorded by the depth sensor. Spectral analysis of the time evolution of the mouth area video frames was also used for heart rate estimation. Results estimated from the image and infrared data of the mouth area were compared with those obtained by contact measurements by Garmin sensors (www.garmin.com. The study proves that simple image and depth sensors can be used to efficiently record biomedical multidimensional data with sufficient accuracy to detect selected biomedical features using specific methods of computational intelligence. The achieved accuracy for non-contact detection of breathing rate was 0.26% and the accuracy of heart rate estimation was 1.47% for the infrared sensor. The following results show how video frames with depth data can be used to differentiate different kinds of breathing. The proposed method enables us to obtain and analyse data for diagnostic purposes in the home environment or during physical activities, enabling efficient human–machine interaction.

  13. Breathing adapted radiotherapy for breast cancer: comparison of free breathing gating with the breath-hold technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N; Nøttrup, Trine Jakobi

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer implies a risk of late cardiac and pulmonary toxicity. This is the first study to evaluate cardiopulmonary dose sparing of breathing adapted radiotherapy (BART) using free breathing gating......, and to compare this respiratory technique with voluntary breath-hold. PATIENTS AND METHODS: 17 patients were CT-scanned during non-coached breathing manoeuvre including free breathing (FB), end-inspiration gating (IG), end-expiration gating (EG), deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and end-expiration breath......-hold (EBH). The Varian Real-time Position Management system (RPM) was used to monitor respiratory movement and to gate the scanner. For each breathing phase, a population based internal margin (IM) was estimated based on average chest wall excursion, and incorporated into an individually optimised three...

  14. WORD OF MOUTH SEBAGAI KONSEKUENSI KEPUASAN PELANGGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Purbandari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of price and service quality on customer satisfaction to increase words of mouth. Data were collected by distributes questionnaires to 110 patient of Bhayangkara Polda DIY Hospital. Then, data was analyzed using structural equation modeling. The result showed that service quality, price and image have positive effect on patient satisfaction and patient satisfaction has a positive effect on words of mouth. The results also shows that image have the highest effect in creating the satisfaction. Therefore, the models of words of mouth have acceptable.

  15. Demineralization of teeth in mouth-breathing patients undergoing maxillary expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Bakor, Silvia Fuerte; Pereira, Julio César Motta; Frascino, Silvana; Ladalardo, Thereza Christinna Cellos Gonçalves Pinheiro; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice

    2010-01-01

    A respiração oral pode causar deformações na arcada dentária e representar risco a cáries e doenças periodontais, podendo ser agravado pela utilização de aparelhos fixos. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o grau de mineralização do esmalte dentário e a microbiota cariogênica bucal de respiradores orais que utilizaram disjuntores maxilares. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo prospectivo com 20 pacientes respiradores orais com atresia maxilar, idades entre 9 e 13 anos. A mineralização do esmalte dentário foi medida pel...

  16. Burning mouth syndrome: Clinical dilemma?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanchan R Patil

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS is a chronic orofacial burning pain condition usually in the absence of clinical and laboratory findings that affects many adults worldwide, yet its etiology and treatment remain poorly understood. Though it has been associated with numerous oral and systemic conditions, there has been no clear consensus on its etiology, pathogenesis and treatment. As a result, patients with inexplicable oral complaints are often referred from one health care professional to another without effective management having significant emotional impact on patients. As the dental profession expands its scope of care to oral medicine and geriatrics, BMS will be more effectively diagnosed and managed by these dental surgeons. Hence, they should be more involved in evaluation and management of these patients. The present article provides updated information on BMS including possible etiological factors and current treatment options, although data on the effectiveness of these treatment modalities remain limited. Recently researchers found that treatment with a familiar nutritional supplement- lipoic acid- is of remarkable benefit with minimal adverse effects. ALA (alpha-lipoic acid may be the effective treatment modality in management of BMS.

  17. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele Nasri-Heir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM. The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  18. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients.

  19. ROHHAD syndrome and evolution of sleep disordered breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppucci, Diana; Hamilton, Jill; Yeh, E Ann; Katz, Sherri; Al-Saleh, Suhail; Narang, Indra

    2016-07-30

    Rapid-onset obesity with hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD) is a rare disease with a high mortality rate. Although nocturnal hypoventilation (NH) is central to ROHHAD, the evolution of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) is not well studied. The aim of the study was to assess early manifestations of SDB and their evolution in ROHHAD syndrome. Retrospective study of children with ROHHAD at two Canadian centers. All children with suspected ROHHAD at presentation underwent polysomnography (PSG) to screen for nocturnal hypoventilation. PSG findings at baseline and follow-up were collected. Interventions and diagnostic test results were recorded. Six children were included. The median age of rapid onset obesity and nocturnal hypoventilation (NH) was 3.5 and 7.2 years respectively. On initial screening for ROHHAD 4/6 (66.7 %) children had obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), 1/6 (16.7 %) had NH and 1/6 (16.7 %) had both OSA and NH. Follow up PSGs were performed in 5/6 children as one child died following a cardiorespiratory arrest. All children at follow up had NH and required non-invasive positive pressure ventilation. Additionally, 3/6 (50 %) children demonstrated irregular breathing patterns during wakefulness. Children with ROHHAD may initially present with OSA and only develop NH later as well as dysregulation of breathing during wakefulness. The recognition of the spectrum of respiratory abnormalities at presentation and over time may be important in raising the index of suspicion of ROHHAD. Early recognition and targeted therapeutic interventions may limit morbidity and mortality associated with ROHHAD.

  20. KAJIAN LITERATUR: MANAKAH YANG LEBIH EFEKTIF? TRADITIONAL WORD OF MOUTH ATAU ELECTRONIC WORD OF MOUTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putu Adriani Prayustika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Word of Mouth telah diakui sebagai salah satu strategi komunikasi yang paling efektif dalam transisi informasi perusahaan kepada konsumen. Perusahaan memanfaatkan komunikasi word of mouth untuk kepentingan pemasaran produk dan layanan. Namun, komunikasi WOM konvensional hanya efektif dalam batasan kontak sosial terbatas. Kemajuan teknologi informasi dan munculnya situs jaringan sosial online telah mengubah cara informasi ditransmisikan dan telah melampaui keterbatasan tradisional WOM. Komunikasi word of mouth dengan memanfaatkan teknologi ini sering disebut electronic word of mouth (eWOM, dimana komunikasi ini memanfaatkan media baru, seperti misalnya media sosial. Makalah ini akan membahas kajian literatur dari beberapa penelitian yang telah dilakukan sebelumnya dalam membandingkan efektivitas traditional word of mouth dan electronic word of mouth. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa secara umum dapat dikatakan dengan perkembangan teknologi seperti sekarang, eWOM jauh lebih efektif daripada traditional WOM.

  1. ACTIVE CYCLE BREATHING TECHNIQUES IN HEART FAILURE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RICHY

    Pulmonary Function Responses to Active Cycle. Breathing ... Key Words: Heart Failure, Active Cycle of Breathing ... cough, fatigue, reduced respiratory muscle mass, and. [5] ... an amount of exercise which is said to lower disease. [9].

  2. Volatile sulphur compounds in morning breath of human volunteers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Burgering, M.; Smit, B.; Noordman, W.; Tangerman, A.; Winkel, E.G.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: morning breath contains elevated concentrations of volatile sulphur components (VSCs). Therefore, morning breath is recognised as a surrogate target for interventions on breath quality. Nevertheless, factors influencing morning breath are poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate

  3. Volatile sulphur compounds in morning breath of human volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Johannes; Burgering, Maurits; Smit, Bart; Noordman, Wouter; Tangerman, Albert; Winkel, Edwin G.; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    Objective: Morning breath contains elevated concentrations of volatile sulphur components (VSCs). Therefore, morning breath is recognised as a surrogate target for interventions on breath quality. Nevertheless, factors influencing morning breath are poorly understood. Our aim was to evaluate

  4. Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease (HFMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feature story, podcast, and other CDC resources about personal hygiene... Prevention People infected with hand, foot, and mouth ... these countries can protect themselves by practicing good personal hygiene. Learn more . To learn more about outbreaks occurring ...

  5. THE PRAGMATICS OF 'MOUTH' METAPHORS IN AKAN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medakubu

    figure, but constitutes a fundamental part of people's ordinary thought, reason, and imagination ... ground for the conceptualisation of emotions and abstract thought in general (see .... psychological, and the socio-cultural functions of the mouth.

  6. Periaqueductal Gray Control of Breathing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, Hari H.; Holstege, Gert; Homma,; Onimaru, H; Fukuchi, Y

    2010-01-01

    Change of the basic respiratory rhythm (eupnea) is a pre-requisite for survival. For example, sudden escape from danger needs rapid shallow breathing, strenuous exercise requires tachypnea for sufficient supply of oxygen and a strong anxiety reaction necessitates gasping. Also for vocalization (and

  7. The 14C-urea breath-test for the detection of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surveyor, I.; Goodwin, C.S.; Mullan, B.P.; Geelhoed, E.; Warren, J.R.; Murray, R.N.; Waters, T.E.; Sanderson, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-three patients who were undergoing endoscopy were studied. The radioactivity in exhaled breath which was sampled within five minutes of 14 C -urea administration was attributed to the presence of urease enzyme in mouth organisms and was discounted. The time-radioactivity curves for breath samples from five to 30 minutes after the administration of 14 C-urea gave an excellent separation between subjects with negative results of the examination of gastric-biopsy samples and patients with microbiological and histological evidence of infection with Campylobacter (C.) pylori. The area under the time-radioactivity curve at between five and 30 minutes after the administration of 14 C-urea in 24 patients with negative microbiological results was 6.9±4.4 area units; in 35 of 39 patients with positive microbiological results, this area was greater than 40 area units. Measured against the results of the microbiological examination of gastricbiopsy samples, the sensitivity of breath-testing was 90% and the specificity was 100%. Measured against the results of histological examination for the presence of C. pylori infection, breath-testing had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 93%. A positive breath-test result also correlated well (P=0.0001) with the serological antibody test-result. The role of non-invasive tests - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and 14 C-urea breath-testing - in the management of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease is discussed. We consider that the 14 C-urea breath-test has an important role in the noninvasive confirmation of gastric infection with C. pylori and in the follow-up of patients after treatment. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Relationships between breath ratios, spirituality and health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this retrospective, quantitative study was to investigate relationships between breath ratios, spirituality perceptions and health perceptions, with special reference to breath ratios that best predict optimal health and spirituality. Significant negative correlations were found between breath ratios and spirituality ...

  9. Comparison of antimicrobial efficacy of chlorhexidine and combination mouth rinse in reducing the Mutans streptococcus count in plaque

    OpenAIRE

    Laxmi S Lakade; Preetam Shah; Dayanand Shirol

    2014-01-01

    Background: The removal of plaque is utmost important to control dental caries. But in children, factors like lack of dexterity, individual motivation and monitoring limit the effectiveness of tooth brushing. This necessitates the use of chemotherapeutic agents for control of plaque. Aims: To compare the antimicrobial efficacy of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth rinse and mouth rinse containing 0.03% triclosan, 0.05% sodium fluoride, and 5% xylitol in reducing the Mutans streptococcus count in plaque...

  10. Understanding the power of word-of-mouth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Z. Gildin

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Word-of-mouth has been considered one of the most powerful forms of communication in the market today. Understanding what makes word-of-mouth such a persuasive and powerful communication tool is important to organizations that intend to build strong relationships with consumers. For this reason, organizations are concerned about promoting positive word-of-mouth and retarding negative word-of-mouth, which can be harmful to the image of the company or a brand. This work focuses on the major aspects involving word-of-mouth communication. Recommendations to generate positive word-of-mouth and retard negative word-of-mouth are also highlighted.

  11. Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protection) to the viruses that cause HFMD. However, older children and adults can also get HFMD. In the United States it is more common for people to get HFMD during spring, summer, and fall. What Are the Symptoms of HFMD? Symptoms of ...

  12. Analysis of Exhaled Breath for Disease Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amann, Anton; Miekisch, Wolfram; Schubert, Jochen; Buszewski, Bogusław; Ligor, Tomasz; Jezierski, Tadeusz; Pleil, Joachim; Risby, Terence

    2014-06-01

    Breath analysis is a young field of research with great clinical potential. As a result of this interest, researchers have developed new analytical techniques that permit real-time analysis of exhaled breath with breath-to-breath resolution in addition to the conventional central laboratory methods using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Breath tests are based on endogenously produced volatiles, metabolites of ingested precursors, metabolites produced by bacteria in the gut or the airways, or volatiles appearing after environmental exposure. The composition of exhaled breath may contain valuable information for patients presenting with asthma, renal and liver diseases, lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammatory lung disease, or metabolic disorders. In addition, oxidative stress status may be monitored via volatile products of lipid peroxidation. Measurement of enzyme activity provides phenotypic information important in personalized medicine, whereas breath measurements provide insight into perturbations of the human exposome and can be interpreted as preclinical signals of adverse outcome pathways.

  13. Word of Mouth Marketing in Mouth and Dental Health Centers towards Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Ekiyor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Influencing the shopping style of others by passing on the experiences of goods purchased or services received is a way of behavior that has its roots in history. The main objective of th is research is to analyze the effects of demographic factors within the scope of word of mouth marketing on the choices of mouth and dental health services. Consumers receiving service from mouth and dental health centers of the Turkish Republic Ministry o f Health constitute the environment of the research. The research conducted in order to determine the mouth and dental health center selection of consumers within the scope of word of mouth marketing. The research has been conducted in Ankara through simpl e random sampling. The sample size has been determined as 400. In terms of word of mouth marketing which has been determined as the third hypothesis of the study, as a result of the analysis of the statistical relationship between mouth and dental health c enter preference and demographic factor groups, it has been determined that there is a meaningful difference in terms of age, level of education, level of income and some dimensions of marital status and that no meaningful difference has been found in term s of gender. It has been attempted to determine the importance of word of mouth marketing in healthcare services

  14. Mapleson′s breathing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tej K Kaul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapleson breathing systems are used for delivering oxygen and anaesthetic agents and to eliminate carbon dioxide during anaesthesia. They consist of different components: Fresh gas flow, reservoir bag, breathing tubes, expiratory valve, and patient connection. There are five basic types of Mapleson system: A, B, C, D and E depending upon the different arrangements of these components. Mapleson F was added later. For adults, Mapleson A is the circuit of choice for spontaneous respiration where as Mapleson D and its Bains modifications are best available circuits for controlled ventilation. For neonates and paediatric patients Mapleson E and F (Jackson Rees modification are the best circuits. In this review article, we will discuss the structure of the circuits and functional analysis of various types of Mapleson systems and their advantages and disadvantages.

  15. The effect of oral habits in the oral cavity of children and its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirina Gartika

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral habits include habit which is continuously done and has the potential to cause defects in teeth and perioral tissues. Some of the oral habits are finger/thumb sucking, lip sucking/biting, nail biting, bruxism, abnormal swallowing and mouth breathing. The etiology of oral habits includes the disharmonious relationship between parents and children, dissatisfaction in oral phase, premature weaning, emotional disturbance, anomaly, and diseases. Oral habits will influence the development of occlusion and perioral structures in children in the growing and development process. The treatment of oral habits can be done with or without appliances. The non-appliance treatment consists of psychological approach, medical approach and myofunctional therapy while the appliance treatment will include the use of orthodontic appliances.

  16. Running and Breathing in Mammals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramble, Dennis M.; Carrier, David R.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical constraints appear to require that locomotion and breathing be synchronized in running mammals. Phase locking of limb and respiratory frequency has now been recorded during treadmill running in jackrabbits and during locomotion on solid ground in dogs, horses, and humans. Quadrupedal species normally synchronize the locomotor and respiratory cycles at a constant ratio of 1:1 (strides per breath) in both the trot and gallop. Human runners differ from quadrupeds in that while running they employ several phase-locked patterns (4:1, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1, 5:2, and 3:2), although a 2:1 coupling ratio appears to be favored. Even though the evolution of bipedal gait has reduced the mechanical constraints on respiration in man, thereby permitting greater flexibility in breathing pattern, it has seemingly not eliminated the need for the synchronization of respiration and body motion during sustained running. Flying birds have independently achieved phase-locked locomotor and respiratory cycles. This hints that strict locomotor-respiratory coupling may be a vital factor in the sustained aerobic exercise of endothermic vertebrates, especially those in which the stresses of locomotion tend to deform the thoracic complex.

  17. Thoracic radiotherapy and breath control: current prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, F.; Mineur, L.; Paoli, J.B.; Bodez, V.; Oozeer, R.; Garcia, R.

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D CRT) is adversely affected by setup error and organ motion. In thoracic 3D CRT, breathing accounts for most of intra-fraction movements, thus impairing treatment quality. Breath control clearly exhibits dosimetric improvement compared to free breathing, leading to various techniques for gated treatments. We review benefits of different breath control methods -i.e. breath-holding or beam gating, with spirometric, isometric or X-ray respiration sensor- and argument the choice of expiration versus inspiration, with consideration to dosimetric concerns. All steps of 3D-CRT can be improved with breath control. Contouring of organs at risk (OAR) and target are easier and more accurate on breath controlled CT-scans. Inter- and intra-fraction target immobilisation allows smaller margins with better coverage. Lung outcome predictors (NTCP, Mean Dose, LV20, LV30) are improved with breath-control. In addition, inspiration breath control facilitates beam arrangement since it widens the distance between OAR and target, and leaves less lung normal tissue within the high dose region. Last, lung density, as of CT scan, is more accurate, improving dosimetry. Our institutions choice is to use spirometry driven, patient controlled high-inspiration breath-hold; this technique gives excellent immobilization results, with high reproducibility, yet it is easy to implement and costs little extra treatment time. Breath control, whatever technique is employed, proves superior to free breathing treatment when using 3D-CRT. Breath control should then be used whenever possible, and is probably mandatory for IMRT. (authors)

  18. Dermoid cyst in the mouth floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portelles Masso, Ayelen Maria; Torres Inniguez, Ailin Tamara.

    2010-01-01

    The Dermoid cyst account for the 0.01 % of all cysts of buccal cavity. Its more frequent location is in the mouth floor. This is the case of a female patient aged 19 who approximately 7 years noted an increase of volume under tongue growing gradually and noting outside face and the discomfort at to speak and to chew. Complementary studies were conducted and under general anesthesia a surgical exeresis was carried out by intrabuccal approach achieving excellent esthetic and functional results. Histopathologic diagnosis matched with a dermoid cyst of mouth floor. Patient has not lesion recurrence after three years after operation. We conclude that the Dermoid cyst of mouth floor appear as benign tumor of middle line. The intrabuccal exeresis demonstrates esthetic and functional benefits. (author)

  19. Burning mouth syndrome: an enigmatic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javali, M A

    2013-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic oral pain or burning sensation affecting the oral mucosa, often unaccompanied by mucosal lesions or other evident clinical signs. It is observed principally in middle-aged patients and postmenopausal women and may be accompanied by xerostomia and altered taste. Burning mouth syndrome is characterized by an intense burning or stinging sensation, preferably on the tongue or in other areas of mouth. This disorder is one of the most common, encountered in the clinical practice. This condition is probably of multifactorial origin; however the exact underlying etiology remains uncertain. This article discusses several aspects of BMS, updates current knowledge about the etiopathogenesis and describes the clinical features as well as the diagnosis and management of BMS patients.

  20. Cryotherapy for treatment of mouth mucocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeep K Aulakh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A mucocele is a common salivary gland disorder that most commonly affects young adults. A 35-year-old female patient reported to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, with the chief complaint of swelling on the left side of floor of mouth. The aim of this case report is to present the management of mucocele present in floor of the mouth in a young female patient using liquid nitrogen cryosurgery. The present case report has also discussed mechanism of action, current protocol of cryosurgery with emphasis on clinical pros and cons along with the clinical outcomes.

