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Sample records for mouse liver cells

  1. [Isolation and purification of primary Kupffer cells from mouse liver].

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    Sun, Chao; Luo, Qingbo; Lu, Xiuxian; Zheng, Daofeng; He, Diao; Wu, Zhongjun

    2016-08-01

    Objective To isolate and purify Kupffer cells (KCs) from BALB/c mice by an efficient method of low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherence. Methods The mouse liver tissue was perfused in situ and digested with 0.5 g/L collagenase type IV in vitro by water bath. Then, through the low-speed centrifugation, KCs were separated from the mixed hepatocytes, and purified by rapid adherent characteristics. Finally, the production and activity of KCs obtained by this modified method were compared with those isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. We used F4/80 antibody immunofluorescence technique to observe morphological features of KCs, flow cytometry (FCM) to detect the expression of F4/80 antibody and the ink uptake test to observe the phagocytic activity. Moreover, using FCM, we evaluated the expressions of molecules associated with antigen presentation, including major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II), CD40, CD86 and CD68 on the surface of KCs subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) modeling. And, ELISA was conducted to measure tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production of the cultured KCs following H/R. Results The yield of KCs was (5.83±0.54)×10(6) per mouse liver and the survival rate of KCs was up to 92% by low-speed centrifugation and rapid adherent method. Compared with Percoll density gradient centrifugation [the yield of KCs was (2.19±0.43)×10(6) per liver], this new method significantly improved the yield of KCs. F4/80 immunofluorescence showed typical morphologic features of KCs such as spindle or polygon shapes and FCM identified nearly 90% F4/80 positive cells. The phagocytic assay showed that lots of ink particles were phagocytosed into the isolated cells. KC H/R models expressed more MHC II, CD40 and CD86 and produced more TNF-α participating in inflammation. Conclusion The efficient method to isolate and purify KCs from BALB /c mice has been successfully established.

  2. A Transcriptomic Signature of Mouse Liver Progenitor Cells

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    Adam M. Passman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver progenitor cells (LPCs can proliferate extensively, are able to differentiate into hepatocytes and cholangiocytes, and contribute to liver regeneration. The presence of LPCs, however, often accompanies liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, indicating that they may be a cancer stem cell. Understanding LPC biology and establishing a sensitive, rapid, and reliable method to detect their presence in the liver will assist diagnosis and facilitate monitoring of treatment outcomes in patients with liver pathologies. A transcriptomic meta-analysis of over 400 microarrays was undertaken to compare LPC lines against datasets of muscle and embryonic stem cell lines, embryonic and developed liver (DL, and HCC. Three gene clusters distinguishing LPCs from other liver cell types were identified. Pathways overrepresented in these clusters denote the proliferative nature of LPCs and their association with HCC. Our analysis also revealed 26 novel markers, LPC markers, including Mcm2 and Ltbp3, and eight known LPC markers, including M2pk and Ncam. These markers specified the presence of LPCs in pathological liver tissue by qPCR and correlated with LPC abundance determined using immunohistochemistry. These results showcase the value of global transcript profiling to identify pathways and markers that may be used to detect LPCs in injured or diseased liver.

  3. Transplantation of mouse fetal liver cells for analyzing the function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

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    Gudmundsson, Kristbjorn Orri; Stull, Steven W; Keller, Jonathan R

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are defined by their ability to self-renew and differentiate through progenitor cell stages into all types of mature blood cells. Gene-targeting studies in mice have demonstrated that many genes are essential for the generation and function of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. For definitively analyzing the function of these cells, transplantation studies have to be performed. In this chapter, we describe methods to isolate and transplant fetal liver cells as well as how to analyze donor cell reconstitution. This protocol is tailored toward mouse models where embryonic lethality precludes analysis of adult hematopoiesis or where it is suspected that the function of fetal liver hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells is compromised.

  4. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

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    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is know...

  5. Continuous cell injury promotes hepatic tumorigenesis in cdc42-deficient mouse liver

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    van Hengel, Jolanda; D'Hooge, Petra; Hooghe, Bart

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: The Rho small guanosine triphosphatase Cdc42 is critical for diverse cellular functions, including regulation of actin organization, cell polarity, intracellular membrane trafficking, transcription, cell-cycle progression, and cell transformation. This implies that Cdc42 might ....... CONCLUSIONS: We describe a mouse model in which chronic liver disease leads to hepatocarcinogenesis....

  6. Structural changes in the cytoskeleton in regenerating mouse liver cells

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    Gleiberman, A.S.; Bannikov, G.A.; Troyanovskii, S.M.

    1985-05-01

    After CCl/sub 4/ poisoning induced in rats poisoning centrilobular necroses formed in the liver during the next 24 h. Single a-feto protein-containing cells appeared onnthe second day of regeneration. By the end of the 2nd day a perinecrotic layer of cells containing AFP was formed. There is a definite correlation between loss of biliary capillary antigen, the appearance of bundles of prekeratin and actin, and expression of AFP synthesis. It is possible to include all these features in a single marker ocmplex of ''embronalization'' of the hepatocyte.

  7. Interleukin-1 regulates hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

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    Orelio, Claudia; Peeters, Marian; Haak, Esther; van der Horn, Karin; Dzierzak, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are found in the fetal liver. The fetal liver is a potent hematopoietic site, playing an important role in the expansion and differentiation of hematopoietic progenitors and hematopoietic stem cells. However, little is known concerning the regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells. In particular, the role of cytokines such as interleukin-1 in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells in the embryo has been largely unexplored. Recently, we observed that the adult pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 is involved in regulating aorta-gonad-mesonephros hematopoietic progenitor and hematopoietic stem cell activity. Therefore, we set out to investigate whether interleukin-1 also plays a role in regulating fetal liver progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. Design and Methods We examined the interleukin-1 ligand and receptor expression pattern in the fetal liver. The effects of interleukin-1 on hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells were studied by FACS and transplantation analyses of fetal liver explants, and in vivo effects on hematopoietic stem cell and progenitors were studied in Il1r1−/− embryos. Results We show that fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells express the IL-1RI and that interleukin-1 increases fetal liver hematopoiesis, progenitor cell activity and promotes hematopoietic cell survival. Moreover, we show that in Il1r1−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell activity is impaired and myeloid progenitor activity is increased. Conclusions The IL-1 ligand and receptor are expressed in the midgestation liver and act in the physiological regulation of fetal liver hematopoietic progenitor cells and hematopoietic stem cells. PMID

  8. Repair of liver mediated by adult mouse liver neuro-glia antigen 2-positive progenitor cell transplantation in a mouse model of cirrhosis

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    Zhang, Hongyu; Siegel, Christopher T.; Shuai, Ling; Lai, Jiejuan; Zeng, Linli; Zhang, Yujun; Lai, Xiangdong; Bie, Ping; Bai, Lianhua

    2016-01-01

    NG2-expressing cells are a population of periportal vascular stem/progenitors (MLpvNG2+ cells) that were isolated from healthy adult mouse liver by using a “Percoll-Plate-Wait” procedure. We demonstrated that isolated cells are able to restore liver function after transplantation into a cirrhotic liver, and co-localized with the pericyte marker (immunohistochemistry: PDGFR-β) and CK19. Cells were positive for: stem cell (Sca-1, CD133, Dlk) and liver stem cell markers (EpCAM, CD14, CD24, CD49f); and negative for: hematopoietic (CD34, CD45) and endothelial markers (CD31, vWf, von Willebrand factor). Cells were transplanted (1 × 106 cells) in mice with diethylnitrosamine-induced cirrhosis at week 6. Cells showed increased hepatic associated gene expression of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), Albumin (Alb), Glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pc), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9), hepatic nuclear factors (HNF1a, HNF1β, HNF3β, HNF4α, HNF6, Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), Leucine-rich repeated-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5-positive (Lgr5) and Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT). Cells showed decreased fibrogenesis, hepatic stellate cell infiltration, Kupffer cells and inflammatory cytokines. Liver function markers improved. In a cirrhotic liver environment, cells could differentiate into hepatic lineages. In addition, grafted MLpvNG2+ cells could mobilize endogenous stem/progenitors to participate in liver repair. These results suggest that MLpvNG2+ cells may be novel adult liver progenitors that participate in liver regeneration. PMID:26905303

  9. Ectopic expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in mouse liver endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, M B; Berchtold, M W; Rülicke, T;

    1997-01-01

    vasoconstriction via calcium signalling, were investigated in the mouse liver perfused in situ. Vasoconstriction, thought to be mediated by the Ito cell, was not affected in the transgenic animals, whereas microvascular exchange, probed with the multiple indicator dilution technique, was markedly decreased...

  10. Evidence against a stem cell origin of new hepatocytes in a common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

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    Schaub, Johanna R; Malato, Yann; Gormond, Coralie; Willenbring, Holger

    2014-08-21

    Hepatocytes provide most liver functions, but they can also proliferate and regenerate the liver after injury. However, under some liver injury conditions, particularly chronic liver injury where hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver stem cells (LSCs) are thought to replenish lost hepatocytes. Conflicting results have been reported about the identity of LSCs and their contribution to liver regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we followed candidate LSC populations by genetic fate tracing in adult mice with chronic liver injury due to a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet. In contrast to previous studies, we failed to detect hepatocytes derived from biliary epithelial cells or mesenchymal liver cells beyond a negligible frequency. In fact, we failed to detect hepatocytes that were not derived from pre-existing hepatocytes. In conclusion, our findings argue against LSCs, or other nonhepatocyte cell types, providing a backup system for hepatocyte regeneration in this common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

  11. Evidence against a Stem Cell Origin of New Hepatocytes in a Common Mouse Model of Chronic Liver Injury

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    Johanna R. Schaub

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocytes provide most liver functions, but they can also proliferate and regenerate the liver after injury. However, under some liver injury conditions, particularly chronic liver injury where hepatocyte proliferation is impaired, liver stem cells (LSCs are thought to replenish lost hepatocytes. Conflicting results have been reported about the identity of LSCs and their contribution to liver regeneration. To address this uncertainty, we followed candidate LSC populations by genetic fate tracing in adult mice with chronic liver injury due to a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented diet. In contrast to previous studies, we failed to detect hepatocytes derived from biliary epithelial cells or mesenchymal liver cells beyond a negligible frequency. In fact, we failed to detect hepatocytes that were not derived from pre-existing hepatocytes. In conclusion, our findings argue against LSCs, or other nonhepatocyte cell types, providing a backup system for hepatocyte regeneration in this common mouse model of chronic liver injury.

  12. Embryonic mouse STO cell-derived xenografts express hepatocytic functions in the livers of nonimmunosuppressed adult rats.

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    Zhang, Mingjun; Joseph, Brigid; Gupta, Sanjeev; Guest, I; Xu, Meng; Sell, Stewart; Son, Kyung-Hwa; Koch, Katherine S; Leffert, Hyam L

    2005-02-01

    Cells derived from embryonic mouse STO cell lines differentiate into hepatocytes when transplanted into the livers of nonimmunosuppressed dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV)-negative F344 rats. Within 1 day after intrasplenic injection, donor cells moved rapidly into the liver and were found in intravascular and perivascular sites; by 1 month, they were intrasinusoidal and also integrated into hepatic plates with approximately 2% efficiency and formed conjoint bile canaliculi. Neither donor cell proliferation nor host inflammatory responses were observed during this time. Detection of intrahepatic mouse COX1 mitochondrial DNA and mouse albumin mRNA in recipient rats indicated survival and differentiation of donor cells for at least 3 months. Mouse COX1 targets were also detected intrahepatically 4-9 weeks after STO cell injection into nonimmunosuppressed wild-type rats. In contrast to STO-transplanted rats, mouse DNA or RNA was not detectable in untreated or mock-transplanted rats or in rats injected with donor cell DNA. In cultured STO donor cells, DPPIV and glucose-6-phosphatase activities were observed in small clusters; in contrast, mouse major histocompatibility complex class I H-2Kq, H-2Dq, and H-2Lq and class II I-Aq markers were undetectable in vitro before or after interferon gamma treatment. Together with H-2K allele typing, which confirmed the Swiss mouse origin of the donor cells, these observations indicate that mouse-derived STO cell lines can differentiate along hepatocytic lineage and engraft into rat liver across major histocompatibility barriers.

  13. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver

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    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J.; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C.; Hayes, Peter C.; Plevris, John N.; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization. PMID:28134251

  14. Low-dose acetaminophen induces early disruption of cell-cell tight junctions in human hepatic cells and mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Wesam; Treskes, Philipp; Samuel, Kay; Sullivan, Gareth J; Siller, Richard; Srsen, Vlastimil; Morgan, Katie; Bryans, Anna; Kozlowska, Ada; Koulovasilopoulos, Andreas; Underwood, Ian; Smith, Stewart; Del-Pozo, Jorge; Moss, Sharon; Thompson, Alexandra Inés; Henderson, Neil C; Hayes, Peter C; Plevris, John N; Bagnaninchi, Pierre-Olivier; Nelson, Leonard J

    2017-01-30

    Dysfunction of cell-cell tight junction (TJ) adhesions is a major feature in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Liver TJs preserve cellular polarity by delimiting functional bile-canalicular structures, forming the blood-biliary barrier. In acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity, the mechanism by which tissue cohesion and polarity are affected remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that acetaminophen, even at low-dose, disrupts the integrity of TJ and cell-matrix adhesions, with indicators of cellular stress with liver injury in the human hepatic HepaRG cell line, and primary hepatocytes. In mouse liver, at human-equivalence (therapeutic) doses, dose-dependent loss of intercellular hepatic TJ-associated ZO-1 protein expression was evident with progressive clinical signs of liver injury. Temporal, dose-dependent and specific disruption of the TJ-associated ZO-1 and cytoskeletal-F-actin proteins, correlated with modulation of hepatic ultrastructure. Real-time impedance biosensing verified in vitro early, dose-dependent quantitative decreases in TJ and cell-substrate adhesions. Whereas treatment with NAPQI, the reactive metabolite of acetaminophen, or the PKCα-activator and TJ-disruptor phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, similarly reduced TJ integrity, which may implicate oxidative stress and the PKC pathway in TJ destabilization. These findings are relevant to the clinical presentation of acetaminophen-hepatotoxicity and may inform future mechanistic studies to identify specific molecular targets and pathways that may be altered in acetaminophen-induced hepatic depolarization.

  15. The organoid-initiating cells in mouse pancreas and liver are phenotypically and functionally similar

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    Craig Dorrell

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic Lgr5 expression has been associated with organoid-forming epithelial progenitor populations but the identity of the organoid-initiating epithelial cell subpopulation has remained elusive. Injury causes the emergence of an Lgr5+ organoid-forming epithelial progenitor population in the adult mouse liver and pancreas. Here, we define the origin of organoid-initiating cells from mouse pancreas and liver prior to Lgr5 activation. This clonogenic population was defined as MIC1-1C3+/CD133+/CD26− in both tissues and the frequency of organoid initiation within this population was approximately 5% in each case. The transcriptomes of these populations overlapped extensively and showed enrichment of epithelial progenitor-associated regulatory genes such as Sox9 and FoxJ1. Surprisingly, pancreatic organoid cells also had the capacity to generate hepatocyte-like cells upon transplantation to Fah−/− mice, indicating a differentiation capacity similar to hepatic organoids. Although spontaneous endocrine differentiation of pancreatic progenitors was not observed in culture, adenoviral delivery of fate-specifying factors Pdx1, Neurog3 and MafA induced insulin expression without glucagon or somatostatin. Pancreatic organoid cultures therefore preserve many key attributes of progenitor cells while allowing unlimited expansion, facilitating the study of fate determination.

  16. Functional Characteristics of Reversibly Immortalized Hepatic Progenitor Cells Derived from Mouse Embryonic Liver

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    Yang Bi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Liver is a vital organ and retains its regeneration capability throughout adulthood, which requires contributions from different cell populations, including liver precursors and intrahepatic stem cells. To overcome the mortality of hepatic progenitors (iHPs in vitro, we aim to establish reversibly immortalized hepatic progenitor cells from mouse embryonic liver. Methods and Results: Using retroviral system to stably express SV40 T antigen flanked with Cre/LoxP sites, we establish a repertoire of iHP clones with varied differentiation potential. The iHP cells maintain long-term proliferative activity and express varied levels of progenitor markers (Pou5f1/Oct4 and Dlk and hepatocyte markers (AFP, Alb and ApoB. Five representative iHP clones express hepatic/pancreatic transcription factors HNF3α/Foxa1, HNF3β/Foxa2, and HNF4α/MODY1. Dexamethasone is shown to promote the expression of hepatocyte markers AFP and TAT, along with ICG-uptake and glycogen storage functions in the iHP clones. Cre-mediated removal of SV40 T antigen reverses the proliferative activity of iHP cells. When iHP cells are subcutaneously implanted in athymic nude mice, no tumor formation is observed for up to 8 weeks. Conclusions: We demonstrate that the established iHP cells are stable, reversible, and non-tumorigenic hepatic progenitor-like cells, which should be valuable for studying liver organogenesis, metabolic regulations, and hepatic lineage-specific differentiation.

  17. Electrochemical Detection of Alkaline Phosphatase in BALB/c Mouse Fetal Liver Stromal Cells with Capillary Electrophoresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Mei SUN; Dong LI; Zeng Liang BAI; Wen Rui JIN

    2004-01-01

    A method for determination of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in BALB/c mouse fetal liver stromal cells has been described based on the catalytic reaction. After the cell extract is incubated with the substrate disodium phenyl phosphate, the reaction product phenol generated by ALP is determined by capillary electrophoresis with electrochemical detection.

  18. Butachlor, a suspected carcinogen, alters growth and transformation characteristics of mouse liver cells.

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    Ou, Y H; Chung, P C; Chang, Y C; Ngo, F Q; Hsu, K Y; Chen, F D

    2000-12-01

    Butachlor is a widely used herbicide in Asia and South America. Previous investigations have indicated that it is a suspected carcinogen. To understand more about the biological effects of butachlor on cultured cells and the mechanism(s) of its carcinogenicity, we studied the alteration of the growth characteristics that was induced by butachlor in normal mouse liver cells (BNL CL2). This study demonstrates that butachlor decreases the population-doubling time of BNL CL2 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. To support this finding, a thymidine incorporation assay was conducted and a similar result that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation was elucidated. In addition, we show that butachlor increases the saturation density of the BNL CL2 cells. When combined with the tumor initiator N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), butachlor transforms cells efficiently, as demonstrated by loss of contact inhibition. These findings indicate that butachlor alters the growth characteristics of BNL CL2 cells and suggest that butachlor may induce malignant transformation through stimulation of cell proliferation, alteration of cell cycle regulation, and suppression of cell density-dependent inhibition of proliferation.

  19. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

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    Ishida, Tokiko; Kotani, Hirokazu; Miyao, Masashi; Kawai, Chihiro; Jemail, Leila; Abiru, Hitoshi; Tamaki, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs) has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy), autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the pathophysiological mechanisms of

  20. Renal Impairment with Sublethal Tubular Cell Injury in a Chronic Liver Disease Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiko Ishida

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of renal impairment in chronic liver diseases (CLDs has been primarily studied in the advanced stages of hepatic injury. Meanwhile, the pathology of renal impairment in the early phase of CLDs is poorly understood, and animal models to elucidate its mechanisms are needed. Thus, we investigated whether an existing mouse model of CLD induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC shows renal impairment in the early phase. Renal injury markers, renal histology (including immunohistochemistry for tubular injury markers and transmission electron microscopy, autophagy, and oxidative stress were studied longitudinally in DDC- and standard diet-fed BALB/c mice. Slight but significant renal dysfunction was evident in DDC-fed mice from the early phase. Meanwhile, histological examinations of the kidneys with routine light microscopy did not show definitive morphological findings, and electron microscopic analyses were required to detect limited injuries such as loss of brush border microvilli and mitochondrial deformities. Limited injuries have been recently designated as sublethal tubular cell injury. As humans with renal impairment, either with or without CLD, often show almost normal tubules, sublethal injury has been of particular interest. In this study, the injuries were associated with mitochondrial aberrations and oxidative stress, a possible mechanism for sublethal injury. Intriguingly, two defense mechanisms were associated with this injury that prevent it from progressing to apparent cell death: autophagy and single-cell extrusion with regeneration. Furthermore, the renal impairment of this model progressed to chronic kidney disease with interstitial fibrosis after long-term DDC feeding. These findings indicated that DDC induces renal impairment with sublethal tubular cell injury from the early phase, leading to chronic kidney disease. Importantly, this CLD mouse model could be useful for studying the

  1. Binding of erythropoietin to CFU-E derived from fetal mouse liver cells

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    Fukamachi, H.; Saito, T.; Tojo, A.; Kitamura, T.; Urabe, A.; Takaku, F.

    1987-09-01

    The binding of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) to fetal mouse liver cells (FMLC) was investigated using a radioiodinated derivative which retained full biological activity. FMLC were fractionated using a preformed Percoll density gradient. Using the fractionated FMLC, the ability to form CFU-E colonies in a semisolid culture was examined, and the binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO was measured. The highest specific binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO was observed in a fraction with a density between 1.062 and 1.076 g/ml. The same fraction showed the highest ability to form CFU-E-derived colonies. After suspension culture of FMLC with EPO for 2 days, differentiated erythroid cells with higher density markedly increased. The specific binding of (/sup 125/I)EPO to these cells almost disappeared with differentiation. Scatchard analysis with cells of the CFU-E-enriched fraction showed a nonlinear curve, suggesting the existence of two classes of binding sites. One binding site was high-affinity (Kd1 = 0.41 nM), and the other low-affinity (Kd2 = 3.13 nM). These results suggest that the expression of EPO receptors on the erythroid cells is highest in CFU-E.

  2. Progressive developmental restriction, acquisition of left-right identity and cell growth behavior during lobe formation in mouse liver development.

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    Weiss, Mary C; Le Garrec, Jean-Francois; Coqueran, Sabrina; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Buckingham, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    To identify cell-based decisions implicated in morphogenesis of the mammalian liver, we performed clonal analysis of hepatocytes/hepatoblasts in mouse liver development, using a knock-in allele of Hnf4a/laacZ This transgene randomly undergoes a low frequency of recombination that generates a functional lacZ gene that produces β-galactosidase in tissues in which Hnf4a is expressed. Two types of β-galactosidase-positive clones were found. Most have undergone three to eight cell divisions and result from independent events (Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test); we calculate that they arose between E8.5 and E13.5. A second class was mega-clones derived from early endoderm progenitors, generating many descendants. Some originated from multi-potential founder cells, with labeled cells in the liver, pancreas and/or intestine. A few mega-clones populate only one side of the liver, indicating hepatic cell chirality. The patterns of labeled cells indicate cohesive and often oriented growth, notably in broad radial stripes, potentially implicated in the formation of liver lobes. This retrospective clonal analysis gives novel insights into clonal origins, cell behavior of progenitors and distinct properties of endoderm cells that underlie the formation and morphogenesis of the liver.

  3. Differential migration of passenger leukocytes and rapid deletion of naive alloreactive CD8 T cells after mouse liver transplantation.

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    Tay, Szun S; Lu, Bo; Sierro, Fred; Benseler, Volker; McGuffog, Claire M; Bishop, G Alex; Cowan, Peter J; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Dwyer, Karen M; Bowen, David G; Bertolino, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    Donor passenger leukocytes (PLs) from transplanted livers migrate to recipient lymphoid tissues, where they are thought to induce the deletion of donor-specific T cells and tolerance. Difficulties in tracking alloreactive T cells and PLs in rats and in performing this complex surgery in mice have limited progress in identifying the contribution of PL subsets and sites and the kinetics of T cell deletion. Here we developed a mouse liver transplant model in which PLs, recipient cells, and a reporter population of transgenic CD8 T cells specific for the graft could be easily distinguished and quantified in allografts and recipient organs by flow cytometry. All PL subsets circulated rapidly via the blood as soon as 1.5 hours after transplantation. By 24 hours, PLs were distributed differently in the lymph nodes and spleen, whereas donor natural killer and natural killer T cells remained in the liver and blood. Reporter T cells were activated in both liver and lymphoid tissues, but their numbers dramatically decreased within the first 48 hours. These results provide the first unequivocal demonstration of the differential recirculation of liver PL subsets after transplantation, and show that alloreactive CD8 T cells are deleted more rapidly than initially reported. This model will be useful for dissecting early events leading to the spontaneous acceptance of liver transplants.

  4. Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane technical mixture regulates cell cycle and apoptosis genes through the activation of CAR and ERα in mouse livers

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    Kazantseva, Yuliya A.; Yarushkin, Andrei A. [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Pustylnyak, Vladimir O., E-mail: pustylnyak@ngs.ru [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics SB RAMS, Novosibirsk, Timakova str., 2, 630117 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk, Pirogova str., 2, 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-01

    Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is a widely used organochlorine pesticide and a xenoestrogen that promotes rodent hepatomegaly and tumours. A recent study has shown significant correlation between DDT serum concentration and liver cancer incidence in humans, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We hypothesised that a mixture of DDT isomers could exert effects on the liver through pathways instead of classical ERs. The acute effects of a DDT mixture containing the two major isomers p,p′-DDT (85%) and o,p′-DDT (15%) on CAR and ERα receptors and their cell cycle and apoptosis target genes were studied in mouse livers. ChIP results demonstrated increased CAR and ERα recruitment to their specific target gene binding sites in response to the DDT mixture. The results of real-time RT-PCR were consistent with the ChIP data and demonstrated that the DDT was able to activate both CAR and ERα in mouse livers, leading to target gene transcriptional increases including Cyp2b10, Gadd45β, cMyc, Mdm2, Ccnd1, cFos and E2f1. Western blot analysis demonstrated increases in cell cycle progression proteins cMyc, Cyclin D1, CDK4 and E2f1 and anti-apoptosis proteins Mdm2 and Gadd45β. In addition, DDT exposure led to Rb phosphorylation. Increases in cell cycle progression and anti-apoptosis proteins were accompanied by a decrease in p53 content and its transcriptional activity. However, the DDT was unable to stimulate the β-catenin signalling pathway, which can play an important role in hepatocyte proliferation. Thus, our results indicate that DDT treatment may result in cell cycle progression and apoptosis inhibition through CAR- and ERα-mediated gene activation in mouse livers. These findings suggest that the proliferative and anti-apoptotic conditions induced by CAR and ERα activation may be important contributors to the early stages of hepatocarcinogenesis as produced by DDT in rodent livers. - Highlights: • DDT activated both CAR and ERα and their cell

  5. Nuclear receptor atlas of female mouse liver parenchymal, endothelial, and Kupffer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaosha; Kruijt, J Kar; van der Sluis, Ronald J; Van Berkel, Theo J C; Hoekstra, Menno

    2013-04-01

    The liver consists of different cell types that together synchronize crucial roles in liver homeostasis. Since nuclear receptors constitute an important class of drug targets that are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes, we have composed the hepatic cell type-specific expression profile of nuclear receptors to uncover the pharmacological potential of liver-enriched nuclear receptors. Parenchymal liver cells (hepatocytes) and liver endothelial and Kupffer cells were isolated from virgin female C57BL/6 wild-type mice using collagenase perfusion and counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The hepatic expression pattern of 49 nuclear receptors was generated by real-time quantitative PCR using the NUclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) program resources. Thirty-six nuclear receptors were expressed in total liver. FXR-α, EAR2, LXR-α, HNF4-α, and CAR were the most abundantly expressed nuclear receptors in liver parenchymal cells. In contrast, NUR77, COUP-TFII, LXR-α/β, FXR-α, and EAR2 were the most highly expressed nuclear receptors in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Interestingly, members of orphan receptor COUP-TF family showed a distinct expression pattern. EAR2 was highly and exclusively expressed in parenchymal cells, while COUP-TFII was moderately and exclusively expressed in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Of interest, the orphan receptor TR4 showed a similar expression pattern as the established lipid sensor PPAR-γ. In conclusion, our study provides the most complete quantitative assessment of the nuclear receptor distribution in liver reported to date. Our gene expression catalog suggests that orphan nuclear receptors such as COUP-TFII, EAR2, and TR4 may be of significant importance as novel targets for pharmaceutical interventions in liver.

  6. Overexpression of Hepatitis B Virus-binding Protein, Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen 1, Extends Retention of Hepatitis B Virus in Mouse Liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Bin XIA; Xi-Gu CHEN

    2006-01-01

    How receptors mediate the entry of hepatitis B virus (HBV) into the target liver cells is poorly understood. Recently, human squamous cell carcinoma antigen 1 (SCCA1) has been found to mediate binding and internalization of HBV to liver-derived cell lines in vitro. In this report, we investigate if SCCA1 is able to function as an HBV receptor and mediate HBV entry into mouse liver. SCCA1 transgene under the control of Rous sarcoma virus promoter was constructed in a minicircle DNA vector that was delivered to NOD/SCID mouse liver using the hydrodynamic technique. Subsequently, HBV-positive human serum was injected intravenously. We demonstrated that approximately 30% of the mouse liver cells expressed a high level of recombined SCCA1 protein for at least 37 d. The HBV surface antigen was found to persist in mouse liver for up to 17 d. Furthermore, HBV genome also persisted in mouse liver, as determined by polymerase chain reaction, for up to 17 d, and in mouse circulation for 7 d. These results suggest that SCAA1 might serve as an HBV receptor or co-receptor and play an important role in mediating HBV entry into hepatocytes, although its role in human HBV infection remains to be determined.

  7. Kupffer cells hasten resolution of liver immunopathology in mouse models of viral hepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Sitia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs are widely considered important contributors to liver injury during viral hepatitis due to their pro-inflammatory activity. Herein we utilized hepatitis B virus (HBV-replication competent transgenic mice and wild-type mice infected with a hepatotropic adenovirus to demonstrate that KCs do not directly induce hepatocellular injury nor do they affect the pathogenic potential of virus-specific CD8 T cells. Instead, KCs limit the severity of liver immunopathology. Mechanistically, our results are most compatible with the hypothesis that KCs contain liver immunopathology by removing apoptotic hepatocytes in a manner largely dependent on scavenger receptors. Apoptotic hepatocytes not readily removed by KCs become secondarily necrotic and release high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1 protein, promoting organ infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils. Overall, these results indicate that KCs resolve rather than worsen liver immunopathology.

  8. Completion of hepatitis C virus replication cycle in heterokaryons excludes dominant restrictions in human non-liver and mouse liver cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Frentzen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is hepatotropic and only infects humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, an immunocompetent small animal model is lacking. The restricted tropism of HCV likely reflects specific host factor requirements. We investigated if dominant restriction factors expressed in non-liver or non-human cell lines inhibit HCV propagation thus rendering these cells non-permissive. To this end we explored if HCV completes its replication cycle in heterokaryons between human liver cell lines and non-permissive cell lines from human non-liver or mouse liver origin. Despite functional viral pattern recognition pathways and responsiveness to interferon, virus production was observed in all fused cells and was only ablated when cells were treated with exogenous interferon. These results exclude that constitutive or virus-induced expression of dominant restriction factors prevents propagation of HCV in these cell types, which has important implications for HCV tissue and species tropism. In turn, these data strongly advocate transgenic approaches of crucial human HCV cofactors to establish an immunocompetent small animal model.

  9. Chlamydia pneumoniae replicates in Kupffer cells in mouse model of liver infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonella Marangoni; Manuela Donati; Francesca Cavrini; Rita Aldini; Silvia Accardo; Vittorio Sambri; Marco Montagnani; Roberto Cevenini

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop an animal model of liver infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae (C.pneumoniae) in intraperitoneally infected mice for studying the presence of chlamydiae in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes.METHODS: A total of 80 BALB/c mice were inoculated intraperitoneally with C. pneumoniae and sacrificed at various time points after infection. Chlamydiae were looked for in liver homogenates as well as in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes separated by liver perfusion with collagenase. C. pneumoniae was detected by both isolation in LLC-MK2 cells and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The releasing of TNFA-α by C. pneumoniae in vitro stimulated Kupffer cells was studied by enzymelinked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS: C. pneumoniae isolation from liver homogenates reached a plateau on d 7 after infection when 6 of 10 animals were positive, then decreased, and became negative by d 20. C. pneumoniae isolation from separated Kupffer cells reached a plateau on d 7 when 5 of 10 animals were positive, and became negative by d 20.The detection of C. pneumoniae in separated Kupffer cells by FISH, confirmed the results obtained by culture.Isolated hepatocytes were always negative. Stimulation of Kupffer cells by alive C. pneumoniae elicited high TNF-α levels.CONCLUSION: A productive infection by C. pneumoniae may take place in Kupffer cells and C. pneumoniae induces a local pro-inflammatory activity. C. pneumoniae is therefore, able to act as antigenic stimulus when localized in the liver. One could speculate that C. pneumoniae infection, involving cells of the innate immunity such as Kupffer cells, could also trigger pathological immune reactions involving the liver, as observed in human patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

  10. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

  11. Interleukin-1 regulates Hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells in the midgestation mouse fetal liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia); M. Peeters (Marian); E. Haak (Esther); K. van der Horn (Karin); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground Hematopoietic progenitors are generated in the yolk sac and aorta-gonad-mesonephros region during early mouse development. At embryonic day 10.5 the first hematopoietic stem cells emerge in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros. Subsequently, hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors are

  12. BENZO[a]PYRENE DIOL EPOXIDE PERTURBATION OF CELL CYCLE KINETICS OF SYNCHRONIZED MOUSE LIVER EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearlman, A.L.; Navsky, B.N.; Bartholomew, J.C

    1980-07-01

    A cell cycle synchronization system is described for the analysis of the perturbation of cell cycle kinetics and the cycle-phase specificity of chemicals and other agents. We used the system to study the effects of ({+-})r-7, t-8-dihydroxy-t-9, 10-oxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydrobenzo[a]pyrene (BaP diol epoxide) upon the cell cycle of mouse liver epithelial cells(NMuLi). BaP diol epoxide(0.6 uM) was added to replated cultures of NMuLi cells that had been synchronized in various stages of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation. DNA histograms were obtained by flow cytometry as a function of time after replating. The data were analyzed by a computer modeling routine and reduced to a few graphs illustrating the 'net effects' of the BaP diol epoxide relative to controls. BaP diol epoxide slowed S-phase traversal in all samples relative to their respective control. Traversal through G{sub 2}M was also slowed by at least 50%. BaP diol epoxide had no apparent effect upon G{sub 1} traversal by cycling cells, but delayed the recruitment of quiescent G{sub 0} cells by about 2 hrs. The methods described constitute a powerful new approach for probing the cell cycle effects of a wide variety of agents. The present system appears to be extremely sensitive and capable of characterizing the action of agents on each phase of the cell cycle. The methods are automatable and would allow for the assay and possible differential characterization of mutagens and carcinogens.

  13. Investigation of Hepatoprotective Activity of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in the Mouse Model of Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hung Chiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To date liver transplantation is the only effective treatment for end-stage liver diseases. Considering the potential of pluripotency and differentiation into tridermal lineages, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs may serve as an alternative of cell-based therapy. Herein, we investigated the effect of iPSC transplantation on thioacetamide- (TAA- induced acute/fulminant hepatic failure (AHF in mice. Firstly, we demonstrated that iPSCs had the capacity to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells (iPSC-Heps that expressed various hepatic markers, including albumin, α-fetoprotein, and hepatocyte nuclear factor-3β, and exhibited biological functions. Intravenous transplantation of iPSCs effectively reduced the hepatic necrotic area, improved liver functions and motor activity, and rescued TAA-treated mice from lethal AHF. 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate cell labeling revealed that iPSCs potentially mobilized to the damaged liver area. Taken together, iPSCs can effectively rescue experimental AHF and represent a potentially favorable cell source of cell-based therapy.

  14. A novel cell-free strategy for promoting mouse liver regeneration: utilization of a conditioned medium from adipose-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Kuon; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Say-June

    2015-04-01

    Although stem cells have beneficial effects, their clinical application faces many issues, including high cost and safety. Because stem cell plasty is largely based on their paracrine activity, this study aimed to test the hypothesis that utilization of the stem-cell secretome instead of actual cells would not only overcome these limitations, but also have similar effects as stem cell-based therapy. Partial hepatectomized mice were divided into four groups according to the material administered via the tail vein: normal saline (saline group); 1.0 × 10(6) human adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) in 0.1 mL saline (ASC group); 25-fold concentrated conditioned medium from ASCs (ASC-secretome group); and concentrated medium (media group). Specimens were obtained postoperatively. Liver regeneration was estimated by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, Lgr5 RT-PCR, proliferating cell nuclear antigen western blot, and liver weights, and liver function was estimated by albumin immunohistochemistry and liver function tests. The liver regenerative capacities of the ASC and ASC-secretome groups were not statistically different from each other, but were higher than their respective control groups. Moreover, the ASC and ASC-secretome groups promoted the phosphorylation of Akt, STAT3, and Erk1/2, and expressed higher levels of mouse albumin in immunohistochemistry. ASCs and ASC-secretome infusions to the partially hepatectomized mice produced similar outcomes in terms of liver regeneration and mouse albumin expression. Therefore, cell-free therapy, which is based on the paracrine properties of stem cells, is expected to overcome the limitations of cell-based methods and to provide a novel treatment for liver diseases.

  15. Deregulation of energy metabolism promotes antifibrotic effects in human hepatic stellate cells and prevents liver fibrosis in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Swathi; Potter, James J; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Sur, Surojit; Hamilton, James P; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Mezey, Esteban; Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-15

    Liver fibrosis and cirrhosis result from uncontrolled secretion and accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are activated by liver injury and inflammation. Despite the progress in understanding the biology liver fibrogenesis and the identification of potential targets for treating fibrosis, development of an effective therapy remains elusive. Since an uninterrupted supply of intracellular energy is critical for the activated-HSCs to maintain constant synthesis and secretion of ECM, we hypothesized that interfering with energy metabolism could affect ECM secretion. Here we report that a sublethal dose of the energy blocker, 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) facilitates phenotypic alteration of activated LX-2 (a human hepatic stellate cell line), into a less-active form. This treatment-dependent reversal of activated-LX2 cells was evidenced by a reduction in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen secretion, and an increase in activity of matrix metalloproteases. Mechanistically, 3-BrPA-dependent antifibrotic effects involved down-regulation of the mitochondrial metabolic enzyme, ATP5E, and up-regulation of glycolysis, as evident by elevated levels of lactate dehydrogenase, lactate production and its transporter, MCT4. Finally, the antifibrotic effects of 3-BrPA were validated in vivo in a mouse model of carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Results from histopathology & histochemical staining for collagen and α-SMA substantiated that 3-BrPA promotes antifibrotic effects in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that sublethal, metronomic treatment with 3-BrPA blocks the progression of liver fibrosis suggesting its potential as a novel therapeutic for treating liver fibrosis.

  16. Promoted differentiation of cynomolgus monkey ES cells into hepatocyte-like cells by co-culture with mouse fetal liver-derived cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ko Saito; Masahide Yoshikawa; Yukiteru Ouji; Kei Moriya; Mariko Nishiofuku; Shigehiko Ueda; Noriko Hayashi; Shigeaki Ishizaka; Hiroshi Fukui

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To explore whether a co-culture of cynomolgus monkey embryonic stem (cES) cells with embryonic liver cells could promote their differentiation into hepatocytes.METHODS:Mouse fetal liver-derived cells (MFLCs) were prepared as adherent cells from mouse embryos on embryonic d (ED) 14, after which undifferentiated cES cells were co-cultured with MFLCs. The induction of cES cells along a hepatic lineage was examined in MFLCassisted differentiation, spontaneous differentiation,and growth factors (GF) and chemicals-induced differentiations (GF-induced differentiation) using retinoic acid, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), FGF2, FGF4,hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), oncostatin M (OSM),and dexamethasone.RESULTS:The mRNA expression of α-fetoprotein,albumin (ALB), α-1-antitrypsin, and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α was observed earlier in the differentiating cES cells co-cultured with MFLCs, as compared to cES cells undergoing spontaneous differentiation and those subjected to GF-induced differentiation. The expression of cytochrome P450 7a1, a possible marker for embryonic endoderm-derived mature hepatocytes,was only observed in cES cells that had differentiated in a co-culture with MFLCs. Further, the disappearance of Oct3/4, a representative marker of an undifferentiated state, was noted in cells co-cultured with MFLCs, but not in those undergoing spontaneous or GF-induced differentiation. Tmmunocytochemical analysis revealed an increased ratio of ALS-immunopositive cells among cES cells co-cultured with MFLCs, while glycogen storage and urea synthesis were also demonstrated.CONCLUSION:MFLCs showed an ability to induce cES cells to differentiate toward hepatocytes. The co-culture system with MFLCs is a useful method for induction of hepatocyte-like cells from undifferentiated cES cells.

  17. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and derived hepatocyte-like cells exhibit similar therapeutic effects on an acute liver failure mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiping Zhou

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have exhibited therapeutic effects in multiple animal models so that are promising liver substitute for transplantation treatment of end-stage liver diseases. However, it has been shown that over-manipulation of these cells increased their tumorigenic potential, and that reducing the in vitro culture time could minimize the risk. In this study, we used a D-galactosamine plus lipopolysaccharide (Gal/LPS-induced acute liver failure mouse model, which caused death of about 50% of the mice with necrosis of more than 50% hepatocytes, to compare the therapeutic effects of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUCMSCs before and after induction of differentiation into hepatocyte (i-Heps. Induction of hUCMSCs to become i-Heps was achieved by treatment of the cells with a group of growth factors within 4 weeks. The resulted i-Heps exhibited a panel of human hepatocyte biomarkers including cytokeratin (hCK-18, α-fetoprotein (hAFP, albumin (hALB, and hepatocyte-specific functions glycogen storage and urea metabolism. We demonstrated that transplantation of both cell types through tail vein injection rescued almost all of the Gal/LPS-intoxicated mice. Although both cell types exhibited similar ability in homing at the mouse livers, the populations of the hUCMSCs-derived cells, as judged by expressing hAFP, hCK-18 and human hepatocyte growth factor (hHGF, were small. These observations let us to conclude that the hUCMSCs was as effective as the i-Heps in treatment of the mouse acute liver failure, and that the therapeutic effects of hUCMSCs were mediated largely via stimulation of host hepatocyte regeneration, and that delivery of the cells through intravenous injection was effective.

  18. Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes Improve the Mouse Liver after Acute Acetaminophen Intoxication by Preventing Progress of Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy Stock

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells from human bone marrow (hMSC have the potential to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and continue to maintain important hepatocyte functions in vivo after transplantation into host mouse livers. Here, hMSC were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro (hMSC-HC and transplanted into livers of immunodeficient Pfp/Rag2−/− mice treated with a sublethal dose of acetaminophen (APAP to induce acute liver injury. APAP induced a time- and dose-dependent damage of perivenous areas of the liver lobule. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST increased to similar levels irrespective of hMSC-HC transplantation. Yet, hMSC-HC resided in the damaged perivenous areas of the liver lobules short-term preventing apoptosis and thus progress of organ destruction. Disturbance of metabolic protein expression was lower in the livers receiving hMSC-HC. Seven weeks after APAP treatment, hepatic injury had completely recovered in groups both with and without hMSC-HC. Clusters of transplanted cells appeared predominantly in the periportal portion of the liver lobule and secreted human albumin featuring a prominent quality of differentiated hepatocytes. Thus, hMSC-HC attenuated the inflammatory response and supported liver regeneration after acute injury induced by acetaminophen. They hence may serve as a novel source of hepatocyte-like cells suitable for cell therapy of acute liver diseases.

  19. Growth characteristics and Ha-ras mutations of cell cultures isolated from chemically induced mouse liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, M S; Rumsby, P C; Wright, V; Phillimore, H E; Butler, W H; Evans, J G

    1994-09-01

    Cells have been isolated from liver tumours that have arisen in control C3H/He mice, in mice given 10 micrograms diethylnitrosamine (DEN) during the neonatal period or in mice given a diet containing phenobarbitone (PB) to allow a daily intake of 85 mg/kg/day. The cells were grown to the 8 degrees subculture when their growth characteristics were investigated in monolayer culture and following suspension in soft agar and on transplantation into nude mice. In addition, DNA was isolated from the cultures and from tumours that grew in nude mice and analysed for mutations at codon 61 of the Ha-ras oncogene. All cells derived from DEN-induced hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) demonstrated a lack of density inhibition of growth in monolayer culture, grew in soft agar and formed tumours in nude mice with an average mean latency of 29 days. Three of the seven lines showed mutations in Ha-ras: two were CAA-->AAA transversions and one showed a CAA-->CTA transversion. In contrast, cells isolated from eosinophilic nodules in mice given PB showed inhibition of growth at confluence, did not grow in soft agar and only four of eight formed tumours in nude mice with a mean average latent period of 181 days. Cells grown from HCC in mice given PB showed a lack of density inhibition of growth, however, they did not grow in soft agar nor did they form tumours in nude mice. A single spontaneous HCC from a control mouse showed a similar growth pattern to HCC cells isolated from mice given PB. Cells from a basophilic nodule, taken from a control untreated mouse grew vigorously in culture and in soft agar and formed tumours in nude mice with a latency of 6 days. None of the cells isolated from control mice or from mice given PB showed evidence of mutations at codon 61 of Ha-ras. These data confirm that there are fundamental differences in the biology of cells grown from tumours that develop in mice under different treatment regimes. These studies also demonstrate the utility of cell culture

  20. Bisphenol S Interacts with Catalase and Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Liver and Renal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Rutao; Zong, Wansong

    2016-08-31

    Bisphenol S (BPS) is present in multitudinous consumer products and detected in both food and water. It also has been a main substitute for bisphenol A (BPA) in the food-packaging industry. Yet, the toxicity of BPS is not fully understood. The present study of the toxicity of BPS was divided into two parts. First, oxidative stress, cell viability, apoptosis level, and catalase (CAT) activity in mouse hepatocytes and renal cells were investigated after BPS exposure. After 12 h of incubation with BPS, all of these parameters of hepatocytes and renal cells changed by >15% as the concentration of BPS ranged from 0.1 to 1 mM. Second, the direct interaction between BPS and CAT on the molecule level was investigated by multiple spectral methods and molecular docking investigations. BPS changed the structure and the activity of CAT through binding to the Gly 117 residue on the substrate channel of the enzyme. The main binding forces were hydrogen bond and hydrophobic force.

  1. Remarkable heterogeneity displayed by oval cells in rat and mouse models of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Peter; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Rasmussen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    The experimental protocols used in the investigation of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration in rodents are characterized by activation of the hepatic stem cell compartment in the canals of Hering followed by transit amplification of oval cells and their subsequent differentiation along hepatic...... lineages. Although the protocols are numerous and often used interchangeably across species, a thorough comparative phenotypic analysis of oval cells in rats and mice using well-established and generally acknowledged molecular markers has not been provided. In the present study, we evaluated and compared...... the molecular phenotypes of oval cells in several of the most commonly used protocols of stem cell-mediated liver regeneration-namely, treatment with 2-acetylaminofluorene and partial (70%) hepatectomy (AAF/PHx); a choline-deficient, ethionine-supplemented (CDE) diet; a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydro...

  2. Phenobarbital induces cell cycle transcriptional responses in mouse liver humanized for constitutive androstane and pregnane x receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Lempiäinen, Harri; Scherbichler, Nina; Braeuning, Albert; Geissler, Miriam; Dubost, Valerie; Müller, Arne; Scheer, Nico; Chibout, Salah-Dine; Hara, Hisanori; Picard, Frank; Theil, Diethilde; Couttet, Philippe; Vitobello, Antonio; Grenet, Olivier; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Thomson, John P; Meehan, Richard R; Elcombe, Clifford R; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Schwarz, Michael; Moulin, Pierre; Terranova, Rémi; Moggs, Jonathan G

    2014-06-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR) are closely related nuclear receptors involved in drug metabolism and play important roles in the mechanism of phenobarbital (PB)-induced rodent nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogenesis. Here, we have used a humanized CAR/PXR mouse model to examine potential species differences in receptor-dependent mechanisms underlying liver tissue molecular responses to PB. Early and late transcriptomic responses to sustained PB exposure were investigated in liver tissue from double knock-out CAR and PXR (CAR(KO)-PXR(KO)), double humanized CAR and PXR (CAR(h)-PXR(h)), and wild-type C57BL/6 mice. Wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers exhibited temporally and quantitatively similar transcriptional responses during 91 days of PB exposure including the sustained induction of the xenobiotic response gene Cyp2b10, the Wnt signaling inhibitor Wisp1, and noncoding RNA biomarkers from the Dlk1-Dio3 locus. Transient induction of DNA replication (Hells, Mcm6, and Esco2) and mitotic genes (Ccnb2, Cdc20, and Cdk1) and the proliferation-related nuclear antigen Mki67 were observed with peak expression occurring between 1 and 7 days PB exposure. All these transcriptional responses were absent in CAR(KO)-PXR(KO) mouse livers and largely reversible in wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mouse livers following 91 days of PB exposure and a subsequent 4-week recovery period. Furthermore, PB-mediated upregulation of the noncoding RNA Meg3, which has recently been associated with cellular pluripotency, exhibited a similar dose response and perivenous hepatocyte-specific localization in both wild-type and CAR(h)-PXR(h) mice. Thus, mouse livers coexpressing human CAR and PXR support both the xenobiotic metabolizing and the proliferative transcriptional responses following exposure to PB.

  3. Comparison of the Treatment Efficiency of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation via Tail and Portal Veins in CCl4-Induced Mouse Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Nhung Hai; Nguyen, Nam Hai; Le, Trinh Van; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Thanh Van; Le, Huy Minh; Phan, Ngoc Kim; Pham, Phuc Van

    2016-01-01

    Because of self-renewal, strong proliferation in vitro, abundant sources for isolation, and a high differentiation capacity, mesenchymal stem cells are suggested to be potentially therapeutic for liver fibrosis/cirrhosis. In this study, we evaluated the treatment effects of mouse bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on mouse liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride. Portal and tail vein transplantations were examined to evaluate the effects of different injection routes on the liver cirrhosis model at 21 days after transplantation. BM-MSCs transplantation reduced aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase levels at 21 days after injection. Furthermore, BM-MSCs induced positive changes in serum bilirubin and albumin and downregulated expression of integrins (600- to 7000-fold), transforming growth factor, and procollagen-α1 compared with the control group. Interestingly, both injection routes ameliorated inflammation and liver cirrhosis scores. All mice in treatment groups had reduced inflammation scores and no cirrhosis. In conclusion, transplantation of BM-MSCs via tail or portal veins ameliorates liver cirrhosis in mice. Notably, there were no differences in treatment effects between tail and portal vein administrations. In consideration of safety, we suggest transfusion of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells via a peripheral vein as a potential method for liver fibrosis treatment.

  4. ATF4 plays a pivotal role in the development of functional hematopoietic stem cells in mouse fetal liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunze; Zhou, Jie; Liu, Dan; Dong, Fang; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Weili; Pang, Yakun; Wang, Yajie; Mu, Xiaohuan; Ni, Yanli; Li, Zhuan; Xu, Huiyu; Hao, Sha; Wang, Xiaochen; Ma, Shihui; Wang, Qian-fei; Xiao, Guozhi; Yuan, Weiping; Liu, Bing; Cheng, Tao

    2015-11-19

    The fetal liver (FL) serves as a predominant site for expansion of functional hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) during mouse embryogenesis. However, the mechanisms for HSC development in FL remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that deletion of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) significantly impaired hematopoietic development and reduced HSC self-renewal in FL. In contrast, generation of the first HSC population in the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region was not affected. The migration activity of ATF4(-/-) HSCs was moderately reduced. Interestingly, the HSC-supporting ability of both endothelial and stromal cells in FL was significantly compromised in the absence of ATF4. Gene profiling using RNA-seq revealed downregulated expression of a panel of cytokines in ATF4(-/-) stromal cells, including angiopoietin-like protein 3 (Angptl3) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA). Addition of Angptl3, but not VEGFA, partially rescued the repopulating defect of ATF4(-/-) HSCs in the culture. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay in conjunction with silencing RNA-mediated silencing and complementary DNA overexpression showed transcriptional control of Angptl3 by ATF4. To summarize, ATF4 plays a pivotal role in functional expansion and repopulating efficiency of HSCs in developing FL, and it acts through upregulating transcription of cytokines such as Angptl3 in the microenvironment.

  5. An update on the mouse liver proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borlak Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decoding of the liver proteome is subject of intense research, but hampered by methodological constraints. We recently developed an improved protocol for studying rat liver proteins based on 2-DE-MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. This methodology was now applied to develop a mouse liver protein database. Results Liver proteins were extracted by two different lysis buffers in sequence followed by a liquid-phase IEF pre-fractionation and separation of proteins by 2 DE at two different pH ranges, notably 5-8 and 7-10. Based on 9600 in gel digests a total of 643 mouse liver proteins with high sequence coverage (> 20 peptides per protein could be identified by MALDI-TOF-MS peptide mass finger printing. Notably, 255 proteins are novel and have not been reported so far by conventional two-dimensional electrophoresis proteome mapping. Additionally, the results of the present findings for mouse liver were compared to published data of the rat proteome to compile as many proteins as possible in a rodent liver database. Conclusion Based on 2-DE MALDI-TOF-MS a significantly improved proteome map of mouse liver was obtained. We discuss some prominent members of newly identified proteins for a better understanding of liver biology.

  6. Activation of the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway occurs in the CD133 positive cells of mouse liver cancer Hepa 1–6 cells

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    Jeng KS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kuo-Shyang Jeng,1 I-Shyan Sheen,2 Wen-Juei Jeng,2 Ming-Che Yu,3 Hsin-I Hsiau,3 Fang-Yu Chang,3 Hsin-Hua Tsai31Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, 2Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Medical Center, Chang Gung University, 3Department of Medical Research, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of ChinaBackground: The important role of cancer stem cells in carcinogenesis has been emphasized in research. CD133+ cells have been mentioned as liver cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Some researchers have proposed that the sonic hedgehog (Shh pathway contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis and that the pathway activation occurs mainly in cancer stem cells. We investigated whether the activation of the Shh pathway occurs in CD133+ cells from liver cancer.Materials and methods: We used magnetic sorting to isolate CD133+ cells from mouse cancer Hepa 1–6 cells. To examine the clonogenicity, cell culture and soft agar colony formation assay were performed between CD133+ and CD133- cells. To study the activation of the Shh pathway, we examined the mRNA expressions of Shh, patched homolog 1 (Ptch-1, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli-1, and smoothened homolog (Smoh by real-time polymerase chain reaction of both CD133+ and CD133- cells.Results: The number (mean ± standard deviation of colonies of CD133+ cells and CD133- cells was 1,031.0 ± 104.7 and 119.7 ± 17.6 respectively. This difference was statistically significant (P < 0.001. Their clonogenicity was 13.7% ± 1.4% and 1.6% ± 0.2% respectively with a statistically significant difference found (P < 0.001. CD133+ cells and CD133– cells were found to have statistically significant differences in Shh mRNA and Smoh mRNA (P = 0.005 and P = 0.043 respectively.Conclusion: CD133+ Hepa 1–6 cells have a significantly higher colony proliferation and clonogenicity. The Shh pathway is activated in these

  7. Early stage transplantation of bone marrow cells markedly ameliorates copper metabolism and restores liver function in a mouse model of Wilson disease

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    Wang Chuhuai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated that normal bone marrow (BM cells transplantation can correct liver injury in a mouse model of Wilson disease (WD. However, it still remains unknown when BM cells transplantation should be administered. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential impact of normal BM cells transplantation at different stages of WD to correct liver injury in toxic milk (tx mice. Methods Recipient tx mice were sublethally irradiated (5 Gy prior to transplantation. The congenic wild-type (DL BM cells labeled with CM-DiI were transplanted via caudal vein injection into tx mice at the early (2 months of age or late stage (5 months of age of WD. The same volume of saline or tx BM cells were injected as controls. The DL donor cell population, copper concentration, serum ceruloplasmin oxidase activity and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels in the various groups were evaluated at 1, 4, 8 and 12 weeks post-transplant, respectively. Results The DL BM cells population was observed from 1 to 12 weeks and peaked by the 4th week in the recipient liver after transplantation. DL BM cells transplantation during the early stage significantly corrected copper accumulation, AST across the observed time points and serum ceruloplasmin oxidase activity through 8 to 12 weeks in tx mice compared with those treated with saline or tx BM cells (all P P P > 0.05. Conclusions Early stage transplantation of normal BM cells is better than late stage transplantation in correcting liver function and copper metabolism in a mouse model of WD.

  8. Comparison of the Treatment Efficiency of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation via Tail and Portal Veins in CCl4-Induced Mouse Liver Fibrosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Truong, Nhung Hai; Nguyen, Nam Hai; Le, Trinh Van; Vu, Ngoc Bich; Huynh, Nghia; Nguyen, Thanh Van; Le, Huy Minh; Phan, Ngoc Kim; Pham, Phuc Van

    2016-01-01

    ...) on mouse liver cirrhosis induced by carbon tetrachloride. Portal and tail vein transplantations were examined to evaluate the effects of different injection routes on the liver cirrhosis model at 21 days after transplantation...

  9. Lack of liver X receptors leads to cell proliferation in a model of mouse dorsal prostate epithelial cell.

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    Julie Dufour

    Full Text Available Recent studies underline the implication of Liver X Receptors (LXRs in several prostate diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we derived epithelial cells from dorsal prostate (MPECs of wild type (WT or Lxrαβ-/- mice. In the WT MPECs, our results show that LXR activation reduces proliferation and correlates with the modification of the AKT-survival pathway. Moreover, LXRs regulate lipid homeostasis with the regulation of Abca1, Abcg1 and Idol, and, in a lesser extent, Srebp1, Fas and Acc. Conversely cells derived from Lxrαβ-/- mice show a higher basal phosphorylation and consequently activation of the survival/proliferation transduction pathways AKT and MAPK. Altogether, our data point out that the cell model we developed allows deciphering the molecular mechanisms inducing the cell cycle arrest. Besides, we show that activated LXRs regulate AKT and MAPK transduction pathways and demonstrate that LXRs could be good pharmacological targets in prostate disease such as cancer.

  10. Large tumor suppressor homologs 1 and 2 regulate mouse liver progenitor cell proliferation and maturation through antagonism of the coactivators YAP and TAZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jing; Lu, Li; Yanger, Kilangsungla; Wang, Wenqi; Sohn, Bo Hwa; Stanger, Ben Z; Zhang, Min; Martin, James F; Ajani, Jaffer A; Chen, Junjie; Lee, Ju-Seog; Song, Shumei; Johnson, Randy L

    2016-11-01

    In the adult liver, the Hippo pathway mammalian STE20-like protein kinases 1 and 2 and large tumor suppressor homologs 1 and 2 (LATS1/2) control activation of the transcriptional coactivators Yes-associated protein (YAP) and WW domain containing transcription regulator 1 (TAZ) in hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells, thereby regulating liver cell proliferation, differentiation, and malignant transformation. Less is known about the contribution of Hippo signaling to liver development. We used conditional mutagenesis to show that the Hippo signaling pathway kinases LATS1 and LATS2 are redundantly required during mouse liver development to repress YAP and TAZ in both the biliary epithelial and hepatocyte lineages. In the absence of LATS1/2, biliary epithelial cells exhibit excess proliferation while hepatoblasts fail to mature into hepatocytes, defects that result in perinatal lethality. Using an in vitro hepatocyte differentiation assay, we demonstrate that YAP activity decreases and Hippo pathway kinase activities increase upon differentiation. In addition, we show that YAP activation in vitro, resulting from either depletion of its negative regulators LATS1/2 or expression of a mutant form of YAP that is less efficiently phosphorylated by LATS1/2, results in transcriptional suppression of genes that normally accompany hepatocyte maturation. Moreover, we provide evidence that YAP activity is repressed by Hippo pathway activation upon hepatocytic maturation in vitro. Finally, we examine the localization of YAP during fetal liver development and show that higher levels of YAP are found in biliary epithelial cells, while in hepatocytes YAP levels decrease with hepatocyte maturation. Hippo signaling, mediated by the LATS1 and LATS2 kinases, is required to restrict YAP and TAZ activation during both biliary and hepatocyte differentiation. These findings suggest that dynamic regulation of the Hippo signaling pathway plays an important role in differentiation and

  11. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bility, Moses T; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system's contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mouse model engrafted with both human immune and human liver cells is needed to study infection and immunopathogenesis of HBV/HCV infection in vivo. We have recently developed the humanized mouse model with both human immune and human liver cells (AFC8-hu HSC/Hep) to study immunopathogenesis and therapy of HCV infection in vivo. In this review, we summarize the current models of HBV/HCV infection and their limitations in immunopathogenesis. We will then present our recent findings of HCV infection and immunopathogenesis in the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse, which supports HCV infection, human T-cell response and associated liver pathogenesis. Inoculation of humanized mice with primary HCV isolates resulted in long-term HCV infection. HCV infection induced elevated infiltration of human immune cells in the livers of HCV-infected humanized mice. HCV infection also induced HCV-specific T-cell immune response in lymphoid tissues of humanized mice. Additionally, HCV infection induced liver fibrosis in humanized mice. Anti-human alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA) staining showed elevated human hepatic stellate cell activation in HCV-infected humanized mice. We discuss the limitation and future improvements of the AFC8-hu HSC/Hep mouse model and its application in evaluating novel therapeutics, as well as studying both HCV and HBV infection, human immune responses, and associated human liver fibrosis and cancer.

  12. gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase overexpression increases metastatic growth of B16 melanoma cells in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrador, Elena; Carretero, Julian; Ortega, Angel; Medina, Ignacio; Rodilla, Vicente; Pellicer, José A; Estrela, José M

    2002-01-01

    B16 melanoma (B16M) cells with high glutathione (GSH) content show rapid proliferation in vitro and high metastatic activity in the liver in vivo. gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-mediated extracellular GSH cleavage and intracellular GSH synthesis were studied in vitro in B16M cells with high (F10) and low (F1) metastatic potential. GGT activity was modified by transfection with the human GGT gene (B16MF1/Tet-GGT cells) or by acivicin-induced inhibition. B16MF1/Tet-GGT and B16MF10 cells exhibited higher GSH content (35 +/- 6 and 40 +/- 5 nmol/10(6) cells, respectively) and GGT activity (89 +/- 9 and 37 +/- 7 mU/10(6) cells, respectively) as compared (P <.05) with B16MF1 cells (10 +/- 3 nmol GSH and 4 mU GGT/10(6) cells). Metastasis (number of foci/100 mm(3) of liver) increased in B16MF1 cells pretreated with GSH ester ( approximately 3-fold, P <.01), and decreased in B16MF1/Tet-GGT and B16MF10 cells pretreated with the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine (S,R)-sulphoximine ( approximately 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively, P <.01). Liver, kidney, brain, lung, and erythrocyte GSH content in B16MF1/Tet-GGT- or B16MF10-bearing mice decreased as compared with B16MF1- and non-tumor-bearing mice. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1-independent sinusoidal GSH efflux from hepatocytes increased in B16MF1/Tet-GGT- or B16MF10-bearing mice ( approximately 2-fold, P <.01) as compared with non-tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicate that tumor GGT activity and an intertissue flow of GSH can regulate GSH content of melanoma cells and their metastatic growth in the liver.

