WorldWideScience

Sample records for mouse genetic background

  1. Comparative action spectrum for ultraviolet light killing of mouse melanocytes from different genetic coat color backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, H.Z.; Xin, P. [New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Section of Cancer Biology; Hill, G.J. [New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Division of Surgical Oncology; Cieszka, K.; Plonka, P.M. [Jagiellonian University, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Molecular Biology; Mitchell, D.L. [University of Texas, Smithville (United States); Meyenhofer, M.F. [New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States). Central EM Facility; Boissy, R.E. [University of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Dermatology

    1997-06-01

    The photobiology of mouse melanocyte lines with different pigment genotypes was studied by measuring colony-forming ability after irradiation. The cell lines were wild-type black (melan-a) and the mutants brown (melan-b) and albino (melan-c). Four lamps emitting various UV wavelengths were used. These were germicidal (UVC, 200-280 nm), 82.3% output at 254 nm, TL01 (UVB, 280-320 nm), 64.2% at 310-311 nm, FS20, broadband with peak output at 312 nm and Alisun-S (UVA, 320-400 nm), broadband with peak output at 350-354 nm. Appropriate filtration reduced the contaminating UVC to nonlethal levels for the longer waverange lamps. It is clear from these studies that, in pigment cells, monochromatic results cannot predict polychromatic responses and that cell death from solar irradiations is a complex phenomenon that depends on more than DNA damage. (author).

  2. DBA/2J genetic background exacerbates spontaneous lethal seizures but lessens amyloid deposition in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriet M Jackson

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia in the elderly and is characterized by amyloid plaques, neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs and neuronal dysfunction. Early onset AD (EOAD is commonly caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP or genes involved in the processing of APP including the presenilins (e.g. PSEN1 or PSEN2. In general, mouse models relevant to EOAD recapitulate amyloidosis, show only limited amounts of NFTs and neuronal cell dysfunction and low but significant levels of seizure susceptibility. To investigate the effect of genetic background on these phenotypes, we generated APPswe and PSEN1de9 transgenic mice on the seizure prone inbred strain background, DBA/2J. Previous studies show that the DBA/2J genetic background modifies plaque deposition in the presence of mutant APP but the impact of PSEN1de9 has not been tested. Our study shows that DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice are significantly more prone to premature lethality, likely to due to lethal seizures, compared to B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice-70% of DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice die between 2-3 months of age. Of the DBA/2J.APPswePSEN1de9 mice that survived to 6 months of age, plaque deposition was greatly reduced compared to age-matched B6.APPswePSEN1de9 mice. The reduction in plaque deposition appears to be independent of microglia numbers, reactive astrocytosis and complement C5 activity.

  3. Role of oxygen tension and genetic background during the epigenetic conversion of mouse fibroblasts into insulin secreting cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Zenobi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic cell conversion overcomes the stability of a mature cell phenotype transforming a somatic cell in an unlimited source of autologous cells of a different type. It is based on the exposure to a demethylating agent followed by an induction protocol. In our work we exposed mouse dermal fibroblasts to the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. Cell differentiation was directed toward the endocrine pancreatic lineage with a sequential combination of Activin A, Retinoic Acid, B27 supplement, ITS and bFGF. The overall duration of the process was 10 days. Aim of this work was to evaluate the role of oxygen during differentiation of dermal fibroblasts derived from two different mouse strains, NOD and C57 BL/6J. During differentiation, both cell lines were cultured either in the standard in vitro culture 20% oxygen concentration or in the lower and more physiological 5% of oxygen. Our results show that C57 BL/6J cells are able to differentiate into insulin secreting cells in both oxygen tensions with a higher amount of insulin release in low oxygen conditions. On the other hand, cells of NOD mice, which are physiologically predisposed to the onset of diabetes, differentiate in 20% of oxygen but not in low oxygen and they died after three days of culture. However, if these cells are moved to 5% of oxygen after their differentiation in high oxygen they remain viable for up to four days. Furthermore, their capacity to release insulin remains unchanged for 24 hours. Results suggest that genetic background has a profound effect on the role of oxygen during the in vitro differentiation process, possibly reflecting the different susceptibility to the disease of the strains used in the experiment.Supported by EFSD and Carraresi Foundation

  4. ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF THE MOUSE FETUS TO IMPAIRED PROSTATIC BUD FORMATION BY DIOXIN: INFLUENCE OF GENETIC BACKGROUND AND NULL EXPRESSION OF TGF-ALFA AND EGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altered sensitivity of the mouse fetus to impaired prostatic bud formation by dioxin: Influence of genetic background and null expression of TGF and EGF. Rasmussen, N.T., Lin T-M., Fenton, S.E., Abbott, B.D. and R.E. Peterson. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)...

  5. Finding the most appropriate mouse model of juvenile CLN3 (Batten disease for therapeutic studies: the importance of genetic background and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila D. Kovács

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the CLN3 gene cause a fatal neurodegenerative disorder: juvenile CLN3 disease, also known as juvenile Batten disease. The two most commonly utilized mouse models of juvenile CLN3 disease are Cln3-knockout (Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8-knock-in mice, the latter mimicking the most frequent disease-causing human mutation. To determine which mouse model has the most pronounced neurological phenotypes that can be used as outcome measures for therapeutic studies, we compared the exploratory activity, motor function and depressive-like behavior of 1-, 3- and 6-month-old Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8-knock-in mice on two different genetic backgrounds (129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J. Although, in many cases, the behavior of Cln3−/− and Cln3Δex7/8 mice was similar, we found genetic-background-, gender- and age-dependent differences between the two mouse models. We also observed large differences in the behavior of the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6J wild-type strains, which highlights the strong influence that genetic background can have on phenotype. Based on our results, Cln3−/− male mice on the 129S6/SvEv genetic background are the most appropriate candidates for therapeutic studies. They exhibit motor deficits at 1 and 6 months of age in the vertical pole test, and they were the only mice to show impaired motor coordination in the rotarod test at both 3 and 6 months. Cln3−/− males on the C57BL/6J background and Cln3Δex7/8 males on the 129S6/SvEv background also provide good outcome measures for therapeutic interventions. Cln3−/− (C57BL/6J males had serious difficulties in climbing down (at 1 and 6 months and turning downward on (at 1, 3 and 6 months the vertical pole, whereas Cln3Δex7/8 (129S6/SvEv males climbed down the vertical pole drastically slower than wild-type males at 3 and 6 months of age. Our study demonstrates the importance of testing mouse models on different genetic backgrounds and comparing males and females in order to

  6. Genetic backgrounds and modifier genes of NTD mouse models: An opportunity for greater understanding of the multifactorial etiology of neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Renee Y M; Singh, Parmveer; McDermid, Heather E

    2016-10-21

    Neurulation, the early embryonic process of forming the presumptive brain and spinal cord, is highly complex and involves hundreds of genes in multiple genetic pathways. Mice have long served as a genetic model for studying human neurulation, and the resulting neural tube defects (NTDs) that arise when neurulation is disrupted. Because mice appear to show mostly single gene inheritance for NTDs and humans show multifactorial inheritance, mice sometimes have been characterized as a simpler model for the identification and study of NTD genes. But are they a simple model? When viewed on different genetic backgrounds, many genes show significant variation in the penetrance and expressivity of NTD phenotypes, suggesting the presence of modifier loci that interact with the target gene to affect the phenotypic expression. Looking at mutations on different genetic backgrounds provides us with an opportunity to explore these complex genetic interactions, which are likely to better emulate similar processes in human neurulation. Here, we review NTD genes known to show strain-specific phenotypic variation. We focus particularly on the gene Cecr2, which is studied using both a hypomorphic and a presumptive null mutation on two different backgrounds: one susceptible (BALB/c) and one resistant (FVB/N) to NTDs. This strain difference has led to a search for genetic modifiers within a region on murine chromosome 19. Understanding how genetic variants alter the phenotypic outcome in NTD mouse models will help to direct future studies in humans, particularly now that more genome wide sequencing approaches are being used. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Steve

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that comparing gene expression profiles for specific brain regions in these strains might provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of human neuropsychiatric traits. We performed a whole-genome gene expression experiment and applied a systems biology approach using weighted gene co-expression network analysis. Results We were able to identify modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish a strain or brain region. Analysis of the networks that are most informative for hippocampus and amygdala revealed enrichment in neurologically, genetically and psychologically related pathways. Close examination of the strain-specific gene expression profiles, however, revealed no functional relevance but a significant enrichment of single nucleotide polymorphisms in the probe sequences used for array hybridization. This artifact was not observed for the modules of co-expressed genes that distinguish amygdala and hippocampus. Conclusions The brain-region specific modules were found to be independent of genetic background and are therefore likely to represent biologically relevant molecular networks that can be studied to complement our knowledge about pathways in neuropsychiatric disease.

  8. A new mouse model for marfan syndrome presents phenotypic variability associated with the genetic background and overall levels of Fbn1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno L Lima

    Full Text Available Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disease of connective tissue caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 encoding gene FBN1. Patients present cardiovascular, ocular and skeletal manifestations, and although being fully penetrant, MFS is characterized by a wide clinical variability both within and between families. Here we describe a new mouse model of MFS that recapitulates the clinical heterogeneity of the syndrome in humans. Heterozygotes for the mutant Fbn1 allele mgΔloxPneo, carrying the same internal deletion of exons 19-24 as the mgΔ mouse model, present defective microfibrillar deposition, emphysema, deterioration of aortic wall and kyphosis. However, the onset of a clinical phenotypes is earlier in the 129/Sv than in C57BL/6 background, indicating the existence of genetic modifiers of MFS between these two mouse strains. In addition, we characterized a wide clinical variability within the 129/Sv congenic heterozygotes, suggesting involvement of epigenetic factors in disease severity. Finally, we show a strong negative correlation between overall levels of Fbn1 expression and the severity of the phenotypes, corroborating the suggested protective role of normal fibrillin-1 in MFS pathogenesis, and supporting the development of therapies based on increasing Fbn1 expression.

  9. Monitoring perinatal gut microbiota in mouse models by mass spectrometry approaches: parental genetic background and breastfeeding effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Levi Mortera

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available At birth, contact with external stimuli, such as nutrients derived from food, is necessary to modulate the symbiotic balance between commensal and pathogenic bacteria, protect against bacterial dysbiosis, and initiate the development of the mucosal immune response. Among a variety of different feeding patterns, breastfeeding represents the best modality. In fact, the capacity of breast milk to modulate the composition of infants’ gut microbiota leads to beneficial effects on their health. In this study, we used newborn mice as a model to evaluate the effect of parental genetic background (i.e., IgA-producing mice and IgA-deficient mice and feeding modulation (i.e., maternal feeding and cross-feeding on the onset and shaping of gut microbiota after birth. To investigate these topics, we used either a culturomic approach that employed Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MS, or bottom-up Liquid Chromatography, with subsequent MSMS shotgun metaproteomic analysis that compared and assembled results of the two techniques. We found that the microbial community was enriched by lactic acid bacteria when pups were breastfed by wild-type (WT mothers, while IgA-deficient milk led to an increase in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen (OBP population. Cross-feeding results suggested that IgA supplementation promoted the exclusion of some OBPs and the temporary appearance of beneficial species in pups fed by WT foster mothers. Our results show that both techniques yield a picture of microbiota from different angles and with varying depths. In particular, our metaproteomic pipeline was found to be a reliable tool in the description of microbiota. Data from these studies are available via ProteomeXchange, with identifier PXD004033.