  1. Kidney motion during free breathing and breath hold for MR-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stam, Mette K; Van Vulpen, Marco; Intven, Martijn; Crijns, Sjoerd P M; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Raaymakers, Bas W; Barendrecht, Maurits M; Zonnenberg, Bernard A

    2013-01-01

    Current treatments for renal cell carcinoma have a high complication rate due to the invasiveness of the treatment. With the MRI-linac it may be possible to treat renal tumours non-invasively with high-precision radiotherapy. This is expected to reduce complications. To deliver a static dose distribution, radiation gating will be used. In this study the reproducibility and efficiency of free breathing gating and a breath hold treatment of the kidney was investigated. For 15 patients with a renal lesion the kidney motion during 2 min of free breathing and 10 consecutive expiration breath holds was studied with 2D cine MRI. The variability in kidney expiration position and treatment efficiency for gating windows of 1 to 20 mm was measured for both breathing patterns. Additionally the time trend in free breathing and the variation in expiration breath hold kidney position with baseline shift correction was determined. In 80% of the patients the variation in expiration position during free breathing is smaller than 2 mm. No clinically relevant time trends were detected. The variation in expiration breath hold is for all patients larger than the free breathing expiration variation. Gating on free breathing is, for gating windows of 1 to 5 mm more efficient than breath hold without baseline correction. When applying a baseline correction to the breath hold it increases the treatment efficiency. The kidney position is more reproducible in expiration free breathing than non-guided expiration breath hold. For small gating windows it is also more time efficient. Since free breathing also seems more comfortable for the patients it is the preferred breathing pattern for MRI-Linac treatments of the kidney. (paper)

  2. Relationships between hippocampal activity and breathing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, R M; Poe, G R; Rector, D M

    1998-01-01

    Single cell discharge, EEG activity, and optical changes accompanying alterations in breathing patterns, as well as the knowledge that respiratory musculature is heavily involved in movement and other behavioral acts, implicate hippocampal regions in some aspects of breathing control. The control...... is unlikely to reside in oscillatory breathing movements, because such patterns emerge in preparations retaining only the medulla (and perhaps only the spinal cord). However, momentary changes in breathing patterns induced by affect, startle, whole-body movement changes, or compensatory ventilatory changes...... of hippocampal contributions to breathing control should be viewed in the context that significant interactions exist between blood pressure changes and ventilation, and that modest breathing challenges, such as exposure to hypercapnia or to increased resistive loads, bring into action a vast array of brain...

  3. Work of breathing as a tool to diagnose severe fixed upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirani, S; Pierrot, S; Leboulanger, N; Ramirez, A; Breton, D; Couloigner, V; Fauroux, B

    2014-03-01

    A 4-year-old girl with bilateral vocal fold palsy was successfully decannulated from tracheotomy after seven laryngeal procedures. But an important stridor and dyspnea recurred 13 months after decannulation. Nocturnal gas exchange was normal but her daytime work of breathing was increased by fourfold, without any beneficial effect of nasal noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure ventilation (CPAP), reflecting a severe fixed airway obstruction. Endoscopic examination confirmed the work of breathing findings showing glottic and supraglottic stenosis. This upper airway obstruction was successfully treated with a recannulation. In conclusion, the major message of this case report is that measurement of the work of breathing was able to document the "fixed" nature of the airway obstruction, by showing no improvement even with highest tolerated levels of nasal CPAP. As such, the work of breathing may be proposed as a screening tool to quantify and assess the reversibility of severe upper airway obstruction in children. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Alterações no modo respiratório, na oclusão e na fala em escolares: ocorrências e relações Alterations in breathing mode, occlusion and speech in school-age children: occurrences and relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Cristina Berwig

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: verificar a ocorrência de alterações no modo respiratório, má oclusão e distúrbio articulatório, bem como a relação entre as mesmas, em crianças de escolas públicas do município de Santa Maria/Rio Grande do Sul. MÉTODOS: 308 crianças de ambos os sexos, com idades entre 6 e 11 anos, foram submetidas às avaliações fonoaudiológica e ortodôntica, sendo selecionadas 235, de acordo com critérios de inclusão e exclusão. Das informações coletadas nas avaliações, consideraram-se o modo respiratório, a classificação da oclusão segundo Angle e as alterações oclusais vertical e transversal, bem como o distúrbio articulatório. RESULTADOS: 60,43% crianças apresentaram alterações no modo respiratório; 97,02% más oclusões de Angle; 28,94% alteração oclusal vertical e transversal e 14,89% apresentaram distúrbio articulatório. Relações significativas foram encontradas entre distúrbio articulatório e alteração oclusal vertical e transversal, modo respiratório e má oclusão de Angle e entre má oclusão de Angle e alteração oclusal vertical e transversal. CONCLUSÃO: as más oclusões e as alterações do modo respiratório foram frequentes no grupo de escolares estudados. As relações verificadas reforçam a ideia de que existe uma estreita relação entre as estruturas e funções do sistema estomatognático, razão pela qual merecem atenção de diversos profissionais da área da saúde.PURPOSE: to check the occurrence of articulation disorders, alterations in breathing mode and malocclusion as well as the relation among theses variables in public-school children. METHODS: 308 female and male children aged between 6 and 11 years were submitted to speech pathologic and orthodontic evaluations, being selected 235. From the information collected in the evaluations, we considered: breathing mode, malocclusion by Angle's classification and transverse alterations, as well as articulation disorder

  5. Sleep disordered breathing in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgay Izci Balserak

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disordered breathing (SDB is very common during pregnancy, and is most likely explained by hormonal, physiological and physical changes. Maternal obesity, one of the major risk factors for SDB, together with physiological changes in pregnancy may predispose women to develop SDB. SDB has been associated with poor maternal and fetal outcomes. Thus, early identification, diagnosis and treatment of SDB are important in pregnancy. This article reviews the pregnancy-related changes affecting the severity of SDB, the epidemiology and the risk factors of SDB in pregnancy, the association of SDB with adverse pregnancy outcomes, and screening and management options specific for this population.

  6. Environmental contamination and breathing disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardona A, Jose D

    2003-01-01

    The atmospheric contamination is the main component of the environmental contamination and it can be defined as the presence in the atmosphere of an or several substances in enough quantity to produce alterations of the health, it is presented in aerosol form, with its gassy and specific components, altering the quality of the population's life and the degradation of the ecosystems. The main pollutant, as much for the frequency as for the importance of its effects, is the smoke of cigarettes. The paper mentions other types of polluting agents and their effects in the breathing apparatus

  7. Salvage excavations at the Tokanui River mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacomb, C.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three years, invstigations have been undertaken at three sites in eastern Foveaux Strait that are particularly severely threatened by coastal erosion. The last of these three sites is at the mouth of the Tokanui River, near Fortrose. (author). 16 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Language abstraction in word of mouth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellekens, G.A.C.; Verlegh, P.W.J.; Smidts, A.

    2010-01-01

    This research examines the language that consumers use in word of mouth. For both positive and negative product experiences, we demonstrate that consumers use more abstract terms when they describe experiences that are in line with the valence of their product attitude. This effect cannot be

  9. Zoology: A New Mouth for Amphioxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Vladimir; Kozmik, Zbynek

    2016-05-09

    Deuterostomes - a key subdivision of animals - are characterized by the mouth developing anteriorly as a rupture between the outer epithelium and the foregut wall. A new study of amphioxus challenges this view and proposes separate evolutionary origins of deuterostome oral openings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Sodium Bicarbonate mouth rinse: An Uncommon Complication

    OpenAIRE

    Fatih Mehmet Coskunses

    2012-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate is a natural buffer that maintains a healthy pH in mouth to promote a clean and fresh oral environment. Sodium-bicarbonate rinse is empirically suggested to patients by dentist and people around, and may prove to be harmful. In this short communication, we present chemical burn of oral mucosa because of sodium-bicarbonate rinse after misfit dental impression.

  11. The origin of mouth-exhaled ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Metsälä, M; Vaittinen, O; Halonen, L

    2014-09-01

    It is known that the oral cavity is a production site for mouth-exhaled NH3. However, the mechanism of NH3 production in the oral cavity has been unclear. Since bacterial urease in the oral cavity has been found to produce ammonia from oral fluid urea, we hypothesize that oral fluid urea is the origin of mouth-exhaled NH3. Our results show that under certain conditions a strong correlation exists between oral fluid urea and oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) (rs = 0.77, p oral fluid NH3 and mouth-exhaled NH3 (rs = 0.81, p oral fluid pH. Bacterial urease catalyses the hydrolysis of oral fluid urea to ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3). Oral fluid ammonia (NH4(+)+NH3) and pH determine the concentration of oral fluid NH3, which evaporates from oral fluid into gas phase and turns to mouth-exhaled NH3.

  12. Mouth cancer in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giagkou, E; Christodoulou, D K; Katsanos, K H

    2016-05-01

    Mouth cancer is a major health problem. Multiple risk factors for developing mouth cancer have been studied and include history of tobacco and alcohol abuse, age over 40, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, human papilloma virus infection (HPV), nutritional deficiencies, chronic irritation, and existence or oral potentially malignant lesions such as leukoplakia and lichen planus. An important risk factor for mouth cancer is chronic immunosuppression and has been extensively reported after solid organ transplantation as well as HIV-infected patients. Diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is not yet considered as a risk factor for oral cancer development. However, a significant number of patients with IBD are receiving immunosuppressants and biological therapies which could represent potential oral oncogenic factors either by direct oncogenic effect or by continuous immunosuppression favoring carcinogenesis, especially in patients with HPV(+) IBD. Education on modifiable risk behaviors in patients with IBD is the cornerstone of prevention of mouth cancer. Oral screening should be performed for all patients with IBD, especially those who are about to start an immunosuppressant or a biologic. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. News from the Breath Analysis Summit 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2012-06-01

    This special section highlights some of the important work presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2011, which was held in Parma (Italy) from 11 to 14 September 2011. The meeting, which was jointly organized by the International Association for Breath Research and the University of Parma, was attended by more than 250 delegates from 33 countries, and offered 34 invited lectures and 64 unsolicited scientific contributions. The summit was organized to provide a forum to scientists, engineers and clinicians to present their latest findings and to meet industry executives and entrepreneurs to discuss key trends, future directions and technologies available for breath analysis. A major focus was on nitric oxide, exhaled breath condensate, electronic nose, mass spectrometry and newer sensor technologies. Medical applications ranged from asthma and other respiratory diseases to gastrointestinal disease, occupational diseases, critical care and cancer. Most people identify breath tests with breathalysers used by police to estimate ethanol concentration in blood. However, breath testing has far more sophisticated applications. Breath analysis is rapidly evolving as a new frontier in medical testing for disease states in the lung and beyond. Every individual has a breath fingerprint-or 'breathprint'-that can provide useful information about his or her state of health. This breathprint comprises the many thousands of molecules that are expelled with each breath we exhale. Breath research in the past few years has uncovered the scientific and molecular basis for such clinical observations. Relying on mass spectrometry, we have been able to identify many such unique substances in exhaled breath, including gases, such as nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), and a wide array of volatile organic compounds. Exhaled breath also carries aerosolized droplets that can be collected as an exhaled breath condensate that contains endogenously produced non-volatile compounds. Breath

  14. FIRST-line support for Assistance in Breathing in Children (FIRST-ABC): protocol for a multicentre randomised feasibility trial of non-invasive respiratory support in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarayan, Padmanabhan; Lister, Paula; Dominguez, Troy; Habibi, Parviz; Edmonds, Naomi; Canter, Ruth; Mouncey, Paul; Peters, Mark J

    2017-06-12

    Over 18 000 children are admitted annually to UK paediatric intensive care units (PICUs), of whom nearly 75% receive respiratory support (invasive and/or non-invasive). Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has traditionally been used to provide first-line non-invasive respiratory support (NRS) in PICUs; however, high-flow nasal cannula therapy (HFNC), a novel mode of NRS, has recently gained popularity despite the lack of high-quality trial evidence to support its effectiveness. This feasibility study aims to inform the design and conduct of a future definitive randomised clinical trial (RCT) comparing the two modes of respiratory support. We will conduct a three-centre randomised feasibility study over 12 months. Patients admitted to participating PICUs who satisfy eligibility criteria will be recruited to either group A (primary respiratory failure) or group B (postextubation). Consent will be obtained from parents/guardians prior to randomisation in 'planned' group B, and deferred in emergency situations (group A and 'rescue' group B). Participants will be randomised (1:1) to either CPAP or HFNC using sealed, opaque envelopes, from a computer-generated randomisation sequence with variable block sizes. The study protocol specifies algorithms for the initiation, maintenance and weaning of HFNC and CPAP. The primary outcomes are related to feasibility, including the number of eligible patients in each group, feasibility of randomising >50% of eligible patients and measures of adherence to the treatment protocols. Data will also be collected on patient outcomes (eg, mortality and length of PICU stay) to inform the selection of an appropriate outcome measure in a future RCT. We aim to recruit 120 patients to the study. Ethical approval was granted by the National Research Ethics Service Committee North East-Tyne&Wear South (15/NE/0296). Study findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conferences. NCT02612415; pre

  15. What Drives Word of Mouth: A Multi-Disciplinary Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlegh, Peeter W J; Moldovan, Sarit

    2008-01-01

    The article presents abstracts on word-of-mouth advertising-related topics which include the different roles of product originality and usefulness in generating word of mouth, understanding the way consumers deal with the tension between authenticity and commercialism in seeded word of mouth

  16. Word of mouth marketing applications on the internet

    OpenAIRE

    Gülmez, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    Word of mouth marketing, also called WOMM in English, is a marketing strategyform via oral or written in which consumers share&spread other people aboutproduct or firm. Word of mouth marketing is an extremely important factor in theconsumer’s final purchase decision in the conscious societies on the internet. Thispaper aims to evaluate word of mouth marketing applications on the internet.

  17. Quality and Toxicity Assessments of Foot and Mouth Disease Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality and toxicity assessment of foot and mouth disease virus vaccine was carried out in inoculated guinea pigs. ... could be used for the control and prevention of foot and mouth disease in Nigerian livestock. Keyword: Foot and Mouth Disease ... 2 blended with Incomplete. Seepic Adjuvant (ISA) montanide 206, which.

  18. Submarines, spacecraft and exhaled breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleil, Joachim D; Hansel, Armin

    2012-03-01

    Foreword The International Association of Breath Research (IABR) meetings are an eclectic gathering of researchers in the medical, environmental and instrumentation fields; our focus is on human health as assessed by the measurement and interpretation of trace chemicals in human exhaled breath. What may have escaped our notice is a complementary field of research that explores the creation and maintenance of artificial atmospheres practised by the submarine air monitoring and air purification (SAMAP) community. SAMAP is comprised of manufacturers, researchers and medical professionals dealing with the engineering and instrumentation to support human life in submarines and spacecraft (including shuttlecraft and manned rockets, high-altitude aircraft, and the International Space Station (ISS)). Here, the immediate concerns are short-term survival and long-term health in fairly confined environments where one cannot simply 'open the window' for fresh air. As such, one of the main concerns is air monitoring and the main sources of contamination are CO(2) and other constituents of human exhaled breath. Since the inaugural meeting in 1994 in Adelaide, Australia, SAMAP meetings have been held every two or three years alternating between the North American and European continents. The meetings are organized by Dr Wally Mazurek (a member of IABR) of the Defense Systems Technology Organization (DSTO) of Australia, and individual meetings are co-hosted by the navies of the countries in which they are held. An overriding focus at SAMAP is life support (oxygen availability and carbon dioxide removal). Certainly, other air constituents are also important; for example, the closed environment of a submarine or the ISS can build up contaminants from consumer products, cooking, refrigeration, accidental fires, propulsion and atmosphere maintenance. However, the most immediate concern is sustaining human metabolism: removing exhaled CO(2) and replacing metabolized O(2). Another

  19. Passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection using advanced sensor signal acquisition and fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungblad, Jonas; Hök, Bertil; Allalou, Amin; Pettersson, Håkan

    2017-05-29

    The research objective of the present investigation is to demonstrate the present status of passive in-vehicle driver breath alcohol detection and highlight the necessary conditions for large-scale implementation of such a system. Completely passive detection has remained a challenge mainly because of the requirements on signal resolution combined with the constraints of vehicle integration. The work is part of the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) program aiming at massive deployment of alcohol sensing systems that could potentially save thousands of American lives annually. The work reported here builds on earlier investigations, in which it has been shown that detection of alcohol vapor in the proximity of a human subject may be traced to that subject by means of simultaneous recording of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) at the same location. Sensors based on infrared spectroscopy were developed to detect and quantify low concentrations of alcohol and CO 2 . In the present investigation, alcohol and CO 2 were recorded at various locations in a vehicle cabin while human subjects were performing normal in-step procedures and driving preparations. A video camera directed to the driver position was recording images of the driver's upper body parts, including the face, and the images were analyzed with respect to features of significance to the breathing behavior and breath detection, such as mouth opening and head direction. Improvement of the sensor system with respect to signal resolution including algorithm and software development, and fusion of the sensor and camera signals was successfully implemented and tested before starting the human study. In addition, experimental tests and simulations were performed with the purpose of connecting human subject data with repeatable experimental conditions. The results include occurrence statistics of detected breaths by signal peaks of CO 2 and alcohol. From the statistical data, the accuracy of breath alcohol

  20. How Does a Hopping Kangaroo Breathe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliodori, Mauricio J.; Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein; DiCarlo, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    We developed a model to demonstrate how a hopping kangaroo breathes. Interestingly, a kangaroo uses less energy to breathe while hopping than while standing still. This occurs, in part, because rather than using muscle power to move air into and out of the lungs, air is pulled into (inspiration) and pushed out of (expiration) the lungs as the…

  1. Respiratory difficulties and breathing disorders in achondroplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsharpaiman, S; Saburi, A; Waters, Karen A

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory difficulties and breathing disorders in achondroplasia are thought to underlie the increased risk for sudden infant death and neuropsychological deficits seen in this condition. This review evaluates literature regarding respiratory dysfunctions and their sequelae in patients with achondroplasia. The limited number of prospective studies of respiratory disease in achondroplasia means that observational studies and case series provide a large proportion of the data regarding the spectrum of respiratory diseases in achondroplasia and their treatments. Amongst clinical respiratory problems described, snoring is the commonest observed abnormality, but the reported incidence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) shows wide variance (10% to 75%). Reported treatments of OSA include adenotonsillectomy, the use of CPAP, and surgical improvement of the airway, including mid-face advancement. Otolaryngologic manifestations are also common. Respiratory failure due to small thoracic volumes is reported, but uncommon. Mortality rate at all ages was 2.27 (CI: 1.7-3.0) with age-specific mortality increased at all ages. Sudden death was most common in infants and children. Cardiovascular events are the main cause of mortality in adults. Despite earlier recognition and treatment of respiratory complications of achondroplasia, increased mortality rates and other complications remain high. Future and ongoing evaluation of the prevalence and impact of respiratory disorders, particularly OSA, in achondroplasia is recommended. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Age-wise and gender-wise prevalence of oral habits in 7–16-year-old school children of Mewar ethnicity, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Vishnoi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study aimed to check the age- and gender-wise prevalence of oral habits in the children of 7–16-year-old Indian children. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey involving 1029 (661 males and 368 females children of age 7–16 years was done to record the presence or absence of the oral habits with the aid of the anamnestic questionnaire. The recorded oral habits were tongue thrusting, thumb or digit sucking, mouth breathing, bruxism, lip biting or lip sucking, and nail biting. The collected data were subjected to Pearson's Chi-square statistical analysis to know the overall difference in the prevalence rate of different oral habits and to evaluate the gender- and age-wise difference in the prevalence of oral habits. Results: Oral habits were present in 594 participants (57.73%. The highest prevalence rate was registered for tongue thrusting habit (28.8%, which was followed by nail biting (201/19.5% and thumb sucking (128/12.4%, mouth breathing (109/10.6%, lip biting (85/8.3%, and bruxism (29/2.8%. The male participants showed a greater prevalence rate for the oral habits than the female participants (58.55% vs. 56.25%. There was a significant difference in the age-wise prevalence of oral habits with older children showing greater prevalence of oral habits than the younger ones. Conclusion: The prevalence of oral habits in the current group of children is high. It warrants the need for the community-based educational preventive and interceptive programs to spread the awareness regarding the deleterious effects of these oral habits.