  13. A dedicated promoter drives constitutive expression of the cell-autonomous immune resistance GTPase, Irga6 (IIGP1 in mouse liver.

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    Jia Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In general, immune effector molecules are induced by infection. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: However, strong constitutive expression of the cell-autonomous resistance GTPase, Irga6 (IIGP1, was found in mouse liver, contrasting with previous evidence that expression of this protein is exclusively dependent on induction by IFNgamma. Constitutive and IFNgamma-inducible expression of Irga6 in the liver were shown to be dependent on transcription initiated from two independent untranslated 5' exons, which splice alternatively into the long exon encoding the full-length protein sequence. Irga6 is expressed constitutively in freshly isolated hepatocytes and is competent in these cells to accumulate on the parasitophorous vacuole membrane of infecting Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The role of constitutive hepatocyte expression of Irga6 in resistance to parasites invading from the gut via the hepatic portal system is discussed.

  14. Spontaneous focal activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells in mouse liver and kidney

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    Zeng Jia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells differ from other T cells by their hyperactive effector T-cell status, in addition to the expression of NK lineage receptors and semi-invariant T-cell receptors. It is generally agreed that the immune phenotype of iNKT cells is maintained by repeated activation in peripheral tissues although no explicit evidence for such iNKT cell activity in vivo has so far been reported. Results We used an interferon (IFN-γ-inducible cytoplasmic protein, Irga6, as a histological marker for local IFN-γ production. Irga6 was intensely expressed in small foci of liver parenchymal cells and kidney tubular epithelium. Focal Irga6 expression was unaffected by germ-free status or loss of TLR signalling and was totally dependent on IFN-γ secreted by T cells in the centres of expression foci. These were shown to be iNKT cells by diagnostic T cell receptor usage and their activity was lost in both CD1 d and Jα-deficient mice. Conclusions This is the first report that supplies direct evidence for explicit activation events of NKT cells in vivo and raises issues about the triggering mechanism and consequences for immune functions in liver and kidney.

  15. Liver immune-pathogenesis and therapy of human liver tropic virus infection in humanized mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    Bility, Moses T.; Li, Feng; Cheng, Liang; Su, Lishan

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infect and replicate primarily in human hepatocytes. Few reliable and easy accessible animal models are available for studying the immune system’s contribution to the liver disease progression during hepatitis virus infection. Humanized mouse models reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been developed to study human immunology, human immunodeficiency virus 1 infection, and immunopathogenesis. However, a humanized mous...

  16. Distinct populations of hepatic stellate cells in the mouse liver have different capacities for retinoid and lipid storage.

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    Diana N D'Ambrosio

    Full Text Available Hepatic stellate cell (HSC lipid droplets are specialized organelles for the storage of retinoid, accounting for 50-60% of all retinoid present in the body. When HSCs activate, retinyl ester levels progressively decrease and the lipid droplets are lost. The objective of this study was to determine if the HSC population in a healthy, uninjured liver demonstrates heterogeneity in its capacity for retinoid and lipid storage in lipid droplets. To this end, we utilized two methods of HSC isolation, which leverage distinct properties of these cells, including their vitamin A content and collagen expression. HSCs were isolated either from wild type (WT mice in the C57BL/6 genetic background by flotation in a Nycodenz density gradient, followed by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS based on vitamin A autofluorescence, or from collagen-green fluorescent protein (GFP mice by FACS based on GFP expression from a GFP transgene driven by the collagen I promoter. We show that GFP-HSCs have: (i increased expression of typical markers of HSC activation; (ii decreased retinyl ester levels, accompanied by reduced expression of the enzyme needed for hepatic retinyl ester synthesis (LRAT; (iii decreased triglyceride levels; (iv increased expression of genes associated with lipid catabolism; and (v an increase in expression of the retinoid-catabolizing cytochrome, CYP2S1.Our observations suggest that the HSC population in a healthy, uninjured liver is heterogeneous. One subset of the total HSC population, which expresses early markers of HSC activation, may be "primed" and ready for rapid response to acute liver injury.

  17. CCR2 and CD44 promote inflammatory cell recruitment during fatty liver formation in a lithogenic diet fed mouse model.

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    Charlotte E Egan

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a common disease with a spectrum of presentations. The current study utilized a lithogenic diet model of NAFLD. The diet was fed to mice that are either resistant (AKR or susceptible (BALB/c and C57BL/6 to hepatitis followed by molecular and flow cytometric analysis. Following this, a similar approach was taken in congenic mice with specific mutations in immunological genes. The initial study identified a significant and profound increase in multiple ligands for the chemokine receptor CCR2 and an increase in CD44 expression in susceptible C57BL/6 (B6 but not resistant AKR mice. Ccr2(-/- mice were completely protected from hepatitis and Cd44(-/- mice were partially protected. Despite protection from inflammation, both strains displayed similar histological steatosis scores and significant increases in serum liver enzymes. CD45(+CD44(+ cells bound to hyaluronic acid (HA in diet fed B6 mice but not Cd44(-/- or Ccr2(-/- mice. Ccr2(-/- mice displayed a diminished HA binding phenotype most notably in monocytes, and CD8(+ T-cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that absence of CCR2 completely and CD44 partially reduces hepatic leukocyte recruitment. These data also provide evidence that there are multiple redundant CCR2 ligands produced during hepatic lipid accumulation and describes the induction of a strong HA binding phenotype in response to LD feeding in some subsets of leukocytes from susceptible strains.

  18. Cell Based Drug Delivery: Micrococcus luteus Loaded Neutrophils as Chlorhexidine Delivery Vehicles in a Mouse Model of Liver Abscesses in Cattle.

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    Sebastian O Wendel

    Full Text Available The recent WHO report on antibiotic resistances shows a dramatic increase of microbial resistance against antibiotics. With only a few new antibiotics in the pipeline, a different drug delivery approach is urgently needed. We have obtained evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of a cell based drug delivery system that utilizes the innate immune system as targeting carrier for antibacterial drugs. In this study we show the efficient loading of neutrophil granulocytes with chlorhexidine and the complete killing of E. coli as well as Fusobacterium necrophorum in in-vitro studies. Fusobacterium necrophorum causes hepatic abscesses in cattle fed high grain diets. We also show in a mouse model that this delivery system targets infections of F. necrophorum in the liver and reduces the bacterial burden by an order of magnitude from approximately 2•106 to 1•105.

  19. Cell Based Drug Delivery: Micrococcus luteus Loaded Neutrophils as Chlorhexidine Delivery Vehicles in a Mouse Model of Liver Abscesses in Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendel, Sebastian O; Menon, Sailesh; Alshetaiwi, Hamad; Shrestha, Tej B; Chlebanowski, Lauren; Hsu, Wei-Wen; Bossmann, Stefan H; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Troyer, Deryl L

    2015-01-01

    The recent WHO report on antibiotic resistances shows a dramatic increase of microbial resistance against antibiotics. With only a few new antibiotics in the pipeline, a different drug delivery approach is urgently needed. We have obtained evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of a cell based drug delivery system that utilizes the innate immune system as targeting carrier for antibacterial drugs. In this study we show the efficient loading of neutrophil granulocytes with chlorhexidine and the complete killing of E. coli as well as Fusobacterium necrophorum in in-vitro studies. Fusobacterium necrophorum causes hepatic abscesses in cattle fed high grain diets. We also show in a mouse model that this delivery system targets infections of F. necrophorum in the liver and reduces the bacterial burden by an order of magnitude from approximately 2•106 to 1•105.

  20. Stringent V beta requirement for the development of NK1.1+ T cell receptor-alpha/beta+ cells in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohteki, T; MacDonald, H R

    1996-03-01

    The liver of C57BL/6 mice contains a major subset of CD4+8- and CD4-8- T cell receptor (TCR)-alpha/beta+ cells expressing the polymorphic natural killer NK1.1 surface marker. Liver NK1.1+TCR-alpha/beta+ (NK1+ T) cells require interaction with beta2-microglobulin-associated, major histocompatibility complex I-like molecules on hematopoietic cells for their development and have a TCR repertoire that is highly skewed to Vbeta8.2, Vbeta7, and Vbeta2. We show here that congenic C57BL/6.Vbeta(a) mice, which lack Vbeta8- expressing T cells owing to a genomic deletion at the Vbeta locus, maintain normal levels of liver NK1+ T cells owing to a dramatic increase in the proportion of cells expressing Vbeta7 and Vbeta2 (but not other Vbetas). Moreover, in C57BL/6 congenic TCR-V Vbeta3 and -Vbeta8.1 transgenic mice (which in theory should not express other Vbeta, owing to allelic exclusion at the TCR-beta locus), endogenous TCR-Vbeta8.2, Vbeta7, and Vbeta2 (but not other Vbetas) are frequently expressed on liver NK1+T cells but absent on lymph node T cells. Finally, when endogenous V beta expression is prevented in TCR-Vbeta3 and Vbeta8.1 transgenic mice (by introduction of a null allele at the C beta locus), the development of liver NK1+T cells is totally abrogated. Collectively, our data indicate that liver NK1+T cells have a stringent requirement for expression of TCR-Vbeta8.2, Vbeta7, or Vbeta2 for their development.

  1. Glutathione transferases P1/P2 regulate the timing of signaling pathway activations and cell cycle progression during mouse liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaud, J; Ribault, C; Ben Mosbah, I; Rauch, C; Henderson, C; Bellaud, P; Aninat, C; Loyer, P; Morel, F; Corlu, A

    2015-01-15

    Glutathione transferases (GST) are phase II enzymes catalyzing the detoxification of endogenous noxious compounds and xenobiotics. They also regulate phosphorylation activities of MAPKinases in a catalytic-independent manner. Previous studies have demonstrated the regulation of JNK-dependent pathway by GSTP1/2. Considering the crucial role of JNK in the early steps of the hepatocyte cell cycle, we sought to determine whether GSTP1/2 were essential for hepatocyte proliferation following partial hepatectomy (PH). Using a conventional double knockout mouse model for the Gstp1 and Gstp2 genes, we found that the lack of GSTP1/P2 reduced the rate of DNA replication and mitotic index during the first wave of hepatocyte proliferation. The lowered proliferation was associated with the decrease in TNFalpha and IL-6 plasma concentrations, reduced hepatic HGF expression and delayed and/or altered activation of STAT3, JNK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways. In addition, the expression and/or activation of cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1 and MCM7 was postponed demonstrating that the absence of GSTP1/2 delayed the entry into and progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle and impaired the synchrony of proliferation in hepatocytes following PH. Furthermore, while JNK and its downstream targets c-Jun and ATF2 were activated during the early steps of the liver regeneration in wild-type animals, the constitutively active JNK found in the quiescent liver of Gstp1/2 knockout mice underwent a decrease in its activity after PH. Transient induction of antioxidant enzymes and nitric oxide synthase were also delayed or repressed during the regenerative response. Altogether our results demonstrate that GSTP1/2 are a critical regulators of hepatocyte proliferation in the initial phases of liver regeneration.

  2. SiRNA-Mediated Down-Regulation of CLIC4 Gene Inhibits Cell Proliferation and Accelerates Cell Apoptosis of Mouse Liver Cancer Hca-F and Hca-P Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiu-Yun; Zhou, Xin-Feng; Xia, Qing; Shen, Jia; Yan, Jia; Zhu, Jiu-Ting; Li, Xiang; Shu, Ming

    2017-06-21

    This study explored the effects involved in silencing CLIC4 on apoptosis and proliferation of mouse liver cancer Hca-F and Hca-P cells. A CLIC4-target small interfering RNA (siRNA) was designed to compound into two individual complementary oligonucleotide chains. A process of annealing and connection to a pSilencer vector was followed by transfection with Hca-F and Hca-P cells. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting techniques were used to determine CLIC4 mRNA and protein expressions. CCK8 assay and flow cytometry were employed for analysis of the survival and apoptosis rate as well as the cell cycle in an octreotide-induced apoptosis model. Expressions of caspase 3, caspase 9, and cleaved PARP were measured using Western blotting. The CLIC4 mRNA and protein expressions in Hca-F and Hca-P cells transfected by pSilencer-CLIC4 siRNA plasmid in the blank group displayed remarkably decreased levels of expression, when compared with both the control and negative control (NC) groups. Decreased survival rates and cleaved PARP expression, increased cell apoptosis rate,expressions of caspase 3 and caspase 9 in Hca-F and Hca-P cells were detected in groups that had been cultured in a medium containing octreotide. The pSilencer-CLIC4 siRNA-2 group when compared with the control and NC groups exhibited decreased survival rates, cleaved PARP expression, increased cell apoptosis rates, and increased expressions of caspase 3 and caspase 9 of Hca-F and Hca-P cells. The results demonstrated that siRNA-induced down-regulation of CLIC4 could proliferation, while in turn promoting apoptosis of mouse liver cancer Hca-F and Hca-P cells. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-10, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. EGFR is dispensable for c-Met-mediated proliferation and survival activities in mouse adult liver oval cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Palacián, A; del Castillo, G; Herrera, B; Fernández, M; Roncero, C; Fabregat, I; Sánchez, A

    2012-02-01

    Liver progenitor cells rise as potential critical players in hepatic regeneration but also carcinogenesis. It is therefore mandatory to define the signals controlling their activation and expansion. Recently, by using a novel in vitro model of oval cell lines expressing a mutant tyrosine kinase-inactive form of c-Met we demonstrated that autocrine c-Met signalling plays an essential role in promoting oval cell survival. Here, we investigated the significance of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling in oval cell proliferation and survival, as well as a potential functional crosstalk between the c-Met and the EGFR pathways. We found an autocrine activation of the EGFR-triggered pathway in Met(flx/flx) and Met(-/-) oval cells as judged by constitutive expression of the EGFR ligands, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-α) and heparin-binding EGF like growth factor (HB-EGF), and activation of EGFR. On the other hand, treatment with AG1478, a specific inhibitor of EGFR, effectively blocked endogenous and EGF-induced proliferation, while increased serum withdrawal and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β)-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that constitutively activated EGFR might promote oval cell proliferation and survival. We found that hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) does not transactivate EGFR nor EGF transactivates c-Met. Furthermore, treatment with AG1478 or EGFR gene silencing did not interfere with HGF-mediated activation of target signals, such as protein kinase B (AKT/PKB), and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK 1/2), nor did it have any effect on HGF-induced proliferative and antiapoptotic activities in Met(flx/flx) cells, showing that HGF does not require EGFR activation to mediate such responses. EGF induced proliferation and survival equally in Met(flx/flx) and Met(-/-) oval cells, proving that EGFR signalling does not depend on c-Met tyrosine kinase activity. Together, our results provide strong evidence that in

  4. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

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    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  5. Cloning and characterization of a mouse liver-specific gene mfrep-1, upregulated in liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Human fibrinogen-related protein-1/liver fibrinogen-related protein-1 (HFREP-1/LFIRE-1), a liver-specificprotein, is a member of fibrinogen superfamily that exerts various biological activities. However, the func-tion of HFREP-1/LFIRE-1 in liver remains unknown. Here we isolated its mouse ortholog gene-mousefibrinogen-related protein-1 (mfrep-1), which encoded 314 amino acids, exhibiting 80.4% similarity toHFREP-1/LFIRE-1. Northern blot analysis revealed that 1.2-kb mfrep-1 mRNA was detected selectivelyin mouse liver. To explore the function of MFREP-1, we examined the levels of mfrep-1 mRNA duringregeneration after 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx) in mice. mfrep-1 mRNA increased in the regeneratingliver and reached the first shoulder peak at 2-4 h after PHx. Cycloheximide pretreatment could suppress theinduction of mfrep-1, indicating the up-regulation of this gene need de novo protein synthesis. Its mRNAcontinued to elevate at 6 h thereafter and reached the second peak at 24 h. The enhanced expression ofmfrep-1 maintained high until 72 h and then declined slowly to the basal level. Immunohistochemistryassessment confirmed the up-regulated expression of MFREP-1 protein in parenchymal cells during liverregeneration. These data suggested that MFREP-1 might play an important role in liver regeneration andbe involved in the regulation of cell growth.

  6. Mechanistic Investigation of Toxaphene Induced Mouse Liver Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zemin; Neal, Barbara H; Lamb, James C; Klaunig, James E

    2015-10-01

    Chronic exposure to toxaphene resulted in an increase in liver tumors in B6C3F1 mice. This study was performed to investigate the mode of action of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors. Following an initial 14 day dietary dose range-finding study in male mice, a mechanistic study (0, 3, 32, and 320 ppm toxaphene in diet for 7, 14, and 28 days of treatment) was performed to examine the potential mechanisms of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors. Toxaphene induced a significant increase in expression of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) target genes (Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11) at 32 and 320 ppm toxaphene. aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) target genes (Cyp1a1 and Cyp1a2) were slightly increased in expression at the highest toxaphene dose (320 ppm). No increase in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha activity or related genes was seen following toxaphene treatment. Lipid peroxidation was seen following treatment with 320 ppm toxaphene. These changes correlated with increases in hepatic DNA synthesis. To confirm the role of CAR in this mode of action, CAR knockout mice (CAR(-/-)) treated with toxaphene confirmed that the induction of CAR responsive genes seen in wild-type mice was abolished following treatment with toxaphene for 14 days. These findings, taken together with previously reported studies, support the mode of action of toxaphene induced mouse liver tumors is through a nongenotoxic mechanism involving primarily a CAR-mediated processes that results in an increase in cell proliferation in the liver, promotes the clonal expansion of preneoplastic lesions leading to adenoma formation.

  7. Human Muse cells, non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, have the capacity for liver regeneration by specific homing and replenishment of new hepatocytes in liver fibrosis mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Masahiro; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Akimoto, Takahiro; Mizuma, Masamichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Asada, Ryuta; Shimizu, Shinobu; Unno, Michiaki; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-11-02

    Muse cells, a novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells reside in the bone marrow, skin and adipose tissue, are collectable as cells positive for pluripotent surface marker SSEA-3. They are able to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers. The capacity of intravenously injected human bone marrow-Muse cells to repair the liver fibrosis model of immunodeficient mice was evaluated in this study. They exhibited the ability for differentiation spontaneously into hepatoblast/hepatocyte-lineage cells and high migration toward the serum and liver tissue of carbon tetrachloride-treated mice in vitro. In vivo, they specifically accumulated into the liver, but not into other organs except the lower rate in the lung at 2 weeks after intravenous injection into the liver fibrosis model. After homing, Muse cells spontaneously differentiated in vivo into HepPar-1 (71.1±15.2%), human albumin (54.3±8.2%) and anti-trypsin (47.9±4.6%)-positive cells without fusing with host hepatocytes, and expressed mature functional markers such as human-CYP1A2, and human-Glc-6-Pase, at 8 weeks. Recovery in serum total bilirubin and albumin, and significant attenuation of fibrosis were recognized with statistical differences between the Muse group and control groups which received the vehicle or the same number of non-Muse cells, namely cells other than Muse cells in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, unlike ES and iPS cells, Muse cells are unique in their efficient migration and integration into damaged liver only by intravenous injection, nontumorigenicity, and spontaneous differentiation into hepatocytes, rendering induction into hepatocytes prior to transplantation unnecessary. They are suggested to repair liver fibrosis in two simple steps; expansion after collection from the bone marrow and intravenous injection. Such feasible strategy might provide impressive regenerative performance to liver disease patients.

  8. CD8+ T cells from a novel T cell receptor transgenic mouse induce liver-stage immunity that can be boosted by blood-stage infection in rodent malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Lei Shong; Fernandez-Ruiz, Daniel; Mollard, Vanessa; Sturm, Angelika; Neller, Michelle A; Cozijnsen, Anton; Gregory, Julia L; Davey, Gayle M; Jones, Claerwen M; Lin, Yi-Hsuan; Haque, Ashraful; Engwerda, Christian R; Nie, Catherine Q; Hansen, Diana S; Murphy, Kenneth M; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Miles, John J; Burrows, Scott R; de Koning-Ward, Tania; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Carbone, Francis R; Crabb, Brendan S; Heath, William R

    2014-05-01

    To follow the fate of CD8+ T cells responsive to Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) infection, we generated an MHC I-restricted TCR transgenic mouse line against this pathogen. T cells from this line, termed PbT-I T cells, were able to respond to blood-stage infection by PbA and two other rodent malaria species, P. yoelii XNL and P. chabaudi AS. These PbT-I T cells were also able to respond to sporozoites and to protect mice from liver-stage infection. Examination of the requirements for priming after intravenous administration of irradiated sporozoites, an effective vaccination approach, showed that the spleen rather than the liver was the main site of priming and that responses depended on CD8α+ dendritic cells. Importantly, sequential exposure to irradiated sporozoites followed two days later by blood-stage infection led to augmented PbT-I T cell expansion. These findings indicate that PbT-I T cells are a highly versatile tool for studying multiple stages and species of rodent malaria and suggest that cross-stage reactive CD8+ T cells may be utilized in liver-stage vaccine design to enable boosting by blood-stage infections.

  9. Gene expression profile analysis of type 2 diabetic mouse liver.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zhang

    Full Text Available Liver plays a key role in glucose metabolism and homeostasis, and impaired hepatic glucose metabolism contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes. However, the precise gene expression profile of diabetic liver and its association with diabetes and related diseases are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we detected the gene expression profile by high-throughput sequencing in 9-week-old normal and type 2 diabetic db/db mouse liver. Totally 12132 genes were detected, and 2627 genes were significantly changed in diabetic mouse liver. Biological process analysis showed that the upregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Surprisingly, the downregulated genes in diabetic mouse liver were mainly enriched in immune-related processes, although all the altered genes were still mainly enriched in metabolic processes. Similarly, KEGG pathway analysis showed that metabolic pathways were the major pathways altered in diabetic mouse liver, and downregulated genes were enriched in immune and cancer pathways. Analysis of the key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism showed that some key enzyme genes were significantly increased and none of the detected key enzyme genes were decreased. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and hepatitis were most likely to be associated with diabetes. Taken together, this study provides the digital gene expression profile of diabetic mouse liver, and demonstrates the main diabetes-associated hepatic biological processes, pathways, key enzyme genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism and potential hepatic diseases.

  10. Variables influencing DNA-binding in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, H G

    1987-01-01

    The suitability of certain mouse strains for carcinogenicity testing has been questioned. Some chemicals increase the incidence of liver tumors above a relatively high background, an effect not seen in rats. This raises the question whether species and tissue specific effects are involved which are reflected in the DNA binding of metabolites. DNA binding indices in mouse liver have been determined in only a few instances. They are comparable to those found for rat liver DNA with aniline, benzo(a)-pyrene, butadiene, dimethylnitrosamine, methylnitrosourea and they are lower in the mouse with aflatoxin B1, trans-4-acetylaminostilbene and 2-aminofluorene derivatives. The available data on DNA binding in mouse liver suggest that the same adducts are formed as in rats but that metabolism and repair are variables which can modify the extent of DNA damage. However, the extent of DNA binding does not always correlate with the susceptibility of this tissue to carcinogenesis. But mouse liver is no exception in this respect. It is concluded that the formation of mouse liver tumors in long term studies with genotoxic chemicals indicates tumor initiating potential. In contrast, there are other chemicals such as chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides which do not bind to DNA to any extent and which are not genotoxic in common short term tests and yet give rise to liver tumors in mice but not in rats. Positive results in long term studies are suggested to indicate promoting properties of such compounds.

  11. Histological changes in mouse liver and spleen caused by different Coxiella burnetii antigenic preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokorin, I N; Pushkareva, V I; Kazár, J; Schramek, S

    1985-09-01

    The effect was examined on mouse liver and spleen (inbred line A) of intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation of phase I Coxiella burnetii (C.b.) cells either untreated or treated with chloroform-methanol (CM) mixture in comparison to the trichloracetic acid extract (TCAE) from phase I C.b.) cells. The phase I C.b. cells were highly toxic as manifested by marked hepatosplenomegaly accompanied with hyperplastic, degenerative and necrotic changes in the liver. By contrast, phase I CM--treated C.b. cells and TCAE were nontoxic as evidenced by the absence of any distinct pathological changes in mouse viscera.

  12. Role of interleukin-1 and its antagonism of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and liver fibrosis in the Abcb4-/- mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Florian P; Wimmer, Ralf; Wottke, Lena; Artmann, Renate; Nagel, Jutta M; Carranza, Manuel O; Mayr, Doris; Rust, Christian; Fickert, Peter; Trauner, Michael; Gerbes, Alexander L; Hohenester, Simon; Denk, Gerald U

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the interleukin-1 (IL-1) pathway as a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis in vitro and in vivo using the ATP-binding cassette transporter b4-/- (Abcb4-/-) mouse model. METHODS: Female and male Abcb4-/- mice from 6 to 13 mo of age were analysed for the degree of cholestasis (liver serum tests), extent of liver fibrosis (hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining) and tissue-specific activation of signalling pathways such as the IL-1 pathway [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. For in vivo experiments, murine hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were isolated via pronase-collagenase perfusion followed by density gradient centrifugation using female mice. Murine HSCs were stimulated with up to 1 ng/mL IL-1β with or without 2.5 μg/mL Anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, respectively. The proliferation of murine HSCs was assessed via the BrdU assay. The toxicity of Anakinra was evaluated via the fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis (FDH) assay. In vivo 8-wk-old Abcb4-/- mice with an already fully established hepatic phenotype were treated with Anakinra (1 mg/kg body-weight daily intraperitoneally) or vehicle and liver injury and liver fibrosis were evaluated via serum tests, qPCR, hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining. RESULTS: Liver fibrosis was less pronounced in males than in female Abcb4-/- animals as defined by a lower hydroxyproline content (274 ± 64 μg/g vs 436 ± 80 μg/g liver, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.001; Mann-Whitney U-test) and lower mRNA expression of the profibrogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP) (1 ± 0.41 vs 0.66 ± 0.33 fold, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). Reduced liver fibrosis was associated with significantly lower levels of F4/80 mRNA expression (1 ± 0.28 vs 0.71 ± 0.41 fold, respectively; n = 12-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test) and significantly lower IL-1β mRNA expression levels (1 ± 0.38 vs 0.44 ± 0.26 fold, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.001; Mann

  13. Proteomic analysis of regenerating mouse liver following 50% partial hepatectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Hongcui; Yu, Jiong; Xu, Wei; Jia, Xiaofei; Yang, Jinfeng; Pan, Qiaoling; Zhang, Qiyi; Sheng, Guoping; Li, Jun; Pan, Xiaoping; Wang, Yingjie; Li, Lanjuan

    2009-01-01

    Background Although 70% (or 2/3) partial hepatectomy (PH) is the most studied model for liver regeneration, the hepatic protein expression profile associated with lower volume liver resection (such as 50% PH) has not yet been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the global protein expression profile of the regenerating mouse liver following 50% PH by differential proteomics, and thereby gaining some insights into the hepatic regeneration mechanism(s) under this milder b...

  14. Proteomic analysis of regenerating mouse liver following 50% partial hepatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Xiaoping

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although 70% (or 2/3 partial hepatectomy (PH is the most studied model for liver regeneration, the hepatic protein expression profile associated with lower volume liver resection (such as 50% PH has not yet been reported. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the global protein expression profile of the regenerating mouse liver following 50% PH by differential proteomics, and thereby gaining some insights into the hepatic regeneration mechanism(s under this milder but clinically more relevant condition. Results Proteins from sham-operated mouse livers and livers regenerating for 24 h after 50% PH were separated by SDS-PAGE and analyzed by nanoUPLC-Q-Tof mass spectrometry. Compared to sham-operated group, there were totally 87 differentially expressed proteins (with 50 up-regulated and 37 down-regulated ones identified in the regenerating mouse livers, most of which have not been previously related to liver regeneration. Remarkably, over 25 differentially expressed proteins were located at mitochondria. Several of the mitochondria-resident proteins which play important roles in citric acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production were found to be down-regulated, consistent with the recently-proposed model in which the reduction of ATP content in the remnant liver gives rise to early stress signals that contribute to the onset of liver regeneration. Pathway analysis revealed a central role of c-Myc in the regulation of liver regeneration. Conclusions Our study provides novel evidence for mitochondria as a pivotal organelle that is connected to liver regeneration, and lays the foundation for further studies on key factors and pathways involved in liver regeneration following 50% PH, a condition frequently used for partial liver transplantation and conservative liver resection.

  15. Liver transplantation in the mouse: Insights into liver immunobiology, tissue injury, and allograft tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Osamu; Ono, Yoshihiro; Geller, David A; Thomson, Angus W

    2016-04-01

    The surgically demanding mouse orthotopic liver transplant model was first described in 1991. It has proved to be a powerful research tool for the investigation of liver biology, tissue injury, the regulation of alloimmunity and tolerance induction, and the pathogenesis of specific liver diseases. Liver transplantation in mice has unique advantages over transplantation of the liver in larger species, such as the rat or pig, because the mouse genome is well characterized and there is much greater availability of both genetically modified animals and research reagents. Liver transplant experiments using various transgenic or gene knockout mice have provided valuable mechanistic insights into the immunobiology and pathobiology of the liver and the regulation of graft rejection and tolerance over the past 25 years. The molecular pathways identified in the regulation of tissue injury and promotion of liver transplant tolerance provide new potential targets for therapeutic intervention to control adverse inflammatory responses/immune-mediated events in the hepatic environment and systemically. In conclusion, orthotopic liver transplantation in the mouse is a valuable model for gaining improved insights into liver biology, immunopathology, and allograft tolerance that may result in therapeutic innovation in the liver and in the treatment of other diseases.

  16. 高效氯氰菊酯对小鼠肝细胞的氧化损伤%Oxidative damages of beta-cypermethrin on mouse liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马萍; 秦龙娟; 张亚然; 杜娟; 尤会会; 杨旭

    2012-01-01

    This study was aimed at identifying the oxidative stress effects of beta-cypermethrin on organisms. Mice were orally administrated with betacypermethrin for seven days at the concentration of 10, 20 and 40 mg· kg- 1 , respectively. The contents of ROS, GSH, and MDA in the liver homogenate and DPC coefficients in the liver cells were measured to indicate the oxidative damages. The experimental results showed that the contents of ROS, MDA and DPC coefficients increased gradually while GSH content decreased with the increasing exposure dose. All the biomarkers were in the exposure doseresponse manner. When exposure dose was over 20 mg·kg-1 , ROS content and DPC coefficient were significantly higher than the control group (p 〈 0.05) ; in the higher dose groups ( I〉 40 rag·kg - 1) , GSH and MDA contents indicated significant differences compared with the control group (p 〈 0. 05), and DPC coefficient had extremely significant differences (p 〈 0.01 ). These experimental results demonstrated that beta-cypermethrin can increase the oxidative stress and DNA-protein crosslinks in mouse liver at high doses.%为了探讨高效氯氰菊酯对生物体的氧化损伤,以昆明小鼠为受试体,高效氯氰菊酯按10、和40mg·kg20-13个剂量水平,灌胃染毒小鼠7d,并以肝匀浆测定活性氧自由基(ROS)、还原型谷胱甘肽(GSH)、丙二醛(MDA)含量,以肝细胞测定DNA-蛋白质交联(DPC)系数.实验结果表明,随着高效氯氰菊酯染毒剂量的升高,ROS和MDA含量及DPC系数逐渐上升,GSH含量逐渐降低,各指标呈一定的剂量-效应关系.染毒剂量≥20mg·kg-1时,处理组的ROS含量和DPC系数与对照组有显著差异(p〈0.05);染毒剂量≥40mg·kg-1时,GSH和MDA含量与对照组有显著差异(p〈0.05),DPC系数有极显著差异(p〈0.01).说明较高剂量的高效氯氰菊酯可造成小鼠肝脏的氧化损伤和DNA-蛋白质交联作用增强.

  17. Transcriptomic profiling of trichloroethylene exposure in male mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Trichloroethylene (TCE exposure could induce hepatocellular carcinoma in mice, and occupational exposure in humans was suggested to be associated with liver cancer. To understand the role of non-genotoxic mechanism(s for TCE action, we examined the gene expression and DNA methylation changes in the liver of B6C3F1 mice orally administered with TCE for 5 days. As a beginning step, we profiled gene expression alterations induced by the TCE in mouse livers. Here we describe in detail the experimental methods, quality controls, and other information associated with our data deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO under GSE58819. Our data provide useful information for gene expression responses to TCE in mouse liver.

  18. Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein is required for normal mouse liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunyogova, Eva; Zhou, Haiyan; Maxwell, Gillian K.; Powis, Rachael A.; Francesco, Muntoni; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Parson, Simon H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Decreased levels of, cell-ubiquitous, SMN protein is associated with a range of systemic pathologies reported in severe patients. Despite high levels of SMN protein in normal liver, there is no comprehensive study of liver pathology in SMA. We describe failed liver development in response to reduced SMN levels, in a mouse model of severe SMA. The SMA liver is dark red, small and has: iron deposition; immature sinusoids congested with blood; persistent erythropoietic elements and increased immature red blood cells; increased and persistent megakaryocytes which release high levels of platelets found as clot-like accumulations in the heart. Myelopoiesis in contrast, was unaffected. Further analysis revealed significant molecular changes in SMA liver, consistent with the morphological findings. Antisense treatment from birth with PMO25, increased lifespan and ameliorated all morphological defects in liver by postnatal day 21. Defects in the liver are evident at birth, prior to motor system pathology, and impair essential liver function in SMA. Liver is a key recipient of SMA therapies, and systemically delivered antisense treatment, completely rescued liver pathology. Liver therefore, represents an important therapeutic target in SMA. PMID:27698380

  19. Towards a Humanized Mouse Model of Liver Stage Malaria Using Ectopic Artificial Livers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shengyong; March, Sandra; Galstian, Ani; Gural, Nil; Stevens, Kelly R.; Mota, Maria M.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2017-01-01

    The malaria liver stage is an attractive target for antimalarial development, and preclinical malaria models are essential for testing such candidates. Given ethical concerns and costs associated with non‐human primate models, humanized mouse models containing chimeric human livers offer a valuable alternative as small animal models of liver stage human malaria. The best available human liver chimeric mice rely on cellular transplantation into mice with genetically engineered liver injury, but these systems involve a long and variable humanization process, are expensive, and require the use of breeding-challenged mouse strains which are not widely accessible. We previously incorporated primary human hepatocytes into engineered polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based nanoporous human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs), implanted them in mice without liver injury, and rapidly generated human liver chimeric mice in a reproducible and scalable fashion. By re-designing the PEG scaffold to be macroporous, we demonstrate the facile fabrication of implantable porous HEALs that support liver stage human malaria (P. falciparum) infection in vitro, and also after implantation in mice with normal liver function, 60% of the time. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the feasibility of applying a tissue engineering strategy towards the development of scalable preclinical models of liver stage malaria infection for future applications. PMID:28361899

  20. Modulation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid Counteracts Apoptotic Cell Death and Fibrosis in a Mouse Model for Secondary Biliary Liver Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paridaens, Annelies; Raevens, Sarah; Devisscher, Lindsey; Bogaerts, Eliene; Verhelst, Xavier; Hoorens, Anne; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; van Grunsven, Leo A; Geerts, Anja; Colle, Isabelle

    2017-01-20

    The role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cholestatic liver disease and fibrosis is not fully unraveled. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a hydrophilic bile acid, has been shown to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and counteract apoptosis in different pathologies. We aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of TUDCA in experimental secondary biliary liver fibrosis in mice, induced by common bile duct ligation. The kinetics of the hepatic UPR and apoptosis during the development of biliary fibrosis was studied by measuring markers at six different timepoints post-surgery by qPCR and Western blot. Next, we investigated the therapeutic potential of TUDCA, 10 mg/kg/day in drinking water, on liver damage (AST/ALT levels) and fibrosis (Sirius red-staining), in both a preventive and therapeutic setting. Common bile duct ligation resulted in the increased protein expression of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP) at all timepoints, along with upregulation of pro-apoptotic caspase 3 and 12, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 1A (TNFRsf1a) and Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) expression. Treatment with TUDCA led to a significant reduction of liver fibrosis, accompanied by a slight reduction of liver damage, decreased hepatic protein expression of CHOP and reduced gene and protein expression of pro-apoptotic markers. These data indicate that TUDCA exerts a beneficial effect on liver fibrosis in a model of cholestatic liver disease, and suggest that this effect might, at least in part, be attributed to decreased hepatic UPR signaling and apoptotic cell death.

  1. Retinoic acid enhances expression of neural specific genes in Sca-1+ cells of mouse fetal liver through activating protein kinase C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gexiu Liu; Yuan Zhang; Dongmei He

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interstitial stem cell is characterized by multiple differentiations,and retinoic acid (RA) can induce differentiation of stromal cells into nerve tissue cells in fetal liver of mice, so, its signal transduction pathway should be discussed to trigger differentiation.OBJECTIVE: To study the effect of RA on expression of neural specific gene and its signal transduction in fetal liver of mice.DESIGN: Paired controlled study on the basis of cell.SETTING: Institute of Hematology, Medical College of Jinan University.MATERIALS: The experiment was completed in the Institute of Hematology, Medical College of Jinan University from April to December 2005. C57BL/6 mice, of clean grade, aged 8-10 weeks, weighting 20-35 g,10 females and 4 males, were selected in this study.METHODS: Sca-1+ cells in fetal liver were prepared with MACS kit and cultured with DMEM + 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). On the fourth day, it was added with or without protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor chelerythrine chloride (3 μmol/L) and 5×10-7 mol/L RA for 24 hours, and then incubated in serum-free medium for 5 days. Expressions of genes were assayed by Western blotting and semi-quantitative RT-PCR.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Expression of neural specific gene NF-L, NF-H, BF-1 and TH.RESULTS: Expression of neural specific gene NF-L, NF-H, BF-1 and TH was significantly increased after treatment with RA and they were increased 5.06, 5.15, 4.63 and 3.33 times, respectively. However, chelerythrine chloride could inhibit expression of neural specific gene NF-L, NF-H, BF-1 and TH induced by RA.CONCLUSION: RA can promote the expression of neural specific genes in Sca-1+ cells of fetal liver, and its pathway may be related to PKC.

  2. Psychosine-induced alterations in peroxisomes of Twitcher Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Miguel Agustin; Haq, Ehtishamul; Uto, Takuhiro; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar Kaur

    2008-01-01

    Krabbe’s disease is a neuroinflammatory disorder in which galactosylsphingosine (psychosine) accumulates in nervous tissue. To gain insight into whether the psychosine-induced effects in nervous tissue extend to peripheral organs, we investigated the expression of cytokines and their effects on peroxisomal structure/function in twitcher mouse liver (animal model of Krabbe disease). Immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated TNF-α and IL-6 expression, which was confirmed by mRNAs quantitation. Despite the presence of TNF-α, lipidomic analysis did not indicate a significant decrease in sphingomyelin or an increase in ceramide fractions. Ultrastructural analysis of catalase-dependent staining of liver sections showed reduced reactivity without significant changes in peroxisomal contents. This observation was confirmed by assaying catalase activity and quantitation of its mRNA, both of which were found significantly decreased in twitcher mouse liver. Western blot analysis demonstrated a generalized reduction of peroxisomal matrix and membrane proteins. These observations indicate that twitcher mouse pathobiology extends to the liver, where the induction of TNF-α and IL-6 compromise peroxisomal structure and function. PMID:18602885

  3. Role of interleukin-1 and its antagonism of hepatic stellate cell proliferation and liver fibrosis in the Abcb4-/- mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Florian; P; Reiter; Ralf; Wimmer; Lena; Wottke; Renate; Artmann; Jutta; M; Nagel; Manuel; O; Carranza; Doris; Mayr; Christian; Rust; Peter; Fickert; Michael; Trauner; Alexander; L; Gerbes; Simon; Hohenester; Gerald; U; Denk

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the interleukin-1(IL-1) pathway as a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis in vitro and in vivo using the ATP-binding cassette transporter b4-/-(Abcb4-/-) mouse model.METHODS: Female and male Abcb4-/- mice from 6 to 13 mo of age were analysed for the degree of cholestasis(liver serum tests), extent of liver fibrosis(hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining) and tissue-specific activation of signalling pathways such as the IL-1 pathway [quantitative polymerase chain reaction(q PCR)]. For in vivo experiments, murine hepatic stellate cells(HSCs) were isolated via pronasecollagenase perfusion followed by density gradient centrifugation using female mice. Murine HSCs were stimulated with up to 1 ng/m L IL-1β with or without 2.5 μg/m L Anakinra, an IL-1 receptor antagonist, respectively. The proliferation of murine HSCs was assessed via the Brd U assay. The toxicity of Anakinra was evaluated via the fluorescein diacetate hydrolysis(FDH) assay. In vivo 8-wk-old Abcb4-/- mice with an already fully established hepatic phenotype were treated with Anakinra(1 mg/kg body-weight daily intraperitoneally) or vehicle and liver injury and liver fibrosis were evaluated via serum tests, q PCR, hydroxyproline content and Sirius red staining. RESULTS: Liver fibrosis was less pronounced in males than in female Abcb4-/- animals as defined by a lower hydroxyproline content(274 ± 64 μg/g vs 436 ± 80 μg/g liver, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.001; MannWhitney U-test) and lower m RNA expression of the profibrogenic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1(TIMP)(1 ± 0.41 vs 0.66 ± 0.33 fold, respectively; n = 13-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test). Reduced liver fibrosis was associated with significantly lower levels of F4/80 m RNA expression(1 ± 0.28 vs 0.71 ± 0.41 fold, respectively; n = 12-15; P < 0.05; Mann-Whitney U-test) and significantly lower IL-1β m RNA expression levels(1 ± 0.38 vs 0.44 ± 0.26 fold

  4. Mouse cell culture - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases, starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward and David Tosh provide a necessary update of the protocols currently needed. In fact, nearly half of the book is devoted to stem cells culture protocols, mainly embryonic, from a list of several organs (kidney, lung, oesophagus and intestine, pancreas and liver to mention some........

  5. Function of GATA Factors in the Adult Mouse Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Rena; Rebolledo-Jaramillo, Boris; Zong, Yiwei; Wang, Liqing; Russo, Pierre; Hancock, Wayne; Stanger, Ben Z.; Hardison, Ross C.; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2013-01-01

    GATA transcription factors and their Friend of Gata (FOG) cofactors control the development of diverse tissues. GATA4 and GATA6 are essential for the expansion of the embryonic liver bud, but their expression patterns and functions in the adult liver are unclear. We characterized the expression of GATA and FOG factors in whole mouse liver and purified hepatocytes. GATA4, GATA6, and FOG1 are the most prominently expressed family members in whole liver and hepatocytes. GATA4 chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 4409 occupied sites, associated with genes enriched in ontologies related to liver function, including lipid and glucose metabolism. However, hepatocyte-specific excision of Gata4 had little impact on gross liver architecture and function, even under conditions of regenerative stress, and, despite the large number of GATA4 occupied genes, resulted in relatively few changes in gene expression. To address possible redundancy between GATA4 and GATA6, both factors were conditionally excised. Surprisingly, combined Gata4,6 loss did not exacerbate the phenotype resulting from Gata4 loss alone. This points to the presence of an unusually robust transcriptional network in adult hepatocytes that ensures the maintenance of liver function. PMID:24367609

  6. [Cytoskeletal reorganization in hepatocytes of the regenerating mouse liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleĭberman, A S; Troianovskiĭ, S M; Bannikov, G A

    1984-12-01

    The intracellular pattern of prekeratin and actin filaments has been studied on sections of mouse livers regenerating after CCl4 injury. Monoclonal antibodies against one of liver prekeratins and monospecific polyclonal actin antibodies were used in the indirect immunofluorescent test. The presence of alpha-fetoprotein and bile canaliculi antigen was also monitored during regeneration. In control livers, prekeratin and actin filaments formed thick bundles adjacent to plasma membranes. The cytoplasmic prekeratin network was unmarked. In contrast to the latter, the bright well developed intracytoplasmic prekeratin network and intracytoplasmic actin fibers were identified in the perinecrotic hepatocytes by the 3d-4th day of regeneration. This rearrangement of the cytoskeleton coincided in time with the appearance of alpha-fetoprotein and the loss of the bile canaliculi antigen in the perinecrotic hepatocytes.

  7. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  8. Zonal induction of mixed lineage kinase ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression in regenerating mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douziech, M; Grondin, G; Loranger, A; Marceau, N; Blouin, R

    1998-08-28

    ZPK/DLK/MUK is a serine/theronine kinase believed to be involved in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation. To further explore the suggested participation of ZPK/DLK/MUK in this process, we examined the expression and cellular localization of ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNA in regenerating mouse liver following partial hepatectomy by ribonuclease protection assay and in situ hybridization. The steady-state level of APK/DLKMUK mRNA was very low in normal and sham-operated mouse livers, whereas a marked and transient increase was observed in the regenerating liver. While ZPK/DLK/MUK mRNAs were rarely detected in hepatocytes from all zones of the normal liver, hepatocytes of regenerating liver exhibit a gradient of expression ranging from low in the periportal zone, to intermediate in the mid-zone, to high in the pericentral zone. These findings demonstrate a transient stimulation of ZPK/DLK/MUK gene expression that correlates with the growth response of hepatocyte subpopulations in regenerating liver.

  9. Role of liver functions on liver cell mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takata,Tameyuki

    1974-06-01

    Full Text Available The control mechanism of mitosis in the regenerating rat liver was studied in relation to the cell functions. Partial hepatec· tomy induces a series of changes prior to the initiation of mitosis, i. e. decrease in serum glucose and albumin levels, loss of glycogen from liver cells, and increased lipid mobilization to liver cells. Massive supplies of glucose and fructose suppressed significantly hepatocellu. lar mitosis with suppression of lipid accumulation and preservation of glycogen in the liver cells and of blood sugar level. Homologous serum administration also suppressed the rate of liver cell mitosis after hepatectomy preventing the decrease in serum albumin level, but did not suppress the lipid accumulation in the liver. Starvation, which would relieve the liver cell from the work of detoxication of intesti. nal toxic products, did not show any suppressive effect on the mitotic rate of liver cells after partial hepatectomy in single animals. But starvation induced severe hypoglycemia, moderate hypoalbuminemia and loss of glycogen content in the liver. These changes in metabo. lism by starvation and partial hepatectomy were suppressed by con· jugating the animals with nonhepatectomized fed.partners by aortic anastomosis, and mitosis was suppressed in the residual liver of the fasting animals in this parabiosis. The results indicate that all the major functions of parenchymal live cells tested, sugar metabolism, serum albumin production, and detoxication, are closely related to the control of liver cell mitosis. Accumulation of lipids in the liver remnant after partial hepatectomy is thought to be for the compensa. tion of reduced glycogen storage and not concerned directly with the liver cell mitosis. Discussion was made briefly on the humoral factor and portal blood factor in relation to excess load of functions on resi. dual liver cells.

  10. Evaluation of immunological escape mechanisms in a mouse model of colorectal liver metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Detlef

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The local and systemic activation and regulation of the immune system by malignant cells during carcinogenesis is highly complex with involvement of the innate and acquired immune system. Despite the fact that malignant cells do have antigenic properties their immunogenic effects are minor suggesting tumor induced mechanisms to circumvent cancer immunosurveillance. The aim of this study is the analysis of tumor immune escape mechanisms in a colorectal liver metastases mouse model at different points in time during tumor growth. Methods CT26.WT murine colon carcinoma cells were injected intraportally in Balb/c mice after median laparotomy using a standardized injection technique. Metastatic tumor growth in the liver was examined by standard histological procedures at defined points in time during metastatic growth. Liver tissue with metastases was additionally analyzed for cytokines, T cell markers and Fas/Fas-L expression using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Comparisons were performed by analysis of variance or paired and unpaired t test when appropriate. Results Intraportal injection of colon carcinoma cells resulted in a gradual and time dependent metastatic growth. T cells of regulatory phenotype (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ which might play a role in protumoral immune response were found to infiltrate peritumoral tissue increasingly during carcinogenesis. Expression of cytokines IL-10, TGF-β and TNF-α were increased during tumor growth whereas IFN-γ showed a decrease of the expression from day 10 on following an initial increase. Moreover, liver metastases of murine colon carcinoma show an up-regulation of FAS-L on tumor cell surface with a decreased expression of FAS from day 10 on. CD8+ T cells express FAS and show an increased rate of apoptosis at perimetastatic location. Conclusions This study describes cellular and macromolecular changes contributing to immunological escape mechanisms during metastatic

  11. A study of structural differences between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells using FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Daping; Xu, Fangcheng; Yu, Qiang; Fang, Tingting; Xia, Junjun; Li, Seruo; Wang, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Since liver cancer seriously threatens human health, it is very urgent to explore an effective method for diagnosing liver cancer early. In this study, we investigated the structure differences of IR spectra between neoplastic liver cells and normal liver cells. The major differences of absorption bands were observed between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells, the values of A2955/A2921, A1744/A1082, A1640/A1535, H1121/H1020 might be potentially useful factors for distinguishing liver cancer cells from normal liver cells. Curve fitting also provided some important information on structural differences between malignant and normal liver cancer cells. Furthermore, IR spectra combined with hierarchical cluster analysis could make a distinction between liver cancer cells and normal liver cells. The present results provided enough cell basis for diagnosis of liver cancer by FTIR spectroscopy, suggesting FTIR spectroscopy may be a potentially useful tool for liver cancer diagnosis.

  12. Liver BCATm transgenic mouse model reveals the important role of the liver in maintaining BCAA homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananieva, Elitsa A; Van Horn, Cynthia G; Jones, Meghan R; Hutson, Susan M

    2017-02-01

    Unlike other amino acids, the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) largely bypass first-pass liver degradation due to a lack of hepatocyte expression of the mitochondrial branched-chain aminotransferase (BCATm). This sets up interorgan shuttling of BCAAs and liver-skeletal muscle cooperation in BCAA catabolism. To explore whether complete liver catabolism of BCAAs may impact BCAA shuttling in peripheral tissues, the BCATm gene was stably introduced into mouse liver. Two transgenic mouse lines with low and high hepatocyte expression of the BCATm transgene (LivTg-LE and LivTg-HE) were created and used to measure liver and plasma amino acid concentrations and determine whether the first two BCAA enzymatic steps in liver, skeletal muscle, heart and kidney were impacted. Expression of the hepatic BCATm transgene lowered the concentrations of hepatic BCAAs while enhancing the concentrations of some nonessential amino acids. Extrahepatic BCAA metabolic enzymes and plasma amino acids were largely unaffected, and no growth rate or body composition differences were observed in the transgenic animals as compared to wild-type mice. Feeding the transgenic animals a high-fat diet did not reverse the effect of the BCATm transgene on the hepatic BCAA catabolism, nor did the high-fat diet cause elevation in plasma BCAAs. However, the high-fat-diet-fed BCATm transgenic animals experienced attenuation in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the liver and had impaired blood glucose tolerance. These results suggest that complete liver BCAA metabolism influences the regulation of glucose utilization during diet-induced obesity.

  13. Experimental study of bioartificial liver with cultured human liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    AIM To establish an extracorporeal bioartificial liver support system (EBLSS) using cultured human liver cells and to study its support effect for fulminant hepatic failure (FHF).METHODS The liver support experiment of EBLSS consisting of aggregates cultured human liver cells, hollow fiber bioreactor, and circulation unit was carried out in dizhepatic dogs.RESULTS The viability of isolated hepatocytes and nonparenchymal liver cells reached 96%. These cells were successfully cultured as multicellular spheroids with synthetic technique. The typical morphological appearance was retained up to the end of the artificial liver experiment. Compared with the control dogs treated with EBLSS without liver cells, the survival time of artificial liver support dogs was significantly prolonged. The changes of blood pressure, heart rate and ECG were slow. Both serum ammonia and lactate levels were significantly lowered at the 3rd h and 5th h. In addition, a good viability of human liver cells was noted after 5 h experiment.CONCLUSION EBLSS playing a metabolic role of cultured human hepatocytes, is capable of compensating the function of the liver, and could provide effective artificial liver support and therapy for patients with FHF.

  14. Thiamethoxam induced mouse liver tumors and their relevance to humans. Part 2: species differences in response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Trevor; Toghill, Alison; Lee, Robert; Waechter, Felix; Weber, Edgar; Peffer, Richard; Noakes, James; Robinson, Mervyn

    2005-07-01

    Thiamethoxam is a neonicotinoid insecticide that is not a mutagen, but it did cause a significant increase in liver cancer in mice, but not rats, in chronic dietary feeding studies. Previous studies in mice have characterized a carcinogenicity mode of action that involved depletion of plasma cholesterol, cell death, both as single cell necrosis and as apoptosis, and sustained increases in cell replication rates. In a study reported in this article, female rats have been exposed to thiamethoxam in their diet at concentrations of 0, 1000, and 3000 ppm for 50 weeks, a study design directly comparable to the mouse study in which the mode of action changes were characterized. In rats, thiamethoxam had no adverse effects on either the biochemistry or histopathology of the liver at any time point during the study. Cell replication rates were not increased, in fact they were significantly decreased at several time points. The lack of effect on the rat liver is entirely consistent with the lack of liver tumor formation in the two-year cancer bioassay. Comparisons of the metabolism of thiamethoxam in rats and mice have shown that concentrations of the parent chemical were either similar or higher in rat blood than in mouse blood in both single dose and the dietary studies strongly indicating that thiamethoxam itself is unlikely to play a role in the development of liver tumors. In contrast, the concentrations of the two metabolites, CGA265307 and CGA330050, shown to play a role in the development of liver damage in the mouse, were 140- (CGA265307) and 15- (CGA330050) fold lower in rats than in mice following either a single oral dose, or dietary administration of thiamethoxam for up to 50 weeks. Comparisons of the major metabolic pathways of thiamethoxam in vitro using mouse, rat, and human liver fractions have shown that metabolic rates in humans are lower than those in the rat suggesting that thiamethoxam is unlikely to pose a hazard to humans exposed to this chemical at

  15. Discrimination of tumorigenic triazole conazoles from phenobarbital by transcriptional analyses of mouse liver gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are fungicides used to control fungal growth in environmental settings and to treat humans with fungal infections. Mouse hepatotumorigenic conazoles display many of the same hepatic toxicologic responses as the mouse liver carcinogen phenobarbital (PB): constitutive and...

  16. Discrimination of tumorigenic triazole conazoles from phenobarbital by transcriptional analyses of mouse liver gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conazoles are fungicides used to control fungal growth in environmental settings and to treat humans with fungal infections. Mouse hepatotumorigenic conazoles display many of the same hepatic toxicologic responses as the mouse liver carcinogen phenobarbital (PB): constitutive and...

  17. Role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Bo; Xu; Chao; Liu

    2014-01-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive disease with a high mortality rate. Management of liver cancer is strongly dependent on the tumor stage and underlying liver disease. Unfortunately, most cases are discovered when the cancer is already advanced, missing the opportunity for surgical resection. Thus, an improved understanding of the mechanisms responsible for liver cancer initiation and progression will facilitate the detection of more reliable tumor markers and the development of new small molecules for targeted therapy of liver cancer. Recently, there is increasing evidence for the "cancer stem cell hypothesis", which postulates that liver cancer originates from the malignant transformation of liver stem/progenitor cells(liver cancer stem cells). This cancer stem cell model has important significance for understanding the basic biology of liver cancer and has profound importance for the development of new strategies for cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the role of liver stem cells in hepatocarcinogenesis. Our review of the literature shows that identification of the cellular origin and the signaling pathways involved is challenging issues in liver cancer with pivotal implications in therapeutic perspectives. Although the dedifferentiation of mature hepatocytes/cholangiocytes in hepatocarcinogenesis cannot be excluded, neoplastic transformation of a stem cell subpopulation more easily explains hepatocarcinogenesis. Elimination of liver cancer stem cells in liver cancer could result in the degeneration of downstream cells, which makes them potential targets for liver cancer therapies. Therefore, liver stem cells could represent a new target for therapeutic approaches to liver cancer in the near future.

  18. Laminin and Fibronectin in Cell Adhesion: Enhanced Adhesion of Cells from Regenerating Liver to Laminin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Roland; Engvall, Eva; Freeman, Aaron; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1981-04-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein isolated from cultures of mouse endodermal cells and rat yolk sac carcinoma cells, promoted the attachment of liver cells obtained from regenerating mouse liver. Cells from normal mouse liver attached readily to dishes coated with fibronectin but attached poorly to surfaces coated with laminin. Both proteins efficiently promoted the attachment of cells from livers undergoing regeneration. After regeneration, the attachment to laminin returned to the low levels found in animals not subjected to partial hepatectomy but attachment to fibronectin remained high. Immunofluorescent staining of sections of normal liver with antilaminin revealed the presence of laminin in or adjacent to the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels. After induction of regeneration by partial hepatectomy, increased amounts of laminin appeared in the sinusoidal areas. After carbon tetrachloride poisoning, staining for laminin was especially pronounced in the necrotic and postnecrotic areas around the central veins. This additional expression of laminin was transient. It reached a maximum around 5-6 days after the injury and then gradually disappeared. These findings show that laminin is an adhesive protein. The increase of laminin in regenerating liver and the adhesiveness of cells from such livers to laminin suggest a role for laminin in the maintenance of a proper tissue organization during liver regeneration.

  19. Effects of social isolation stress on immune response and survival time of mouse with liver cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Liu; Zhun Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of isolation stress on mouse with liver cancer and possible associated mechanisms.METHODS: Transplantable murine hepatoma22 (H22) model was used to evaluate the effects of social isolation stress on murine liver cancer. Mice were immunized with sheep red blood cell (SRBC) and intraperitoneally inoculated with H22 cell, then divided into two groups, one reared individually as group (Ⅰ) and the other reared in groups as group (G). Titer of antibody to SRBC and interleukin 2 (IL-2) in serum was monitored. The survival time of mouse with liver cancer was observed.RESULTS: The titer of antibody to SRBC in group (G) was 1:24.5 and that in group (Ⅰ) was 1:11.2. There was a significant difference between these two groups (t = 2.60,P = 0.02). A significant difference in IL-2 concentration was observed between group (G) (39.6 ng/L) and group (Ⅰ) (47.1 ng/L, t= 2.14, P = 0.046). The survival time in group (G) (16.5 d) was markedly longer than that in group (Ⅰ) (13.2 d, t = 3.46, P = 0.002).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that survival time of the mouse bearing H22 tumor is affected by the social isolation stress and the associated mechanism may be the immunological changes under the social isolation stress.

  20. Case Study: Polycystic Livers in a Transgenic Mouse Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Artwohl, James E.; Ward, Christopher J.; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.; Ito, Yoshihiro; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2014-04-01

    Three mice (2 male, 1 female; age, 5 to 16 mo) from a mouse line transgenic for keratin 14 (K14)-driven LacZ expression and on an outbred Crl:CD1(ICR) background, were identified as having distended abdomens and livers that were diffusely enlarged by numerous cysts (diameter, 0.1 to 2.0 cm). Histopathology revealed hepatic cysts lined by biliary type epithelium and mild chronic inflammation, and confirmed the absence of parasites. Among 21 related mice, 5 additional affected mice were identified via laparotomy. Breeding of these 5 mice (after 5 mo of age) did not result in any offspring; the K14 mice with olycystic livers failed to reproduce. Affected male mice had degenerative testicular lesions, and their sperm was immotile. Nonpolycystic K14 control male mice bred well, had no testicular lesions, and had appropriate sperm motility. Genetic analysis did not identify an association of this phenotype with the transgene or insertion site.

  1. Targeted induction of interferon-λ in humanized chimeric mouse liver abrogates hepatotropic virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The interferon (IFN system plays a critical role in innate antiviral response. We presume that targeted induction of IFN in human liver shows robust antiviral effects on hepatitis C virus (HCV and hepatitis B virus (HBV. METHODS: This study used chimeric mice harboring humanized livers and infected with HCV or HBV. This mouse model permitted simultaneous analysis of immune responses by human and mouse hepatocytes in the same liver and exploration of the mechanism of antiviral effect against these viruses. Targeted expression of IFN was induced by treating the animals with a complex comprising a hepatotropic cationic liposome and a synthetic double-stranded RNA analog, pIC (LIC-pIC. Viral replication, IFN gene expression, IFN protein production, and IFN antiviral activity were analyzed (for type I, II and III IFNs in the livers and sera of these humanized chimeric mice. RESULTS: Following treatment with LIC-pIC, the humanized livers of chimeric mice exhibited increased expression (at the mRNA and protein level of human IFN-λs, resulting in strong antiviral effect on HBV and HCV. Similar increases were not seen for human IFN-α or IFN-β in these animals. Strong induction of IFN-λs by LIC-pIC occurred only in human hepatocytes, and not in mouse hepatocytes nor in human cell lines derived from other (non-hepatic tissues. LIC-pIC-induced IFN-λ production was mediated by the immune sensor adaptor molecules mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS and Toll/IL-1R domain-containing adaptor molecule-1 (TICAM-1, suggesting dual recognition of LIC-pIC by both sensor adaptor pathways. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate that the expression and function of various IFNs differ depending on the animal species and tissues under investigation. Chimeric mice harboring humanized livers demonstrate that IFN-λs play an important role in the defense against human hepatic virus infection.

  2. Study of in vivo exposure of single-walled carbon nanotubes in mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Lyndon L.

    Currently, few studies are available that have explored the role of carbon nanoparticles in liver toxicity. The susceptibility of the liver to nanoparticles rises from the inhalation exposure route often encountered during manufacturing and occupational exposure. Persons occupying these types of environmental setting are exposed to airborne nanoparticles less than 100nm, which have unobstructed access to most area of the lungs due to their size. Several reports have shown that single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induce oxidative stress and pose the greatest cytotoxicity potential do to their size. Also, studies in mice indicate nanoparticles tend to accumulate in organs such as the spleen, kidney and liver, which is a major concern due to a lack of knowledge as to their fate. Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (SWCNT's) are able to more easily penetrate through the cell membrane and display higher cell toxicity than Multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCTs), opening the possibility for crossing various biological barriers within the body. Therefore effective occupational and environmental health risk assessments are significant in controlling the manufacture process of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The present study was undertaken to determine the toxicity exhibited by SWCNT in mouse liver tissue as a model system. Mouse exposure during inhalation with and without SWCNT and reactive oxygen species (ROS) products were measured by change in fluorescence using dichloro fluorescein (DCF). The result showed no increase ROS on exposure of SWCNT in a dose and time dependent manner. Also, there is no reduction levels of glutathione (GSH) and super oxide dismutase (SOD), the antioxidant protective mechanism present in mouse liver cells upon SWCNT exposure. Lipid Peroxidation (LPO) and Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) assays indicated no tissue or protein damage. Additionally, Caspases --8 and --3 assays were conducted in order to understand the apoptotic signaling pathways initiated by

  3. The antineoplastic antibiotic taurolidine promotes lung and liver metastasis in two syngeneic osteosarcoma mouse models and exhibits severe liver toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Matthias J E; Walters, Denise K; Banke, Ingo J; Steinmann, Patrick; Puskas, Gabor J; Bertz, Josefine; Rentsch, Katharina M; Ehrensperger, Felix; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2012-09-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most frequent primary bone tumor. Despite multiagent neoadjuvant chemotherapy, patients with metastatic disease have a poor prognosis. Moreover, currently used chemotherapeutics have severe toxic side effects. Thus, novel agents with improved antimetastatic activity and reduced toxicity are needed. Taurolidine, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial, has recently been shown to have antineoplastic properties against a variety of tumors and low systemic toxicity. Consequently, we investigated in our study the antineoplastic potential of taurolidine against OS in two different mouse models. Although both OS cell lines, K7M2 and LM8, were sensitive for the compound in vitro, intraperitoneal application of taurolidine failed to inhibit primary tumor growth. Moreover, it enhanced the metastatic load in both models 1.7- to 20-fold and caused severe liver deformations and up to 40% mortality. Thus, systemic toxicity was further investigated in tumor-free mice histologically, by electron microscopy and by measurements of representative liver enzymes. Taurolidine dose-dependent fibrous thickening of the liver capsule and adhesions and atrophies of the liver lobes were comparable in healthy and tumor-bearing mice. Liver toxicity was further indicated by up to eightfold elevated levels of the liver enzymes alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and GLDH in the circulation. Ultrastructural analysis of affected liver tissue showed swollen mitochondria with cristolysis and numerous lipid vacuoles in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. The findings of our study question the applicability of taurolidine for OS treatment and may suggest the need for caution regarding the widespread clinical use of taurolidine as an antineoplastic agent.