  10. Monitoring Perinatal Gut Microbiota in Mouse Models by Mass Spectrometry Approaches: Parental Genetic Background and Breastfeeding Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi Mortera, Stefano; Del Chierico, Federica; Vernocchi, Pamela; Rosado, Maria M.; Cavola, Agnese; Chierici, Marco; Pieroni, Luisa; Urbani, Andrea; Carsetti, Rita; Lante, Isabella; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Putignani, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    At birth, contact with external stimuli, such as nutrients derived from food, is necessary to modulate the symbiotic balance between commensal and pathogenic bacteria, protect against bacterial dysbiosis, and initiate the development of the mucosal immune response. Among a variety of different feeding patterns, breastfeeding represents the best modality. In fact, the capacity of breast milk to modulate the composition of infants’ gut microbiota leads to beneficial effects on their health. In this study, we used newborn mice as a model to evaluate the effect of parental genetic background (i.e., IgA-producing mice and IgA-deficient mice) and feeding modulation (i.e., maternal feeding and cross-feeding) on the onset and shaping of gut microbiota after birth. To investigate these topics, we used either a culturomic approach that employed Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MS), or bottom–up Liquid Chromatography, with subsequent MSMS shotgun metaproteomic analysis that compared and assembled results of the two techniques. We found that the microbial community was enriched by lactic acid bacteria when pups were breastfed by wild-type (WT) mothers, while IgA-deficient milk led to an increase in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen (OBP) population. Cross-feeding results suggested that IgA supplementation promoted the exclusion of some OBPs and the temporary appearance of beneficial species in pups fed by WT foster mothers. Our results show that both techniques yield a picture of microbiota from different angles and with varying depths. In particular, our metaproteomic pipeline was found to be a reliable tool in the description of microbiota. Data from these studies are available via ProteomeXchange, with identifier PXD004033. PMID:27725814

  11. The physiological effects of deleting the mouse SLC30A8 gene encoding zinc transporter-8 are influenced by gender and genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynley D Pound

    Full Text Available The SLC30A8 gene encodes the islet-specific transporter ZnT-8, which is hypothesized to provide zinc for insulin-crystal formation. A polymorphic variant in SLC30A8 is associated with altered susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. Several groups have examined the effect of global Slc30a8 gene deletion but the results have been highly variable, perhaps due to the mixed 129SvEv/C57BL/6J genetic background of the mice studied. We therefore sought to remove the conflicting effect of 129SvEv-specific modifier genes.The impact of Slc30a8 deletion was examined in the context of the pure C57BL/6J genetic background.Male C57BL/6J Slc30a8 knockout (KO mice had normal fasting insulin levels and no change in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS from isolated islets in marked contrast to the ∼50% and ∼35% decrease, respectively, in both parameters observed in male mixed genetic background Slc30a8 KO mice. This observation suggests that 129SvEv-specific modifier genes modulate the impact of Slc30a8 deletion. In contrast, female C57BL/6J Slc30a8 KO mice had reduced (∼20% fasting insulin levels, though this was not associated with a change in fasting blood glucose (FBG, or GSIS from isolated islets. This observation indicates that gender also modulates the impact of Slc30a8 deletion, though the physiological explanation as to why impaired insulin secretion is not accompanied by elevated FBG is unclear. Neither male nor female C57BL/6J Slc30a8 KO mice showed impaired glucose tolerance.Our data suggest that, despite a marked reduction in islet zinc content, the absence of ZnT-8 does not have a substantial impact on mouse physiology.

  12. Gene expression profiling in C57BL/6J and A/J mouse inbred strains reveals gene networks specific for brain regions independent of genetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Simone; Fuller, Tova F; Janson, Esther; Strengman, Eric; Horvath, Steve; Kas, Martien J H; Ophoff, Roel A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We performed gene expression profiling of the amygdala and hippocampus taken from inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J and A/J. The selected brain areas are implicated in neurobehavioral traits while these mouse strains are known to differ widely in behavior. Consequently, we hypothesized that

  13. The genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H; Rotter, J I

    2000-01-01

    Available evidence indicates that genetic factors are essential in providing the susceptibility to the majority of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease occurring in man. It is also clear that the genetic susceptibility to these diseases is complex, and that more than one gene may predispose (the concept of multilocus/oligogenic inheritance), and likely in different etiologic combinations (the concept of genetic heterogeneity). Paradigms are now available that should lead to the identification of a number of these predisposing genes. These paradigms include the candidate gene approach, systematic genome wide scans, and mouse human synteny. While genome wide scans are currently limited to multiplex family linkage studies, both candidate genes and mouse human synteny can be approached in either linkage or association paradigms. Eventually whole genome association studies will be available as well. Identification of inflammatory bowel disease predisposing genes should lead to their incorporation in studies of natural history, investigation of environmental risk factors, and especially utilization of genetic markers in clinical trials. This will allow us to identify the best therapy available for the individual patient based on their unique genetic constitution. With advances in molecular technology, the search for genes influencing traits and diseases with a complex genetic background, such as the inflammatory bowel diseases, has become a realistic task. Although exogenous or infectious agents may contribute to the pathogenesis or may trigger the onset of disease, and the immune system almost certainly mediates the tissue damage, it is clear from available data that genetic factors determine the susceptibility of a given individual to inflammatory bowel disease (reviewed below). Thus, genetic studies are essential for the delineation of the basic etiologies of the various forms of inflammatory bowel disease and thus can aid in the development of radically

  14. Mouse gestation length is genetically determined.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A Murray

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm birth is an enormous public health problem, affecting over 12% of live births and costing over $26 billion in the United States alone. The causes are complex, but twin studies support the role of genetics in determining gestation length. Despite widespread use of the mouse in studies of the genetics of preterm birth, there have been few studies that actually address the precise natural gestation length of the mouse, and to what degree the timing of labor and birth is genetically determined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further develop the mouse as a genetic model of preterm birth, we developed a high-throughput monitoring system and measured the gestation length in 15 inbred strains. Our results show an unexpectedly wide variation in overall gestation length between strains that approaches two full days, while intra-strain variation is quite low. Although litter size shows a strong inverse correlation with gestation length, genetic difference alone accounts for a significant portion of the variation. In addition, ovarian transplant experiments support a primary role of maternal genetics in the determination of gestation length. Preliminary analysis of gestation length in the C57BL/6J-Chr#(A/J/NaJ chromosome substitution strain (B.A CSS panel suggests complex genetic control of gestation length. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Together, these data support the role of genetics in regulating gestation length and present the mouse as an important tool for the discovery of genes governing preterm birth.

  15. A resposta oxidativa em corações de camundongos é modulada por background genético The oxidative response of mouse hearts is modulated by genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Santos-Silva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: o tabagismo apresenta importante papel sobre as doenças cardiovasculares, entretanto permanecem pouco compreendidos os motivos pelos quais alguns seres humanos as desenvolvem e outros não. OBJETIVO: nosso objetivo foi analisar o perfil redox do coração de diferentes linhagens de camundongos após exposição à fumaça de cigarro. MÉTODOS: camundongos machos suíços (n = 10, C3H (n = 10, BALB/c (n = 10 e C57BL/6 (n = 10 foram expostos à fumaça de cigarro (12 cigarros/dia, enquanto os respectivos controles (n = 10 ao ar ambiente por 60 dias. Após sacrifício, o coração foi retirado para análises bioquímicas. RESULTADOS: embora o conteúdo de malondialdeído não tenha aumentado em nenhum grupo, a atividade da catalase diminuiu no grupo suíço (p BACKGROUND: Smoking plays an important role in cardiovascular diseases. However, the reasons why some individuals develop those diseases and others do not remain to be explained. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at assessing the redox profile of the heart of different mouse strains after exposure to cigarette smoke. METHODS: Male mice of the Swiss (n = 10, C3H (n = 10, BALB/c (n = 10 and C57BL/6 (n = 10 strains were exposed to cigarette smoke (12 cigarettes/day, while their respective controls (n = 10 were exposed to ambient air for 60 days. After being euthanized, their heart was removed for biochemical analyses. RESULTS: Although the malondialdehyde content did not increase in any of the groups, catalase activity decreased in the Swiss (p < 0.05 and BALB/c (p < 0.05 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups, while myeloperoxidase decreased in the C3H (p < 0.05 and C57BL/6 (p < 0.001 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups. The reduced glutathione content decreased in the Swiss, C3H, C57BL/6 (p < 0.05 and BALB/c (p < 0,001 strain mice as compared with their respective control groups. Regarding reduced glutathione content, an increase was

  16. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Woong Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO mice hasrevolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. Asthe use of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells is inevitable forconventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout miceremains a very time-consuming and expensive process. Toaccelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses ofKO mice, international efforts have organized global consortiasuch as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMCand International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC, andthey are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that ispublicly available for the researches studying specific genes ofinterests in vivo. However, new technologies, adoptingzinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs or Transcription Activator-LikeEffector (TALE Nucleases (TALENs to edit the mouse genome,are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternativefor the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, weintroduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate thesignificance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  17. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  18. Genetic background of phenotypic variation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A noteworthy feature of the living world is its bewildering variability. A key issue in several biological disciplines is the achievement of an understanding of the hereditary basis of this variability. Two opposing, but not necessarily irreconcilable conceptions attempt to explain the underlying mechanism. The gene function paradigm postulates that phenotypic variance is generated by the polymorphism in the coding sequences of genes. However, comparisons of a great number of homologous gene and protein sequences have revealed that they predominantly remained functionally conserved even across distantly related phylogenic taxa. Alternatively, the gene regulation paradigm assumes that differences in the cis-regulatory region of genes do account for phenotype variation within species. An extension of this latter concept is that phenotypic variability is generated by the polyrnorphism in the overall gene expression profiles of gene networks.In other words, the activity of a particular gene is a system property determined both by the cis-regulatory sequences of the given genes and by the other genes of a gene network, whose expressions vary among individuals, too. Novel proponents of gene function paradigm claim that functional genetic variance within the coding sequences of regulatory genes is critical for the generation of morphological polymorphism. Note, however, that these developmental genes play direct regulatory roles in the control of gene expression.

  19. Missing Ancestry: Filling in a Genetic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Missing Ancestry Follow us A Missing Ancestry Filling in a genetic background Many adopted children don’t know very much about their biological family. That was the case for David Hale. He didn’t know any of his biological family’s health. All Hale knew from his adoption papers was ...