  3. Daily activities and breathing parameters for use in respiratory tract dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, M.; Courtay, C.

    1991-01-01

    Dosimetry of inhaled substances is based on the air volumes breathed every day by people under exposure to gases and aerosols. In order to assess modern standards for average inspired air volumes according to age and gender, information was recorded on daily activities and breathing rates both indoors and outdoors, of specific categories of the population. Economic surveys recently published provided time budgets and activities of adults, teenagers and children. The data were matched with published data on physical activities and breathing parameters in order to calculate the daily inspired volumes of air. The results were given for adults (age > 17 years), neonates, and children 1, 5, 10 and 15 years old. The values obtained are close to those published by the Internal Commission for Radiological Protection and the reports of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. (author)

  4. Oral health status and treatment needs of asthmatic children aged 6 – 12 Years in Lucknow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramod Kumar Yadav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Asthma is a growing public health problem affecting over 300 million people worldwide. Asthmatic children have an altered immune response and a high tendency to mouth breathing especially during an episode of rhinitis or an attack thus predisposing them to serious oral health problems. Aim: This study aims to assess oral health status of asthmatic children aged 6–12. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 450 asthmatic children aged 6–12 years in Lucknow, asthmatic children were chosen from pediatric department of major hospitals. Gingival index (GI, oral hygiene index-simplified (OHI-S, and dentition status and treatment need of World Health Organization oral health survey pro forma (1997 were used to assess oral health status. ANOVA, Chi-square test, and descriptive statistics were carried out. SPSS 16 was used for the data analysis. Results: Mean dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT was 2.98 ± 1.52 and 3.05 ± 1.60, mean GI score was 1.55 ± 0.52 and 1.53 ± 0.42 and mean OHI-S was 2.59 ± 0.68 and 2.48 ± 0.77 among the male and female asthmatic children. Conclusion: Female asthmatic children had higher mean DMFT score, but lower mean GI score and oral hygiene score than male children in comparison and also they had a compromised oral hygiene status.

  5. Self-perceived oral health and salivary proteins in children with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, F; Sundin, U; Altamash, M; Klinge, B; Engström, P-E

    2009-01-01

    The aim was to validate self-perceived oral health with salivary IgG as an inflammatory parameter in children with type 1 diabetes. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were collected from 36 children with well controlled and 12 with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and 40 non-diabetic children (Controls). Salivary flow rate, random blood glucose level, salivary protein concentration and immunoglobulin A and G levels were recorded using standard techniques. Data concerning oral health and diabetes status were collected. Self-perceived gingival bleeding (bleeding gums), bad breath and dry mouth were higher in diabetic children when compared with those in controls (P diabetes (P diabetes (P Salivary flow rate was lower in the diabetic children compared to controls (P diabetes. Salivary IgG per mg protein concentration was higher in the diabetics when compared with the control group (P diabetes (P diabetes. Self-perceived gingival bleeding and salivary IgG per mg protein concentration were increased in children with type 1 diabetes compared with controls. These variables were also increased in children with poorly controlled compared with well-controlled type 1 diabetes.

  6. The sup 14 C-urea breath-test for the detection of gastric Campylobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surveyor, I; Goodwin, C S; Mullan, B P; Geelhoed, E; Warren, J R; Murray, R N; Waters, T E; Sanderson, C R [Royal Perth Hospital (Australia)

    1989-10-16

    Sixty-three patients who were undergoing endoscopy were studied. The radioactivity in exhaled breath which was sampled within five minutes of {sup 14}C -urea administration was attributed to the presence of urease enzyme in mouth organisms and was discounted. The time-radioactivity curves for breath samples from five to 30 minutes after the administration of {sup 14}C-urea gave an excellent separation between subjects with negative results of the examination of gastric-biopsy samples and patients with microbiological and histological evidence of infection with Campylobacter (C.) pylori. The area under the time-radioactivity curve at between five and 30 minutes after the administration of {sup 14}C-urea in 24 patients with negative microbiological results was 6.9{plus minus}4.4 area units; in 35 of 39 patients with positive microbiological results, this area was greater than 40 area units. Measured against the results of the microbiological examination of gastricbiopsy samples, the sensitivity of breath-testing was 90% and the specificity was 100%. Measured against the results of histological examination for the presence of C. pylori infection, breath-testing had a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 93%. A positive breath-test result also correlated well (P=0.0001) with the serological antibody test-result. The role of non-invasive tests - enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and {sup 14}C-urea breath-testing - in the management of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease is discussed. We consider that the {sup 14}C-urea breath-test has an important role in the noninvasive confirmation of gastric infection with C. pylori and in the follow-up of patients after treatment. 38 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Time Breath of Psychological Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tateo, Luca; Valsiner, Jaan

    2015-01-01

    Psychology as a self-aspiring, ambitious, developmental science faces the crucial limit of time—both theoretically and practically. The issue of time in constructing psychology’s theories is a major unresolved metatheoretical task. This raises several questions about generalization of knowledge...... of time—or fail to do that? How can they generalize with respect to time? The different conceptions of time often remain implicit, while shaping the concepts used in understanding psychological processes. Any preconception about time in human development will foster the generalizability of theory, as well......: which is the time length of breath of psychological theories? Which is the temporal dimension of psychological processes? In this article we discuss the role of different axiomatic assumptions about time in the construction of psychological theories. How could different theories include a concept...

  8. The indoor air we breathe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, L C; Shackleton, B W

    1998-01-01

    Increasingly recognized as a potential public health problem since the outbreak of Legionnaire's disease in Philadelphia in 1976, polluted indoor air has been associated with health problems that include asthma, sick building syndrome, multiple chemical sensitivity, and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Symptoms are often nonspecific and include headache, eye and throat irritation, chest tightness and shortness of breath, and fatigue. Air-borne contaminants include commonly used chemicals, vehicular exhaust, microbial organisms, fibrous glass particles, and dust. Identified causes include defective building design and construction, aging of buildings and their ventilation systems, poor climate control, inattention to building maintenance. A major contributory factor is the explosion in the use of chemicals in building construction and furnishing materials over the past four decades. Organizational issues and psychological variables often contribute to the problem and hinder its resolution. This article describes the health problems related to poor indoor air quality and offers solutions.

  9. Detection of pulmonary metastases with pathological correlation: effect of breathing on the accuracy of spiral CT. Editor`s note

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, F.V. [Abdominal Imaging Section, Department of Radiology, University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States); Cohen, M.D. [Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Waters, D.J. [Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States); Davis, M.M. [Department of Pathology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Karmazyn, B. [Department of Radiology, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Gonin, R. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Hanna, M.P. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Medicine, Riley Hospital for Children, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Background. CT of the chest for suspected pulmonary metastases in adults is generally performed using a breath-hold technique. The results may not be applicable to young children in whom breath-holding may be impossible. Objective. Determine the effect of breathing on the accuracy of pulmonary metastasis detection by spiral CT (SCT). Materials and methods. Prior to euthanasia four anesthetized dogs with metastatic osteosarcoma underwent SCT with a collimation of 5 mm and a pitch of 2, during both induced breath-hold and normal quiet breathing. Images were reconstructed as contiguous 5-mm slices. Macroscopically evident metastases were noted at postmortem. Hard-copy SCT images were reviewed by ten radiologists, each of whom circled all suspected metastases. SCT images were compared with postmortem results to determine true and false positives. Results. The pathologist identified 132 macroscopically evident pulmonary metastases. For metastasis detection, there was no significant difference between breath-hold SCT and breathing SCT. Conclusion. In our animal model, SCT can be performed during normal resting breathing without significant loss of accuracy in the detection of pulmonary metastases. (orig.). With 3 tabs.

  10. Detection of pulmonary metastases with pathological correlation: effect of breathing on the accuracy of spiral CT. Editor's note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coakley, F.V.; Cohen, M.D.; Waters, D.J.; Davis, M.M.; Karmazyn, B.; Gonin, R.; Hanna, M.P.

    1997-01-01

    Background. CT of the chest for suspected pulmonary metastases in adults is generally performed using a breath-hold technique. The results may not be applicable to young children in whom breath-holding may be impossible. Objective. Determine the effect of breathing on the accuracy of pulmonary metastasis detection by spiral CT (SCT). Materials and methods. Prior to euthanasia four anesthetized dogs with metastatic osteosarcoma underwent SCT with a collimation of 5 mm and a pitch of 2, during both induced breath-hold and normal quiet breathing. Images were reconstructed as contiguous 5-mm slices. Macroscopically evident metastases were noted at postmortem. Hard-copy SCT images were reviewed by ten radiologists, each of whom circled all suspected metastases. SCT images were compared with postmortem results to determine true and false positives. Results. The pathologist identified 132 macroscopically evident pulmonary metastases. For metastasis detection, there was no significant difference between breath-hold SCT and breathing SCT. Conclusion. In our animal model, SCT can be performed during normal resting breathing without significant loss of accuracy in the detection of pulmonary metastases. (orig.). With 3 tabs

  11. Dry mouth: Xerostomia and salivary gland hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydrych, Agnieszka M

    2016-07-01

    Mouth dryness may present as salivary gland hypofunction (SGH), xerostomia or both. It is considered one of the most underappreciated, underdiagnosed and undermanaged oral health conditions. Despite its common presentation and adverse impact on life quality, it is also generally poorly understood. Increased awareness of the condition is important in addressing these problems. This article discusses SGH and xerostomia, and the associated intra-oral and extra-oral implications. It also summarises currently available management approaches and the evidence behind them. SGH and xerostomia are complex problems. None of the currently available management approaches are entirely satisfactory. Addressing the causative or contributing factors is therefore paramount. While oral health complaints are generally left up to the dental professional to manage, the nature of mouth dryness necessitates increased dialogue between the dental and 
medical professions to ensure optimal patient care.

  12. Pain Part 8: Burning Mouth Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneng, Kiran; Renton, Tara

    2016-04-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a rare but impactful condition affecting mainly post-menopausal women resulting in constant pain and significant difficulty with eating, drinking and daily function. The aetiology of BMS remains an enigma. Recent evidence suggests it likely to be neuropathic in origin, the cause of which remains unknown. There is no cure for this condition and the unfortunate patients remain managed on a variety of neuropathic pain medication, salivary substitutes and other non-medical interventions that help the patient 'get through the day'. Some simple strategies can assist both clinician and patient to manage this debilitating condition. CPD/Clinical Relevance: The dental team will recognize patients presenting with burning mouth syndrome. They are difficult patients to manage and are often referred to secondary care and, ultimately, depend on their general medical practitioners for pain management.

  13. Social media: the word of mouth revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garven, Joseph J

    2010-01-01

    Many dental practices today find themselves uncertain about the new social media universe, and in particular with how to relate to younger patients. The power of social networking is its immediate access to the word of mouth exchange of information, and the word of mouth avenue itself is recognized as the single most effective form of advertising. To tap into that phenomenon, begin by investing a small amount of time and effort to understand the basics of social networking. Sign up for Facebook and Twitter. First-hand experience interacting in a social network is the vital first step. The bottom line is simply this: To begin to understand this new arena of communication, you first have to join the conversation.

  14. Electronic word of mouth about medical services

    OpenAIRE

    Hinz, Vera; Drevs, Florian; Wehner, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Electronic word of mouth (eWOM) about medical services gains growing popularity from the part of health care users, accompanied with a high reluctance of health care providers towards existing platforms, fearing unqualified, negative reviews driven by motives of vengeance. Purpose of this research is to shed light on the characteristics, content, and motives of eWOM about medical services. Using primary and secondary data of 822 reviews, this study shows that reviews about medical services ar...

  15. A Personalized Word of Mouth Recommender Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chihli Hung

    2008-01-01

    Word of mouth (WOM) has a powerful effect on consumer behavior. Manually collecting WOM is very time-consuming in the era of the Internet. An automatic WOM recommender model is useful for both marketers and consumers. There are many different product features and thus many consumer choices. Each individual consumer has different preferences and these preferences may be changed deliberately or unwittingly. However, most existing WOM recommender models do not adapt to user preferences. This stu...

  16. WORD OF MOUTH ON SOCIAL MEDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Raluca CHIOSA

    2014-01-01

    Through the access to information, the Internet has transformed people lifestyle, their preference for products, how they relate to brands. Perceived as an open space, without limitation, social media has become the main channel for expression of word-of-mouth, with both positive and negative effects. Thus The Internet has allowed the development of WOM, making it contemporary in our technological world. This paper examines the motives for adopting WOM behavior, forms of WOM, the WOM model an...

  17. Impact of rapid maxillary expansion on nasomaxillary complex volume in mouth-breathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Cappellette Jr.

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To assess the volumetric changes that occur in the nasomaxillary complex of mouth-breathing patients with transverse maxillary deficiency subjected to rapid maxillary expansion (RME. Methods: This was a controlled, prospective intervention study involving 38 mouth-breathing patients presenting with transverse maxillary deficiency, regardless of malocclusion type or race. Twenty-three of them comprised the experimental group, which was composed of 11 (47.8% boys, and 12 (52.2% girls, with a mean age of 9.6 years, ranging from 6.4 to 14.2 years and standard deviation of 2.3 years; and 15 of them comprised the control group, composed of 9 (60% boys and 6 (40% girls with an mean age of 10.5 years, ranging from 8.0 to 13.6 years, and standard deviation of 1.9 years. All patients were scanned (CT according to a standard protocol: Initial CT (T1, and CT three months thereafter (T2, and the patients in the experimental group were treated with RME using a Hyrax expander for the correction of maxillary deficiency during the T1-T2 interval. The CT scans were manipulated using Dolphin® Imaging version 11.7 software for total and partial volumetric assessment of the nasomaxillary complex. Results: The results revealed that in the experimental group there was a significant increase in the size of the structures of interest compared to the control group, both in general aspect and in specific regions. Conclusions: Rapid maxillary expansion (RME provided a significant expansion in all the structures of the nasomaxillary complex (nasal cavity, oropharynx, right and left maxillary sinuses.

  18. Cardiorespiratory interactions during resistive load breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, P; Perrault, H; Dinh, T P; Eberhard, A; Benchetrit, G

    2000-12-01

    The addition to the respiratory system of a resistive load results in breathing pattern changes and in negative intrathoracic pressure increases. The aim of this study was to use resistive load breathing as a stimulus to the cardiorespiratory interaction and to examine the extent of the changes in heart rate variability (HRV) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) in relation to the breathing pattern changes. HRV and RSA were studied in seven healthy subjects where four resistive loads were applied in a random order during the breath and 8-min recording made in each condition. The HRV spectral power components were computed from the R-R interval sequences, and the RSA amplitude and phase were computed from the sinusoid fitting the instantaneous heart rate within each breath. Adding resistive loads resulted in 1) increasing respiratory period, 2) unchanging heart rate, and 3) increasing HRV and changing RSA characteristics. HRV and RSA characteristics are linearly correlated to the respiratory period. These modifications appear to be linked to load-induced changes in the respiratory period in each individual, because HRV and RSA characteristics are similar at a respiratory period obtained either by loading or by imposed frequency breathing. The present results are discussed with regard to the importance of the breathing cycle duration in these cardiorespiratory interactions, suggesting that these interactions may depend on the time necessary for activation and dissipation of neurotransmitters involved in RSA.

  19. Optimal ventilatory patterns in periodic breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanshahi, S D; Khoo, M C

    1993-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether periodic breathing (PB), which is highly prevalent during sleep at high altitudes, imposes physiological penalties on the respiratory system in the absence of any accompanying disease. Using a computer model of respiratory gas exchange, we compared the effects of a variety of PB patterns on the chemical and mechanical costs of breathing to those resulting from regular tidal breathing. Although PB produced considerable fluctuation in arterial blood gas tensions, for the same cycle-averaged ventilation, higher arterial oxygen saturation and lower arterial carbon dioxide levels were achieved. This result can be explained by the fact that the combination of large breaths and apnea in PB leads to a substantial reduction in dead space ventilation. At the same time, the savings in mechanical cost achieved by the respiratory muscles during apnea partially offset the increase during the breathing phase. Consequently, the "pressure cost," a criterion based on mean inspiratory pressure, was elevated only slightly, although the average work rate of breathing increased significantly. We found that, at extreme altitudes, PB patterns with clusters of 2 to 4 large breaths that alternate with apnea produce the highest arterial oxygenation levels and lowest pressure costs. The common occurrence of PB patterns with closely similar features has been reported in sleeping healthy sojourners at extreme altitudes. Taken together, these findings suggest that PB favors a reduction in the oxygen demands of the respiratory muscles and therefore may not be as detrimental as it is generally believed to be.

  20. An Ultrasonic Contactless Sensor for Breathing Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Arlotto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of human breathing activity during a long period has multiple fundamental applications in medicine. In breathing sleep disorders such as apnea, the diagnosis is based on events during which the person stops breathing for several periods during sleep. In polysomnography, the standard for sleep disordered breathing analysis, chest movement and airflow are used to monitor the respiratory activity. However, this method has serious drawbacks. Indeed, as the subject should sleep overnight in a laboratory and because of sensors being in direct contact with him, artifacts modifying sleep quality are often observed. This work investigates an analysis of the viability of an ultrasonic device to quantify the breathing activity, without contact and without any perception by the subject. Based on a low power ultrasonic active source and transducer, the device measures the frequency shift produced by the velocity difference between the exhaled air flow and the ambient environment, i.e., the Doppler effect. After acquisition and digitization, a specific signal processing is applied to separate the effects of breath from those due to subject movements from the Doppler signal. The distance between the source and the sensor, about 50 cm, and the use of ultrasound frequency well above audible frequencies, 40 kHz, allow monitoring the breathing activity without any perception by the subject, and therefore without any modification of the sleep quality which is very important for sleep disorders diagnostic applications. This work is patented (patent pending 2013-7-31 number FR.13/57569.

  1. New perspectives in monitoring lung inflammation: analysis of exhaled breath condensate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montuschi, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    ... diseases might be relevant to differential diagnosis. Given its noninvasiveness, this method might be suitable for longitudinal studies in patients with lung disease, including children. This book provides an introduction to the analysis of exhaled breath condensate. To provide an overview of lung inflammation, basic and clinical pharmacology of leukotrie...

  2. Research Into Childhood Obstructive Sleep-Disordered Breathing : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venekamp, Roderick P.; Chandrasekharan, Deepak; Abel, Francois; Blackshaw, Helen; Kreis, Irene A.; E R Evans, Hannah; Schilder, Anne G.M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite recent clinical guideline development, the best pathway of care for children with symptoms of obstructive sleep-disordered breathing (oSDB) is still debated. This systematic review aims to map the research in childhood oSDB that has been conducted so far to support further

  3. Does adenotonsillectomy alter IGF-1 and ghrelin serum levels in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy and failure to thrive? A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari Moghaddam, Yalda; Golzari, Samad E J; Saboktakin, Lida; Seyedashrafi, Mir Hojjat; Sabermarouf, Babak; Gavgani, Heidar Ali Esmaeili; Haghjo, Amir Ghorbani; Lotfi, Alireza; Ghabili, Kamyar

    2013-09-01

    Adenotonsillar hypertrophy (ATH) contributes to upper airway obstruction and recurrent tonsillitis in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of adenotonsillectomy on serum IGF-1 and ghrelin levels in children with ATH failure to thrive. Forty pre-pubertal children with more than 5 years of age (6.57 ± 1.284 years) suffering from ATH, sleep disorder breathing, snoring, open mouth breathing and growth retardation were studied. Blood samples were taken eight hours after fasting and weight and height were measured by SECA instrument. Blood samples were centrifuged immediately and the extracted sera were stored at -70 °C in Eppendorf vials. IGF-1 and ghrelin were measured by ELISA kit. Patients with adenotonsillectomy indication underwent adenotonsillectomy and serum levels of IGF-1 and ghrelin were measured 12 months after operation. Weight, height and BMI were increased significantly after operation (P failure to thrive increases IGF-1 and Ghrelin serum levels which might contribute to the improvement in the growth pattern of the children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Bad breath--etiological, diagnostic and therapeutic problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, M; Reiss, G

    2000-01-01

    Oral malodor has many etiologies and is a clinical problem for many people. This paper reviews the causes and management of oral malador. In the majority of cases the problem has been shown to originate in the oral cavity. Oral malodor, a generic descriptor term for foul smells emanating from the mouth, encompasses ozostomia, stomatodysodia, halitosis (both pathological halitosis and physiological halitosis) and fetor oris or fetor ex ore. These latter terms, in turn, denote different sources of oral malodor. All conditions that favour the retention of anaerobic, mainly gram-negative, bacteria will predispose for the development of bad breath. In addition to periodontal pockets, the most important retention site is the dorsum of the tongue with its numerous papillae. During the night and between meals the conditions are optimal for odour production. Systemic pathological states, such as diabetes mellitus, uremia and hepatic diseases, induce metabolic products that are detectable as oral smells. It is always easy to recognize halitosis, but identifying the exact cause is more complex. The clinical labelling and interpretation of different oral malodors both contribute to the diagnosis and treatment of underlying disease. Treatment is directed at the underlying cause.