  4. Human endostatin gene transfer, either naked or with liposome, has the same inhibitory effect on growth of mouse liver tumor cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-Hong; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Li-Fen; Liu, Hua; Guo, Chun; Liu, Su-Xia; Cao, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Li-Ning; Sun, Wen-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore a safe and efficient strategy of tumor therapy using anti-angiogenetic agents. METHODS: Endostatin gene with a signal sequence of human IgG γ chain was amplified by PCR and cloned into pVAX1 plasmid which was the only vector authorized by FDA in clinical trial to construct a recombinant plasmid named as pVAX-sEN. The recombinant plasmid was detected with Eco I/Kpn I and DNA sequencing. BALB/c mice bearing hepatocarcinoma cell line H22 were treated with naked pVAX-sEN or liposome-DNA complex in which the dose of DNA and the ratio of DNA and liposome were different from each other. To compare the efficiency of gene transfection, expression of endostatin at the treated tumor site was assayed with ELISA. To investigate the effect of pVAX1-sEN on hepatocellular carcinoma, pVAX-sEN either naked or in liposome-DNA complex was injected into BALB/c mice bearing H22, then the diameter of tumors was measured, microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry, endostatin expression in vivo was assayed at different time points. RESULTS: DNA sequencing showed the endostatin gene with the signal peptide was correctly cloned. In situ gene expression assay indicated that both the ratio of DNA and liposome and the dose of DNA could affect the gene transfection efficiency. Interestingly, naked pVAX-sEN had a similar in situ endostatin expression to pVAX-sEN with liposome. Animal experiments showed that pVAX-sEN together with pVAX-sEN-liposome complex could efficiently suppress the growth of mouse hepatoma cells. CONCLUSION: Naked endostatin plasmid intratumoral injection can get a similar gene transfection efficiency to liposome-DNA complex when used in situ. PMID:15334690

  5. Human endostatin gene transfer,either naked or with liposome,has the same inhibitory effect on growth of mouse liver tumor cells in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-Hong Ma; Wen-Sheng Sun; Yan Zhang; Xiao-Yan Wang; Li-Fen Gao; Hua Liu; Chun Guo; Su-Xia Liu; Ying-Lin Cao; Li-Ning Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore a safe and efficient strategy of tumor therapy using anti-angiogenetic agents.METHODS: Endostatin gene with a signal sequence of human IgG γ chain was amplified by PCR and cloned into pVAX1 plasmid which was the only vector authorized by FDA in clinical trial to construct a recombinant plasmid named as pVAX-sEN. The recombinant plasmid was detected with EcoRI/KpnI and DNA sequencing. BALB/c mice bearing hepatocarcinoma cell line H22 were treated with naked pVAX-sEN or liposome-DNA complex in which the dose of DNA and the ratio of DNA and liposome were different from each other. To compare the efficiency of gene transfection, expression of endostatin at the treated tumor site was assayed with ELISA. To investigate the effect of pVAX1-sEN on hepatocellular carcinoma, pVAX-sEN either naked or in liposome-DNA complex was injected into BALB/c mice bearing H22, then the diameter of tumors was measured, microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry, endostatin expression in vivo was assayed at different time points.RESULTS: DNA sequencing showed the endostatin gene with the signal peptide was correctly cloned. In situ gene expression assay indicated that both the ratio of DNA and liposome and the dose of DNA could affect the gene transfection efficiency. Interestingly, naked pVAX-sEN had a similar in situ endostatin expression to pVAX-sEN with liposome. Animal experiments showed that pVAX-sEN together with pVAX-sEN-liposome complex could efficiently suppress the growth of mouse hepatoma cells.CONCLUSION: Naked endostatin plasmid intratumoral injection can get a similar gene transfection efficiency to liposome-DNA complex when used in situ.

  6. Ex vivo-expanded bone marrow stem cells home to the liver and ameliorate functional recovery in a mouse model of acute hepatic injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Zhu Jin; Ming-Zi Han; Bing-Rong Liu; Jun Xu; Fu-Lai Gao; Zong-Jing Hu; Xin-Hong Wang; Feng-Hua Pei; Yu Hong; Hong-Yan Hu

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stem cell transplantation provides a theoretical approach for liver regeneration medicine; it may promote liver regeneration  and  self-repair.  However,  the  transplantation  of bone  marrow-mesenchymal  stem  cells  expanded  ex vivo  as  a therapy for liver disease has rarely been investigated. This study aimed  to  explore  whether  bone  marrow  stem  cells  expanded ex vivo home to the liver and foster hepatic recovery after CCl4 injury. METHODS: Bone  marrow  cells  from  BALB/c  mice  were expanded ex vivo by multiple-passage cultivation, characterized by cytoflow immunofluorescence, and pre-labeled with PKH26 before intravenous infusion into animals treated with CCl4. The integration of bone marrow cells into the liver was examined microscopically, and plasma hepatic enzymes were determined biochemically. RESULTS: Cultured  bone  marrow  cells  exhibited  antigenic profiles comparable to those of primary medullary stem cells. Double  immunofluorescence  showed  colocalization  of  these cells with proliferative activity and albumin expression in the liver of CCl4-treated mice. Densitometry showed increased in situ  cell  proliferation  (50±14  vs  20±3  cells/high-power  field, P CONCLUSIONS: Ex vivo-expanded  bone  marrow  cells  are capable  of  relocating  to  and  proliferating  in  the  chemically-injured  liver.  Transplantation  of  these  pluripotent  stem cells appears to improve serum indices of liver function and survival rate in mice after CCl4-induced hepatic damage.

  7. Protracted elimination of gold nanoparticles from mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadauskas, Evaldas; Wallin, Håkan; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at revealing the fate of 40-nm gold nanoparticles after intravenous injections. The gold nanoparticles were traced histochemically with light and transmission electron microscopy using autometallographic (AMG) staining, and the gold content in the liver was determined...... with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Gold nanoparticles were identified in almost all Kupffer cells one day after the injection, but the fraction of gold-loaded cells gradually decreased to about one fifth after 6 months. Transmission electron microscopic analysis showed that the gold......% fall in the gold content over the observed 6 months, the AMG finding of a significant reduction in the stained area of the liver sections and number of macrophages loaded with gold nanoparticles reveals that over time an increasing part of the total amount of gold nanoparticles in the liver...

  8. Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Adelaine; Ortiz-Neira, Clara L.; Abou Reslan, Walid; Kaura, Deepak [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Sharon, Raphael; Anderson, Ronald [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Oncology, Calgary, AB (Canada); Pinto-Rojas, Alfredo [Alberta Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2006-10-15

    Liver involvement in Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) typically presents with hepatomegaly and other signs of liver dysfunction. We present an 11-month-old child having only minimally elevated liver enzymes as an indication of liver involvement. Using sonography as the initial diagnostic tool followed by MRI, LCH of the liver was revealed. A review of sonographic, CT, MRI and MR cholangiopancreatography findings in liver LCH is presented. We recommend that physicians consider sonography and MRI screening for liver involvement in patients with newly diagnosed LCH, as periportal involvement may be present with little or no liver function abnormality present, as in this patient. (orig.)

  9. Therapeutic efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on human colorectal cancer liver metastasis in orthotopic nude-mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yong; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-10-13

    Liver metastasis is the most frequent cause of death from colon and other cancers. Generally, liver metastasis is recalcitrant to treatment. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R on liver metastasis in orthotopic mouse models. HT-29 human colon cancer cells expressing red fluorescent protein (RFP) were used in the present study. S. typhimurium A1-R infected HT-29 cells in a time-dependent manner, inhibiting cancer-cell proliferation in vitro. S. typhimurium A1-R promoted tumor necrosis and inhibited tumor growth in a subcutaneous tumor mouse model of HT-29-RFP. In orthotopic mouse models, S. typhimurium A1-R targeted liver metastases and significantly reduced their growth. The results of this study demonstrate the future clinical potential of S. typhimurium A1-R targeting of liver metastasis.

  10. The effects of silibin administration for different time periods on mouse liver with Ehrlich ascites carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydogan, Alisa Bahar; Bolkent, Sema

    2016-06-01

    Ehrlich ascites carcinoma is the one of the animal cancer models having high malignancy and rapid growth resistance. Silibin has reported to be an antioxidant in previous studies. We aimed to investigate the effects of silibin on mouse liver with Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells in different time periods. Balb/c mice were divided into five groups. Group I (Control): The saline buffer (sb) was injected intraperitoneally (ip) to the mice for 15 days. Group II (Silibin): 150mg/kg silibin was injected ip for 15 days. Group III (Ehrlich): 2×10(5) cells were transferred from the donor mouse to healthy mice on first day. Group IV (Ehrlich+Silibin): Silibin was given between 5th and 15th days to mice inoculated with EAT. Group V (Silibin+Ehrlich): Silibin was injected for 15 days after EAT cells. The liver sections were stained with matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9), caspase 3, caspase 8, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) antibodies by the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. Biochemical analysis and Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) method were performed in the liver. Superoxide dismutase levels of liver increased in Ehrlich+Silibin group compared with Ehrlich group. Malondialdehyde levels significantly decreased in Silibin+Ehrlich group compared with Ehrlich+Silibin. MMP-2 and MMP-9 immunopositive cells increased in Silibin+Ehrlich compared with Ehrlich group. Caspase 3 and TUNEL signals significantly increased in Silibin+Ehrlich group compared with Ehrlich group. PCNA positive signals significantly increased in Ehrlich+Silibin group compared with Ehrlich group. According to our findings, we suggest that silibin treatment after EAT cells inoculation has more effective than concurrently EAT and silibin treatment. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  11. The Role of NK Cell in T Cell Recruitment in Murine Liver Infected with Adenovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游上游; 艾洪武; 黄巍; 张楚瑜

    2003-01-01

    To study the role of natural killer (NK) cells in T cell recruitment in murine liver infected with virus, mice wereintravenously injected daily with anti-NK1.1+ antibody to deplete NK cells. Lymphocytes in the liver tissue of mice infectedwith type 5 adenovirus depleted in the E1 and E3 regions were assessed by fluorometric activated cell sorting (FACS). Ex-pression of chemokine IP-10 and its receptor CXCR3 mRNA in the liver, hepatic lymphocytes and spleen tissue were examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serum almfine aminotransferase (ALT) was measured asan indicator of liver injury. It was found that infection of adenovims and anfi-Fas monoclonal antibody (mAb) into mice caused liver injury and high expression of interfemn-γ inducible protein-10 (IP-10) mRNA in the liver. Anfi-NK1.1+ mAb, which was intraperitoneally injected into the mice infected with adenovirus, suppresses T cell recruitment and expression of IP-10 mRNA in the hver. Slighter hver injury was also observed. After vires infection, expression of CXCR3 mRNAin spleen and hver tissue was observed at different time. The results suggested that T cell recruitment was initiated by NKcell dependent chemokine IP-10, which induced activated T cells priming in the spleen to the hver of the mouse. NK cells played a key role in T cell recruitment in the liver of mouse infected with adenovims.

  12. Effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia on theophylline metabolism in mouse liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiao-yang; ZENG Yi-ming; ZHANG Yi-xiang; WANG Wan-yu; WU Run-hua

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) has been associated with abnormalities in the liver,which is the most important organ for drug metabolism.This study aimed to investigate the effect of CIH on theophylline metabolism in mouse liver.Methods Eight C57BL/6J mice were exposed to CIH for 12 weeks.Eight C57BL/6J mice were exposed to room air as a control group.Serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were measured.Liver histology was observed by light and electron microscopy.Total hepatic cytochrome P450 concentration was measured.Hepatocytes were isolated and incubated with 15 mg/ml theophylline for four hours.After incubation,the theophylline concentration in the supernatant was measured and the theophylline metabolism rate was calculated.Results CIH did not affect the serum transaminase levels.Livers from mice exposed to CIH showed hepatocellular edema,and liver cells had fuzzy rough endoplasmic reticulum under the electron microscope.The theophylline metabolism rate was significantly inhibited by CIH compared with controls; (16.60±2.43)% vs.(21.58±4.52)% (P=0.02).The total liver cytochrome P450 concentration in the CIH group was significantly lower than in the control group;(0.83±0.08) vs.(1.13±0.21) mol/mg microsomal protein (P=0.004).Conclusion CIH decreases theophylline metabolism by mouse hepatocytes,which may correlate with the downregulation of cytochrome P450 expression by CIH.

  13. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor BIBF1120 ameliorates inflammation, angiogenesis and fibrosis in CCl4-induced liver fibrogenesis mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk Akcora, Büsra; Storm, Gert; Prakash, Jai; Bansal, Ruchi

    2017-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis, a progressive chronic disease mainly caused by hepatitis viral infections, alcohol abuse or metabolic syndrome leading to liver dysfunction and is the growing cause of mortality worldwide. Tyrosine kinase inhibitor BIBF1120 (Nintedanib) has been evaluated in clinical trials for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and advanced Hepatocellular carcinoma, but has not been explored for liver fibrosis yet. In this study, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic effects and mechanism of BIBF1120 in liver fibrogenesis. The effects of BIBF1120 were evaluated in TGFβ-activated mouse 3T3 fibroblasts, LX2 cells, primary human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and CCl4-induced liver fibrogenesis mouse model. Fibroblasts-conditioned medium studies were performed to assess the paracrine effects on macrophages and endothelial cells. In-vitro in TGFβ-activated fibroblasts, BIBF1120 significantly inhibited expression of major fibrotic parameters, wound-healing and contractility. In vivo in CCl4-induced acute liver injury model, post-disease BIBF1120 administration significantly attenuated collagen accumulation and HSC activation. Interestingly, BIBF1120 drastically inhibited intrahepatic inflammation and angiogenesis. To further elucidate the mechanism of action, 3T3-conditioned medium studies demonstrated increased 3T3-mediated macrophage chemotaxis and endothelial cells tube formation and activation, which was significantly decreased by BIBF1120. These results suggests that BIBF1120 can be a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of liver fibrosis. PMID:28291245

  14. In vivo liver regeneration potential of human induced pluripotent stem cells from diverse origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Kim, Yonghak; Sharkis, Saul; Marchionni, Luigi; Jang, Yoon-Young

    2011-05-11

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a potential source of hepatocytes for liver transplantation to treat end-stage liver disease. In vitro differentiation of human iPSCs into hepatic cells has been achieved using a multistage differentiation protocol, but whether these cells are functional and capable of engrafting and regenerating diseased liver tissue is not clear. We show that human iPSC-derived hepatic cells at various differentiation stages can engraft the liver in a mouse transplantation model. Using the same differentiation and transplantation protocols, we also assessed the ability of human iPSCs derived from each of the three developmental germ layer tissues (that is, ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) to regenerate mouse liver. These iPSC lines, with similar but distinct global DNA methylation patterns, differentiated into multistage hepatic cells with an efficiency similar to that of human embryonic stem cells. Human hepatic cells at various differentiation stages derived from iPSC lines of different origins successfully repopulated the liver tissue of mice with liver cirrhosis. They also secreted human-specific liver proteins into mouse blood at concentrations comparable to that of proteins secreted by human primary hepatocytes. Our results demonstrate the engraftment and liver regenerative capabilities of human iPSC-derived multistage hepatic cells in vivo and suggest that human iPSCs of distinct origins and regardless of their parental epigenetic memory can efficiently differentiate along the hepatic lineage.

  15. Zonation of nitrogen and glucose metabolism gene expression upon acute liver damage in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrouz Ghafoory

    Full Text Available Zonation of metabolic activities within specific structures and cell types is a phenomenon of liver organization and ensures complementarity of variant liver functions like protein production, glucose homeostasis and detoxification. To analyze damage and regeneration of liver tissue in response to a toxic agent, expression of liver specific enzymes was analyzed by in situ hybridization in mouse over a 6 days time course following carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 injection. CCl4 mixed with mineral oil was administered to BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injection, and mice were sacrificed at different time points post injection. Changes in the expression of albumin (Alb, arginase (Arg1, glutaminase 2 (Gls2, Glutamine synthetase (Gs, glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc, glycogen synthase 2 (Gys2, Glycerinaldehyd-3-phosphat-Dehydrogenase (Gapdh, Cytochrom p450 2E1 (Cyp2e1 and glucagon receptor (Gcgr genes in the liver were studied by in situ hybridization and qPCR. We observed significant changes in gene expression of enzymes involved in nitrogen and glucose metabolism and their local distribution following CCl4 injury. We also found that Cyp2e1, the primary metabolizing enzyme for CCl4, was strongly expressed in the pericentral zone during recovery. Furthermore, cells in the damaged area displayed distinct gene expression profiles during the analyzed time course and showed complete recovery with strong albumin production 6 days after CCl4 injection. Our results indicate that despite severe damage, liver cells in the damaged area do not simply die but instead display locally adjusted gene expression supporting damage response and recovery.

  16. Zonation of Nitrogen and Glucose Metabolism Gene Expression upon Acute Liver Damage in Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoory, Shahrouz; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Li, Qi; Scholl, Catharina; Dooley, Steven; Wölfl, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Zonation of metabolic activities within specific structures and cell types is a phenomenon of liver organization and ensures complementarity of variant liver functions like protein production, glucose homeostasis and detoxification. To analyze damage and regeneration of liver tissue in response to a toxic agent, expression of liver specific enzymes was analyzed by in situ hybridization in mouse over a 6 days time course following carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injection. CCl4 mixed with mineral oil was administered to BALB/c mice by intraperitoneal injection, and mice were sacrificed at different time points post injection. Changes in the expression of albumin (Alb), arginase (Arg1), glutaminase 2 (Gls2), Glutamine synthetase (Gs), glucose-6-phosphatase (G6pc), glycogen synthase 2 (Gys2), Glycerinaldehyd-3-phosphat-Dehydrogenase (Gapdh), Cytochrom p450 2E1 (Cyp2e1) and glucagon receptor (Gcgr) genes in the liver were studied by in situ hybridization and qPCR. We observed significant changes in gene expression of enzymes involved in nitrogen and glucose metabolism and their local distribution following CCl4 injury. We also found that Cyp2e1, the primary metabolizing enzyme for CCl4, was strongly expressed in the pericentral zone during recovery. Furthermore, cells in the damaged area displayed distinct gene expression profiles during the analyzed time course and showed complete recovery with strong albumin production 6 days after CCl4 injection. Our results indicate that despite severe damage, liver cells in the damaged area do not simply die but instead display locally adjusted gene expression supporting damage response and recovery. PMID:24147127

  17. IDH1 deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis in mouse liver by impairing amino acid utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Gu, Yu; Zhang, Feng; Zhao, Yuanlin; Yuan, Yuan; Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Li, Wanda Y.; Wakeham, Andrew; Cairns, Rob A.; Mak, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Although the enzymatic activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) was defined decades ago, its functions in vivo are not yet fully understood. Cytosolic IDH1 converts isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG), a key metabolite regulating nitrogen homeostasis in catabolic pathways. It was thought that IDH1 might enhance lipid biosynthesis in liver or adipose tissue by generating NADPH, but we show here that lipid contents are relatively unchanged in both IDH1-null mouse liver and IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells generated using the CRISPR-Cas9 system. Instead, we found that IDH1 is critical for liver amino acid (AA) utilization. Body weights of IDH1-null mice fed a high-protein diet (HPD) were abnormally low. After prolonged fasting, IDH1-null mice exhibited decreased blood glucose but elevated blood alanine and glycine compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Similarly, in IDH1-deficient HepG2 cells, glucose consumption was increased, but alanine utilization and levels of intracellular α-KG and glutamate were reduced. In IDH1-deficient primary hepatocytes, gluconeogenesis as well as production of ammonia and urea were decreased. In IDH1-deficient whole livers, expression levels of genes involved in AA metabolism were reduced, whereas those involved in gluconeogenesis were up-regulated. Thus, IDH1 is critical for AA utilization in vivo and its deficiency attenuates gluconeogenesis primarily by impairing α-KG–dependent transamination of glucogenic AAs such as alanine. PMID:28011762

  18. Cellular distribution of {sup 111}In-LDTPA galactose BSA in normal and asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mouse liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deal, Kim A.; Cristel, Michael E.; Welch, Michael J

    1998-05-01

    {sup 111}In-LDTPA galactose BSA (bovine serum albumin) was used to evaluate the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) system in both normal and ASGPR-deficient mice. The radiolabeled glycoprotein had complete liver uptake in both normal and ASGPR-deficient mice. Metabolism and hepatic cell-type distribution studies were performed. The normal mouse excreted greater than 60% of the hepatic activity, while the ASGPR-deficient mouse excreted less than 40% of the hepatic activity. {sup 111}In-LDTPA galactose BSA was metabolized to {sup 111}In-LDTPA-L-lysine in both mouse types. Normal mice showed 70% of the radioactivity in the hepatocyte, whereas the homozygous ASGPR-deficient mouse had equal activity in the hepatocyte and the hepatic endothelial cell.

  19. DNA Ploidy and Liver Cell Dysplasia in Liver Biopsies from Patients with Liver Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed S El-Sayed

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available There is controversy among pathologists when assessing the presence or absence of liver cell dysplasia in liver biopsies taken from cirrhotic patients. The objective of the present study was to determine the DNA ploidy pattern of hepatocytes of patients with liver cirrhosis and its relationship to liver cell dysplasia. A total of 48 male patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis based on clinical, laboratory and histopathological criteria were included in the study. A liver biopsy was taken from each patient; one part of the biopsy was subjected to histopathology, and the other to flow cytometry. The histopathological examination revealed liver cell dysplasia in 60% of patients with liver cirrhosis (62% of them had large cell dysplasia [LCD] and 38% had small cell dysplasia [SCD]. Abnormal DNA content (aneuploidy was found in 81.5% of positive liver cell dysplasia specimens and found only in 11.1% of negative liver cell dysplasia specimens, with a statistically significant difference (P0.05 in comparison with SCD. In conclusion, SCD (similar to LCD is also associated with aneuploidy and elevated DNA index, and may carry the same risk for progression to hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fransén-Pettersson

    Full Text Available Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

  1. Nucleoside transporters and liver cell growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valdés, Raquel; Mata, João F; Del Santo, Belén; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Felipe, Antonio; Casado, F Javier

    1998-01-01

    .... This review summarizes work performed in our laboratory on these transport systems, particularly nucleoside transporters, which are up-regulated in physiological situations associated with liver cell growth...

  2. Binding of Cimetidine to Balb/C Mouse Liver Catalase; Kinetics and Conformational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangirvand, Mahboubeh; Minai-Tehrani, Dariush; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Minai-Tehrani, Arash; Razmi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    Catalase is responsible for converting hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into water and oxygen in cells. This enzyme has high affinity for hydrogen peroxide and can protect the cells from oxidative stress damage. Catalase is a tetramer protein and each monomer contains a heme group. Cimetidine is a histamine H2 receptor blocker which inhibits acid release from stomach and is used for gasterointestinal diseases. In this research, effect of cimetidine on the activity of liver catalase was studied and the kinetic parameters of this enzyme and its conformational changes were investigated. Cell free extract of mouse liver was used for the catalase assay. The activity of the catalase was detected in the absence and presence of cimetidine by monitoring hydrogen peroxide reduction absorbance at 240 nm. The purified enzyme was used for conformational studies by Fluorescence spectrophotometry. The data showed that cimetidine could inhibit the enzyme in a non-competitive manner. Ki and IC50 values of the drug were determined to be about 0.75 and 0.85 uM, respectively. The Arrhenius plot showed that activation energy was 6.68 and 4.77 kJ/mol in the presence and absence of the drug, respectively. Fluorescence spectrophotometry revealed that the binding of cimetidine to the purified enzyme induced hyperchromicity and red shift which determined the conformational change on the enzyme. Cimetidine could non-competitively inhibit the liver catalase with high affinity. Binding of cimetidine to the enzyme induced conformational alteration in the enzyme.

  3. Long-term culture of genome-stable bipotent stem cells from adult human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M A; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N M; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R G; van der Laan, Luc J W; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be

  4. Long-term culture of genome-stable bipotent stem cells from adult human liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Huch (Meritxell); H. Gehart (Helmuth); R. Van Boxtel (Ruben); K. Hamer (Karien); F. Blokzijl (Francis); M.M.A. Verstegen (Monique); E. Ellis (Ewa); M. Van Wenum (Martien); S.A. Fuchs (Sabine A.); J. de Ligt (Joep); M. van de Wetering (M.); N. Sasaki (Nobuo); S.J. Boers (Susanne J.); H. Kemperman (Hans); J. de Jonge (Jeroen); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis (Edward); R. Hoekstra (Ruurdtje); S. Strom (Stephen); R.R.G. Vries (Robert R.G.); L.J.W. van der Laan (Luc); E. Cuppen (Edwin); H.C. Clevers (Hans)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDespite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro

  5. Long-Term Culture of Genome-Stable Bipotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; van Boxtel, Ruben; Hamer, Karien; Blokzijl, Francis; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; Ellis, Ewa; van Wenum, Martien; Fuchs, Sabine A.; de Ligt, Joep; van de Wetering, Marc; Sasaki, Nobuo; Boers, Susanne J.; Kemperman, Hans; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje; Strom, Stephen; Vries, Robert R. G.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Cuppen, Edwin; Clevers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous replication potential of the human liver, there are currently no culture systems available that sustain hepatocyte replication and/or function in vitro. We have shown previously that single mouse Lgr5+ liver stem cells can be expanded as epithelial organoids in vitro and can be

  6. Adult Mouse Liver Contains Two Distinct Populations of Cholangiocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The biliary system plays an important role in several acquired and genetic disorders of the liver. We have previously shown that biliary duct epithelium contains cells giving rise to proliferative Lgr5+ organoids in vitro. However, it remained unknown whether all biliary cells or only a specific subset had this clonogenic activity. The cell surface protease ST14 was identified as a positive marker for the clonogenic subset of cholangiocytes and was used to separate clonogenic and non-clonogenic duct cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Only ST14hi duct cells had the ability to generate organoids that could be serially passaged. The gene expression profiles of clonogenic and non-clonogenic duct cells were similar, but several hundred genes were differentially expressed. RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that clonogenic duct cells are interspersed among regular biliary epithelium at a ∼1:3 ratio. We conclude that adult murine cholangiocytes can be subdivided into two populations differing in their proliferative capacity.

  7. Mouse model of carbon tetrachloride induced liver fibrosis: Histopathological changes and expression of CD133 and epidermal growth factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodwin Jonathan M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the setting of chronic liver injury in humans, epidermal growth factor (EGF and EGF receptor (EGFR are up-regulated and have been proposed to have vital roles in both liver regeneration and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Chronic liver injury also leads to hepatic stellate cell (HSC differentiation and a novel subpopulation of HSCs which express CD133 and exhibit properties of progenitor cells has been described in rats. The carbon tetrachloride (CCl4-induced mouse model has been historically relied upon to study liver injury and regeneration. We exposed mice to CCl4 to assess whether EGF and CD133+ HSCs are up-regulated in chronically injured liver. Methods CCl4 in olive oil was administered to strain A/J mice three times per week by oral gavage. Results Multiple well-differentiated HCCs were found in all livers after 15 weeks of CCl4 treatment. Notably, HCCs developed within the setting of fibrosis and not cirrhosis. CD133 was dramatically up-regulated after CCl4 treatment, and increased expression of desmin and glial fibrillary acidic protein, representative markers of HSCs, was also observed. EGF expression significantly decreased, contrary to observations in humans, whereas the expression of amphiregulin, another EGFR ligand, was significantly increased. Conclusions Species-specific differences exist with respect to the histopathological and molecular pathogenesis of chronic liver disease. CCl4-induced chronic liver injury in A/J mice has important differences compared to human cirrhosis leading to HCC.

  8. A microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants o...

  9. Altered microRNA expression induced by tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants ...

  10. A potential microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants of conazole tumor...

  11. Exploring pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelder Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex phenotypes such as insulin resistance involve different biological pathways that may interact and influence each other. Interpretation of related experimental data would be facilitated by identifying relevant pathway interactions in the context of the dataset. Results We developed an analysis approach to study interactions between pathways by integrating gene and protein interaction networks, biological pathway information and high-throughput data. This approach was applied to a transcriptomics dataset to investigate pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver in response to a glucose challenge. We identified regulated pathway interactions at different time points following the glucose challenge and also studied the underlying protein interactions to find possible mechanisms and key proteins involved in pathway cross-talk. A large number of pathway interactions were found for the comparison between the two diet groups at t = 0. The initial response to the glucose challenge (t = 0.6 was typed by an acute stress response and pathway interactions showed large overlap between the two diet groups, while the pathway interaction networks for the late response were more dissimilar. Conclusions Studying pathway interactions provides a new perspective on the data that complements established pathway analysis methods such as enrichment analysis. This study provided new insights in how interactions between pathways may be affected by insulin resistance. In addition, the analysis approach described here can be generally applied to different types of high-throughput data and will therefore be useful for analysis of other complex datasets as well.

  12. Hepatic progenitor cell lines from allyl alcohol-treated adult rats are derived from gamma-irradiated mouse STO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingjun; Sell, Stewart; Leffert, Hyam L

    2003-01-01

    In attempts to recharacterize several markers of putative rat liver progenitor cells, single-stage reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses failed to confirm the reported immunochemical detection of albumin, alpha(1)-fetoprotein, and cytochrome P450-1A2 in the clonal line, 3(8)#21, and the cloned derivative, 3(8)#21-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein). Undetectable expression occurred whether or not both lines were cultured on or off feeder layers of gamma-irradiated mouse embryonic STO (SIM [Sandoz inbred Swiss mouse] thioguanine-resistant ouabain-resistant) cells. PCR amplification of liver progenitor cell chromosomal (rat and mouse Pigr, rat INS1, mouse INS2) and mitochondrial (rat and mouse COX1) genes revealed only mouse sequences. Further analyses of rat and mouse COX1 sequences in cells from untampered storage vials of all 11 reported liver progenitor cell lines and strains revealed only mouse sequences. In addition, uniquely similar metaphase spreads were observed in STO, 3(8)#21, and 3(8)#21-EGFP cells. The combined results suggest that the previously reported "rat" liver progenitor cell lines were most likely generated during early derivation in cell culture from gamma-radiation-resistant or ineffectively irradiated mouse STO cells used as the feeder layers. These findings reveal new types of artifacts encountered in cocultures of tissue progenitor cells and feeder layer cell lines, and they sound a cautionary note: phenotypic and genotypic properties of feeder layers should be well-characterized before and during coculture with newly derived stem cells and clonal derivatives.

  13. Liver stem cells - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Alberto Redi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The brief and concise preface written by prof. Takahiro Ochiya is particularly well addressed to scholars belonging to different scientific fields: cellular and molecular biology, liver and cancer biology, tissue engineering and stem cell therapy. By a few lines prof Ochiya is telling us that we are getting exciting results, at the lab and the preclinical level, in treating liver injuries thanks to the unprecedented advances in our knowledge on liver stem cells biology....

  14. Carbon black nanoparticle instillation induces sustained inflammation and genotoxicity in mouse lung and liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourdon Julie A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widespread occupational exposure to carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs raises concerns over their safety. CBNPs are genotoxic in vitro but less is known about their genotoxicity in various organs in vivo. Methods We investigated inflammatory and acute phase responses, DNA strand breaks (SB and oxidatively damaged DNA in C57BL/6 mice 1, 3 and 28 days after a single instillation of 0.018, 0.054 or 0.162 mg Printex 90 CBNPs, alongside sham controls. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid was analyzed for cellular composition. SB in BAL cells, whole lung and liver were assessed using the alkaline comet assay. Formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG sensitive sites were assessed as an indicator of oxidatively damaged DNA. Pulmonary and hepatic acute phase response was evaluated by Saa3 mRNA real-time quantitative PCR. Results Inflammation was strongest 1 and 3 days post-exposure, and remained elevated for the two highest doses (i.e., 0.054 and 0.162 mg 28 days post-exposure (P Saa3 mRNA in lung tissue on day 1 (all doses, 3 (all doses and 28 (0.054 and 0.162 mg, but not in liver. Conclusions Deposition of CBNPs in lung induces inflammatory and genotoxic effects in mouse lung that persist considerably after the initial exposure. Our results demonstrate that CBNPs may cause genotoxicity both in the primary exposed tissue, lung and BAL cells, and in a secondary tissue, the liver.

  15. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within

  16. Stem cells in liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poll, D. van

    2008-01-01

    Failure of the liver, the largest vital organ in the body, unequivocally results in death. Hepatic failure most commonly evolves over a period of several years as a result of chronic liver disease, most often viral hepatitis or alcoholic liver damage. In rarer cases, the organ shuts down within week

  17. Usage of adenovirus expressing thymidine kinase mediated hepatocellular damage for enabling mouse liver repopulation with allogenic or xenogenic hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moreno

    Full Text Available It has been shown that the liver of immunodeficient mice can be efficiently repopulated with human hepatocytes when subjected to chronic hepatocellular damage. Mice with such chimeric livers represent useful reagents for medical and clinical studies. However all previously reported models of humanized livers are difficult to implement as they involve cross-breeding of immunodeficient mice with mice exhibiting genetic alterations causing sustained hepatic injury. In this paper we attempted to create chimeric livers by inducing persistent hepatocellular damage in immunodeficient Rag2(-/- γc(-/- mice using an adenovirus encoding herpes virus thymidine kinase (AdTk and two consecutive doses of ganciclovir (GCV. We found that this treatment resulted in hepatocellular damage persisting for at least 10 weeks and enabled efficient engraftment and proliferation within the liver of either human or allogenic hepatocytes. Interestingly, while the nodules generated from the transplanted mouse hepatocytes were well vascularized, the human hepatocytes experienced progressive depolarization and exhibited reduced numbers of murine endothelial cells inside the nodules. In conclusion, AdTk/GCV-induced liver damage licenses the liver of immunodeficient mice for allogenic and xenogenic hepatocyte repopulation. This approach represents a simple alternative strategy for chimeric liver generation using immunodeficient mice without additional genetic manipulation of the germ line.

  18. Flow cytometric analysis of mitotic cycle perturbation by chemical carcinogens in cultured epithelial cells. [Effects of benzo(a)pyrene-diol-epoxide on mitotic cycle of cultural mouse liver epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearlman, A.L.

    1978-08-01

    A system for kinetic analysis of mitotic cycle perturbation by various agents was developed and applied to the study of the mitotic cycle effects and dependency of the chemical carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene-diolepoxide, DE, upon a mouse lever epithelial cell line, NMuLi. The study suggests that the targets of DE action are not confined to DNA alone but may include cytoplasmic structures as well. DE was found to affect cells located in virtually every phase of the mitotic cycle, with cells that were actively synthesizing DNA showing the strongest response. However, the resulting perturbations were not confined to S-phase alone. DE slowed traversal through S-phase by about 40% regardless of the cycle phase of the cells exposed to it, and slowed traversal through G/sub 2/M by about 50%. When added to G/sub 1/ cells, DE delayed recruitment of apparently quiescent (G/sub 0/) cells by 2 hours, and reduced the synchrony of the cohort of cells recruited into active proliferation. The kinetic analysis system consists of four elements: tissue culture methods for propagating and harvesting cell populations; an elutriation centrifugation system for bulk synchronization of cells in various phases of the mitotic cycle; a flow cytometer (FCM), coupled with appropriate staining protocols, to enable rapid analysis of the DNA distribution of any given cell population; and data reduction and analysis methods for extracting information from the DNA histograms produced by the FCM. The elements of the system are discussed. A mathematical analysis of DNA histograms obtained by FCM is presented. The analysis leads to the detailed implementation of a new modeling approach. The new modeling approach is applied to the estimation of cell cycle kinetic parameters from time series of DNA histograms, and methods for the reduction and interpretation of such series are suggested.

  19. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) potentiates autoimmune hepatitis in the CYP2D6 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Peter; Messmer, Marie; Bayer, Monika; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Hintermann, Edith; Christen, Urs

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and its more severe development non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are increasing worldwide. In particular NASH, which is characterized by an active hepatic inflammation, has often severe consequences including progressive fibrosis, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here we investigated how metabolic liver injury is influencing the pathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). We used the CYP2D6 mouse model in which wild type C57BL/6 mice are infected with an Adenovirus expressing the major liver autoantigen cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6). Such mice display several features of human AIH, including interface hepatitis, formation of LKM-1 antibodies and CYP2D6-specific T cells, as well as hepatic fibrosis. NAFLD was induced with a high-fat diet (HFD). We found that pre-existing NAFLD potentiates the severity of AIH. Mice fed for 12 weeks with a HFD displayed increased cellular infiltration of the liver, enhanced hepatic fibrosis and elevated numbers of liver autoantigen-specific T cells. Our data suggest that a pre-existing metabolic liver injury constitutes an additional risk for the severity of an autoimmune condition of the liver, such as AIH.

  20. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G.; Sharp, Phillip A.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells1. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas system in vivo in wild-type mice. We have used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs)2–4 to the liver and directly target the tumor suppressor genes Pten5 and p536, alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology7, 8. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumors that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumor tissue revealed insertion or deletion (indel) mutations of the tumor suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumors. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harboring sgRNAs targeting the β-Catenin gene (Ctnnb1) and a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-Catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics. PMID:25119044

  1. CRISPR-mediated direct mutation of cancer genes in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wen; Chen, Sidi; Yin, Hao; Tammela, Tuomas; Papagiannakopoulos, Thales; Joshi, Nikhil S; Cai, Wenxin; Yang, Gillian; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G; Zhang, Feng; Anderson, Daniel G; Sharp, Phillip A; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-10-16

    The study of cancer genes in mouse models has traditionally relied on genetically-engineered strains made via transgenesis or gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Here we describe a new method of cancer model generation using the CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated proteins) system in vivo in wild-type mice. We used hydrodynamic injection to deliver a CRISPR plasmid DNA expressing Cas9 and single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) to the liver that directly target the tumour suppressor genes Pten (ref. 5) and p53 (also known as TP53 and Trp53) (ref. 6), alone and in combination. CRISPR-mediated Pten mutation led to elevated Akt phosphorylation and lipid accumulation in hepatocytes, phenocopying the effects of deletion of the gene using Cre-LoxP technology. Simultaneous targeting of Pten and p53 induced liver tumours that mimicked those caused by Cre-loxP-mediated deletion of Pten and p53. DNA sequencing of liver and tumour tissue revealed insertion or deletion mutations of the tumour suppressor genes, including bi-allelic mutations of both Pten and p53 in tumours. Furthermore, co-injection of Cas9 plasmids harbouring sgRNAs targeting the β-catenin gene and a single-stranded DNA oligonucleotide donor carrying activating point mutations led to the generation of hepatocytes with nuclear localization of β-catenin. This study demonstrates the feasibility of direct mutation of tumour suppressor genes and oncogenes in the liver using the CRISPR/Cas system, which presents a new avenue for rapid development of liver cancer models and functional genomics.

  2. Activation of farnesoid X receptor induces RECK expression in mouse liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Sun, Zhichao; Ji, Lingling; Ruan, Yuanyuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Lei, E-mail: yhchloech@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •RECK is a novel transcriptional target gene of FXR in mouse liver. •The FXR response element is located within the intron 1 of RECK gene. •FXR agonist reverses the down-regulation of RECK in the liver in mouse NASH model. -- Abstract: Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) belongs to the ligand-activated nuclear receptor superfamily, and functions as a transcription factor regulating the transcription of numerous genes involved in bile acid homeostasis, lipoprotein and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we identified RECK, a membrane-anchored inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, as a novel target gene of FXR in mouse liver. We found that FXR agonist substantially augmented hepatic RECK mRNA and protein expression in vivo and in vitro. FXR regulated the transcription of RECK through directly binding to FXR response element located within intron 1 of the mouse RECK gene. Moreover, FXR agonist reversed the down-regulation of RECK in the livers from mice fed a methionine and choline deficient diet. In summary, our data suggest that RECK is a novel transcriptional target of FXR in mouse liver, and provide clues to better understanding the function of FXR in liver.

  3. [Histopathology of strobilocercosis found in the livers of white mouse.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Nasuhi Engin; Miman, Ozlem; Gül, Mehmet; Daldal, Nilgün

    2010-01-01

    The adult form of Taenia taeniaeformis is found in the intestine of the cat and cheetah. The larva form is called Strobilocercus fasciolaris and is found in rodents such as mice and rats. Our objective was to draw attention to that rare zoonosis, since it has already been reported in the literature as strobilocercosis in humans. During an experimental animal study conducted at Inonu University, some unexpected cystic formations were found in the livers of nine 6-8-month-old healthy white mice, which affected the conducted study negatively. These cystic formations were examined histopathologically. Prepared sections were stained with haemotoxylin eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and Masson trichrome stains, and examined by light microscopy. Strobilocercus fasciolaris larvae that curled towards cyst cavity and their hooks were seen. Plasma cells, macrophage, focus of eosinophilic infiltration and fibroblastic connective tissue were simultaneous found. In this paper, histopathological changes in intermediate hosts caused by Strobilocercus fasciolaris and other cestod larvae have been discussed.

  4. Natural Killer cells and liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eFasbender

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the 40 years since the discovery of Natural Killer (NK cells it has been well established that these innate lymphocytes are important for early and effective immune responses against transformed cells and infections with different pathogens. In addition to these classical functions of NK cells, we now know that they are part of a larger family of innate lymphoid cells and that they can even mediate memory-like responses. Additionally, tissue resident NK cells with distinct phenotypical and functional characteristics have been identified. Here we focus on the phenotype of different NK cell subpopulations that can be found in the liver and summarize the current knowledge about the functional role of these cells with a special emphasis on liver fibrosis. NK cell cytotoxicity can contribute to liver damage in different forms of liver disease. However, NK cells can limit liver fibrosis by killing hepatic stellate cell-derived myofibroblasts, which play a key role in this pathogenic process. Therefore, liver NK cells need to be tightly regulated in order to balance these beneficial and pathological effects.

  5. Specific microbiome changes in a mouse model of parenteral nutrition associated liver injury and intestinal inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kirk Harris

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN has been a life-saving treatment in infants intolerant of enteral feedings. However, PN is associated with liver injury (PN Associated Liver Injury: PNALI in a significant number of PN-dependent infants. We have previously reported a novel PNALI mouse model in which PN infusion combined with intestinal injury results in liver injury. In this model, lipopolysaccharide activation of toll-like receptor 4 signaling, soy oil-derived plant sterols, and pro-inflammatory activation of Kupffer cells (KCs played key roles. The objective of this study was to explore changes in the intestinal microbiome associated with PNALI.Microbiome analysis in the PNALI mouse identified specific alterations within colonic microbiota associated with PNALI and further association of these communities with the lipid composition of the PN solution. Intestinal inflammation or soy oil-based PN infusion alone (in the absence of enteral feeds caused shifts within the gut microbiota. However, the combination resulted in accumulation of a specific taxon, Erysipelotrichaceae (23.8% vs. 1.7% in saline infused controls, in PNALI mice. Moreover, PNALI was markedly attenuated by enteral antibiotic treatment, which also was associated with significant reduction of Erysipelotrichaceae (0.6% and a Gram-negative constituent, the S24-7 lineage of Bacteroidetes (53.5% in PNALI vs. 0.8%. Importantly, removal of soy oil based-lipid emulsion from the PN solution resulted in significant reduction of Erysipelotrichaceae as well as attenuation of PNALI. Finally, addition of soy-derived plant sterol (stigmasterol to fish oil-based PN restored Erysipelotrichaceae abundance and PNALI.Soy oil-derived plant sterols and the associated specific bacterial groups in the colonic microbiota are associated with PNALI. Products from these bacteria may directly trigger activation of KCs and promote PNALI. Furthermore, the results indicate that lipid modification of PN solutions may

  6. Liver stem cells: from preface to advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Kanwal; Iqbal, Muhammad Javed; Zahra, Nureen; Akash, Muhammad Sajid Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Liver is a major metabolic organ of the body and is known to comprise of two epithelial cell lineages, namely, hepatocytes and cholangiocytes which are known to originate from hepatoblasts during fetal developing stages. Upon acute injury, the hepatocytes and cholangiocytes undergo cellular division to compensate the loss, however, chronic damage may suppress this proliferative ability and as a consequence hepatic and extra-hepatic stem cells may contribute for liver regeneration. Facultative liver stem cells (oval cells) may emerge, proliferate and contribute in replacing damaged hepatic cells. Similarly, bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells are also known for contributing in liver regeneration having their ability of self renewal and differentiation. However, a closer look is still required to bridge the existing knowledge gaps between functionality and limitations. Thereby, we have discussed the detailed mechanistic insights of both hepatic and extra-hepatic stem cells including, stem/progenitor cells, adult/fetal hepatocytes, oval cells, bone marrow and mesenchymal stem cells. We have also focused on few in vitro and in vivo studies elucidating therapeutic applications and challenges related to the liver stem cells. We believe that such conversations may provide invaluable contribution for realistic advancement in the state of therapeutic stem-cell transplantation.

  7. Effector CD8(+) T cell-derived interleukin-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Jessica; Di Lucia, Pietro; Magini, Diletta; Moalli, Federica; Boni, Carolina; Benechet, Alexandre Pierre; Fumagalli, Valeria; Inverso, Donato; Vecchi, Andrea; Fiocchi, Amleto; Wieland, Stefan; Purcell, Robert; Ferrari, Carlo; Chisari, Francis V; Guidotti, Luca G; Iannacone, Matteo

    2017-09-01

    Besides secreting pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and effector molecules, effector CD8(+) T cells that arise upon acute infection with certain viruses have been shown to produce the regulatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 and, therefore, contain immunopathology. Whether the same occurs during acute hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and role that IL-10 might play in liver disease is currently unknown. Mouse models of acute HBV pathogenesis, as well as chimpanzees and patients acutely infected with HBV, were used to analyse the role of CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 in liver immunopathology. Mouse HBV-specific effector CD8(+) T cells produce significant amounts of IL-10 upon in vivo antigen encounter. This is corroborated by longitudinal data in a chimpanzee acutely infected with HBV, where serum IL-10 was readily detectable and correlated with intrahepatic CD8(+) T cell infiltration and liver disease severity. Unexpectedly, mouse and human CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 was found to act in an autocrine/paracrine fashion to enhance IL-2 responsiveness, thus preventing antigen-induced HBV-specific effector CD8(+) T cell apoptosis. Accordingly, the use of mouse models of HBV pathogenesis revealed that the IL-10 produced by effector CD8(+) T cells promoted their own intrahepatic survival and, thus supported, rather than suppressed liver immunopathology. Effector CD8(+) T cell-derived IL-10 enhances acute liver immunopathology. Altogether, these results extend our understanding of the cell- and tissue-specific role that IL-10 exerts in immune regulation. Lay summary: Interleukin-10 is mostly regarded as an immunosuppressive cytokine. We show here that HBV-specific CD8(+) T cells produce IL-10 upon antigen recognition and that this cytokine enhances CD8(+) T cell survival. As such, IL-10 paradoxically promotes rather than suppresses liver disease. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural killer cells in liver disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tian, Zhigang; Chen, Yongyan; Gao, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are enriched in lymphocytes within the liver and have unique phenotypic features and functional properties, including tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis‐inducing ligand...

  9. Proteomic profiling in incubation medium of mouse, rat and human precision-cut liver slices for biomarker detection regarding acute drug-induced liver injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Swelm, Rachel P. L.; Hadi, Mackenzie; Laarakkers, Coby M. M.; Masereeuw, Rosalinde; Groothuis, Geny M. M.; Russel, Frans G. M.

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced liver injury is one of the leading causes of drug withdrawal from the market. In this study, we investigated the applicability of protein profiling of the incubation medium of human, mouse and rat precision-cut liver slices (PCLS) exposed to liver injury-inducing drugs for biomarker ide

  10. Human mesenchymal stem cells towards non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in an immunodeficient mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.pelz@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Borkham-Kamphorst, Erawan, E-mail: ekamphorst@ukaachen.de [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Stock, Peggy, E-mail: peggy.stock@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Brückner, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.brueckner@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Dollinger, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.dollinger@uniklinik-ulm.de [Department for Internal Medicine I, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Weiskirchen, Ralf, E-mail: rweiskirchen@ukaachen.de [Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 30, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Christ, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.christ@medizin.uni-leipzig.de [Applied Molecular Hepatology Laboratory, Department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, University Hospital Leipzig, Liebigstraße 21, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine (TRM), University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a frequent clinical picture characterised by hepatic inflammation, lipid accumulation and fibrosis. When untreated, NASH bears a high risk of developing liver cirrhosis and consecutive hepatocellular carcinoma requiring liver transplantation in its end-stage. However, donor organ scarcity has prompted the search for alternatives, of which hepatocyte or stem cell-derived hepatocyte transplantation are regarded auspicious options of treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are able to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and thus may represent an alternative cell source to primary hepatocytes. In addition these cells feature anti-inflammatory and pro-regenerative characteristics, which might favour liver recovery from NASH. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential benefit of hepatocyte-like cells derived from human bone marrow MSC in a mouse model of diet-induced NASH. Seven days post-transplant, human hepatocyte-like cells were found in the mouse liver parenchyma. Triglyceride depositions were lowered in the liver but restored to normal in the blood. Hepatic inflammation was attenuated as verified by decreased expression of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, inflammation-associated markers (e.g. lipocalin 2), as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Moreover, the proliferation of host hepatocytes that indicate the regenerative capacity in livers receiving cell transplants was enhanced. Transplantation of MSC-derived human hepatocyte-like cells corrects NASH in mice by restoring triglyceride depositions, reducing inflammation and augmenting the regenerative capacity of the liver. - Highlights: • First time to show NASH in an immune-deficient mouse model. • Human MSC attenuate NASH and improve lipid homeostasis. • MSC act anti-fibrotic and augment liver regeneration by stimulation of proliferation. • Pre-clinical assessment of human MSC for stem cell-based therapy of NASH.

  11. Mouse models in liver cancer research: A review of current literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martijn WH Leenders; Maarten W Nijkamp; Inne HM Borel Rinkes

    2008-01-01

    Primary liver cancer remains one of the most lethal malignancies worldwide. Due to differences in prevalence of etiological factors the incidence of primary liver cancer varies among the world, with a peak in EasL-Asia. As this disease is still lethal in most of the cases, research has to be done to improve our understanding of the disease, offering insights for possible treatment options. For this purpose, animal models are widely used,especially mouse models. In this review, we describe the different types of mouse models used in liver cancer research, with emphasis on genetically engineered mice used in this field. We focus on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as this is by far the most common Lype of primary liver cancer, accounting for 70%-85% of cases.

  12. Mouse cell culture: methods and protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Elvira M. Guerra Shinohara

    2010-01-01

    The mouse is, out of any doubt, the experimental animal par excellence for many many colleagues within the scientific community, notably for those working in mammalian biology (in a broad sense, from basic genetic to modeling human diseases), starting at least from 1664 Robert Hooke experiments on air’s propertyn. Not surprising then that mouse cell cultures is a well established field of research itself and that there are several handbooks devoted to this discipline. Here, Andrew Ward ...

  13. Hepatic Stellate Cells Support Hematopoiesis and are Liver-Resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Kordes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Hematopoiesis can occur in the liver, when the bone marrow fails to provide an adequate environment for hematopoietic stem cells. Hepatic stellate cells possess characteristics of stem/progenitor cells, but their contribution to hematopoiesis is not known thus far. Methods: Isolated hepatic stellate cells from rats were characterized with respect to molecular markers of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC and treated with adipocyte or osteocyte differentiation media. Stellate cells of rats were further co-cultured with murine stem cell antigen-1+ hematopoietic stem cells selected by magnetic cell sorting. The expression of murine hematopoietic stem cell markers was analyzed by mouse specific quantitative PCR during co-culture. Hepatic stellate cells from eGFP+ rats were transplanted into lethally irradiated wild type rats. Results: Desmin-expressing stellate cells were associated with hematopoietic sites in the fetal rat liver. Hepatic stellate cells expressed MSC markers and were able to differentiate into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro. Stellate cells supported hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells during co-culture similar to bone marrow MSC, but failed to differentiate into blood cell lineages after transplantation. Conclusion: Hepatic stellate cells are liver-resident MSC and can fulfill typical functions of bone marrow MSC such as the differentiation into adipocytes or osteocytes and support of hematopoiesis.

  14. Intrahepatic infiltrating NK and CD8 T cells cause liver cell death in different phases of dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jui-Min; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2012-01-01

    Elevated liver enzyme level is an outstanding feature in patients with dengue. However, the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, employing a mouse model we aimed to investigate the immunopathogenic mechanism of dengue liver injury. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were infected intravenously with dengue virus strain 16681. Infected mice had transient viremia, detectable viral capsid gene and cleaved caspase 3 in the liver. In the mean time, NK cell and T cell infiltrations peaked at days 1 and 5, respectively. Neutralizing CXCL10 or depletion of Asialo GM1(+) cells reduced cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+) cells in the liver at day 1 after infection. CD8(+) T cells infiltrated into the liver at later time point and at which time intrahepatic leukocytes (IHL) exhibited cytotoxicity against DENV-infected targets. Cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+) cells were diminished in mice with TCRβ deficiency and in those depleted of CD8(+) T cells, respectively, at day 5 after infection. Moreover, intrahepatic CD8(+) T cells were like their splenic counterparts recognized DENV NS4B(99-107) peptide. Together, these results show that infiltrating NK and CD8(+) T cells cause liver cell death. While NK cells were responsible for cell death at early time point of infection, CD8(+) T cells were for later. CD8(+) T cells that recognize NS4B(99-107) constitute at least one of the major intrahepatic cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell populations.

  15. Intrahepatic infiltrating NK and CD8 T cells cause liver cell death in different phases of dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Min Sung

    Full Text Available Elevated liver enzyme level is an outstanding feature in patients with dengue. However, the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, employing a mouse model we aimed to investigate the immunopathogenic mechanism of dengue liver injury. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were infected intravenously with dengue virus strain 16681. Infected mice had transient viremia, detectable viral capsid gene and cleaved caspase 3 in the liver. In the mean time, NK cell and T cell infiltrations peaked at days 1 and 5, respectively. Neutralizing CXCL10 or depletion of Asialo GM1(+ cells reduced cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+ cells in the liver at day 1 after infection. CD8(+ T cells infiltrated into the liver at later time point and at which time intrahepatic leukocytes (IHL exhibited cytotoxicity against DENV-infected targets. Cleaved caspase 3 and TUNEL(+ cells were diminished in mice with TCRβ deficiency and in those depleted of CD8(+ T cells, respectively, at day 5 after infection. Moreover, intrahepatic CD8(+ T cells were like their splenic counterparts recognized DENV NS4B(99-107 peptide. Together, these results show that infiltrating NK and CD8(+ T cells cause liver cell death. While NK cells were responsible for cell death at early time point of infection, CD8(+ T cells were for later. CD8(+ T cells that recognize NS4B(99-107 constitute at least one of the major intrahepatic cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell populations.

  16. Metabolism, Genomics, and DNA Repair in the Mouse Aging Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Lebel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products, thereby maintaining body homeostasis. The liver undergoes substantial changes in structure and function within old age. Such changes are associated with significant impairment of many hepatic metabolic and detoxification activities, with implications for systemic aging and age-related disease. It has become clear, using rodent models as biological tools, that genetic instability in the form of gross DNA rearrangements or point mutations accumulate in the liver with age. DNA lesions, such as oxidized bases or persistent breaks, increase with age and correlate well with the presence of senescent hepatocytes. The level of DNA damage and/or mutation can be affected by changes in carcinogen activation, decreased ability to repair DNA, or a combination of these factors. This paper covers some of the DNA repair pathways affecting liver homeostasis with age using rodents as model systems.

  17. Clinical data and characterization of the liver conditional mouse model exclude neoplasia as a non-neurological manifestation associated with Friedreich’s ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Martelli

    2012-11-01

    Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA is the most common hereditary ataxia in the caucasian population and is characterized by a mixed spinocerebellar and sensory ataxia, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and increased incidence of diabetes. FRDA is caused by impaired expression of the FXN gene coding for the mitochondrial protein frataxin. During the past ten years, the development of mouse models of FRDA has allowed better understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease. Among the mouse models of FRDA, the liver conditional mouse model pointed to a tumor suppressor activity of frataxin leading to the hypothesis that individuals with FRDA might be predisposed to cancer. In the present work, we investigated the presence and the incidence of neoplasia in the largest FRDA patient cohorts from the USA, Australia and Europe. As no predisposition to cancer could be observed in both cohorts, we revisited the phenotype of the liver conditional mouse model. Our results show that frataxin-deficient livers developed early mitochondriopathy, iron-sulfur cluster deficits and intramitochondrial dense deposits, classical hallmarks observed in frataxin-deficient tissues and cells. With age, a minority of mice developed structures similar to the ones previously associated with tumor formation. However, these peripheral structures contained dying, frataxin-deficient hepatocytes, whereas the inner liver structure was composed of a pool of frataxin-positive cells, due to inefficient Cre-mediated recombination of the Fxn gene, that contributed to regeneration of a functional liver. Together, our data demonstrate that frataxin deficiency and tumorigenesis are not associated.

  18. Effect of exercise on mouse liver and brain bioenergetic infrastructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E, Lezi; Lu, Jianghua; Burns, Jeffrey M; Swerdlow, Russell H

    2013-01-01

    To assess the effects of exercise on liver and brain bioenergetic infrastructures, we exposed C57BL/6 mice to 6 weeks of moderate-intensity treadmill exercise. During the training period, fasting blood glucose was lower in exercised mice than in sedentary mice, but serum insulin levels were not reduced. At week 6, trained mice showed a paradoxical decrease in plasma lactate during exercise, which was accompanied by an increase in the liver monocarboxylate transporter 2 protein level (∼30%, P Exercise increased liver peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator 1α expression (approximately twofold, P brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression (∼40%, P brain parameter observed was a reduction in tumour necrosis factor α expression (∼35%, P exercising muscle modifies the liver bioenergetic infrastructure, and enhanced liver uptake may in turn limit the ability of exercise-generated lactate to modify brain bioenergetics. Also, it appears that, at least in the liver, a dissociated mitochondrial biogenesis, in which some components are strategically enhanced while others are minimized, can occur.

  19. Isolation of Mouse salivary gland stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pringle, Sarah; Nanduri, Lalitha; van der Zwaag, Marianne; van Os, Ronald; Coppes, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Mature salivary glands of both human and mouse origin comprise a minimum of five cell types, each of which facilitates the production and excretion of saliva into the oral cavity. Serous and mucous acinar cells are the protein and mucous producing factories of the gland respectively, and represent

  20. Liver-derived systemic factors drive β-cell hyperplasia in insulin resistant states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Kawamori, Dan; Dirice, Ercument; Liew, Chong Wee; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Hu, Jiang; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Qian, Weijun; Wagers, Amy J.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2013-02-21

    Integrative organ cross-talk regulates key aspects of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation may underlie metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. To test the hypothesis that cross-talk between the liver and pancreatic islets modulates β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance, we used the Liver-specific Insulin Receptor Knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a unique model that exhibits dramatic islet hyperplasia. Using complementary in vivo parabiosis and transplantation assays, and in vitro islet culture approaches, we demonstrate that humoral, non-neural, non-cell autonomous factor(s) induce β-cell proliferation in LIRKO mice. Furthermore, we report that a hepatocyte-derived factor(s) stimulates mouse and human β-cell proliferation in ex vivo assays, independent of ambient glucose and insulin levels. These data implicate the liver as a critical source of β-cell growth factors in insulin resistant states.

  1. Effects of Melatonin on Differentiation Potential of Ito Cells in Mice with Induced Fibrosis of the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalobin, D S; Suprunenko, E A; Golichenkov, V A

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effects of melatonin on differentiation potential of Ito cells during atypical regeneration of mouse liver under conditions of CCl4-induced fibrosis. The dynamics of fibrosis was traced at the histological level and the effects of melatonin on the differentiation potential of mouse Ito cells were evaluated. Melatonin alleviated fibrotic changes in the liver tissue and reduced differentiation of Ito cells into myofibroblasts under conditions of atypical regeneration of the liver in induced fibrosis. The hepatoprotective role of melatonin was shown.