  20. Somatic structural rearrangements in genetically engineered mouse mammary tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varela, I.; Klijn, C.N.; Stephens, P.J.; Mudie, L.J.; Stebbings, L.; Galappaththige, D.; Van der Gulden, H.; Schut, E.; Klarenbeek, S.; Campbell, P.J.; Wessels, L.F.A.; Stratton, M.R.; Jonkers, J.; Futreal, P.A.; Adams, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Here we present the first paired-end sequencing of tumors from genetically engineered mouse models of cancer to determine how faithfully these models recapitulate the landscape of somatic rearrangements found in human tumors. These were models of Trp53-mutated breast cancer, Brca1- and B

  1. Genetic background of Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, M; Vuorre, I; Tiilikainen, A; Algvere, P

    1978-10-01

    We studied the genetic background of 24 patients with Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis (FHC). Each was given a careful eye examination which included family history and serological determination of HLA antigens. Two families each had 2 cases of FHC in the same family; in addition an ancestor in the second family possibly had FHC; in both families one healthy member had simple heterochromia. One patient with FHC had congenital uveal coloboma, one pigmentary retinal dystrophy, and four had cysts of the ciliary body. The frequencies of all HLA antigens in patients with FHC compared well with the frequencies in the controls. In a family in which HLA haplotypes could be derived, the patients with FHC showed different HLA haplotypes. We conclude that FHC has a hereditary basis but its immunological component is not genetically associated with the HLA system.

  2. Genetically engineered mouse models of prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, Martijn C.; Bergman, Andreas M.; van der Poel, Henk G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Mouse models of prostate cancer are used to test the contribution of individual genes to the transformation process, evaluate the collaboration between multiple genetic lesions observed in a single tumour, and perform preclinical intervention studies in prostate cancer research. Methods:

  3. Empathy is moderated by genetic background in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    QiLiang Chen

    Full Text Available Empathy, as originally defined, refers to an emotional experience that is shared among individuals. When discomfort or alarm is detected in another, a variety of behavioral responses can follow, including greater levels of nurturing, consolation or increased vigilance towards a threat. Moreover, changes in systemic physiology often accompany the recognition of distressed states in others. Employing a mouse model of cue-conditioned fear, we asked whether exposure to conspecific distress influences how a mouse subsequently responds to environmental cues that predict this distress. We found that mice are responsive to environmental cues that predict social distress, that their heart rate changes when distress vocalizations are emitted from conspecifics, and that genetic background substantially influences the magnitude of these responses. Specifically, during a series of pre-exposure sessions, repeated experiences of object mice that were exposed to a tone-shock (CS-UCS contingency resulted in heart rate deceleration in subjects from the gregarious C57BL/6J (B6 strain, but not in subjects from the less social BALB/cJ (BALB strain. Following the pre-exposure sessions, subjects were individually presented with the CS-only for 5 consecutive trials followed by 5 consecutive pairings of the CS with the UCS. Pre-exposure to object distress increased the freezing responses of B6 mice, but not BALB mice, on both the CS-only and the CS-UCS trials. These physiological and behavioral responses of B6 mice to social distress parallel features of human empathy. Our paradigm thus has construct and face validity with contemporary views of empathy, and provides unequivocal evidence for a genetic contribution to the expression of empathic behavior.

  4. Strain Background Modifies Phenotypes in the ATP8B1-Deficient Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Julie C.; Xu, Hongmei; Groen, Annamiek; Paulusma, Coen C.; Grenert, James P.; Pawlikowska, Ludmila; Sen, Saunak; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Bull, Laura N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1) underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis). The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficiency. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the effect of genetic background on phenotypes of ATP8B1-deficient and wild-type mice, using C57Bl/6 (B6), 129, and (B6-129) F1 strain backgrounds. B6 background resulted in greater abnormalities in ATP8B1-deficient mice than did 129 and/or F1 background. ATP8B1-deficient pups of B6 background gained less weight. In adult ATP8B1-deficient mice at baseline, those of B6 background had lower serum cholesterol levels, higher serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and larger livers. After challenge with cholate-supplemented diet, these mice exhibited higher serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels, greater weight loss and larger livers. ATP8B1-deficient phenotypes in mice of F1 and 129 backgrounds are usually similar, suggesting that susceptibility to manifestations of ATP8B1 deficiency may be recessive. We also detected differences in hepatobiliary phenotypes between wild-type mice of differing strains. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that the ATP8B1-deficient mouse in a B6 background may be a better model of human ATP8B1 deficiency and highlight the importance of informed background strain selection for mouse models of liver disease. PMID:20126555

  5. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohela Shah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1 underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis. The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficiency. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the effect of genetic background on phenotypes of ATP8B1-deficient and wild-type mice, using C57Bl/6 (B6, 129, and (B6-129 F1 strain backgrounds. B6 background resulted in greater abnormalities in ATP8B1-deficient mice than did 129 and/or F1 background. ATP8B1-deficient pups of B6 background gained less weight. In adult ATP8B1-deficient mice at baseline, those of B6 background had lower serum cholesterol levels, higher serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and larger livers. After challenge with cholate-supplemented diet, these mice exhibited higher serum alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin levels, greater weight loss and larger livers. ATP8B1-deficient phenotypes in mice of F1 and 129 backgrounds are usually similar, suggesting that susceptibility to manifestations of ATP8B1 deficiency may be recessive. We also detected differences in hepatobiliary phenotypes between wild-type mice of differing strains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that the ATP8B1-deficient mouse in a B6 background may be a better model of human ATP8B1 deficiency and highlight the importance of informed background strain selection for mouse models of liver disease.

  6. Genetic backgrounds determine brown remodeling of white fat in rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ferrannini

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Rodent genetic background determines the brown remodeling of different white fat depots. This study provides new insights into the role of genetic variation in fat remodeling in susceptibility to metabolic diseases.

  7. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S Alex

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease.

  8. Genetic background may contribute to PAM50 gene expression breast cancer subtype assignments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genome wide transcriptional analysis have provided greater insights into the etiology and heterogeneity of breast cancer. Molecular signatures have been developed that stratify the conventional estrogen receptor positive or negative categories into subtypes that are associated with differing clinical outcomes. It is thought that the expression patterns of the molecular subtypes primarily reflect cell-of-origin or tumor driver mutations. In this study however, using a genetically engineered mouse mammary tumor model we demonstrate that the PAM50 subtype signature of tumors driven by a common oncogenic event can be significantly influenced by the genetic background on which the tumor arises. These results have important implications for interpretation of "snapshot" expression profiles, as well as suggesting that incorporation of genetic background effects may allow investigation into phenotypes not initially anticipated in individual mouse models of cancer.

  9. Genetic background determines response to hemostasis and thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Annie E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thrombosis is the fatal and disabling consequence of cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in Western countries. Two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J and A/J, have marked differences in susceptibility to obesity, atherosclerosis, and vessel remodeling. However, it is unclear how these diverse genetic backgrounds influence pathways known to regulate thrombosis and hemostasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate thrombosis and hemostasis in these two inbred strains and determine the phenotypic response of A/J chromosomes in the C57BL/6J background. Methods A/J and C57Bl/6J mice were evaluated for differences in thrombosis and hemostasis. A thrombus was induced in the carotid artery by application of the exposed carotid to ferric chloride and blood flow measured until the vessel occluded. Bleeding and rebleeding times, as surrogate markers for thrombosis and hemostasis, were determined after clipping the tail and placing in warm saline. Twenty-one chromosome substitution strains, A/J chromosomes in a C57BL/6J background, were screened for response to the tail bleeding assay. Results Thrombus occlusion time was markedly decreased in the A/J mice compared to C57BL/6J mice. Tail bleeding time was similar in the two strains, but rebleeding time was markedly increased in the A/J mice compared to C57BL/6J mice. Coagulation times and tail morphology were similar, but tail collagen content was higher in A/J than C57BL/6J mice. Three chromosome substitution strains, B6-Chr5A/J, B6-Chr11A/J, and B6-Chr17A/J, were identified with increased rebleeding time, a phenotype similar to A/J mice. Mice heterosomic for chromosomes 5 or 17 had rebleeding times similar to C57BL/6J mice, but when these two chromosome substitution strains, B6-Chr5A/J and B6-Chr17A/J, were crossed, the A/J phenotype was restored in these doubly heterosomic progeny. Conclusion These results indicate that susceptibility to arterial

  10. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  11. Genetic testing in asymptomatic minors: background considerations towards ESHG Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borry, Pascal; Evers-Kiebooms, Gerry; Cornel, Martina C

    2009-01-01

    Although various guidelines and position papers have discussed, in the past, the ethical aspects of genetic testing in asymptomatic minors, the European Society of Human Genetics had not earlier endorsed any set of guidelines exclusively focused on this issue. This paper has served as a background...... document in preparation of the development of the policy recommendations of the Public and Professional Committee of the European Society of Human Genetics. This background paper first discusses some general considerations with regard to the provision of genetic tests to minors. It discusses the concept...... of best interests, participation of minors in health-care decisions, parents' responsibilities to share genetic information, the role of clinical genetics and the health-care system in communication within the family. Second, it discusses, respectively, the presymptomatic and predictive genetic testing...

  12. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  13. Detected microsatellite polymorphisms in genetically altered inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaoyan; Cui, Jing; Wang, Chao; Huo, Xueyun; Lu, Jing; Li, Yichen; Chen, Zhenwen

    2013-08-01

    Microsatellites are 50-200 repetitive DNA sequences composed of 1- to 6-base-pair-long reiterative motifs within the genome. They are vulnerable to DNA modifications, such as recombination and/or integration, and are recognized as "sentinel" DNA. Our previous report indicated that the genotypes of the microsatellite loci could change from mono- to poly-morphisms (CMP) in gene knockout (KO) mice, implying that genetic modification induces microsatellite mutation. However, it is still unclear whether the random insertion of DNA fragments into mice genomes produced via transgene (Tg) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) would also result in microsatellite mutations or microsatellite loci genotypes changes. This study was designed to find possible clues to answer this question. In brief, 198 microsatellite loci that were distributed among almost all of the chromosomes (except for the Y) were examined through polymerase chain reaction to screen possible CMPs in six Tg strains. First, for each strain, the microsatellite sequences of all loci were compared between Tg and the corresponding background strain to exclude genetic interference. Simultaneously, to exclude spontaneous mutation-related CMPs that might exist in the examined six strains, mice from five spontaneously mutated inbred strains were used as the negative controls. Additionally, the sequences of all loci in these spontaneous mutated mice were compared to corresponding genetic background controls. The results showed that 40 of the 198 (20.2%) loci were identified as having CMPs in the examined Tg mice strains. The CMP genotypes were either homozygous or heterozygous compared to the background controls. Next, we applied the 40 CMP positive loci in ENU-mutated mice and their corresponding background controls. After that, a general comparison of CMPs that exist among Tg, ENU-treated and KO mouse strains was performed. The results indicated that four (D11mit258, D13mit3, D14mit102 and DXmit172) of the 40 (10%) CMP

  14. Time course of cytokine upregulation in the lacrimal gland and presence of autoantibodies in a predisposed mouse model of Sjögren's Syndrome: the influence of sex hormones and genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Stefanie; Mostafa, Safinaz; Rowan, Vanessa Seamon; Azzarolo, Ana Maria

    2014-11-01

    expression of IL-1β and IL-4 was observed only at later experimental time points in the lacrimal glands of OVX C57BL/10 mice, while no significant changes in the expression of TNF-α and IL-10 were seen at any experimental times in this group. No significant differences were observed in the levels of the cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-10 in the lacrimal glands of the OVX C57BL/10 mice at any of the experimental times studied compared to the sham-operated group. IFN-γ was not detected in either mouse strains at the level of mRNA and protein. OVX in the NOD.B10.H2(b) mice also caused an increase in the levels of anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies in the serum only, while no anti-La/SSB autoantibodies were found in the serum or lacrimal gland supernatants. Physiological doses of E2 or DHT at time of OVX prevented the upregulation of cytokines and the presence of anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies in these animals. These results showed that a decrease in the concentrations of ovarian hormones in the genetically predisposed mice accelerated the onset of the disease by upregulating various pro-inflammatory cytokines at different time points and promoting the formation of anti-Ro/SSA serum autoantibodies, creating an environment favorable for the initiation of SS.