  5. Electromyographic evaluation of the upper lip according to the breathing mode: a longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldrieli Regina Ambrosio

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at analyzing and comparing longitudinally the EMG (electromyographic activity of the superior orbicularis oris muscle according to the breathing mode. The sample, 38 adolescents with Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion with predominantly nose (PNB or mouth (PMB breathing, was evaluated at two different periods, with a two-year interval between them. For that purpose, a 16channel electromyography machine was employed, which was properly calibrated in a PC equipped with an analogue-digital converter, with utilization of surface, passive and bipolar electrodes. The RMS data (root mean square were collected at rest and in 12 movements and normalized according to time and amplitude, by the peak value of EMG, in order to allow comparisons between subjects and between periods. Comparison of the muscle function of PNB and PMB subjects at period 1 (P1, period 2 (P2 and the variation between periods (Δ did not reveal statistically significant differences between groups (p < 0.05. However, longitudinal evaluation of the muscle function in PNB and PMB subjects demonstrated different evolutions in the percentage of required EMG for accomplishment of the movements investigated. It was possible to conclude that there are differences in the percentage of electric activity of the upper lip with the growth of the subjects according to the breathing mode.

  6. Is breath acetone a biomarker of diabetes? A historical review on breath acetone measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhennan; Wang, Chuji

    2013-09-01

    Since the ancient discovery of the 'sweet odor' in human breath gas, pursuits of the breath analysis-based disease diagnostics have never stopped. Actually, the 'smell' of the breath, as one of three key disease diagnostic techniques, has been used in Eastern-Medicine for more than three thousand years. With advancement of measuring technologies in sensitivity and selectivity, more specific breath gas species have been identified and established as a biomarker of a particular disease. Acetone is one of the breath gases and its concentration in exhaled breath can now be determined with high accuracy using various techniques and methods. With the worldwide prevalence of diabetes that is typically diagnosed through blood testing, human desire to achieve non-blood based diabetic diagnostics and monitoring has never been quenched. Questions, such as is breath acetone a biomarker of diabetes and how is the breath acetone related to the blood glucose (BG) level (the golden criterion currently used in clinic for diabetes diagnostic, monitoring, and management), remain to be answered. A majority of current research efforts in breath acetone measurements and its technology developments focus on addressing the first question. The effort to tackle the second question has begun recently. The earliest breath acetone measurement in clearly defined diabetic patients was reported more than 60 years ago. For more than a half-century, as reviewed in this paper, there have been more than 41 independent studies of breath acetone using various techniques and methods, and more than 3211 human subjects, including 1581 healthy people, 242 Type 1 diabetic patients, 384 Type 2 diabetic patients, 174 unspecified diabetic patients, and 830 non-diabetic patients or healthy subjects who are under various physiological conditions, have been used in the studies. The results of the breath acetone measurements collected in this review support that many conditions might cause changes to breath

  7. A Literature Review of Word of Mouth and Electronic Word of Mouth: Implications for Consumer Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Huete-Alcocer, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    The rise and spread of the Internet has led to the emergence of a new form of word of mouth (WOM): electronic word of mouth (eWOM), considered one of the most influential informal media among consumers, businesses, and the population at large. Drawing on these ideas, this paper reviews the relevant literature, analyzing the impact of traditional WOM and eWOM in the field of consumer behavior and highlighting the main differences between the two types of recommendations, with a view to contrib...

  8. A Literature Review of Word of Mouth and Electronic Word of Mouth: Implications for Consumer Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Huete-Alcocer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The rise and spread of the Internet has led to the emergence of a new form of word of mouth (WOM: electronic word of mouth (eWOM, considered one of the most influential informal media among consumers, businesses, and the population at large. Drawing on these ideas, this paper reviews the relevant literature, analyzing the impact of traditional WOM and eWOM in the field of consumer behavior and highlighting the main differences between the two types of recommendations, with a view to contributing to a better understanding of the potential of both.

  9. A Literature Review of Word of Mouth and Electronic Word of Mouth: Implications for Consumer Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huete-Alcocer, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    The rise and spread of the Internet has led to the emergence of a new form of word of mouth (WOM): electronic word of mouth (eWOM), considered one of the most influential informal media among consumers, businesses, and the population at large. Drawing on these ideas, this paper reviews the relevant literature, analyzing the impact of traditional WOM and eWOM in the field of consumer behavior and highlighting the main differences between the two types of recommendations, with a view to contributing to a better understanding of the potential of both.

  10. Effect of breathing technique of blowing on the extent of damage to the perineum at the moment of delivery: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Ahmadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the important tasks in managing labor is the protection of perineum. An important variable affecting this outcome is maternal pushing during the second stage of labor. This study was done to investigate the effect of breathing technique on perineal damage extention in laboring Iranian women. Materials and Methods: This randomized clinical trial was performed on 166 nulliparous pregnant women who had reached full-term pregnancy, had low risk pregnancy, and were candidates for vaginal delivery in two following groups: using breathing techniques (case group and valsalva maneuver (control group. In the control group, pushing was done with holding the breath. In the case group, the women were asked to take 2 deep abdominal breaths at the onset of pain, then take another deep breath, and push 4–5 seconds with the open mouth while controlling exhalation. From the crowning stage onward, the women were directed to control their pushing, and do the blowing technique. Results: According to the results, intact perineum was more observed in the case group (P = 0.002. Posterior tears (Grade 1, 2, and 3 was considerably higher in the control group (P = 0.003. Anterior tears (labias and episiotomy were not significantly different in the two groups. Conclusions: It was concluded that breathing technique of blowing can be a good alternative to Valsalva maneuver in order to reduce perineal damage in laboring women.

  11. Aleitamento e hábitos orais deletérios em respiradores orais e nasais Breast-feeding and deleterious oral habits in mouth and nose breathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Vitaliano Voi Trawitzki

    2005-12-01

    and the history of breast-feeding and of deleterious oral habits was determined. STUDY DESIGN: clinical with transversal cohort. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The study population consisted of 62 children ranging in age from 3 years and 3 months to 6 years and 11 months who were submitted to otorhinolaryngologic evaluation to determine nasal and mouth breathers and to a speech language pathologic interview. The otorhinolaryngologic evaluation involved the following exams: anterior rhinoscopy, oroscopy and radiologic examination. The parents of the children were questioned about the form of feeding (natural and/or artificial, the duration of breast-feeding and the presence of deleterious oral habits (suction and biting. The Fisher exact test was used to compare groups regarding the presence and absence of habits and the different periods of breast-feeding. RESULTS: The breast-feeding period was longer among nasal breathers and was concentrated in the period between 3 and 6 months of age. Regarding the use of bottle, the results showed that most of the children in both groups used this type of feeding during the first years of life, with no significant difference between groups (p=0.58. There was a marked presence of deleterious oral habits among mouth breathers, with a statistically significant difference between groups regarding suction (p=0.004 and biting habits (p=0.0002. CONCLUSION: Mouth breathing children were breast-fed for a shorter period of time and had a history of deleterious oral habits compared to nose breathers.

  12. Cyclical Patterns of Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease Caused by Enterovirus A71 in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    NikNadia, NMN; Sam, I-Ching; Rampal, Sanjay; WanNorAmalina, WMZ; NurAtifah, Ghazali; Verasahib, Khebir; Ong, Chia Ching; MohdAdib, MohdAidinniza; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is an important emerging pathogen causing large epidemics of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. In Malaysia, since the first EV-A71 epidemic in 1997, recurrent cyclical epidemics have occurred every 2–3 years for reasons that remain unclear. We hypothesize that this cyclical pattern is due to changes in population immunity in children (measured as seroprevalence). Neutralizing antibody titers against EV-A71 were measured in 2,141 residual serum samples collected from children ≤12 years old between 1995 and 2012 to determine the seroprevalence of EV-A71. Reported national HFMD incidence was highest in children Malaysia is mainly due to the fall of population immunity accompanying the accumulation of susceptible children between epidemics. This study will impact the future planning, timing and target populations for vaccine programs. PMID:27010319

  13. 46 CFR 197.456 - Breathing supply hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing supply hoses. 197.456 Section 197.456 Shipping....456 Breathing supply hoses. (a) The diving supervisor shall insure that— (1) Each breathing supply....5 times its maximum working pressure; (2) Each breathing supply hose assembly, prior to being placed...

  14. 21 CFR 862.3080 - Breath nitric oxide test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Systems § 862.3080 Breath nitric oxide test system. (a) Identification. A breath nitric oxide test system... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath nitric oxide test system. 862.3080 Section... fractional nitric oxide concentration in expired breath aids in evaluating an asthma patient's response to...

  15. Analysis for drugs in saliva and breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-25

    Collection devices for saliva and breath that involved non-invasive techniques for sample collection were evaluated. Having subjects simply spit into a specially prepared glass vial was found to be an efficient, inexpensive and simple way to collect ...

  16. Analysis for drug in saliva and breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-25

    Collection devices for saliva and breath that involved non-invasive : techniques for sample collection were evaluated. Having subjects simply : spit into a specially prepared glass vial was found to be an efficient, : inexpensive and simple way to co...

  17. Humidifiers: Air Moisture Eases Skin, Breathing Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... create deposits inside your humidifier that promote bacterial growth. And, when released into the air, these minerals often appear as white dust on your furniture. You may also breathe in some minerals that ...

  18. Swimming in air-breathing fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, S; Domenici, P; McKenzie, D J

    2014-03-01

    Fishes with bimodal respiration differ in the extent of their reliance on air breathing to support aerobic metabolism, which is reflected in their lifestyles and ecologies. Many freshwater species undertake seasonal and reproductive migrations that presumably involve sustained aerobic exercise. In the six species studied to date, aerobic exercise in swim flumes stimulated air-breathing behaviour, and there is evidence that surfacing frequency and oxygen uptake from air show an exponential increase with increasing swimming speed. In some species, this was associated with an increase in the proportion of aerobic metabolism met by aerial respiration, while in others the proportion remained relatively constant. The ecological significance of anaerobic swimming activities, such as sprinting and fast-start manoeuvres during predator-prey interactions, has been little studied in air-breathing fishes. Some species practise air breathing during recovery itself, while others prefer to increase aquatic respiration, possibly to promote branchial ion exchange to restore acid-base balance, and to remain quiescent and avoid being visible to predators. Overall, the diversity of air-breathing fishes is reflected in their swimming physiology as well, and further research is needed to increase the understanding of the differences and the mechanisms through which air breathing is controlled and used during exercise. © 2014 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  19. Optoacoustic 13C-breath test analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harde, Hermann; Helmrich, Günther; Wolff, Marcus

    2010-02-01

    The composition and concentration of exhaled volatile gases reflects the physical ability of a patient. Therefore, a breath analysis allows to recognize an infectious disease in an organ or even to identify a tumor. One of the most prominent breath tests is the 13C-urea-breath test, applied to ascertain the presence of the bacterium helicobacter pylori in the stomach wall as an indication of a gastric ulcer. In this contribution we present a new optical analyzer that employs a compact and simple set-up based on photoacoustic spectroscopy. It consists of two identical photoacoustic cells containing two breath samples, one taken before and one after capturing an isotope-marked substrate, where the most common isotope 12C is replaced to a large extent by 13C. The analyzer measures simultaneously the relative CO2 isotopologue concentrations in both samples by exciting the molecules on specially selected absorption lines with a semiconductor laser operating at a wavelength of 2.744 μm. For a reliable diagnosis changes of the 13CO2 concentration of 1% in the exhaled breath have to be detected at a concentration level of this isotope in the breath of about 500 ppm.

  20. Osteolipoma of floor of the mouth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, Vandana; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha

    2015-06-25

    Lipomas are benign soft tissue tumours composed mainly of mature adipose tissue. Histological variants of lipomas have been named according to the type of tissue present and they include fibrolipoma, angiolipoma, osteolipoma, chondrolipoma and others. Osteolipoma, a classic lipoma with osseous metaplasia, is a very rare histological variant. Owing to the rarity of oral osteolipomas, we report an uncommon case of osteolipoma located on the floor of the mouth of a 20-year-old female patient and include a review of the literature. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. [Burning mouth syndrome - a joint biopsychosocial approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpone, Francesca; Combremont, Florian; Weber, Kerstin; Scolozzi, Paolo

    2016-02-10

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a medical condition that is often refractory to conventional diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Patients suffering from BMS can benefit from a biopsychosocial approach in a joint, medical-psychological consultation model. Such a consultation exists at Geneva University Hospitals, involving the collaboration of the maxillo-facial and oral surgery division and the division of liaison psychiatry and crisis intervention, in order to take into account the multiple factors involved in BMS onset and persistence. This article will describe BMS clinical presentation, and present an integrate approach to treat these patients.

  2. Immediate impact of rapid maxillary expansion on upper airway dimensions and on the quality of life of mouth breathers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Namiko Izuka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess short-term tomographic changes in the upper airway dimensions and quality of life of mouth breathers after rapid maxillary expansion (RME. METHODS: A total of 25 mouth breathers with maxillary atresia and a mean age of 10.5 years old were assessed by means of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT and a standardized quality of life questionnaire answered by patients' parents/legal guardians before and immediately after rapid maxillary expansion. RESULTS: Rapid maxillary expansion resulted in similar and significant expansion in the width of anterior (2.8 mm, p < 0.001 and posterior nasal floor (2.8 mm, p < 0.001. Although nasopharynx and nasal cavities airway volumes significantly increased (+1646.1 mm3, p < 0.001, oropharynx volume increase was not statistically significant (+1450.6 mm3, p = 0.066. The results of the quality of life questionnaire indicated that soon after rapid maxillary expansion, patients' respiratory symptoms significantly decreased in relation to their initial respiratory conditions. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that RME produces significant dimensional increase in the nasal cavity and nasopharynx. Additionally, it also positively impacts the quality of life of mouth-breathing patients with maxillary atresia.

  3. Telling stories: opportunities for word-of-mouth communication.

    OpenAIRE

    Cownie, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Word-of-mouth is an important aspect of marketing communications and can be conceived as the story-telling of everyday life. This working paper suggests that marketing communicators’ understanding of word-of-mouth might usefully be enhanced by the consideration of the tools of the screenwriter, in particular the premise and the active question. The jeopardy of the premise and unresolved nature of the active questions the premise generates may contribute to the potency of word-of-mouth message...

  4. Open bite in prematurely born children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harila, V; Heikkinen, T; Grön, M; Alvesalo, L

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to: examine the expression of open bite in prematurely born children and discuss the etiological factors that may lead to bite it. The subjects were 328 prematurely born (cross-sectional study of the Collaborative Perinatal Project in the 1960s and 1970s. Dental documents, including casts and photographs, were taken once at the age of 6-12 years in the mixed dentition. The occlusion was recorded by examining and measuring the hard stone casts. Vertical open bite was recorded only for full erupted teeth. The statistical method used was chi-square analysis. Significant differences in the incidence of anterior open bite (from left to right canine) was found between the preterm and control groups and between gender and ethnic groups. The prevalence of anterior open bite was nearly 9% in the preterm group and almost 7% in the control group. African Americans (9%) had a significantly greater incidence of open bite than Caucasians (3%; Pbite than boys (8% vs 6%; Pbite was increased--especially in preterm African American boys compared to controls (11% vs 8%). The results show differences in the development of anterior open bite between ethnic and gender groups. Premature birth may also influence dental occlusal development. Of importance are the patient's: general health condition; respiratory infections; inadequate nasal- and mouth-breathing; oral habits; and other medical problems. Preterm children may be relatively more predisposed to etiological factors for the development of anterior open bite.

  5. Understanding the power of word-of-mouth.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzana Z. Gildin

    2003-01-01

    Word-of-mouth has been considered one of the most powerful forms of communication in the market today. Understanding what makes word-of-mouth such a persuasive and powerful communication tool is important to organizations that intend to build strong relationships with consumers. For this reason, organizations are concerned about promoting positive word-of-mouth and retarding negative word-of-mouth, which can be harmful to the image of the company or a brand. This work focuses on the major asp...

  6. In vivo proton MRS of normal pancreas metabolites during breath-holding and free-breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, T.-H.; Jin, E.-H.; Shen, H.; Zhang, Y.; He, W.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To characterize normal pancreas metabolites using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) at 3 T under conditions of breath-holding and free-breathing. Materials and methods: The pancreases of 32 healthy volunteers were examined using 1 H MRS during breath-holding and free-breathing acquisitions in a single-voxel point-resolved selective spectroscopy sequence (PRESS) technique using a 3 T MRI system. Resonances were compared between paired spectra of the two breathing modes. Furthermore, correlations between lipid (Lip) content and age, body-mass index (BMI), as well as choline (Cho) peak visibility of the normal pancreas were analysed during breath-holding. Results: Twenty-nine pairs of spectra were successfully obtained showing three major resonances, Lip, Cho, cholesterol and the unsaturated parts of the olefinic region of fatty acids (Chol + Unsat). Breath-hold spectra were generally better, with higher signal-to-noise ratios (SNR; Z=–2.646, p = 0.008) and Cho peak visible status (Z=–2.449, p = 0.014). Correlations were significant between spectra acquired by the two breathing modes, especially for Lip height, Lip area, and the area of other peaks at 1.9–4.1 ppm. However, the Lip resonance was significantly different between the spectra of the two breathing modes (p 1 H MRS of the normal pancreas at 3 T is technically feasible and can characterize several metabolites. 1 H MRS during breath-holding acquisition is superior to that during free-breathing acquisition.

  7. Estimation of breathing rate in thermal imaging videos: a pilot study on healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Pereira, Carina; Yu, Xinchi; Czaplik, Michael; Blazek, Vladimir; Venema, Boudewijn; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2017-12-01

    Diverse studies have demonstrated the importance of monitoring breathing rate (BR). Commonly, changes in BR are one of the earliest and major markers of serious complications/illness. However, it is frequently neglected due to limitations of clinically established measurement techniques, which require attachment of sensors. The employment of adhesive pads or thoracic belts in preterm infants as well as in traumatized or burned patients is an additional paramount issue. The present paper proposes a new robust approach, based on data fusion, to remotely monitor BR using infrared thermography (IRT). The algorithm considers not only temperature modulation around mouth and nostrils but also the movements of both shoulders. The data of these four sensors/regions of interest need to be further fused to reach improved accuracy. To investigate the performance of our approach, two different experiments (phase A: normal breathing, phase B: simulation of breathing disorders) on twelve healthy volunteers were performed. Thoracic effort (piezoplethysmography) was simultaneously acquired to validate our results. Excellent agreements between BR estimated with IRT and gold standard were achieved. While in phase A a mean correlation of 0.98 and a root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.28 bpm was reached, in phase B the mean correlation and the RMSE hovered around 0.95 and 3.45 bpm, respectively. The higher RMSE in phase B results predominantly from delays between IRT and gold standard in BR transitions: eupnea/apnea, apnea/tachypnea etc. Moreover, this study also demonstrates the capability of IRT to capture varied breathing disorders, and consecutively, to assess respiratory function. In summary, IRT might be a promising monitoring alternative to the conventional contact-based techniques regarding its performance and remarkable capabilities.