  2. Cinnamon Extract Improves Insulin Sensitivity in the Brain and Lowers Liver Fat in Mouse Models of Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tina; Peter, Andreas; Schulz, Nadja; Drescher, Andrea; Bergheim, Ina; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Siegel-Axel, Dorothea; Schürmann, Annette; Weigert, Cora; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hennige, Anita M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment of diabetic subjects with cinnamon demonstrated an improvement in blood glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity but the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. This work intends to elucidate the impact of cinnamon effects on the brain by using isolated astrocytes, and an obese and diabetic mouse model. Methods Cinnamon components (eugenol, cinnamaldehyde) were added to astrocytes and liver cells to measure insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis. Ob/ob mice were supplemented with extract from cinnamomum zeylanicum for 6 weeks and cortical brain activity, locomotion and energy expenditure were evaluated. Insulin action was determined in brain and liver tissues. Results Treatment of primary astrocytes with eugenol promoted glycogen synthesis, whereas the effect of cinnamaldehyde was attenuated. In terms of brain function in vivo, cinnamon extract improved insulin sensitivity and brain activity in ob/ob mice, and the insulin-stimulated locomotor activity was improved. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance were greatly improved in ob/ob mice due to cinnamon extracts, while insulin secretion was unaltered. This corresponded with lower triglyceride and increased liver glycogen content and improved insulin action in liver tissues. In vitro, Fao cells exposed to cinnamon exhibited no change in insulin action. Conclusions Together, cinnamon extract improved insulin action in the brain as well as brain activity and locomotion. This specific effect may represent an important central feature of cinnamon in improving insulin action in the brain, and mediates metabolic alterations in the periphery to decrease liver fat and improve glucose homeostasis. PMID:24643026

  3. 含人AGM区、胎肝及骨髓基质细胞培养体系程序化诱导小鼠胚胎干细胞向造血干细胞的分化%Effects of sequential inductive systems with feeder cells from human aorta-gonad-mesonephros region, fetal liver and bone marrow on the differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into hematopoietic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡耘; 张绪超; 陈惠芹; 黄绍良

    2011-01-01

    背景:前期已分别制备人主动脉-性腺-中肾区基质细胞系及胎肝基质细胞系,发现前者可促进小鼠胚胎干细胞定向分化为造血干细胞.目的:模拟胚胎发育过程中永久造血发育的时空顺序,探讨人主动脉-性腺-中肾(AGM)区、胎肝(FL)及骨髓(BM)基质细胞对小鼠胚胎干细胞体外诱导分化为造血干细胞的支持作用,以寻求更佳的诱导条件.方法:将小鼠E14 胚胎干细胞诱导为拟胚体(EB),并利用Transwell 非接触共培养体系依次在人主动脉-性腺-中肾区、胎肝及骨髓基质细胞饲养层上进一步诱导分化,按不同诱导阶段分为拟胚体对照、EB/AGM、EB/AGM+FL 和EB/AGM+FL+BM共4 组.共培养6 d 后分别收获各组拟胚体来源细胞,以流式细胞仪检测Sca-1+c-Kit+细胞含量,进行各系造血细胞集落形成单位分析并观察细胞形态.结果与结论:①EB/AGM+FL 组和EB/AGM+FL+BM 组收获细胞涂片均发现原始造血细胞.②拟胚体来源细胞经AGM 区基质细胞诱导后Sca-1+c-Kit+ 细胞明显升高(P < 0.05).③拟胚体对照组造血细胞集落形成单位低于其他各组(P < 0.05),而EB/AGM+FL、EB/AGM+FL+BM组造血细胞集落形成单位计数亦较EB/AGM组明显增高.提示AGM+FL 和AGM+FL+骨髓基质细胞微环境对原始造血干细胞的扩增效应均明显高于单纯主动脉-性腺-中肾饲养层.%BACKGROUND: Previous studies have prepared human aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region stromal cell line and fetal liver stromal cell line, and found that AGM can promote directional differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into hemopoietic stem cells (HSCs).OBJECTIVE: To simulate the spatial and temporal hematopoietic microenvironment changes in embryonic development,investigate the supportive effects of sequential inductive systems with feeder cells from human AGM region and fetal liver and bone marrow on the differentiation of mouse ESCs into HSCs, and design more effective

  4. Differences in Liver Injury and Trophoblastic Mitochondrial Damage in Different Preeclampsia-like Mouse Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Wei Han; Zi Yang; Xiao-Yan Ding; Huan Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Preeclampsia is a multifactorial disease during pregnancy.Dysregulated lipid metabolism may be related to some preeclampsia.We investigated the relationship between triglycerides (TGs) and liver injury in different preeclampsia-like mouse models and their potential common pathways.Methods:Preeclampsia-like models (Nw-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester [L-NAME],lipopolysaccharide [LPS],apolipoprotein C-Ⅲ [Apo] transgnic mice + L-NAME,β2 glycoprotein Ⅰ [βGPI]) were used in four experimental groups:L-NAME (LN),LPS,Apo-LN and βGPI,respectively,and controls received saline (LN-C,LPS-C,Apo-C,βGPI-C).The first three models were established in preimplantation (PI),early-,mid-and late-gestation (EG,MG and LG).βGPI and controls were injected before implantation.Mean arterial pressure (MAP),24-hour urine protein,placental and fetal weight,serum TGs,total cholesterol (TC) and pathologic liver and trophocyte changes were assessed.Results:MAP and proteinuria were significantly increased in the experimental groups.Placenta and fetal weight in PI,EP and MP subgroups were significantly lower than LP.Serum TGs significantly increased in most groups but controls.TC was not different between experimental and control groups.Spotty hepatic cell necrosis was observed in PI,EG,MG in LN,Apo-LN and βGPI,but no morphologic changes were observed in the LPS group.Similar trophoblastic mitochondrial damage was observed in every experimental group.Conclusions:Earlier preeclampsia onset causes a higher MAP and urine protein level,and more severe placental and fetal damage.Preeclampsia-like models generated by varied means lead to different changes in lipid metabolism and associated with liver injury.Trophoblastic mitochondrial damage may be the common terminal pathway in different preeclampsia-like models.

  5. Liver-specific gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is induced by liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudia Lange; Philipp Bassler; Michael V. Lioznov; Helge Bruns; Dietrich Kluth; Axel R. Zander; Henning C. Fiegel

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The origin of putative liver cells from distinct bone marrow stem cells, e.g. hematopoietic stem cells or multipotent adult progenitor cells was found in recent in vitro studies. Cell culture experiments revealed a key role of growth factors for the induction of liver-specific genes in stem cell cultures. We investigated the potential of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow to differentiate into hepatocytic cells in vitro. Furthermore,we assessed the influence of cocultured liver cells on induction of liver-specific gene expression.METHODS: Mesenchymal stem cells were marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP) by retroviral gene transduction. Clonal marked MSC were either cultured under liver stimulating conditions using fibronectin-coated culture dishes and medium supplemented with SCF, HGF,EGF, and FGF-4 alone, or in presence of freshly isolated rat liver cells. Cells in cocultures were harvested and GFP+ or GFP- cells were separated using fluorescence activated cell sorting. RT-PCR analysis for the stem cell marker Thy1 and the hepatocytic markers CK-18, albumin, CK-19,and AFP was performed in the different cell populations.RESULTS: Under the specified culture conditions, rat MSC cocultured with liver cells expressed albumin-, CK-18,CK-19, and AFP-RNA over 3 weeks, whereas MSC cultured alone did not show liver specific gene expression.CONCLUSION: The results indicate that (1) rat MSC from bone marrow can differentiate towards hepatocytic lineage in vitro, and (2) that the microenvironment plays a decisive role for the induction of hepatic differentiation of rMSC.

  6. Metabolism, genomics, and DNA repair in the mouse aging liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebel, Michel; de Souza-Pinto, Nadja C; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    The liver plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of nutrients, drugs, hormones, and metabolic waste products, thereby maintaining body homeostasis. The liver undergoes substantial changes in structure and function within old age. Such changes are associated with significant impairment of many...... hepatic metabolic and detoxification activities, with implications for systemic aging and age-related disease. It has become clear, using rodent models as biological tools, that genetic instability in the form of gross DNA rearrangements or point mutations accumulate in the liver with age. DNA lesions......, such as oxidized bases or persistent breaks, increase with age and correlate well with the presence of senescent hepatocytes. The level of DNA damage and/or mutation can be affected by changes in carcinogen activation, decreased ability to repair DNA, or a combination of these factors. This paper covers some...

  7. Chinese Herbal Preparation Xuebijing Potently Inhibits Inflammasome Activation in Hepatocytes and Ameliorates Mouse Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiqiang Liu

    Full Text Available The Chinese herb preparation Xuebijing injection (XBJ has been widely used in the management of various septic disorders or inflammation-related conditions, however the molecular mechanism of its anti-inflammatory effect remains largely elusive. In the current study, we found that XBJ treatment potently ameliorated mouse hepatic ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury, manifested as decreased liver function tests (LDH, ALT, AST, improved inflammation and less hepatocyte apoptosis. Notably, XBJ markedly inhibited inflammasome activation and IL-1 production in mouse livers subjected to IRI, even in the absence of Kupffer cells, suggesting Kupffer cells are not necessary for hepatic inflammasome activation upon Redox-induced sterile inflammation. This finding led us to investigate the role of XBJ on hepatocyte apoptosis and inflammasome activation using an in vitro hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-triggered hepatocyte injury model. Our data clearly demonstrated that XBJ potently inhibited apoptosis, as well as caspase-1 cleavage and IL-1β production in a time- and dose-dependent manner in isolated hepatocytes, suggesting that in addition to its known modulatory effect on NF-κB-dependent inflammatory gene expression, it also has a direct impact on hepatocyte inflammasome activation. The current study not only deepens our understanding of how XBJ ameliorates inflammation and apoptosis, but also has immediate practical significance in many clinical situations such as partial hepatectomy, liver transplantation, etc.

  8. Maternal western diet primes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in adult mouse offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pruis, M. G. M.; Lendvai, A.; Bloks, V. W.; Zwier, M. V.; Baller, J. F. W.; de Bruin, A.; Groen, A. K.; Plosch, T.

    AimMetabolic programming via components of the maternal diet during gestation may play a role in the development of different aspects of the metabolic syndrome. Using a mouse model, we aimed to characterize the role of maternal western-type diet in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver

  9. Adult liver stem cells in hepatic regeneration and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak

    2015-01-01

    An alternative source of livers for transplantation in patients with (genetic) liver diseases and liver failure is needed because liver donors are scarce. HPC-derived hepatocyte-like cells could be one of the options. Because dogs and humans share liver-pathologies and disease-pathways, the dog is c

  10. An Efficient Protocol for Deriving Liver Stem Cells from Neonatal Mice: Validating Its Differentiation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugapriya Dhanasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of liver regeneration depends on the availability of suitable cell types and their potential to differentiate into functional hepatocytes. To identify the stem cells which have the ability to differentiate into hepatocytes, we used neonatal liver as source. However, the current protocol for isolating stem cells from liver involves enzymes like collagenase, hyaluronidase exposed for longer duration which limits the success. This results in the keen interest to develop an easy single step enzyme digestion protocol for isolating stem cells from liver for tissue engineering approaches. Thus, the unlimited availability of cell type favors setting up the functional recovery of the damaged liver, ensuring ahead success towards treating liver diseases. We attempted to isolate liver stem derived cells (LDSCs from mouse neonatal liver using single step minimal exposure to enzyme followed by in vitro culturing. The cells isolated were characterized for stem cell markers and subjected to lineage differentiation. Further, LDSCs were induced to hepatocyte differentiation and validated with hepatocyte markers. Finally, we developed a reproducible, efficient protocol for isolation of LDSCs with functional hepatocytes differentiation potential, which further can be used as in vitro model system for assessing drug toxicity assays in various preclinical trials.

  11. Genetic variation in the metabolism of coumarin in mouse liver

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lovell, D.P.; Iersel, van M.P.L.S.; Walters, D.G.; Price, R.J.; Lake, B.G.

    1999-01-01

    The metabolism of 50 μM [3-14C] coumarin to polar products separated by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and covalently bound metabolites in liver microsomes was compared in a series of inbred strains of mice. Coumarin metabolism to total polar products was higher in female than male mi

  12. Mapping of a liver phosphorylase kinase [alpha]-subunit gene on the mouse x chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yan; Derry, J.M.J.; Barnard, P.J. (MRC Molecular Neurobiology Unit, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Hendrickx, J.; Coucke, P.; Willems, P.R. (Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium))

    1993-01-01

    Phosphorylase kinase (PHK) is a regulatory enzyme of the glycogenolytic pathway composed of a complex of four subunits. We recently mapped the muscle [alpha]-subunit gene (Phka) to the mouse X chromosome in a region syntenic with the proximal long arm of the human X chromosome and containing the human homologue of this gene, PHKA. We now report the mapping of the liver [alpha]-subunit gene to the telomeric end of the mouse X chromosome. This mapping position would suggest a location for the human liver [alpha]-subunit gene on the proximal short arm of the X chromosome, a region recently implicated in X-linked liver glycogenosis (XLG). 20 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Gene signatures derived from a c-MET-driven liver cancer mouse model predict survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ivanovska

    Full Text Available Biomarkers derived from gene expression profiling data may have a high false-positive rate and must be rigorously validated using independent clinical data sets, which are not always available. Although animal model systems could provide alternative data sets to formulate hypotheses and limit the number of signatures to be tested in clinical samples, the predictive power of such an approach is not yet proven. The present study aims to analyze the molecular signatures of liver cancer in a c-MET-transgenic mouse model and investigate its prognostic relevance to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Tissue samples were obtained from tumor (TU, adjacent non-tumor (AN and distant normal (DN liver in Tet-operator regulated (TRE human c-MET transgenic mice (n = 21 as well as from a Chinese cohort of 272 HBV- and 9 HCV-associated HCC patients. Whole genome microarray expression profiling was conducted in Affymetrix gene expression chips, and prognostic significances of gene expression signatures were evaluated across the two species. Our data revealed parallels between mouse and human liver tumors, including down-regulation of metabolic pathways and up-regulation of cell cycle processes. The mouse tumors were most similar to a subset of patient samples characterized by activation of the Wnt pathway, but distinctive in the p53 pathway signals. Of potential clinical utility, we identified a set of genes that were down regulated in both mouse tumors and human HCC having significant predictive power on overall and disease-free survival, which were highly enriched for metabolic functions. In conclusions, this study provides evidence that a disease model can serve as a possible platform for generating hypotheses to be tested in human tissues and highlights an efficient method for generating biomarker signatures before extensive clinical trials have been initiated.

  14. Triton X-114 phase separation in the isolation and purification of mouse liver microsomal membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Rommel A; Chen, Yuan-Shou; Kapp, Eugene A; Greening, David W; Mathivanan, Suresh; Simpson, Richard J

    2011-08-01

    Integral membrane proteins (IMPs) mediate several cellular functions including cell adhesion, ion and nutrient transport, and cell signalling. IMPs are typically hard to isolate and purify due to their hydrophobic nature and low cellular abundance, however, microsomes are small lipid vesicles rich in IMPs, which form spontaneously when cells are mechanically disrupted. In this study, we have employed mouse liver microsomes as a model for optimising a method for IMP isolation and characterisation. Microsomes were collected by differential centrifugation, purified with sodium carbonate, and subjected to GeLC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 1124 proteins were identified in the microsome fraction, with 47% (524/1124) predicted by TMHMM to contain at least one transmembrane domain (TMD). The ability of phase partitioning using the detergent Triton X-114 (TX-114) to further enrich for membrane proteins was evaluated. Microsomes were subjected to successive rounds of solubility-based phase separation, with proteins partitioning into the aqueous phase, detergent phase, or TX-114-insoluble pellet fraction. GeLC-MS/MS analysis of the three TX-114 fractions identified 1212 proteins, of which 146 were not detected in the un-fractionated microsome sample. Conspicuously, IMPs partitioned to the detergent phase, with 56% (435/770) of proteins identified in that fraction containing at least one TMD. GO Slim characterisation of the microsome proteome revealed enrichment of proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, Golgi apparatus, endosome, and cytoplasm. Further, enzymes including monooxygenases were well represented with 35 cytochrome P450 identifications (CYPs 1A2, 2A5, 2A12, 2B10, 2C29, 2C37, 2C39, 2C44, 2C50, 2C54. 2C67, 2C68, 2C70, 2D10, 2D11, 2D22, 2D26, 2D9, 2E1, 2F2, 2J5, 2U1, 3A11, 3A13, 3A25, 4A10, 4A12A, 4A12B, 4F13, 4F14, 4F15, 4V3, 51,7B1, and 8B1). Evaluation of biological processes showed enrichment of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and

  15. Development of neural precursor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xuan; LI Hai-di; Li Shu-nong; XU Hai-wei; XU Ling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the serum-free culture conditions for differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells)into neural precursor cells (NPC) and compare the effects of human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) as the feeder layer of ES with that of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF)in vitro. Methods: Mouse ES cells were cultured in or not in feeder layer cells medium containing or not leukemia inhibitory factor to suppress their differentiation. Immunocytochemical method was used to identify NPC by detecting nestin antigen and alkaline phosphatase. Results: The ES cells cultured in HEF were positive to alkaline phosphatase. Serum-free medium allowed the differentiation of ES cells into NPC. Conclusion:HEF could replace MEF and keep the undifferentiated condition of ES cells with more benefits. NPC of high purity could be cultured from ES cells by serum-free culture method.

  16. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  17. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  18. Isolation and analysis of mouse microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Jenny A; Cardona, Sandra M; Cardona, Astrid E

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are mononuclear phagocytes that make up about 10% of the central nervous system (CNS). They are known for their surveillant behavior, which involves continuous monitoring of neural tissue by extending and retracting their processes. Microglial cells are derived from myeloid progenitor cells and play important roles in homeostasis as well as inflammatory and immune responses in the brain. This unit describes several microglial cell isolation protocols that can be easily adapted for projects requiring a rapid and efficient analysis of mouse microglial cells by flow cytometry. Methods for visualizing microglial cells using in situ immunohistochemistry and immunochemistry in free-floating sections are also included.

  19. Mechanism of ethylbenzene-induced mouse-specific lung tumor: metabolism of ethylbenzene by rat, mouse, and human liver and lung microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghir, Shakil A; Rick, David L; McClymont, E L; Zhang, Fagen; Bartels, Michael J; Bus, James S

    2009-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine species differences in the metabolism of ethylbenzene (EB) in liver and lung. EB (0.22-7.0mM) was incubated with mouse, rat and human liver and lung microsomes and the formation of 1-phenylethanol (1PE), acetophenone (AcPh), 2-ethylphenol (2EP), 4-ethylphenol (4EP), 2,5-ethylquinone, and 3,4-ethylquinone were measured. Reactive metabolites (2,5-dihydroxyethylbenzene-GSH [2EP-GSH] and 3,4-dihydroxyethylbenzene-GSH [4EP-GSH]) were monitored via glutathione (GSH) trapping technique. None of the metabolites were formed at detectable levels in incubations with human lung microsomes. Percent conversion of EB to 1PE ranged from 1% (rat lung; 7.0mM EB) to 58% (mouse lung; 0.22 mM EB). More 1PE was formed in mouse lung than in mouse liver microsomes, although formation of 1PE by rat liver and lung microsomes was similar. Metabolism of EB to 1PE was in the order of mouse > rat > human. Formation of AcPh was roughly an order of magnitude lower than 1PE. Conversion of EB to ring-hydroxylated metabolites was much lower (0.0001% [4EP-GSH; rat lung] to 0.6% [2EP-GSH; mouse lung]); 2EP-GSH was typically 10-fold higher than 4EP-GSH. Formation of 2EP-GSH was higher by lung (highest by mouse lung) than liver microsomes and the formation of 2EP-GSH by mouse liver microsomes was higher than rat and human liver microsomes. Increasing concentrations of EB did lead to a decrease in amount of some formed metabolites. This may indicate some level of substrate- or metabolite-mediated inhibition. High concentrations of 2EP and 4EP were incubated with microsomes to further investigate their oxidation to ethylcatechol (ECat) and ethylhydroquinone (EHQ). Conversion of 2EP to EHQ ranged from 6% to 9% by liver (mouse > human > rat) and from 0.1% to 18% by lung microsomes (mouse > rat > human). Conversion of 4EP to ECat ranged from 2% to 4% by liver (mouse > human approximately rat) and from 0.3% to 7% by lung microsomes (mouse > rat > human). Although ring

  20. Stem cell differentiation and human liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Li Zhou; Claire N Medine; Liang Zhu; David C Hay

    2012-01-01

    Human stem cells are scalable cell populations capable of cellular differentiation.This makes them a very attractive in vitro cellular resource and in theory provides unlimited amounts of primary cells.Such an approach has the potential to improve our understanding of human biology and treating disease.In the future it may be possible to deploy novel stem cell-based approaches to treat human liver diseases.In recent years,efficient hepatic differentiation from human stem cells has been achieved by several research groups including our own.In this review we provide an overview of the field and discuss the future potential and limitations of stem cell technology.

  1. Deciphering the Developmental Dynamics of the Mouse Liver Transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumedha S Gunewardena

    Full Text Available During development, liver undergoes a rapid transition from a hematopoietic organ to a major organ for drug metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. However, little is known on a transcriptome level of the genes and RNA-splicing variants that are differentially regulated with age, and which up-stream regulators orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver. We used RNA-Seq to interrogate the developmental dynamics of the liver transcriptome in mice at 12 ages from late embryonic stage (2-days before birth to maturity (60-days after birth. Among 21,889 unique NCBI RefSeq-annotated genes, 9,641 were significantly expressed in at least one age, 7,289 were differently regulated with age, and 859 had multiple (> = 2 RNA splicing-variants. Factor analysis showed that the dynamics of hepatic genes fall into six distinct groups based on their temporal expression. The average expression of cytokines, ion channels, kinases, phosphatases, transcription regulators and translation regulators decreased with age, whereas the average expression of peptidases, enzymes and transmembrane receptors increased with age. The average expression of growth factors peak between Day-3 and Day-10, and decrease thereafter. We identified critical biological functions, upstream regulators, and putative transcription modules that seem to govern age-specific gene expression. We also observed differential ontogenic expression of known splicing variants of certain genes, and 1,455 novel splicing isoform candidates. In conclusion, the hepatic ontogeny of the transcriptome ontogeny has unveiled critical networks and up-stream regulators that orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver, and suggest that age contributes to the complexity of the alternative splicing landscape of the hepatic transcriptome.

  2. Deciphering the Developmental Dynamics of the Mouse Liver Transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunewardena, Sumedha S.; Yoo, Byunggil; Peng, Lai; Lu, Hong; Zhong, Xiaobo; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Cui, Julia Yue

    2015-01-01

    During development, liver undergoes a rapid transition from a hematopoietic organ to a major organ for drug metabolism and nutrient homeostasis. However, little is known on a transcriptome level of the genes and RNA-splicing variants that are differentially regulated with age, and which up-stream regulators orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver. We used RNA-Seq to interrogate the developmental dynamics of the liver transcriptome in mice at 12 ages from late embryonic stage (2-days before birth) to maturity (60-days after birth). Among 21,889 unique NCBI RefSeq-annotated genes, 9,641 were significantly expressed in at least one age, 7,289 were differently regulated with age, and 859 had multiple (> = 2) RNA splicing-variants. Factor analysis showed that the dynamics of hepatic genes fall into six distinct groups based on their temporal expression. The average expression of cytokines, ion channels, kinases, phosphatases, transcription regulators and translation regulators decreased with age, whereas the average expression of peptidases, enzymes and transmembrane receptors increased with age. The average expression of growth factors peak between Day-3 and Day-10, and decrease thereafter. We identified critical biological functions, upstream regulators, and putative transcription modules that seem to govern age-specific gene expression. We also observed differential ontogenic expression of known splicing variants of certain genes, and 1,455 novel splicing isoform candidates. In conclusion, the hepatic ontogeny of the transcriptome ontogeny has unveiled critical networks and up-stream regulators that orchestrate age-specific biological functions in liver, and suggest that age contributes to the complexity of the alternative splicing landscape of the hepatic transcriptome. PMID:26496202

  3. Transformation and action of extracellular NAD+ in perfused rat and mouse livers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Carla BROETTO-BLAZON; Fabricio BRACHT; Livia BRACHT; Ana Maria KELMER-BRACHT; Adelar BRACHT

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Transformation and possible metabolic effects of extracellular NAD+ were investigated in the livers of mice (Mus mus-culus; Swiss strain) and rats (Rattus novergicus; Holtzman and Wistar strains). Methods: The livers were perfused in an open system using oxygen-saturated Krebs/Henseleit-bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) as the perfusion fluid. The transformation of NAD+ was monitored using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: In the mouse liver, the single-pass metabolism of 100 μmol/L NAD+ was almost complete; ADP-ribose and nicoti-namide were the main products in the outflowing perfusate. In the livers of both Holtzman and Wistar rats, the main trans-formation products were ADP-ribose, uric acid and nicotinamide; significant amounts of inosine and AMP were also iden-tified. On a weight basis, the transformation of NAD+ was more efficient in the mouse liver. In the rat liver, 100 μmol/L NAD+ transiently inhibited gluconeogenesis and oxygen uptake. Inhibition was followed by a transient stimulation. Inhibi-tion was more pronounced in the Wistar strain and stimulation was more pronounced in the Holtzman strain. In the mouse liver, no clear effects on gluconeogenesis and oxygen uptake were found even at 500 μmol/L NAD+. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the functions of extracellular NAD+ are species-dependent and that observations in one species are strictly valid for that species. Interspecies extrapolations should thus be made very carefully. Actually, even variants of the same species can demonstrate considerably different responses.

  4. Germ cell transplantation in infertility mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This work investigated the spermatogenesis in an infertility BALB/c-nu mouse model by reinfusing germline stem cells into seminiferous tubules.Donor germ cells were isolated from male FVB/NJ-GFP transgenic mice.Seminiferous tubule microiniection was applied to achieve intratubular germ cell transfer.The germ cells were injected into exposed testes of the infertility mice.We used green fluorescence and DNA analysis of donor cells from GFP transgenic mice as genetic marker.The natural mating and Southern blot methods were applied to analyze the effect of sperm cell transplantation and the sperm function after seminiferous tubule microinjecUon.The spermatogenesis was morphologically observed from the seminiferous tubules in 41/60(68.33%)of the injected recipient mice using allogeneic donor cells.In the colonized testes,matured spermatozoa were seen in the lumen of the seminiferous tubules.In this research,BALB/c-nu infertility mouse model,the recipient animal,was used to avoid immunological rejection of donor cells,and germ cell transplantation was applied to overcome infertility caused by busulfan treatment.These results demonstrate that this technique of germ cell transplantation is of great use.Germ cell transplantation could be potentially valuable to oncological patients.

  5. Acute digoxin loading reduces ABCA8A mRNA expression in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakaumi, Michi; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Ando, Hitoshi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Tsuruoka, Shuichi

    2005-12-01

    Human ABCA8, a new member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, transports certain lipophilic drugs, such as digoxin. To investigate the roles of this transporter, we cloned a mouse homologue of ABCA8, from a mouse heart cDNA library, named ABCA8a. The deduced mouse ABCA8a protein is 66% identical with that of human ABCA8 and possesses features common to the ABC superfamily. It was found that ABCA8a was mainly expressed in the liver and heart, similar to human ABCA8. We further evaluated the effect of acute digoxin (a substrate for ABCA8) intoxication on the mRNA expression of ABCA8 using northern blotting with a 3' non-coding region as a probe to avoid cross-hybridization with other ABCA genes. Following acute digoxin infusion, the mRNA expression of ABCA8 was significantly reduced in the liver 12-24 h after injection (14.7% of vehicle treatment), but not in the heart and kidney. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the reduction in ABCA8a mRNA. Similar reductions in ABCA5, ABCA7, ABCA8b and ABCA9 mRNA were also observed. A comparable amount of digitoxin did not affect ABCA8a mRNA expression in the liver. The results suggest that ABCA8 may play a role in digoxin metabolism in the liver.

  6. Antifibrotic mechanism of Fuzheng Huayu prescription by regulation of the differential expression of microRNAs in mouse liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Qinglan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo identify microRNAs (miRNAs regulated by Fuzheng Huayu prescription (FZHY and analyze their biological functions, and to partially reveal the antifibrotic mechanism of FZHY in liver fibrosis. MethodsThe mouse model of liver fibrosis was developed by subcutaneous injection of CCl4. The mice were divided into normal group, model group, and FZHY group. The mice received FZHY once a day at 3 days before model establishment, and the treatment lasted for 8 weeks. Collagen deposition in liver tissue was evaluated by Sirius Red staining and determination of hydroxyproline (Hyp content. The expression profile of miRNAs in mouse liver was determined by miRNA microarray. According to the expression profile, miRNAs regulated by FZHY were identified by looking for miRNAs showing the same trends in the normal group and the FZHY group compared with the model group. The results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. The miRNA targets were predicted using TargetScan program and PITA database. The DAVID database was used to analyze and identify the substantial functions and signaling pathways of those miRNA targets. Comparison between multiple groups was made by analysis of variance. ResultsFZHY substantially reduced Hyp content and inhibited collagen deposition in the fibrotic liver tissue. The miRNA microarray identified mmu-miR-322, mmu-miR-342-3p, and mmu-miR-296-5p as miRNAs regulated by FZHY. According to the analysis of signaling pathway, the three miRNAs might regulate 32 signaling pathways, including chemokine signaling pathway, focal adhesion, MAPK signaling pathway, regulation of actin cytoskeleton, gap junction, ECM-receptor interaction, Wnt signaling pathway, and Jak-STAT signaling pathway, which were closely related to liver fibrosis; the functional enrichment analysis predicted 32 substantial functions of the three miRNAs, including GTPase regulator, cell junction, regulation of apoptosis, regulation of Ras signal transduction

  7. LIVER AND BONE MARROW STEM/PROGENITOR CELLS AS REGULATORS OF REPARATIVE REGENERATION OF DAMAGED LIVER

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    А. V. Lundup

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review the modern information about effectiveness of liver insufficiency treatment by stem/ progenitor cells of liver (oval cells and bone marrow (hemopoietic cells and mesenchymal cells was presented. It is shown that medical action of these cells is referred on normalization of liver cell interaction and reorganization of processes of a reparative regeneration in damaged liver. It is believed that application of mesenchymal stromal cells from an autological bone marrow is the most perspective strategy. However, for definitive judgement about regenerative possibilities of the autological bone marrow cells it is necessary to carry out large-scale double blind clinical researches. 

  8. Cellular Mechanisms of Liver Regeneration and Cell-Based Therapies of Liver Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarygin, Konstantin N.

    2017-01-01

    The emerging field of regenerative medicine offers innovative methods of cell therapy and tissue/organ engineering as a novel approach to liver disease treatment. The ultimate scientific foundation of both cell therapy of liver diseases and liver tissue and organ engineering is delivered by the in-depth studies of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration. The cellular mechanisms of the homeostatic and injury-induced liver regeneration are unique. Restoration of the mass of liver parenchyma is achieved by compensatory hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the differentiated parenchymal cells, hepatocytes, while expansion and differentiation of the resident stem/progenitor cells play a minor or negligible role. Participation of blood-borne cells of the bone marrow origin in liver parenchyma regeneration has been proven but does not exceed 1-2% of newly formed hepatocytes. Liver regeneration is activated spontaneously after injury and can be further stimulated by cell therapy with hepatocytes, hematopoietic stem cells, or mesenchymal stem cells. Further studies aimed at improving the outcomes of cell therapy of liver diseases are underway. In case of liver failure, transplantation of engineered liver can become the best option in the foreseeable future. Engineering of a transplantable liver or its major part is an enormous challenge, but rapid progress in induced pluripotency, tissue engineering, and bioprinting research shows that it may be doable. PMID:28210629

  9. Transplantation of fetal liver epithelial progenitor cells ameliorates experimental liver fibrosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Fang Zheng; Li-Jian Liang; Chang-Xiong Wu; Jin-Song Chen; Zhen-Sheng Zhang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of transplanted fetal liver epithelial progenitor (FLEP) cells on liver fibrosis in mice.METHODS: FLEP cells were isolated from embryonal day (ED) 14 BALB/c mice and transplanted into female syngenic BALB/c mice (n = 60). After partial hepatectomy (PH), diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was administered to induce liver fibrosis. Controls received FLEP cells and non-supplemented drinking water, the model group received DEN-spiked water, and the experimental group received FLEP cells and DEN.Mice were killed after 1, 2, and 3 mo, and alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) in serum,and hydroxyproline (Hyp) content in liver were assessed.Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) of liver was tested by immunohistochemistry. Transplanted male mice FLEP cells were identified by immunocytochemistry for sry (sex determination region for Y chromosome) protein.RESULTS: Serum ALT, AST, HA, and LN were markedly reduced by transplanted FLEP cells. Liver Hyp content and α-SMA staining in mice receiving FLEP cells were lower than that of the model group, which was consistent with altered liver pathology. Transplanted cells proliferated and differentiated into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with 30%-50% repopulation in the liver fibrosis induced by DEN after 3 mo.CONCLUSION: Transplanted FLEP cells proliferate and differentiate into hepatocytes and bile duct epithelial cells with high repopulation capacity in the fiberized liver induced by DEN, which restores liver function and reduces liver fibrosis.

  10. Expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 in aging of transgenic mouse liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Background Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) is related to the aging of many organs, but few data are available on the change of TIMP-1 in liver aging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression and role of TIMP-1, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 in the process of natural aging in the livers of normal and transgenic mice, and to detect the effects of TIMP-1 on oxidative level and anti-oxidative ability of the livers of transgenic young mice.Methods Normal and transgenic mice were divided into 3 groups according to their age: 3-month-old group (n=5), 12-month-old group (n=5) and 24-month-old group (n=5). Histopathological changes of the liver were observed after HE and Masson staining. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of TIMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-9 were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction; protein expression was measured by Western blot in the livers of normal and transgenic mice of various ages. Changes in levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), monoamine oxidase (MAO), malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as oxidative and anti-oxidative ability were measured.Results Histologically, more fatty degeneration and collagen deposition were found in the aging livers of transgenic mice than in those of the normal mice as their age of months increased. The mRNA and protein expressions of TIMP-1 were significantly high in the oldest animals. The histopathological changes, mRNA and protein expressions of TIMP-1 increased significantly in the liver of transgenic mice as compared with normal mice. The expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 showed a minor change in the process of aging. Liver change and collagen deposition were not observed in young mice, but the activity of SOD decreased (P<0.05), and the activity of MAO (P<0.01) and the content of MDA increased in the liver of transgenic mice (P<0.01).Conclusions The expression of TIMP-1 is significantly high in the liver of transgenic mouse in the

  11. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihnatovych, Ivanna; Sielski, Neil L; Hofmann, Wilma A

    2014-01-01

    Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C). Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP) model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate-) cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  12. Hepatic stellate cell-expressed endosialin balances fibrogenesis and hepatocyte proliferation during liver damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogler, Carolin; Wieland, Matthias; König, Courtney; Hu, Junhao; Runge, Anja; Korn, Claudia; Besemfelder, Eva; Breitkopf-Heinlein, Katja; Komljenovic, Dorde; Dooley, Steven; Schirmacher, Peter; Longerich, Thomas; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2015-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a reversible wound-healing response to injury reflecting the critical balance between liver repair and scar formation. Chronic damage leads to progressive substitution of liver parenchyma by scar tissue and ultimately results in liver cirrhosis. Stromal cells (hepatic stellate cells [HSC] and endothelial cells) have been proposed to control the balance between liver fibrosis and regeneration. Here, we show that endosialin, a C-type lectin, expressed in the liver exclusively by HSC and portal fibroblasts, is upregulated in liver fibrosis in mouse and man. Chronic chemically induced liver damage resulted in reduced fibrosis and enhanced hepatocyte proliferation in endosialin-deficient (ENKO) mice. Correspondingly, acute-liver-damage-induced hepatocyte proliferation (partial hepatectomy) was increased in ENKO mice. A candidate-based screen of known regulators of hepatocyte proliferation identified insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) as selectively endosialin-dependent hepatocyte mitogen. Collectively, the study establishes a critical role of HSC in the reciprocal regulation of fibrogenesis vs. hepatocyte proliferation and identifies endosialin as a therapeutic target in non-neoplastic settings. PMID:25680861

  13. Mutagenic activation reduces carcinogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene for mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikova, L P; Bogdanova, L A; Kaledin, V I

    2013-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (aromatic amine and azo stain metabolic stimulation inhibitor) reduced the hepatocarcinogenic activity of 4-aminoazobenzene and reduced that of ortho-aminoazotoluene in suckling mice. Both 4-aminoazobenzene and ortho-aminoazotoluene exhibited mutagenic activity in Ames' test in vitro on S. typhimurium TA 98 strain with activation with liver enzymes; this mutagenic activity was similarly suppressed by adding pentachlorophenol into activation medium. Induction of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes, stimulating the mutagenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene, suppressed its carcinogenic effect on mouse liver. Hence, ortho-aminotoluene (the initial compound), but not its mutagenic metabolites, was the direct active hepatocarcinogen for mice.

  14. A balanced diet is necessary for proper entrainment signals of the mouse liver clock.

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    Akiko Hirao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The peripheral circadian clock in mice is entrained not only by light-dark cycles but also by daily restricted feeding schedules. Behavioral and cell culture experiments suggest an increase in glucose level as a factor in such feeding-induced entrainment. For application of feeding-induced entrainment in humans, nutrient content and dietary variations should be considered. PRINCIPAL FINDING: To elucidate the food composition necessary for dietary entrainment, we examined whether complete or partial substitution of dietary nutrients affected phase shifts in liver clocks of mice. Compared with fasting mice or ad libitum fed mice, the liver bioluminescence rhythm advanced by 3-4 h on the middle day in Per2::luciferase knock-in mice that were administered a standard mouse diet, i.e. AIN-93M formula [0.6-0.85 g/10 g mouse BW] (composition: 14% casein, 47% cornstarch, 15% gelatinized cornstarch, 10% sugar, 4% soybean oil, and 10% other [fiber, vitamins, minerals, etc.], for 2 days. When each nutrient was tested alone (100% nutrient, an insignificant weak phase advance was found to be induced by cornstarch and soybean oil, but almost no phase advance was induced by gelatinized cornstarch, high-amylose cornstarch, glucose, sucrose, or casein. A combination of glucose and casein without oil, vitamin, or fiber caused a significant phase advance. When cornstarch in AIN-93M was substituted with glucose, sucrose, fructose, polydextrose, high-amylose cornstarch, or gelatinized cornstarch, the amplitude of phase advance paralleled the increase in blood glucose concentration. CONCLUSIONS: Our results strongly suggest the following: (1 balanced diets containing carbohydrates/sugars and proteins are good for restricted feeding-induced entrainment of the peripheral circadian clock and (2 a balanced diet that increases blood glucose, but not by sugar alone, is suitable for entrainment. These findings may assist in the development of dietary

  15. Identification and cloning of a novel isoform of mouse secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, mSLPI-beta, overexpressed in murine leukemias and a highly liver metastatic tumor, IMC-HA1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, M; Arakawa, H; Nishimura, S

    1999-01-01

    Several genes showing transcriptional alteration in a highly liver metastatic murine carcinoma cell line, IMC-HA1, were identified by mRNA differential display system. Among them, a gene identical to mSLPI was isolated as mSLPI-alpha and -beta. They were produced through an alternative splicing. Their full-length cDNA sequences were determined, and their expression in various murine tumors and normal tissues was analysed. The deduced translation product of mSLPI-alpha showed 59% identity to hSLPI. Although mSLPI-beta had the same 103-amino-acid sequence from the carboxyl terminus, the amino terminus showed hydrophilicity opposite mSLPI-alpha or hSLPI. The mSLPI-alpha was expressed ubiquitously in various tumor cell lines. Interestingly, however, mSLPI-beta expression was only observed in P388 and L1210 leukemias and IMC-HA1 cells, and in lower amounts in three normal tissues (thymus, lung and spleen), suggesting that mSLPI, and in particular the unusual splicing product, mSLPI-beta, plays a specific role in these cells, including malignant processes of tumor cells.

  16. Hepatoprotective Effects of Antrodia cinnamomea: The Modulation of Oxidative Stress Signaling in a Mouse Model of Alcohol-Induced Acute Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yange Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the components of A. cinnamomea (AC mycelia were systematically analyzed. Subsequently, its hepatoprotective effects and the underlying mechanisms were explored using a mouse model of acute alcohol-induced liver injury. AC contained 25 types of fatty acid, 16 types of amino acid, 3 types of nucleotide, and 8 types of mineral. The hepatoprotective effects were observed after 2 weeks of AC treatment at doses of 75 mg/kg, 225 mg/kg, and 675 mg/kg in the mouse model. These effects were indicated by the changes in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, several oxidation-related factors, and inflammatory cytokines in serum and/or liver samples. AC reduced the incidence rate of necrosis, inflammatory infiltration, fatty droplets formation, and cell apoptosis in liver detecting via histological and TUNEL assay. In addition, AC reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, -8, and -9 and the levels of phosphor-protein kinase B (Akt and phosphor-nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB in the liver samples. Collectively, AC-mediated hepatoprotective effects in a mouse model of acute alcohol-induced liver injury are the result of reduction in oxidative stress. This may be associated with Akt/NF-κB signaling. These results provide valuable evidence to support the use of A. cinnamomea as a functional food and/or medicine.

  17. Establishment of mouse Mac-2 binding protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and its application for mouse chronic liver disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Ayumi; Kamada, Yoshihiro; Ebisutani, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Ueda, Yui; Arai, Hitomi; Fujii, Hironobu; Takamatsu, Shinji; Maruyama, Nobuhiro; Maeda, Masahiro; Takehara, Tetsuo; Miyoshi, Eiji

    2017-08-01

    We identified Mac-2 (galectin-3) binding protein (Mac-2bp) as a novel diagnostic and liver fibrosis predicting biomarker for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in humans. In mouse models, there are no serum biomarkers predicting liver disease severity. In this study, we developed a mouse Mac-2bp enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system and determined its efficacy for predicting the severity of liver disease in mouse models, especially in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) models. We established several rat monoclonal antibodies against mouse Mac-2bp, selected two clones for the ELISA, and checked the accuracy and reproducibility of the ELISA, especially for NAFLD models and liver fibrosis models. We also investigated the relationships between serum levels and hepatic gene expression of Mac-2bp in mouse models. Our ELISA system had high accuracy and reproducibility (R(2)  = 0.999). The intra-assay and inter-assay results for the coefficient of variation were 2.0-3.7% and 1.7-6.9%, respectively. The levels of bilirubin, hemoglobin, and chyle did not affect the Mac-2bp serum levels detected by our ELISA kit. In the mouse models, serum Mac-2bp levels increased with liver disease progression (F0/F1/F2/F3, 239.1 ± 36.7 / 259.1 ± 43.0 / 457.5 ± 162.0 / 643.7 ± 116.0 ng/mL; P Mac-2bp (R = 0.42, P Mac-2bp ELISA system effectively predicts severity of NAFLD and liver fibrosis in mouse models. © 2016 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  18. A SMALL POPULATION OF LIVER ENDOTHELIAL CELLS UNDERGOES ENDOTHELIAL TO MESENCHYMAL TRANSITION IN RESPONSE TO CHRONIC LIVER INJURY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribera, Jordi; Pauta, Montse; Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Cordoba, Bernat; Bosch, Anna; Calvo, Maria; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Mira, Aurea; Jimenez, Wladimiro; Morales-Ruiz, Manuel

    2017-08-10

    Rising evidence points to endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) as a significant source of the mesenchymal cell population in fibrotic diseases. In this context, we hypothesized that liver endothelial cells undergo EndMT during fibrosis progression. Cirrhosis in mice was induced by CCl4 A transgenic mouse expressing a red fluorescent protein reporter under the control of Tie2 promoter (Tie2-tdTomato) was used to trace the acquisition of EndMT. Sinusoidal vascular connectivity was evaluated by intravital microscopy and high resolution 3D confocal microscopy. A modest but significant fraction of liver endothelial cells from both cirrhotic patients and CCl4-treated Tie2-tdTomato mice acquired an EndMT phenotype characterized by the co-expression of CD31 and α-SMA, compared with non-cirrhotic livers. BMP-7 inhibited the acquisition of EndMT induced by TGF-β1 treatment in cultured MLiECs from control mice. EndMT was also reduced significantly in vivo in cirrhotic Tie2-tdTomato mice treated intraperitoneally with BMP-7 compared with untreated mice (1.9±0.2 vs. 3.8±0.3 %, respectively; p<0.05). The decrease of EndMT in cirrhotic livers correlated with a significant decrease in liver fibrosis (p<0.05) and an improvement in the vascular disorganization rate (p<0.05). We demonstrated the acquisition of the EndMT phenotype by a subpopulation of endothelial cells from cirrhotic livers in both animal models and patients. BMP-7 treatment decreases the occurrence of the EndMT phenotype and has a positive impact on the severity of disease by reducing fibrosis and sinusoidal vascular disorganization. Copyright © 2017, American Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology.

  19. Cumene hydroperoxide-supported denitrification of 2-nitropropane in uninduced mouse liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, E K; Kulkarni, A P

    1986-01-01

    Cumene hydroperoxide supported oxidative denitrification of 2-nitropropane was investigated in uninduced mouse liver microsomes. The cytochrome P-450 peroxygenase catalyzed reaction resulted in the production of nitrite and acetone. Several lines of evidence suggested the involvement of multiple forms of cytochrome P-450. Acetone production was at least two times greater than nitrite release possibly due to sequestration of nitrite in the reaction mixtures.

  20. Functional Integrity of the Chimeric (Humanized) Mouse Liver: Enzyme Zonation, Physiologic Spaces, and Hepatic Enzymes and Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Wang, Jason Z Ya; Quach, Holly P; Tang, Hui; Evans, David C; Li, Albert P; Silva, Jose; Pang, K Sandy

    2016-09-01

    Chimeric mouse liver models are useful in vivo tools for human drug metabolism studies; however, liver integrity and the microcirculation remain largely uninvestigated. Hence, we conducted liver perfusion studies to examine these attributes in FRGN [Fah(-/-), Rag2(-/-), and Il2rg(-/-), NOD strain] livers (control) and chimeric livers repopulated with mouse (mFRGN) or human (hFRGN) hepatocytes. In single-pass perfusion studies (2.5 ml/min), outflow dilution profiles of noneliminated reference indicators ((51)Cr-RBC, (125)I-albumin, (14)C-sucrose, and (3)H-water) revealed preservation of flow-limited distribution and reduced water and albumin spaces in hFRGN livers compared with FRGN livers, a view supported microscopically by tightly packed sinusoids. With prograde and retrograde perfusion of harmol (50 µM) in FRGN livers, an anterior sulfation (Sult1a1) over the posterior distribution of glucuronidation (Ugt1a1) activity was preserved, evidenced by the 42% lower sulfation-to-glucuronidation ratio (HS/HG) and 14% higher harmol extraction ratio (E) upon switching from prograde to retrograde flow. By contrast, zonation was lost in mFRGN and hFRGN livers, with HS/HG and E for both flows remaining unchanged. Remnant mouse genes persisted in hFRGN livers (10%-300% those of FRGN). When hFRGN livers were compared with human liver tissue, higher UGT1A1 and MRP2, lower MRP3, and unchanged SULT1A1 and MRP4 mRNA expression were observed. Total Sult1a1/SULT1A1 protein expression in hFRGN livers was higher than that of FRGN livers, consistent with higher harmol sulfate formation. The composite data on humanized livers suggest a loss of zonation, lack of complete liver humanization, and persistence of murine hepatocyte activities leading to higher sulfation.

  1. Molecularly Characterised Xenograft Tumour Mouse Models: Valuable Tools for Evaluation of New Therapeutic Strategies for Secondary Liver Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available To develop and evaluate new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of human cancers, well-characterised preclinical model systems are a prerequisite. To this aim, we have established xenotransplantation mouse models and corresponding cell cultures from surgically obtained secondary human liver tumours. Established xenograft tumours were patho- and immunohistologically characterised, and expression levels of cancer-relevant genes were quantified in paired original and xenograft tumours and the derivative cell cultures applying RT-PCR-based array technology. Most of the characteristic morphological and immunohistochemical features of the original tumours were shown to be maintained. No differences were found concerning expression of genes involved in cell cycle regulation and oncogenesis. Interestingly, cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase encoding genes appeared to be expressed differentially. Thus, the established models are closely reflecting pathohistological and molecular characteristics of the selected human tumours and may therefore provide useful tools for preclinical analyses of new antitumour strategies in vivo.

  2. Donor liver natural killer cells alleviate liver allograft acute rejection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Dong Yu; Tian-Zhu Long; Guo-Lin Li; Li-Hong Lv; Hao-Ming Lin; Yong-Heng Huang; Ya-Jin Chen; Yun-Le Wan

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Liver enriched natural killer (NK) cells are of high immune activity. However, the function of donor liver NK cells in allogeneic liver transplantation (LTx) remains unclear. METHODS: Ten Gy of whole body gamma-irradiation (WBI) from a 60Co source at 0.6 Gy/min was used for depleting donor-derived leukocytes, and transfusion of purified liver NK cells isolated from the same type rat as donor (donor type liver NK cells, dtlNKs) through portal vein was performed immediately after grafting the irradiated liver. Post-transplant survival observation on recipients and histopathological detection of liver grafts were adoptive to evaluate the biological impact of donor liver NK cells on recipients' survival in rat LTx. RESULTS: Transfusion of dtlNKs did not shorten the survival time among the recipients of spontaneous tolerance model (BN to LEW rat) after rat LTx, but prolonged the liver graft survival among the recipients depleted of donor-derived leukocytes in the acute rejection model (LEW to BN rat). Compared to the recipients in the groups which received the graft depleted of donor-derived leukocytes, better survival and less damage in the allografts were also found among the recipients in the two different strain combinations of liver allograft due to transfusion of dtlNKs. CONCLUSIONS: Donor liver NK cells alone do not exacerbate liver allograft acute rejection. Conversely, they can alleviate it, and improve the recipients' survival.

  3. Genotoxicity of 3-nitrobenzanthrone and 3-aminobenzanthrone in MutaMouse and lung epithelial cells derived from MutaMouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlt, Volker M; Gingerich, John; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Phillips, David H; Douglas, George R; White, Paul A

    2008-11-01

    FE1 lung epithelial cells derived from MutaMouse are a new model system to provide in vitro mutagenicity data with the potential to predict the outcome of an in vivo MutaMouse test. 3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a potent mutagen and suspected human carcinogen identified in diesel exhaust and urban air pollution. We investigated the mutagenicity and DNA binding of 3-NBA and its main metabolite 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA) in vitro and in vivo in the MutaMouse assay. Mice were treated with 3-NBA or 3-ABA (0, 2 or 5 mg/kg body weight/day) by gavage for 28 days and 28 days later lacZ mutant frequency (MF) was determined in liver, lung and bone marrow. For both compounds, dose-related increases in MF were seen in liver and bone marrow, but not in lung; mutagenic activity was approximately 2-fold lower for 3-ABA than for 3-NBA. With 3-NBA, highest DNA adduct levels (measured by (32)P-post-labelling) were found in liver (approximately 230 adducts per 10(8) nucleotides) with levels 20- to 40-fold lower in bone marrow and lung. With 3-ABA, DNA adduct levels were again highest in the liver, but approximately 4-fold lower than for 3-NBA. FE1 cells were exposed to up to 10 microg/ml 3-NBA or 3-ABA for 6 h with or without exogenous activation (S9) and harvested after 3 days. For 3-NBA, there was a dose-related increase in MF both with and without S9 mix, which was >10 times higher than observed in vivo. At the highest concentration of 3-ABA (10 microg/ml), we found only around a 2-fold increase in MF relative to controls. DNA adduct formation in FE1 cells was dose-dependent for both compounds, but 10- to 20-fold higher for 3-NBA compared to 3-ABA. Collectively, our data indicate that MutaMouse FE1 cells are well suited for cost-effective testing of suspected mutagens with different metabolic activation pathways as a guide for subsequent in vivo MutaMouse testing.

  4. MiR-152 may silence translation of CaMK II and induce spontaneous immune tolerance in mouse liver transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Spontaneous immune tolerance in mouse liver transplantation has always been a hotspot in transplantation-immune research. Recent studies revealed that regulatory T cells (Tregs, hepatic satellite cells and Kupffer cells play a potential role in spontaneous immune tolerance, however the precise mechanism of spontaneous immune tolerance is still undefined. By using Microarray Chips, we investigated different immune regulatory factors to decipher critical mechanisms of spontaneous tolerance after mouse liver transplantation. Allogeneic (C57BL/6-C3H and syngeneic (C3H-C3H liver transplantation were performed by 6-8 weeks old male C57BL/6 and C3H mice. Graft samples (N = 4 each group were collected from 8 weeks post-operation mice. 11 differentially expressed miRNAs in allogeneic grafts (Allografts vs. syngeneic grafts (Syngrafts were identified using Agilent Mouse miRNA Chips. It was revealed that 185 genes were modified by the 11 miRNAs, furthermore, within the 185 target genes, 11 of them were tightly correlated with immune regulation after Gene Ontology (GO, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG analysis and Genbank data cross-comparison. Verified by real-time PCR and western blot, our results indicated that mRNA expression levels of IL-6 and TAB2 were respectively down regulated following miR-142-3p and miR-155 augment. In addition, increased miR-152 just silenced mRNA of CaMK II and down-regulated translation of CaMK II in tolerated liver grafts, which may play a critical role in immune regulation and spontaneous tolerance induction of mouse liver transplantation.

  5. Withaferin A Suppresses Liver Tumor Growth in a Nude Mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It also suppressed formation of cytoskeletal protein actin projection involved in cell migration. ... Wang et al. Trop J Pharm Res, June 2015; 14(6): 1006 growth factor. (VEGF) and matrix ..... Gunatilaka AA, Zhan CG, Sun D. Withaferin A targets.

  6. Signal molecule-mediated hepatic cell communication during liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Yu Zheng; Shun-Yan Weng; Yan Yu

    2009-01-01

    Liver regeneration is a complex and well-orchestrated process, during which hepatic cells are activated to produce large signal molecules in response to liver injury or mass reduction. These signal molecules, in turn, set up the connections and cross-talk among liver cells to promote hepatic recovery. In this review, we endeavor to summarize the network of signal molecules that mediates hepatic cell communication in the regulation of liver regeneration.

  7. Comparison of clenbuterol and salbutamol accumulation in the liver of two different mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulić, Ana; Pleadin, Jelka; Durgo, Ksenija; Scortichini, Giampiero; Stojković, Ranko

    2014-06-01

    In the European Union, β(2)-adrenergic agonists like clenbuterol and salbutamol are banned from use as growth promoters. Although clenbuterol and salbutamol both accumulate in the liver, differences in the accumulation rate can be seen among animal species due to different β(2)-adrenoreceptor distributions. The aim of this study was to compare the accumulation of the two in the liver tissue of two different mouse strains. The study included 200 8-week-old BALB/c and C57/BL/6 mice. One group of BALB/c (40) and one group of C57/BL/6 (40) mice were treated with 2.5 mg/kg body mass clenbuterol per os for 28 days. The remaining two animal groups were treated with salbutamol in the same manner. The animals were then randomly sacrificed on day 1, 15 and 30 post treatments. Despite of the same treatment dose, the results revealed clenbuterol to persist in the liver tissue longer than salbutamol. On post treatment day 30, the concentration of clenbuterol residue in C57/BL/6 and BALB/c mice liver tissue were 0.23 ± 0.02 and 0.21 ± 0.03 ng/g, respectively, while residues of salbutamol were not detected. When comparing the accumulation of both compounds between the two mouse strains, it becomes apparent that no significant difference (P > 0.05) in the accumulation rate can be found.

  8. Regulation of retinoid X receptor gamma expression by fed state in mouse liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sangkyu, E-mail: 49park@cku.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Catholic Kwandong University, Gangneung 210-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yoo Jeong [Division of Metabolic Disease, Center for Biomedical Sciences, National Institute of Health Korea, Osong 361-709 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Hee [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-woo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Integrated Genomic Research Center for Metabolic Regulation, Institute of Genetic Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-27

    Glucose metabolism is balanced by glycolysis and gluconeogenesis with precise control in the liver. The expression of genes related to glucose metabolism is regulated primarily by glucose and insulin at transcriptional level. Nuclear receptors play important roles in regulating the gene expression of glucose metabolism at transcriptional level. Some of these nuclear receptors form heterodimers with RXRs to bind to their specific regulatory elements on the target promoters. To date, three isotypes of RXRs have been identified; RXRα, RXRβ and RXRγ. However, their involvement in the interactions with other nuclear receptors in the liver remains unclear. In this study, we found RXRγ is rapidly induced after feeding in the mouse liver, indicating a potential role of RXRγ in controlling glucose or lipid metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. In addition, RXRγ expression was upregulated by glucose in primary hepatocytes. This implies that glucose metabolism governed by RXRγ in conjunction with other nuclear receptors. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RXRγ as well as RXRα increased SREBP-1c promoter activity in hepatocytes. These results suggest that RXRγ may play an important role in tight control of glucose metabolism in the fasting–feeding cycle. - Highlights: • Refeeding increases the RXRγ expression level in mouse liver. • RXRγ expression is induced by high glucose condition in primary hepatocytes. • RXRγ and LXRα have synergistic effect on SREBP-1c promoter activity. • RXRγ binds to LXRE(-299/-280) located within SREBP-1c promoter region and interacts with LXRα.

  9. Fetal and adult liver stem cells for liver regeneration and tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegel, H C; Lange, Claudia; Kneser, U; Lambrecht, W; Zander, A R; Rogiers, X; Kluth, D

    2006-01-01

    For the development of innovative cell-based liver directed therapies, e.g. liver tissue engineering, the use of stem cells might be very attractive to overcome the limitation of donor liver tissue. Liver specific differentiation of embryonic, fetal or adult stem cells is currently under investigation. Different types of fetal liver (stem) cells during development were identified, and their advantageous growth potential and bipotential differentiation capacity were shown. However, ethical and legal issues have to be addressed before using fetal cells. Use of adult stem cells is clinically established, e.g. transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Other bone marrow derived liver stem cells might be mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). However, the transdifferentiation potential is still in question due to the observation of cellular fusion in several in vivo experiments. In vitro experiments revealed a crucial role of the environment (e.g. growth factors and extracellular matrix) for specific differentiation of stem cells. Co-cultured liver cells also seemed to be important for hepatic gene expression of MSC. For successful liver cell transplantation, a novel approach of tissue engineering by orthotopic transplantation of gel-immobilized cells could be promising, providing optimal environment for the injected cells. Moreover, an orthotopic tissue engineering approach using bipotential stem cells could lead to a repopulation of the recipients liver with healthy liver and biliary cells, thus providing both hepatic functions and biliary excretion. Future studies have to investigate, which stem cell and environmental conditions would be most suitable for the use of stem cells for liver regeneration or tissue engineering approaches.

  10. Hormonal regulation of Cyp4a isoforms in mouse liver and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2013-12-01

    Mouse Cyp4a subfamily, including Cyp4a10, Cyp4a12a, Cyp4a12b and Cyp4a14, demonstrate a gender- and strain-specific expression in liver and kidney. In C57BL/6 mouse liver and kidney, Cyp4a12a and 4a12b are male-predominant, whereas Cyp4a14 is female-predominant. Cyp4a10 is female-predominant in liver, but shows no gender difference in kidney. The present study was aimed to determine whether sex hormones and/or growth hormone (GH) secretion patterns are responsible for the gender-specific Cyp4a expression in C57BL/6 mice. Gonadectomized mice, GH-releasing hormone receptor-deficient little (lit/lit) mice and hypophysectomized mice were used with replacement of sex hormones or GH in male or female secretion patterns. Both androgens and male-pattern GH regulated the gender-divergent Cyp4a10, 4a12a and 4a12b in liver, whereas androgens played an exclusive role in regulating Cyp4a10 and 4a12a in kidney. In contrast, Cyp4a12b was increased by male-pattern GH but not androgens in kidney. The female-predominant Cyp4a14 in liver and kidney was due to a combined effect of male-pattern GH and androgens. In addition, estrogens played a minor role in regulation of Cyp4a isoforms through an indirect pathway. In conclusion, gender-divergent Cyp4a mRNA expression in liver is caused by male-pattern GH secretion pattern and androgens, whereas in kidney, Cyp4a mRNA expression is primarily regulated by androgens.

  11. Intra-por tal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells ameliorates liver ifbrosis in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Fang Zheng; Li-Jian Liang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bone marrow cells can differentiate into hepatocytes in a suitable microenvironment. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on liver ifbrosis in mice. METHODS: BMSCs were harvested and cultured from male BALB/c mice, then transplanted into female syngenic BALB/c mice via the portal vein. After partial hepatectomy, diethylnitrosamine (DEN) was administered to induce liver ifbrosis. Controls received BMSCs and non-supplemented drinking water, the model group received DEN with their water, and the experimental group received BMSCs and DEN. Mice were killed after 3 months, and ALT, AST, hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) in serum and hydroxyproline (Hyp) in the liver were assessed. Alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the liver was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Bone marrow-derived hepatocytes were identiifed by lfuorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in liver sections. RESULTS: BMSCs were shown to differentiate into hepatocyte-like phenotypes after hepatocyte growth factor treatment in vitro. Serum ALT, AST, HA, and LN were markedly reduced by transplanted BMSCs. Liver Hyp content andα-SMA staining in mice receiving BMSCs were lower than in the model group, consistent with altered liver pathology. FISH analysis revealed the presence of donor-derived hepatocytes in the injured liver after cross-gender mouse BMSC transplantation. After three months, about 10%of cells in the injured liver were bone marrow-derived. CONCLUSION: BMSCs transplanted via the portal vein can convert into hepatocytes to repair liver injury induced by DEN, restore liver function, and reduce liver ifbrosis.

  12. Role of farnesoid X receptor in establishment of ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing enzyme genes in mouse liver

    OpenAIRE

    Lai Peng; Stephanie Piekos; Guo, Grace L.; Xiao-bo Zhong

    2016-01-01

    The expression of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes in liver changes dramatically during postnatal liver maturation. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is critical for bile acid and lipid homeostasis in liver. However, the role of FXR in regulating ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing genes is not clear. Hence, we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify the developmental expression of phase-I genes in both Fxr-null and control (C57BL/6) mouse livers during development. Liver samples of male C57BL/6 and F...

  13. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Nurlina Wan Yahya

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration.

  14. Cell Patterning for Liver Tissue Engineering via Dielectrophoretic Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Wan Nurlina Wan; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the most common treatment for patients with end-stage liver failure. However, liver transplantation is greatly limited by a shortage of donors. Liver tissue engineering may offer an alternative by providing an implantable engineered liver. Currently, diverse types of engineering approaches for in vitro liver cell culture are available, including scaffold-based methods, microfluidic platforms, and micropatterning techniques. Active cell patterning via dielectrophoretic (DEP) force showed some advantages over other methods, including high speed, ease of handling, high precision and being label-free. This article summarizes liver function and regenerative mechanisms for better understanding in developing engineered liver. We then review recent advances in liver tissue engineering techniques and focus on DEP-based cell patterning, including microelectrode design and patterning configuration. PMID:24991941

  15. A stringent dual control system overseeing transcription and activity of the Cre recombinase for the liver-specific conditional gene knock-out mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wu; Yinghua He; Hongyu Zhang; Xinlan Dai; Xiaoyu Zhou; Jun Gu; Guan Wang; Jingde Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Liver cancer is one of the most threatening diseases in Chinese population. Just like in other tissues, tumor initiation and development in liver involve multiple steps of genetic and epigenetic alterations with several unknown details. However, unlike in other tissues, a tis- sue specific inducible Cre recombinase system that allows temporal and spatial deletion of a target DNA fragment is still not available for in vivo functional gene annotation in hepatocytes. In our pursuit to establish such a mouse model, we designed a dual inducible Cre transgene system and tested it in cultured cells. By combining a CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBP β) promoter derived Tet-off expression system and the estrogen receptor (ER) mediated functional control, we show a desirable profile of both hepatocyte-specificity and regulability of the Cre expression in a series of critical assessments in the cell culture system, which provides confidence in continua- tion of our ongoing pursuit in mouse.