  15. Genetic mouse models of brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilkei-Gorzo, Andras

    2014-05-01

    Progression of brain ageing is influenced by a complex interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Analysis of genetically modified animals with uniform genetic backgrounds in a standardised, controlled environment enables the dissection of critical determinants of brain ageing on a molecular level. Human and animal studies suggest that increased load of damaged macromolecules, efficacy of DNA maintenance, mitochondrial activity, and cellular stress defences are critical determinants of brain ageing. Surprisingly, mouse lines with genetic impairment of anti-oxidative capacity generally did not show enhanced cognitive ageing but rather an increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. Mouse lines with impaired mitochondrial activity had critically short life spans or severe and rapidly progressing neurodegeneration. Strains with impaired clearance in damaged macromolecules or defects in the regulation of cellular stress defences showed alterations in the onset and progression of cognitive decline. Importantly, reduced insulin/insulin-like growth factor signalling generally increased life span but impaired cognitive functions revealing a complex interaction between ageing of the brain and of the body. Brain ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. Transgenic mouse models expressing high levels of mutant human amyloid precursor protein showed a number of symptoms and pathophysiological processes typical for early phase of Alzheimer's disease. Generally, therapeutic strategies effective against Alzheimer's disease in humans were also active in the Tg2576, APP23, APP/PS1 and 5xFAD lines, but a large number of false positive findings were also reported. The 3xtg AD model likely has the highest face and construct validity but further studies are needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetics of primary and timing effects in the mnd mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messer, A.; Plummer, J.; MacMillen, M.C. [New York State, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-05

    The mnd mouse shows a spontaneous adult-onset hereditary neurological disease, with motor abnormality by 6 months of age, progressing to severe spastic paralysis and premature death. The disease is autosomal recessive, with heterozygote effects seen under stress. It maps to mouse chromosome (chr) 8. Histopathology with Nissl stains documents substantial abnormalities of upper and lower motor neurons, and there is retinal degeneration beginning in the first month, even without light exposure. Increasing levels of autofluorescent lipopigment are found in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues as the mnd mice age. Recently, NCL-like inclusions and accumulating subunit c have also been described. When mnd is outcrossed to the AKR/J genetic background, ca. 40% of the mnd/mnd F2 progeny show early onset (onset by 4.5-5 months and death by 7 months). This accelerated timing effect seems to be strain-specific, and unlinked to the mnd gene itself. Our current working hypothesis is that the timing effect is due to 2 or 3 unlinked dominant genes with incomplete penetrance at any single locus. In a combined RFLP/PCR fragment genetic analysis, the strongest deviation from the expected ratio of AKR vs B6 alleles occurs with markers on proximal half of chr 1. Additional loci on chrs 5 and 10 may also be involved. The mechanism of interaction of these modifying genes with the primary mnd gene may offer new therapeutic avenues. 22 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Genetic variations strongly influence phenotypic outcome in the mouse retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin S Jelcick

    Full Text Available Variation in genetic background can significantly influence the phenotypic outcome of both disease and non-disease associated traits. Additionally, differences in temporal and strain specific gene expression can also contribute to phenotypes in the mammalian retina. This is the first report of microarray based cross-strain analysis of gene expression in the retina investigating genetic background effects. Microarray analyses were performed on retinas from the following mouse strains: C57BL6/J, AKR/J, CAST/EiJ, and NOD.NON-H2(-nb1 at embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5 and postnatal day 30.5 (P30.5. Over 3000 differentially expressed genes were identified between strains and developmental stages. Differential gene expression was confirmed by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Three major gene networks were identified that function to regulate retinal or photoreceptor development, visual perception, cellular transport, and signal transduction. Many of the genes in these networks are implicated in retinal diseases such as bradyopsia, night-blindness, and cone-rod dystrophy. Our analysis revealed strain specific variations in cone photoreceptor cell patterning and retinal function. This study highlights the substantial impact of genetic background on both development and function of the retina and the level of gene expression differences tolerated for normal retinal function. These strain specific genetic variations may also be present in other tissues. In addition, this study will provide valuable insight for the development of more accurate models for human retinal diseases.

  18. PFAPA syndrome in siblings. Is there a genetic background?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón-Martín, Pilar; Ortiz Movilla, Roberto; Guillén Martín, Sara; Allende, Luis M; Cuesta Rubio, M Teresa; López González, M Fernanda; Ramos Amador, José Tomás

    2011-12-01

    "PFAPA syndrome" is an autoinflammatory entity composed of periodic fever, aphthous stomatitis, pharyngitis, and cervical adenitis. There have been many reports of children with the disease, but only occasionally have been described in siblings, and no specific genetic mutation has been determined yet. Corticosteroids are the mainstay in the treatment of the acute attacks. The role of surgery in long-term follow-up (tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy) is controversial. We report two brothers affected with the syndrome, in whom corticosteroids as the only treatment led to an improvement. A genetic work-up was performed, making very unlikely other possible syndromes of recurrent fever. PFAPA syndrome is the most common recurrent periodic fever disorder described in childhood. Its genetic background has not been elucidated yet. Our contribution with two siblings affected with PFAPA syndrome further support the genetic basis for the entity.

  19. Genetically modified mouse models addressing gonadotropin function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, Laura D; Rulli, Susana B; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2014-03-01

    The development of genetically modified animals has been useful to understand the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the gonadotropin function. It is well known that alterations in the secretion of a single hormone is capable of producing profound reproductive abnormalities. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is a glycoprotein hormone normally secreted by the human placenta, and structurally and functionally it is related to pituitary LH. LH and hCG bind to the same LH/hCG receptor, and hCG is often used as an analog of LH to boost gonadotropin action. There are many physiological and pathological conditions where LH/hCG levels and actions are elevated. In order to understand how elevated LH/hCG levels may impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis we have developed a transgenic mouse model with chronic hCG hypersecretion. Female mice develop many gonadal and extragonadal phenotypes including obesity, infertility, hyperprolactinemia, and pituitary and mammary gland tumors. This article summarizes recent findings on the mechanisms involved in pituitary gland tumorigenesis and hyperprolactinemia in the female mice hypersecreting hCG, in particular the relationship of progesterone with the hyperprolactinemic condition of the model. In addition, we describe the role of hyperprolactinemia as the main cause of infertility and the phenotypic abnormalities in these mice, and the use of dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline to normalize these conditions. Copyright © 2014 Society for Biology of Reproduction & the Institute of Animal Reproduction and Food Research of Polish Academy of Sciences in Olsztyn. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of the mitochondrial genetic background in complex III deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Carmen Gil Borlado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent years clinical evidence has emphasized the importance of the mtDNA genetic background that hosts a primary pathogenic mutation in the clinical expression of mitochondrial disorders, but little experimental confirmation has been provided. We have analyzed the pathogenic role of a novel homoplasmic mutation (m.15533 A>G in the cytochrome b (MT-CYB gene in a patient presenting with lactic acidosis, seizures, mild mental delay, and behaviour abnormalities. METHODOLOGY: Spectrophotometric analyses of the respiratory chain enzyme activities were performed in different tissues, the whole muscle mitochondrial DNA of the patient was sequenced, and the novel mutation was confirmed by PCR-RFLP. Transmitochondrial cybrids were constructed to confirm the pathogenicity of the mutation, and assembly/stability studies were carried out in fibroblasts and cybrids by means of mitochondrial translation inhibition in combination with blue native gel electrophoresis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Biochemical analyses revealed a decrease in respiratory chain complex III activity in patient's skeletal muscle, and a combined enzyme defect of complexes III and IV in fibroblasts. Mutant transmitochondrial cybrids restored normal enzyme activities and steady-state protein levels, the mutation was mildly conserved along evolution, and the proband's mother and maternal aunt, both clinically unaffected, also harboured the homoplasmic mutation. These data suggested a nuclear genetic origin of the disease. However, by forcing the de novo functioning of the OXPHOS system, a severe delay in the biogenesis of the respiratory chain complexes was observed in the mutants, which demonstrated a direct functional effect of the mitochondrial genetic background. CONCLUSIONS: Our results point to possible pitfalls in the detection of pathogenic mitochondrial mutations, and highlight the role of the genetic mtDNA background in the development of mitochondrial disorders.

  1. Genetic mouse models for otitis media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyin Zheng; Ken R Johnson

    2003-01-01

    @@ Genetics of Otitis Media (OM): OM is affected by multiple factors including eustachian tube (ET) structure and function, immune status, innate mucosal defense, genetic susceptibility, and pathogens.

  2. Cellular and genetic analysis of mouse blastocyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, R A; Spindle, A I

    1979-01-01

    The development of mouse embryos was studied by both cellular and genetic approaches. In the cellular analysis, determination of cell fate in blastocysts and in cell populations derived from them was studied in an attempt to estimate the time that these cells become committed to their fate. In the genetic analysis, existing mutations that are lethal to mouse embryos were used to discern essential features of early development. In this review, the timing of cell determination in the inner cell mass and the primary ectoderm, and the manifestation of defects in mouse embryos that are homozygous for the A/sup y/ allele of the agouti locus were considered.