  8. Managing a patient with burning mouth syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Danny; Trudgill, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with an increasing frequency of symptoms of heartburn and retrosternal pain over the last few months, and a constant and intense burning pain affecting her tongue tip, mouth and lips for the past 5 years. She found consuming hot drinks exacerbated the burning oral pain and chewing gum seemed to alleviate some of her symptoms. She thought these oral sensations were caused by frequently licking her finger tips to separate prints in her work in publishing. She had been previously diagnosed with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), and her heartburn symptoms had been controlled until recently with lansoprazole 15 mg daily. Her past medical history included irritable bowel syndrome and depression, for which she had been treated with mebeverine and paroxetine for a number of years. She was a non-smoker and did not consume alcohol. Clinical examination was unremarkable with no oral lesions on examination. Her routine laboratory tests, including autoimmune serology, haematinics and thyroid function tests were all within normal limits. She underwent a gastroscopy, which revealed moderate reflux oesophagitis, and following commencing omeprazole 20 mg twice daily, her heartburn resolved. However, her oral burning symptoms were not affected and a diagnosis of burning mouth syndrome (BMS) was made. Following explanation and reassurance concerning the cause of her BMS symptoms, she chose not to receive treatment for this but to access cognitive behavioural therapy in the future if her symptoms worsened. PMID:28839812

  9. Burning mouth syndrome: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Francisco J; Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; López-Jornet, Pía

    2015-05-16

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is mainly found in middle aged or elderly women and is characterized by intense burning or itching sensation of the tongue or other regions of the oral mucosa. It can be accompanied by xerostomia and dysgeusia. The syndrome generally manifests spontaneously, and the discomfort is typically of a continuous nature but increases in intensity during the evening and at night. Although BMS classically has been attributed to a range of factors, in recent years evidence has been obtained relating it peripheral (sensory C and/or trigeminal nerve fibers) or central neuropathic disturbances (involving the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system). The differential diagnosis requires the exclusion of oral mucosal lesions or blood test alterations that can produce burning mouth sensation. Patient management is based on the avoidance of causes of oral irritation and the provision of psychological support. Drug treatment for burning sensation in primary BMS of peripheral origin can consist of topical clonazepam, while central type BMS appears to improve with the use of antidepressants such as duloxetine, antiseizure drugs such as gabapentin, or amisulpride.

  10. Cigarette Mouth Insertion Depths Among Chinese Smokers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Q

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vent blocking - where filter ventilation holes are intentionally or unintentionally, partly or completely covered by smokers’ lips during smoking - is an aspect of smoking behavior which can alter mainstream smoke yields. This study was designed to determine if, and to what extent ventilation holes were blocked by smokers’ lips in two cohorts of Chinese smokers. In this study, two groups of samples were collected. One group (1742 butts was collected randomly from public places in six chosen cities. Another (1037 butts was obtained by collecting the butts from identified smokers in Kunming. In this paper, the mouth insertion depth among Chinese smokers was studied for the first time by a staining method employing ninhydrin in ethanol. The results indicate that Chinese smokers exhibit a mouth insertion depth ranging from 1 to 17 mm with an average value of 7.5 AA± 2 mm. In this study, 95% of the ventilated filters examined showed that the vent zone was neither completely nor partially covered by smokers’ lips.

  11. Digital stethoscopes compared to standard auscultation for detecting abnormal paediatric breath sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevat, Ajay C; Kalirajah, Anaath; Roseby, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Our study aimed to objectively describe the audiological characteristics of wheeze and crackles in children by using digital stethoscope (DS) auscultation, as well as assess concordance between standard auscultation and two different DS devices in their ability to detect pathological breath sounds. Twenty children were auscultated by a paediatric consultant doctor and digitally recorded using the Littman™ 3200 Digital Electronic Stethoscope and a Clinicloud™ DS with smart device. Using spectrographic analysis, we found those with clinically described wheeze had prominent periodic waveform segments spanning expiration for a period of 0.03-1.2 s at frequencies of 100-1050 Hz, and occasionally spanning shorter inspiratory segments; paediatric crackles were brief discontinuous sounds with a distinguishing waveform. There was moderate concordance with respect to wheeze detection between digital and standard binaural stethoscopes, and 100% concordance for crackle detection. Importantly, DS devices were more sensitive than clinician auscultation in detecting wheeze in our study. Objective definition of audio characteristics of abnormal paediatric breath sounds was achieved using DS technology. We demonstrated superiority of our DS method compared to traditional auscultation for detection of wheeze. What is Known: • The audiological characteristics of abnormal breath sounds have been well-described in adult populations but not in children. • Inter-observer agreement for detection of pathological breath sounds using standard auscultation has been shown to be poor, but the clinical value of now easily available digital stethoscopes has not been sufficiently examined. What is New: • Digital stethoscopes can objectively define the nature of pathological breath sounds such as wheeze and crackles in children. • Paediatric wheeze was better detected by digital stethoscopes than by standard auscultation performed by an expert paediatric clinician.

  12. Sleep Disordered Breathing and Academic Performance: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Barbara; Spruyt, Karen; Dawes, Patrick; McDowall, Philippa S; Elder, Dawn; Schaughency, Elizabeth

    2015-10-01

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children is associated with daytime functioning decrements in cognitive performance and behavioral regulation. Studies addressing academic achievement are underrepresented. This study aimed to evaluate the strength of the relationships between SDB and achievement in core domains and general school performance. Data sources included PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. Studies of school-aged children investigating the relationships between SDB and academic achievement were selected for inclusion in a systematic literature review using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Data extracted were converted into standardized mean differences; effect sizes (ES) and statistics were calculated by using random-effects models. Heterogeneity tests (I(2)) were conducted. Of 488 studies, 16 met eligibility criteria. SDB was significantly associated with poorer academic performance for core academic domains related to language arts (ES -0.31; P performance. Variable definitions of both academic performance and SDB likely contributed to the heterogeneity among published investigations. Clear links between SDB and poorer academic performance in school-age children are demonstrated. ES statistics were in the small to medium range, but nevertheless the findings serve to highlight to parents, teachers, and clinicians that SDB in children may contribute to academic difficulties some children face. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Chemical sensors for breath gas analysis: the latest developments at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisch, Ulrike; Haick, Hossam

    2014-06-01

    Profiling the body chemistry by means of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breath opens exciting new avenues in medical diagnostics. Gas sensors could provide ideal platforms for realizing portable, hand-held breath testing devices in the near future. This review summarizes the latest developments and applications in the field of chemical sensors for diagnostic breath testing that were presented at the Breath Analysis Summit 2013 in Wallerfangen, Germany. Considerable progress has been made towards clinically applicable breath testing devices, especially by utilizing chemo-sensitive nanomaterials. Examples of several specialized breath testing applications are presented that are either based on stand-alone nanomaterial-based sensors being highly sensitive and specific to individual breath compounds over others, or on combinations of several highly specific sensors, or on experimental nanomaterial-based sensors arrays. Other interesting approaches include the adaption of a commercially available MOx-based sensor array to indirect breath testing applications, using a sample pre-concentration method, and the development of compact integrated GC-sensor systems. The recent trend towards device integration has led to the development of fully integrated prototypes of point-of-care devices. We describe and compare the performance of several prototypes that are based on different sensing technologies and evaluate their potential as low-cost and readily available next-generation medical devices.

  14. Asthma-associated oral and dental health repercussions in children aged 6 to 12 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana Angélica Ramos-Ríos

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asthma, which is characterized by mouth breathing and by the use of drugs for its treatment, affects between 1 and 30% of children and adolescents. There are only few studies reporting its impact on the oral cavity. Objectives: To find out the most common asthma-associated repercussions in 6 to 12-year-old children. Methods: Cross-sectional, comparative, analytical study carried out in 2 primary schools from Coclique, Veracruz, Mexico, in 6 to 12-year-old children. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC questionnaire for parents was used. Results: In a population of 409 children, a prevalence of asthma of 6.84% (n = 28 was found, which was higher in males (15, 54%; boys aged 6, 7 and 11 years and girls aged 8, 9 and 10 years were most affected. Risk factors for oral manifestations were acidic pH (OR = 170, caries (OR = 4.29, anterior open bite (OR = 66.78, gingivitis (OR = 9.75, atypical swallowing (OR = 15.70 and high-arched palate (OR = 45.60. Conclusion: Children with chronic conditions such as asthma require an oral and dental preventive program as part of their interdisciplinary care.

  15. The efficacy of amine fluoride/stannous fluoride in the suppression of morning breath odour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirynen, Marc; Avontroodt, Pieter; Soers, Catherine; Zhao, Hong; Pauwels, Martine; Coucke, Wim; van Steenberghe, Daniel

    2002-10-01

    Breath odour is a complaint encountered worldwide, often linked to microbial overload in the oral cavity. This double blind, crossover, randomised study assessed the efficacy of several antiseptic mouthrinses or slurry vs. a control solution in the prevention of morning bad breath during an experimental period of 7 days without mechanical plaque control. Sixteen dental students with a healthy periodontium abolished, after a thorough professional cleaning, all means of mechanical plaque control during five experimental periods of 7 days, interleaved by washout periods of at least 3 weeks. During each experimental period, as the only oral hygiene measure, the students rinsed twice a day with one of the following formulations (in a randomised order): a 0.2% chlorhexidine-alcohol mouthrinse (CHX-Alc), a 0.05% CHX + 0.05% cetylpyridinium chloride + 0.14% zinc lactate mouthrinse (CHX-CPC-Zn), an amine fluoride/stannous fluoride (125 ppm F-/125 ppm F-) containing mouthrinse (AmF/SnF2Mr), a slurry of a tooth paste (AmF/SnF2Sl) containing amine fluoride (350 ppm F-) and stannous fluoride (1050 ppm F-) and a placebo solution (placebo). At days 0, 3 and 7, morning breath was scored via VSC level measurements of the mouth air, and organoleptic ratings of the mouth air and tongue coating. At the same visits both the degree of gingival inflammation and the de novo plaque formation were rated. At the end of each period a questionnaire for subjective ratings was completed and microbiological samples were taken from the tongue dorsum, the saliva and the supragingival plaque for anaerobic and aerobic culturing. Although oral hygiene during the experimental periods was limited to rinsing, bad breath parameters systematically improved (P bacterial load (aerobic & anaerobic) in the saliva (>or= 0.5 log reduction with a superiority (P bacterial load on the tongue dorsum could only be detected for the CHX-Alc solution (0.5 log). The antibacterial effect of the placebo solution and the

  16. Sudarshan kriya yoga: Breathing for health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer A Zope

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breathing techniques are regularly recommended for relaxation, stress management, control of psychophysiological states, and to improve organ function. Yogic breathing, defined as a manipulation of breath movement, has been shown to positively affect immune function, autonomic nervous system imbalances, and psychological or stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to assess and provide a comprehensive review of the physiological mechanisms, the mind-body connection, and the benefits of Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY in a wide range of clinical conditions. Various online databases searched were Medline, Psychinfo, EMBASE, and Google Scholar. All the results were carefully screened and articles on SKY were selected. The references from these articles were checked to find any other potentially relevant articles. SKY, a unique yogic breathing practice, involves several types of cyclical breathing patterns, ranging from slow and calming to rapid and stimulating. There is mounting evidence to suggest that SKY can be a beneficial, low-risk, low-cost adjunct to the treatment of stress, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, stress-related medical illnesses, substance abuse, and rehabilitation of criminal offenders.

  17. Responses of primary producers to mouth closure in the temporarily ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low river inflow conditions during 2009/2010 resulted in the mouth of the Great Brak Estuary remaining closed for almost two years. The low water level in Wolwedans Dam resulted in no annual environmental flow releases being made, causing mouth closure. The response of primary producers to this prolonged period of ...

  18. The use of acoustic stimulation to inspect the fetal mouth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keun Young; Jun, Hyun Ah; Jang, Pong Rheem; Lee, Keung Hee [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nagey, David A. [The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore (United States)

    2000-12-15

    The normal neonatal response to sound stimulus consists of a generalized paroxysmal startle reflex. We recently noted an increase in fetal movements, head turning, mouth opening, tongue protrusion, cheek motion, hand to head movement and fetal eye blinking subsequent to fetal vibroacoustic stimulation. These movements are thought to represent portions of a startle response. Evaluation of the fetal face is an essential part of routine sonographic examination and of a level II examination. The complexity of the face in combination with suboptimal positioning may make it difficult to obtain adequate images of the fetal mouth. The fetal mouth is especially difficult to examine if it remains closed. It appeared to us that approximately 50% of the time, fetuses may be seen touching their face and head with their hands. This action may make evaluation of the face more difficult because of the shadowing caused by the overlying bones of the hands. We hypothesized that if vibroacoustic stimulation brings about fetal mouth movement and opening and/or withdrawal of the fetal hand from the mouth, it may facilitate anatomic evaluation for cleft lip and palate. Sonographic examination of the fetal mouth is facilitated if the mouth is open or moving. This study was designed to determine whether acoustic stimulation of the fetus would cause it to move its mouth. 109 women with uncomplicated pregnancies between 20 and 39 weeks gestation consented.

  19. The use of acoustic stimulation to inspect the fetal mouth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Keun Young; Jun, Hyun Ah; Jang, Pong Rheem; Lee, Keung Hee; Nagey, David A.

    2000-01-01

    The normal neonatal response to sound stimulus consists of a generalized paroxysmal startle reflex. We recently noted an increase in fetal movements, head turning, mouth opening, tongue protrusion, cheek motion, hand to head movement and fetal eye blinking subsequent to fetal vibroacoustic stimulation. These movements are thought to represent portions of a startle response. Evaluation of the fetal face is an essential part of routine sonographic examination and of a level II examination. The complexity of the face in combination with suboptimal positioning may make it difficult to obtain adequate images of the fetal mouth. The fetal mouth is especially difficult to examine if it remains closed. It appeared to us that approximately 50% of the time, fetuses may be seen touching their face and head with their hands. This action may make evaluation of the face more difficult because of the shadowing caused by the overlying bones of the hands. We hypothesized that if vibroacoustic stimulation brings about fetal mouth movement and opening and/or withdrawal of the fetal hand from the mouth, it may facilitate anatomic evaluation for cleft lip and palate. Sonographic examination of the fetal mouth is facilitated if the mouth is open or moving. This study was designed to determine whether acoustic stimulation of the fetus would cause it to move its mouth. 109 women with uncomplicated pregnancies between 20 and 39 weeks gestation consented.

  20. Giant Calculus In The Mouth Of Partially Edentulous Woman, (Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This case report is to create awareness of the presence of giant calculus in the mouth, the possible causes and its prevention. Report: This describes the oral condition of a partially edentulous woman with a giant calculus in the mouth. It highlights the effect of such an enormous calculus in the oral cavity.

  1. Veterinary realities: what is foot and mouth disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, J.; Mol, A.

    2011-01-01

    Veterinary science draws on different traditions for knowing and acting, and mobilises different kinds of materials and techniques. This article explores these differences and their tensions for the diagnosis of foot and mouth disease in the UK in 2001. It shows that when they talk of foot and mouth

  2. Keep Kids' Mouths Healthy: Brush 2min2X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Make sure your kids brush for 2 minutes, twice a day. En Español facebook twitter instagram Kids’ Healthy Mouths Health Watch & Brush! Watch ... About Kids’ Teeth Teeth Helpful Resources Links Keep Kids’ Mouths Healthy Roll over or click the time ...

  3. Word of mouth and opinion leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žnideršić-Kovač Ružica

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The new, alternative thinking patterns in marketing highlight the fact that exchanges per se are not the focus of marketing analysis and researches; rather than that, they must surrender this position to relationships between different sides in the marketing setting - the company and consumers, internal relations within companies, and relations between consumers themselves. A new philosophy, relationship marketing, is taking over the position of the old transaction marketing philosophy. The greatest challenge for marketing professionals at the beginning of the 21st century is this third dimension of relationships - relations between consumers, their mutual impact on preferences and purchase decisions, and, most notably, the possibility of involving consumers in companies marketing mix programs. Opinion leaders - their identification, creation, their word-of-mouth communication, its emergence and impact are currently the focus of marketing theory and practice.

  4. An overview of burning mouth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Carmen; Di Stasio, Dario; Petruzzi, Massimo; Lauritano, Dorina; Gentile, Enrica; Guida, Agostino; Maio, Claudio; Tammaro, Mariasofia; Serpico, Rosario; Lucchese, Alberta

    2016-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is characterised by the presence of a burning sensation in the oral mucosa in the absence of any clinically apparent mucosal sign. It occurs more commonly in older women and often affects the tongue tip and lateral borders, lips, and hard and soft palates. Besides the burning sensation, patients with BMS may complain of unremitting oral mucosal pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia. The exact pathophysiology of primary BMS remains unknown. A major challenge for the clinician is the treatment of BMS: identifying possible causative factors is the first step, but BMS is often idiopathic. Drug therapy, in addition to behavioural therapy and psychotherapy, may help to eliminate the symptoms. Considering the growing incidence of BMS in older people, further research is required to determine the true efficacy of current management strategies for patients with this disorder.

  5. The Liquid Hand-to-Mouth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olafsson, Arna; Pagel, Michaela

    constraints. To that end, we analyze cash-holding responses to income payments inspired by the corporate finance literature. However, we find that individuals’ cash responses are consistent with standard models without illiquid savings, and neither present nor future liquidity constraints being frequently...... and spending categories throughout the income distribution. Spending responses to income are typically explained by households’ capital structures. Households that hold little or no liquid wealth have to consume hand-to-mouth. However, we find that few individuals hold little or no liquidity, and we report...... that liquidity holdings are much larger than predicted by state-of-the-art models that explain spending responses with liquidity constraints due to illiquid savings. Given that present liquidity constraints do not bind, we analyze whether individuals hold liquidity cushions to cope with future liquidity...

  6. Steroid dysregulation and stomatodynia (burning mouth syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woda, Alain; Dao, Thuan; Gremeau-Richard, Christelle

    2009-01-01

    Stomatodynia ( burning mouth syndrome) is characterized by a spontaneous, continuous burning pain felt in the oral mucosa typically of anxiodepressive menopausal women. Because there is no obvious organic cause, it is considered a nonspecific pain. This Focus Article proposes a hypothesis based on the following pathophysiological cascade: chronic anxiety or post traumatic stress leads to a dysregulation of the adrenal production of steroids. One consequence is a decreased or modified production of some major precursors for the neuroactive steroid synthesis occurring in the skin, mucosa, and nervous system. At menopause, the drastic fall of the other main precursor supply , the gonadal steroids, leads to a brisk alteration of the production of neuroactive steroids. This results in neurodegenerative alterations of small nerves fibers of the oral mucosa and /or some brain areas involved in oral somatic sensations. These neuropathic changes become irreversible and precipitate the burning pain, dysgeusia, and xerostomia associated with stomatodynia, which all involve thin nerve fibers.

  7. WORD OF MOUTH ON SOCIAL MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raluca CHIOSA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through the access to information, the Internet has transformed people lifestyle, their preference for products, how they relate to brands. Perceived as an open space, without limitation, social media has become the main channel for expression of word-of-mouth, with both positive and negative effects. Thus The Internet has allowed the development of WOM, making it contemporary in our technological world. This paper examines the motives for adopting WOM behavior, forms of WOM, the WOM model and principles, directions of WOM research. Brand engagement has made consumers more powerful in terms of requirements and evaluation of product/brand, more demanding and impatient in brand communication and market response.

  8. Clinical Applications of CO2 and H2 Breath Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Si-qian;CHEN Bao-jun;LUO Zhi-fu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Breath test is non-invasive, high sensitivity and high specificity. In this article, CO2 breath test, H2 breath test and their clinical applications were elaborated. The main applications of CO2 breath test include helicobacter pylori test, liver function detection, gastric emptying test, insulin resistance test, pancreatic exocrine secretion test, etc. H2 breath test can be applied in the diagnosis of lactose malabsorption and detecting small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. With further research, the breath test is expected to be applied in more diseases diagnosis.