  16. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of human basophilic cells derived from dispersed fetal liver with murine T cell factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seldin, D.C.; Caulfield, J.P.; Hein, A.; Osathanondh, R.; Nabel, G.; Schlossman, S.F.; Stevens, R.L.; Austen, K.F.

    1986-03-15

    Metachromatically granulated cells were generated from human fetal liver stem cells cultured in heterologous mouse conditioned medium rich in interleukin 3. After 2 to 3 wk of culture with biweekly changes of medium and selection of nonadherent cells, all cells present in five cultures had cytoplasmic granules. Ultrastructurally, many granules contained fibrillar material or electron-dense cores with fibrils and vesicular fragments. In addition, the granules of many cells were filled with electron-dense material, which in some cases had a fine structure consisting of concentric whorls or a reticular pattern. Analysis of high-affinity IgE receptors on the cultured cells by flow cytometry demonstrated a unimodel fluorescence pattern, suggesting that most cells were in the basophil or mast cell lineage. The cells contained 52 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of histamine and incorporated (/sup 35/S)sulfate at an average rate of 31,300 cpm/10/sup 6/ cells/4 hr into 175,000 m.w. chondroitin sulfate A proteoglycans. Upon activation with 1 ..mu..M calcium ionophore A23187, the cultured cells released 53% of their cell-associated histamine and metabolized arachidonic acid to 15.0 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of immunoreactive leukotriene C/sub 4/ equivalents, 0.5 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of leukotriene B/sub 4/, and 3.1 ng/10/sup 6/ cells of prostaglandin D/sub 2/ (means, n = 3). Thus, stem cells present in human fetal liver give rise, as do stem cells in mouse fetal liver, to metachromatically granulated cells when cultured in the presence of mouse interleukin 3.

  17. Three-dimentional growth of liver / stem cells in vitro under simulated microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mei Fu

    Liver is a important and largest parenchymatous organ in vivo, and have complex and diverse structures and functions. In the world, there are many peoples suffers from liver injury and dis-ease, especially in Asia, but serious shortage of donor organ, especially for organic pathological changes, is a big problem in the world. Stem cells have the capabilities to self-renew and differ-entiate into multiple lineages, and are very significant in both theoretical research and clinical applications. Compared with traditional cell culture, cells of 3D growth are more close to their situation in vivo. The specific physics environment in space provides a great opportunity for 3D growth of cells and tissues. Due to the chance for entering into the space is so scarce, to mimic microgravity effects using a rotating cell culture system (RCCS) designed by NASA, and some other methods were studied for cellular 3D growth in vitro. Neonatal mouse liver Cells, hepatic progenitor/stem cells from fetal liver and WB-F344 cells were cultured in a 1:1 mixture of DMEM and F-12 supplemented with 10 % FCS and several factors, and seeded into the RCCS, 6-well and 24-well plates. Their growth characteristic, metabolism, differentiation and gene expression were studied by SEM, Histochemistry, Flow Cytometry, RT-PCR and so on. The results showed: 1. Neonatal mouse liver Cells (1day after birth) seem easy to grow for a three-dimentional-like structure, when the cells were cultured in the RCCS, a cell aggregate formed after 1 day of culture and were kept during 10 days culture. The size of aggregate was about 1 2 mm in diameter. 2. Hepatic progenitor/stem cells from fetal liver seem a good cell resource for liver disease'cell therapy. They expressed AFP and CKs, and no mature hepato-cytes marker and bile duct epithelial cells marker were detected. When were transplanted into Nod-Scid mice, they had multi-potential differentiation. 3. WB-F344 cells, a liver epithelial cell line, could grew well on

  18. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase is dispensable for virus-mediated liver and skin tumor development in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tung; Xu, Jianliang; Chikuma, Shunsuke; Hiai, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Kazuo; Moriya, Kyoji; Koike, Kazuhiko; Marcuzzi, Gian Paolo; Pfister, Herbert; Honjo, Tasuku; Kobayashi, Maki

    2014-07-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) not only promotes immune diversity by initiating somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination in immunoglobulin genes but also provokes genomic instability by introducing translocations and mutations into non-immunoglobulin genes. To test whether AID is essential for virus-induced tumor development, we used two transgenic tumor models: mice expressing hepatitis C virus (HCV) core proteins (HCV-Tg), driven by the hepatitis B virus promoter, and mice expressing human papillomavirus type 8 proteins (HPV8-Tg), driven by the Keratin 14 promoter. Both strains were analyzed in the absence and presence of AID by crossing each with AID (-/-) mice. There was no difference in the liver tumor frequency between the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) and HCV-Tg/AID (-/-) mice at 20 months of age although the AID (+/+) mice showed more severe histological findings and increased cytokine expression. Furthermore, a low level of AID transcript was detected in the HCV-Tg/AID (+/+) liver tissue that was not derived from hepatocytes themselves but from intra-hepatic immune cells. Although AID may not be the direct cause of HCV-induced oncogenesis, AID expressed in B cells, not in hepatocytes, may prolong steatosis and cause increased lymphocyte infiltration into HCV core protein-induced liver lesions. Similarly, there was no difference in the time course of skin tumor development between the HPV8-Tg/AID (-/-) and HPV8-Tg/AID (+/+) groups. In conclusion, AID does not appear to be required for tumor development in the two virus-induced tumor mouse models tested although AID expressed in infiltrating B cells may promote inflammatory reactions in HCV core protein-induced liver pathogenesis.

  19. Macrophage Migration Inhibitor Factor Upregulates MCP-1 Expression in an Autocrine Manner in Hepatocytes during Acute Mouse Liver Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jieshi Xie; Le Yang; Lei Tian; Weiyang Li; Lin Yang; Liying Li

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitor factor (MIF), a multipotent innate immune mediator, is an upstream component of the inflammatory cascade in diseases such as liver disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a highly representative chemokine, is critical in liver disease pathogenesis. We investigated the role of MIF in regulating hepatocytic MCP-1 expression. MIF and MCP-1 expression were characterized by immunochemistry, RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunoblotting in CCl4-treated mouse liver an...

  20. Toxaphene-induced mouse liver tumorigenesis is mediated by the constitutive androstane receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zemin; Li, Xilin; Wu, Qiangen; Lamb, James C; Klaunig, James E

    2017-02-20

    Toxaphene was shown to increase liver tumor incidence in B6C3F1 mice following chronic dietary exposure. Preliminary evidence supported a role for the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in the mode of action of toxaphene-induced mouse liver tumors. However, these results could not rule out a role for the pregnane X receptor (PXR) in liver tumor formation. To define further the nuclear receptors involved in this study, we utilized CAR, PXR and PXR/CAR knockout mice (CAR(-/-) , PXR(-/-) and PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) ) along with the wild-type C57BL/6. In this study CAR-responsive genes Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 were induced in the liver of C57BL/6 (wild-type) mice by toxaphene (30-570-fold) (at the carcinogenic dose 320 ppm) and phenobarbital (positive control) (16-420-fold) following 14 days' dietary treatment. In contrast, in CAR(-/-) mice, no induction of these genes was seen following treatment with either chemical. Cyp3a11 and Cyp2b10 were also induced in PXR(-/-) mice with toxaphene and phenobarbital but were not changed in treated PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) mice. Similarly, induction of liver pentoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (CAR activation) activity by toxaphene and phenobarbital was absent in CAR(-/-) and PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) mice treated with phenobarbital or toxaphene. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD, represents aryl hydrocarbon receptor activation) activity in CAR(-/-) mice treated with toxaphene or phenobarbital was increased compared with untreated control, but lower overall in activity in comparison to the wild-type mouse. Liver EROD activity was also induced by both phenobarbital and toxaphene in the PXR(-/-) mice but not in the PXR(-/-) /CAR(-/-) mice. Toxaphene treatment increased 7-benzyloxyquinoline activity (a marker for PXR activation) in a similar pattern to that seen with pentoxyresorufin-O-deethylase. These observations indicate that EROD and PXR activation are evidence, as expected, of secondary overlap to primary CAR receptor activation. Together, these

  1. Fate tracing of mature hepatocytes in mouse liver homeostasis and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malato, Yann; Naqvi, Syed; Schürmann, Nina; Ng, Raymond; Wang, Bruce; Zape, Joan; Kay, Mark A; Grimm, Dirk; Willenbring, Holger

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence has contradicted the prevailing view that homeostasis and regeneration of the adult liver are mediated by self duplication of lineage-restricted hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells. These new data suggest that liver progenitor cells do not function solely as a backup system in chronic liver injury; rather, they also produce hepatocytes after acute injury and are in fact the main source of new hepatocytes during normal hepatocyte turnover. In addition, other evidence suggests that hepatocytes are capable of lineage conversion, acting as precursors of biliary epithelial cells during biliary injury. To test these concepts, we generated a hepatocyte fate-tracing model based on timed and specific Cre recombinase expression and marker gene activation in all hepatocytes of adult Rosa26 reporter mice with an adenoassociated viral vector. We found that newly formed hepatocytes derived from preexisting hepatocytes in the normal liver and that liver progenitor cells contributed minimally to acute hepatocyte regeneration. Further, we found no evidence that biliary injury induced conversion of hepatocytes into biliary epithelial cells. These results therefore restore the previously prevailing paradigms of liver homeostasis and regeneration. In addition, our new vector system will be a valuable tool for timed, efficient, and specific loop out of floxed sequences in hepatocytes.

  2. Troxerutin protects the mouse liver against oxidative stress-mediated injury induced by D-galactose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-feng; Fan, Shao-hua; Zheng, Yuan-lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2009-09-01

    Troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of rutin, has been well-demonstrated to exert hepatoprotective properties. In the present study, we attempted to explore whether the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms were involved in troxerutin-mediated protection from D-gal-induced liver injury. The effects of troxerutin on liver lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymatic activities, and the expression of inflammatory mediator were investigated in D-gal-treated mice. The results showed that troxerutin largely attenuated the D-gal-induced TBARS content increase and also markedly renewed the activities of Cu, Zn-SOD, CAT, and GPx in the livers of D-gal-treated mice. Furthermore, troxerutin inhibited the upregulation of the expression of NF-kappaB p65, iNOS, and COX-2 induced by D-gal. D-Gal-induced tissue architecture changes and serum ALT and AST increases were effectively suppressed by troxerutin. In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse liver from D-gal-induced injury by attenuating lipid peroxidation, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and suppressing inflammatory response. This study provided novel insights into the mechanisms of troxerutin in the protection of the liver.

  3. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation.

  4. Comparison Analysis of Dysregulated LncRNA Profile in Mouse Plasma and Liver after Hepatic Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Luo, Yanjin; Yang, Weili; Ding, Liwei; Wang, Junpei; Tu, Jian; Geng, Bin; Cui, Qinghua; Yang, Jichun

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) have been believed to be the major transcripts in various tissues and organs, and may play important roles in regulation of many biological processes. The current study determined the LncRNA profile in mouse plasma after liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) using microarray technology. Microarray assays revealed that 64 LncRNAs were upregulated, and 244 LncRNAs were downregulated in the plasma of liver IRI mouse. Among these dysregulated plasma LncRNAs, 59-61% were intergenic, 22-25% were antisense overlap, 8-12% were sense overlap and 6-7% were bidirectional. Ten dysregulated plasma LncRNAs were validated by quantitative PCR assays, confirming the accuracy of microarray analysis result. Comparison analysis between dysregulated plasma and liver LncRNA profile after liver IRI revealed that among the 308 dysregulated plasma LncRNAs, 245 LncRNAs were present in the liver, but remained unchanged. In contrast, among the 98 dysregulated liver LncRNAs after IRI, only 19 were present in the plasma, but remained unchanged. LncRNA AK139328 had been previously reported to be upregulated in the liver after IRI, and silencing of hepatic AK139328 ameliorated liver IRI. Both microarray and RT-PCR analyses failed to detect the presence of AK139328 in mouse plasma. In summary, the current study compared the difference between dysregulated LncRNA profile in mouse plasma and liver after liver IRI, and suggested that a group of dysregulated plasma LncRNAs have the potential of becoming novel biomarkers for evaluation of ischemic liver injury.

  5. 肝X受体激动剂诱导获得的小鼠耐受性树突状细胞与天然耐受性树突状细胞的比较%Comparison between mouse tolerant dendritic cells induced by liver X receptor agonist and natural tolerant dendritic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海燕; 马旭怡; 董盼盼; 薛冬; 何小舟

    2015-01-01

    目的 通过与天然耐受性树突状细胞(N-tDCs)比较来探讨肝X受体(LXR)激动剂诱导获得的小鼠耐受性树突状细胞T-tDCs的免疫耐受特性.方法 获取小鼠骨髓来源单个核细胞,以白细胞介素(IL)-4和粒细胞-巨噬细胞集落刺激因子(GM-CSF)辅以LXR激动剂(T0901317)诱导7d后,检测细胞表型、进行混合淋巴细胞反应、调节性T细胞(Tregs)体外诱导实验等;或继续以脂多糖(LPS)诱导其成熟,进行表型分析.利用BALB/c DO11.10 RAG-/-小鼠来源的CD4+T细胞进行Tregs诱导实验,并与磁珠阴性分选从小鼠脾脏获得CD4+ DCs (N-tDCs)进行对照研究.结果 与N-tDCs比较,T0901317诱导7d时的T-tDCs形态更接近普通DCs,CD80、CD86、MHC-Ⅱ类分子表达略低,但均为中低表达,CCR7表达水平相近.N-tDCs具有更强的抑制能力,当特异性抗原鸡卵清白蛋白(OVA)存在时,N-tDCs可以更强地诱导Tregs的生成,而T-tDCs可以分泌更高水平的IL-10.结论 T-tDCs与N-tDCs以不同的方式发挥免疫抑制作用.%Objective To explore the characteristics of tolerant dendritic cells (tDCs) induced by liver X receptor (LXR) agonist by comparing with natural tDCs (N-DCs).Methods Mononuclear cells from mouse bone marrow were stimulated by interleukin (IL)-4 and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the presence or absence of the stimulation by LXR agonist-T0901317 for 7 days,or induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 3 days.Then phenotype detection,mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR),and regulatory T cells (Tregs) induction assay were performed.CD4 + T cells purified from BALB/c DO11.10 RAG-/-mouse were used in Tregs induction assay.N-tDCs isolated from mouse spleen were used as controls.Results Compared with N-tDCs,the morphology of T-tDCs induced by T0901317 for 7 days were similar to normal DCs',but with little lower or moderate expression levels of CD80,CD86 and MHC-Ⅱ.Stronger inhibitory effect of N-tDCs was observed,and their

  6. Bioinformatic analysis of microRNA networks following the activation of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ruixin; Su, Shengzhong; Wan, Yinan; Shen, Frank; Niu, Ben; Coslo, Denise M; Albert, Istvan; Han, Xing; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2016-09-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR; NR1I3) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that functions as a xenosensor, serving to regulate xenobiotic detoxification, lipid homeostasis and energy metabolism. CAR activation is also a key contributor to the development of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis in mice. The underlying pathways affected by CAR in these processes are complex and not fully elucidated. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as critical modulators of gene expression and appear to impact many cellular pathways, including those involved in chemical detoxification and liver tumor development. In this study, we used deep sequencing approaches with an Illumina HiSeq platform to differentially profile microRNA expression patterns in livers from wild type C57BL/6J mice following CAR activation with the mouse CAR-specific ligand activator, 1,4-bis-[2-(3,5,-dichloropyridyloxy)] benzene (TCPOBOP). Bioinformatic analyses and pathway evaluations were performed leading to the identification of 51 miRNAs whose expression levels were significantly altered by TCPOBOP treatment, including mmu-miR-802-5p and miR-485-3p. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis of the differentially expressed microRNAs revealed altered effector pathways, including those involved in liver cell growth and proliferation. A functional network among CAR targeted genes and the affected microRNAs was constructed to illustrate how CAR modulation of microRNA expression may potentially mediate its biological role in mouse hepatocyte proliferation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie.

  7. Role of Th17 cells in common liver diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI Linlin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, it has been found that T helper type 17 (Th17 cells are a new subset of CD4+ Th cells. Th17 cells play an important role in the onset and development of many liver diseases and have become the research focus in immunology. This paper summarizes the studies on the relationship between Th17 cells and various liver diseases in order to provide a new idea for the study and treatment of liver diseases.

  8. Memory NK cells: why do they reside in the liver?

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Xiaojun; Chen, Yonglin; Peng, Hui; Tian, Zhigang

    2013-01-01

    Immune memory is the hallmark of adaptive immunity. However, recent studies have shown that natural killer (NK) cells, key components of the innate immune system, also mediate memory responses in mice and humans. Strikingly, memory NK cells were liver-resident in some models, raising the question as to whether the liver is a special organ for the acquisition of NK cell memory. Here, we review the characteristics of NK cell memory by summarizing recent progress and discuss how the liver may ge...

  9. Overexpression of the cholesterol-binding protein MLN64 induces liver damage in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Enrique Tichauer; Juan Francisco Miquel; Attilio Rigotti; Silvana Zanlungo; Mar(i)a Gabriela Morales; Ludwig Amigo; Leopoldo Galdames; Andrés Kléin; Verónica Quifio(n)es; Carla Ferrada; Alejandra Alvarez R; Marie-Christine Rio

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To examine the in vivo phenotype associated with hepatic metastatic lymph node 64 (MLN64) over-expression.METHODS: Recombinant-adenovirus-mediated MLN64 gene transfer was used to overexpress MLN64 in the livers of C57BL/6 mice. We measured the effects of MLN64 overexpression on hepatic cholesterol content, bile flow, biliary lipid secretion and apoptosis markers. For in vitro studies cultured CHO cells with transient MLN64 overexpression were utilized and apoptosis by TUNEL assay was measured.RESULTS: Livers from Ad.MLN64-infected mice exhibited early onset of liver damage and apoptosis. This response correlated with increases in liver cholesterol content and biliary bile acid concentration, and impaired bile flow. We investigated whether liver MLN64 expression could be modulated in a murine model of hepatic injury. We found increased hepatic MLN64 mRNA and protein levels in mice with chenodeoxycholic acid-induced liver damage. In addition, cultured CHO cells with transient MLN64 overexpression showed increased apoptosis.CONCLUSION: In summary, hepatic MLN64 over-expression induced damage and apoptosis in murine livers and altered cholesterol metabolism. Further studies are required to elucidate the relevance of these findings under physiologic and disease conditions.

  10. Adeno-associated virus mediated endostatin gene therapy in combination with topoisomerase inhibitor effectively controls liver tumor in mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sung Yi Hong; Myun Hee Lee; Kyung Sup Kim; Hyun Cheol Jung; Jae Kyung Roh; Woo Jin Hyung; Sung Hoon Noh; Seung Ho Choi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: rAAV mediated endostatin gene therapy has been examined as a new method for treating cancer. However,a sustained and high protein delivery is required to achieve the desired therapeutic effects. We evaluated the impact of topoisomerase inhibitors in rAAV delivered endostatin gene therapy in a liver tumor model.METHODS: rAAV containing endostatin expression cassettes were transduced into hepatoma cell lines. To test whether the topoisomerase inhibitor pretreatment increased the expression of endostatin, Western blotting and ELISA were performed. The biologic activity of endostatin was confirmed by endothelial cell proliferation and tube formation assays.The anti-tumor effects of the rAAV-endostatin vector combined with a topoisomerase inhibitor, etoposide, were evaluated in a mouse liver tumor model.RESULTS: Topoisomerase inhibitors, including camptothecin and etoposide, were found to increase the endostatin expression level in vitro. The over-expressed endostatin,as a result of pretreatment with a topoisomerase inhibitor,was also biologically active. In animal experiments, the combined therapy of topoisomerase inhibitor, etoposide with the rAAV-endostatin vector had the best tumorsuppressive effect and tumor foci were barely observed in livers of the treated mice. Pretreatment with an etoposide increased the level of endostatin in the liver and serum of rAAV-endostatin treated mice. Finally, the mice treated with rAAV-endostatin in combination with etoposide showed the longest survival among the experimental models.CONCLUSION: rAAV delivered endostatin gene therapy in combination with a topoisomerase inhibitor pretreatment is an effective modality for anticancer gene therapy.

  11. Liver growth factor treatment reverses emphysema previously established in a cigarette smoke exposure mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Girón-Martínez, Alvaro; Terrón-Expósito, Raúl; Díaz-Gil, Juan J; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2014-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an inflammatory lung disease largely associated with cigarette smoke exposure (CSE) and characterized by pulmonary and extrapulmonary manifestations, including systemic inflammation. Liver growth factor (LGF) is an albumin-bilirubin complex with demonstrated antifibrotic, antioxidant, and antihypertensive actions even at extrahepatic sites. We aimed to determine whether short LGF treatment (1.7 μg/mouse ip; 2 times, 2 wk), once the lung damage was established through the chronic CSE, contributes to improvement of the regeneration of damaged lung tissue, reducing systemic inflammation. We studied AKR/J mice, divided into three groups: control (air-exposed), CSE (chronic CSE), and CSE + LGF (LGF-treated CSE mice). We assessed pulmonary function, morphometric data, and levels of various systemic inflammatory markers to test the LGF regenerative capacity in this system. Our results revealed that the lungs of the CSE animals showed pulmonary emphysema and inflammation, characterized by increased lung compliance, enlargement of alveolar airspaces, systemic inflammation (circulating leukocytes and serum TNF-α level), and in vivo lung matrix metalloproteinase activity. LGF treatment was able to reverse all these parameters, decreasing total cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and T-lymphocyte infiltration in peripheral blood observed in emphysematous mice and reversing the decrease in monocytes observed in chronic CSE mice, and tends to reduce the neutrophil population and serum TNF-α level. In conclusion, LGF treatment normalizes the physiological and morphological parameters and levels of various systemic inflammatory biomarkers in a chronic CSE AKR/J model, which may have important pathophysiological and therapeutic implications for subjects with stable COPD.

  12. Extremely underwound chromosomal DNA in nucleoids of mouse sarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, M; Matthes, E; Arnold, W

    1981-07-01

    The superhelical properties of chromosomal DNA from cells of a mouse sarcoma were investigated in neutral sucrose gradients containing ethidium bromide. Removal of negative supercoiling from the DNA of the sarcoma cells required a substantially higher dye concentration than was necessary in the case of DNA from cultured mouse fibroblasts. The calculated value of the mean superhelical density in malignant cells (sigma = -0.14) appears abnormally high compared with the value (sigma = -0.09) obtained for DNA of mouse fibroblasts. Chromosomal DNA from mouse sarcoma cells is therefore concluded to be highly deficient in helical turns.

  13. Cytoglobin is expressed in hepatic stellate cells, but not in myofibroblasts, in normal and fibrotic human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Hiroyuki; Komiya, Tohru; Thuy, Le Thi Thanh; Tamori, Akihiro; Enomoto, Masaru; Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Iwai, Shuji; Uchida-Kobayashi, Sawako; Fujii, Hideki; Hagihara, Atsushi; Kawamura, Etsushi; Murakami, Yoshiki; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; Kawada, Norifumi

    2014-02-01

    Cytoglobin (CYGB) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytoplasm of fibroblastic cells in many organs, including hepatic stellate cells. As yet, there is no specific marker with which to distinguish stellate cells from myofibroblasts in the human liver. To investigate whether CYGB can be utilized to distinguish hepatic stellate cells from myofibroblasts in normal and fibrotic human liver, human liver tissues damaged by infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and at different stages of fibrosis were obtained by liver biopsy. Immunohistochemistry was performed on histological sections of liver tissues using antibodies against CYGB, cellular retinol-binding protein-1 (CRBP-1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), thymocyte differentiation antigen 1 (Thy-1), and fibulin-2 (FBLN2). CYGB- and CRBP-1-positive cells were counted around fibrotic portal tracts in histological sections of the samples. The expression of several of the proteins listed above was examined in cultured mouse stellate cells. Quiescent stellate cells, but not portal myofibroblasts, expressed both CYGB and CRBP-1 in normal livers. In fibrotic and cirrhotic livers, stellate cells expressed both CYGB and α-SMA, whereas myofibroblasts around the portal vein expressed α-SMA, Thy-1, and FBLN2, but not CYGB. Development of the fibrotic stage was positively correlated with increases in Sirius red-stained, α-SMA-positive, and Thy-1-positive areas, whereas the number of CYGB- and CRBP-1-positive cells decreased with fibrosis development. Primary cultured mouse stellate cells expressed cytoplasmic CYGB at day 1, whereas they began to express α-SMA at the cellular margins at day 4. Thy-1 was undetectable throughout the culture period. In human liver tissues, quiescent stellate cells are CYGB positive. When activated, they also become α-SMA positive; however, they are negative for Thy-1 and FBLN2. Thus, CYGB is a useful marker with which to distinguish stellate cells from portal myofibroblasts in the damaged human

  14. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. F. Chang; J. Y. Fan; F. C. Zhang; J. Ma; C. S. Xu

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  15. Transcriptome atlas of eight liver cell types uncovers effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C F; Fan, J Y; Zhang, F C; Ma, J; Xu, C S

    2010-12-01

    Eight liver cell types were isolated using the methods of Percoll density gradient centrifugation and immunomagnetic beads to explore effects of histidine catabolites on rat liver regeneration. Rat Genome 230 2.0 Array was used to detect the expression profiles of genes associated with metabolism of histidine and its catabolites for the above-mentioned eight liver cell types, and bioinformatic and systems biology approaches were employed to analyse the relationship between above genes and rat liver regeneration. The results showed that the urocanic acid (UA) was degraded from histidine in Kupffer cells, acts on Kupffer cells itself and dendritic cells to generate immune suppression by autocrine and paracrine modes. Hepatocytes, biliary epithelia cells, oval cells and dendritic cells can convert histidine to histamine, which can promote sinusoidal endothelial cells proliferation by GsM pathway, and promote the proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary epithelia cells by GqM pathway.

  16. Mouse endometrial stromal cells produce basement-membrane components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Damjanov, A; Weiss, J;

    1986-01-01

    During mouse pregnancy, uterine stromal cells transform into morphologically distinct decidual cells under the influence of the implanting embryo and a proper hormonal environment. Mechanical stimulation of hormonally primed uterine stromal cells leads to the same morphologic alterations. The dec...

  17. Structural and metabolic changes in Atp7b-/- mouse liver and potential for new interventions in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huster, Dominik

    2014-05-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is caused by ATP7B mutations and results in copper accumulation and toxicity in liver and brain tissues. The specific mechanisms underlying copper toxicity are still poorly understood. Mouse models have revealed new insights into pathomechanisms of hepatic WD. Mitochondrial damage is observed in livers of WD patients and in mouse models; copper induces fragmentation of mitochondrial membrane lipids, particularly cardiolipin, with deleterious effects on both mitochondrial integrity and function. Copper accumulation also induces chronic inflammation in WD livers, which is followed by regeneration in parts of the liver and occasionally neoplastic proliferation. Gene expression studies using microarrays have aided our understanding of the molecular basis of these changes. Copper overload alters cholesterol biosynthesis in hepatocytes resulting in reduced liver and serum cholesterol. Experiments are currently underway to elucidate the link between copper and cholesterol metabolism. These findings may facilitate the development of specific therapies to ameliorate WD progression.

  18. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix L Struebing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma.

  19. Establishment and characterization of feeder-cell-dependent bovine fetal liver cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The establishment and initial characterization of bovine fetal liver cell lines is described. Bovine fetal hepatocytes were cultured from the liver of a 34-day bovine fetus by physical disruption of the liver tissue. Released liver cells and clumps of cells were plated on STO feeder layers and wer...

  20. Efficient derivation of functional hepatocytes from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells by a combination of cytokines and sodium butyrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qi; YANG Yang; ZHANG Jian; WANG Guo-ying; LIU Wei; QIU Dong-bo; HEI Zi-qing; YING Qi-long; CHEN Gui-hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Hepatocyte transplantation has been proposed as an alternative to whole-organ transplantation to support many forms of hepatic insufficiency.Unfortunately,the lack of donor livers makes it difficult to obtain enough viable human hepatocytes for hepatocyte-based therapies.Therefore,it is urgent to find new ways to provide ample hepatocytes.Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells,a breakthrough in stem cell research,may terminate these hinders for cell transplantation.For the promise of iPS cells to be realized in liver diseases,it is necessary to determine if and how efficient they can be differentiated into functional hepatocytes.Methods In this study,we directly compared the hepatic-differentiation capacity of mouse iPS cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells with three different induction approaches:conditions via embryonic body (EB) formation plus cytokines,conditions by combination of dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium butyrate and chemically defined,serum free monolayer conditions.Among these three induction conditions,more homogenous populations can be promoted under chemically defined,serum free conditions.The cells generated under these conditions exhibited hepatic functions in vitro,including glycogen storage,indocynine green (ICG) uptake and release as well as urea secretion.Although efficient hepatocytes differentiation from mouse iPS cells were observed,mouse iPS cells showed relatively lower hepatic induction efficiency compared with mouse ES cells.Results Mouse iPS cells would be efficiently differentiated into functional hepatocytes in vitro,which may be helpful in facilitating the development of hepatocytes for transplantation and for research on drug discovery.Conclusion We demonstrate that mouse iPS cells retain full potential for fetal liver development and describe procedures that facilitates the efficient generation of highly differentiated human hepatocyte-like cells from iPS cells in vitro.

  1. Silencing of WWP2 inhibits adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yong; Xu, Sheng-Qian; Pan, De-Biao; Ye, Guan-Xiong; Wu, Cheng-Jun; Wang, Shi; Wang, Chao-Jun; Jiang, Jin-Yan; Fu, Jing

    2016-05-01

    The role and clinical implication of the WWP2 E3 ubiquitin ligase in liver cancer are poorly understood. In the current study, we investigated the expression level of WWP2 and its functions in cell adhesion, invasion, and migration in liver cancer. We used real-time PCR to detect the expression of WWP2 in liver cancer and adjacent samples from the People's Hospital of Lishui and also analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-seq data by bioinformatics. Migration and invasion were detected by transwell analysis. We detected a strong WWP2 expression in tumor tissues of the People's Hospital of Lishui, and the survival rate was significantly higher in patients with lower WWP2-expressing tumors. WWP2 small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentivirus stably infected cells (shWWP2), Huh7, showed slower growth speed compared with scramble control-infected cells in a xenograft mouse model. Knockdown of WWP2 Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells demonstrated a reduction in adhesion, invasion, and migration. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) showed that WWP2 is positively correlated to cancer-related pathways including the chemokine signaling pathway. WWP2 also regulated MMP-9, caspase-9, CXCR3, and CCR5 expression in liver cancer cells. In addition, knockdown of CXCR3 and CCR5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and migration in Huh7 and BEL-7404 cells. Our data suggest that targeting of WWP2 may be a therapeutic strategy for liver cancer treatment.

  2. Development of a novel mouse model of amodiaquine-induced liver injury with a delayed onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metushi, Imir G; Cai, Ping; Dervovic, Dzana; Liu, Feng; Lobach, Alexandra; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Uetrecht, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Amodiaquine (AQ) treatment is associated with a high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. Evidence suggests that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated. A significant impediment to mechanistic studies of IDILI is the lack of valid animal models. This study reports the first animal model of IDILI with characteristics similar to mild IDILI in humans. Treatment of female C57BL/6 mice with AQ led to liver injury with delayed onset, which resolved despite continued treatment. Covalent binding of AQ was detected in the liver, which was greater in female than in male mice, and higher in the liver than in other organs. Covalent binding in the liver was maximal by Day 3, which did not explain the delayed onset of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) elevation. However, coincident with the elevated serum ALT, infiltration of liver and splenic mononuclear cells and activation of CD8 T-cells within the liver were identified. By Week 7, when ALT levels had returned close to normal, down-regulation of several inflammatory cytokines and up-regulation of PD-1 on T-cells suggested induction of immune tolerance. Treatment of Rag1(-/-) mice with AQ resulted in higher ALT activities than C57BL/6 mice, which suggested that the adaptive immune response was responsible for immune tolerance. In contrast, depletion of NK cells significantly attenuated the increase in ALT, which implied a role for NK cells in mild AQ-induced IDILI. This is the first example of a delayed-onset animal model of IDILI that appears to be immune-mediated.

  3. The emerging role of mast cells in liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarido, Veronica; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Demieville, Jennifer; Thomson, Joanne; Stephenson, Kristen; Francis, Heather

    2017-08-01

    The depth of our knowledge regarding mast cells has widened exponentially in the last 20 years. Once thought to be only important for allergy-mediated events, mast cells are now recognized to be important regulators of a number of pathological processes. The revelation that mast cells can influence organs, tissues, and cells has increased interest in mast cell research during liver disease. The purpose of this review is to refresh the reader's knowledge of the development, type, and location of mast cells and to review recent work that demonstrates the role of hepatic mast cells during diseased states. This review focuses primarily on liver diseases and mast cells during autoimmune disease, hepatitis, fatty liver disease, liver cancer, and aging in the liver. Overall, these studies demonstrate the potential role of mast cells in disease progression.

  4. Effect of brown seaweed lipids on fatty acid composition and lipid hydroperoxide levels of mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airanthi, M K Widjaja-Adhi; Sasaki, Naoya; Iwasaki, Sayaka; Baba, Nobuko; Abe, Masayuki; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2011-04-27

    Brown seaweed lipids from Undaria pinnatifida (Wakame), Sargassum horneri (Akamoku), and Cystoseira hakodatensis (Uganomoku) contained several bioactive compounds, namely, fucoxanthin, polyphenols, and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Fucoxanthin and polyphenol contents of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids were higher than those of Wakame lipids, while Wakame lipids showed higher total omega-3 PUFA content than Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and arachidonic acid (AA) in liver lipids of KK-A(y) mouse significantly increased by Akamoku and Uganomoku lipid feeding as compared with the control, but not by Wakame lipid feeding. Fucoxanthin has been reported to accelerate the bioconversion of omega-3 PUFA and omega-6 PUFA to DHA and AA, respectively. The higher hepatic DHA and AA level of mice fed Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids would be attributed to the higher content of fucoxanthin of Akamoku and Uganomoku lipids. The lipid hydroperoxide levels of the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids were significantly lower than those of control mice, even though total PUFA content was higher in the liver of mice fed brown seaweed lipids. This would be, at least in part, due to the antioxidant activity of fucoxanthin metabolites in the liver.

  5. Role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George Kolios; Vassilis Valatas; Elias Kouroumalis

    2006-01-01

    Kupffer cells, the resident liver macrophages have long been considered as mostly scavenger cells responsible for removing particulate material from the portal circulation. However, evidence derived mostly from animal models, indicates that Kupffer cells may be implicated in the pathogenesis of various liver diseases including viral hepatitis, steatohepatitis, alcoholic liver disease, intrahepatic cholostasis, activation or rejection of the liver during liver transplantation and liver fibrosis. There is accumulating evidence, reviewed in this paper, suggesting that Kupffer cells may act both as effector cells in the destruction of hepatocytes by producing harmful soluble mediators as well as antigen presenting cells during viral infections of the liver. Moreover they may represent a significant source of chemoattractant molecules for cytotoxic CD8 and regulatory T cells. Their role in fibrosis is well established as they are one of the main sources of TGFβ1 production, which leads to the transformation of stellate cells into myofibroblasts. Whether all these variable functions in the liver are mediated by different Kupffer cell subpopulations remains to be evaluated. In this review we propose a model that demonstrates the role of Kupffer cells in the pathogenesis of liver disease.

  6. An efficient method of sorting liver stem cells by using immuno-magnetic microbeads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fei He; Yin-Kun Liu; Dong-Mei Gao; Jun Chen; Peng-Yuan Yang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop a method to isolate liver stem cells fast and efficiently.METHODS: Fetal mouse liver cells were characterized by cell surface antigens (c-Kit and CD45/TER119) using flow cytometry. The candidate liver stem cells were sorted by using immuno-magnetic microbeads and identified by clone-forming culture, RT-PCR and immunofluorescence assays.RESULTS: The c-Kit-(CD45/TER119)-cell population with 97.9% of purity were purified by immuno-magnetic microbeads at one time. The yield of this separation was about 6% of the total sorting cells and the cell viability was above 98%. When cultured in vitro these cells had high clone-forming and self-renewing ability and expressed markers of hepatocytes and bile duct cells.Functionally mature hepatocytes were observed after 21 d of culture.CONCLUSION: This method offers an excellent tool for the enrichment of liver stem cells with high purity and viability, which could be used for further studies. It is fast, efficient, simple and not expensive.

  7. Liver Development and In vitro Differentiation of Embryonic Stem Cells to Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behshad Pournasr

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells are characterized with two specific properties: self renewal and differentiationpotential. Embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells that can be differentiatedinto three kind of germ layers; ectoderm, endoderm, mesoderm. These properties makethem ideal for developmental research, toxicology and transplantation in animal model ofhuman diseases. These cells can be differentiated spontaneously into three germ layercells, but in direct differentiation, molecules and growth factors involved in natural developmentof desired cells must well characterized to gain a proper differentiation in vitro.There are increasing numbers of death because of liver disease and failure of organtransplantation in our country and the world. This made stem cell scientists to work onembryonic stem cell differentiation to hepatocyte like cells to create an accessible cellsource in regenerative medicine of liver disease in the future, and also to establish stemcell derived hepatocyte for in vitro screening of drugs.In this review we will summarize the process of liver development including moleculesand growth factors incorporate in the liver development as a template for in vitro differentiationof mouse and human embryonic stem cells and then we will discuss the relatedstudies and techniques for analyzing functionality of differentiated cells.

  8. Sex-specific mouse liver gene expression: genome-wide analysis of developmental changes from pre-pubertal period to young adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conforto Tara L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early liver development and the transcriptional transitions during hepatogenesis are well characterized. However, gene expression changes during the late postnatal/pre-pubertal to young adulthood period are less well understood, especially with regards to sex-specific gene expression. Methods Microarray analysis of male and female mouse liver was carried out at 3, 4, and 8 wk of age to elucidate developmental changes in gene expression from the late postnatal/pre-pubertal period to young adulthood. Results A large number of sex-biased and sex-independent genes showed significant changes during this developmental period. Notably, sex-independent genes involved in cell cycle, chromosome condensation, and DNA replication were down regulated from 3 wk to 8 wk, while genes associated with metal ion binding, ion transport and kinase activity were up regulated. A majority of genes showing sex differential expression in adult liver did not display sex differences prior to puberty, at which time extensive changes in sex-specific gene expression were seen, primarily in males. Thus, in male liver, 76% of male-specific genes were up regulated and 47% of female-specific genes were down regulated from 3 to 8 wk of age, whereas in female liver 67% of sex-specific genes showed no significant change in expression. In both sexes, genes up regulated from 3 to 8 wk were significantly enriched (p p Ihh; female-specific Cdx4, Cux2, Tox, and Trim24 and may contribute to the developmental changes that lead to global acquisition of liver sex-specificity by 8 wk of age. Conclusions Overall, the observed changes in gene expression during postnatal liver development reflect the deceleration of liver growth and the induction of specialized liver functions, with widespread changes in sex-specific gene expression primarily occurring in male liver.

  9. Bimodal role of Kupffer cells during colorectal cancer liver metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Shu Wen; Ager, Eleanor I; Christophi, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) are resident liver macrophages that play a crucial role in liver homeostasis and in the pathogenesis of liver disease. Evidence suggests KCs have both stimulatory and inhibitory functions during tumor development but the extent of these functions remains to be defined. Using KC depletion studies in an orthotopic murine model of colorectal cancer (CRC) liver metastases we demonstrated the bimodal role of KCs in determining tumor growth. KC depletion with gadolinium chloride...

  10. Methods of Liver Stem Cell Therapy in Rodents as Models of Human Liver Regeneration in Hepatic Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi Goradel, Nasser; Darabi, Masoud; Shamsasenjan, Karim; Ejtehadifar, Mostafa; Zahedi, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Cell therapy is a promising intervention for treating liver diseases and liver failure. Different animal models of human liver cell therapy have been developed in recent years. Rats and mice are the most commonly used liver failure models. In fact, rodent models of hepatic failure have shown significant improvement in liver function after cell infusion. With the advent of stem-cell technologies, it is now possible to re-programme adult somatic cells such as skin or hair-follicle cells from individual patients to stem-like cells and differentiate them into liver cells. Such regenerative stem cells are highly promising in the personalization of cell therapy. The present review article will summarize current approaches to liver stem cell therapy with rodent models. In addition, we discuss common cell tracking techniques and how tracking data help to direct liver cell therapy research in animal models of hepatic failure.

  11. Toxicity monitoring with primary cultured hepatocytes underestimates the acetaminophen-induced inflammatory responses of the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Shinjiro; Shimomura, Akiko; Inadera, Hidekuni

    2011-01-01

    In vitro gene expression profiling with isolated hepatocytes has been used to assess the hepatotoxicity of certain chemicals because of animal welfare issues. However, whether an in vitro system can completely replace the in vivo system has yet to be elucidated in detail. Using a focused microarray established in our laboratory, we examined gene expression profiles in the mouse liver and primary cultured hepatocytes after treatment with different doses of acetaminophen, a widely used analgesic that frequently causes liver injury. The acute hepatotoxicity of acetaminophen was confirmed by showing the induction of an oxidative stress marker, heme oxygenase-1, elevated levels of serum transaminase, and histopathological findings. In vivo microarray and network analysis showed that acetaminophen treatment provoked alterations in relation to the inflammatory response, and that tumor necrosis factor-α plays a central role in related pathway alterations. By contrast, pathway analyses in in vitro isolated hepatocytes did not find such prominent changes in the inflammation-related networks compared with the in vivo situation. Thus, although in vitro gene expression profiles are useful for evaluating the direct toxicity of chemicals, indirect toxicities including inflammatory responses mediated by cell-cell interactions or secondary toxicity due to pathophysiological changes in the whole body may be overlooked. Our results indicate that the in vitro hepatotoxicity prediction system using isolated hepatocytes does not fully reflect the in vivo cellular response. An in vitro system may be appropriate, therefore, for high throughput screening to detect the direct hepatotoxicity of a test compound.

  12. Gene Expression Profile Change and Associated Physiological and Pathological Effects in Mouse Liver Induced by Fasting and Refeeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Xu, Xiang; Zhou, Ben; He, Zhishui; Zhai, Qiwei

    2011-01-01

    Food availability regulates basal metabolism and progression of many diseases, and liver plays an important role in these processes. The effects of food availability on digital gene expression profile, physiological and pathological functions in liver are yet to be further elucidated. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing technology to detect digital gene expression profile of mouse liver in fed, fasted and refed states. Totally 12162 genes were detected, and 2305 genes were significantly regulated by food availability. Biological process and pathway analysis showed that fasting mainly affected lipid and carboxylic acid metabolic processes in liver. Moreover, the genes regulated by fasting and refeeding in liver were mainly enriched in lipid metabolic process or fatty acid metabolism. Network analysis demonstrated that fasting mainly regulated Drug Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Endocrine System Development and Function, and the networks including Lipid Metabolism, Small Molecule Biochemistry and Gene Expression were affected by refeeding. In addition, FunDo analysis showed that liver cancer and diabetes mellitus were most likely to be affected by food availability. This study provides the digital gene expression profile of mouse liver regulated by food availability, and demonstrates the main biological processes, pathways, gene networks and potential hepatic diseases regulated by fasting and refeeding. These results show that food availability mainly regulates hepatic lipid metabolism and is highly correlated with liver-related diseases including liver cancer and diabetes. PMID:22096593

  13. Selective expression of myosin IC Isoform A in mouse and human cell lines and mouse prostate cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanna Ihnatovych

    Full Text Available Myosin IC is a single headed member of the myosin superfamily. We recently identified a novel isoform and showed that the MYOIC gene in mammalian cells encodes three isoforms (isoforms A, B, and C. Furthermore, we demonstrated that myosin IC isoform A but not isoform B exhibits a tissue specific expression pattern. In this study, we extended our analysis of myosin IC isoform expression patterns by analyzing the protein and mRNA expression in various mammalian cell lines and in various prostate specimens and tumor tissues from the transgenic mouse prostate (TRAMP model by immunoblotting, qRT-PCR, and by indirect immunohistochemical staining of paraffin embedded prostate specimen. Analysis of a panel of mammalian cell lines showed an increased mRNA and protein expression of specifically myosin IC isoform A in a panel of human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines but not in non-cancer prostate or other (non-prostate- cancer cell lines. Furthermore, we demonstrate that myosin IC isoform A expression is significantly increased in TRAMP mouse prostate samples with prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN lesions and in distant site metastases in lung and liver when compared to matched normal tissues. Our observations demonstrate specific changes in the expression of myosin IC isoform A that are concurrent with the occurrence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mouse prostate cancer model that closely mimics clinical prostate cancer. These data suggest that elevated levels of myosin IC isoform A may be a potential marker for the detection of prostate cancer.

  14. Thiamethoxam induced mouse liver tumors and their relevance to humans. Part 1: mode of action studies in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Trevor; Toghill, Alison; Lee, Robert; Waechter, Felix; Weber, Edgar; Noakes, James

    2005-07-01

    Thiamethoxam, a neonicotinoid insecticide, which is not mutagenic either in vitro or in vivo, caused an increased incidence of liver tumors in mice when fed in the diet for 18 months at concentrations in the range 500 to 2500 ppm. A number of dietary studies of up to 50 weeks duration have been conducted in order to identify the mode of action for the development of the liver tumors seen at the end of the cancer bioassay. Both thiamethoxam and its major metabolites have been tested in these studies. Over the duration of a 50-week thiamethoxam dietary feeding study in mice, the earliest change, within one week, is a marked reduction (by up to 40%) in plasma cholesterol. This was followed 10 weeks later by evidence of liver toxicity including single cell necrosis and an increase in apoptosis. After 20 weeks there was a significant increase in hepatic cell replication rates. All of these changes persisted from the time they were first observed until the end of the study at 50 weeks. They occurred in a dose-dependent manner and were only observed at doses (500, 1250, 2500 ppm) where liver tumors were increased in the cancer bioassay. There was a clear no-effect level of 200 ppm. The changes seen in this study are consistent with the development of liver cancer in mice and form the basis of the mode of action. When the major metabolites of thiamethoxam, CGA322704, CGA265307, and CGA330050 were tested in dietary feeding studies of up to 20 weeks duration, only metabolite CGA330050 induced the same changes as those seen in the liver in the thiamethoxam feeding study. It was concluded that thiamethoxam is hepatotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic as a result of its metabolism to CGA330050. Metabolite CGA265307 was also shown to be an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase and to increase the hepatotoxicity of carbon tetrachloride. It is proposed that CGA265307, through its effects on nitric oxide synthase, exacerbates the toxicity of CGA330050 in thiamethoxam treated mice.

  15. Immunodeficient mouse model for human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human immune systems provide an exciting model to study human immunobiology in an in vivo setting without placing patients at risk. The essential parameter for creation of these "humanized models" is engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that will allow for optimal development of human immune systems. However, there are a number of strategies to generate humanized mice and specific protocols can vary significantly among different laboratories. Here we describe a protocol for the co-implantation of human HSC with autologous fetal liver and thymic tissues into immunodeficient mice to create a humanized model with optimal human T cell development. This model, often referred to as the Thy/Liv or BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) mouse, develops a functional human immune system, including HLA-restricted human T cells, B cells, and innate immune cells.

  16. Down-regulation of microRNA-26a promotes mouse hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration.

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    Jian Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate liver regeneration (LR is still an unsolved problem in major liver resection and small-for-size syndrome post-living donor liver transplantation. A number of microRNAs have been shown to play important roles in cell proliferation. Herein, we investigated the role of miR-26a as a pivotal regulator of hepatocyte proliferation in LR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adult male C57BL/6J mice, undergoing 70% partial hepatectomy (PH, were treated with Ad5-anti-miR-26a-LUC or Ad5-miR-26a-LUC or Ad5-LUC vector via portal vein. The animals were subjected to in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Serum and liver samples were collected to test liver function, calculate liver-to-body weight ratio (LBWR, document hepatocyte proliferation (Ki-67 staining, and investigate potential targeted gene expression of miR-26a by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. The miR-26a level declined during LR after 70% PH. Down-regulation of miR-26a by anti-miR-26a expression led to enhanced proliferation of hepatocytes, and both LBWR and hepatocyte proliferation (Ki-67(+ cells % showed an increased tendency, while liver damage, indicated by aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT and total bilirubin (T-Bil, was reduced. Furthermore, CCND2 and CCNE2, as possible targeted genes of miR-26a, were up-regulated. In addition, miR-26a over-expression showed converse results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MiR-26a plays crucial role in regulating the proliferative phase of LR, probably by repressing expressions of cell cycle proteins CCND2 and CCNE2. The current study reveals a novel miRNA-mediated regulation pattern during the proliferative phase of LR.

  17. Measurement of mouse liver glutathione S-transferase activity by the integrated method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖飞; 李甲初; 康格非; 曾昭淳; 左渝萍

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The integrated method was investigated to measure Vm/Km of mouse liver glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity on GSH and 7-Cl-4-nitrobenzofurazozan. Methods: Presetting concentration of one substrate twenty-fold above the others and taking maximum product absorbance Am as parameter while Km as constant, Vm/Km was obtained by nonlinear fitting of GST reaction curve to the integrated Michaelis-Menten equation ln [Am/(Am-Ai)]+Ai/(ε×Km)=(Vm/Km)×ti (1). Results: Vm/Km for GST showed slight dependence on initial substrate concentration and data range, but it was resistant to background absorbance, error in reaction origin and small deviation in presetting Km. Vm/Km was proportional to the amount of GST with upper limit higher than that by initial rate. There was close correlation between Vm/Km and initial rate of the same GST. Consistent results were obtained by this integrated method and classical initial rate method for the measurement of mouse liver GST. Conclusion: With the concentration of one substrate twenty-fold above the others, this integrated method was reliable to measure the activity of enzyme on two substrates, and substrate concentration of the lower one close to its apparent Km was able to be used.

  18. Stem cell-derived hepatocytes for functional liver replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno eChrist

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC represent an alternate cell source to substitute for primary hepatocytes in hepatocyte transplantation because of their multiple differentiation potential and nearly unlimited availability. They may differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro and maintain specific hepatocyte functions also after transplantation into the regenerating livers of mice or rats both under injury and non-injury conditions. Depending on the underlying liver disease their mode of action is either to replace the diseased liver tissue or to support liver regeneration through their anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic as well as their pro-proliferative action.

  19. Effect of Co-Culturing of Mice Liver Cells and Embryonic Carcinomatous Stem Cells on the Rate of Differentiation to Hematopoietic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Pourfatollah

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Considering the importance of co-culture in differentiation of embryonic stem cells, the aim of this study was evaluation of the effect of co-culturing fetal liver stroma cells with P19 cells on the line of differentiation. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, P19 cells were cultured directly in semisolid medium. These cells proliferated and primarily differentiated to colonies know as embryoid bodies (EBs after 8-12 days. The Ebs cells were trypsinized and dissociated to single or double cells. Then these cells were co-cultured on the mouse fetal liver feeder layer in the absence of exogenous factors. After 14-18 days, the colonies were studied morphologically by benzidine and giemsa staining and also counted under invert microscope. Results: The percentages of benzidine positive (or erythroid and negative colonies were 94% and 6% respectively and also the cells of colonies were studied by Giemsa staining. Results showed that they were myeloid or lymphoid type cells. Thus, the results show that in the presence of mouse fetal liver feeder layer, the number of erythroid colonies was increased. Conclusions: Therefore, this technique may be effective for differentiation of stem cells from different sources into hematopoietic cells and can be used in future for human cell therapy.

  20. Effects of feeder layer and BRL conditioned medium on mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TsungHsiaochien; christine,L.Mummery

    1990-01-01

    In vitro growth and maintenance of embryonic stem (ES) cell lines derived from ICM cells of various blastocysts of 129 strain mice,the sustenance of their pluripotency and normal karyotype depend on the feeder layer of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF).Compared with the feeder layer of MEF cells,medium conditioned by Buffalo rat liver cells (BRL-CM) is able to maintain pluripotency and karyotypic normality of ES cells only in short term cell propagation.Besides,ES cells grown in BRL-CM are also capable of aggregation with 8-cell embryos of Swiss strain and develop into germ line chimaeras.Modification to the method of aggregating ES cells with early embryos by making a hole in agar layer on the top of MEF feeder cells was shown to be more converient and efficient than the conventional microdrop method.

  1. Fisetin inhibits liver cancer growth in a mouse model: Relation to dopamine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang-Feng; Long, Hai-Jiao; Miao, Xiong-Ying; Liu, Guo-Li; Yao, Hong-Liang

    2017-07-01

    Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a natural abundant flavonoid, is produced in different vegetables and fruits. Fisetin has been reported to relate to various positive biological effects, including anti-proliferative, anticancer, anti-oxidative and neuroprotective effects. Dopamine receptors (DRs) belonging to G protein‑coupled receptor family, are known as the target of ~50% of all modern medicinal drugs. DRs consist of various proteins, functioning as transduction of intracellular signals for extracellular stimuli. We found that fisetin performed as DR2 agonist to suppress liver cancer cells proliferation, migration and invasion. Caspase-3 signaling was activated to induce apoptosis for fisetin administration. Furthermore, TGF‑β1 was also inhibited in fisetin-treated liver cancer cells, reducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Additionally, fisetin downregulated VEGFR1, p-ERK1/2, p38 and pJNK, ameliorating liver cancer progression. In vivo, the orthotopically implanted tumors from mice were inhibited by fisetin adminisatration accompanied by prolonged survival rate and higher levels of dopamine. Together, the results indicated a novel therapeutic strategy to suppress liver cancer progression associated with DR2 regulation, indicating that dopamine might be of importance in liver cancer progression.

  2. Metabolism of dictamnine in liver microsomes from mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Zhao, Yunli; Zhu, Yingdong; Sun, Jianbo; Yerke, Aaron; Sang, Shengmin; Yu, Zhiguo

    2016-02-05

    Dictamnine, a furoquinoline alkaloid isolated from the root bark of Dictamnus dasycarpus Turcz. (Rutaceae), is reported to have a wide range of pharmacological activities. In this study, the in vitro metabolic profiles of dictamnine in mouse, rat, dog, monkey, and human liver microsomes were investigated and compared. Dictamnine was incubated with liver microsomes in the presence of an NADPH-regenerating system, resulting in the formation of eight metabolites (M1-M8). M1 is an O-desmethyl metabolite. M5 and M6 are formed by a mono-hydroxylation of the benzene ring of dictamnine. M8 was tentatively identified as an N-oxide metabolite. The predominant metabolic pathway of dictamnine occurs through the epoxidation of the 2,3-olefinic to yield a 2,3-epoxide metabolite (M7), followed by the ring of the epoxide opening to give M4. Likewise, cleavage of the furan ring forms M2 and M3. Slight differences were observed in the in vitro metabolic profiles of dictamnine among the five species tested. A chemical inhibition study with a broad and five specific CYP450 inhibitors revealed that most of the dictamnine metabolites in liver microsomes are mediated by CYP450, with CYP3A4 as the predominant enzyme involved in the formation of M7, the major metabolite. These findings provide vital information to better understand the metabolic processes of dictamnine among various species.

  3. Genetically modified mouse models for the study of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perumal Nagarajan; M Jerald Mahesh Kumar; Ramasamy Venkatesan; Subeer S Majundar; Ramesh C Juyal

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity,insulin resistance,and type 2 diabetes.NAFLD represents a large spectrum of diseases ranging from (1) fatty liver (hepatic steatosis); (2) steatosis with inflammation and necrosis; to (3) cirrhosis.The animal models to study NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are extremely useful,as there are still many events to be elucidated in the pathology of NASH.The study of the established animal models has provided many clues in the pathogenesis of steatosis and steatohepatitis,but these remain incompletely understood.The different mouse models can be classified in two large groups.The first one includes genetically modified (transgenic or knockout) mice that spontaneously develop liver disease,and the second one includes mice that acquire the disease after dietary or pharmacological manipulation.Although the molecular mechanism leading to the development of hepatic steatosis in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is complex,genetically modified animal models may be a key for the treatment of NAFLD.Ideal animal models for NASH should closely resemble the pathological characteristics observed in humans.To date,no single animal model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression,but they can imitate particular characteristics of human disease.Therefore,it is important that the researchers choose the appropriate animal model.This review discusses various genetically modified animal models developed and used in research on NAFLD.

  4. Analysis of the effect of Qizhuyigan on liver function in a mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gavaged with 1,000 mg/kg of an aqueous solution containing the contents of a Qizhuyigan capsule. The ... would be very useful to identify a drug that inhibits acute liver .... superoxide anion free radicals and protect cells from damage [17].

  5. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  6. SECs (Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells), Liver Microenvironment, and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Vaishaali; Harris, Edward N.

    2017-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a wound-healing response to chronic liver injury such as alcoholic/nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis with no FDA-approved treatments. Liver fibrosis results in a continual accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and paves the way for replacement of parenchyma with nonfunctional scar tissue. The fibrotic condition results in drastic changes in the local mechanical, chemical, and biological microenvironment of the tissue. Liver parenchyma is supported by an efficient network of vasculature lined by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs). These nonparenchymal cells are highly specialized resident endothelial cell type with characteristic morphological and functional features. Alterations in LSECs phenotype including lack of LSEC fenestration, capillarization, and formation of an organized basement membrane have been shown to precede fibrosis and promote hepatic stellate cell activation. Here, we review the interplay of LSECs with the dynamic changes in the fibrotic liver microenvironment such as matrix rigidity, altered ECM protein profile, and cell-cell interactions to provide insight into the pivotal changes in LSEC physiology and the extent to which it mediates the progression of liver fibrosis. Establishing the molecular aspects of LSECs in the light of fibrotic microenvironment is valuable towards development of novel therapeutic and diagnostic targets of liver fibrosis. PMID:28293634

  7. Evaluation of a hybrid artificial liver module based on a spheroid culture system of embryonic stem cell-derived hepatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Shunsuke; Matsumoto, Kinya; Ikeda, Kaoru; Kusumi, Tomoaki; Inamori, Masakazu; Nakazawa, Kohji; Ijima, Hiroyuki; Funatsu, Kazumori; Kajiwara, Toshihisa

    2012-01-01

    Hybrid artificial liver (HAL) is an extracorporeal circulation system comprised of a bioreactor containing immobilized functional liver cells. It is expected to not only serve as a temporary liver function support system, but also to accelerate liver regeneration in recovery from hepatic failure. One of the most difficult problems in developing a hybrid artificial liver is obtaining an adequate cell source. In this study, we attempt to differentiate embryonic stem (ES) cells by hepatic lineage using a polyurethane foam (PUF)/spheroid culture in which the cultured cells spontaneously form spherical multicellular aggregates (spheroids) in the pores of the PUF. We also demonstrate the feasibility of the PUF-HAL system by comparing ES cells to primary hepatocytes in in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Mouse ES cells formed multicellular spheroids in the pores of PUF. ES cells expressed liver-specific functions (ammonia removal and albumin secretion) after treatment with the differentiation-promoting agent, sodium butyrate (SB). We designed a PUF-HAL module comprised of a cylindrical PUF block with many medium-flow capillaries for hepatic differentiation of ES cells. The PUF-HAL module cells expressed ammonia removal and albumin secretion functions after 2 weeks of SB culture. Because of high proliferative activity of ES cells and high cell density, the maximum expression level of albumin secretion function per unit volume of module was comparable to that seen in primary mouse hepatocyte culture. In the animal experiments with rats, the PUF-HAL differentiating ES cells appeared to partially contribute to recovery from liver failure. This outcome indicates that the PUF module containing differentiating ES cells may be a useful biocomponent of a hybrid artificial liver support system.

  8. Hepatic stellate cell-specific deletion of SIRT1 exacerbates liver fibrosis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Hong, Wenxuan; Hao, Chenzhi; Li, Luyang; Xu, Huihui; Li, Ping; Xu, Yong

    2017-09-14

    Liver fibrosis is widely perceived as a host defense mechanism that aids tissue repair following liver injury. Excessive fibrogenesis, however, serves to disrupts normal liver structure and precedes such irrevocable human pathologies as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is a hallmark event during liver fibrosis. In the present study we investigated the mechanism by which the lysine deacetylase SIRT1 regulates HSC activation. We report here that SIRT1 levels were decreased in the liver in different mouse models and in cultured HSCs undergoing activation. SIRT1 down-regulation paralleled HDAC4 up-regulation. HDAC4 was recruited to the SIRT1 promoter during HSC activation and removed acetylated histones H3 and H4 from the SIRT1 promoter leading to SIRT1 trans‑repression. HDAC4 silencing restored SIRT1 expression and attenuated HSC activation in SIRT1-dependent manner. More important, selective deletion of SIRT1 in HSCs exacerbated CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice. Mechanistically, SIRT1 deacetylated PPARγ to block HSC activation. Together, our data reveal an HDAC4-SIRT1-PPARγ axis that contributes to the regulation of HSC activation and liver fibrosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Stem cells in liver regeneration and their potential clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosos, Ioannis; Kolios, George

    2013-10-01

    Stem cells constitute a population of "primitive cells" with the ability to divide indefinitely and give rise to specialized cells under special conditions. Because of these two characteristics they have received particular attention in recent decades. These cells are the primarily responsible factors for the regeneration of tissues and organs and for the healing of lesions, a feature that makes them a central key in the development of cell-based medicine, called Regenerative Medicine. The idea of wound and organ repair and body regeneration is as old as the mankind, reflecting the human desire for inhibiting aging and immortality and it is first described in the ancient Greek myth of Prometheus. It is of interest that the myth refers to liver, an organ with remarkable regenerative ability after loss of mass and function caused by liver injury or surgical resection. Over the last decade there has been an important progress in understanding liver physiology and the mechanisms underlying hepatic development and regeneration. As liver transplantation, despite its difficulties, remains the only effective therapy for advanced liver disease so far, scientific interest has nowadays been orientated towards Regenerative Medicine and the use of stem cells to repair damaged liver. This review is focused on the available literature concerning the role of stem cells in liver regeneration. It summarizes the results of studies concerning endogenous liver regeneration and stem cell experimental protocols. Moreover, this review discusses the clinical studies that have been conducted in humans so far.