  3. Effect of Duplicate Genes on Mouse Genetic Robustness: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, analyses based on the current knockout (KO mouse phenotypes led to the conclusion that duplicate genes had almost no role in mouse genetic robustness. It has been suggested that the bias of mouse KO database toward ancient duplicates may possibly cause this knockout duplicate puzzle, that is, a very similar proportion of essential genes (PE between duplicate genes and singletons. In this paper, we conducted an extensive and careful analysis for the mouse KO phenotype data and corroborated a strong effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetics robustness. Moreover, the effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetic robustness is duplication-age dependent, which holds after ruling out the potential confounding effect from coding-sequence conservation, protein-protein connectivity, functional bias, or the bias of duplicates generated by whole genome duplication (WGD. Our findings suggest that two factors, the sampling bias toward ancient duplicates and very ancient duplicates with a proportion of essential genes higher than that of singletons, have caused the mouse knockout duplicate puzzle; meanwhile, the effect of genetic buffering may be correlated with sequence conservation as well as protein-protein interactivity.

  4. Vitamin D status in primary hyperparathyroidism: effect of genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battista, Claudia; Guarnieri, Vito; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Baorda, Filomena; Pileri, Mauro; Garrubba, Maria; Salcuni, Antonio S; Chiodini, Iacopo; Minisola, Salvatore; Romagnoli, Elisabetta; Eller-Vainicher, Cristina; Santini, Stefano A; Parisi, Salvatore; Frusciante, Vincenzo; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Hendy, Geoffrey N; Scillitani, Alfredo; Cole, David E C

    2017-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is associated with hypovitaminosis D as assessed by serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (TotalD) levels. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether this is also the case for the calculated bioavailable 25-hydroxyvitamin D (BioD) or free 25-hydroxyvitamin D (FreeD), and whether the vitamin D status is influenced by genetic background. We compared vitamin D status of 88 PHPT patients each with a matched healthy family member sharing genetic background, i.e., first-degree relative (FDR), or not, namely an in-law relative (ILR). We compared TotalD and vitamin D-binding protein (DBP), using the latter to calculate BioD and FreeD. We also genotyped two common DBP polymorphisms (rs7041 and rs4588) likely to affect the affinity for and levels of vitamin D metabolites. TotalD was lower (p < 0.001) in PHPT (12.3 ± 6.6 ng/mL) than either family member group (FDR: 19.4 ± 12.1 and ILR: 23.2 ± 14.1), whether adjusted for DBP or not. DBP levels were also significantly lower (p < 0.001) in PHPT (323 ± 73 mg/L) versus FDR (377 ± 98) or ILR (382 ± 101). The differences between PHPT and control groups for TotalD, BioD, and FreeD were maintained after adjustment for season, gender, and serum creatinine. 25-hydroxyvitamin D, evaluated as total, free, or bioavailable fractions, is decreased in PHPT. No difference was seen between first-degree relative and in-law controls, suggesting that neither genetic nor non-genetic background greatly influences the genesis of the hypovitaminosis D seen in PHPT.

  5. Genetic background affects human glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianshu Bai

    Full Text Available The human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP promoter has been used to generate numerous transgenic mouse lines, which has facilitated the analysis of astrocyte function in health and disease. Here, we evaluated the expression levels of various hGFAP transgenes at different ages in the two most commonly used inbred mouse strains, FVB/N (FVB and C57BL/6N (B6N. In general, transgenic mice maintained on the B6N background displayed weaker transgene expression compared with transgenic FVB mice. Higher level of transgene expression in B6N mice could be regained by crossbreeding to FVB wild type mice. However, the endogenous murine GFAP expression was equivalent in both strains. In addition, we found that endogenous GFAP expression was increased in transgenic mice in comparison to wild type mice. The activities of the hGFAP transgenes were not age-dependently regulated. Our data highlight the importance of proper expression analysis when non-homologous recombination transgenesis is used.

  6. The art and design of genetic screens: mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kile, Benjamin T; Hilton, Douglas J

    2005-07-01

    Humans are mammals, not bacteria or plants, yeast or nematodes, insects or fish. Mice are also mammals, but unlike gorilla and goat, fox and ferret, giraffe and jackal, they are suited perfectly to the laboratory environment and genetic experimentation. In this review, we will summarize the tools, tricks and techniques for executing forward genetic screens in the mouse and argue that this approach is now accessible to most biologists, rather than being the sole domain of large national facilities and specialized genetics laboratories.

  7. Towards Transgenic Primates: What can we learn from mouse genetics?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Hui; WANG Phillip L.; TSIEN Joe Z.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the great physiological and behavioral similarities with humans, monkeys represent the ideal models not only for the study of complex cognitive behavior but also for the precUnical research and development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases. Various powerful genetic tech-nologies initially developed for making mouse models are being explored for generating transgenic primate models. We review the latest genetic engineering technologies and discuss the potentials and limitations for systematic production of transgenic primates.

  8. Astonishing advances in mouse genetic tools for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Lech; Jackson, Walker S

    2015-01-01

    The humble house mouse has long been a workhorse model system in biomedical research. The technology for introducing site-specific genome modifications led to Nobel Prizes for its pioneers and opened a new era of mouse genetics. However, this technology was very time-consuming and technically demanding. As a result, many investigators continued to employ easier genome manipulation methods, though resulting models can suffer from overlooked or underestimated consequences. Another breakthrough, invaluable for the molecular dissection of disease mechanisms, was the invention of high-throughput methods to measure the expression of a plethora of genes in parallel. However, the use of samples containing material from multiple cell types could obfuscate data, and thus interpretations. In this review we highlight some important issues in experimental approaches using mouse models for biomedical research. We then discuss recent technological advances in mouse genetics that are revolutionising human disease research. Mouse genomes are now easily manipulated at precise locations thanks to guided endonucleases, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) or the CRISPR/Cas9 system, both also having the potential to turn the dream of human gene therapy into reality. Newly developed methods of cell type-specific isolation of transcriptomes from crude tissue homogenates, followed by detection with next generation sequencing (NGS), are vastly improving gene regulation studies. Taken together, these amazing tools simplify the creation of much more accurate mouse models of human disease, and enable the extraction of hitherto unobtainable data.

  9. Genetic polymorphism as a background of animal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2009-04-01

    Various studies have shown the associations between differences in human behavioral traits and genetic polymorphism of neurotransmitter-related proteins such as receptors, transporters and monoamine oxidase. To clarify the genetic background of animal behavior, corresponding regions in animals have been analyzed. The study has been especially focused on primates, as the evolutionally closest animal to humans, and on dogs, as the socially closest animal to humans. In primates, polymorphisms were discovered between or within species, and the functional effects on neural transmission were found to be different by alleles. Even in apes, the closest species to humans, function was different from that in humans. In dogs, allele distributions of several genes were different among breeds showing different behavioral traits, and genes associated with individual differences in aggressiveness and aptitude of working dogs were surveyed. The survey of behavior-related genes has also been carried out in other mammals such as horses and cetaceans. Genes controlling various behaviors in birds have also been reported. The marker genes for behavior will provide useful information for human evolution, welfare of zoo animals and effective selection of working dogs and industry animals.

  10. Controlling complexity : the clinical relevance of mouse complex genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schughart, Klaus; Libert, Claude; Kas, Martien J

    2013-01-01

    Experimental animal models are essential to obtain basic knowledge of the underlying biological mechanisms in human diseases. Here, we review major contributions to biomedical research and discoveries that were obtained in the mouse model by using forward genetics approaches and that provided key in

  11. Strain background modifies phenotypes in the ATP8B1-deficient mouse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.; Sanford, U.R.; Vargas, J.C.; Xu, H.; Groen, A.; Paulusma, C.C.; Grenert, J.P.; Pawlikowska, L.; Sen, S.; Oude Elferink, R.P.J.; Bull, L.N.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in ATP8B1 (FIC1) underlie cases of cholestatic disease, ranging from chronic and progressive (progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis) to intermittent (benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis). The ATP8B1-deficient mouse serves as an animal model of human ATP8B1 deficie

  12. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix L Struebing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma.

  13. The Behavioral Consequence of Phenylketonuria in Mice Depends on the Genetic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinenberg, Vibeke M.; van der Goot, Els; van Vliet, Danique; de Groot, Martijn J.; Mazzola, Priscila N.; Heiner-Fokkema, M. Rebecca; van Faassen, Martijn; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; van der Zee, Eddy A.

    2016-01-01

    To unravel the role of gene mutations in the healthy and the diseased state, countless studies have tried to link genotype with phenotype. However, over the years, it became clear that the strain of mice can influence these results. Nevertheless, identical gene mutations in different strains are often still considered equals. An example of this, is the research done in phenylketonuria (PKU), an inheritable metabolic disorder. In this field, a PKU mouse model (either on a BTBR or C57Bl/6 background) is often used to examine underlying mechanisms of the disease and/or new treatment strategies. Both strains have a point mutation in the gene coding for the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase which causes toxic concentrations of the amino acid phenylalanine in blood and brain, as found in PKU patients. Although the mutation is identical and therefore assumed to equally affect physiology and behavior in both strains, no studies directly compared the two genetic backgrounds to test this assumption. Therefore, this study compared the BTBR and C57Bl/6 wild-type and PKU mice on PKU-relevant amino acid- and neurotransmitter-levels and at a behavioral level. The behavioral paradigms were selected from previous literature on the PKU mouse model and address four domains, namely (1) activity levels, (2) motor performance, (3) anxiety and/or depression-like behavior, and (4) learning and memory. The results of this study showed comparable biochemical changes in phenylalanine and neurotransmitter concentrations. In contrast, clear differences in behavioral outcome between the strains in all four above-mentioned domains were found, most notably in the learning and memory domain. The outcome in this domain seem to be primarily due to factors inherent to the genetic background of the mouse and much less by differences in PKU-specific biochemical parameters in blood and brain. The difference in behavioral outcome between PKU of both strains emphasizes that the consequence of the PAH

  14. The Behavioral Consequence of Phenylketonuria in Mice Depends on the Genetic Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vibeke Marijn Bruinenberg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To unravel the role of gene mutations in the healthy and the diseased state, countless studies have tried to link genotype with phenotype. However, over the years, it became clear that the strain of mice can influence these results. Nevertheless, identical gene mutations in different strains are often still considered equals. An example of this, is the research done in phenylketonuria (PKU, an inheritable metabolic disorder. In this field, a PKU mouse model (either on a BTBR or C57Bl/6 background is often used to examine underlying mechanisms of the disease and/or new treatment strategies. Both strains have a point mutation in the gene coding for the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase which causes toxic concentrations of the amino acid phenylalanine in blood and brain, as found in PKU patients. Although the mutation is identical and therefore assumed to equally affect physiology and behavior in both strains, no studies directly compared the two genetic backgrounds to test this assumption. Therefore, this study compared the BTBR and C57Bl/6 wild-type and PKU mice on PKU-relevant amino acid- and neurotransmitter levels and at a behavioral level. The behavioral paradigms were selected from previous literature on the PKU mouse model and address four domains, namely 1 activity levels, 2 motor performance, 3 anxiety and/or depression-like behavior, and 4 learning and memory. The results of this study showed comparable biochemical changes in phenylalanine and neurotransmitter concentrations. In contrast, clear differences in behavioral outcome between the strains in all four above-mentioned domains were found, most notably in the learning and memory domain. The outcome in this domain seem to be primarily due to factors inherent to the genetic background of the mouse and much less by differences in PKU-specific biochemical parameters in blood and brain. The difference in behavioral outcome between PKU of both strains emphasizes that the consequence of the