  9. Electronic Word-of-Mouth Communication and Consumer Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe Tegtmeier; Razmerita, Liana; Colleoni, Elanor

    2014-01-01

    The rapid adoption of social media, along with the easy access to peer information and interactions, has resulted in massive online word-of-mouth communication. These interactions among consumers have an increasing power over the success or failure of companies and brands. Drawing upon word-of-mouth...... communication and consumer behaviour theories, this paper investigates the use of word-of-mouth communication through social media among a group of Danish consumers. The findings suggest that electronic word-of-mouth communication among friends and peers affect consumer behaviour. Additionally, peer...... communication is perceived as more objective and therefore found more reliable than companies’ brand communication. Furthermore, negative word-of-mouth is perceived as more trustworthy compared to positive messages, which are often believed to be too subjective. The research findings emphasise the importance...

  10. Experimental Study Abour How the Thermal Plume Affects the Air Quality a Person Breathes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmedo, Inés; Nielsen, Peter V.; Ruiz de Adana, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    of this research is to increase the knowledge of how the thermal plume generated by a person affects the PME and therefore the concentration of contaminants in the inhalation area. An experimental study in a displacement ventilation room was carried out. Experiments were developed in a full scale test chamber 4.......10 m (length), 3.2 m (width), 2.7 m (height). The incoming air is distributed through a wall-mounted displacement diffuser. A breathing thermal manikin exhaling through the mouth and inhaling through the nose was used. A tracer gas, N2O, was used to simulate the gaseous substances, which might...... be considered as biological contaminants, exhaled by the manikin. The manikin was operated in three different heat fluxes with a value of: 0W, 94 W and 120 W. During the experiments six concentration probes were situated in the room. Three concentration tubes were fixed on the surface of the manikin at three...

  11. Is a multivalent hand, foot, and mouth disease vaccine feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Michel; Chong, Pele

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus A infections are the primary cause of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in infants and young children. Although enterovirus 71 (EV-A71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) are the predominant causes of HFMD epidemics worldwide, EV-A71 has emerged as a major neurovirulent virus responsible for severe neurological complications and fatal outcomes. HFMD is a serious health threat and economic burden across the Asia-Pacific region. Inactivated EV-A71 vaccines have elicited protection against EV-A71 but not against CV-A16 infections in large efficacy trials. The current development of a bivalent inactivated EV-A71/CV-A16 vaccine is the next step toward that of multivalent HFMD vaccines. These vaccines should ultimately include other prevalent pathogenic coxsackieviruses A (CV-A6 and CV-A10), coxsackieviruses B (B3 and B5) and echovirus 30 that often co-circulate during HFMD epidemics and can cause severe HFMD, aseptic meningitis and acute viral myocarditis. The prospect and challenges for the development of such multivalent vaccines are discussed. PMID:26009802

  12. Comparison of antimicrobial efficacy of chlorhexidine and combination mouth rinse in reducing the Mutans streptococcus count in plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi S Lakade

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The removal of plaque is utmost important to control dental caries. But in children, factors like lack of dexterity, individual motivation and monitoring limit the effectiveness of tooth brushing. This necessitates the use of chemotherapeutic agents for control of plaque. Aims: To compare the antimicrobial efficacy of 0.2% chlorhexidine mouth rinse and mouth rinse containing 0.03% triclosan, 0.05% sodium fluoride, and 5% xylitol in reducing the Mutans streptococcus count in plaque. Materials and Methods: Thirty healthy children aged 8-10 years with dmft (decay component of three or four were selected. They were divided randomly into two groups: The control or chlorhexidine group and the study group or combination mouth rinse. Both the groups practiced rinsing with respective mouth wash for 1 min for 15 d twice a day. The plaque samples were collected and after incubation Mutans streptococcus count was estimated on the strips from the Dentocult SM kit and evaluated using manufacture′s chart. Statistical Analysis Used: Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to analyze the findings. Results: Statistically significant reduction in the Mutans streptococci count in the plaque was seen in the control and study group from baseline level. But when both the groups were compared, the antimicrobial effect of chlorhexidine was more.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is being scanned. Most children older than six years are able to hold their breath long enough ... more severe allergic reaction. If your child experiences any kind of reaction to the intravenous contrast, it ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... order to produce clear images. Also, shorter scan times will make it easier for children to hold their breath during critical parts of the exam. CT scanning is painless, noninvasive ...

  15. Effect of oxygenation on breath-by-breath response of the genioglossus muscle during occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauda, E B; Carroll, J L; McColley, S; Smith, P L

    1991-10-01

    We investigated the effect of different levels of O2 tension (hypoxia, normoxia, and hyperoxia) on the breath-by-breath onset and peak electromyographic (EMG) activity of the genioglossus (GG) muscle during a five-breath end-expiratory tracheal occlusion of 20- to 30-s duration. GG and diaphragmatic (DIA) EMG activity were measured with needle electrodes in eight anesthetized tracheotomized adult cats. In response to occlusion, the increase in the number of animals with GG EMG activity was different during hypoxia, normoxia, and hyperoxia (P = 0.003, Friedman). During hypoxia, eight of eight of the animals had GG EMG activity by the third occluded effort. In contrast, during normoxia, only four of eight and, during hyperoxia, only three of eight animals had GG EMG activity throughout the entire five-breath occlusion. Similarly, at release of the occlusion, more animals had persistent GG EMG activity on the postocclusion breaths during hypoxia than during normoxia or hyperoxia. Breath-by-breath augmentation of peak amplitude of the GG and DIA EMGs on each occluded effort was accentuated during hypoxia (P less than 0.01) and abolished during hyperoxia (P = 0.10). These results suggest that hypoxemia is a major determinant of the rapidity of onset, magnitude, and sustained activity of upper airway muscles during airway occlusion.

  16. Medication effects on sleep and breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Gilbert; Tsai, Sheila; Lee-Chiong, Teofilo

    2014-09-01

    Sleep respiration is regulated by circadian, endocrine, mechanical and chemical factors, and characterized by diminished ventilatory drive and changes in Pao2 and Paco2 thresholds. Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are more pronounced during rapid eye movement. Breathing is influenced by sleep stage and airway muscle tone. Patient factors include medical comorbidities and body habitus. Medications partially improve obstructive sleep apnea and stabilize periodic breathing at altitude. Potential adverse consequences of medications include precipitation or worsening of disorders. Risk factors for adverse medication effects include aging, medical disorders, and use of multiple medications that affect respiration. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Does a Smaller Waist Mean Smelly Breath?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it inhibits the growth of Streptococcus mutans , the oral bacteria that cause cavities. ; 3. Keep a toothbrush handy and brush after all meals ; Brushing and flossing at least twice a day can help keep your mouth healthy and prevent odors. An AGD survey found ...

  18. Childhood obstructive sleep-disordered breathing: a clinical update and discussion of technological innovations and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbower, Ann C; Ishman, Stacey L; McGinley, Brian M

    2007-12-01

    Childhood sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been known to be associated with health and cognitive impacts for more than a century, and yet our understanding of this disorder is in its infancy. Neuropsychological consequences in children with snoring or subtle breathing disturbances not meeting the traditional definition of sleep apnea suggest that "benign, or primary snoring" may be clinically significant, and that the true prevalence of SDB might be underestimated. There is no standard definition of SDB in children. The polysomnographic technology used in many sleep laboratories may be inadequate to diagnose serious but subtle forms of clinically important airflow limitation. In the last several years, advances in digital technology as well as new observational studies of respiratory and arousal patterns in large populations of healthy children have led to alternative views of what constitutes sleep-related breathing and arousal abnormalities that may refine our diagnostic criteria. This article reviews our knowledge of childhood SDB, highlights recent advances in technology, and discusses diagnostic and treatment strategies that will advance the management of children with pediatric SDB.

  19. Pengaruh Word of Mouth Marketing dan Pameran terhadap Keputusan Orang Tua Memilih Sekolah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartiwi Prabowo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In decision-making of choosing schools, people recommendation is effected. WOM factor and exhibition twice in a year for ISMILE school is a considered efficient and effective promotional media. The research method is to identify the effect of word of mouth and exhibition towards perception of value proposition and effects of decision-making. Analysis method in this research is validity, reliability, normality test, simple correlation and path analysis. Data gathering technique is questionnaire. The repondents in the research are 100 people, including parents from students in ISMILE school. The expected result from this research is a relationship among variables, significant effects from word of mouth and exhibition at the same time of perception towards value position and significant effects from perception of value proposition towards decision- making. From this research, ISMILE school should hold exhibition and focus to things that will lead to positive word of mouth so it could gain more parents register their children in ISMILE school. 

  20. Estudo comparativo do padrão de respiração e a porcentagem de ocupação da nasofaringe pela tonsila faríngea em crianças com ou sem história de infecção pelo HIV A comparative study of the breathing pattern and amount of nasopharynx obstruction by the pharyngeal tonsil in hiv infected and non infected children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michella Dinah Zastrow

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: o objetivo deste estudo foi estudar a associação entre o padrão de respiração e o tamanho da tonsila faríngea em 122 crianças (60 infectadas pelo HIV e 62 sem infecção. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: As crianças foram analisadas quanto ao padrão de respiração, fluxo nasal e ocupação da tonsila faríngea em radiografias cefalométricas de perfil, através de uma análise computadorizada. RESULTADOS: O padrão de respiração de maior ocorrência nos dois grupos foi o tipo misto. A maioria das crianças apresentou tipo de respiração bucal ou mista, não havendo associação entre o tipo de respiração e presença do HIV (p=0,091. O fluxo nasal mostrou predomínio do fluxo médio nos dois grupos. As crianças sem história de infecção pelo HIV apresentaram fluxo nasal de médio a grande e a maioria das crianças infectadas pelo HIV apresentou de pouco a médio fluxo nasal de ar, havendo uma associação positiva entre o fluxo nasal e a infecção pelo HIV (pAIM: the goal of the present investigation was to study the association between breathing pattern and pharyngeal tonsil size in 122 children (60 HIV infected and 62 without such infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The children were analyzed as to their breathing pattern, nasal flow and pharyngeal tonsil obstruction seen in side cephalometric x-rays, by means of a computerized analysis. RESULTS: The pattern that most occurred in both groups was the mixed type. Most of the children presented oral or mixed type breathing and there was no association between the type of breathing and HIV presence (p=0.091. Nasal flow was mainly medium in both groups. Children without prior history of HIV infection had medium to large nasal flow and most of the HIV-infected children had medium nasal airflow. There was a positive association between nasal flow and HIV infection (p<0.0001. The average percentage of nasopharynx obstruction by the pharyngeal tonsil was high in both groups, and there was

  1. Self contained compressed air breathing apparatus to facilitate personnel decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C W [Radiological and Safety Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1963-11-15

    This report describes the modification of a Self Contained Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus to provide extended respiratory protection to grossly contaminated personnel during a decontamination period which may exceed the duration of the Breathing Apparatus air supply. (author)

  2. Self contained compressed air breathing apparatus to facilitate personnel decontamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.W.

    1963-11-01

    This report describes the modification of a Self Contained Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus to provide extended respiratory protection to grossly contaminated personnel during a decontamination period which may exceed the duration of the Breathing Apparatus air supply. (author)

  3. On the Conventionalization of Mouth Actions in Australian Sign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Trevor; van Roekel, Jane; Schembri, Adam

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the conventionalization of mouth actions in Australian Sign Language. Signed languages were once thought of as simply manual languages because the hands produce the signs which individually and in groups are the symbolic units most easily equated with the words, phrases and clauses of spoken languages. However, it has long been acknowledged that non-manual activity, such as movements of the body, head and the face play a very important role. In this context, mouth actions that occur while communicating in signed languages have posed a number of questions for linguists: are the silent mouthings of spoken language words simply borrowings from the respective majority community spoken language(s)? Are those mouth actions that are not silent mouthings of spoken words conventionalized linguistic units proper to each signed language, culturally linked semi-conventional gestural units shared by signers with members of the majority speaking community, or even gestures and expressions common to all humans? We use a corpus-based approach to gather evidence of the extent of the use of mouth actions in naturalistic Australian Sign Language-making comparisons with other signed languages where data is available--and the form/meaning pairings that these mouth actions instantiate.

  4. Significance of proper oral hygiene for health condition of mouth and teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljaljević Agima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Proper mouth and teeth hygiene has influence on the prevention of a great number of diseases and very often some of them are not related only to oral cavity. Most frequent diseases of mouth and teeth such as caries and periodontal diseases are caused, among other factors, by poor oral hygiene. They are also more frequent in young population. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and hygienic habit on oral health in children aged 11-15 years. Methods. This crosssectional study was conducted by the dental teams in dentist surgeries in Tivat Health Center between May and September 2009. The sample consisted of patients 11 to 15 years of age. A questionnaire and dental examination of mouth and teeth were used as research instruments. The examinations were conducted in accordance with the World Health Organization methodology and criteria. The data obtained from the interviews were correlated with those obtained from the clinical examinations. Results. The results show that the majority of respondents brush their teeth twice a day and visit the dentist once in every six months. The research also shows that 57% respondents have caries of deciduous teeth and over 63% respondents of permanent teeth. Gingivitis was found in 14% and orthodontic anomalies in 44.7% respondents. A half of respondents who brush their teeth rarely have problems with gingivitis. There is a highly statistically significant difference between the occurrence of gingivitis and the frequency of teeth brushing. Conclusion. There is a significant difference between mouth and oral hygiene and sex as well as other sociodemographic characteristics of respondents. The study showed the correlation between occurrence of caries and the gingivitis and frequency of teeth brushing and dental visits.

  5. [Significance of proper oral hygiene for health condition of mouth and teeth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljaljević, Agima; Matijević, Snezana; Terzić, Natasa; Andjelić, Jasmina; Mugosa, Boban

    2012-01-01

    Proper mouth and teeth hygiene has influence on the prevention of a great number of diseases and very often some of them are not related only to oral cavity. Most frequent diseases of mouth and teeth such as caries and periodontal diseases are caused, among other factors, by poor oral hygiene. They are also more frequent in young population. The aim of this study was to estimate the influence of sociodemographic characteristics and hygienic habit on oral health in children aged 11-15 years. This cross-sectional study was conducted by the dental teams in dentist surgeries in Tivat Health Center between May and September 2009. The sample consisted of patients 11 to 15 years of age. A questionnaire and dental examination of mouth and teeth were used as research instruments. The examinations were conducted in accordance with the World Health Organization methodology and criteria. The data obtained from the interviews were correlated with those obtained from the clinical examinations. The results show that the majority of respondents brush their teeth twice a day and visit the dentist once in every six months. The research also shows that 57% respondents have caries of deciduous teeth and over 63% respondents of permanent teeth. Gingivitis was found in 14% and orthodontic anomalies in 44.7% respondents. A half of respondents who brush their teeth rarely have problems with gingivitis. There is a highly statistically significant difference between the occurrence of gingivitis and the frequency of teeth brushing. There is a significant difference between mouth and oral hygiene and sex as well as other sociodemographic characteristics of respondents. The study showed the correlation between occurrence of caries and the gingivitis and frequency of teeth brushing and dental visits.

  6. [Death by erotic asphyxiation (breath control play)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madea, Burkhard; Hagemeier, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Most cases of sexual asphyxia are due to autoerotic activity. Asphyxia due to oronasal occlusion is mostly seen in very old or very young victims. Oronasal occlusion is also used in sadomasochistic sexual practices like "breath control play" or "erotic asphyxiation". If life saving time limitations of oronasal occlusion are not observed, conviction for homicide caused by negligence is possible.

  7. Detection of bronchial breathing caused by pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, V; Fachinger, P; Penzel, Th; Koehler, U; von Wichert, P; Vogelmeier, C

    2002-06-01

    The classic auscultation with stethoscope is the established clinical method for the detection of lung diseases. The interpretation of the sounds depends on the experience of the investigating physician. Therefore, a new computer-based method has been developed to classify breath sounds from digital lung sound recordings. Lung sounds of 11 patients with one-sided pneumonia and bronchial breathing were recorded on both the pneumonia side and on contralateral healthy side simultaneously using two microphones. The spectral power for the 300-600 Hz frequency band was computed for four respiratory cycles and normalized. For each breath, the ratio R between the time-segments (duration = 0.1 s) with the highest inspiratory and highest expiratory flow was calculated and averaged. We found significant differences in R between the pneumonia side (R = 1.4 +/- 1.3) and the healthy side (R = 0.5 +/- 0.5; p = 0.003 Wilcoxon-test) of lung. In 218 healthy volunteers we found R = 0.3 +/- 0.2 as a reference-value. The differences of ratio R (delta R) between the pneumonia side and the healthy side (delta R = 1.0 +/- 0.9) were significantly higher compared to follow-up studies after recovery (delta R = 0.0 +/- 0.1, p = 0.005 Wilcoxon-test). The computer based detection of bronchial breathing can be considered useful as part of a quantitative monitoring of patients at risk to develop pneumonia.

  8. CONTINUOUS EXHALED BREATH ANALYSIS ON THE ICU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    During admittance to the ICU, critically ill patients frequently develop secondary infections and/or multiple organ failure. Continuous monitoring of biological markers is very much needed. This study describes a new method to continuously monitor biomarkers in exhaled breath with an electronic nose.

  9. Practical recommendations for breathing-adapted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, L.; Giraud, P.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Dumas, J.L.; Lorchel, F.; Marre, D.; Dupont, S.; Varmenot, N.; Ginestet, C.; Caron, J.; Marchesi, V.; Ferreira, I.; Garcia, R.

    2007-01-01

    Respiration-gated radiotherapy offers a significant potential for improvement in the irradiation of tumor sites affected by respiratory motion such as lung, breast and liver tumors. An increased conformality of irradiation fields leading to decreased complications rates of organs at risk (lung, heart) is expected. Respiratory gating is in line with the need for improved precision required by radiotherapy techniques such as 3D conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy. Reduction of respiratory motion can be achieved by using either breath-hold techniques or respiration synchronized gating techniques. Breath-hold techniques can be achieved with active techniques, in which airflow of the patient is temporarily blocked by a valve, or passive techniques, in which the patient voluntarily holds his/her breath. Synchronized gating techniques use external devices to predict the phase of the respiration cycle while the patient breaths freely. This work summarizes the different experiences of the centers of the STIC 2003 project. It describes the different techniques, gives an overview of the literature and proposes a practice based on our experience. (authors)

  10. A simple, remote, video based breathing monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Nir; Wulich, Dov

    2017-07-01

    Breathing monitors have become the all-important cornerstone of a wide variety of commercial and personal safety applications, ranging from elderly care to baby monitoring. Many such monitors exist in the market, some, with vital signs monitoring capabilities, but none remote. This paper presents a simple, yet efficient, real time method of extracting the subject's breathing sinus rhythm. Points of interest are detected on the subject's body, and the corresponding optical flow is estimated and tracked using the well known Lucas-Kanade algorithm on a frame by frame basis. A generalized likelihood ratio test is then utilized on each of the many interest points to detect which is moving in harmonic fashion. Finally, a spectral estimation algorithm based on Pisarenko harmonic decomposition tracks the harmonic frequency in real time, and a fusion maximum likelihood algorithm optimally estimates the breathing rate using all points considered. The results show a maximal error of 1 BPM between the true breathing rate and the algorithm's calculated rate, based on experiments on two babies and three adults.

  11. Breathing easier: Indonesia works towards cleaner air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Michael Amdi

    2015-01-01

    Indonesians can look forward to breathing cleaner air following upcoming changes in regulations introduced as a result of a study conducted using nuclear analytical techniques. Lead pollution and other fine particulate matter in the air is now, for the first time, being accurately monitored and is giving Indonesian officials a good understanding of their air pollution problem and how to manage it.

  12. Multi-layered breathing architectural envelope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Larsen, Andreas; Foged, Isak Worre; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    A multi layered breathing envelope is developed as a method of natural ventilation. The two main layers consist of mineral wool and air permeable concrete. The mineral wool works as a dynamic insulation and the permeable concrete as a heat recovery system with a high thermal mass for heat storage...