  10. Arsenite induced oxidative damage in mouse liver is associated with increased cytokeratin 18 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsebatt, M.E. [UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Dept. Medicina Genomica y Toxicologia Ambiental, Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Mexico (Mexico); Razo, L.M. del; Sanchez-Pena, L.C. [Seccion de Toxicologia, CINVESTAV, Mexico (Mexico); Cerbon, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Departamento de Biologia, Mexico (Mexico); Zuniga, O.; Ramirez, P. [Facultad de Estudios Superiores Cuautitlan, UNAM, Laboratorio de Toxicologia Celular, Coordinacion General de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Cuautitlan Izcalli, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-09-15

    Cytokeratins (CK) constitute a family of cytoskeletal intermediate filament proteins that are typically expressed in epithelial cells. An abnormal structure and function are effects that are clearly related to liver diseases as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. We have previously observed that sodium arsenite (SA) induced the synthesis of CK18 protein and promotes a dose-related disruption of cytoplasmic CK18 filaments in a human hepatic cell line. Both abnormal gene expression and disturbance of structural organization are toxic effects that are likely to cause liver disease by interfering with normal hepatocyte function. To investigate if a disruption in the CK18 expression pattern is associated with arsenite liver damage, we investigated CK18 mRNA and protein levels in liver slices treated with low levels of SA. Organotypic cultures were incubated with 0.01, 1 and 10 {mu}M of SA in the absence and presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Cell viability and inorganic arsenic metabolism were determined. Increased expression of CK18 was observed after exposure to SA. The addition of NAC impeded the oxidative effects of SA exposure, decreasing the production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and significantly diminishing the up regulation of CK18 mRNA and protein. Liver arsenic levels correlated with increased levels of mRNA. Mice treated with intragastric single doses of 2.5 and 5 mg/kg of SA showed an increased expression of CK18. Results suggest that CK18 expression may be a sensible early biomarker of oxidative stress and damage induced by arsenite in vitro and in vivo. Then, during SA exposure, altered CK expression may compromise liver function. (orig.)

  11. Prostaglandin E2 Regulates Liver versus Pancreas Cell Fate Decisions and Endodermal Outgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, Sahar; Sherwood, Richard I.; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Saunders, Diane; Harris, James M.; Esain, Virginie; Carroll, Kelli J.; Frechette, Gregory M.; Kim, Andrew J.; Hwang, Katie L.; Cutting, Claire C.; Elledge, Susanna; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The liver and pancreas arise from common endodermal progenitors. How these distinct cell fates are specified is poorly understood. Here, we describe prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a regulator of endodermal fate specification during development. Modulating PGE2 activity has opposing effects on liver-versus-pancreas specification in zebrafish embryos as well as mouse endodermal progenitors. The PGE2 synthetic enzyme cox2a and receptor ep2a are patterned such that cells closest to PGE2 synthesis acquire a liver fate whereas more distant cells acquire a pancreas fate. PGE2 interacts with the bmp2b pathway to regulate fate specification. At later stages of development, PGE2 acting via the ep4a receptor promotes outgrowth of both the liver and pancreas. PGE2 remains important for adult organ growth, as it modulates liver regeneration. This work provides in vivo evidence that PGE2 may act as a morphogen to regulate cell fate decisions and outgrowth of the embryonic endodermal anlagen. PMID:24530296

  12. SIRT1 antagonizes liver fibrosis by blocking hepatic stellate cell activation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Hong, Wenxuan; Hao, Chenzhi; Li, Luyang; Wu, Dongmei; Shen, Aiguo; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Yuanlin; Li, Ping; Xu, Yong

    2017-09-26

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are a major source of fibrogenesis in the liver contributing to cirrhosis. When activated, HSCs transdifferentiate into myofibroblast and undergo profound functional alterations paralleling an overhaul of the transcriptome, the mechanism of which remains largely undefined. We investigated the involvement of the class III deacetylase sirtuin (silent information regulator 1, SIRT1) in HSC activation and liver fibrosis. SIRT1 levels were down-regulated in the livers in mouse models of liver fibrosis, in patients with cirrhosis, and in activated HSCs as opposed to quiescent HSCs. SIRT1 activation halted whereas SIRT1 inhibition promoted HSC trans-differentiation into myofibroblast. Liver fibrosis was exacerbated in mice with HSC-specific deletion of SIRT1 (conditional knockout, cKO), receiving CCl4 (1 mg/kg) injection or subjected to bile duct ligation, compared to wild-type littermates. SIRT1 regulated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) transcription by deacetylating enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) in quiescent HSCs. Finally, EZH2 inhibition or PPARγ activation ameliorated fibrogenesis in cKO mice. In summary, our data suggest that SIRT1 plays an essential role guiding the transition of HSC phenotypes.-Li, M., Hong, W., Hao, C., Li, L., Wu, D., Shen, A., Lu, J., Zheng, Y., Li, P., Xu, Y. SIRT1 antagonizes liver fibrosis by blocking hepatic stellate cell activation in mice. © FASEB.

  13. Pitavastatin suppressed liver cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, He-Yi; Zhang, Wei-Jian; Xie, Xue-Meng; Zheng, Zhi-Hai; Zhu, Heng-Liang; Jiang, Fei-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Pitavastatin classically functions as a blood cholesterol-lowering drug. Previously, it was discovered with antiglioma stem cell properties through drug screening. However, whether it can be used for liver cancer cell therapy has never been reported. In this study, the cell viability and colony formation assay were utilized to analyze the cytotoxicity of pitavastatin on liver cancer cells. The cell cycle alteration was checked after pitavastatin treatment. Apoptosis-related protein expression and the effect of caspase inhibitor were also checked. The in vivo inhibitory effect of pitavastatin on the growth of liver tumor was also tested. It was found that pitavastatin inhibited growth and colony formation of liver cancer Huh-7 cells and SMMC7721 cells. It induced arrest of liver cancer cells at the G1 phase. Increased proportion of sub-G1 cells was observed after pitavastatin treatment. Pitavastatin promoted caspase-9 cleavage and caspase-3 cleavage in liver cancer cells. Caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK reversed the cleavage of cytotoxic effect of pitavastatin. Moreover, pitavastatin decreased the tumor growth and improved the survival of tumor-bearing mice. This study suggested the antiliver cancer effect of the old drug pitavastatin. It may be developed as a drug for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27621652

  14. In Vitro transformation of LW13 Rat liver epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHICAN; KARLFETNANSKY; 等

    1992-01-01

    A rat liver epithelial cell line designated LW 13 was established using a sequential sedimentation method.The cell line retained many normal proerties of liver epithelial cells and showed some structural and functional features resembling those of liver parenchymal cells,LW13 cells became malignant after the intrduction of exogenous transforming EJ Ha ras gene,Tumors produced by inoculation of the transformed cells into baby rats contained areas of poorly differentialted hepatocellular carcinoma,In situ hybridization analysis confirmed the random rather than specific integration of exogenous ras gene into host chromosomes.Furthermore,an at least tenfold increase in the expression of the endogenous c mys gene was detected among transformed cell lines,suggesting the involvement of the c myc proto oncogene in the in vitro transformation of rat liver epithelial cells by EJ Ha ras oncogene.

  15. UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase Expression in Mouse Liver Is Increased in Obesity- and Fasting-Induced Steatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jialin; Kulkarni, Supriya R.; Li, Liya

    2012-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugt) catalyze phase II conjugation reactions with glucuronic acid, which enhances chemical polarity and the elimination from the body. Few studies have addressed whether Ugt expression and activity are affected by liver disease, such as steatosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether steatosis induced by obesity or fasting could affect liver Ugt mRNA expression and activity. Male C57BL/6J and Lepob/ob (ob/ob) mice were fed ad libitum or food was withheld for 24 h. In steatotic livers of ob/ob mice, Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a9, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression increased. Fasting, which also induced steatosis, increased hepatic Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a7, -1a9, -2b1, -2b5, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression in mouse liver. Likewise, acetaminophen glucuronidation increased by 47% in hepatic microsomes from ob/ob mice compared with that in C57BL/6J mice, but not after fasting. In both steatosis models, Ugt induction was accompanied by increased aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, pregnane X receptor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α mRNA expression. In addition, fasting increased CAR, PPAR, and Nrf2 binding activity. The work points to hepatic triglyceride concentrations corresponding with nuclear receptor and Ugt expression. The findings indicate that steatosis significantly alters hepatic Ugt expression and activity, which could have a significant impact on determining circulating hormone levels, drug efficacy, and environmental chemical clearance. PMID:22031624

  16. UDP-glucuronosyltransferase expression in mouse liver is increased in obesity- and fasting-induced steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jialin; Kulkarni, Supriya R; Li, Liya; Slitt, Angela L

    2012-02-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (Ugt) catalyze phase II conjugation reactions with glucuronic acid, which enhances chemical polarity and the elimination from the body. Few studies have addressed whether Ugt expression and activity are affected by liver disease, such as steatosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether steatosis induced by obesity or fasting could affect liver Ugt mRNA expression and activity. Male C57BL/6J and Lep(ob/ob) (ob/ob) mice were fed ad libitum or food was withheld for 24 h. In steatotic livers of ob/ob mice, Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a9, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression increased. Fasting, which also induced steatosis, increased hepatic Ugt1a1, -1a6, -1a7, -1a9, -2b1, -2b5, -2a3, -3a1, and -3a2 mRNA expression in mouse liver. Likewise, acetaminophen glucuronidation increased by 47% in hepatic microsomes from ob/ob mice compared with that in C57BL/6J mice, but not after fasting. In both steatosis models, Ugt induction was accompanied by increased aryl hydrocarbon receptor, constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α, pregnane X receptor, nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α mRNA expression. In addition, fasting increased CAR, PPAR, and Nrf2 binding activity. The work points to hepatic triglyceride concentrations corresponding with nuclear receptor and Ugt expression. The findings indicate that steatosis significantly alters hepatic Ugt expression and activity, which could have a significant impact on determining circulating hormone levels, drug efficacy, and environmental chemical clearance.

  17. The role of natural killer cells in autoimmune liver disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudspeth, Kelly; Pontarini, Elena; Tentorio, Paolo; Cimino, Matteo; Donadon, Matteo; Torzilli, Guido; Lugli, Enrico; Della Bella, Silvia; Gershwin, M Eric; Mavilio, Domenico

    2013-10-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are important players of the innate arm of the immune system and provide an early defense against pathogens and tumor-transformed cells. Peripheral blood NK (PB-NK) cells were first identified because of their ability to spontaneously kill tumor-cell targets in vitro without the need for specific antigen priming, which is the reason that they were named 'natural killer' cells. The characterization of NK cells in human tissues and body organs represented another important step forward to better understand their physiology and physiopathology. In this regard, many reports revealed over the past decade a differential anatomic distribution of NK cell subsets in several sites such as the intestine, lung, cervix, placenta and liver as well as in secondary lymphoid organs such as spleen, lymph nodes and tonsils. Among all these tissues, the liver is certainly unique as its parenchyma contains an unusually high number of infiltrating immune cells with 30-50% of total lymphocytes being NK cells. Given the constant liver intake of non-self antigens from the gastrointestinal tract via the portal vein, hepatic NK (H-NK) cells must retain a certain degree of tolerance in the context of their immune-surveillance against dangers to the host. Indeed, the breakdown of the tolerogenic state of the liver-associated immune system has been shown to induce autoimmunity. However, the role of NK cells during the course of autoimmune liver diseases is still being debated mainly because a complete characterization of H-NK cells normally resident in healthy human liver has not yet been fully disclosed. Furthermore, the differences in phenotype and functions between human and mouse H-NK cells often preclude translation of results obtained from murine models into experimental approaches to be performed in humans. Here, we provide an extensive characterization of the phenotype of H-NK cells physiologically resident in the human liver by both mentioning data available

  18. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol.

  19. Macrophages and dendritic cells in the development of liver injury leading to liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananiev, J; Penkova, M; Tchernev, G; Chokoeva, A A; Philipov, S; Tana, C; Gulubova, M; Wollina, U

    2014-01-01

    Liver failure (LF) continues to be a serious problem due to different underlying disorders. Not only hepatocytes but Kupffer cells (KCs) and dendritic cells (DCs) are of importance in this instance. We wanted to investigate the possible role of KCs and liver DCs in the development of liver injury in patients with liver failure. Liver specimens from 23 patients who died after liver failure were examined for the presence and distribution of CD68-positive KCs and CD83-positive DCs by immunohistochemistry. The distribution of the CD83-positive DC in the sinusoidal and the periportal spaces was not even. While 39.1% of patients had a high sinusoidal density of CD83-positive cells, 60.9% demonstrated a high density of CD83-positive cells in the periportal tract. The number of CD83-positive DCs in periportal tracts in patients with advanced liver fibrosis (n=5) were high, while those with mild liver fibrosis (n=18) had low numbers of mature dendritic cells (χ2=4.107; p=0.043). In addition, all patients with intensive fibrosis had low counts of CD68-positive KC’s in portal tracts vs patients with mild fibrosis of which 67% had high counts (χ2=6.97; p=0.008). In seven of the patients with moderate steatosis (87.5%) low numbers of CD68-positive KCs were found in sinusoids, in contrast to those with severe steatosis, where 12 patients (80%) had high KC counts (χ2=13.4; p less than 0.001). The distribution and number of CD68-positive KC and CD83-positive DC reflect the progression of liver fibrosis leading to liver failure.

  20. MEK kinase 1 activity is required for definitive erythropoiesis in the mouse fetal liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnesen, Barbara; Ørskov, Cathrine; Rasmussen, Susanne

    2005-01-01

    KD) embryos have normal morphology but are anemic due to failure of definitive erythropoiesis. When Mekk1(DeltaKD) fetal liver cells were transferred to lethally irradiated wild-type hosts, mature red blood cells were generated from the mutant cells, suggesting that MEKK1 functions in a non......-cell-autonomous manner. Based on immunohistochemical and hemoglobin chain transcription analysis, we propose that the failure of definitive erythropoiesis is due to a deficiency in enucleation activity caused by insufficient macrophage-mediated nuclear DNA destruction....

  1. Primary culture of adult rat liver cells. I. Preparation of isolated cells from trypsin-perfused liver of adult rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyazaki,Masahiro

    1977-12-01

    Full Text Available Isolated hepatic cells from adult rats were prepared by perfusing the livers with trypsin. The highest yield of viable cells was obtained by perfusing the liver with 0.1% trypsin, pH 7.0, at 37 degrees C for 30 min. Following this treatment about 70% of cells excluded trypan blue. The isolated cells contained many binucleate cells. Between 60 and 70% of DNA present originally in the liver was recovered from the isolated hepatic cells, which had higher glucose 6-phosphatase activity than the liver. Thus the resulting cell population seems to be rich in hepatocytes. The isolated hepatic cells, however, lost some of their cellular proteins such as alanine and tyrosine amino-transferases. It was suggested that the membranes of isolated hepatic cells might be damaged by both enzymatic digestion and mechanical destruction.

  2. Mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells in patients with liver cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ursula; M; Gehling; Marc; Willems; Kathleen; Schlagner; Ralf; A; Benndorf; Maura; Dandri; Jrg; Petersen; Martina; Sterneck; Joerg-Matthias; Pollok; Dieter; K; Hossfeld; Xavier; Rogiers

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To test the hypothesis that liver cirrhosis is associated with mobilization of hematopoietic progenitor cells. METHODS:Peripheral blood samples from 72 patients with liver cirrhosis of varying etiology were analyzed by flow cytometry.Identified progenitor cell subsets were immunoselected and used for functional assays in vitro. Plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor-1(SDF-1) were measured using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.RESULTS:Progenitor cells with a CD133 + /CD45 + CD14 + phenotype we...

  3. Studies of Secondary Melanoma on C57BL/6J Mouse Liver Using 1H NMR Metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Ju; Isern, Nancy G.; Burton, Sarah D.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-31

    NMR metabolomics, consisting of solid state high resolution (hr) magic angle spinning (MAS) 1H NMR (1H hr-MAS), liquid state high resolution 1H-NMR, and principal components analysis (PCA) has been used to study secondary metastatic B16-F10 melanoma in C57BL/6J mouse liver . The melanoma group can be differentiated from its control group by PCA analysis of the absolute concentrations or by the absolute peak intensities of metabolites from either 1H hr-MAS NMR data on intact liver tissues or liquid state 1H-NMR spectra on liver tissue extracts. In particular, we found that the absolute concentrations of alanine, glutamate, creatine, creatinine, fumarate and cholesterol are elevated in the melanoma group as compared to controls, while the absolute concentrations of succinate, glycine, glucose, and the family of linear lipids including long chain fatty acids, total choline and acylglycerol are decreased. The ratio of glycerophosphocholine to phosphocholine is increased by about 1.5 fold in the melanoma group, while the absolute concentration of total choline is actually lower in melanoma mice. These results suggest the following picture in secondary melanoma metastasis: Linear lipid levels are decreased by beta oxidation in the melanoma group, which contributes to an increase in the synthesis of cholesterol, and also provides an energy source input for TCA cycle. These findings suggest a link between lipid oxidation, the TCA cycle and the hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) signal pathway in tumor metastases. Thus this study indicates that the metabolic profile derived from NMR analysis can provide a valuable bio-signature of malignancy and cell hypoxia in metastatic melanoma.

  4. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies.

  5. Development of hematopoietic stem cell activity in the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Müller (Albrecht); A. Medvinsky; J. Strouboulis (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe precise time of appearance of the first hematopoietic stem cell activity in the developing mouse embryo is unknown. Recently the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the developing mouse embryo has been shown to possess hematopoietic colony-forming activity (CFU-S) in irradiated recipie

  6. EMP-1 is a junctional protein in a liver stem cell line and in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsuan-Shu; Sherley, James L; Chen, Jeremy J W; Chiu, Chien-Chang; Chiou, Ling-Ling; Liang, Ja-Der; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Huang, Guan-Tarn; Sheu, Jin-Chuan

    2005-09-09

    In an attempt to discover cell markers for liver stem cells, a cDNA microarray analysis was carried out to compare the gene expression profiles between an adult liver stem cell line, Lig-8, and mature hepatocytes. Several genes in the categories of extracellular matrix, cell membrane, cell adhesion, transcription factor, signal molecule, transporter, and metabolic enzyme were shown to be differentially expressed in Lig-8 cells. Among them, epithelial membrane protein (EMP)-1 has been previously implicated with stem cell phenotypes. Antiserum to EMP-1 was produced to localize its expression. On monolayers of Lig-8 cells, EMP-1 was expressed along the intercellular border. In the liver harboring proliferating oval cells, the liver progenitors, EMP-1 was localized as ribbon bands, a staining pattern for epithelial junctions, all the way through bile duct epithelia, oval cell ductules, and into peri-hepatocytic regions. These peri-hepatocytic regions were proved to be bile canaliculi by co-localization of EMP-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase IV, an enzyme located on bile canaliculi. This report is the first to indicate EMP-1 to be a junctional protein in the liver.

  7. Cell therapy for liver diseases: current medicine and future promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejandra, Meza-Ríos; Juan, Armendáriz-Borunda; Ana, Sandoval-Rodríguez

    2015-06-01

    Liver diseases are a major health problem worldwide since they usually represent the main causes of death in most countries, causing excessive costs to public health systems. Nowadays, there are no efficient current therapies for most hepatic diseases and liver transplant is infrequent due to the availability of organs, cost and risk of transplant rejection. Therefore, alternative therapies for liver diseases have been developed, including cell-based therapies. Stem cells (SCs) are characterized by their self-renewing capacity, unlimited proliferation and differentiation under certain conditions into tissue- or organ-specific cells with special functions. Cell-based therapies for liver diseases have been successful in experimental models, showing anti-inflammatory, antifibrogenic and regenerative effects. Nowadays, clinical trials using SCs for liver pathologies are increasing in number, and those that have reached publication have achieved favorable effects, encouraging us to think that SCs will have a potential clinical use in a short time.

  8. Development of Short-term Molecular Thresholds to Predict Long-term Mouse Liver Tumor Outcomes: Phthalate Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short-term molecular profiles are a central component of strategies to model health effects of environmental chemicals. In this study, a 7 day mouse assay was used to evaluate transcriptomic and proliferative responses in the liver for a hepatocarcinogenic phthalate, di (2-ethylh...

  9. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  10. Cell-autonomous progeroid changes in conditional mouse models for repair endonuclease XPG deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Barnhoorn

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER process, the endonuclease XPG is involved in repair of helix-distorting DNA lesions, but the protein has also been implicated in several other DNA repair systems, complicating genotype-phenotype relationship in XPG patients. Defects in XPG can cause either the cancer-prone condition xeroderma pigmentosum (XP alone, or XP combined with the severe neurodevelopmental disorder Cockayne Syndrome (CS, or the infantile lethal cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS syndrome, characterized by dramatic growth failure, progressive neurodevelopmental abnormalities and greatly reduced life expectancy. Here, we present a novel (conditional Xpg-/- mouse model which -in a C57BL6/FVB F1 hybrid genetic background- displays many progeroid features, including cessation of growth, loss of subcutaneous fat, kyphosis, osteoporosis, retinal photoreceptor loss, liver aging, extensive neurodegeneration, and a short lifespan of 4-5 months. We show that deletion of XPG specifically in the liver reproduces the progeroid features in the liver, yet abolishes the effect on growth or lifespan. In addition, specific XPG deletion in neurons and glia of the forebrain creates a progressive neurodegenerative phenotype that shows many characteristics of human XPG deficiency. Our findings therefore exclude that both the liver as well as the neurological phenotype are a secondary consequence of derailment in other cell types, organs or tissues (e.g. vascular abnormalities and support a cell-autonomous origin caused by the DNA repair defect itself. In addition they allow the dissection of the complex aging process in tissue- and cell-type-specific components. Moreover, our data highlight the critical importance of genetic background in mouse aging studies, establish the Xpg-/- mouse as a valid model for the severe form of human XPG patients and segmental accelerated aging, and strengthen the link between DNA damage and aging.

  11. Dataset from proteomic analysis of rat, mouse, and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makan Golizeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Rat, mouse and human liver microsomes and S9 fractions were analyzed using an optimized method combining ion exchange fractionation of digested peptides, and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC coupled to high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HR-MS/MS. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaíno et al., 2013 [1] with the dataset identifiers PXD000717, PXD000720, PXD000721, PXD000731, PXD000733 and PXD000734. Data related to the peptides (trypsin digests only were also uploaded to Peptide Atlas (Farrah et al., 2013 [2] and are available with the dataset identifiers PASS00407, PASS00409, PASS00411, PASS00412, PASS00413 and PASS00414. The present dataset is associated with a research article published in EuPA Open Proteomics [3].

  12. Susceptibility to T cell-mediated liver injury is enhanced in asialoglycoprotein receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Casey, Carol A; Osna, Natalia A; Tuma, Dean J

    2013-05-01

    T cell activation and associated pro-inflammatory cytokine production is a pathological feature of inflammatory liver disease. It is also known that liver injury is associated with marked impairments in the function of many hepatic proteins including a hepatocyte-specific binding protein, the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). Recently, it has been suggested that hepatic ASGPRs may play an important role in the physiological regulation of T lymphocytes, leading to our hypothesis that ASGPR defects correlate with inflammatory-mediated events in liver diseases. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether changes in hepatocellular ASGPR expression were related to the dysregulation of intrahepatic T lymphocytes and correlate with the development of T-cell mediated hepatitis. Mice lacking functional ASGPRs (receptor-deficient, RD), and wild-type (WT) controls were intravenously injected with T-cell mitogens, Concanavalin A (Con A) or anti-CD3 antibody. As a result of T cell mitogen treatment, RD mice lacking hepatic ASGPRs displayed enhancements in liver pathology, transaminase activities, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and caspase activation compared to that observed in normal WT mice. Furthermore, FACS analysis demonstrated that T-cell mitogen administration resulted in a significant rise in the percentage of CD8+ lymphocytes present in the livers of RD animals versus WT mice. Since these two mouse strains differ only in whether they express the hepatic ASGPR, it can be concluded that proper ASGPR function exerts a protective effect against T cell mediated hepatitis and that impairments to this hepatic receptor could be related to the accumulation of cytotoxic T cells that are observed in inflammatory liver diseases.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein: localization in secretory granules of Paneth cells in the mouse small intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert H; Rasmussen, Karina; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte;

    2009-01-01

    in closer detail the synthesis and storage of LBP in the intestinal mucosal epithelium, we performed an immunolocalization of LBP in mouse small intestine. By immunofluorescence microscopy, an antibody recognizing the 58-60 kDa protein of LBP distinctly labeled a small population of cells located deep......Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) is an acute-phase protein involved in the host's response to endotoxin and mainly synthesized and secreted to the blood by the liver. But in addition, LBP is also made by extrahepatic cells, including the enterocyte-like cell line Caco-2. To study...... into the crypts. This cell population was also positive for lysozyme and alpha-defensin 4, identifying Paneth cells as the main intestinal LBP-producing cells. By immunogold electron microscopy, intense labeling was observed in the secretory granules of these cells. We conclude that Paneth cells express LBP...

  14. Apolipoprotein O expression in mouse liver enhances hepatic lipid accumulation by impairing mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng; Wu, Chen-Lu; Yu, Bi-Lian; Liu, Ling; Hu, Jia-Rui

    2017-09-09

    Apolipoprotein O (ApoO) was recently observed in the cellular mitochondrial inner membrane, which plays a role in mitochondrial function and is associated with myocardiopathy. Empirical information on the physiological functions of apoO is therefore limited. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effect of apoO on hepatic fatty acid metabolism. An adenoviral vector expressing hApoO was constructed and introduced into chow diet and high-fat diet induced mice and the L02 human hepatoma cell line. High levels of hApoO mRNA and protein were detected in the liver, and the expression of lipid metabolism genes was significantly altered compared with negative controls. The liver function indices (serum ALT and AST) were clearly elevated, and the ultrastructure of cellular mitochondria was distinctly altered in the liver after apoO overexpression. Further, mitochondrial membrane potential decreased with hApoO treatment in L02 cells. These results establish a link between apoO and lipid accumulation and could suggest a new pathway for regulating non-alcoholic fatty liver disease progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative metabolism of cinobufagin in liver microsomes from mouse, rat, dog, minipig, monkey, and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Chi; Ning, Jing; Ge, Guang-Bo; Liang, Si-Cheng; Wang, Xiu-Li; Zhang, Bao-Jing; Huang, Shan-Shan; Li, Jing-Kui; Yang, Ling

    2011-04-01

    Cinobufagin (CB), a major bioactive component of the traditional Chinese medicine Chansu, has been reported to have potent antitumor activity. In this study, in vitro metabolism of CB among species was compared with respect to metabolic profiles, enzymes involved, and catalytic efficiency by using liver microsomes from human (HLM), mouse (MLM), rat (RLM), dog (DLM), minipig (PLM), and monkey (CyLM). Significant species differences in CB metabolism were revealed. In particular, species-specific deacetylation and epimerization combined with hydroxylation existed in RLM, whereas hydroxylation was a major pathway in HLM, MLM, DLM, PLM, and CyLM. Two monohydroxylated metabolites of CB in human and animal species were identified as 1α-hydroxylcinobufagin and 5β-hydroxylcinobufagin by using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and two-dimensional NMR techniques. CYP3A4 was identified as the main isoform involved in CB hydroxylation in HLM on the basis of the chemical inhibition studies and screen assays with recombinant human cytochrome P450s. Furthermore, ketoconazole, a specific inhibitor of CYP3A, strongly inhibited CB hydroxylation in MLM, DLM, PLM, and CyLM, indicating that CYP3A was responsible for CB hydroxylation in these animal species. The apparent substrate affinity and catalytic efficiency for 1α- and 5β-hydroxylation of CB in liver microsomes from various species were also determined. PLM appears to have K(m) and total intrinsic clearance value (V(max)/K(m)) similar to those for HLM, and the total microsomal intrinsic clearance values for CB obeyed the following order: mouse > dog > monkey > human > minipig. These findings provide vital information to better understand the metabolic behaviors of CB among various species.

  16. Mouse Reporter Strain for Noninvasive Bioluminescent Imaging of Cells that have Undergone Cre-Mediated Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Safran

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Conditional alleles containing LoxP recombination sites, in conjunction with Cre recombinase delivered by a variety of means, allows for spatial and temporal control of gene expression in mouse models. Here we describe a mouse strain in which a luciferase (Luc cDNA, preceded by a LoxP-stop-LoxP (L-S-L cassette, was introduced into the ubiquitously expressed ROSA26 locus. Mouse embryo fibroblasts derived from this strain expressed luciferase after Cre-mediated recombination in vitro. ROSA26 L-S-L-Luc/+ mice expressed luciferase in a diffuse or liver-restricted pattern, as determined by noninvasive, bioluminescent imaging, when crossed to transgenic mice in which Cre was under the control of a zygotically expressed (EIIA-Cre, or a liver-restricted (albumin-Cre, promoter, respectively. Organ-specific luciferase expression was also seen after intraparenchymal administration of an adenovirus encoding Cre. The ROSA26 L-S-L-Luc/+ strain should be useful for characterizing Cre mouse strains and for following the fate of cells that have undergone Cre-mediated recombination in vivo.

  17. Immunoregulatory activities of Dendrobium huoshanense polysaccharides in mouse intestine, spleen and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Xue-Qiang; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Bansal, Vibha; Pan, Li-Hua; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Luo, Jian-Ping

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the immunomodulating responses in intestine, spleen and liver, 50-200mg/kg of DHP was orally administrated to mice without or with methotrexate. The proliferation of marrow cells, which was performed with the addition of the supernatant of small intestinal lymphocytes isolated from the mice administrated orally with DHP, showed that the intestinal immune response was significantly enhanced in all DHP-treated groups. For the immune response in spleen, all tested doses of DHP remarkably promoted the proliferation of splenic cells and increased the secretion of interferon-γ (IFN-γ). For the immune responses in liver, DHP not only significantly stimulated the proliferation of hepatic cells and the secretion of IFN-γ at all tested doses of DHP, but also significantly elevated the secretion interleukin-4 (IL-4) at the doses of 100 and 200mg/kg. Moreover, DHP could recover methotrexate-injured small intestinal immune function (100 and 200mg/kg) and promoted cell proliferation and IFN-γ production (200mg/kg) in spleen and liver of methotrexate-treated mice. These results suggested that DHP after oral administration possessed immunomodulating effects both in small intestine immune system and in systemic immune system, which were further proved by the mRNA expression of IFN-γ and IL-4.

  18. c-Myc regulates cell size and ploidy but is not essential for postnatal proliferation in liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, Esther; Gandarillas, Alberto; Vallespinós, Mireia; Zanet, Jennifer; Bachs, Oriol; Redondo, Clara; Fabregat, Isabel; Martinez-A., Carlos; Moreno de Alborán, Ignacio

    2005-05-01

    The c-Myc protein is a transcription factor implicated in the regulation of multiple biological processes, including cell proliferation, cell growth, and apoptosis. In vivo overexpression of c-myc is linked to tumor development in a number of mouse models. Here, we show that perinatal inactivation of c-Myc in liver causes disorganized organ architecture, decreased hepatocyte size, and cell ploidy. Furthermore, c-Myc appears to have distinct roles in proliferation in liver. Thus, postnatal hepatocyte proliferation does not require c-Myc, whereas it is necessary for liver regeneration in adult mice. These results show novel physiological functions of c-myc in liver development and hepatocyte proliferation and growth.

  19. Characterization and cloning of lgp110, a lysosomal membrane glycoprotein from mouse and rat cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granger, B L; Green, S A; Gabel, C A; Howe, C L; Mellman, I; Helenius, A

    1990-07-15

    lgp110 is a heavily glycosylated intrinsic protein of lysosomal membranes. Initially defined by monoclonal antibodies against mouse liver lysosomes, it consists of a 45-kilodalton core polypeptide with O-linked and 17 asparagine-linked oligosaccharide side chains in mouse cells. Sialic acid residues make the mature protein extremely acidic, with an isoelectric point of between 2 and 4 in both normal tissues and most cultured cell lines. Partial sequencing of mouse lgp110 allowed oligonucleotide probes to be constructed for the screening of several mouse cDNA libraries. A partial cDNA clone for mouse lgp110 was found and used for additional library screening, generating a cDNA clone covering all of the coding sequence of mature rat lgp110 as well as genomic clones covering most of the mouse gene. These new clones bring to seven the number of lysosomal membrane proteins whose amino acid sequences can be deduced, and two distinct but highly similar groups (designated lgp-A and lgp-B) can now be defined. Sequence comparisons suggest that differences within each group reflect species variations of the same protein and that lgp-A and lgp-B probably diverged from a common ancestor prior to the evolup4f1ary divergence of birds and mammals. Individual cells and individual lysosomes possess both lgp-A and lgp-B, suggesting that these two proteins have different functions. Mouse lgp110 is encoded by at least seven exons; intron positions suggest that the two homologous ectodomains of each lgp arose through gene duplication.

  20. Fetal progenitor cell transplantation treats methylmalonic aciduria in a mouse model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, Nicole E., E-mail: nicole.buck@mcri.edu.au [Metabolic Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, Royal Children' s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3052 (Australia); Pennell, Samuel D.; Wood, Leonie R. [Metabolic Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, Royal Children' s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3052 (Australia); Pitt, James J. [Victorian Clinical Genetics Services, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children' s Hospital, Parkville (Australia); Allen, Katrina J. [Gastro and Food Allergy, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Parkville (Australia); Peters, Heidi L. [Metabolic Research, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The University of Melbourne, Department of Paediatrics, Royal Children' s Hospital, Flemington Road, Parkville, VIC 3052 (Australia)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fetal cells were transplanted into a methylmalonic acid mouse model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell engraftment was detected in liver, spleen and bone marrow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical disease correction was measured in blood samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) proved more effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher levels of engraftment may be required for greater disease correction. -- Abstract: Methylmalonic aciduria is a rare disorder caused by an inborn error of organic acid metabolism. Current treatment options are limited and generally focus on disease management. We aimed to investigate the use of fetal progenitor cells to treat this disorder using a mouse model with an intermediate form of methylmalonic aciduria. Fetal liver cells were isolated from healthy fetuses at embryonic day 15-17 and intravenously transplanted into sub-lethally irradiated mice. Liver donor cell engraftment was determined by PCR. Disease correction was monitored by urine and blood methylmalonic acid concentration and weight change. Initial studies indicated that pre-transplantation sub-lethal irradiation followed by transplantation with 5 million cells were suitable. We found that a double dose of 5 million cells (1 week apart) provided a more effective treatment. Donor cell liver engraftment of up to 5% was measured. Disease correction, as defined by a decrease in blood methylmalonic acid concentration, was effected in methylmalonic acid mice transplanted with a double dose of cells and who showed donor cell liver engraftment. Mean plasma methylmalonic acid concentration decreased from 810 {+-} 156 (sham transplanted) to 338 {+-} 157 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells) while mean blood C3 carnitine concentration decreased from 20.5 {+-} 4 (sham transplanted) to 5.3 {+-} 1.9 {mu}mol/L (double dose of 5 million cells). In conclusion, higher levels of engraftment may

  1. Methylglyoxal Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the p...

  2. Imaging gold nanoparticles in mouse liver by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Wang, Zheng; Mo, Jiamei; Zhang, Guoxia; Chen, Yirui; Huang, Chuchu

    2017-06-07

    Imaging the size distribution of metal nanoparticles (NPs) in a tissue has important implications in terms of evaluating NP toxicity. Microscopy techniques used to image tissue NPs are limited by complicated sample preparation or poor resolution. In this study, we developed a laser ablation (LA) system coupled to single-particle inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) for quantitative imaging of gold (G)NPs in tissue samples. In this system, GNPs were ablated but did not disintegrate and integrate under optimised operation conditions, which were verified by characterising LA particles by scanning electron microscopy. The feasibility of imaging size distributions in tissue was validated using reference GNPs 60 and 80 nm in size on matrix-matched kidney. A transport efficiency of 6.07% was obtained by LA-SP-ICP-MS under optimal conditions. We used this system to image 80-nm GNPs in mouse liver and the size distribution thus obtained was in accordance with that determined by nebuliser SP-ICP-MS. The images revealed that 80-nm GNPs mainly accumulate in the liver and did not obviously aggregate. Our results demonstrate that LA-SP-ICP-MS is an effective tool for evaluating the size distribution of metal NPs in tissue.

  3. Impaired function of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in murine liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakura, Katsuya; Masuda, Haruchika; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Obi, Syotaro; Ito, Rie; Shizuno, Tomoko; Kurihara, Yusuke; Mine, Tetsuya; Asahara, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    Liver fibrosis (LF) caused by chronic liver damage has been considered as an irreversible disease. As alternative therapy for liver transplantation, there are high expectations for regenerative medicine of the liver. Bone marrow (BM)- or peripheral blood-derived stem cells, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), have recently been used to treat liver cirrhosis. We investigated the biology of BM-derived EPC in a mouse model of LF. C57BL/6J mice were subcutaneously injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) every 3 days for 90 days. Sacrificed 2 days after final injection, whole blood (WB) was collected for isolation of mononuclear cells (MNCs) and biochemical examination. Assessments of EPC in the peripheral blood and BM were performed by flow cytometry and EPC colony-forming assay, respectively, using purified MNCs and BM c-KIT(+), Sca-1(+), and Lin(-) (KSL) cells. Liver tissues underwent histological analysis with hematoxylin/eosin/Azan staining, and spleens were excised and weighed. CCl(4)-treated mice exhibited histologically bridging fibrosis, pseudolobular formation, and splenomegaly, indicating successful induction of LF. The frequency of definitive EPC-colony-forming-units (CFU) as well as total EPC-CFU at the equivalent cell number of 500 BM-KSL cells decreased significantly (p changes in primitive EPC-CFU occurred in LF mice. The frequency of WB-MNCs of definitive EPC-CFU decreased significantly (p < 0.01) in LF mice compared with control mice. Together, these findings indicated the existence of impaired EPC function and differentiation in BM-derived EPCs in LF mice and might be related to clinical LF.

  4. Epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation and liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Taghdouini, Adil; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic liver injury to hepatocytes or cholangiocytes, when left unmanaged, leads to the development of liver fibrosis, a condition characterized by the excessive intrahepatic deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. Activated hepatic stellate cells constitute the predominant source of extracellular matrix in fibrotic livers and their transition from a quiescent state during fibrogenesis is associated with important alterations in their transcriptional and epigenetic landscape. Areas covered: We briefly describe the processes involved in hepatic stellate cell activation and discuss our current understanding of alterations in the epigenetic landscape, i.e DNA methylation, histone modifications and the functional role of non-coding RNAs that accompany this key event in the development of chronic liver disease. Expert commentary: Although great progress has been made, our understanding of the epigenetic regulation of hepatic stellate cell activation is limited and, thus far, insufficient to allow the development of epigenetic drugs that can selectively interrupt liver fibrosis.

  5. Heat stable cell growth inhibiting factor isolated from rat liver microsomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaba,Kozo

    1979-08-01

    Full Text Available A heat stable cell growth inhibiting factor was isolated from rat liver microsomes by hot salt extraction, ethanol fractionation and the hot phenol method. The factor was contained in the RNA fraction (designated as mhRNA. mhRNA inhibited the growth of mouse fibroblast (L-929 cells at a relatively low concentration (55 microgram/ml of culture medium. The molecular weight of mhRNA was about 27,000 and the base composition was guanine and cytosine rich.

  6. Ultra Low Dose Delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Protects Mouse Liver from Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Hochhauser

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is the main cause of both primary graft dysfunction and primary non-function of liver allografts. Cannabinoids has been reported to attenuate myocardial, cerebral and hepatic I/R oxidative injury. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, a cannabinoid agonist, is the active components of marijuana. In this study we examined the role of ultralow dose THC (0.002mg/kg in the protection of livers from I/R injury. This extremely low dose of THC was previously found by us to protect the mice brain and heart from a variety of insults. Methods: C57Bl Mice were studied in in vivo model of hepatic segmental (70% ischemia for 60min followed by reperfusion for 6 hours. Results: THC administration 2h prior to the induction of hepatic I/R was associated with significant attenuated elevations of: serum liver transaminases ALT and AST, the hepatic oxidative stress (activation of the intracellular signaling CREB pathway, the acute proinflammatory response (TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-10 and c-FOS hepatic mRNA levels, and ERK signaling pathway activation. This was followed by cell death (the cleavage of the pro-apoptotic caspase 3, DNA fragmentation and TUNEL after 6 hours of reperfusion. Significantly less hepatic injury was detected in the THC treated I/R mice and fewer apoptotic hepatocytes cells were identified by morphological criteria compared with untreated mice. Conclusion: A single ultralow dose THC can reduce the apoptotic, oxidative and inflammatory injury induced by hepatic I/R injury. THC may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in hepatic I/R injury during liver transplantation, liver resection and trauma.

  7. RDX induces aberrant expression of microRNAs in mouse brain and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baohong; Pan, Xiaoping

    2009-02-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNAs) have been found to play an important role in many biological and metabolic processes, their functions in animal response to environmental toxicant exposure are largely unknown. We used hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), a common environmental contaminant, as a toxicant stressor to investigate toxicant-induced changes in miRNA expression in B6C3F1 mice and the potential mechanism of RDX-induced toxic action. B6C3F1 mice were fed diets with or without 5 mg/kg RDX for 28 days. After the feeding trials, we isolated RNAs from both brain and liver tissues and analyzed the expression profiles of 567 known mouse miRNAs using microarray and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction technologies. RDX exposure induced significant changes in miRNA expression profiles. A total of 113 miRNAs, belonging to 75 families, showed significantly altered expression patterns after RDX exposure. Of the 113 miRNAs, 10 were significantly up-regulated and 3 were significantly down-regulated (p RDX exposure. Specifically, expression of seven miRNAs was up-regulated in the brain but down-regulated in the liver or up-regulated in the liver but down-regulated in the brain (p < 0.01). Many aberrantly expressed miRNAs were related to various cancers, toxicant-metabolizing enzymes, and neurotoxicity. We found a significant up-regulation of oncogenic miRNAs and a significant down-regulation of tumor-suppressing miRNAs, which included let-7, miR-17-92, miR-10b, miR-15, miR-16, miR-26, and miR-181. Environmental toxicant exposure alters the expression of a suite of miRNAs.

  8. Interaction of low density lipoproteins with rat liver cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Harkes (Leendert)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe most marked conclusion is the establishment of the important role of non-parenchymal cells in the catabolism of the low density lipoproteins by the rat liver. Because the liver is responsible for 70-80% of the removal of LDL from blood this conclusion can be extended to total LDL tur

  9. SURVIVAL OF LIVER CELLS, IMMOBILIZED ON 3D-MATRIXES, IN LIVER FAILURE MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Shagidulin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was examined a new method for correction of hepatic failure by transplantation of liver support biounit (liver cells, immobilized on biocompatible and biodegradable 3D-matrixes ElastoPOB® into small intestine mesentery. It was determined that after modeling of acute hepatic failure on dogs by 65–70% liver resection and transplantation liver support biounit the restoration of disturbed biochemical indecies (such as total protein, lactate, cytolytic ensymes-ALT, AST, ALP, LDH, fibrinogen, protrombine index and others took place more rapidly on 9–14th day instead of 18th day in control. It was made a preposition about efficiency of the suggested method for correction both acute hepatic failure because even 90 days after transplantation of liver support biounit alive hepatocytes and neogenic plethoric vessels, growing through matrix were revealed. 

  10. Generation and characterization of rat liver stem cell lines and their engraftment in a rat model of liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijk, Ewart W; Rasmussen, Shauna; Blokzijl, Francis; Huch, Meritxell; Gehart, Helmuth; Toonen, Pim; Begthel, Harry; Clevers, Hans; Geurts, Aron M; Cuppen, Edwin

    2016-02-26

    The rat is an important model for liver regeneration. However, there is no in vitro culture system that can capture the massive proliferation that can be observed after partial hepatectomy in rats. We here describe the generation of rat liver stem cell lines. Rat liver stem cells, which grow as cystic organoids, were characterized by high expression of the stem cell marker Lgr5, by the expression of liver progenitor and duct markers, and by low expression of hepatocyte markers, oval cell markers, and stellate cell markers. Prolonged cultures of rat liver organoids depended on high levels of WNT-signalling and the inhibition of BMP-signaling. Upon transplantation of clonal lines to a Fah(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) rat model of liver failure, the rat liver stem cells engrafted into the host liver where they differentiated into areas with FAH and Albumin positive hepatocytes. Rat liver stem cell lines hold potential as consistent reliable cell sources for pharmacological, toxicological or metabolic studies. In addition, rat liver stem cell lines may contribute to the development of regenerative medicine in liver disease. To our knowledge, the here described liver stem cell lines represent the first organoid culture system in the rat.

  11. Structural and functional aspects of the liver and liver sinusoidal cells in relation to colon carcinoma metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katrien Vekemans; Filip Braet

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, liver metastasis remains difficult to cure. When tumor cells escape and arrive in the liver sinusoids, they encounter the local defense mechanism specific to the liver. The sinusoidal cells have been widely described in physiologic conditions and in relation to metastasis during the past 30 years. This paper provides an "overview" of how these cells function in health and in diseases such as liver metastasis.

  12. Humanizing π-class glutathione S-transferase regulation in a mouse model alters liver toxicity in response to acetaminophen overdose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Vaughn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs metabolize drugs and xenobiotics. Yet despite high protein sequence homology, expression of π-class GSTs, the most abundant of the enzymes, varies significantly between species. In mouse liver, hepatocytes exhibit high mGstp expression, while in human liver, hepatocytes contain little or no hGSTP1 mRNA or hGSTP1 protein. π-class GSTs are known to be critical determinants of liver responses to drugs and toxins: when treated with high doses of acetaminophen, mGstp1/2+/+ mice suffer marked liver damage, while mGstp1/2-/- mice escape liver injury. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To more faithfully model the contribution of π-class GSTs to human liver toxicology, we introduced hGSTP1, with its exons, introns, and flanking sequences, into the germline of mice carrying disrupted mGstp genes. In the resultant hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- strain, π-class GSTs were regulated differently than in wild-type mice. In the liver, enzyme expression was restricted to bile duct cells, Kupffer cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells, reminiscent of human liver, while in the prostate, enzyme production was limited to basal epithelial cells, reminiscent of human prostate. The human patterns of hGSTP1 transgene regulation were accompanied by human patterns of DNA methylation, with bisulfite genomic sequencing revealing establishment of an unmethylated CpG island sequence encompassing the gene promoter. Unlike wild-type or mGstp1/2-/- mice, when hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- mice were overdosed with acetaminophen, liver tissues showed limited centrilobular necrosis, suggesting that π-class GSTs may be critical determinants of toxin-induced hepatocyte injury even when not expressed by hepatocytes. CONCLUSIONS: By recapitulating human π-class GST expression, hGSTP1+mGstp1/2-/- mice may better model human drug and xenobiotic toxicology.

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes and endothelial cells in multi-component hydrogel fibers for liver tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chan; Narayanan, Karthikeyan; Leong, Meng Fatt; Wan, Andrew C A

    2014-07-01

    Liver tissue engineering requires a suitable cell source, methodologies to assemble the cells within their niche microenvironments in a spatially defined manner, and vascularization of the construct in vivo for maintenance of hepatocyte viability and function. Recently, we have developed methods of encapsulating cells within separate domains in multi-component hydrogel fibers and methods of assembling fibers to form 3D-patterned tissue constructs. In the present work, we have combined these approaches to encapsulate hepatocytes and endothelial cells within their specific niches, and to assemble them into endothelialized liver tissue constructs. The hepatocytes and endothelial cells were obtained in parallel by differentiating human recombinant protein-induced human pluripotent stem cells, resulting in a construct which contained genetically identical endothelial and parenchymal elements. We were able to demonstrate that the presence of endothelial cells in the scaffold significantly improved hepatocyte function in vitro and facilitated vascularization of the scaffold when implanted in a mouse partial hepatectomy model. The in vivo studies further asserted that integration of the scaffold with host vasculature had occurred, as demonstrated by the presence of human albumin in the mouse serum. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Study of Silymarin and Vitamin E Protective Effects on Silver Nanoparticle Toxicity on Mice Liver Primary Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firouz Faedmaleki

    2016-03-01

    (IC50 value = 121.7 ppm or µg/ml. Then the hepatoprotective effect of silymarin and vitamin E were experimented on silver nanoparticle toxicity on mice liver primary cell culture. The results showed that silymarin at 600µg/ml and vitamin E at 2500µmol/l have protective effects on silver nanoparticle toxicity on mice liver primary cell culture. Viability percentage of the primary liver cell of the mouse were exposed to silver nanoparticles at 121.7ppm and co-treatment of silymarin, and vitamin E is more than viability percentage of the primary liver cell of the mouse were exposed to silver nanoparticles and silymarin or silver nanoparticles and vitamin E.

  15. Advanced computational biology methods identify molecular switches for malignancy in an EGF mouse model of liver cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Stegmaier

    Full Text Available The molecular causes by which the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase induces malignant transformation are largely unknown. To better understand EGFs' transforming capacity whole genome scans were applied to a transgenic mouse model of liver cancer and subjected to advanced methods of computational analysis to construct de novo gene regulatory networks based on a combination of sequence analysis and entrained graph-topological algorithms. Here we identified transcription factors, processes, key nodes and molecules to connect as yet unknown interacting partners at the level of protein-DNA interaction. Many of those could be confirmed by electromobility band shift assay at recognition sites of gene specific promoters and by western blotting of nuclear proteins. A novel cellular regulatory circuitry could therefore be proposed that connects cell cycle regulated genes with components of the EGF signaling pathway. Promoter analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested the majority of regulated transcription factors to display specificity to either the pre-tumor or the tumor state. Subsequent search for signal transduction key nodes upstream of the identified transcription factors and their targets suggested the insulin-like growth factor pathway to render the tumor cells independent of EGF receptor activity. Notably, expression of IGF2 in addition to many components of this pathway was highly upregulated in tumors. Together, we propose a switch in autocrine signaling to foster tumor growth that was initially triggered by EGF and demonstrate the knowledge gain form promoter analysis combined with upstream key node identification.

  16. Novel mouse model of combined hyperlipidemia associated with steatosis and liver injury by a single-dose intragastric administration of schisandrin B/cholesterol/bile salts mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Si-Yuan; Jia, Zhan-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Yu, Qing; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Nan; Zhu, Pei-Li; Yu, Zhi-Ling; Ko, Kam-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is referred to as hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, or both in combined hyperlipidemia. Here, a novel mouse model of combined hyperlipidemia is described. Mice were orally given a single dose of a modeling agent (MA) made of a mixture of schisandrin B/cholesterol/bile salts (1/2/0.5 g/kg) suspended in olive oil. MA treatment increased serum triglycerides (TG) and total cholesterol (TC) (up to 422% and 100% at 12 - 96 h post-treatment, respectively) and hepatic TG and TC (up to 220% and 26%, respectively) in a time- and dose-dependent manner, associated with elevation of high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein levels. Serum alanine/aspartate aminotransferase activities, indicators of liver cell damage, were also elevated (up to 198%) at 48 and 72 h post-MA treatment. Fenofibrate blocks MA-induced hyperlipidemia, lipid accumulation in the liver, as well as liver injury. Oral administration of a mixture of schisandrin B, cholesterol, and bile salt could generate an interesting mouse model of combined hyperlipidemia associated with hepatic steatosis and steatohepatitis.

  17. Observing planar cell polarity in multiciliated mouse airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladar, Eszter K; Lee, Yin Loon; Stearns, Tim; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    The concerted movement of cilia propels inhaled contaminants out of the lungs, safeguarding the respiratory system from toxins, pathogens, pollutants, and allergens. Motile cilia on the multiciliated cells (MCCs) of the airway epithelium are physically oriented along the tissue axis for directional motility, which depends on the planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway. The MCCs of the mouse respiratory epithelium have emerged as an important model for the study of motile ciliogenesis and the PCP signaling mechanism. Unlike other motile ciliated or planar polarized tissues, airway epithelial cells are relatively easily accessible and primary cultures faithfully model many of the essential features of the in vivo tissue. There is growing interest in understanding how cells acquire and polarize motile cilia due to the impact of mucociliary clearance on respiratory health. Here, we present methods for observing and quantifying the planar polarized orientation of motile cilia both in vivo and in primary culture airway epithelial cells. We describe how to acquire and evaluate electron and light microscopy images of ciliary ultrastructural features that reveal planar polarized orientation. Furthermore, we describe the immunofluorescence localization of PCP pathway components as a simple readout for airway epithelial planar polarization and ciliary orientation. These methods can be adapted to observe ciliary orientation in other multi- and monociliated cells and to detect PCP pathway activity in any tissue or cell type.

  18. Hedgehog signal activation coordinates proliferation and differentiation of fetal liver progenitor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Yoshikazu [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Itoh, Tohru, E-mail: itohru@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Miyajima, Atsushi [Laboratory of Cell Growth and Differentiation, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2009-09-10

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays crucial roles in development and homeostasis of various organs. In the adult liver, it regulates proliferation and/or viability of several types of cells, particularly under injured conditions, and is also implicated in stem/progenitor cell maintenance. However, the role of this signaling pathway during the normal developmental process of the liver remains elusive. Although Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed in the ventral foregut endoderm from which the liver derives, the expression disappears at the onset of the liver bud formation, and its possible recurrence at the later stages has not been investigated. Here we analyzed the activation and functional relevance of Hh signaling during the mouse fetal liver development. At E11.5, Shh and an activation marker gene for Hh signaling, Gli1, were expressed in Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts, the fetal liver progenitor cells, and the expression was rapidly decreased thereafter as the development proceeded. In the culture of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts isolated from the E11.5 liver, activation of Hh signaling stimulated their proliferation and this effect was cancelled by a chemical Hh signaling inhibitor, cyclopamine. In contrast, hepatocyte differentiation of Dlk{sup +} hepatoblasts in vitro as manifested by the marker gene expression and acquisition of ammonia clearance activity was significantly inhibited by forced activation of Hh signaling. Taken together, these results demonstrate the temporally restricted manner of Hh signal activation and its role in promoting the hepatoblast proliferation, and further suggest that the pathway needs to be shut off for the subsequent hepatic differentiation of hepatoblasts to proceed normally.

  19. Immune Cell Isolation from Mouse Femur Bone Marrow

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Quan, Ning

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow is the site of hematopoesis and contains mixed population of blood cells including erythrocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, dendritic cells, lymphocytes and hematopoietic stem cells. The following protocol provides a simple and fast method for isolation of bone marrow immune cells (no erythrocytes) from mouse femurs with a yield of approximate 8 × 107 cells in 5 ml culture media (1.6 × 104 cells/μl). Further isolation or flow cytometric analysis might be required for study of sp...

  20. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver cells as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-hui; Li, Ren; Dou, Ke-feng

    2011-03-01

    Although the stem cells are commonly isolated by FACS or MACS, they are very expensive and these is no specific marker for liver stem/progentior cells (LSPCs). This paper applied a convenient and efficient method to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation (PDGC) from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence (DTDA). Flow cytometric analysis revealed more than half of the purified FLCs expressed alternative markers of LSPCs (CD117, c-Met, Sca-1, CD90, CD49f and CD133). In other words, the purified FLCs were heterogeneous. Therefore, they were sequentially layered into six fractions by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation (PCGC). Both CD133 and CD49f expressed decreasingly from fraction 1 to 6. In fraction 1 and 2, about 85% FLCs expressed CD133, which were revealed to be LSPCs by high expressions of AFP and CK-19, low expressions of G-6-P and ALB. To conclude, the purity of CD133(+) LSPCs enriched by combination of PDGC, DTDA and PCGC is close to that obtained by MACS. This study will greatly contribute to two important biological aspects: liver stem cells isolation and liver cell therapy.

  1. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2016-01-21

    In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such 'output channels' exist and what each encodes are areas of intense debate. In the mouse, anatomical estimates range from 15 to 20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. By combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of more than 11,000 cells, here we show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse eye to the mouse brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems.

  2. Manifestation of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Different Dietary Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera HI Fengler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, which are usually associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome, are considerable health and economic issues due to the rapid increase of their prevalence in Western society. Histologically, the diseases are characterised by steatosis, hepatic inflammation, and if further progressed, fibrosis. Dietary-induced mouse models are widely used in investigations of the development and progression of NAFLD and NASH; these models attempt to mimic the histological and metabolic features of the human diseases. However, the majority of dietary mouse models fail to reflect the whole pathophysiological spectrum of NAFLD and NASH. Some models exhibit histological features similar to those seen in humans while lacking the metabolic context, while others resemble the metabolic conditions leading to NAFLD in humans but fail to mimic the whole histological spectrum, including progression from steatosis to liver fibrosis, and thus fail to mimic NASH. This review summarises the advantages and disadvantages of the different dietary-induced mouse models of NAFLD and NASH, with a focus on the genetic background of several commonly used wild-type mouse strains as well as gender and age, which influence the development and progression of these liver diseases.

  3. Signals and Cells Involved in Regulating Liver Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I. Kang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Liver regeneration is a complex phenomenon aimed at maintaining a constant liver mass in the event of injury resulting in loss of hepatic parenchyma. Partial hepatectomy is followed by a series of events involving multiple signaling pathways controlled by mitogenic growth factors (HGF, EGF and their receptors (MET and EGFR. In addition multiple cytokines and other signaling molecules contribute to the orchestration of a signal which drives hepatocytes into DNA synthesis. The other cell types of the liver receive and transmit to hepatocytes complex signals so that, in the end of the regenerative process, complete hepatic tissue is assembled and regeneration is terminated at the proper time and at the right liver size. If hepatocytes fail to participate in this process, the biliary compartment is mobilized to generate populations of progenitor cells which transdifferentiate into hepatocytes and restore liver size.

  4. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the ba

  5. Metabolism of aildenafil in vivo in rats and in vitro in mouse, rat, dog, and human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wu, Linan; Gu, Yuan; Si, Duanyun; Liu, Changxiao

    2014-06-01

    Aildenafil, 1-{[3-(6, 7-dihydro-1-methyl-7-oxo-3-propyl-1H-pyrazolo [4, 3-d] primidin-5-yl)-4-ethoxyphenyl] sulfonyl}-cis-3, 5-dimethylpiperazine, a phosphodiesterase type V enzyme inhibitor (PDE5I), is under development for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). The purpose of this study was to elucidate metabolism of aildenafil in vivo in rats and in vitro in mouse, rat, dog, and human liver microsomes. Thirty-one phase I metabolites have been found by LTQ/Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometry in rat urine, faeces, and bile after oral administration. Major biotransformation pathways of aildenafil included N-dealkylation of the piperazine ring, hydroxylation and dehydrogenation, aliphatic hydroxylation and loss of alkyl group of piperazine ring. Minor pathways involved hydroxylation on the phenyl ring, pyrazole N-demethylation, O-deethylation, loss of piperazine ring (cleavage of N-S bond) and dehydrogenation on the piperazine ring. Similar metabolic pathways of aildenafil were observed in the incubations of liver microsomes from mouse, rat, and dog as well as from human. The depletion rate of parent drug in mouse and rat liver microsomes was significantly different from that in human liver microsomes. The cytochrome P450 reaction phenotyping analysis was conducted using isozyme-specific inhibitors. The results indicated that CYP3A was the main isoenzyme involved in oxidative metabolism of aildenafil. Overall, these in vitro and in vivo findings should provide valuable information on possible metabolic behaviours of aildenafil in humans.

  6. [Correction of cronic liver failure by transplantation of liver cells suspension and cell-engineering designs (experimental investigation)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Got'e, S V; Shagidulin, M Iu; Onishchenko, N A; Krasheninnikov, M E; Il'inskiĭ, I M; Mozheĭko, N P; Liundup, A V; Volkova, E A; Petrakov, K I; Avramov, P V; Perova, N V; Sevast'ianov, V I

    2013-01-01

    On an experimental model of chronic fibrotic liver damage (male rats Wistar (n-60), damage of CCl4, the duration of the experiment 90 days) it was studied the effectiveness of cell therapy for the correction of chronic liver failure. These rats were divided into 3 experimental groups: in the Ist-group (control, n=10) isotonic saline (650 mkl.) was injected; in the IInd-group (n=20) suspension of liver cells was applicated in a dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) cells; in the IIIrd-group (n=30) suspension of liver cells and bone marrow cells (mesenchymal stromal cells) in ratio 5:1 were used as cell associates on microparticles intjectable heterogeneous biopolymer hydrogel "SpheroGEL" (cell-engineering design) in common dose 8 - l0 x 10(6) It was ascertained that in the 2nd and in the 3rd groups the accelerated normalization of disturbed liver functional indices (ALT, AST, ALP) took place - to 30 days, but in the control group only to 90 days. The reliable differences in rats ofnormalization offunctional indices were absent between the IInd and the IIIrd groups. But in 90 days by using special histological dyeing it was found out that defibrotic processes in liver tissue were more expressed in the IIIrd group in comparison with the IIIrd group. Received results were consequence of prolonged vital activity of cells (liver cells and mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells) into cell-engineering designs, which were transplanted in the IIIrd group. The obtained effect can be explained by that the developed cell-engineering designs provide adequate conditions for prolonged vital activity of the transplanted cells.

  7. Therapeutic Implications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ausiliatrice Puglisi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, represent an attractive tool for the establishment of a successful stem-cell-based therapy of liver diseases. A number of different mechanisms contribute to the therapeutic effects exerted by MSCs, since these cells can differentiate into functional hepatic cells and can also produce a series of growth factors and cytokines able to suppress inflammatory responses, reduce hepatocyte apoptosis, regress liver fibrosis, and enhance hepatocyte functionality. To date, the infusion of MSCs or MSC-conditioned medium has shown encouraging results in the treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and in end-stage liver disease in experimental settings. However, some issues under debate hamper the use of MSCs in clinical trials. This paper summarizes the biological relevance of MSCs and the potential benefits and risks that can result from translating the MSC research to the treatment of liver diseases.

  8. Hepatic stellate cells and innate immunity in alcoholic liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang-Gun Suh; Won-Il Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Constant alcohol consumption is a major cause of chronic liver disease, and there has been a growing concern regarding the increased mortality rates worldwide. Alcoholic liver diseases (ALDs) range from mild to more severe conditions, such as steatosis, steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The liver is enriched with innate immune cells (e.g. natural killer cells and Kupffer cells) and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), and interestingly, emerging evidence suggests that innate immunity contributes to the development of ALDs (e.g. steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis). Indeed, HSCs play a crucial role in alcoholic steatosis via production of endocannabinoid and retinol metabolites. This review describes the roles of the innate immunity and HSCs in the pathogenesis of ALDs, and suggests therapeutic targets and strategies to assist in the reduction of ALD.

  9. Convenient and efficient enrichment of the CD133+ liver cells from rat fetal liver as a source of liver stem/progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihui; You, Nan; Dou, Kefeng

    2012-01-01

    Although stem cells are commonly isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or magnetic affinity cell sorting, they are very expensive, and they need known markers. However, there is no specific marker for liver stem/progenitor cells (LSPCs). Here, we describe a convenient and efficient method (three-step method) to enrich LSPCs. The fetal liver cells (FLCs) were firstly enriched by Percoll discontinuous gradient centrifugation from the rat fetal liver. Then the FLCs in culture were purified to be homogeneous in size by differential trypsinization and differential adherence. Finally, fetal liver stem/progenitor cells (FLSPCs) were enriched from purified FLCs by Percoll continuous gradient centrifugation. Flow cytometric analysis combining with marker CD133 was used to detect the purity of FLSPCs and evaluate the isolating effects of the three-step method.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells support hepatocyte function in engineered liver grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadota, Yoshie; Yagi, Hiroshi; Inomata, Kenta; Matsubara, Kentaro; Hibi, Taizo; Abe, Yuta; Kitago, Minoru; Shinoda, Masahiro; Obara, Hideaki; Itano, Osamu; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that organ decellularization is a promising approach to facilitate the clinical application of regenerative therapy by providing a platform for organ engineering. This unique strategy uses native matrices to act as a reservoir for the functional cells which may show therapeutic potential when implanted into the body. Appropriate cell sources for artificial livers have been debated for some time. The desired cell type in artificial livers is primary hepatocytes, but in addition, other supportive cells may facilitate this stem cell technology. In this context, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) is an option meeting the criteria for therapeutic organ engineering. Ideally, supportive cells are required to (1) reduce the hepatic cell mass needed in an engineered liver by enhancing hepatocyte function, (2) modulate hepatic regeneration in a paracrine fashion or by direct contact, and (3) enhance the preservability of parenchymal cells during storage. Here, we describe enhanced hepatic function achieved using a strategy of sequential infusion of cells and illustrate the advantages of co-cultivating bone marrow-derived MSCs with primary hepatocytes in the engineered whole-liver scaffold. These co-recellularized liver scaffolds colonized by MSCs and hepatocytes were transplanted into live animals. After blood flow was established, we show that expression of adhesion molecules and proangiogenic factors was upregulated in the graft.