  15. Host genetic and environmental effects on mouse intestinal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James H; Foster, Carmen M; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Campbell, Alisha G; Yang, Zamin K; Wymore, Ann; Palumbo, Anthony V; Chesler, Elissa J; Podar, Mircea

    2012-11-01

    The mammalian gut harbors complex and variable microbial communities, across both host phylogenetic space and conspecific individuals. A synergy of host genetic and environmental factors shape these communities and account for their variability, but their individual contributions and the selective pressures involved are still not well understood. We employed barcoded pyrosequencing of V1-2 and V4 regions of bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes to characterize the effects of host genetics and environment on cecum assemblages in 10 genetically distinct, inbred mouse strains. Eight of these strains are the foundation of the Collaborative Cross (CC), a panel of mice derived from a genetically diverse set of inbred founder strains, designed specifically for complex trait analysis. Diversity of gut microbiota was characterized by complementing phylogenetic and distance-based, sequence-clustering approaches. Significant correlations were found between the mouse strains and their gut microbiota, reflected by distinct bacterial communities. Cohabitation and litter had a reduced, although detectable effect, and the microbiota response to these factors varied by strain. We identified bacterial phylotypes that appear to be discriminative and strain-specific to each mouse line used. Cohabitation of different strains of mice revealed an interaction of host genetic and environmental factors in shaping gut bacterial consortia, in which bacterial communities became more similar but retained strain specificity. This study provides a baseline analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in the eight CC progenitor strains and will be linked to integrated host genotype, phenotype and microbiota research on the resulting CC panel.

  16. Host Genetic and Environmental Effects on Mouse Cecum Microbiota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, James H [ORNL; Foster, Carmen M [ORNL; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A [ORNL; Campbell, Alisha G [ORNL; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Wymore, Ann [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL; Podar, Mircea [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian gut harbors complex and variable microbial communities, across both host phylogenetic space and conspecific individuals. A synergy of host genetic and environmental factors shape these communities and account for their variability, but their individual contributions and the selective pressures involved are still not well understood. We employed barcoded pyrosequencing of V1-2 and V4 regions of bacterial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes to characterize the effects of host genetics and environment on cecum assemblages in 10 genetically distinct, inbred mouse strains. Eight of these strains are the foundation of the Collaborative Cross (CC), a panel of mice derived from a genetically diverse set of inbred founder strains, designed specifically for complex trait analysis. Diversity of gut microbiota was characterized by complementing phylogenetic and distance-based, sequence-clustering approaches. Significant correlations were found between the mouse strains and their gut microbiota, reflected by distinct bacterial communities. Cohabitation and litter had a reduced, although detectable effect, and the microbiota response to these factors varied by strain. We identified bacterial phylotypes that appear to be discriminative and strain-specific to each mouse line used. Cohabitation of different strains of mice revealed an interaction of host genetic and environmental factors in shaping gut bacterial consortia, in which bacterial communities became more similar but retained strain specificity. This study provides a baseline analysis of intestinal bacterial communities in the eight CC progenitor strains and will be linked to integrated host genotype, phenotype and microbiota research on the resulting CC panel.

  17. Genetic background modifies nuclear mutant huntingtin accumulation and HD CAG repeat instability in Huntington's disease knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Alejandro; Dragileva, Ella; Teed, Allison; Espinola, Janice; Fossale, Elisa; Gillis, Tammy; Lopez, Edith; Myers, Richard H; MacDonald, Marcy E; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2006-06-15

    Genetically precise models of Huntington's disease (HD), Hdh CAG knock-in mice, are powerful systems in which phenotypes associated with expanded HD CAG repeats are studied. To dissect the genetic pathways that underlie such phenotypes, we have generated Hdh(Q111) knock-in mouse lines that are congenic for C57BL/6, FVB/N and 129Sv inbred genetic backgrounds and investigated four Hdh(Q111) phenotypes in these three genetic backgrounds: the intergenerational instability of the HD CAG repeat and the striatal-specific somatic HD CAG repeat expansion, nuclear mutant huntingtin accumulation and intranuclear inclusion formation. Our results reveal increased intergenerational and somatic instability of the HD CAG repeat in C57BL/6 and FVB/N backgrounds compared with the 129Sv background. The accumulation of nuclear mutant huntingtin and the formation of intranuclear inclusions were fastest in the C57BL/6 background, slowest in the 129Sv background and intermediate in the FVB/N background. Inbred strain-specific differences were independent of constitutive HD CAG repeat size and did not correlate with Hdh mRNA levels. These data provide evidence for genetic modifiers of both intergenerational HD CAG repeat instability and striatal-specific phenotypes. Different relative contributions of C57BL/6 and 129Sv genetic backgrounds to the onset of nuclear mutant huntingtin and somatic HD CAG repeat expansion predict that the initiation of each of these two phenotypes is modified by different genes. Our findings set the stage for defining disease-related genetic pathways that will ultimately provide insight into disease mechanism.

  18. Behavioral phenotypes of genetic mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdoba, T M; Leach, P T; Crawley, J N

    2016-01-01

    More than a hundred de novo single gene mutations and copy-number variants have been implicated in autism, each occurring in a small subset of cases. Mutant mouse models with syntenic mutations offer research tools to gain an understanding of the role of each gene in modulating biological and behavioral phenotypes relevant to autism. Knockout, knockin and transgenic mice incorporating risk gene mutations detected in autism spectrum disorder and comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders are now widely available. At present, autism spectrum disorder is diagnosed solely by behavioral criteria. We developed a constellation of mouse behavioral assays designed to maximize face validity to the types of social deficits and repetitive behaviors that are central to an autism diagnosis. Mouse behavioral assays for associated symptoms of autism, which include cognitive inflexibility, anxiety, hyperactivity, and unusual reactivity to sensory stimuli, are frequently included in the phenotypic analyses. Over the past 10 years, we and many other laboratories around the world have employed these and additional behavioral tests to phenotype a large number of mutant mouse models of autism. In this review, we highlight mouse models with mutations in genes that have been identified as risk genes for autism, which work through synaptic mechanisms and through the mTOR signaling pathway. Robust, replicated autism-relevant behavioral outcomes in a genetic mouse model lend credence to a causal role for specific gene contributions and downstream biological mechanisms in the etiology of autism.

  19. Genetically engineered mouse models and human osteosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Alvin JM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Osteosarcoma is the most common form of bone cancer. Pivotal insight into the genes involved in human osteosarcoma has been provided by the study of rare familial cancer predisposition syndromes. Three kindreds stand out as predisposing to the development of osteosarcoma: Li-Fraumeni syndrome, familial retinoblastoma and RecQ helicase disorders, which include Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome in particular. These disorders have highlighted the important roles of P53 and RB respectively, in the development of osteosarcoma. The association of OS with RECQL4 mutations is apparent but the relevance of this to OS is uncertain as mutations in RECQL4 are not found in sporadic OS. Application of the knowledge or mutations of P53 and RB in familial and sporadic OS has enabled the development of tractable, highly penetrant murine models of OS. These models share many of the cardinal features associated with human osteosarcoma including, importantly, a high incidence of spontaneous metastasis. The recent development of these models has been a significant advance for efforts to improve our understanding of the genetics of human OS and, more critically, to provide a high-throughput genetically modifiable platform for preclinical evaluation of new therapeutics.

  20. Mouse models for pseudoxanthoma elasticum: genetic and dietary modulation of the ectopic mineralization phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoli Li

    Full Text Available Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE, a heritable ectopic mineralization disorder, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. Null mice (Abcc6(-/- recapitulate the genetic, histopathologic and ultrastructural features of PXE, and they demonstrate early and progressive mineralization of vibrissae dermal sheath, which serves as a biomarker of the overall mineralization process. Recently, as part of a mouse aging study at The Jackson Laboratory, 31 inbred mouse strains were necropsied, and two of them, KK/HlJ and 129S1/SvImJ, were noted to have vibrissae dermal mineralization similar to Abcc6(-/- mice. These two strains were shown to harbor a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs32756904 in the Abcc6 gene, which resulted in out-of-frame splicing and marked reduction in ABCC6 protein expression in the liver of these mice. The same polymorphism is present in two additional mouse strains, DBA/2J and C3H/HeJ, with similar reduction in Abcc6 protein levels, yet these mice did not demonstrate tissue mineralization when kept on standard rodent diet. However, all four mouse strains, when placed on experimental diet enriched in phosphate and low in magnesium, developed extensive ectopic mineralization. These results indicate that the genetic background of mice and the mineral composition of their diet can profoundly modulate the ectopic mineralization process predicated on mutations in the Abcc6 gene. These mice provide novel model systems to study the pathomechanisms and the reasons for strain background on phenotypic variability of PXE.

  1. A Strong Impact of Genetic Background on Gut Microflora in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Steven Esworthy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background affects susceptibility to ileocolitis in mice deficient in two intracellular glutathione peroxidases, GPx1 and GPx2. The C57BL/6 (B6 GPx1/2 double-knockout (DKO mice have mild ileocolitis, and 129S1/Sv (129 DKO mice have severe inflammation. We used diet to modulate ileocolitis; a casein-based defined diet with AIN76A micronutrients (AIN attenuates inflammation compared to conventional LabDiets. Because luminal microbiota induce DKO ileocolitis, we assessed bacterial composition with automated ribosomal intergenic-spacer analysis (ARISA on cecal DNA. We found that mouse strain had the strongest impact on the composition of microbiota than diet and GPx genotypes. In comparing AIN and LabDiet, DKO mice were more resistant to change than the non-DKO or WT mice. However, supplementing yeast and inulin to AIN diet greatly altered microflora profiles in the DKO mice. From 129 DKO strictly, we found overgrowth of Escherichia coli. We conclude that genetic background predisposes mice to colonization of potentially pathogenic E. coli.

  2. The Mouse House: A brief history of the ORNL mouse-genetics program, 1947–2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Liane B.