  13. A breath actuated dry powder inhaler

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Anne; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hagedoorn, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A breath actuated dry powder inhaler with a single air circulation chamber for de-agglomeration of entrained powdered medicament using the energy of the inspiratory air stream. The chamber has a substantially polygonal sidewall, a plurality of air supply channels entering the chamber substantially

  14. Development of prenatal lateralization: evidence from fetal mouth movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissland, N; Francis, B; Aydin, E; Mason, J; Exley, K

    2014-05-28

    Human lateralized behaviors relate to the asymmetric development of the brain. Research of the prenatal origins of laterality is equivocal with some studies suggesting that fetuses exhibit lateralized behavior and other not finding such laterality. Given that by around 22weeks of gestation the left cerebral hemisphere compared to the right is significantly larger in both male and female fetuses we expected that the right side of the fetal face would show more movement with increased gestation. This longitudinal study investigated whether fetuses from 24 to 36weeks of gestation showed increasing lateralized behaviors during mouth opening and whether lateralized mouth movements are related to fetal age, gender and maternal self-reported prenatal stress. Following ethical approval, fifteen healthy fetuses (8 girls) of primagravid mothers were scanned four times from 24 to 36-gestation. Two types of mouth opening movements - upper lip raiser and mouth stretch - were coded in 60 scans for 10min. We modeled the proportion of right mouth opening for each fetal scan using a generalized linear mixed model, which takes account of the repeated measures design. There was a significant increase in the proportion of lateralized mouth openings over the period increasing by 11% for each week of gestational age (LRT change in deviance=10.92, 1df; pgender differences were found nor was there any effect of maternally reported stress on fetal lateralized mouth movements. There was also evidence of left lateralization preference in mouth movement, although no evidence of changes in lateralization bias over time. This longitudinal study provides important new insights into the development of lateralized mouth movements from 24 to 36 weeks of gestation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Correlation between adenoidal nasopharyngeal ratio and symptoms of enlarged adenoids in children with adenoidal hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo Olugbemiga Adedeji

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adenoid hypertrophy is one of the most common health problems affecting the paediatric population. This study aims to correlate adenoidal nasopharyngeal ratio (ANR with symptoms of enlarged adenoids in children with enlarged adenoids. Materials and Methods: It was a year, cross-sectional, hospital-based study conducted at Lautech Teaching Hospital, Osogbo. ANR was determined by dividing adenoidal depth with nasopharyngeal depth on the plain lateral radiographs. Results: A total of 90 consecutive children consisting of 61 males and 29 females were included in the study with M:F ratio of 2.1:1. Their ages ranged from 8 months to 11 years. All the patients presented with nasal obstruction, mouth breathing and noisy breathing. Majority (64.5% had severe obstructions with preponderance among children of 3-5 years (39.9%. Linear regression analysis showed significant association between age and ANR (t = 10.447, P < 0.001. There was high significant association (P < 0.05 between presenting symptoms and degree of nasopharyngeal airway obstruction; for snoring (r = 0.251, P = 0.000, sleep apnoea (r = 0.594, P = 0.000, nasal discharge (r = 0.314, P = 0.001, excessive daytime sleepiness (r = 0.219, P = 0.019 and failure to thrive (r = 0.240, P = 0.011. Conclusion: Lateral X-ray of the nasopharynx is an effective tool to evaluate children with suspected adenoid hypertrophy. It correlates well with patients′ symptoms and provides objective measures of adenoid hypertrophy.

  16. Burning mouth syndrome: a discussion of a complex pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zur, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a complex pathology for which there is very little information about the etiology and pathogenesis. This lack of knowledge leaves patients with suboptimal treatments. This article discusses the existing scientific evidence about this disease. Since topical oral use of clonazepam have been shown to be effective and safe to treat some patients suffering with burning mouth syndrome, formulations including clonazepam are included with this article. Compounding topical preparations of clonazepam offers opportunities for compounding pharmacists to be more involved in improving the quality of life of burning mouth syndrome patients.

  17. A case report of burning mouth syndrome: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghassan M Al-Iryani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral dysaesthesia syndrome called burning mouth syndrome (BMS causes chronic pain in the orofacial region without presence of any of the detectable organic causes. Common features of BMS are burning sensation in the mouth, xerostomia, dysgeusia, etc. These symptoms ideally show a diurnal pattern, were they are less in the morning and worsen as the day progresses and classically subside at the night time. BMS have multifactorial etiology. This report describes a case of burning mouth syndrome in a 60 year old female patient.

  18. 21 CFR 862.3050 - Breath-alcohol test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Breath-alcohol test system. 862.3050 Section 862.3050 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED....3050 Breath-alcohol test system. (a) Identification. A breath-alcohol test system is a device intened...

  19. 46 CFR 197.340 - Breathing gas supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing gas supply. 197.340 Section 197.340 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.340 Breathing gas supply. (a) A primary breathing gas supply for surface-supplied diving must be sufficient to support the following for the...

  20. 46 CFR 197.312 - Breathing supply hoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Breathing supply hoses. 197.312 Section 197.312 Shipping... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.312 Breathing supply hoses. (a) Each breathing supply hose must— (1) Have a maximum working pressure that is equal to or exceeds— (i) The maximum...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5240 - Anesthesia breathing circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia breathing circuit. 868.5240 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5240 Anesthesia breathing circuit. (a) Identification. An anesthesia breathing circuit is a device that is intended to administer medical gases to a...

  2. Effects of Electronic Word - of - Mouth Messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choong Hoon Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increased usage of online technologies, there has been an escalation of Electronic Word - of –Mouth (eWOM messages related to sport products and services offered and consumed. Therefore, in this original investigation by applying eWOM to the sport industry, this study examined how the combination of the quality of the eWOM message and the provider of the eWOM message affects purchaseintentions depending on the expertise level of the consumer. This study – which involved the collection of data from 134 students at a large university situated in the Midwest of the United States – utilized repeated measures of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA with tripartite groups of expertise and experimental conditions as independent variables. Purchase intention was the dependent variables. The results indicated that the quality of the eWOM message moderated the effect of the provider of the eWOM message. The subject’s level of expertise also had a moderating role on purchase intention.

  3. Catastrophizing in Patients with Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana ANDABAK ROGULJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is an idiopathic painful condition which manifests with burning sensations in the oral cavity in patients with clinically normal oral mucosa and without any local and/or systemic causative factor. Catastrophizing is defined as an exaggerated negative orientation toward pain stimuli and pain experience. The aim of this study was to examine the association between catastrophizing and clinical parameters of BMS, and to examine the association between catastrophizing and the quality of life in patients with BMS. Materials and methods: Anonymous questionnaire consisting of 3 parts (demographic and clinical data with 100 mm visual analogue scale (VAS, Croatian version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14 scale and Croatian version of the Pain Catastrophizing scale (PC, was distributed to 30 patients diagnosed with BMS. Results: A higher level of catastrophizing was clinically significant in 30% of the patients. Total catastrophizing score and all three subcomponents of catastrophizing significantly correlated with the intensity of symptoms, but did not correlate with the duration of symptoms. Gender and previous treatment did not affect the catastrophizing. Conclusion: Obtaining the information about catastrophizing could help a clinician to identify patients with negative behavioural patterns. Additional psychological intervention in these individuals could reduce/eliminate negative cognitive factors and improve coping with chronic painful condition such as BMS.

  4. The Association between Sleep-Disordered Breathing and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in a Pediatric Cohort with Chiari 1 Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Amin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The prevalence of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB reported in the literature for Chiari malformation type 1 (CM1 is uniformly high (24% to 70%. In Canada, there is limited access to pediatric polysomnography (PSG. Therefore, the identification of clinical features would be invaluable for triaging these children.

  5. Increase of methanol in exhaled breath quantified by SIFT-MS following aspartame ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Španěl, Patrik; Dryahina, Kseniya; Vicherková, Petra; Smith, David

    2015-11-19

    Aspartame, methyl-L-α-aspartyl-L-phenylalaninate, is used worldwide as a sweetener in foods and drinks and is considered to be safe at an acceptable daily intake (ADI) of 40 mg per kg of body weight. This compound is completely hydrolyzed in the gastrointestinal tract to aspartic acid, phenylalanine and methanol, each being toxic at high levels. The objective of the present study was to quantify the volatile methanol component in the exhaled breath of ten healthy volunteers following the ingestion of a single ADI dose of aspartame. Direct on-line measurements of methanol concentration were made in the mouth and nose breath exhalations using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, SIFT-MS, several times before aspartame ingestion in order to establish individual pre-dose (baseline) levels and then during two hours post-ingestion to track their initial increase and subsequent decrease. The results show that breath methanol concentrations increased in all volunteers by 1082   ±   205 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) from their pre-ingestion values, which ranged from 193 to 436 ppbv to peak values ranging from 981-1622 ppbv, from which they slowly decreased. These observations agree quantitatively with a predicted increase of 1030 ppbv estimated using a one-compartment model of uniform dilution of the methanol generated from a known amount of aspartame throughout the total body water (including blood). In summary, an ADI dose of aspartame leads to a 3-6 fold increase of blood methanol concentration above the individual baseline values.

  6. Maximum opening of the mouth by mouth prop during dental procedures increases the risk of upper airway constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ito

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Hiroshi Ito1, Hiroyoshi Kawaai1, Shinya Yamazaki1, Yosuke Suzuki21Division of Systemic Management, Department of Oral Function, 2Division of Radiology and Diagnosis, Department of Medical Sciences, Ohu University, Post Graduate School of Dentistry, Koriyama City, Fukushima Prefecture, JapanAbstract: From a retrospective evaluation of data on accidents and deaths during dental procedures, it has been shown that several patients who refused dental treatment died of asphyxia during dental procedures. We speculated that forcible maximum opening of the mouth by using a mouth prop triggers this asphyxia by affecting the upper airway. Therefore, we assessed the morphological changes of the upper airway following maximal opening of the mouth. In 13 healthy adult volunteers, the sagittal diameter of the upper airway on lateral cephalogram was measured between the two conditions; closed mouth and maximally open mouth. The dyspnea in each state was evaluated by a visual analog scale. In one subject, a computed tomograph (CT was taken to assess the three-dimensional changes in the upper airway. A significant difference was detected in the mean sagittal diameter of the upper airway following use of the prop (closed mouth: 18.5 ± 3.8 mm, maximally open mouth: 10.4 ± 3.0 mm. All subjects indicated upper airway constriction and significant dyspnea when their mouth was maximally open. Although a CT scan indicated upper airway constriction when the mouth was maximally open, muscular compensation was admitted. Our results further indicate that the maximal opening of the mouth narrows the upper airway diameter and leads to dyspnea. The use of a prop for the patient who has communication problems or poor neuromuscular function can lead to asphyxia. When the prop is used for patient refusal in dentistry, the respiratory condition should be monitored strictly, and it should be kept in mind that the “sniffing position” is effective for avoiding upper airway

  7. River Mouth Management In Malaysia– An Overview of Issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelmager Jensen, Jacob; Pedersen, C.

    2012-01-01

    ) of which some are often unforeseen. The key parameter for success and effectiveness of interventions including adopted mitigation measures for secondary problems depends on a detailed understanding of physical conditions at the river mouth as much as on the functionality of the layout, its design....... Numerical models have been used in the past to obtain qualitative and quantitative understanding of physical conditions at river mouths which is required as part of the design of interventions, as baseline for successful management as well as to test potential intervention schemes for various design...... and optimization phases. Examples demonstrating the use of numerical modeling as an engineering tool for previous river mouth improvement works are highlighted to reiterate its value in river mouth engineering and hopefully serve as motivation for future usage....

  8. Mouth Sores Caused by Cancer Treatment: How to Cope

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leading to sores and infections. Both chemotherapy and radiation can impair your body's germ-fighting system (immune system). With an impaired immune system, viruses, bacteria and fungi can more easily infect your mouth, ...

  9. Update knowledge of dry mouth- A guideline for dentists

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: There are no clearly established protocols for the treatment of dry mouth in the ... both sexes and it was more frequent at night than during .... Cancer therapy .... drugs versus non-drug active therapies for non-neurogenic overactive.

  10. Linking relationship benefit and word of mouth engagement in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the past decade, there is an increasing attention among marketing scholars and ... on the topic about word of mouth engagement in social media platform. ... within online brand community, this study provides guidance to brand marketers on ...

  11. Survival of foot-and-mouth disease virus in cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, J H

    1976-09-01

    Persistence of foot-and-mouth disease virus during the manufacture of Cheddar, Mozzarella, Camembert cheese prepared from milk of cows experimentally infected with the virus was studied. Cheese samples were made on a laboratory scale with commercial lactic acid starter cultures and the microbial protease MARZYME as a coagulant. Milk was heated at different temperatures for different intervals before it was made into cheese. Food-and-mouth disease virus survived the acidic conditions of Cheddar and Camembert cheese processing but not that of Mozzarella. Foot-and-mouth disease virus survived processing but not curing for 30 days in Cheddar cheese preparaed from heated milk. However, the virus survived curing for 60 days but not for 120 days in cheese (pH 5) prepared from unheated milk. Foot-and-mouth disease virus survived in Camembert cheese (pH 5) for 21 days at 2 C but not for 35 days.

  12. Field investigation of Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) virus infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV) is a non-enveloped, single stranded RNA virus ... continents of Asia, Africa, and some regions in the South America. .... FCT = Federal Capital Territory; NE = North East, NC = North Central; NW =.

  13. Development and evolution of the vertebrate primary mouth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Vladimír; Horácek, Ivan; Cerny, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate oral region represents a key interface between outer and inner environments, and its structural and functional design is among the limiting factors for survival of its owners. Both formation of the respective oral opening (primary mouth) and establishment of the food-processing apparatus (secondary mouth) require interplay between several embryonic tissues and complex embryonic rearrangements. Although many aspects of the secondary mouth formation, including development of the jaws, teeth or taste buds, are known in considerable detail, general knowledge about primary mouth formation is regrettably low. In this paper, primary mouth formation is reviewed from a comparative point of view in order to reveal its underestimated morphogenetic diversity among, and also within, particular vertebrate clades. In general, three main developmental modes were identified. The most common is characterized by primary mouth formation via a deeply invaginated ectodermal stomodeum and subsequent rupture of the bilaminar oral membrane. However, in salamander, lungfish and also in some frog species, the mouth develops alternatively via stomodeal collar formation contributed both by the ecto- and endoderm. In ray-finned fishes, on the other hand, the mouth forms via an ectoderm wedge and later horizontal detachment of the initially compressed oral epithelia with probably a mixed germ-layer derivation. A very intriguing situation can be seen in agnathan fishes: whereas lampreys develop their primary mouth in a manner similar to the most common gnathostome pattern, hagfishes seem to undergo a unique oropharyngeal morphogenesis when compared with other vertebrates. In discussing the early formative embryonic correlates of primary mouth formation likely to be responsible for evolutionary–developmental modifications of this area, we stress an essential role of four factors: first, positioning and amount of yolk tissue; closely related to, second, endoderm formation during

  14. Factors associated with bruxism in children with developmental disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeska Aparecida Fernandes SOUZA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate factors associated with bruxism in children aged from 1 to 13 years with developmental disabilities. A total of 389 dental records were examined. The bruxism analyzed was determined based on parental reports. The following variables were also analyzed: gender, age, International Code of Diseases (ICD, mouth breathing, history of gastroesophageal reflux, use of psychotropic drugs, gingival status, reports of xerostomia, hyperkinesis, pacifier use, thumb sucking and involuntary movements. For the purposes of analysis, the individuals were categorized as being with and without bruxism. Variables with a p-value < 0.25 in the bivariate analysis were incorporated into the logistic regression models. Females had a 0.44-fold (95%CI: 0.25 to 0.78 greater chance of exhibiting bruxism than males. Individuals with gastroesophageal reflux had a 2.28-fold (95%CI: 1.03 to 5.02 greater chance of exhibiting bruxism. Individuals with reported involuntary movements had a 2.24-fold (95%CI: 1.19 to 4.24 greater chance of exhibiting bruxism than those without such movements. Exhibiting involuntary movements, the male gender and gastroesophageal reflux are factors associated with bruxism in children with developmental disabilities.

  15. Factors associated with bruxism in children with developmental disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Valeska Aparecida Fernandes; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães; Resende, Vera Lúcia Silva; Castilho, Lia Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate factors associated with bruxism in children aged from 1 to 13 years with developmental disabilities. A total of 389 dental records were examined. The bruxism analyzed was determined based on parental reports. The following variables were also analyzed: gender, age, International Code of Diseases (ICD), mouth breathing, history of gastroesophageal reflux, use of psychotropic drugs, gingival status, reports of xerostomia, hyperkinesis, pacifier use, thumb sucking and involuntary movements. For the purposes of analysis, the individuals were categorized as being with and without bruxism. Variables with a p-value bruxism than males. Individuals with gastroesophageal reflux had a 2.28-fold (95%CI: 1.03 to 5.02) greater chance of exhibiting bruxism. Individuals with reported involuntary movements had a 2.24-fold (95%CI: 1.19 to 4.24) greater chance of exhibiting bruxism than those without such movements. Exhibiting involuntary movements, the male gender and gastroesophageal reflux are factors associated with bruxism in children with developmental disabilities.

  16. Word-of-Mouth Communication and Social Learning

    OpenAIRE

    A. Banerjee; Drew Fudenberg

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the way that word-of-mouth communication aggregates the information of individual agents. We find that the structure of the communication process determines whether all agents end up making identical choices, with less communication making this conformity more likely. Despite the players' naive decision rules and the stochastic decision environment, word-of-mouth communication may lead all players to adopt the action that is on average superior. These socially efficient out...

  17. Current Treatment Options in Challenging Oral Diseases: Burning Mouth Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bilgen Erdoğan; Murat Yılmaz

    2012-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by burning pain without any signs of an oral mucosal pathology, that usually affects postmenopausal women. Burning sensation is often accompanied by dysgeusia and xerostomia. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and an effective treatment option for most of the patients has not been defined yet. The aim of this review is to present current pharmacological and physicological treatments of burning mouth syndrome.

  18. Current Treatment Options in Challenging Oral Diseases: Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilgen Erdoğan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome is a chronic condition characterized by burning pain without any signs of an oral mucosal pathology, that usually affects postmenopausal women. Burning sensation is often accompanied by dysgeusia and xerostomia. The pathogenesis of the disease is unknown and an effective treatment option for most of the patients has not been defined yet. The aim of this review is to present current pharmacological and physicological treatments of burning mouth syndrome.