  11. Carbamazepine suppresses calpain-mediated autophagy impairment after ischemia/reperfusion in mouse livers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: Jae.Kim@surgery.ufl.edu; Wang, Jin-Hee, E-mail: jin-hee.wang@surgery.ufl.edu; Biel, Thomas G., E-mail: Thomas.Biel@surgery.ufl.edu; Kim, Do-Sung, E-mail: do-sung.kim@surgery.med.ufl.edu; Flores-Toro, Joseph A., E-mail: Joseph.Flores-Toro@surgery.ufl.edu; Vijayvargiya, Richa, E-mail: rvijayvargiya@ufl.edu; Zendejas, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.zendejas@surgery.ufl.edu; Behrns, Kevin E., E-mail: Kevin.Behrns@surgery.ufl.edu

    2013-12-15

    Onset of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) plays a causative role in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Current therapeutic strategies for reducing reperfusion injury remain disappointing. Autophagy is a lysosome-mediated, catabolic process that timely eliminates abnormal or damaged cellular constituents and organelles such as dysfunctional mitochondria. I/R induces calcium overloading and calpain activation, leading to degradation of key autophagy-related proteins (Atg). Carbamazepine (CBZ), an FDA-approved anticonvulsant drug, has recently been reported to increase autophagy. We investigated the effects of CBZ on hepatic I/R injury. Hepatocytes and livers from male C57BL/6 mice were subjected to simulated in vitro, as well as in vivo I/R, respectively. Cell death, intracellular calcium, calpain activity, changes in autophagy-related proteins (Atg), autophagic flux, MPT and mitochondrial membrane potential after I/R were analyzed in the presence and absence of 20 μM CBZ. CBZ significantly increased hepatocyte viability after reperfusion. Confocal microscopy revealed that CBZ prevented calcium overloading, the onset of the MPT and mitochondrial depolarization. Immunoblotting and fluorometric analysis showed that CBZ blocked calpain activation, depletion of Atg7 and Beclin-1 and loss of autophagic flux after reperfusion. Intravital multiphoton imaging of anesthetized mice demonstrated that CBZ substantially reversed autophagic defects and mitochondrial dysfunction after I/R in vivo. In conclusion, CBZ prevents calcium overloading and calpain activation, which, in turn, suppresses Atg7 and Beclin-1 depletion, defective autophagy, onset of the MPT and cell death after I/R. - Highlights: • A mechanism of carbamazepine (CBZ)-induced cytoprotection in livers is proposed. • Impaired autophagy is a key event contributing to lethal reperfusion injury. • The importance of autophagy is extended and confirmed in an in vivo model. • CBZ is a potential

  12. Comparative analysis of the relationship between trichloroethylene metabolism and tissue-specific toxicity among inbred mouse strains: liver effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hong Sik; Bradford, Blair U; Kosyk, Oksana; Shymonyak, Svitlana; Uehara, Takeki; Collins, Leonard B; Bodnar, Wanda M; Ball, Louise M; Gold, Avram; Rusyn, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a widely used organic solvent. Although TCE is classified as carcinogenic to humans, substantial gaps remain in our understanding of interindividual variability in TCE metabolism and toxicity, especially in the liver. A hypothesis was tested that amounts of oxidative metabolites of TCE in mouse liver are associated with hepatic-specific toxicity. Oral dosing with TCE was conducted in subacute (600 mg/kg/d; 5 d; 7 inbred mouse strains) and subchronic (100 or 400 mg/kg/d; 1, 2, or 4 wk; 2 inbred mouse strains) designs. The quantitative relationship was evaluated between strain-, dose-, and time-dependent formation of TCE metabolites from cytochrome P-450-mediated oxidation (trichloroacetic acid [TCA], dichloroacetic acid [DCA], and trichloroethanol) and glutathione conjugation [S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine and S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)glutathione] in serum and liver, and various hepatic toxicity phenotypes. In subacute study, interstrain variability in TCE metabolite amounts was observed in serum and liver. No marked induction of Cyp2e1 protein levels in liver was detected. Serum and hepatic levels of TCA and DCA were correlated with increased transcription of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes Cyp4a10 and Acox1 but not with degree of induction in hepatocellular proliferation. In subchronic study, serum and liver levels of oxidative metabolites gradually decreased over time despite continuous dosing. Hepatic protein levels of CYP2E1, ADH, and ALDH2 were unaffected by treatment with TCE. While the magnitude of induction of peroxisome proliferator-marker genes also declined, hepatocellular proliferation increased. This study offers a unique opportunity to provide a scientific data-driven rationale for some of the major assumptions in human health assessment of TCE.

  13. In Situ Transplantation of Alginate Bioencapsulated Adipose Tissues Derived Stem Cells (ADSCs via Hepatic Injection in a Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mong-Jen Chen

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue derived stem cells (ADSCs transplantation has recently gained widespread enthusiasm, particularly in the perspective to use them as potential alternative cell sources for hepatocytes in cell based therapy, mainly because of their capability of hepatogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. But some challenges remain to be addressed, including whether ADSCs can be provided effectively to the target organ and whether subsequent proliferation of transplanted cells can be achieved. To date, intrasplenic injection is the conventional method to deliver ADSCs into the liver; however, a number of donor cells retained in the spleen has been reported. In this study, our objective is to evaluate a novel route to transplant ADSCs specifically to the liver. We aimed to test the feasibility of in situ transplantation of ADSCs by injecting bioencapsulated ADSCs into the liver in mouse model.The ADSCs isolated from human alpha 1 antitrypsin (M-hAAT transgenic mice were used to allow delivered ADSCs be readily identified in the liver of recipient mice, and alginate was selected as a cell carrier. We first evaluated whether alginate microspheres are implantable into the liver tissue by injection and whether ADSCs could migrate from alginate microspheres (study one. Once proven, we then examined the in vivo fate of ADSCs loaded microspheres in the liver. Specifically, we evaluated whether transplanted, undifferentiated ASDCs could be induced by the local microenvironment toward hepatogenic differentiation and the distribution of surviving ADSCs in major tissue organs (study two.Our results indicated ADSCs loaded alginate microspheres were implantable into the liver. Both degraded and residual alginate microspheres were observed in the liver up to three weeks. The viable ADSCs were detectable surrounding degraded and residual alginate microspheres in the liver and other major organs such as bone marrow and the lungs. Importantly, transplanted

  14. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Maria Nicoline Baandrup; Veidal, Sanne Skovgård; Rigbolt, Kristoffer Tobias Gustav; Tølbøl, Kirstine Sloth; Roth, Jonathan David; Jelsing, Jacob; Vrang, Niels; Feigh, Michael

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize development of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by performing liver biopsy in wild-type and genetically obese mice. METHODS: Male wild-type C57BL/6J (C57) mice (DIO-NASH) and male Lepob/Lepob (ob/ob) mice (ob/ob-NASH) were maintained on a diet high in trans-fat (40%), fructose (22%) and cholesterol (2%) for 26 and 12 wk, respectively. A normal chow diet served as control in C57 mice (lean chow) and ob/ob mice (ob/ob chow). After the diet-induction period, mice were liver biopsied and a blinded histological assessment of steatosis and fibrosis was conducted. Mice were then stratified into groups counterbalanced for steatosis score and fibrosis stage and continued on diet and to receive daily PO dosing of vehicle for 8 wk. Global gene expression in liver tissue was assessed by RNA sequencing and bioinformatics. Metabolic parameters, plasma liver enzymes and lipids (total cholesterol, triglycerides) as well as hepatic lipids and collagen content were measured by biochemical analysis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (NAS) (steatosis/inflammation/ballooning degeneration) and fibrosis were scored. Steatosis and fibrosis were also quantified using percent fractional area. RESULTS: Diet-induction for 26 and 12 wk in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice, respectively, elicited progressive metabolic perturbations characterized by increased adiposity, total cholesterol and elevated plasma liver enzymes. The diet also induced clear histological features of NASH including hepatosteatosis and fibrosis. Overall, the metabolic NASH phenotype was more pronounced in ob/ob-NASH vs DIO-NASH mice. During the eight week repeated vehicle dosing period, the metabolic phenotype was sustained in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice in conjunction with hepatomegaly and increased hepatic lipids and collagen accumulation. Histopathological scoring demonstrated significantly increased NAS of DIO-NASH mice (0 vs 4.7 ± 0.4, P < 0.001 compared to lean chow

  15. Multidimensional LC–MS/MS analysis of liver proteins in rat, mouse and human microsomal and S9 fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makan Golizeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Liver plays a key role in metabolism and detoxification, therefore analysis of its proteome is relevant for toxicology and drug discovery studies. To optimize for high proteome coverage, protein and peptide-level ion exchange fractionation were assessed using rat liver microsomes and S9 fractions. 2D-(SCX-RP-LC–MS/MS analysis with peptide fractionation was subsequently employed for rat, mouse and human samples, yielding between 1400 and 1939 identified proteins, 58% of which were shared between species, and with relatively high sequence coverage. This rich dataset is specifically interesting for the toxicology community, and could serve as an excellent source for targeted assay development.

  16. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described.

  17. Liver cancer stem cell markers: Progression and therapeutic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing-Hui; Luo, Qing; Liu, Ling-Ling; Song, Guan-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subpopulation in cancer, have been proposed to be cancer-initiating cells, and have been shown to be responsible for chemotherapy resistance and cancer recurrence. The identification of CSC subpopulations inside a tumor presents a new understanding of cancer development because it implies that tumors can only be eradicated by targeting CSCs. Although advances in liver cancer detection and treatment have increased the possibility of curing the disease at early stages, unfortunately, most patients will relapse and succumb to their disease. Strategies aimed at efficiently targeting liver CSCs are becoming important for monitoring the progress of liver cancer therapy and for evaluating new therapeutic approaches. Herein, we provide a critical discussion of biological markers described in the literature regarding liver cancer stem cells and the potential of these markers to serve as therapeutic targets. PMID:27053846

  18. UPTAKE OF [3H]-COLCHICINE INTO BRAIN AND LIVER OF MOUSE, RAT, AND CHICK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Edward L.; Alberti, Marie Hebert; Flood, James F.

    1980-07-01

    The uptake of [ring A-4-{sup 3}H] colchicine and [ring C-methoxy-{sup 3}H]colchicine has been compared in mice from 1 to 24 hr after administration. Less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of ring-labeled colchicine than after administration of the methoxy-labeled colchicine. Three hr after administration of ring-labeled colchicine, 5% of the label was in liver and about 0.01% of the label was present in brain. Forty percent of the brain radioactivity was bound to tubulin as determined by vinblastine precipitation. After 3 hr, an average of 8% of the radioactivity from methoxy-labeled colchicine was found in the liver and 0.16% in brain. However, less than 5% of the activity in brain was precipitated by vinblastine, and the colchicine equivalent was comparable to that found after administration of the ring-labeled colchicine. The amount of colchicine entering mouse brain after subcutaneous injection is comparable to the minimum behaviorally effective dose when administered to the caudate. The metabolism of [ring C-methoxy-{sup 3}H] and [ring A-{sup 3}H]colchicine was also studied in rats. the general pattern was similar to mice; less radioactivity was found in brain after administration of the ring-labeled alkoloid than after administration of methoxy-labeled colchicine. Again, 40-50% of ring-labeled colchicine was precipitated by vinblastine. A much smaller percentage of the methoxy-labeled drug was precipitated by vinblastine than of the ring A-labeled colchicine. These experiments, together with behavioral experiments [7], support the hypotheses that structural alteration in synapses by recently synthesized proteins which are transported down the axons and dendrites may be an essential process for long-term memory formation.

  19. Implantation of healthy matrix-embedded endothelial cells rescues dysfunctional endothelium and ischaemic tissue in liver engraftment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Balcells, Mercedes; Edelman, Elazer R

    2017-07-01

    Liver transplantation is limited by ischaemic injury which promotes endothelial cell and hepatocyte dysfunction and eventually organ failure. We sought to understand how endothelial state determines liver recovery after hepatectomy and engraftment. Matrix-embedded endothelial cells (MEECs) with retained healthy phenotype or control acellular matrices were implanted in direct contact with the remaining median lobe of donor mice undergoing partial hepatectomy (70%), or in the interface between the remaining median lobe and an autograft or isograft from the left lobe in hepatectomised recipient mice. Hepatic vascular architecture, DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in the median lobe and grafts, serum markers of liver damage and phenotype of macrophage and lymphocyte subsets in the liver after engraftment were analysed 7 days post-op. Healthy MEECs create a functional vascular splice in donor and recipient liver after 70% hepatectomy in mouse protecting these livers from ischaemic injury, hepatic congestion and inflammation. Macrophages recruited adjacent to the vascular nodes into the implants switched to an anti-inflammatory and regenerative profile M2. MEECs improved liver function and the rate of liver regeneration and prevented apoptosis in donor liver lobes, autologous grafts and syngeneic engraftment. Implants with healthy endothelial cells rescue liver donor and recipient endothelium and parenchyma from ischaemic injury after major hepatectomy and engraftment. This study highlights endothelial-hepatocyte crosstalk in hepatic repair and provides a promising new approach to improve regenerative medicine outcomes and liver transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. Role of stem cells during diabetic liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Ying; Garner, Jessica; Wu, Nan; Phillip, Levine; Han, Yuyan; McDaniel, Kelly; Annable, Tami; Zhou, Tianhao; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Huang, Qiaobing; Alpini, Gianfranco; Meng, Fanyin

    2016-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most severe endocrine metabolic disorders in the world that has serious medical consequences with substantial impacts on the quality of life. Type 2 diabetes is one of the main causes of diabetic liver diseases with the most common being non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Several factors that may explain the mechanisms related to pathological and functional changes of diabetic liver injury include: insulin resistance, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress. The realization that these factors are important in hepatocyte damage and lack of donor livers has led to studies concentrating on the role of stem cells (SCs) in the prevention and treatment of liver injury. Possible avenues that the application of SCs may improve liver injury include but are not limited to: the ability to differentiate into pancreatic β-cells (insulin producing cells), the contribution for hepatocyte regeneration, regulation of lipogenesis, glucogenesis and anti-inflammatory actions. Once further studies are performed to explore the underlying protective mechanisms of SCs and the advantages and disadvantages of its application, there will be a greater understand of the mechanism and therapeutic potential. In this review, we summarize the findings regarding the role of SCs in diabetic liver diseases.

  1. Single-cell spatial reconstruction reveals global division of labour in the mammalian liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Shenhav, Rom; Matcovitch-Natan, Orit; Tóth, Beáta; Lemze, Doron; Golan, Matan; Massasa, Efi E; Baydatch, Shaked; Landen, Shanie; Moor, Andreas E; Brandis, Alexander; Giladi, Amir; Stokar-Avihail, Avigail; David, Eyal; Amit, Ido; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2017-02-16

    The mammalian liver consists of hexagon-shaped lobules that are radially polarized by blood flow and morphogens. Key liver genes have been shown to be differentially expressed along the lobule axis, a phenomenon termed zonation, but a detailed genome-wide reconstruction of this spatial division of labour has not been achieved. Here we measure the entire transcriptome of thousands of mouse liver cells and infer their lobule coordinates on the basis of a panel of zonated landmark genes, characterized with single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization. Using this approach, we obtain the zonation profiles of all liver genes with high spatial resolution. We find that around 50% of liver genes are significantly zonated and uncover abundant non-monotonic profiles that peak at the mid-lobule layers. These include a spatial order of bile acid biosynthesis enzymes that matches their position in the enzymatic cascade. Our approach can facilitate the reconstruction of similar spatial genomic blueprints for other mammalian organs.

  2. Direct hepatic differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells induced by valproic acid and cytokines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Jun Dong; Guo-Rong Zhang; Qing-Jun Zhou; Ruo-Lang Pan; Ye Chen; Li-Xin Xiang; Jian-Zhong Shao

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To develop a protocol for direct hepatic lineage differentiation from early developmental progenitors to a population of mature hepatocytes. METHODS: Hepatic progenitor cells and then mature hepatocytes from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells were obtained in a sequential manner, induced by valproic acid (VPA) and cytokines (hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor and insulin). Morphological changes of the differentiated cells were examined by phase-contrast microscopy and electron microscopy. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemical analyses were used to evaluate the gene expression profiles of the VPA-induced hepatic progenitors and the hepatic progenitor-derived hepatocytes. Glycogen storage, cytochrome P450 activity, transplantation assay, differentiation of bile duct-like structures and tumorigenic analyses were performed for the functional identification of the differentiated cells. Furthermore, FACS and electron microscopy were used for the analyses of cell cycle profile and apoptosis in VPA-induced hepatic differentiated cells. RESULTS: Based on the combination of VPA and cytokines, mouse ES cells differentiated into a uniform and homogeneous cell population of hepatic progenitor cells and then matured into functional hepatocytes. The progenitor population shared several characteristics with ES cells and hepatic stem/progenitor cells, and represented a novel progenitor cell between ES and hepatic oval cells in embryonic development. The differentiated hepatocytes from progenitor cells shared typical characteristics with mature hepatocytes, including the patterns of gene expression, immunological markers, in vitro hepatocyte functions and in vivo capacity to restore acute-damaged liver function. In addition, the differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells from ES cells was accompanied by significant cell cycle arrest and selective survival of differentiating cells towards hepatic lineages. CONCLUSION: Hepatic cells

  3. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation via different approaches in treatment of liver cirrhosis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Lixia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the clinical effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC transplantation via different approaches in the treatment of liver cirrhosis in mice. Methods A total of 46 BALB/c mice were randomly divided into normal control group with 5 mice and liver cirrhosis model group with 41 mice. Subcutaneously injected carbon tetrachloride olive oil was used to establish the mouse model of liver cirrhosis. A total of 36 mice with liver cirrhosis were randomly divided into control group, caudal vein BMSC transplantation group, and spleen BMSC transplantation group, with 12 mice in each group. Whole bone marrow adherent culture was performed to obtain the third-generation BMSCs, and flow cytometry was used for cell surface identification. BMSCs were injected into the mice through the caudal vein or spleen. Blood samples were collected at 4 weeks after transplantation to measure liver function. HE and Masson staining and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA immunohistochemistry were performed for liver sections. Liver injury and fibrosis in mice were examined. A one-way analysis of variance was used for comparison between groups. Results At 8 weeks after the establishment of the model, the mice in the model group had sparse and dark yellow hair, reduced food consumption and activity, and a reduction in body weight. After transplantation, compared with the model control group, the caudal vein BMSC transplantation group and spleen BMSC transplantation group showed a significant increase in albumin and significant reductions in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (all P<0.01. There were no significant differences between the two transplantation approaches (P>0.05. After transplantation, there were significant changes in diseased tissue, alleviated liver cirrhosis, reduced collagen fiber and necrotic area, and a good structure. Immunohistochemistry showed both transplantation groups showed significant reductions in

  4. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells improve liver function and ascites in decompensated liver cirrhosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zheng; Lin, Hu; Shi, Ming; Xu, Ruonan; Fu, Junliang; Lv, Jiyun; Chen, Liming; Lv, Sa; Li, Yuanyuan; Yu, Shuangjie; Geng, Hua; Jin, Lei; Lau, George K K; Wang, Fu-Sheng

    2012-03-01

    Decompensated liver cirrhosis (LC), a life-threatening complication of chronic liver disease, is one of the major indications for liver transplantation. Recently, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transfusion has been shown to lead to the regression of liver fibrosis in mice and humans. This study examined the safety and efficacy of umbilical cord-derived MSC (UC-MSC) in patients with decompensated LC. A total of 45 chronic hepatitis B patients with decompensated LC, including 30 patients receiving UC-MSC transfusion, and 15 patients receiving saline as the control, were recruited; clinical parameters were detected during a 1-year follow-up period. No significant side-effects and complications were observed in either group. There was a significant reduction in the volume of ascites in patients treated with UC-MSC transfusion compared with controls (P decompensated LC. UC-MSC transfusion, therefore, might present a novel therapeutic approach for patients with decompensated LC.

  5. Cell expression patterns of CD147 in N-diethylnitrosamine/phenobarbital-induced mouse hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Meng; Wu, Jiao; He, Feng; Wang, Xi-Long; Li, Can; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Bian, Huijie

    2015-02-01

    Overexpression of CD147/basigin in hepatic cells promotes the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Whether CD147 also expressed in liver non-parenchymal cells and associated with HCC development was unknown. The aim of the study was to explore time-dependent cell expression patterns of CD147 in a widely accepted N-diethylnitrosamine/phenobarbital (DEN/PB)-induced HCC mouse model. Liver samples collected at month 1-12 of post-DEN/PB administration were assessed the localization of CD147 in hepatocytes, endothelial cells, hepatic stellate cells, and macrophages. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that CD147 was upregulated in liver tumors during month 1-8 of DEN/PB induction. Expression of CD147 was positively correlated with cytokeratin 18, a hepatocyte marker (r = 0.7857, P = 0.0279), CD31 (r = 0.9048, P = 0.0046), an endothelial cell marker, and CD68, a macrophage marker (r = 0.7619, P = 0.0368). A significant correlation was also observed between CD147 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (r = 0.8857, P = 0.0333) at DEN/PB initiation and early stage of tumor formation. Immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that CD147 co-expressed with cytokeratin 18, CD31, alpha-smooth muscle actin, and CD68. Moreover, there existed positive correlations between CD147 and microvessel density (r = 0.7857, P = 0.0279), CD147 and Ki-67 (r = 0.9341, P = 0.0022) in the development of DEN/PB-induced HCC. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that CD147 was upregulated in the liver parenchymal and mesenchymal cells and involved in angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation in the development of DEN/PB-induced HCC.

  6. Vismodegib suppresses TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a mouse model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsova, Petra; Ibrahim, Samar H; Bronk, Steven F; Yagita, Hideo; Gores, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling pathway activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Despite this concept, hedgehog pathway inhibitors have not been explored. Thus, we examined the effect of vismodegib, a hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor, in a diet-induced model of NASH. C57BL/6 mice were placed on 3-month chow or FFC (high saturated fats, fructose, and cholesterol) diet. One week prior to sacrifice, mice were treated with vismodegib or vehicle. Mice fed the FFC diet developed significant steatosis, which was unchanged by vismodegib therapy. In contrast, vismodegib significantly attenuated FFC-induced liver injury as manifested by reduced serum ALT and hepatic TUNEL-positive cells. In line with the decreased apoptosis, vismodegib prevented FFC-induced strong upregulation of death receptor DR5 and its ligand TRAIL. In addition, FFC-fed mice, but not chow-fed animals, underwent significant liver injury and apoptosis following treatment with a DR5 agonist; however, this injury was prevented by pre-treatment with vismodegib. Consistent with a reduction in liver injury, vismodegib normalized FFC-induced markers of inflammation including mRNA for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and a variety of macrophage markers. Furthermore, vismodegib in FFC-fed mice abrogated indices of hepatic fibrogenesis. In conclusion, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with vismodegib appears to reduce TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a nutrient excess model of NASH, thereby attenuating hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. We speculate that hedgehog signaling inhibition may be salutary in human NASH.

  7. Vismodegib suppresses TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a mouse model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Hirsova

    Full Text Available Hedgehog signaling pathway activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of NASH. Despite this concept, hedgehog pathway inhibitors have not been explored. Thus, we examined the effect of vismodegib, a hedgehog signaling pathway inhibitor, in a diet-induced model of NASH. C57BL/6 mice were placed on 3-month chow or FFC (high saturated fats, fructose, and cholesterol diet. One week prior to sacrifice, mice were treated with vismodegib or vehicle. Mice fed the FFC diet developed significant steatosis, which was unchanged by vismodegib therapy. In contrast, vismodegib significantly attenuated FFC-induced liver injury as manifested by reduced serum ALT and hepatic TUNEL-positive cells. In line with the decreased apoptosis, vismodegib prevented FFC-induced strong upregulation of death receptor DR5 and its ligand TRAIL. In addition, FFC-fed mice, but not chow-fed animals, underwent significant liver injury and apoptosis following treatment with a DR5 agonist; however, this injury was prevented by pre-treatment with vismodegib. Consistent with a reduction in liver injury, vismodegib normalized FFC-induced markers of inflammation including mRNA for TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and a variety of macrophage markers. Furthermore, vismodegib in FFC-fed mice abrogated indices of hepatic fibrogenesis. In conclusion, inhibition of hedgehog signaling with vismodegib appears to reduce TRAIL-mediated liver injury in a nutrient excess model of NASH, thereby attenuating hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. We speculate that hedgehog signaling inhibition may be salutary in human NASH.

  8. Differential Proteomics in Malignant and Normal Liver Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-jun; WANG Bin; YAN Zhi-yong; QIAN Dong-meng; SONG Xu-xia; Ding Shou-yi; BAI Zhi-qiang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To detect differential protein expression in malignant and normal liver cell lines in vitro using the SELDI ProteinChip platform, for investigating the pathogenesis of liver cancer. Methods: Two cell lines, human normal liver cell line L02 and hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 were cultured routinely, harvested in good condition and lysed. After quantification, the supernatant of the lysate was tested by IMAC3 (Immobilized Mental Affinity Capture) and WCX2 (Weak Cation Exchange) chips on the SELDI-TOF-MS ProteinChip reader. Results: Protein expression differed between the malignant and normal liver cell lines. A total of 20 differentially expressed proteins were found, among which, 7 were captured by the IMAC3 chip and 14 by the WCX2 chip. Peaks at 5,419, 7,979 and 11,265 Da were higher and at 8,103, 8,492, 10,160 and 11,304 Da lower in SMMC-7721 cells by the IMAC3 chip; peaks at 7,517, 7,945 and 7,979 Da were higher and at 5,061, 5,551, 5,818, 7,439, 9,401,10,100, 10,312, 11,621, 11,662, 11,830 and 12,772 Da lower in SMMC-7721 cells by the WCX2 chip. Interestingly, both chips captured the 7,979 Da peak. In addition, the 11,081 Da peak corresponded precisely with the molecular mass of the calcium binding protein S100A10, which may participate in the formation of liver cancer in association with p36. Conclusion: Detecting differential protein expression in malignant and normal liver cell lines using the SELDI ProteinChip platform was simple, sensitive and repeatable. The results we obtained can serve as a basis for investigating the pathogenesis of liver cancer and aid the discovery of new therapeutic targets.

  9. Isolation and Culture of Satellite Cells from Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarò, Antonio; Carosio, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue is characterized by a population of quiescent mononucleated myoblasts, localized between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers, known as satellite cells. Satellite cells play a pivotal role in muscle homeostasis and are the major source of myogenic precursors in mammalian muscle regeneration.This chapter describes protocols for isolation and culturing satellite cells isolated from mouse skeletal muscles. The classical procedure, which will be discussed extensively in this chapter, involves the enzymatic dissociation of skeletal muscles, while the alternative method involves isolation of satellite cells from isolated myofibers in which the satellite cells remain in their in situ position underneath the myofiber basal lamina.In particular, we discuss the technical aspect of satellite cell isolation, the methods necessary to enrich the satellite cell fraction and the culture conditions that optimize proliferation and myotube formation of mouse satellite cells.

  10. Hepato-biliary profile of potential candidate liver progenitor cells from healthy rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Céric Maerckx; Isabelle Scheers; Tatiana Tondreau; David Campard; Omar Nyabi; Mustapha Najimi; Etienne Sokal

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the presence of progenitor cells in healthy adult rat liver displaying the equivalent advanced hepatogenic profile as that obtained in humans.METHODS:Rat fibroblastic-like liver derived cells (rFLDC) were obtained from collagenase-isolated liver cell suspensions and characterized and their phenotype profile determined using flow cytometry,immunocyto-chemistry,reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and functional assays.RESULTS:rFLDC exhibit fibroblastoid morphology,express mesenchymal (CD73,CD90,vimentin,α-smooth muscle actin),hepatocyte (UGT1A1,CK8) and biliary (CK19) markers.Moreover,these cells are able to store glycogen,and have glucose 6 phosphatase activity,but not UGT1A1 activity.Under the hepatogenic differentiation protocol,rFLDC display an up-regulation of hepatocyte markers expression (albumin,tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase,G6Pase) correlated to a down-regulation of the expression of the biliary marker CK19.CONCLUSION:Advanced hepatic features observed in human liver progenitor cells could not be demonstrated in rFLDC.However,we demonstrated the presence of an original rodent hepato-biliary cell type.

  11. Differential patterns in the periodicity and dynamics of clock gene expression in mouse liver and stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Francavilla, Massimo; Pazienza, Valerio; Benegiamo, Giorgia; Piepoli, Ada; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Giuliani, Francesco; Yamamoto, Takuro; Takumi, Toru

    2012-12-01

    The rhythmic recurrence of biological processes is driven by the functioning of cellular circadian clocks, operated by a set of genes and proteins that generate self-sustaining transcriptional-translational feedback loops with a free-running period of about 24 h. In the gastrointestinal apparatus, the functioning of the biological clocks shows distinct patterns in the different organs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the time-related variation of clock gene expression in mouse liver and stomach, two components of the digestive system sharing vascular and autonomic supply, but performing completely different functions. The authors analyzed the periodicity by cosinor analysis and the dynamics of variation by computing the fractional variation to assess the rate of change in gene expression. Five-week-old male Balb/c mice were exposed to 2 wks of 12-h light/12-h dark cycles, then kept in complete darkness for 3 d as a continuation of the dark span of the last light-dark cycle. The authors evaluated the expression of Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, Per3, Rev-erbα, Rev-erbβ, Npas2, Timeless, Dbp, Csnk1d, and Csnk1e by using real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in mouse liver and stomach. A significant 24-h rhythmic component was found for 10 genes in the liver (Bmal1, Clock, Cry1, Per1, Per2, Per3, Rev-erbα, Rev-erbβ, Npas2, and Dbp), and for 9 genes in the stomach (Bmal1, Cry1, Per1, Per2, Per3, Rev-erbα, Rev-erbβ, Npas2, and Dbp). In particular, Clock showed marked rhythm differences between liver and stomach, putatively due to some compensation by Npas2. The acrophase of the original values of Bmal1, Per2, Per3, Rev-erbα, Rev-erbβ, Npas2, and Dbp expression was delayed in the stomach, and the average delay expressed as mean ± SD was 14.30 ± 7.94 degrees (57.20 ± 31.78 minutes). A statistically significant difference was found in the acrophases of Bmal1 (p = .015) and Npas2 (p

  12. Synchronisation strategies in T2-weighted MR imaging for detection of liver lesions: Application on a nude mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Baboi, L; Milot, L; Lartizien, C; Roche, C; Scoazec, J-Y; Pilleul, F; Beuf, O

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The objective of this work was to propose original synchronisation strategies based on T2-weighted sequence performed on a small animal MRI spectrometer in order to improve the image contrast and detect mouse liver lesions at high magnetic field. Materials and Methods: The experiments were performed in vivo at 7T using a 32 mm inner diameter cylindrical volumetric coil for both RF emission and reception. A sensitive pressure sensor was used to detect external movements due to both respir...

  13. Obese diet-induced mouse models of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-tracking disease by liver biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria; Nicoline; Baandrup; Kristiansen; Sanne; Skovg?rd; Veidal; Kristoffer; Tobias; Gustav; Rigbolt; Kirstine; Sloth; T?lb?l; Jonathan; David; Roth; Jacob; Jelsing; Niels; Vrang; Michael; Feigh

    2016-01-01

    AIM:To characterize development of diet-induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis(NASH)by performing live biopsy in wild-type and genetically obese mice.METHODS:Male wild-type C57BL/6J(C57)mice(DIO NASH)and male Lep ob/Lep ob(ob/ob)mice(ob/ob-NASH were maintained on a diet high in trans-fat(40%)fructose(22%)and cholesterol(2%)for 26 and 12 wk respectively.A normal chow diet served as control in C57 mice(lean chow)and ob/ob mice(ob/ob chow)After the diet-induction period,mice were liver biopsied and a blinded histological assessment of steatosis and fibrosis was conducted.Mice were then stratified into groups counterbalanced for steatosis score and fibrosi stage and continued on diet and to receive daily PO dosing of vehicle for 8 wk.Global gene expression in liver tissue was assessed by RNA sequencing and bioin formatics.Metabolic parameters,plasma liver enzyme and lipids(total cholesterol,triglycerides)as well a hepatic lipids and collagen content were measured b biochemical analysis.Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score(NAS)(steatosis/inflammation/ballooningdegeneration)and fibrosis were scored.Steatosis and fibrosis were also quantified using percent fractional area.RESULTS:Diet-induction for 26 and 12 wk in DIONASH and ob/ob-NASH mice,respectively,elicited progressive metabolic perturbations characterized by increased adiposity,total cholesterol and elevated plasma liver enzymes.The diet also induced clear histological features of NASH including hepatosteatosis and fibrosis.Overall,the metabolic NASH phenotype was more pronounced in ob/ob-NASH vs DIO-NASH mice.During the eight week repeated vehicle dosing period,the metabolic phenotype was sustained in DIO-NASH and ob/ob-NASH mice in conjunction with hepatomegaly and increased hepatic lipids and collagen accumulation.Histopathological scoring demonstrated significantly increased NAS of DIO-NASH mice(0 vs4.7±0.4,P<0.001 compared to lean chow)and ob/ob-NASH mice(2.4±0.3 vs 6.3±0.2,P<0.001compared to ob

  14. Transplanted bone marrow stromal cells are not cellular origin of hepatocellular carcinomas in a mouse model of carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Fang Zheng; Li-Jian Liang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the malignant potential of hepatic stem cells derived from the bone marrow stromal cells (BHSCs) in a mouse model of chemical hepatocarcinogenesis.METHODS: BMSCs from male BAUB/c mice were harvested and cultured, then transplanted into female syngenic BALB/c mice via portal vein. Hepato-carcinogenesis was induced by 6 months of treatment with diethylnitrosamine (DEN).Six months later, the liver was removed from each treated mouse and evaluated by immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybddization (FISH).RESULTS: Twenty-six percent of recipient mice survived and developed multiple hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs).Immunohistochemically, HCC expressed placental form of glutathione-S-transferase (GST-P) and α-fetoprotein,but did not express cytokeratin 19. Y chromosome positive hepatocytes were detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) in the liver of mice treated with DEN after BMSCs transplantation while no such hepatocytes were identified in the liver of mice not treated with DEN.No HCC was positive for the Y chromosome by FISH.CONCLUSION: Hepatic stem cells dedved from the bone marrow stromal cells have a low malignant potential in our mouse model of chemical hepatocarcingenesis.

  15. Trihalomethanes in liver pathology: Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino-Rocha, Ana I; Rodrigues, D; da Costa, R Gil; Diniz, C; Aragão, S; Talhada, D; Botelho, M; Colaço, A; Pires, M J; Peixoto, F; Oliveira, P A

    2016-08-01

    Trihalomethanes (THMs) are disinfection byproducts found in chlorinated water, and are associated with several different kinds of cancer in human populations and experimental animal models. Metabolism of THMs proceeds through enzymes such as GSTT1 and CYP2E1 and gives rise to reactive intermediates, which form the basis for their toxic activities. The aim of this study was to assess the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by THMs at low levels, and the resulting hepatic histological and biochemical changes in the mouse. Male ICR mice were administered with two THMs: dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM); once daily, by gavage, to a total of four administrations. Animals were sacrificed four weeks after DBCM and BDCM administrations. Blood biochemistry was performed for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total bilirubin (TB), albumin (Alb), total protein (TP), creatinine, and urea. Animals exposed to DBCM and BDCM showed elevated ALT and TB levels (p stress (glutathione S-transferase (GST)) in hepatic tissues (p stress in liver toxicity caused by DBCM and BDCM. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1009-1016, 2016.

  16. Development of S/MAR minicircles for enhanced and persistent transgene expression in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyros, Orestis; Wong, Suet Ping; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Tolmachov, Oleg; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J; Niceta, Marcello; Coutelle, Charles; Harbottle, Richard P

    2011-05-01

    We have previously described the development of a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) episomal vector system for in vivo application and demonstrated its utility to sustain transgene expression in the mouse liver for at least 6 months following a single administration. Subsequently, we observed that transgene expression is sustained for the lifetime of the animal. The level of expression, however, does drop appreciably over time. We hypothesised that by eliminating the bacterial components in our vectors, we could improve their performance since bacterial sequences have been shown to be responsible for the immunotoxicity of the vector and the silencing of its expression when applied in vivo. We describe here the development of a minimally sized S/MAR vector, which is devoid of extraneous bacterial sequences. This minicircle vector comprises an expression cassette and an S/MAR moiety, providing higher and more sustained transgene expression for several months in the absence of selection, both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to the expression of our original S/MAR plasmid vector, the novel S/MAR minicircle vectors mediate increased transgene expression, which becomes sustained at about twice the levels observed immediately after administration. These promising results demonstrate the utility of minimally sized S/MAR vectors for persistent, atoxic gene expression.

  17. Hepatocytes Polyploidization and Cell Cycle Control in Liver Physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Géraldine Gentric

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most cells in mammalian tissues usually contain a diploid complement of chromosomes. However, numerous studies have demonstrated a major role of “diploid-polyploid conversion” during physiopathological processes in several tissues. In the liver parenchyma, progressive polyploidization of hepatocytes takes place during postnatal growth. Indeed, at the suckling-weaning transition, cytokinesis failure events induce the genesis of binucleated tetraploid liver cells. Insulin signalling, through regulation of the PI3K/Akt signalling pathway, is essential in the establishment of liver tetraploidization by controlling cytoskeletal organisation and consequently mitosis progression. Liver cell polyploidy is generally considered to indicate terminal differentiation and senescence, and both lead to a progressive loss of cell pluripotency associated to a markedly decreased replication capacity. Although adult liver is a quiescent organ, it retains a capacity to proliferate and to modulate its ploidy in response to various stimuli or aggression (partial hepatectomy, metabolic overload (i.e., high copper and iron hepatic levels, oxidative stress, toxic insult, and chronic hepatitis etc.. Here we review the mechanisms and functional consequences of hepatocytes polyploidization during normal and pathological liver growth.

  18. Stimulation of Liver X Receptor Has Potent Anti-HIV Effects in a Humanized Mouse Model of HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Ali; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Sviridov, Dmitri; Karandish, Sara; Raj, Dominic S; Fitzgerald, Michael L; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that liver X receptor (LXR) agonists inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by upregulating cholesterol transporter ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), suppressing HIV production, and reducing infectivity of produced virions. In this study, we extended these observations by analyzing the effect of the LXR agonist T0901317 [N-[4-(1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-hydroxypropan-2-yl)phenyl]-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)benzenesulfonamide] on the ongoing HIV infection and investigating the possibility of using LXR agonist for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection in a humanized mouse model. Pre-exposure of monocyte-derived macrophages to T0901317 reduced susceptibility of these cells to HIV infection in vitro. This protective effect lasted for up to 4 days after treatment termination and correlated with upregulated expression of ABCA1, reduced abundance of lipid rafts, and reduced fusion of the cells with HIV. Pre-exposure of peripheral blood leukocytes to T0901317 provided only a short-term protection against HIV infection. Treatment of HIV-exposed humanized mice with LXR agonist starting 2 weeks postinfection substantially reduced viral load. When eight humanized mice were pretreated with LXR agonist prior to HIV infection, five animals were protected from infection, two had viral load at the limit of detection, and one had viral load significantly reduced relative to mock-treated controls. T0901317 pretreatment also reduced HIV-induced dyslipidemia in infected mice. In conclusion, these results reveal a novel link between LXR stimulation and cell resistance to HIV infection and suggest that LXR agonists may be good candidates for development as anti-HIV agents, in particular for pre-exposure prophylaxis of HIV infection.

  19. In vitro metabolism studies of {sup 18}F-labeled 1-phenylpiperazine using mouse liver S9 fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Eun Kyoung [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Yearn Seong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: ysnm.choe@samsung.com; Kim, Dong Hyun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Bong-Ho [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyung-Han [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Tae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-15

    The in vitro metabolism of 1-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluoromethylbenzyl)-4-phenylpiperazine ([{sup 18}F]1) and 1-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzyl)-4-phenylpiperazine ([{sup 18}F]2) was investigated using mouse liver S9 fraction. Results were compared to those of in vivo metabolism using mouse blood and bone and to in vitro metabolism using mouse liver microsomes. Defluorination was the main metabolic pathway for [{sup 18}F]1 in vitro and in vivo. Based on TLC, HPLC and LC-MS data, [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion and less polar radioactive metabolites derived from aromatic ring oxidation were detected in vitro, and the latter metabolites were rapidly converted into the former with time, whereas only the [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion was detected in vivo. Similarly, the in vitro metabolism of [{sup 18}F]2 using either S9 fraction or microsomes showed the same pattern as the in vivo method using blood; however, the radioactive metabolites derived from aromatic ring oxidation were not detected in vivo. These results demonstrate that liver S9 fraction can be widely used to investigate the intermediate radioactive metabolites and to predict the in vivo metabolism of radiotracers.

  20. A selective tropism of transfused oval cells for liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Zhi Chen; Hai Hong; Jin Xiang; Ling Xue; Guo-Qiang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the biological behaviors of hepatic oval cells after transfused into the circulation of experimental animals.METHODS: Oval cells from male SD rat were transfused into the circulation of a female rat which were treated by a 2-AAF/CCl4 program, through caudal vein. Sex-determining gene sry which located on Y chromosome was examined by PCR and in situ hybridization technique in liver, kidney and spleen of the experimental animals, respectively.RESULTS: The results of the cell-transplant experiment showed that the srygene was detectable only in the liver but not in spleen and kidney of the experimental rats, and no signals could be detected in the control animals. It can be also morphologically proved that some exogenous cells had migrated into the parenchyma of the liver and settled there.CONCLUSION: The result means that there are exogenous cells located in the liver of the experimental animal and the localization is specific to the liver. This indicates that some "signal molecules" must exist in the circulation of the rats treated by 2-AAF/CCl4. These "signal molecules" might play an important role in specific localization and differentiation of transfused oval cells.

  1. Fetal liver stromal cells promote hematopoietic cell expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kun; Hu, Caihong [Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Zhou, Zhigang [Shanghai 1st People Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Huang, Lifang; Liu, Wenli [Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China); Sun, Hanying, E-mail: shanhum@163.com [Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430030 (China)

    2009-09-25

    Future application of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) in clinical therapies largely depends on their successful expansion in vitro. Fetal liver (FL) is a unique hematopoietic organ in which hematopoietic cells markedly expand in number, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Stromal cells (StroCs) have been suggested to provide a suitable cellular environment for in vitro expansion of HSPCs. In this study, murine StroCs derived from FL at E14.5, with a high level of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Wnt expression, were found to have an increased ability to support the proliferation of HSPCs. This effect was inhibited by blocking Shh signaling. Supplementation with soluble Shh-N promoted the proliferation of hematopoietic cells by activating Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that FL-derived StroCs support proliferation of HSPCs via Shh inducing an autocrine Wnt signaling loop. The use of FL-derived StroCs and regulation of the Shh pathway might further enhance HPSC expansion.

  2. Prolonged expression of a lysosomal enzyme in mouse liver after Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated gene delivery: implications for non-viral gene therapy of mucopolysaccharidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovich, Elena L; Bell, Jason B; Belur, Lalitha R; Gunther, Roland; Koniar, Brenda; Erickson, David C C; Schachern, Patricia A; Matise, Ilze; McIvor, R Scott; Whitley, Chester B; Hackett, Perry B

    2007-05-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is a non-viral vector system that can integrate precise sequences into chromosomes. We evaluated the SB transposon system as a tool for gene therapy of mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) types I and VII. We constructed SB transposon plasmids for high-level expression of human beta-glucuronidase (hGUSB) or alpha-L-iduronidase (hIDUA). Plasmids were delivered with and without SB transposase to mouse liver by rapid, high-volume tail-vein injection. We studied the duration of expressed therapeutic enzyme activity, transgene presence by PCR, lysosomal pathology by toluidine blue staining and cell-mediated immune response histologically and by immunohistochemical staining. Transgene frequency, distribution of transgene and enzyme expression in liver and the level of transgenic enzyme required for amelioration of lysosomal pathology were estimated in MPS I and VII mice. Without immunomodulation, initial GUSB and IDUA activities in plasma reached > 100-fold of wild-type (WT) levels but fell to background within 4 weeks post-injection. In immunomodulated transposon-treated MPS I mice plasma IDUA persisted for over 3 months at up to 100-fold WT activity in one-third of MPS I mice, which was sufficient to reverse lysosomal pathology in the liver and, partially, in distant organs. Histological and immunohistochemical examination of liver sections in IDUA transposon-treated WT mice revealed inflammation 10 days post-injection consisting predominantly of mononuclear cells, some of which were CD4- or CD8-positive. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of achieving prolonged expression of lysosomal enzymes in the liver and reversing MPS disease in adult mice with a single dose of therapeutic SB transposons. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effects of Liver Fibrosis Progression on Tissue Relaxation Times in Different Mouse Models Assessed by Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Hochrath, Katrin; Stroeder, Jonas; Hittatiya, Kanishka; Schneider, Günther; Lammert, Frank; Buecker, Arno; Fries, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Recently, clinical studies demonstrated that magnetic resonance relaxometry with determination of relaxation times T1 and T2(⁎) may aid in staging and management of liver fibrosis in patients suffering from viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis. In the present study we investigated T1 and T2(⁎) in different models of liver fibrosis to compare alternate pathophysiologies in their effects on relaxation times and to further develop noninvasive quantification methods of liver fibrosis. MRI was performed with a fast spin echo sequence for measurement of T1 and a multigradient echo sequence for determination of T2(⁎). Toxic liver fibrosis was induced by injections of carbon tetrachloride (1.4 mL CCl4 per kg bodyweight and week, for 3 or 6 weeks) in BALB/cJ mice. Chronic sclerosing cholangitis was mimicked using the ATP-binding cassette transporter B4 knockout (Abcb4 (-/-)) mouse model. Untreated BALB/cJ mice served as controls. To assess hepatic fibrosis, we ascertained collagen contents and fibrosis scores after Sirius red staining. T1 and T2(⁎) correlate differently to disease severity and etiology of liver fibrosis. T2(⁎) shows significant decrease correlating with fibrosis in CCl4 treated animals, while demonstrating significant increase with disease severity in Abcb4 (-/-) mice. Measurements of T1 and T2(⁎) may therefore facilitate discrimination between different stages and causes of liver fibrosis.

  4. Effects of Liver Fibrosis Progression on Tissue Relaxation Times in Different Mouse Models Assessed by Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Andreas; Hochrath, Katrin; Stroeder, Jonas; Hittatiya, Kanishka; Schneider, Günther; Lammert, Frank; Buecker, Arno

    2017-01-01

    Recently, clinical studies demonstrated that magnetic resonance relaxometry with determination of relaxation times T1 and T2⁎ may aid in staging and management of liver fibrosis in patients suffering from viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis. In the present study we investigated T1 and T2⁎ in different models of liver fibrosis to compare alternate pathophysiologies in their effects on relaxation times and to further develop noninvasive quantification methods of liver fibrosis. MRI was performed with a fast spin echo sequence for measurement of T1 and a multigradient echo sequence for determination of T2⁎. Toxic liver fibrosis was induced by injections of carbon tetrachloride (1.4 mL CCl4 per kg bodyweight and week, for 3 or 6 weeks) in BALB/cJ mice. Chronic sclerosing cholangitis was mimicked using the ATP-binding cassette transporter B4 knockout (Abcb4 −/−) mouse model. Untreated BALB/cJ mice served as controls. To assess hepatic fibrosis, we ascertained collagen contents and fibrosis scores after Sirius red staining. T1 and T2⁎ correlate differently to disease severity and etiology of liver fibrosis. T2⁎ shows significant decrease correlating with fibrosis in CCl4 treated animals, while demonstrating significant increase with disease severity in Abcb4 −/− mice. Measurements of T1 and T2⁎ may therefore facilitate discrimination between different stages and causes of liver fibrosis. PMID:28194423

  5. Effects of Liver Fibrosis Progression on Tissue Relaxation Times in Different Mouse Models Assessed by Ultrahigh Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Müller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, clinical studies demonstrated that magnetic resonance relaxometry with determination of relaxation times T1 and T2⁎ may aid in staging and management of liver fibrosis in patients suffering from viral hepatitis and steatohepatitis. In the present study we investigated T1 and T2⁎ in different models of liver fibrosis to compare alternate pathophysiologies in their effects on relaxation times and to further develop noninvasive quantification methods of liver fibrosis. MRI was performed with a fast spin echo sequence for measurement of T1 and a multigradient echo sequence for determination of T2⁎. Toxic liver fibrosis was induced by injections of carbon tetrachloride (1.4 mL CCl4 per kg bodyweight and week, for 3 or 6 weeks in BALB/cJ mice. Chronic sclerosing cholangitis was mimicked using the ATP-binding cassette transporter B4 knockout (Abcb4 -/- mouse model. Untreated BALB/cJ mice served as controls. To assess hepatic fibrosis, we ascertained collagen contents and fibrosis scores after Sirius red staining. T1 and T2⁎ correlate differently to disease severity and etiology of liver fibrosis. T2⁎ shows significant decrease correlating with fibrosis in CCl4 treated animals, while demonstrating significant increase with disease severity in Abcb4 -/- mice. Measurements of T1 and T2⁎ may therefore facilitate discrimination between different stages and causes of liver fibrosis.

  6. Cryo-imaging of fluorescently labeled single cells in a mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Grant J.; Roy, Debashish; Salvado, Olivier; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a cryo-imaging system to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse, with particular applicability to stem cells and metastatic cancer. The Case cryoimaging system consists of a fluorescence microscope, robotic imaging positioner, customized cryostat, PC-based control system, and visualization/analysis software. The system alternates between sectioning (10-40 μm) and imaging, collecting color brightfield and fluorescent blockface image volumes >60GB. In mouse experiments, we imaged quantum-dot labeled stem cells, GFP-labeled cancer and stem cells, and cell-size fluorescent microspheres. To remove subsurface fluorescence, we used a simplified model of light-tissue interaction whereby the next image was scaled, blurred, and subtracted from the current image. We estimated scaling and blurring parameters by minimizing entropy of subtracted images. Tissue specific attenuation parameters were found [uT : heart (267 +/- 47.6 μm), liver (218 +/- 27.1 μm), brain (161 +/- 27.4 μm)] to be within the range of estimates in the literature. "Next image" processing removed subsurface fluorescence equally well across multiple tissues (brain, kidney, liver, adipose tissue, etc.), and analysis of 200 microsphere images in the brain gave 97+/-2% reduction of subsurface fluorescence. Fluorescent signals were determined to arise from single cells based upon geometric and integrated intensity measurements. Next image processing greatly improved axial resolution, enabled high quality 3D volume renderings, and improved enumeration of single cells with connected component analysis by up to 24%. Analysis of image volumes identified metastatic cancer sites, found homing of stem cells to injury sites, and showed microsphere distribution correlated with blood flow patterns. We developed and evaluated cryo-imaging to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse. Our cryo-imaging system provides extreme (>60GB), micron

  7. Loss of lysosomal membrane protein NCU-G1 in mice results in spontaneous liver fibrosis with accumulation of lipofuscin and iron in Kupffer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Y. Kong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Human kidney predominant protein, NCU-G1, is a highly conserved protein with an unknown biological function. Initially described as a nuclear protein, it was later shown to be a bona fide lysosomal integral membrane protein. To gain insight into the physiological function of NCU-G1, mice with no detectable expression of this gene were created using a gene-trap strategy, and Ncu-g1gt/gt mice were successfully characterized. Lysosomal disorders are mainly caused by lack of or malfunctioning of proteins in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway. The clinical symptoms vary, but often include liver dysfunction. Persistent liver damage activates fibrogenesis and, if unremedied, eventually leads to liver fibrosis/cirrhosis and death. We demonstrate that the disruption of Ncu-g1 results in spontaneous liver fibrosis in mice as the predominant phenotype. Evidence for an increased rate of hepatic cell death, oxidative stress and active fibrogenesis were detected in Ncu-g1gt/gt liver. In addition to collagen deposition, microscopic examination of liver sections revealed accumulation of autofluorescent lipofuscin and iron in Ncu-g1gt/gt Kupffer cells. Because only a few transgenic mouse models have been identified with chronic liver injury and spontaneous liver fibrosis development, we propose that the Ncu-g1gt/gt mouse could be a valuable new tool in the development of novel treatments for the attenuation of fibrosis due to chronic liver damage.

  8. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: from genoma to liver disease. PiZ mouse as model for the development of liver pathology in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannoni, Isabella; Callea, Francesco; Stefanelli, Marta; Mariani, Riccardo; Santorelli, Filippo M; Francalanci, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Homozygous individuals with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) type PiZ have an increased risk of chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is noteworthy that HCCs are composed by hepatocytes without accumulation of AAT, but the reason for this remains unclear. The aim of this study was to determine liver pathology in PiZ mice, focusing the attention on the distribution of AAT globules in normal liver, regenerative foci and neoplastic nodules. Liver of 79 PiZ mice and 18 wild type (Wt) was histologically analysed for steatosis, clear cell foci, hyperplasia and neoplasia. The expression of human-AAT transgene and murine AAT, in non-neoplastic liver and in hyperplastic/neoplastic nodules was tested by qPCR and qRT-PCR. RT-PCR was used to study expression of hepatic markers: albumin, α-foetoprotein, transthyretin, AAT, glucose-6-phospate, tyrosine aminotransferase. Liver pathology was seen more frequently in PiZ (47/79) than in Wt (5/18) and its development was age related. In older PiZ mice (18-24 m), livers showed malignant tumours (HCC and angiosarcoma) (17/50), hyperplastic nodules (28/50), non-specific changes (33/50), whereas only 9/50 were normal. Both human-AATZ DNA and mRNA showed no differences between tumours/nodules and normal liver, while murine-AAT mRNA was reduced in tumours/nodules. Accumulation of AAT is associated with an increased risk of liver nodules. The presence of globule-devoid hepatocytes and the reduced expression of murine-AAT mRNA in hyperplastic and neoplastic nodules suggest that these hepatic lesions in AATD could originate from proliferating dedifferentiated cells, lacking AAT storage and becoming capable of AFP re-expression. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Substrate stiffness and matrix composition coordinately control the differentiation of liver progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourouklis, Andreas P; Kaylan, Kerim B; Underhill, Gregory H

    2016-08-01

    Recent approaches have utilized microfabricated platforms to examine combinations of microenvironmental signals that regulate stem and progenitor cell differentiation. However, the majority of these efforts have focused on the biochemical properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) or soluble factors without simultaneously exploring the biomechanical effects of cell-substrate interactions. To address this need, we combined a high-throughput approach for the analysis of combinatorial ECM cues with substrates of modular stiffness and traction force microscopy. This integrated approach enabled the characterization of cell-generated traction stress and phenotypic expression in response to ECM cues. We investigated the impact of substrate stiffness and ECM composition on the differentiation of bipotential mouse embryonic liver (BMEL) progenitor cells. We observed that hepatocyte differentiation was primarily regulated by ECM composition, and cholangiocyte differentiation was cooperatively influenced by ECM proteins and stiffness properties. In particular, stiffness-mediated cholangiocyte differentiation was observed for cells cultured on fibronectin, while collagen IV promoted differentiation independent of substrate stiffness. We demonstrated the influence of cell contractility and traction stress in early cholangiocyte specification and further uncovered the roles of ERK and ROCK in this differentiation process. Overall, these findings illustrate the involvement of biomechanical signals in liver progenitor differentiation. Further, this approach could enable investigations for a broad range of cell types and ECM proteins, providing an integrated platform for evaluating the combinatorial effects of biochemical and biophysical signals in cell differentiation.

  10. Bromopropylate: induction of hepatic cytochromes P450 and absence of covalent binding to DNA in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, H; Sagelsdorff, P; Molitor, E; Skripsky, T; Waechter, F

    1994-11-01

    Oral administration of benzilic acid ester-based acaricide bromopropylate at daily doses of 3, 15, 100, and 300 mg/kg body wt to young adult male Tif:MAGf mice for 14 days caused slightly increased liver weights in the high-dose group. A dose-dependent increase of the microsomal cytochrome P450 content was accompanied by elevated ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, pentoxyresorufin O-depentylase, and total testosterone hydroxylase activities. When compared with mice treated in parallel with the model compounds for hepatic xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme induction, phenobarbitone, and 3-methylcholanthrene, the enzyme activity changes observed with bromopropylate largely equalled those expressed in phenobarbitone-treated mice. Immunochemical studies with monoclonal antibodies against rat liver cytochrome P450 isoenzymes of the gene families 1A, 2B, 3A, and 4A confirmed that bromopropylate is a phenobarbitone-type inducer in the mouse liver. Titration of liver microsomal suspensions with bromopropylate yielded Type I substrate binding spectra. The specific amplitude was increased 1.5-fold when microsomes from bromopropylate-treated mice (300 mg/kg body wt) were used instead of control microsomes, indicating the induction of cytochromes P450 catalyzing the oxidative metabolism of the test compound. Single oral administration of 300 mg/kg body wt [14C]bromopropylate to male mice, without or following pretreatment for 14 days with 300 mg/kg body wt unlabeled bromopropylate, gave no indication for DNA binding of the test compound in the liver. This excludes a genotoxic potential via covalent DNA modification. The results suggest that, in analogy to phenobarbitone, bromopropylate acts as a tumor promotor rather than a tumor initiator in the mouse liver.

  11. MBD3 inhibits formation of liver cancer stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruizhi; He, Qihua; Han, Shuo; Zhang, Mingzhi; Liu, Jinwen; Su, Ming; Wei, Shiruo; Wang, Xuan; Shen, Li

    2017-01-01

    Liver cancer cells can be reprogrammed into induced cancer stem cells (iCSCs) by exogenous expression of the reprogramming transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (OSKM). The nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex is essential for reprogramming somatic cells. In this study, we investigated the function of NuRD in the induction of liver CSCs. We showed that suppression of methyl-CpG binding domain protein 3 (MBD3), a core subunit of the NuRD repressor complex, together with OSKM transduction, induces conversion of liver cancer cells into stem-like cells. Expression of the transcription factor c-JUN is increased in MBD3-depleted iCSCs, and c-JUN activates endogenous pluripotent genes and regulates iCSC-related genes. These results indicate that MBD3/NuRD inhibits the induction of iCSCs, while c-JUN facilitates the generation of CSC-like properties. The iCSC reprogramming approach devised here provides a novel platform for dissection of the disordered signaling in liver CSCs. In addition, our results indicate that c-JUN may serve as a potential target for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27894081

  12. Mathematical modelling of cell aggregation in liver tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Green, John Edward E.

    2006-01-01

    A promising method for growing functional liver tissue in vitro involves culturing hepatocytes as spheroidal cell aggregates. In this thesis, we develop mathematical models of cell aggregation, and use them to determine how hepatocytes' interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM) on which they are seeded, and with stellate cells, affect the process. Chapters 2-4 focus on the effect that cell-ECM coupling has on the aggregation process. We use a novel formulation that couples a mechani...

  13. Notch Signaling Contributes to Liver Inflammation by Regulation of Interleukin-22-Producing Cells in Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Jiu-Ping; Hao, Chun-Qiu; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Lin-Xu; Huang, Chang-Xing; Bai, Xue-Fan; Lian, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) induced liver inflammation is not fully elucidated. Notch signaling augmented interleukin (IL)-22 secretion in CD4+ T cells, and Notch-IL-22 axis fine-tuned inflammatory response. We previously demonstrated a proinflammatory role of IL-22 in HBV infection. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the role of Notch in development of IL-22-producing cells in HBV infection by inhibition of Notch signaling using γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT in both hydrodynamic induced HBV-infected mouse model and in peripheral blood cells isolated from patients with HBV infection. mRNA expressions of Notch1 and Notch2 were significantly increased in livers and CD4+ T cells upon HBV infection. Inhibition of Notch signaling in vivo leaded to the reduction in NKp46+ innate lymphoid cells 22 (ILC22) and lymphoid tissue inducer 4 (LTi4) cells in the liver. This process was accompanied by downregulating the expressions of IL-22 and related proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the liver, as well as blocking the recruitment of antigen-non-specific inflammatory cells into the liver and subsequent liver injury, but did not affect HBV antigens production and IL-22 secretion in the serum. Furthermore, IL-22 production in HBV non-specific cultured CD4+ T cells, but not HBV-specific CD4+ T cells, was reduced in response to in vitro inhibition of Notch signaling. In conclusion, Notch siganling appears to be an important mediator of the liver inflammation by modulating hepatic ILC22. The potential proinflammatory effect of Notch-mediated ILC22 may be significant for the development of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of hepatitis B.

  14. Notch Signaling Contributes to Liver Inflammation by Regulation of Interleukin-22-Producing Cells in Hepatitis B Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Jiu-Ping; Hao, Chun-Qiu; Yang, Xiao-Fei; Wang, Lin-Xu; Huang, Chang-Xing; Bai, Xue-Fan; Lian, Jian-Qi; Zhang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of hepatitis B virus (HBV) induced liver inflammation is not fully elucidated. Notch signaling augmented interleukin (IL)-22 secretion in CD4(+) T cells, and Notch-IL-22 axis fine-tuned inflammatory response. We previously demonstrated a proinflammatory role of IL-22 in HBV infection. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the role of Notch in development of IL-22-producing cells in HBV infection by inhibition of Notch signaling using γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT in both hydrodynamic induced HBV-infected mouse model and in peripheral blood cells isolated from patients with HBV infection. mRNA expressions of Notch1 and Notch2 were significantly increased in livers and CD4(+) T cells upon HBV infection. Inhibition of Notch signaling in vivo leaded to the reduction in NKp46(+) innate lymphoid cells 22 (ILC22) and lymphoid tissue inducer 4 (LTi4) cells in the liver. This process was accompanied by downregulating the expressions of IL-22 and related proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the liver, as well as blocking the recruitment of antigen-non-specific inflammatory cells into the liver and subsequent liver injury, but did not affect HBV antigens production and IL-22 secretion in the serum. Furthermore, IL-22 production in HBV non-specific cultured CD4(+) T cells, but not HBV-specific CD4(+) T cells, was reduced in response to in vitro inhibition of Notch signaling. In conclusion, Notch siganling appears to be an important mediator of the liver inflammation by modulating hepatic ILC22. The potential proinflammatory effect of Notch-mediated ILC22 may be significant for the development of new therapeutic approaches for treatment of hepatitis B.