    2013-10-01

    The large mouse genetics program at the Oak Ridge National Lab is often re-membered chiefly for the germ-cell mutation-rate data it generated and their uses in estimating the risk of heritable radiation damage. In fact, it soon became a multi-faceted research effort that, over a period of almost 60 years, generated a wealth of information in the areas of mammalian mutagenesis, basic genetics (later enriched by molecular techniques), cytogenetics, reproductive biology, biochemistry of germ cells, and teratology. Research in the area of germ-cell mutagenesis explored the important physical and biological factors that affect the frequency and nature of induced mutations and made several unexpected discoveries, such as the major importance of the perigametic interval (the zygote stage) for the origin of spontaneous mutations and for the sensitivity to induced genetic change. Of practical value was the discovery that ethylnitrosourea was a supermutagen for point mutations, making high-efficiency mutagenesis in the mouse feasible worldwide. Teratogenesis findings resulted in recommendations still generally accepted in radiological practice. Studies supporting the mutagenesis research added whole bodies of information about mammalian germ-cell development and about molecular targets in germ cells. The early decision to not merely count but propagate genetic variants of all sorts made possible further discoveries, such as the Y-Chromosome s importance in mammalian sex determination and the identification of rare X-autosome translocations, which, in turn, led to the formulation of the single-active-X hypothesis and provided tools for studies of functional mosaicism for autosomal genes, male sterility, and chromosome-pairing mechanism. Extensive genetic and then molecular analyses of large numbers of induced specific-locus mutants resulted in fine-structure physical and correlated functional mapping of significant portions of the mouse genome and constituted a valuable

  3. Mouse redox histology using genetically encoded probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, Yuuta; Roma, Leticia P; Sobotta, Mirko C; Rose, Adam J; Diaz, Mauricio Berriel; Locatelli, Giuseppe; Breckwoldt, Michael O; Misgeld, Thomas; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Herzig, Stephan; Müller-Decker, Karin; Dick, Tobias P

    2016-03-15

    Mapping the in vivo distribution of endogenous oxidants in animal tissues is of substantial biomedical interest. Numerous health-related factors, including diet, physical activity, infection, aging, toxins, or pharmacological intervention, may cause redox changes. Tools are needed to pinpoint redox state changes to particular organs, tissues, cell types, and subcellular organelles. We describe a procedure that preserves the in vivo redox state of genetically encoded redox biosensors within histological tissue sections, thus providing "redox maps" for any tissue and comparison of interest. We demonstrate the utility of the technique by visualizing endogenous redox differences and changes in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, embryonic development, and nutrient starvation. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Temporal Dependence of Chromosomal Aberration on Radiation Quality and Cellular Genetic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Krieger, Stephanie; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Goss, Rosalin; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Radiation induced cancer risks are driven by genetic instability. It is not well understood how different radiation sources induce genetic instability in cells with different genetic background. Here we report our studies on genetic instability, particularly chromosome instability using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in human primary lymphocytes, normal human fibroblasts, and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in a temporal manner after exposure to high energy protons and Fe ions. The chromosome spread was prepared 48 hours, 1 week, 2 week, and 1 month after radiation exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with whole chromosome specific probes (chr. 3 and chr. 6). After exposure to protons and Fe ions of similar cumulative energy (??), Fe ions induced more chromosomal aberrations at early time point (48 hours) in all three types of cells. Over time (after 1 month), more chromosome aberrations were observed in cells exposed to Fe ions than in the same type of cells exposed to protons. While the mammary epithelial cells have higher intrinsic genetic instability and higher rate of initial chromosome aberrations than the fibroblasts, the fibroblasts retained more chromosomal aberration after long term cell culture (1 month) in comparison to their initial frequency of chromosome aberration. In lymphocytes, the chromosome aberration frequency at 1 month after exposure to Fe ions was close to unexposed background, and the chromosome aberration frequency at 1 month after exposure to proton was much higher. In addition to human cells, mouse bone marrow cells isolated from strains CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 were irradiated with proton or Fe ions and were analyzed for chromosome aberration at different time points. Cells from CBA mice showed similar frequency of chromosome aberration at early and late time points, while cells from C57 mice showed very different chromosome aberration rate at early and late time points. Our results suggest that relative

  5. Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease: Focus on Electrophysiological Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Cepeda

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the HD (Huntington's disease gene in 1993 led to the creation of genetic mouse models of the disease and opened the doors for mechanistic studies. In particular, the early changes and progression of the disease could be followed and examined systematically. The present review focuses on the contribution of these genetic mouse models to the understanding of functional changes in neurons as the HD phenotype progresses, and concentrates on two brain areas: the striatum, the site of most conspicuous pathology in HD, and the cortex, a site that is becoming increasingly important in understanding the widespread behavioural abnormalities. Mounting evidence points to synaptic abnormalities in communication between the cortex and striatum and cell-cell interactions as major determinants of HD symptoms, even in the absence of severe neuronal degeneration and death.

  6. Telomere length homeostasis and telomere position effect on a linear human artificial chromosome are dictated by the genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weuts, An; Voet, Thierry; Verbeeck, Jelle; Lambrechts, Nathalie; Wirix, Evelyne; Schoonjans, Luc; Danloy, Sophie; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2012-12-01

    Telomere position effect (TPE) is the influence of telomeres on subtelomeric epigenetic marks and gene expression. Previous studies suggested that TPE depends on genetic background. As these analyses were performed on different chromosomes, cell types and species, it remains unclear whether TPE represents a chromosome-rather than genetic background-specific regulation. We describe the development of a Linear Human Artificial Chromosome (L-HAC) as a new tool for telomere studies. The L-HAC was generated through the Cre-loxP-mediated addition of telomere ends to an existing circular HAC (C-HAC). As it can be transferred to genetically distinct cell lines and animal models the L-HAC enables the study of TPE in an unprecedented manner. The HAC was relocated to four telomerase-positive cell lines via microcell-mediated chromosome transfer and subsequently to mice via blastocyst injection of L-HAC(+)-ES-cells. We could show consistent genetic background-dependent adaptation of telomere length and telomere-associated de novo subtelomeric DNA methylation in mouse ES-R1 cells as well as in mice. Expression of the subtelomeric neomycin gene was inversely correlated with telomere length and subtelomeric methylation. We thus provide a new tool for functional telomere studies and provide strong evidence that telomere length, subtelomeric chromatin marks and expression of subtelomeric genes are genetic background dependent.

  7. Growth retardation of Paramecium and mouse cells by shielding them from background radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Masanobu; Okuyama, Katsuyuki; Shiraishi, Kazunori; Matsuda, Yatsuka; Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Shiomi, Nobuyuki; Yonezawa, Morio; Yagi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In the 1970s and 1980s, Planel et al. reported that the growth of paramecia was decreased by shielding them from background radiation. In the 1990s, Takizawa et al. found that mouse cells displayed a decreased growth rate under shielded conditions. The purpose of the present study was to confirm that growth is impaired in organisms that have been shielded from background radiation. Radioprotection was produced with a shielding chamber surrounded by a 15 cm thick iron wall and a 10 cm thick paraffin wall that reduced the γ ray and neutron levels in the chamber to 2% and 25% of the background levels, respectively. Although the growth of Paramecium tetraurelia was not impaired by short-term radioprotection (around 10 days), which disagreed with the findings of Planel et al., decreased growth was observed after long-term (40-50 days) radiation shielding. When mouse lymphoma L5178Y cells were incubated inside or outside of the shielding chamber for 7 days, the number of cells present on the 6th and 7th days under the shielding conditions was significantly lower than that present under the non-shielding conditions. These inhibitory effects on cell growth were abrogated by the addition of a ¹³⁷Cs γ-ray source disk to the chamber. Furthermore, no growth retardation was observed in XRCC4-deficient mouse M10 cells, which display impaired DNA double strand break repair.

  8. Alterations in Striatal Synaptic Transmission are Consistent across Genetic Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI*** (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  9. Alterations in striatal synaptic transmission are consistent across genetic mouse models of Huntington's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian M Cummings

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the identification of the gene responsible for HD (Huntington's disease, many genetic mouse models have been generated. Each employs a unique approach for delivery of the mutated gene and has a different CAG repeat length and background strain. The resultant diversity in the genetic context and phenotypes of these models has led to extensive debate regarding the relevance of each model to the human disorder. Here, we compare and contrast the striatal synaptic phenotypes of two models of HD, namely the YAC128 mouse, which carries the full-length huntingtin gene on a yeast artificial chromosome, and the CAG140 KI (knock-in mouse, which carries a human/mouse chimaeric gene that is expressed in the context of the mouse genome, with our previously published data obtained from the R6/2 mouse, which is transgenic for exon 1 mutant huntingtin. We show that striatal MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons in YAC128 and CAG140 KI mice have similar electrophysiological phenotypes to that of the R6/2 mouse. These include a progressive increase in membrane input resistance, a reduction in membrane capacitance, a lower frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents and a greater frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subpopulation of striatal neurons. Thus, despite differences in the context of the inserted gene between these three models of HD, the primary electrophysiological changes observed in striatal MSNs are consistent. The outcomes suggest that the changes are due to the expression of mutant huntingtin and such alterations can be extended to the human condition.

  10. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randles, Michael J; Woolf, Adrian S; Huang, Jennifer L; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Price, Karen L; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J; Long, David A; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-α, and meprin 1-β. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein-protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease.

  11. Phosphorylation networks regulating JNK activity in diverse genetic backgrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakal, Chris; Linding, Rune; Llense, Flora;

    2008-01-01

    Cellular signaling networks have evolved to enable swift and accurate responses, even in the face of genetic or environmental perturbation. Thus, genetic screens may not identify all the genes that regulate different biological processes. Moreover, although classical screening approaches have suc...

  12. The genetic background of Southern Iranian couples before marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariman, A; Sobhan, MR; Savaei, M; Aref-Eshghi, E; Nourinejad, R; Manoochehri, M; Ghahremani, S; Daliri, F

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Genetic service for couples plays an increasingly important role in diagnosis and risk management. This study investigated the status of consanguinity and the medical genetic history (effectiveness and coverage of medical genetic services) in couples residing in a city in southern Iran. We questioned couples who were referred to Behbahan Marital Counseling Center, Behbahan, Iran, during the period from January to November 2014, to obtain information on consanguinity, disease history, and previous referral to a medical genetics center. For the collected data was obtained descriptive statistics with STATA 11.0 software. A total of 500 couples were questioned. Mean age was 24.8 ± 5.2 years. Almost one quarter (23.4%) of the couples were consanguineous. Consanguinity was almost twice as common in rural areas as in urban areas (33.9 vs. 19.2%, p = 0.001). Only a few couples (~3.0%) had ever been referred for genetic counseling. The main reason for previous genetic counseling was consanguinity (85.7%). The majority of the participants (96.3%) had never been tested for any genetic conditions. Our findings suggest that only a small proportion of couples in Khuzestan Province, Iran (Behbahan City) were receiving adequate genetics care. This may reflect the limited accessibility of such services, and inadequate awareness and education among the care providers. PMID:28289591

  13. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Christopher H; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-06-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. However, it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but are instead due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the underexplored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the 'wild type' genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs.