  19. Ten years experience of isotopic breath test with special reference to Helicobacter pylori detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhas, M.; Tricht, L.Van; Verschaeren, A.; Delmotte, E.; Martin, P

    1997-12-31

    The use of the carbon 14 urea breath test by comparison with culture for campylobacter of gastric endoscopic biopsies is studied in 91 patients. They were divided into 2 groups. The first group consisted of 53 patients examined by gastric endoscopy and carbon 14 urea breath test. In this population, gastric biopsies were taken at different regions of the stomach and duodenum. The breath test was performed within 3 hours after endoscopy. The second group consisted of 38 asymptomatic patients whom 23 were parent of children with campylobacter positive gastritis. For the whole population, neither antibiotic therapy nor bismuth medication was administrated within the 15 days before the realization of the test. Results were expressed in % of injected dose/mmole of CO{sub 2} after correction of endogenous production of CO{sub 2}. In conclusion, carbon 14 urea breath test is a reliable noninvasive test for detection and follow-up of gastritis caused by a widespread microorganism. Also, the precision of both tests, {sup 14} C-UBT and {sup 13} C-UBT, are compared simultaneously in 84 adults patients. The results were expressed as % of administered dose expired in 30 minutes. A better precision is observed with the {sup 13} C-UBT

  20. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of tongue and mouth pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Wha; Chung, Tae Sub; Suh, Jung Ho; Kim, Dong Ik; Lee, Jong Tae; Hong, Won Pyo; Park, Hyung Sik

    1991-01-01

    The evaluation of the tongue and mouth floor using the CT scan can be limited due to dental artifacts. Because the therapeutic plan depends on the nature and the cancer staging of lesions, it is essential to obtain accurate evaluation of lesions. In this study are explored the of Ultrasonography for the evaluation of tongue and mouth floor pathology. We have obtained ultrasonograms in 20 patients who had benign and malignant lesions in the tongue and mouth floor. Comparative analysis was made on 15 patients who underwent both CT and ultrasonography. We used the bimanual compression technique and the phonation technique during real-time scanning. Out of 15 cases, six had tongue cancer, and seven of them had cancer of the mouth floor. The other cases included a ranula, a dermoid cyst, a Ludwig's angina, and abscess of salivary gland, and one care with stones of the submandibular gland. All the benign and malignant masses appeared hypoechoic. Even though the lesions of tongue and mouth floor could not be evaluated by CT scan due to dental artifacts and extremely small size in 5 cases, ultrasonogram using the bimanual compression technique demonstrated good localization of the lesion, and also was greatly helpful in visualizing the invasion of the surrounding structures. Ultrasonography of the tongue and mouth floor proved to be superior to the CT scan not only in delineating the size and extent of the primary lesion, but also in visualizing invasion of surrounding structures

  1. UNDERWATER STROKE KINEMATICS DURING BREATHING AND BREATH-HOLDING FRONT CRAWL SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickos Vezos

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of breathing on the three - dimensional underwater stroke kinematics of front crawl swimming. Ten female competitive freestyle swimmers participated in the study. Each subject swam a number of front crawl trials of 25 m at a constant speed under breathing and breath-holding conditions. The underwater motion of each subject's right arm was filmed using two S-VHS cameras, operating at 60 Hz, which were positioned behind two underwater viewing windows. The spatial coordinates of selected points were calculated using the DLT procedure with 30 control points and after the digital filtering of the raw data with a cut-off frequency of 6 Hz, the hand's linear displacements and velocities were calculated. The results revealed that breathing caused significantly increases in the stroke duration (t9 = 2.764; p < 0.05, the backward hand displacement relative to the water (t9 = 2.471; p<0.05 and the lateral displacement of the hand in the X - axis during the downsweep (t9 = 2.638; p < 0.05. On the contrary, the peak backward hand velocity during the insweep (t9 = 2.368; p < 0.05 and the displacement of the hand during the push phase (t9 = -2.297; p < 0.05 were greatly reduced when breathing was involved. From the above, it was concluded that breathing action in front crawl swimming caused significant modifications in both the basic stroke parameters and the overall motor pattern were, possibly due to body roll during breathing

  2. Breath Analysis Using Laser Spectroscopic Techniques: Breath Biomarkers, Spectral Fingerprints, and Detection Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeyush Sahay

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Breath analysis, a promising new field of medicine and medical instrumentation, potentially offers noninvasive, real-time, and point-of-care (POC disease diagnostics and metabolic status monitoring. Numerous breath biomarkers have been detected and quantified so far by using the GC-MS technique. Recent advances in laser spectroscopic techniques and laser sources have driven breath analysis to new heights, moving from laboratory research to commercial reality. Laser spectroscopic detection techniques not only have high-sensitivity and high-selectivity, as equivalently offered by the MS-based techniques, but also have the advantageous features of near real-time response, low instrument costs, and POC function. Of the approximately 35 established breath biomarkers, such as acetone, ammonia, carbon dioxide, ethane, methane, and nitric oxide, 14 species in exhaled human breath have been analyzed by high-sensitivity laser spectroscopic techniques, namely, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS, cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS, integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS, cavity leak-out spectroscopy (CALOS, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS, quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS, and optical frequency comb cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OFC-CEAS. Spectral fingerprints of the measured biomarkers span from the UV to the mid-IR spectral regions and the detection limits achieved by the laser techniques range from parts per million to parts per billion levels. Sensors using the laser spectroscopic techniques for a few breath biomarkers, e.g., carbon dioxide, nitric oxide, etc. are commercially available. This review presents an update on the latest developments in laser-based breath analysis.

  3. 降钙素原、C 反应蛋白、前清蛋白及白细胞计数在儿童手足口病诊断中的应用价值%Application value of procalcitonin,C-reactive protein,prealbumi and white blood cell in children with hand-foot-and-mouth disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶贵诚; 彭建明; 官燕飞; 袁斌

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the application value of procalcitonin (PCT ) ,C-reactive protein (CRP) ,prealbumi (PA ) and white blood cell count (WBC))in children with hand-foot-and-mouth disease (HFMD) .Methods A total of 209 children with HFMD were classified into ordinary group (171 patients) and severe group (38 patients) according to the condition of disease ,an-other 30 healthy children were selected as the control group .The levels of PCT ,CRP ,PA and WBC in the three groups were meas-ured and compared .Results The levels of PCT ,CRP ,PA and WBC of ordinary group were 0 .16(0 .08 - 0 .34)μg/L ,11 .7(5 .0 -19 .0)mg/L ,(142 .6 ± 38 .4)mg /L and (11 .3 ± 4 .6) × 129 /L respectively ,and those of severe group were 0 .26(0 .14 - 0 .92)μg /L , 18 .4(5 .3 - 41 .4) mg /L ,(125 .5 ± 32 .9)mg/L and (13 .0 ± 5 .6) × 129 /L respectively .The PCT ,CRP ,PA and WBC in ordinary group and severe group were significantly different with those in the control group (P < 0 .05) .The PCT ,CRP and PA in severe group had statistical differences compared with those in the ordinary group (P< 0 .05) .Conclusion PCT ,CRP ,PA and WBC could be used as reference indexes of inflammation in HFMD ,and could be used in the diagnosis of HFMD in children ,PCT and PA could be used to evaluate the severity of disease .%目的:探讨降钙素原(PCT)、C 反应蛋白(CRP)、前清蛋白(PA )、白细胞(WBC)计数在儿童手足口病(HFMD)诊断中的应用价值。方法将209例 HFMD 患儿按病情分为普通病例组(171例)及重症病例组(38例),另外选择同期30例健康体检儿童纳入对照组,测定3组儿童 PCT 、CRP 、PA 及 WBC 水平,并进行比较。结果普通病例组的 PCT 、CRP 、PA 、WBC 水平分别为0.16(0.08~0.34)μg /L 、11.7(5.0~19.0)mg/L 、(142.6±38.4)mg/L 、(11.3±4.6)×129/L ,重症病例组分别为0.26(0.14~0.92)μg/L 、18.4(5.3~41.4

  4. Thoron-in-breath monitoring at CRNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterman, B.F.

    1985-04-01

    This report contains a description of the thoron-in-breath monitor (TIBM) developed at CRNL. This monitor can be used to estimate the amount of thorium (Th-232 and/or Th-228) in humans. Thoron-in-breath monitoring is based on the fact that thoron (Rn-220) is a decay product of thorium, and hence deposited thorium produces thoron in vivo, a fraction of which will be exhaled. Experiences with the TIBM indicate that the monitoring is easy to perform and the results in terms of contaminated vs uncontaminated subjects can be easily interpreted. Work on relationships between thoron exhaled and deposited thorium and hence between thoron exhaled and dose, is continuing

  5. An exercise in preferential unilateral breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheong, D.; Tucker, B.; Jenkins, S.; Robinson, P.; Curtin University, Shenton Park, WA

    1999-01-01

    Full text: In preparation for major thoracic surgery, physiotherapists have traditionally taught unilateral breathing exercises. There are no studies that prove that these exercises are effective This study was undertaken to demonstrate the effects of unilateral thoracic expansion exercises (TEE) using 99 Tc m -Technegas Ten physiotherapists were taught unilateral TEE to increase ventilation to the right lower lobe. Each subject underwent two separate Technegas ventilation studies using a single-breath technique, one with normal deep inspiration and the other during a right TEE. Dynamic and static images were acquired in the seated position for each ventilation study. Analysis was undertaken by dividing the lungs into 6 zones of equal height and calculating the relative ventilation of each zone and each lung. Seven subjects (70%) achieved significantly increased ventilation to the right lower zone, while 9 (90%) achieved greater ventilation to the right lung. Total lung ventilation was reduced during right TEE when compared with normal deep inspiration

  6. Weyl magnons in breathing pyrochlore antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei-Ye; Li, Yao-Dong; Kim, Yong Baek; Balents, Leon; Yu, Yue; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Frustrated quantum magnets not only provide exotic ground states and unusual magnetic structures, but also support unconventional excitations in many cases. Using a physically relevant spin model for a breathing pyrochlore lattice, we discuss the presence of topological linear band crossings of magnons in antiferromagnets. These are the analogues of Weyl fermions in electronic systems, which we dub Weyl magnons. The bulk Weyl magnon implies the presence of chiral magnon surface states forming arcs at finite energy. We argue that such antiferromagnets present a unique example, in which Weyl points can be manipulated in situ in the laboratory by applied fields. We discuss their appearance specifically in the breathing pyrochlore lattice, and give some general discussion of conditions to find Weyl magnons, and how they may be probed experimentally. Our work may inspire a re-examination of the magnetic excitations in many magnetically ordered systems. PMID:27650053

  7. Universe out of a breathing bubble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guendelman, Eduardo I.; Sakai, Nobuyuki

    2008-01-01

    We consider the model of a false-vacuum bubble with a thin wall where the surface energy density is composed of two different components, 'domain-wall' type and 'dust' type, with opposite signs. We find stably oscillating solutions, which we call 'breathing bubbles'. By decay to a lower mass state, such a breathing bubble could become either (i) a child universe or ii) a bubble that 'eats up' the original universe, depending on the sign of the surface energy of the domain-wall component. We also discuss the effect of the finite-thickness corrections to the thin-wall approximation and possible origins of the energy contents of our model

  8. Effect of Oral Care Gel for Burning Mouth Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yumiko; Kawahigashi, Yuji; Kimura, Kanae; Sata, Michio

    2017-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a burning sensation in the mouth with no underlying dental or medical cause. To date, there is no satisfactory treatment for BMS. Herein, we present the case of a 42-year-old female presenting with hepatitis C virus infection along with BMS. Despite two interferon therapies and a sustained virologic response, the discomfort in her oral mucosa persisted. At the age of 51, the patient complained of burning sensation and tingling pain in the tongue; a thin layer of REFRECARE-H®, an oral care gel (therapeutic dentifrice), was applied on the oral membrane after each meal for 60 days. Application of REFRECARE-H® decreased the various symptoms including tingling pain, oral discomfort, breath odor, sleep disorder, depressive mood, and jitteriness. The improvement in quality of life continued for 30 days after application of the gel. These findings indicate that REFRECARE-H® may be effective in reducing the symptoms associated with BMS. Long-term follow-up studies with larger number of patients are required to elucidate the therapeutic effects of this gel.

  9. Effect of Oral Care Gel for Burning Mouth Syndrome in a Patient with Hepatitis C: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumiko Nagao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Burning mouth syndrome (BMS is a burning sensation in the mouth with no underlying dental or medical cause. To date, there is no satisfactory treatment for BMS. Herein, we present the case of a 42-year-old female presenting with hepatitis C virus infection along with BMS. Despite two interferon therapies and a sustained virologic response, the discomfort in her oral mucosa persisted. At the age of 51, the patient complained of burning sensation and tingling pain in the tongue; a thin layer of REFRECARE-H®, an oral care gel (therapeutic dentifrice, was applied on the oral membrane after each meal for 60 days. Application of REFRECARE-H® decreased the various symptoms including tingling pain, oral discomfort, breath odor, sleep disorder, depressive mood, and jitteriness. The improvement in quality of life continued for 30 days after application of the gel. These findings indicate that REFRECARE-H® may be effective in reducing the symptoms associated with BMS. Long-term follow-up studies with larger number of patients are required to elucidate the therapeutic effects of this gel.

  10. A mechanical breathing simulator for respirator test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio; Ikezawa, Yoshio; Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    1976-01-01

    A mechanical breathing simulator has been developed to produce the human respiration for use in respirator test. The respirations were produced through the strokes of piston controlled by a rockerarm with adjustable fulcrum. The respiration rate was governed by motor-speed control, independent of the tidal volume achieved by adjustment of the piston stroke. By the breather, the simulated respirations for work rate 0, 208, 415, 622 and 830 kg-m/min could be produced through the typical dummy head. (auth.)

  11. The experimental modification of sonorous breathing.

    OpenAIRE

    Josephson, S C; Rosen, R C

    1980-01-01

    Loud snoring is a noxious habit and potential personal health risk. We are reporting the first experimental study of simple behavioral techniques for the modification of chronic snoring. Twenty-four volunteers participated in a repeated measures, randomized group design over 2 weeks of intervention and one-month follow-up. Treatment groups included a contingent-awakening and breathing retraining (self-control) condition. Both treatment groups were compared to a no-treatment control. Despite c...

  12. Breathing conditions for animals in radiobiological experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.N.; Michael, B.D.

    1988-01-01

    In the course of experiments designed to determine the influence of redox agents on the radiosensitivity of murine normal tissues, an unexpected scatter of data points relating to jejunal crypt regeneration was found in mice irradiated under supposedly air-breathing conditions. One possible explanation for the scatter in the data related to variation in the oxygen tension within the jig at the time of irradiation, and the jig modified accordingly. (author)

  13. Breathing air trailer acceptance test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller's location

  14. C-130J Breathing Resistance Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    scientific and technical information exchange , and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings...regulator and MBU- 20/P oxygen mask, was supplied gaseous Aviators’ Breathing Oxygen (ABO). The regulator was operated in various operating modes, at...Generating System (OBOGS) Laboratory, Area B, Wright-Patterson AFB OH. The CRU-73 oxygen regulator was supplied with 50 pounds/square inch of gaseous

  15. Houses need to breathe--right?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, Max H.

    2004-10-01

    Houses need to breathe, but we can no longer leave the important functions associated with ventilation to be met accidentally. A designed ventilation system must be considered as much a part of a home as its heating system. Windows are a key part of that system because they allow a quick increase in ventilation for unusual events, but neither they nor a leaky building shell can be counted on to provide minimum levels.

  16. Breath tests and irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Satya Vati; Malik, Aastha

    2014-06-28

    Breath tests are non-invasive tests and can detect H₂ and CH₄ gases which are produced by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed intestinal carbohydrate and are excreted in the breath. These tests are used in the diagnosis of carbohydrate malabsorption, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, and for measuring the orocecal transit time. Malabsorption of carbohydrates is a key trigger of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)-type symptoms such as diarrhea and/or constipation, bloating, excess flatulence, headaches and lack of energy. Abdominal bloating is a common nonspecific symptom which can negatively impact quality of life. It may reflect dietary imbalance, such as excess fiber intake, or may be a manifestation of IBS. However, bloating may also represent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. Patients with persistent symptoms of abdominal bloating and distension despite dietary interventions should be referred for H₂ breath testing to determine the presence or absence of bacterial overgrowth. If bacterial overgrowth is identified, patients are typically treated with antibiotics. Evaluation of IBS generally includes testing of other disorders that cause similar symptoms. Carbohydrate malabsorption (lactose, fructose, sorbitol) can cause abdominal fullness, bloating, nausea, abdominal pain, flatulence, and diarrhea, which are similar to the symptoms of IBS. However, it is unclear if these digestive disorders contribute to or cause the symptoms of IBS. Research studies show that a proper diagnosis and effective dietary intervention significantly reduces the severity and frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in IBS. Thus, diagnosis of malabsorption of these carbohydrates in IBS using a breath test is very important to guide the clinician in the proper treatment of IBS patients.

  17. Forced Air-Breathing PEMFC Stacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. S. Dhathathreyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Air-breathing fuel cells have a great potential as power sources for various electronic devices. They differ from conventional fuel cells in which the cells take up oxygen from ambient air by active or passive methods. The air flow occurs through the channels due to concentration and temperature gradient between the cell and the ambient conditions. However developing a stack is very difficult as the individual cell performance may not be uniform. In order to make such a system more realistic, an open-cathode forced air-breathing stacks were developed by making appropriate channel dimensions for the air flow for uniform performance in a stack. At CFCT-ARCI (Centre for Fuel Cell Technology-ARC International we have developed forced air-breathing fuel cell stacks with varying capacity ranging from 50 watts to 1500 watts. The performance of the stack was analysed based on the air flow, humidity, stability, and so forth, The major advantage of the system is the reduced number of bipolar plates and thereby reduction in volume and weight. However, the thermal management is a challenge due to the non-availability of sufficient air flow to remove the heat from the system during continuous operation. These results will be discussed in this paper.

  18. Breathing is different in the quantum world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonitz, Michael; Bauch, Sebastian; Balzer, Karsten; Henning, Christian; Hochstuhl, David

    2009-11-01

    Interacting classicle particles in a harmonic trap are known to possess a radial collective oscillation -- the breathing mode (BM). In case of Coulomb interaction its frequency is universal -- it is independent of the particle number and system dimensionality [1]. Here we study strongly correlated quantum systems. We report a qualitatively different breathing behavior: a quantum system has two BMs one of which is universal whereas the frequency of the other varies with system dimensionality, the particle spin and the strength of the pair interaction. The results are based on exact solutions of the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation for two particles and on time-dependent many-body results for larger particle numbers. Finally, we discuss experimental ways to excite and measure the breathing frequencies which should give direct access to key properties of trapped particles, including their many-body effects [2]. [4pt] [1] C. Henning et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 045002 (2008) [0pt] [2] S. Bauch, K. Balzer, C. Henning, and M. Bonitz, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett., arXiv:0903.1993

  19. Pengaruh Word of Mouth Communication Terhadap Keputusan Pembelian Konsumen Pada Boardgame Lounge Smart Cafe Pekanbaru

    OpenAIRE

    Pratiwi, Yuly Rahmi; Lubis, Evawani Elysa

    2017-01-01

    Of mouth communication is a form of promotion in the form of recommendation by word of mouth about the goodness of a product. Word of mouth communication is very effective in supporting the purchasing decision. The customer in deciding the purchase of products is very influential with the word of mouth communication. This research starts on the stimulus-response theory. In this research Word of mouth communication is the stimulus given by the talkers (speaker/influence) to the recipient regar...

  20. Sleep-disordered breathing in patients with myelomeningocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Daxa M; Rocque, Brandon G; Hopson, Betsy; Arynchyna, Anastasia; Bishop, E Ralee'; Lozano, David; Blount, Jeffrey P

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT A paucity of literature examines sleep apnea in patients with myelomeningocele, Chiari malformation Type II (CM-II), and related hydrocephalus. Even less is known about the effect of hydrocephalus treatment or CM-II decompression on sleep hygiene. This study is an exploratory analysis of sleep-disordered breathing in patients with myelomeningocele and the effects of neurosurgical treatments, in particular CM-II decompression and hydrocephalus management, on sleep organization. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients seen in their multidisciplinary spina bifida clinic (approximately 435 patients with myelomeningocele) to evaluate polysomnographs obtained between March 1999 and July 2013. They analyzed symptoms prompting evaluation, results, and recommended interventions by using descriptive statistics. They also conducted a subset analysis of 9 children who had undergone polysomnography both before and after neurosurgical intervention. RESULTS Fifty-two patients had polysomnographs available for review. Sleep apnea was diagnosed in 81% of these patients. The most common presenting symptom was "breathing difficulties" (18 cases [43%]). Mild sleep apnea was present in 26 cases (50%), moderate in 10 (19%), and severe in 6 (12%). Among the 42 patients with abnormal sleep architecture, 30 had predominantly obstructive apneas and 12 had predominantly central apneas. The most common pulmonology-recommended intervention was adjustment of peripheral oxygen supplementation (24 cases [57%]), followed by initiation of peripheral oxygen (10 cases [24%]). In a subset analysis of 9 patients who had sleep studies before and after neurosurgical intervention, there was a trend toward a decrease in the mean number of respiratory events (from 34.8 to 15.9, p = 0.098), obstructive events (from 14.7 to 13.9, p = 0.85), and central events (from 20.1 to 2.25, p = 0.15) and in the apnea-hypopnea index (from 5.05 to 2.03, p = 0.038, not significant when