  15. Toxicogenomic Dissection of the Perfluorooctanoic Acid Transcript Profile in Mouse Liver: Evidence for Involvement of the Nuclear Receptors PPARα and CAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of perfluorinated alkyl acids including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) elicit effects similar to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) in mouse and rat liver. There is strong evidence that PPC cause many of their effects related to liver carcinogenesis through the nucle...

  16. Toxicogenomic Dissection of the Perfluorooctanoic Acid Transcript Profile in Mouse Liver: Evidence for the Involvement of Nuclear Receptors PPARα and CAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of perfluorinated alkyl acids including perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) elicit effects similar to peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) in mouse and rat liver. There is strong evidence that PPC cause many of their effects linked to liver cancer through the nuclear recep...

  17. Alcohol-induced steatosis in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol-induced fatty liver (steatosis) was believed to result from excessive generation of reducing equivalents from ethanol metabolism, thereby enhancing fat accumulation. Recent findings have revealed a more complex picture in which ethanol oxidation is still required,but specific transcription as well as humoral factors also have important roles. Transcription factors involved include the sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1)which is activated to induce genes that regulate lipid biosynthesis. Conversely, ethanol consumption causes a general down-regulation of lipid (fatty acid) oxidation, a reflection of inactivation of the peroxisome proliferatoractivated receptor-alpha (PPAR-α) that regulates genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. A third transcription factor is the early growth response-1 (Egr-1), which is strongly induced prior to the onset of steatosis. The activities of all these factors are governed by that of the principal regulatory enzyme, AMP kinase. Important humoral factors, including adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α), also regulate alcohol-induced steatosis. Their levels are affected by alcohol consumption and by each other. This review will summarize the actions of these proteins in ethanol-elicited fatty liver. Because steatosis is now regarded as a significant risk factor for advanced liver pathology, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms in its etiology is essential for development of effective therapies.

  18. Epigenetic effects of the continuous exposure to peroxisome proliferator WY-14,643 in mouse liver are dependent upon peroxisome proliferator activated receptor {alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogribny, Igor P.; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Woods, Courtney G. [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); Witt, Sarah E. [Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Rusyn, Ivan [Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States)], E-mail: iir@unc.edu

    2007-12-01

    Peroxisome proliferators are potent rodent liver carcinogens that act via a non-genotoxic mechanism. The mode of action of these agents in rodent liver includes increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis, secondary oxidative stress and other events; however, it is not well understood how peroxisome proliferators are triggering the plethora of the molecular signals leading to cancer. Epigenetic changes have been implicated in the mechanism of liver carcinogenesis by a number of environmental agents. Short-term treatment with peroxisome proliferators and other non-genotoxic carcinogens leads to global and locus-specific DNA hypomethylation in mouse liver, events that were suggested to correlate with a burst of cell proliferation. In the current study, we investigated the effects of long-term exposure to a model peroxisome proliferator WY-14,643 on DNA and histone methylation. Male SV129 mice were fed a control or WY-14,643-containing (1000 ppm) diet for one week, five weeks or five months. Treatment with WY-14,643 led to progressive global hypomethylation of liver DNA as determined by an HpaII-based cytosine extension assay with the maximum effect reaching over 200% at five months. Likewise, trimethylation of histone H4 lysine 20 and H3 lysine 9 was significantly decreased at all time points. The majority of cytosine methylation in mammals resides in repetitive DNA sequences. In view of this, we measured the effect of WY-14,643 on the methylation status of major and minor satellites, as well as in IAP, LINE1 and LINE2 elements in liver DNA. Exposure to WY-14,643 resulted in a gradual loss of cytosine methylation in major and minor satellites, IAP, LINE1 and LINE2 elements. The epigenetic changes correlated with the temporal effects of WY-14,643 on cell proliferation rates in liver, but no sustained effect on (c-Myc) promoter methylation was observed. Finally, WY-14,643 had no effect on DNA and histone methylation status in Ppar{alpha}-null mice at any of the

  19. Intrahepatic Infiltrating NK and CD8 T Cells Cause Liver Cell Death in Different Phases of Dengue Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Jui-Min Sung; Chien-Kuo Lee; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated liver enzyme level is an outstanding feature in patients with dengue. However, the pathogenic mechanism of liver injury has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, employing a mouse model we aimed to investigate the immunopathogenic mechanism of dengue liver injury. Immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were infected intravenously with dengue virus strain 16681. Infected mice had transient viremia, detectable viral capsid gene and cleaved caspase 3 in the liver. In the mean time, NK cel...

  20. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald; Gretz, Norbert; Dooley, Steven; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Rudovich, Natalia

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expression of IDE in subjects with T2DM. HepG2 cells were treated with 10 nM insulin for 24 h with or without inhibition of IDE activity using IDE RNAi, and cell transcriptome and proliferation rate were analyzed. Human liver samples (n = 22) were used for the gene expression profiling by microarrays. In HepG2 cells, IDE knockdown changed expression of genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis pathways. Proliferation rate was lower in IDE knockdown cells than in controls. Microarray analysis revealed the decrease of hepatic IDE expression in subjects with T2DM accompanied by the downregulation of the p53-dependent genes FAS and CCNG2, but not by the upregulation of proliferation markers MKI67, MCM2 and PCNA. Similar results were found in the liver microarray dataset from GEO Profiles database. In conclusion, IDE expression is decreased in liver of subjects with T2DM which is accompanied by the dysregulation of p53 pathway. Prolonged use of IDE inhibitors for T2DM treatment should be carefully tested in animal studies regarding its potential effect on hepatic tumorigenesis.

  1. Effect of endothelial progenitor cell on hematopoietic reconstitution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    化静

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) on hematopoietic reconsititution in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) mouse model.Methods Allo-HSCT mouse model was established with condition of BU/CY,in which C57BL/6 (H-2b) and BABL/c (H-2d) mice were used

  2. Endothelial cell promotion of early liver and pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Deborah A; Kashima, Yasushige; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01

    Different steps of embryonic pancreas and liver development require inductive signals from endothelial cells. During liver development, interactions between newly specified hepatic endoderm cells and nascent endothelial cells are crucial for the endoderm's subsequent growth and morphogenesis into a liver bud. Reconstitution of endothelial cell stimulation of hepatic cell growth with embryonic tissue explants demonstrated that endothelial signalling occurs independent of the blood supply. During pancreas development, midgut endoderm interactions with aortic endothelial cells induce Ptf1a, a crucial pancreatic determinant. Endothelial cells also have a later effect on pancreas development, by promoting survival of the dorsal mesenchyme, which in turn produces factors supporting pancreatic endoderm. A major goal of our laboratory is to determine the endothelial-derived molecules involved in these inductive events. Our data show that cultured endothelial cells induce Ptf1a in dorsal endoderm explants lacking an endogenous vasculature. We are purifying endothelial cell line product(s) responsible for this effect. We are also identifying endothelial-responsive regulatory elements in genes such as Ptf1a by genetic mapping and chromatin-based assays. These latter approaches will allow us to track endothelial-responsive signal pathways from DNA targets within progenitor cells. The diversity of organogenic steps dependent upon endothelial cell signalling suggests that cross-regulation of tissue development with its vasculature is a general phenomenon.

  3. [Hepatic cell transplantation: a new therapy in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Eugenia; Cortés, Miriam; Martínez, Amparo; Vila, Juan José; López, Rafael; Montalvá, Eva; Calzado, Angeles; Mir, José

    2010-07-01

    Liver transplantation has been remarkably effective in the treatment in patients with end-stage liver disease. However, disparity between solid-organ supply and increased demand is the greatest limitation, resulting in longer waiting times and increase in mortality of transplant recipients. This situation creates the need to seek alternatives to orthotopic liver transplantation.Hepatocyte transplantation or liver cell transplantation has been proposed as the best method to support patients. The procedure consists of transplanting individual cells to a recipient organ in sufficient quantity to survive and restore the function. The capacity of hepatic regeneration is the biological basis of hepatocyte transplantation. This therapeutic option is an experimental procedure in some patients with inborn errors of metabolism, fulminant hepatic failure and acute and chronic liver failure, as a bridge to orthotopic liver transplantation. In the Hospital La Fe of Valencia, we performed the first hepatocyte transplantation in Spain creating a new research work on transplant program. Copyright 2009 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Acrolein, a highly toxic aldehyde generated under oxidative stress in vivo, aggravates the mouse liver damage after acetaminophen overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tomoya; Koyama, Ryo; Yuasa, Makoto; Kitamura, Daisuke; Mizuta, Ryushin

    2014-01-01

    Although acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice has been extensively studied as a model of human acute drug-induced hepatitis, the mechanism of liver injury remains unclear. Liver injury is believed to be initiated by metabolic conversion of acetaminophen to the highly reactive intermediate N-acetyl p-benzoquinoneimine, and is aggravated by subsequent oxidative stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the hydroxyl radical (•OH). In this study, we found that a highly toxic unsaturated aldehyde acrolein, a byproduct of oxidative stress, has a major role in acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Acetaminophen administration in mice resulted in liver damage and increased acrolein-protein adduct formation. However, both of them were decreased by treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MESNA), two known acrolein scavengers. The specificity of NAC and MESNA was confirmed in cell culture, because acrolein toxicity, but not H2O2 or •OH toxicity, was inhibited by NAC and MESNA. These results suggest that acrolein may be more strongly correlated with acetaminophen-induced liver injury than ROS, and that acrolein produced by acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress can spread from dying cells at the primary injury site, causing damage to the adjacent cells and aggravating liver injury.

  5. Role of farnesoid X receptor in establishment of ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing enzyme genes in mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lai; Piekos, Stephanie; Guo, Grace L; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2016-09-01

    The expression of phase-I drug metabolizing enzymes in liver changes dramatically during postnatal liver maturation. Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is critical for bile acid and lipid homeostasis in liver. However, the role of FXR in regulating ontogeny of phase-I drug metabolizing genes is not clear. Hence, we applied RNA-sequencing to quantify the developmental expression of phase-I genes in both Fxr-null and control (C57BL/6) mouse livers during development. Liver samples of male C57BL/6 and Fxr-null mice at 6 different ages from prenatal to adult were used. The Fxr-null showed an overall effect to diminish the "day-1 surge" of phase-I gene expression, including cytochrome P450s at neonatal ages. Among the 185 phase-I genes from 12 different families, 136 were expressed, and differential expression during development occurred in genes from all 12 phase-I families, including hydrolysis: carboxylesterase (Ces), paraoxonase (Pon), and epoxide hydrolase (Ephx); reduction: aldoketo reductase (Akr), quinone oxidoreductase (Nqo), and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (Dpyd); and oxidation: alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh), aldehyde dehydrogenase (Aldh), flavin monooxygenases (Fmo), molybdenum hydroxylase (Aox and Xdh), cytochrome P450 (P450), and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (Por). The data also suggested new phase-I genes potentially targeted by FXR. These results revealed an important role of FXR in regulation of ontogeny of phase-I genes.

  6. Culture of Mouse Neural Stem Cell Precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Currle, D. Spencer; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Monuki, Edwin S

    2007-01-01

    Primary neural stem cell cultures are useful for studying the mechanisms underlying central nervous system development. Stem cell research will increase our understanding of the nervous system and may allow us to develop treatments for currently incurable brain diseases and injuries. In addition, stem cells should be used for stem cell research aimed at the detailed study of mechanisms of neural differentiation and transdifferentiation and the genetic and environmental signals that direct the...

  7. Cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia L Bordiuk

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis, the formation of new neurons, can be observed in the adult brain of many mammalian species, including humans. Despite significant progress in our understanding of adult neurogenesis, we are still missing data about the extent and location of production of neural precursors in the adult mammalian brain. We used 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU to map the location of proliferating cells throughout the entire adult mouse brain and found that neurogenesis occurs at two locations in the mouse brain. The larger one we define as the main proliferative zone (MPZ, and the smaller one corresponds to the subgranular zone of the hippocampus. The MPZ can be divided into three parts. The caudate migratory stream (CMS occupies the middle part of the MPZ. The cable of proliferating cells emanating from the most anterior part of the CMS toward the olfactory bulbs forms the rostral migratory stream. The thin layer of proliferating cells extending posteriorly from the CMS forms the midlayer. We have not found any additional aggregations of proliferating cells in the adult mouse brain that could suggest the existence of other major neurogenic zones in the adult mouse brain.

  8. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  9. Activation of cellular immunity and marked inhibition of liver cancer in a mouse model following gene therapy and tumor expression of GM-SCF, IL-21, and Rae-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mingrong; Zhi, Kangkang; Gao, Xiaoyan; He, Bing; Li, Yingchun; Han, Jiang; Zhang, Zhiping; Wu, Yan

    2013-12-18

    Cancer is both a systemic and a genetic disease. The pathogenesis of cancer might be related to dampened immunity. Host immunity recognizes nascent malignant cells - a process referred to as immune surveillance. Augmenting immune surveillance and suppressing immune escape are crucial in tumor immunotherapy. A recombinant plasmid capable of co-expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony- stimulating factor (GM-SCF), interleukin-21 (IL-21), and retinoic acid early transcription factor-1 (Rae-1) was constructed, and its effects determined in a mouse model of subcutaneous liver cancer. Serum specimens were assayed for IL-2 and INF-γ by ELISA. Liver cancer specimens were isolated for Rae-1 expression by RT-PCR and Western blot, and splenocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry. The recombinant plasmid inhibited the growth of liver cancer and prolonged survival of tumor-loaded mice. Activation of host immunity might have contributed to this effect by promoting increased numbers and cytotoxicity of natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) following expression of GM-SCF, IL-21, and Rae-1. By contrast, the frequency of regulatory T cells was decreased, Consequently, activated CTL and NK cells enhanced their secretion of INF-γ, which promoted cytotoxicity of NK cells and CTL. Moreover, active CTL showed dramatic secretion of IL-2, which stimulates CTL. The recombinant expression plasmid also augmented Rae-1 expression by liver cancer cells. Rae-1 receptor expressing CTL and NK cells removed liver cancer. The recombinant expression plasmid inhibited liver cancer by a mechanism that involved activation of cell-mediated immunity and Rae-1 in liver cancer.

  10. Testosterone differentially regulates targets of lipid and glucose metabolism in liver, muscle and adipose tissues of the testicular feminised mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel M; Akhtar, Samia; Sellers, Donna J; Muraleedharan, Vakkat; Channer, Kevin S; Jones, T Hugh

    2016-11-01

    Testosterone deficiency is commonly associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes and their clinical consequences-hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. The testicular feminised mouse (non-functional androgen receptor and low testosterone) develops fatty liver and aortic lipid streaks on a high-fat diet, whereas androgen-replete XY littermate controls do not. Testosterone treatment ameliorates these effects, although the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. We compared the influence of testosterone on the expression of regulatory targets of glucose, cholesterol and lipid metabolism in muscle, liver, abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. Testicular feminised mice displayed significantly reduced GLUT4 in muscle and glycolytic enzymes in muscle, liver and abdominal subcutaneous but not visceral adipose tissue. Lipoprotein lipase required for fatty acid uptake was only reduced in subcutaneous adipose tissue; enzymes of fatty acid synthesis were increased in liver and subcutaneous tissue. Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 that catalyses oleic acid synthesis and is associated with insulin resistance was increased in visceral adipose tissue and cholesterol efflux components (ABCA1, apoE) were decreased in subcutaneous and liver tissue. Master regulator nuclear receptors involved in metabolism-Liver X receptor expression was suppressed in all tissues except visceral adipose tissue, whereas PPARγ was lower in abdominal subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue and PPARα only in abdominal subcutaneous. Testosterone treatment improved the expression (androgen receptor independent) of some targets but not all. These exploratory data suggest that androgen deficiency may reduce the buffering capability for glucose uptake and utilisation in abdominal subcutaneous and muscle and fatty acids in abdominal subcutaneous. This would lead to an overspill and uptake of excess glucose and triglycerides into visceral adipose tissue, liver and arterial walls.

  11. The effect of Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract on liver starch and liver cell morphous of sports fatigue rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; LI Rui; JI Chen-feng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To inspect the effect of Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract to the swimming time and content of liver starch and liver cells morphous of sports fatigue rat. Methods Using weight loading swimming to determine swimming time, using kits to determine liver starch, using transmission electron microscope to observe the diversify of rat liver ceils morphous and construction. Results To compare with negative control group, the Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract can obviously extend survival time of swimming rat, increase the content of liver starch. Conclusions Sachalin rhodiola rhizome extract can raise the staying power of sports fatigue rat, strengthen sport ability and play a part in antifatigue by increasing the content of liver starch and protecting liver cells of sports fatigue rat.

  12. Cell type-specific and common characteristics of exosomes derived from mouse cell lines: Yield, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charoenviriyakul, Chonlada; Takahashi, Yuki; Morishita, Masaki; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles secreted from cells and are expected to be used as drug delivery systems. Important characteristics of exosomes, such as yield, physicochemical properties, and pharmacokinetics, may be different among different cell types. However, there is limited information about the effect of cell type on these characteristics. In the present study, we evaluated these characteristics of exosomes derived from five different types of mouse cell lines: B16BL6 murine melanoma cells, C2C12 murine myoblast cells, NIH3T3 murine fibroblasts cells, MAEC murine aortic endothelial cells, and RAW264.7 murine macrophage-like cells. Exosomes were collected using a differential ultracentrifugation method. The exosomes collected from all the cell types were negatively charged globular vesicles with a diameter of approximately 100nm. C2C12 and RAW264.7 cells produced more exosomes than the other types of cells. The exosomes were labeled with a fusion protein of Gaussia luciferase and lactadherin to evaluate their pharmacokinetics. After intravenous injection into mice, all the exosomes rapidly disappeared from the systemic circulation and mainly distributed to the liver. In conclusion, the exosome yield was significantly different among the cell types, and all the exosomes evaluated in this study showed comparable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties.

  13. Global MicroRNA Expression Profiling of Mouse Livers following Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury at Different Stages.

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    Weisheng Zheng

    Full Text Available Hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury is a dynamic process consisting of two stages: ischemia and reperfusion, and triggers a cascade of physiological and biochemical events. Given the important role of microRNAs in regulating gene expression, we analyzed gene expression changes in mouse livers at sham control, ischemia stage, and reperfusion stage. We generated global expression profiles of microRNA and mRNA genes in mouse livers subjected to ischemia-reperfusion injury at the three stages, respectively. Comparison analysis showed that reperfusion injury had a distinct expression profile whereas the ischemia sample and the sham control were clustered together. Consistently, there are 69 differentially expressed microRNAs between the reperfusion sample and the sham control whereas 28 differentially expressed microRNAs between the ischemia sample and the sham control. We further identified two modes of microRNA expression changes in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Functional analysis of both the differentially expressed microRNAs in the two modes and their target mRNAs revealed that ischemia injury impaired mitochondrial function, nutrient consumption, and metabolism process. In contrast, reperfusion injury led to severe tissue inflammation that is predominantly an innate-immune response in the ischemia-reperfusion process. Our staged analysis of gene expression profiles provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms of microRNAs in mouse hepatic IR injury.

  14. Stepwise development of MAIT cells in mouse and human.

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    Emmanuel Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells display two evolutionarily conserved features: an invariant T cell receptor (TCRalpha (iTCRalpha chain and restriction by the nonpolymorphic class Ib major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule, MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1. MR1 expression on thymus epithelial cells is not necessary for MAIT cell development but their accumulation in the gut requires MR1 expressing B cells and commensal flora. MAIT cell development is poorly known, as these cells have not been found in the thymus so far. Herein, complementary human and mouse experiments using an anti-humanValpha7.2 antibody and MAIT cell-specific iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic mice in different genetic backgrounds show that MAIT cell development is a stepwise process, with an intra-thymic selection followed by peripheral expansion. Mouse MAIT cells are selected in an MR1-dependent manner both in fetal thymic organ culture and in double iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic RAG knockout mice. In the latter mice, MAIT cells do not expand in the periphery unless B cells are added back by adoptive transfer, showing that B cells are not required for the initial thymic selection step but for the peripheral accumulation. In humans, contrary to natural killer T (NKT cells, MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype in the thymus as well as in cord blood where they are in low numbers. After birth, MAIT cells acquire a memory phenotype and expand dramatically, up to 1%-4% of blood T cells. Finally, in contrast with NKT cells, human MAIT cell development is independent of the molecular adaptor SAP. Interestingly, mouse MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype and do not express the ZBTB16 transcription factor, which, in contrast, is expressed by NKT cells and the memory human MAIT cells found in the periphery after birth. In conclusion, MAIT cells are selected by MR1 in the thymus on a non-B non-T hematopoietic cell, and acquire a memory phenotype and expand in the

  15. Differentiations of transplanted mouse spermatogonial stem cells in the adult mouse renal parenchyma in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-peng WU; Da-lin HE; Xiang LI; Zhao-hui LIU

    2008-01-01

    Aim:Spermatogonial stem cells can initiate the process of cellular differentia-tion to generate mature spermatozoa, but whether it possess the characteristic of pluripotency and plasticity, similar to embryonic stem cells, has not been elucidated. This study was designed to evaluate the differentiation potential of spermatogonial stem cells into renal cells in vivo. Methods: Neonatal mouse spermatogonial stem cells were transplanted into mature male mice lacking en-dogenous spermatogenesis. The restoration of fertility in recipient males was observed. Spermatogonial stem cells were then injected into renal parenchyma of mature female mice to make a new extracellular environment for differentia-tion. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technology (FISH) was used to detect the expression of chromosome Y in recipient renal tissues. To determine the type of cells differentiated from spermatogonial stem cells, the expression of ricinus communis agglutinin, vimentin, CD45, and F4/80 proteins were examined in the renal tissues by immunohistochemistry. Results: The proliferation of seminiferous epithelial cells was distinctly observed in seminiferous tubules of transplanted testes, whereas no regeneration of spermatogenesis was observed in non-transplanted control testes. In transplanted female renal tissues, FISH showed a much stronger immuno-fluorescence signal of chromosome Y in the nucleolus of epithelial cells of the renal tubule and podocytes of the glomerulus. Conclusion: The spermatogonial stem cells were successfully purified from mouse testicles. This finding demonstrated that spermatogonial stem cells could not only restore damaged spermatogenesis, but were also capable of differentiat-ing into mature renal parenchyma cells in vivo.

  16. Hypercholesterolemia Induces Differentiation of Regulatory T Cells in the Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailer, Reiner K W; Gisterå, Anton; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Ketelhuth, Daniel F J; Hansson, Göran K

    2017-05-26

    The liver is the central organ that responds to dietary cholesterol intake and facilitates the release and clearance of lipoprotein particles. Persistent hypercholesterolemia leads to immune responses against lipoprotein particles that drive atherosclerosis. However, the effect of hypercholesterolemia on hepatic T-cell differentiation remains unknown. To investigate hepatic T-cell subsets upon hypercholesterolemia. We observed that hypercholesterolemia elevated the intrahepatic regulatory T (Treg) cell population and increased the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 in the liver. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that intrahepatically differentiated Treg cells relocated to the inflamed aorta in atherosclerosis-prone low-density lipoprotein receptor deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice. Moreover, hypercholesterolemia induced the differentiation of intrahepatic, but not intrasplenic, Th17 cells in wild-type mice, whereas the disrupted liver homeostasis in hypercholesterolemic Ldlr(-/-) mice led to intrahepatic Th1 cell differentiation and CD11b(+)CD11c(+) leukocyte accumulation. Our results elucidate a new mechanism that controls intrahepatic T-cell differentiation during atherosclerosis development and indicates that intrahepatically differentiated T cells contribute to the CD4(+) T-cell pool in the atherosclerotic aorta. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Antimutagenic Effects of Selenium-Enriched Polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana through Suppression of Cytochrome P450 1A Subfamily in the Mouse Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Peng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Both selenium (Se and polysaccharides from Pyracantha fortuneana (Maxim. Li (PFPs (P. fortuneana have been reported to possess antioxidative and immuno-protective activities. Whether or not Se-containing polysaccharides (Se-PFPs have synergistic effect of Se and polysaccharides on enhancing the antioxidant and immune activities remains to be determined. We previously reported that polysaccharides isolated from Se-enriched P. fortuneana (Se-PFPs possessed hepatoprotective effects. However, it is not clear whether or not they have anti-mutagenic effects. In the present study, we compared and evaluated anti-mutagenic effects of Se-PFPs at three concentrations (1.35, 2.7 and 5.4 g/kg body weight with those of PFPs, Se alone or Se + PFPs in mice using micronucleus assay in bone marrow and peripheral blood as well as mitomycin C-induced chromosomal aberrations in mouse testicular cells. We also elucidated the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that Se-PFPs inhibited cyclophosphamide (CP-induced micronucleus formation in both bone marrow and peripheral blood, enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx in mouse liver, and reduced the activity and expression of cytochrome P450 1A (CYP4501A in mouse liver in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we found that the anti-mutagenic potential of Se-PFPs was higher than those of PFPs, Se alone or Se + PFPs at the same level. These results suggest that the anti-mutagenic potential of Se-PFPs may be mediated through the inhibition of the activity and expression of CYP4501A. This study indicates that application of Se-PFPs may provide an alternative strategy for cancer therapy by targeting CYP1A family.

  18. The mouse liver displays daily rhythms in the metabolism of phospholipids and in the activity of lipid synthesizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorné, Lucas D; Acosta-Rodríguez, Victoria A; Pasquaré, Susana J; Salvador, Gabriela A; Giusto, Norma M; Guido, Mario Eduardo

    2015-02-01

    The circadian system involves central and peripheral oscillators regulating temporally biochemical processes including lipid metabolism; their disruption leads to severe metabolic diseases (obesity, diabetes, etc). Here, we investigated the temporal regulation of glycerophospholipid (GPL) synthesis in mouse liver, a well-known peripheral oscillator. Mice were synchronized to a 12:12 h light-dark (LD) cycle and then released to constant darkness with food ad libitum. Livers collected at different times exhibited a daily rhythmicity in some individual GPL content with highest levels during the subjective day. The activity of GPL-synthesizing/remodeling enzymes: phosphatidate phosphohydrolase 1 (PAP-1/lipin) and lysophospholipid acyltransferases (LPLATs) also displayed significant variations, with higher levels during the subjective day and at dusk. We evaluated the temporal regulation of expression and activity of phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesizing enzymes. PC is mainly synthesized through the Kennedy pathway with Choline Kinase (ChoK) as a key regulatory enzyme or through the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) N-methyltransferase (PEMT) pathway. The PC/PE content ratio exhibited a daily variation with lowest levels at night, while ChoKα and PEMT mRNA expression displayed maximal levels at nocturnal phases. Our results demonstrate that mouse liver GPL metabolism oscillates rhythmically with a precise temporal control in the expression and/or activity of specific enzymes.

  19. Chemotactic and inflammatory responses in the liver and brain are associated with pathogenesis of Rift Valley fever virus infection in the mouse.

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    Kimberly K Gray

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is a major human and animal pathogen associated with severe disease including hemorrhagic fever or encephalitis. RVFV is endemic to parts of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, but there is significant concern regarding its introduction into non-endemic regions and the potentially devastating effect to livestock populations with concurrent infections of humans. To date, there is little detailed data directly comparing the host response to infection with wild-type or vaccine strains of RVFV and correlation with viral pathogenesis. Here we characterized clinical and systemic immune responses to infection with wild-type strain ZH501 or IND vaccine strain MP-12 in the C57BL/6 mouse. Animals infected with live-attenuated MP-12 survived productive viral infection with little evidence of clinical disease and minimal cytokine response in evaluated tissues. In contrast, ZH501 infection was lethal, caused depletion of lymphocytes and platelets and elicited a strong, systemic cytokine response which correlated with high virus titers and significant tissue pathology. Lymphopenia and platelet depletion were indicators of disease onset with indications of lymphocyte recovery correlating with increases in G-CSF production. RVFV is hepatotropic and in these studies significant clinical and histological data supported these findings; however, significant evidence of a pro-inflammatory response in the liver was not apparent. Rather, viral infection resulted in a chemokine response indicating infiltration of immunoreactive cells, such as neutrophils, which was supported by histological data. In brains of ZH501 infected mice, a significant chemokine and pro-inflammatory cytokine response was evident, but with little pathology indicating meningoencephalitis. These data suggest that RVFV pathogenesis in mice is associated with a loss of liver function due to liver necrosis and hepatitis yet the long-term course of disease for those that

  20. Liver cell adenoma with malignant transformation: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masahiro Ito; Makoto Sasaki; Chun-Yang Wen; Masahiro Nakashima; Toshihito Ueki; Hiromi Ishibashi; Michitami Yano; Masayoshi Kage; Masamichi Kojiro

    2003-01-01

    A 57-year-old woman was referred to our hospital because of a liver mass detected by computed tomography. She had taken oral contraceptives for only one month at the age of thirty. Physical examination revealed no abnormalities, and laboratory data, including hepatic function tests, were within the normal range, with the exception of elevated levels of those serum proteins induced by the absence of vitamin K or by raised levels of the antagonist (PIVKA)-Ⅱ (3 502 AU/ml).Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a hyperechoic mass measuring 10x10 cm in the left posterior segment of the liver. Because hepatocellular carcinoma could not be completely excluded, this mass was resected. The tumor consisted of sheets of uniform cells with clear cytoplasm,perinuclear eosinophilic granules and round nuclei. These histological findings were consistent with liver cell adenoma.Background hepatic tissue appeared normal. After resection of the tumor, serum PIVKA-Ⅱ fell to within the normal range.An area of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with a midtrabecular pattern was immunohistochemically found, which was positive for PIVKA-Ⅱ. Sinusoidal endothelial cells were CD34-positive, containing scattered PIVKA-Ⅱ positive cells.This tumor was therefore finally diagnosed as liver cell adenoma with focal malignant transformation to HCC.

  1. Subretinal transplantation of mouse retinal progenitor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caihui Jiang; Maonian Zhang; Henry Klassen; Michael Young

    2011-01-01

    The development of cell replacement techniques is promising as a potential treatment for photoreceptor loss. However, the limited integration ability of donor and recipient cells presents a challenge following transplantation. In the present study, retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) were harvested from the neural retinas of enhanced green fluorescent protein mice on postnatal day 1, and expanded in a neurobasal medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum without endothelial growth factor. Using a confocal microscope, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that expanded RPCs in vitro maintain retinal stem cell properties and can be differentiated into photoreceptor cells. Three weeks after transplantation, subretinal transplanted RPCs were found to have migrated and integrated into the outer nuclear layer of recipient retinas with laser injury, some of the integrated cells had differentiated into photoreceptors, and a subpopulation of these cells expressed photoreceptor specific synaptic protein, appearing to form synaptic connections with bipolar cells. These results suggest that subretinal transplantation of RPCs may provide a feasible therapeutic strategy for the loss of retinal photoreceptor cells.

  2. Liver involvement of Langerhans’ cell histiocytosis in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaoping; Han, Tong; Zai, Hongyan; Long, Xueying; Wang, Xiaoyi; Li, Wenzheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Liver involvement is relatively frequent in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH). Its features remain poorly defined. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out on 14 hepatic LCH children in our hospital. The Clinicopathological and radiological features of this disease was discussed. Results: The rate of liver involvement in children LCH patients is 51.9%. Majority of the patients were disseminated cases. Hepatomegaly was clinically confirmed in 11 cases (78.6%). Liver function dysfunction was seen in nine (64.3%) children. The association of multi-modal imaging significantly yielded more diagnostic information. There are some imaging characteristics of this disease, CT and MRI could help to assess the staging, extent of the hepatic lesions. We found that liver involvement had a significant impact on survival. Patients treated with systemic chemotherapy earlier from time of diagnosis had a relatively better outcome. Conclusions: The rate of liver involvement in children LCH patients maybe much higher than that of expected. We suggest that clinical and biological liver evaluation and abdominal imaging must be performed regularly onwards to screen every LCH children patient from the time of the initial diagnosis. Patient should be treated with systemic chemotherapy earlier. PMID:26221247

  3. Changes in liver cell DNA methylation status in diabetic mice affect its FT-IR characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedicto de Campos Vidal

    Full Text Available Lower levels of cytosine methylation have been found in the liver cell DNA from non-obese diabetic (NOD mice under hyperglycemic conditions. Because the Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR profiles of dry DNA samples are differently affected by DNA base composition, single-stranded form and histone binding, it is expected that the methylation status in the DNA could also affect its FT-IR profile.The DNA FT-IR signatures obtained from the liver cell nuclei of hyperglycemic and normoglycemic NOD mice of the same age were compared. Dried DNA samples were examined in an IR microspectroscope equipped with an all-reflecting objective (ARO and adequate software.Changes in DNA cytosine methylation levels induced by hyperglycemia in mouse liver cells produced changes in the respective DNA FT-IR profiles, revealing modifications to the vibrational intensities and frequencies of several chemical markers, including νas -CH3 stretching vibrations in the 5-methylcytosine methyl group. A smaller band area reflecting lower energy absorbed in the DNA was found in the hyperglycemic mice and assumed to be related to the lower levels of -CH3 groups. Other spectral differences were found at 1700-1500 cm(-1 and in the fingerprint region, and a slight change in the DNA conformation at the lower DNA methylation levels was suggested for the hyperglycemic mice. The changes that affect cytosine methylation levels certainly affect the DNA-protein interactions and, consequently, gene expression in liver cells from the hyperglycemic NOD mice.

  4. Methylthioadenosine (MTA) Regulates Liver Cells Proteome and Methylproteome: Implications in Liver Biology and Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigaud, Emilie; Corrales, Fernando J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), a key enzyme in the adenine and methionine salvage pathways, catalyzes the hydrolysis of methylthioadenosine (MTA), a compound suggested to affect pivotal cellular processes in part through the regulation of protein methylation. MTAP is expressed in a wide range of cell types and tissues, and its deletion is common to cancer cells and in liver injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteome and methyl proteome alterations triggered by MTAP deficiency in liver cells to define novel regulatory mechanisms that may explain the pathogenic processes of liver diseases. iTRAQ analysis resulted in the identification of 216 differential proteins (p MTA levels in SK-Hep1+ cells parallels the specific methylation of 56 proteins, including KRT8, TGF, and CTF8A, which provides a novel regulatory mechanism of their activity with potential implications in carcinogenesis. Inhibition of RNA-binding proteins methylation is especially relevant upon accumulation of MTA. As an example, methylation of quaking protein in Arg242 and Arg256 in SK-Hep1+ cells may play a pivotal role in the regulation of its activity as indicated by the up-regulation of its target protein p27kip1. The phenotype associated with a MTAP deficiency was further verified in the liver of MTAP± mice. Our data support that MTAP deficiency leads to MTA accumulation and deregulation of central cellular pathways, increasing proliferation and decreasing the susceptibility to chemotherapeutic drugs, which involves differential protein methylation. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002957 (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002957). PMID:26819315

  5. Human fetal liver stromal cells that overexpress bFGF support growth and maintenance of human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafei Xi

    Full Text Available In guiding hES cell technology toward the clinic, one key issue to be addressed is to culture and maintain hES cells much more safely and economically in large scale. In order to avoid using mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs we isolated human fetal liver stromal cells (hFLSCs from 14 weeks human fetal liver as new human feeder cells. hFLSCs feeders could maintain hES cells for 15 passages (about 100 days. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF is known to play an important role in promoting self-renewal of human embryonic stem (hES cells. So, we established transgenic hFLSCs that stably express bFGF by lentiviral vectors. These transgenic human feeder cells--bFGF-hFLSCs maintained the properties of H9 hES cells without supplementing with any exogenous growth factors. H9 hES cells culturing under these conditions maintained all hES cell features after prolonged culture, including the developmental potential to differentiate into representative tissues of all three embryonic germ layers, unlimited and undifferentiated proliferative ability, and maintenance of normal karyotype. Our results demonstrated that bFGF-hFLSCs feeder cells were central to establishing the signaling network among bFGF, insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2, and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, thereby providing the framework in which hES cells were instructed to self-renew or to differentiate. We also found that the conditioned medium of bFGF-hFLSCs could maintain the H9 hES cells under feeder-free conditions without supplementing with bFGF. Taken together, bFGF-hFLSCs had great potential as feeders for maintaining pluripotent hES cell lines more safely and economically.

  6. DIFFERENTIATION AND MALIGNANT SUPPRESSION INDUCED BY MOUSE ERYTHROID DIFFERENTIATION AND DENUCLEATION FACTOR ON MOUSE ERYTHROLEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩代书; 赵青; 葛晔华; 周建平; 马静; 陈克铨; 薛社普

    2002-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the roles of mouse erythroid differentiation and denueleation factor (MEDDF), a novel factor cloned in our laboratory recently, in erythroid terminal differentiation.Methods. Mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells were transfected with eukaryotic expression plasmid pcD-NA-MEDDF. Then we investigated the changes on characteristics of cell growth by analyzing cells growth rate,mitotic index and colony-forming rate in semi-solid medium. The expressions of c-myc and β-globin genes were analysed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR.Results. MEL ceils transfected with pcDNA-MEDDF showed significant lower growth rate, mitotic index,and colony-forming rate in semi-solid medium ( P<0.01 ). The percentage of benzidine-positive cells was 32.8% after transfection. The expression of β-globin in cells transfected with pcDNA-MEDDF was 3.43 times higher than that of control (MEL transfected with blank vector, pcDNA3. 1 ), and the expression of c-myc decreased by 66.3%.Conclusions. MEDDF can induce differentiation of MEL cell and suppress its malignancy.

  7. Liver stem cell-derived β-cell surrogates for treatment of type 1 diabetes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Consistent with the common embryonic origin of liver and pancreas as well the similar glucose-sensing systems in hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells, it should not be surprising that liver stem cells/hepatocytes can transdifferentiate into insulin-producing cells under high-glucose culture conditions or by genetic reprogramming. Persistent expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 (Pdx1) transcription factor or its super-active form Pdx1-VP16 fusion protein in hepatic cells reprograms these cells into pancreatic β-cell precursors. In vitro culture at elevated glucose concentrations or in vivo exposure to a hyperglycemia are required for further differentiation and maturation of liver-derived pancreatic β-cell precursor into functional insulin-producing pancreatic β-like cells. Under appropriate conditions, multiple pancreatic transcription factors can work in concert to reprogram liver stem/adult liver cells into functional insulin-producing cells. If such autologous liver-derived insulin-producing cells can be made to escape the type 1 diabetes-associated autoimmunity, they may serve as a valuable cell source for future cell replacement therapy without the need for life-long immunosuppression. PMID:16890895

  8. Transcriptomic responses to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD in liver: Comparison of rat and mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohjanvirta Raimo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse and rat models are mainstays in pharmacology, toxicology and drug development – but differences between strains and between species complicate data interpretation and application to human health. Dioxin-like polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons represent a major class of environmentally and economically relevant toxicants. In mammals dioxin exposure leads to a broad spectrum of adverse affects, including hepatotoxicity of varying severity. Several studies have shown that dioxins extensively alter hepatic mRNA levels. Surprisingly, though, analysis of a limited portion of the transcriptome revealed that rat and mouse responses diverge greatly (Boverhof et al. Toxicol Sci 94:398–416, 2006. Results We employed oligonucleotide arrays to compare the response of 8,125 rat and mouse orthologs. We confirmed that there is limited inter-species overlap in dioxin-responsive genes. Rat-specific and mouse-specific genes are enriched for specific functional groups which differ between species, conceivably accounting for species-specificities in liver histopathology. While no evidence for the involvement of copy-number variation was found, extensive inter-species variation in the transcriptional-regulatory network was identified; Nr2f1 and Fos emerged as candidates to explain species-specific and species-independent responses, respectively. Conclusion Our results suggest that a small core of genes is responsible for mediating the similar features of dioxin hepatotoxicity in rats and mice but non-overlapping pathways are simultaneously at play to result in distinctive histopathological outcomes. The extreme divergence between mouse and rat transcriptomic responses appears to reflect divergent transcriptional-regulatory networks. Taken together, these data suggest that both rat and mouse models should be used to screen the acute hepatotoxic effects of drugs and toxic compounds.

  9. The PPAR alpha-humanized mouse: a model to investigate species differences in liver toxicity mediated by PPAR alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Nagano, Tomokazu; Shah, Yatrik; Cheung, Connie; Ito, Shinji; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2008-01-01

    To determine the impact of the species difference between rodents and humans in response to peroxisome proliferators (PPs) mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)alpha, PPAR alpha-humanized transgenic mice were generated using a P1 phage artificial chromosome (PAC) genomic clone bred onto a ppar alpha-null mouse background, designated hPPAR alpha PAC. In hPPAR alpha PAC mice, the human PPAR alpha gene is expressed in tissues with high fatty acid catabolism and induced upon fasting, similar to mouse PPAR alpha in wild-type (Wt) mice. Upon treatment with the PP fenofibrate, hPPAR alpha PAC mice exhibited responses similar to Wt mice, including peroxisome proliferation, lowering of serum triglycerides, and induction of PPAR alpha target genes encoding enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism in liver, kidney, and heart, suggesting that human PPAR alpha (hPPAR alpha) functions in the same manner as mouse PPAR alpha in regulating fatty acid metabolism and lowering serum triglycerides. However, in contrast to Wt mice, treatment of hPPAR alpha PAC mice with fenofibrate did not cause significant hepatomegaly and hepatocyte proliferation, thus indicating that the mechanisms by which PPAR alpha affects lipid metabolism are distinct from the hepatocyte proliferation response, the latter of which is only induced by mouse PPAR alpha. In addition, a differential regulation of several genes, including the oncogenic let-7C miRNA by PPs, was observed between Wt and hPPAR alpha PAC mice that may contribute to the inherent difference between mouse and human PPAR alpha in activation of hepatocellular proliferation. The hPPAR alpha PAC mouse model provides an in vivo platform to investigate the species difference mediated by PPAR alpha and an ideal model for human risk assessment PPs exposure.

  10. Transient mTOR inhibition facilitates continuous growth of liver tumors by modulating the maintenance of CD133+ cell populations.

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    Zhaojuan Yang

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR pathway, which drives cell proliferation, is frequently hyperactivated in a variety of malignancies. Therefore, the inhibition of the mTOR pathway has been considered as an appropriate approach for cancer therapy. In this study, we examined the roles of mTOR in the maintenance and differentiation of cancer stem-like cells (CSCs, the conversion of conventional cancer cells to CSCs and continuous tumor growth in vivo. In H-Ras-transformed mouse liver tumor cells, we found that pharmacological inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin greatly increased not only the CD133+ populations both in vitro and in vivo but also the expression of stem cell-like genes. Enhancing mTOR activity by over-expressing Rheb significantly decreased CD133 expression, whereas knockdown of the mTOR yielded an opposite effect. In addition, mTOR inhibition severely blocked the differentiation of CD133+ to CD133- liver tumor cells. Strikingly, single-cell culture experiments revealed that CD133- liver tumor cells were capable of converting to CD133+ cells and the inhibition of mTOR signaling substantially promoted this conversion. In serial implantation of tumor xenografts in nude BALB/c mice, the residual tumor cells that were exposed to rapamycin in vivo displayed higher CD133 expression and had increased secondary tumorigenicity compared with the control group. Moreover, rapamycin treatment also enhanced the level of stem cell-associated genes and CD133 expression in certain human liver tumor cell lines, such as Huh7, PLC/PRC/7 and Hep3B. The mTOR pathway is significantly involved in the generation and the differentiation of tumorigenic liver CSCs. These results may be valuable for the design of more rational strategies to control clinical malignant HCC using mTOR inhibitors.

  11. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor.

  12. Polyploidization induced by acridine orange in mouse osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuzaki, K; Takeshita, H; Murata, H; Gebhardt, M C; Springfield, D S; Mankin, H J; Ashihara, T; Hirasawa, Y

    2000-01-01

    This study was undertaken to clarify the in vitro effect of acridine orange (AO) on the cell kinetics of mouse osteosarcoma cells, as well as the mechanism of cell growth inhibition induced by AO. A mouse osteosarcoma cell line (MOS), established from a radiation-induced mouse osteosarcoma, was cultured under exposure to 0.05, 0.5, 5, and 50 micrograms/ml of AO, either continuously or for 10 minutes. The cell kinetic analysis was performed using the following parameters: tumor cell growth by trypan blue exclusion test, mitotic activity, DNA synthetic activity by BrdU labeling and DNA ploidy by cytofluorometry. The results showed that continuous exposure to 5 and 50 micrograms/ml of AO or 10 minute exposure to 50 micrograms/ml of AO quickly killed the tumor cells within 12 hours, whereas continuous exposure to 0.5 microgram/ml of AO or 10 minute exposure to 5 micrograms/ml of AO gradually inhibited tumor cell growth. Under the latter conditions, mitotic activity was rapidly and completely inhibited within 48 hours but DNA synthetic activity was not completely inhibited even after 96 hours. DNA ploidy analysis demonstrated that most of the tumor cells arrested at the S-G2 phase after 12 hours, followed by G2 phase arrest after 24 hours and progressive DNA synthesis to a higher DNA ploidy class after 48 to 96 hours. We therefore concluded that a high concentration of AO has a strong cytocidal effect due to cytotoxicity whilst a moderate concentration of AO induces progressive and synchronous polyploidization by mitotic inhibition without DNA damage in MOS cells. We presume that this in vitro effect on MOS cells may be caused by protein synthetic inhibition after transfer RNA inactivation caused by AO binding.

  13. Reversal of hyperglycemia in mice by using human expandable insulin-producing cells differentiated from fetal liver progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalzman, Michal; Gupta, Sanjeev; Giri, Ranjit K.; Berkovich, Irina; Sappal, Baljit S.; Karnieli, Ohad; Zern, Mark A.; Fleischer, Norman; Efrat, Shimon

    2003-06-01

    Beta-cell replacement is considered to be the most promising approach for treatment of type 1 diabetes. Its application on a large scale is hindered by a shortage of cells for transplantation. Activation of insulin expression, storage, and regulated secretion in stem/progenitor cells offers novel ways to overcome this shortage. We explored whether fetal human progenitor liver cells (FH) could be induced to differentiate into insulin-producing cells after expression of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) gene, which is a key regulator of pancreatic development and insulin expression in beta cells. FH cells possess a considerable replication capacity, and this was further extended by introduction of the gene for the catalytic subunit of human telomerase. Immortalized FH cells expressing Pdx1 activated multiple beta-cell genes, produced and stored considerable amounts of insulin, and released insulin in a regulated manner in response to glucose. When transplanted into hyperglycemic immunodeficient mice, the cells restored and maintained euglycemia for prolonged periods. Quantitation of human C-peptide in the mouse serum confirmed that the glycemia was normalized by the transplanted human cells. This approach offers the potential of a novel source of cells for transplantation into patients with type 1 diabetes.

  14. Mouse cloning and somatic cell reprogramming using electrofused blastomeres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amjad Riaz; Xiaoyang Zhao; Xiangpeng Dai; Wei Li; Lei Liu; Haifeng Wan; Yang Yu; Liu Wang; Qi Zhou

    2011-01-01

    Mouse cloning from fertilized eggs can assist development of approaches for the production of "genetically tailored" human embryonic stem(ES)cell lines that are not constrained by the limitations of oocyte availability. However, to date only zygotes have been successfully used as recipients of nuclei from terminally differentiated somatic cell donors leading to ES cell lines. In fertility clinics, embryos of advanced embryonic stages are usually stored for future use, but their ability to support the derivation of ES cell lines via somatic nuclear transfer has not yet been proved.Here, we report that two-cell stage electrofused mouse embryos, arrested in mitosis, can support developmental reprogramming of nuclei from donor cells ranging from blastomeres to somatic cells. Live, full-term cloned pups from embryonic donors, as well as pluripotent ES cell lines from embryonic or somatic donors, were successfully generated from these reconstructed embryos. Advanced stage pre-implantation embryos were unable to develop normally to term after electrofusion and transfer of a somatic cell nucleus, indicating that discarded pre-implantation human embryos could be an important resource for research that minimizes the ethical concerns for human therapeutic cloning. Our approach provides an attractive and practical alternative to therapeutic cloning using donated oocytes for the generation of patient-specific human ES cell lines.

  15. Mouse cloning and somatic cell reprogramming using electrofused blastomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Amjad; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Dai, Xiangpeng; Li, Wei; Liu, Lei; Wan, Haifeng; Yu, Yang; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi

    2011-05-01

    Mouse cloning from fertilized eggs can assist development of approaches for the production of "genetically tailored" human embryonic stem (ES) cell lines that are not constrained by the limitations of oocyte availability. However, to date only zygotes have been successfully used as recipients of nuclei from terminally differentiated somatic cell donors leading to ES cell lines. In fertility clinics, embryos of advanced embryonic stages are usually stored for future use, but their ability to support the derivation of ES cell lines via somatic nuclear transfer has not yet been proved. Here, we report that two-cell stage electrofused mouse embryos, arrested in mitosis, can support developmental reprogramming of nuclei from donor cells ranging from blastomeres to somatic cells. Live, full-term cloned pups from embryonic donors, as well as pluripotent ES cell lines from embryonic or somatic donors, were successfully generated from these reconstructed embryos. Advanced stage pre-implantation embryos were unable to develop normally to term after electrofusion and transfer of a somatic cell nucleus, indicating that discarded pre-implantation human embryos could be an important resource for research that minimizes the ethical concerns for human therapeutic cloning. Our approach provides an attractive and practical alternative to therapeutic cloning using donated oocytes for the generation of patient-specific human ES cell lines.

  16. Stem Cell Emergence and Hemopoietic Activity Are Incompatible in Mouse Intraembryonic Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Isabelle; Garcia-Porrero, Juan Antonio; Dieterlen-Lièvre, Françoise; Cumano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    In the mouse embryo, the generation of candidate progenitors for long-lasting hemopoiesis has been reported in the paraaortic splanchnopleura (P-Sp)/aorta-gonad-mesonephros (AGM) region. Here, we address the following question: can the P-Sp/AGM environment support hemopoietic differentiation as well as generate stem cells, and, conversely, are other sites where hemopoietic differentiation occurs capable of generating stem cells? Although P-Sp/AGM generates de novo hemopoietic stem cells between 9.5 and 12.5 days post coitus (dpc), we show here that it does not support hemopoietic differentiation. Among mesoderm-derived sites, spleen and omentum were shown to be colonized by exogenous cells in the same fashion as the fetal liver. Cells colonizing the spleen were multipotent and pursued their evolution to committed progenitors in this organ. In contrast, the omentum, which was colonized by lymphoid-committed progenitors that did not expand, cannot be considered as a hemopoietic organ. From these data, stem cell generation appears incompatible with hemopoietic activity. At the peak of hemopoietic progenitor production in the P-Sp/AGM, between 10.5 and 11.5 dpc, multipotent cells were found at the exceptional frequency of 1 out of 12 total cells and 1 out of 4 AA4.1+ cells. Thus, progenitors within this region constitute a pool of undifferentiated hemopoietic cells readily accessible for characterization. PMID:10429669

  17. Regenerative medicine using dental pulp stem cells for liver diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkoshi, Shogo; Hara, Hajime; Hirono, Haruka; Watanabe, Kazuhiko; Hasegawa, Katsuhiko

    2017-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a refractory disease and its prognosis, if not treated using liver transplantation, is extremely poor. It is a good candidate for regenerative medicine, where stem cell-based therapies play a central role. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to differentiate into multiple cell lineages including hepatocytes. Autologous cell transplant without any foreign gene induction is feasible using MSCs, thereby avoiding possible risks of tumorigenesis and immune rejection. Dental pulp also contains an MSC population that differentiates into hepatocytes. A point worthy of special mention is that dental pulp can be obtained from deciduous teeth during childhood and can be subsequently harvested when necessary after deposition in a tooth bank. MSCs have not only a regenerative capacity but also act in an anti-inflammatory manner via paracrine mechanisms. Promising efficacies and difficulties with the use of MSC derived from teeth are summarized in this review. PMID:28217369

  18. Graft versus host disease in the bone marrow, liver and thymus humanized mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Greenblatt

    Full Text Available Mice bearing a "humanized" immune system are valuable tools to experimentally manipulate human cells in vivo and facilitate disease models not normally possible in laboratory animals. Here we describe a form of GVHD that develops in NOD/SCID mice reconstituted with human fetal bone marrow, liver and thymus (NS BLT mice. The skin, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and parotid glands are affected with progressive inflammation and sclerosis. Although all mice showed involvement of at least one organ site, the incidence of overt clinical disease was approximately 35% by 22 weeks after reconstitution. The use of hosts lacking the IL2 common gamma chain (NOD/SCID/γc(-/- delayed the onset of disease, but ultimately did not affect incidence. Genetic analysis revealed that particular donor HLA class I alleles influenced the risk for the development of GVHD. At a cellular level, GVHD is associated with the infiltration of human CD4+ T cells into the skin and a shift towards Th1 cytokine production. GVHD also induced a mixed M1/M2 polarization phenotype in a dermal murine CD11b+, MHC class II+ macrophage population. The presence of xenogenic GVHD in BLT mice both presents a major obstacle in the use of humanized mice and an opportunity to conduct preclinical studies on GVHD in a humanized model.

  19. EBI3 regulates the NK cell response to mouse cytomegalovirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle; Chen, Shih-Yu; Folkersen, Lasse Westergaard

    2017-01-01

    . The induction of EBI3 protein expression in mouse NK cells is a late activation event. Thus, early activation events of NK cells, such as IFNγ production and CD69 expression, were not affected in EBI3-deficient (Ebi3-/-) C57BL/6 (B6) mice during MCMV infection. Furthermore, comparable levels of early viral...... replication in spleen and liver were observed in MCMV-infected Ebi3-/- and wild-type (WT) B6 mice. Interestingly, the viral load in salivary glands and oral lavage was strongly decreased in the MCMV-infected Ebi3-/- B6 mice, suggesting that EBI3 plays a role in the establishment of MCMV latency. We detected...

  20. Teratogenic study of phenobarbital and levamisole on mouse fetus liver tissue using biospectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtarinezhad, Azadeh; Panahyab, Ataollah; Shaterzadeh-Oskouei, Shahrzad; Khoshniat, Hessam; Mohamadzadehasl, Baharak; Shirazi, Farshad H

    2016-09-05

    Biospectroscopic investigations have attracted attention of both the clinicians and basic sciences researchers in recent years. Scientists are discovering new areas for FTIR biospectroscopy applications in medicine. The aim of this study was to measure the possibility of FTIR-MSP application for the recognition and detection of fetus abnormalities after exposure of pregnant mouse to phenobarbital (PB) and levamisole (LEV) alone or in combination. PB is one of the most widely used antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), with sedative and hypnotic effects. When used by pregnant women, it is known to be a teratogenic agent. LEV is an antihelminthic drug with some applications in immune-deficiency as well as colon cancer therapy. Four groups of ten pregnant mice were selected for the experiments as follows: one control group received only standard diet, one group was injected with 120mg/kg of BP, one group was injected with 10mg/kg of LEV, and the last group was treated simultaneously with both BP and LEV at the above mentioned doses. Drugs administration was performed on gestation day 9 and fetuses were dissected on pregnancy day 15. Each dissected fetus was fixed, dehydrated and embedded in paraffin. Sections of liver (10μm) were prepared from control and treated groups by microtome and deparaffinized with xylene. The spectra were taken by FTIR-MSP in the region of 4000-400cm(-1). All the spectra were normalized based on amide II band (1545cm(-1)) after baseline correction of the entire spectrum, followed by classification using PCA, ANN and SVM. Both morphological and spectral changes were shown in the treated fetuses as compared to the fetuses in the control group. While cleft palate and C-R elongation were seen in PB injected fetuses, developmental retardation was mostly seen in the LEV injected group. Biospectroscopy revealed that both drugs mainly affected the cellular lipids and proteins, with LEV causing more changes in amide I and lipid regions than PB. Application of

  1. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 treatment ameliorates alcohol-induced liver injury in a mouse model of chronic alcohol feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fengwei; Chi, Feifei; Wang, Gang; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Qiuxiang; Chen, Yongquan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2015-12-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus CCFM1107 was screened for high antioxidative activity from 55 lactobacilli. The present study attempted to explore the protective properties of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 in alcoholic liver injury. A mouse model was induced by orally feeding alcohol when simultaneously treated with L. rhamnosus CCFM1107, the drug Hu-Gan- Pian (HGP), L. rhamnosus GG (LGG), and L. plantarum CCFM1112 for 3 months. Biochemical analysis was performed for both serum and liver homogenate. Detailed intestinal flora and histological analyses were also carried out. Our results indicated that the administration of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 significantly inhibited the increase in the levels of serum aminotransferase and endotoxin, as well as the levels of triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (CHO) in the serum and in the liver. Glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were elevated while the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) were decreased. The enteric dysbiosis caused by alcohol was restored by increasing the numbers of both lactobacilli and bifidobacteria and decreasing the numbers of both enterococci and enterobacter. Histological analysis confirmed the protective effect of L. rhamnosus CCFM1107. Compared with the other lactobacilli and to the drug Hu-Gan-Pian, there is a high chance that L. rhamnosus CCFM1107 provides protective effects on alcoholic liver injury by reducing oxidative stress and restoring the intestinal flora.

  2. Proteinase activated receptor 1 mediated fibrosis in a mouse model of liver injury: a role for bone marrow derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiannis N Kallis

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis results from the co-ordinated actions of myofibroblasts and macrophages, a proportion of which are of bone marrow origin. The functional effect of such bone marrow-derived cells on liver fibrosis is unclear. We examine whether changing bone marrow genotype can down-regulate the liver's fibrotic response to injury and investigate mechanisms involved. Proteinase activated receptor 1 (PAR1 is up-regulated in fibrotic liver disease in humans, and deficiency of PAR1 is associated with reduced liver fibrosis in rodent models. In this study, recipient mice received bone marrow transplantation from PAR1-deficient or wild-type donors prior to carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis. Bone marrow transplantation alone from PAR1-deficient mice was able to confer significant reductions in hepatic collagen content and activated myofibroblast expansion on wild-type recipients. This effect was associated with a decrease in hepatic scar-associated macrophages and a reduction in macrophage recruitment from the bone marrow. In vitro, PAR1 signalling on bone marrow-derived macrophages directly induced their chemotaxis but did not stimulate proliferation. These data suggest that the bone marrow can modulate the fibrotic response of the liver to recurrent injury. PAR1 signalling can contribute to this response by mechanisms that include the regulation of macrophage recruitment.

  3. Congenital hepatic fibrosis, liver cell carcinoma and adult polycystic kidneys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, J L; Kissane, J M; Valdes, A J

    1977-06-01

    In reviewing the literature, we found no liver cell carcinoma (LCC) or well-documented adult polycystic kidneys (APK) associated with congenital hepatic fibrosis (CHF). We report a 69-year-old man with CHF, LCC, APK, duplication cyst of distal portion of stomach, two calcified splenic artery aneurysms, myocardial fibrosis and muscular hypertrophy of esophagus. The LCC was grossly predunculated and microscopically showed prominent fibrosis and hyaline intracytoplasmic inclusions in the tumor cells.

  4. Speciation of iron in mouse liver during development, iron deficiency, IRP2 deletion and Inflammatory hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Cockrell, Allison L.; Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P.; Lindahl, Lora S.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    The iron content of livers from 57Fe-enriched C57BL/6 mice of different ages were investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electronic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). About 80% of the Fe in an adult liver was due to blood; thus removal of blood by flushing with buffer was essential to observe endogenous liver Fe. Even after exhaustive flushing, ca. 20% of the Fe in anaerobically dissected livers was typical of deoxy-hemoglobin. The concentration of Fe in newborn livers was the highest of any developmental stage (~ 1.2 mM). Most was stored as ferritin, with little mitochondrial Fe (consisting primarily of Fe/S clusters and haems) evident. Within the first few weeks of life, about half of ferritin Fe was mobilized and exported, illustrating the importance of Fe release as well as Fe storage in liver function. Additional ferritin Fe was used to generate mitochondrial Fe centres. From ca. 4 weeks of age to the end of the mouse’s natural lifespan, the concentration of mitochondrial Fe in liver was essentially invariant. A minor contribution from nonhaem high-spin FeII was observed in most liver samples and was also invariant with age. Some portion of these species may constitute the labile iron pool. Livers from mice raised on an Fe-deficient diet were highly Fe depleted; they were devoid of ferritin and contained 1/3 as much mitochondrial Fe as found in Fe-sufficient livers. In contrast, brains of the same Fe-deficient mice retained normal levels of mitochondrial Fe. Livers from mice with inflammatory hepatitis and from IRP2(−/−) mice hyper-accumulated Fe. These livers had high ferritin levels but low levels of mitochondrial Fe. PMID:25325718

  5. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  6. Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Recent Advances on the Path to New Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Rountree, C. Bart; Mishra, Lopa; Willenbring, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells have potential for therapy of liver diseases, but may also be involved in the formation of liver cancer. Recently, the AASLD Henry M. and Lillian Stratton Basic Research Single Topic Conference “Stem Cells in Liver Diseases and Cancer: Discovery and Promise” brought together a diverse group of investigators to define the status of research on stem cells and cancer stem cells in the liver and identify problems and solutions on the path to clinical translation. This report summarizes...

  7. Expression of lactoperoxidase in differentiated mouse colon epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Wook; Esworthy, R Steven; Hahn, Maria A; Pfeifer, Gerd P; Chu, Fong-Fong

    2012-05-01

    Lactoperoxidase (LPO) is known to be present in secreted fluids, such as milk and saliva. Functionally, LPO teams up with dual oxidases (DUOXs) to generate bactericidal hypothiocyanite in the presence of thiocyanate. DUOX2 is expressed in intestinal epithelium, but there is little information on LPO expression in this tissue. To fill the gap of knowledge, we have analyzed Lpo gene expression and its regulation in mouse intestine. In wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 (B6) mouse intestine, an appreciable level of mouse Lpo gene expression was detected in the colon, but not the ileum. However, in B6 mice deficient in glutathione peroxidase (GPx)-1 and -2, GPx1/2-double-knockout (DKO), which had intestinal pathology, the colon Lpo mRNA levels increased 5- to 12-fold depending on mouse age. The Lpo mRNA levels in WT and DKO 129S1/SvlmJ (129) colon were even higher, 9- and 5-fold, than in B6 DKO colon. Higher levels of Lpo protein and enzymatic activity were also detected in the 129 mouse colon compared to B6 colon. Lpo protein was expressed in the differentiated colon epithelial cells, away from the crypt base, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Similar to human LPO mRNA, mouse Lpo mRNA had multiple spliced forms, although only the full-length variant 1 was translated. Higher methylation was found in the 129 than in the B6 strain, in DKO than in control colon, and in older than in juvenile mice. However, methylation of the Lpo intragenic CpG island was not directly induced by inflammation, because dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis did not increase DNA met