  14. Behavioral deficits in an Angelman syndrome model: effects of genetic background and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsien-Sung; Burns, Andrew J; Nonneman, Randal J; Baker, Lorinda K; Riddick, Natallia V; Nikolova, Viktoriya D; Riday, Thorfinn T; Yashiro, Koji; Philpot, Benjamin D; Moy, Sheryl S

    2013-04-15

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder associated with disruption of maternally inherited UBE3A (ubiquitin protein ligase E3A) expression. At the present time, there is no effective treatment for AS. Mouse lines with loss of maternal Ube3a (Ube3a(m-/p+)) recapitulate multiple aspects of the clinical AS profile, including impaired motor coordination, learning deficits, and seizures. Thus, these genetic mouse models could serve as behavioral screens for preclinical efficacy testing, a critical component of drug discovery for AS intervention. However, the severity and consistency of abnormal phenotypes reported in Ube3a(m-/p+) mice can vary, dependent upon age and background strain, which is problematic for the detection of beneficial drug effects. As part of an ongoing AS drug discovery initiative, we characterized Ube3a(m-/p+) mice on either a 129S7/SvEvBrd-Hprt(b-m2) (129) or C57BL/6J (B6) background across a range of functional domains and ages to identify reproducible and sufficiently large phenotypes suitable for screening therapeutic compounds. The results from the study showed that Ube3a(m-/p+) mice have significant deficits in acquisition and reversal learning in the Morris water maze. The findings also demonstrated that Ube3a(m-/p+) mice exhibit motor impairment in a rotarod task, hypoactivity, reduced rearing and marble-burying, and deficient fear conditioning. Overall, these profiles of abnormal phenotypes can provide behavioral targets for evaluating effects of novel therapeutic strategies relevant to AS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. SAP modulates B cell functions in a genetic background-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Yigit, Burcu; Keszei, Marton; Castro, Wilson; Magelky, Erica M; Terhorst, Cox

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lympho-proliferative syndrome (XLP), a severe primary immunodeficiency syndrome with disease manifestations that include fatal mononucleosis, B cell lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. It is well accepted that insufficient help by SAP-/- CD4+ T cells, in particular during the germinal center reaction, is a component of dysgammaglobulinemia in XLP patients and SAP-/- animals. It is however not well understood whether in XLP patients and SAP-/- mice B cell functions are affected, even though B cells themselves do not express SAP. Here we report that B cell intrinsic responses to haptenated protein antigens are impaired in SAP-/- mice and in Rag-/- mice into which B cells derived from SAP-/- mice together with wt CD4+ T cells had been transferred. This impaired B cells functions are in part depending on the genetic background of the SAP-/- mouse, which affects B cell homeostasis. Surprisingly, stimulation with an agonistic anti-CD40 causes strong in vivo and in vitro B cell responses in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the SAP-related B cell functions. The finding that anti-CD40 can in part restore impaired B cell responses in SAP-/- mice, suggests potentially novel therapeutic interventions in subsets of XLP patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Blood pressure, heart rate and tubuloglomerular feedback in A1AR-deficient mice with different genetic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S M; Mizel, D; Qin, Y; Huang, Y; Schnermann, J

    2015-01-01

    Differences in genetic background between control mice and mice with targeted gene mutations have been recognized as a potential cause for phenotypic differences. In this study, we have used A1AR-deficient mice in a C57Bl/6 and SWR/J congenic background to assess the influence of background on the effect of A1AR-deficiency on cardiovascular and renal functional parameters. In A1AR+/+ and A1AR-/- mice in C57Bl/6 and SWR/J congenic backgrounds, we assessed blood pressure and heart rate using radio-telemetry, plasma renin concentrations and tubuloglomerular feedback. We did not detect significant differences in arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rates (HR) between A1AR+/+ and A1AR-/- mice in either C57Bl/6, SWR/J or mixed backgrounds. MAP and HR were significantly higher in SWR/J than in C57Bl/6 mice. A high NaCl intake increased MAP in A1AR-/- mice on C57Bl/6 background while there was less or no salt sensitivity in the SWR/J background. No significant differences in plasma renin concentration were detected between A1AR-/- and A1AR+/+ mice in any of the strains. Tubuloglomerular feedback was found to be absent in A1AR-/- mice with SWR/J genetic background. While this study confirmed important differences between inbred mouse strains, we did not identify phenotypic modifications of A1AR-related effects on blood pressure, heart rate and plasma renin by differences in genetic background. © 2014 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaine C Keebaugh

    Full Text Available Lesch-Nyhan disease (LND is a severe X-linked neurological disorder caused by a deficiency of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT. In contrast, HPRT-deficiency in the mouse does not result in the profound phenotypes such as self-injurious behavior observed in humans, and the genetic basis for this phenotypic disparity between HPRT-deficient humans and mice is unknown. To test the hypothesis that HPRT deficiency is modified by the presence/absence of phosphoribosyltransferase domain containing 1 (PRTFDC1, a paralog of HPRT that is a functional gene in humans but an inactivated pseudogene in mice, we created transgenic mice that express human PRTFDC1 in wild-type and HPRT-deficient backgrounds. Male mice expressing PRTFDC1 on either genetic background were viable and fertile. However, the presence of PRTFDC1 in the HPRT-deficient, but not wild-type mice, increased aggression as well as sensitivity to a specific amphetamine-induced stereotypy, both of which are reminiscent of the increased aggressive and self-injurious behavior exhibited by patients with LND. These results demonstrate that PRTFDC1 is a genetic modifier of HPRT-deficiency in the mouse and could therefore have important implications for unraveling the molecular etiology of LND.

  18. Associations between dietary intake and body fat independent of genetic and familial environmental background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Ann Louise; Heitmann, B L; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm;

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether habitual dietary intake was associated with body fat mass and body fat distribution, independently of possible confounding by the genetic and shared environmental background.......To determine whether habitual dietary intake was associated with body fat mass and body fat distribution, independently of possible confounding by the genetic and shared environmental background....

  19. Distinguishing Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy/Dysplasia-Associated Mutations From Background Genetic Noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Pollevick, Guido D.; Tester, David J.; Cox, Moniek G. P. J.; Bhuiyan, Zahir; Bikker, Hennie; Wiesfeld, Ans C. P.; Hauer, Richard N. W.; van Tintelen, J. Peter; Jongbloed, Jan D. H.; Calkins, Hugh; Judge, Daniel P.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to determine the spectrum and prevalence of "background genetic noise" in the arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC) genetic test and to determine genetic associations that can guide the interpretation of a positive test result. Backgr

  20. Resistance to early-life stress in mice: effects of genetic background and stress duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene M. Savignac

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stress can induce marked behavioural and physiological impairments in adulthood including cognitive deficits, depression, anxiety and gastrointestinal dysfunction. Although robust rat models of early-life stress exist there are few established effective paradigms in the mouse. Genetic background and protocol parameters used are two critical variables in such model development.Thus we investigated the impact of two different early-life stress protocols in two commonly used inbred mouse strains. C57BL/6 and innately anxious BALB/c male mice were maternally deprived 3 hrs daily, either from postnatal day 1 to 14 (Protocol 1 or 6 to 10 (Protocol 2. Animals were assessed in adulthood for cognitive performance (spontaneous alternation behaviour test, anxiety (open field, light/dark box and elevated plus maze tests and depression-related behaviours (forced swim test in addition to stress-sensitive physiological changes. Overall, the results showed that early-life stressed mice from both strains displayed good cognitive ability and no elevations in anxiety. However, paradoxical changes occurred in C57BL/6 mice as the longer protocol (protocol 1 decreased anxiety in the light-dark box and increased exploration in the elevated plus maze. In BALB/c mice there were also limited effects of maternal separation with both separation protocols inducing reductions in stress-induced defecation and protocol 1 reducing the colon length. These data suggest that, independent of stress duration, mice from both strains were on the whole resilient to the maladaptive effects of early-life stress. Thus maternal-separation models of brain-gut axis dysfunction should rely on either different stressor protocols or other strains of mice.

  1. [Genetic and molecular background in autoimmune diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantárová, D; Prídavková, D; Ságová, I; Vrlík, M; Mikler, J; Buc, M

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1 DM) is caused by autoimmune-mediated and idiopathic beta-cell destruction of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans resulting in absolute insulin deficiency. Susceptibility to T1 DM is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. It is generally believed that in genetically susceptible individuals, the disease is triggered by environmental agents, such as viral infections, dietary factors in early infancy, or climatic influences. Many candidate genes for diabetes have been reported; those within the Major Histocompatibility Complex being among the most important. The most common autoantigens are insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, insuloma-associated antigen 2, and zinc transporter ZnT8. The destruction of beta-cells is mediated mainly by cellular mechanisms; antibodies only seem to reflect the ongoing autoimmune processes and are not directly involved in the tissue damage. They, however, appear prior to the onset of insulin deficiency which makes them suitable for use in the prevention of the disease.

  2. GOODNESS-OF-FIT TEST WITH GENETIC BACKGROUND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jihua; XIE Minyu; PENG Rong; SUN Zhihua

    2005-01-01

    The chi-square test is a well-known goodness-of-fit test. It is available for arbitrary alternative hypothesis, particularly for a very general alternative. However, when the alternative is a "one-sided" hypothesis, which usually appears in genetic linkage analysis, the chi-square test does not use the information offered by the one-sided hypothesis.Therefore, it is possible that an appropriate one-sided test, which uses the information,will be better than the chi-square test. This paper gives such an efficient one-sided test.Monte Carlo simulation results show that it is more powerful than the chi-square test, and its power has been in creased by 30 percent as compared with that of the chi-square test inmost situations.

  3. Ogg1 genetic background determines the genotoxic potential of environmentally relevant arsenic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Jordi; Sampayo-Reyes, Adriana; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2014-03-01

    Inorganic arsenic (i-As) is a well-established human carcinogen to which millions of people are exposed worldwide. It is generally accepted that the genotoxic effects of i-As after an acute exposure are partially linked to the i-As-induced production of reactive oxygen species, but it is necessary to better determine whether chronic sub-toxic i-As doses are able to induce biologically significant levels of oxidative DNA damage (ODD). To fill in this gap, we have tested the genotoxic and oxidative effects of environmentally relevant arsenic exposures using mouse embryonic fibroblast MEF mutant Ogg1 cells and their wild-type counterparts. Effects were examined by using the comet assay complemented with the use of FPG enzyme. Our findings indicate that MEF Ogg1-/- cells are more sensitive to arsenite-induced acute toxicity, genotoxicity and ODD. Long-term exposure to sub-toxic doses of arsenite generates a detectable increase in ODD and genotoxic DNA damage only in MEF Ogg1-deficient cells. Altogether, the data presented here point out the relevance of ODD and Ogg1 genetic background on the genotoxic risk of i-As at environmentally plausible doses. The persistent accumulation of DNA 8-OH-dG lesions in Ogg1-/- cells during the complete course of the exposure suggests a relevant role in arsenic-associated carcinogenic risk in turn.

  4. Genetic Background Strongly Influences the Bone Phenotype of P2X7 Receptor Knockout Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syberg, Susanne; Petersen, Solveig; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik

    2012-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor is expressed by bone cells and has been shown to be important in both bone formation and bone resorption. In this study we investigated the importance of the genetic background of the mouse strains on which the P2X7 knock-out models were based by comparing bone status...... of a new BALB/cJ P2X7(-/-) strain with a previous one based on the C57BL/6 strain. Female four-month-old mice from both strains were DXA scanned on a PIXImus densitometer; femurs were collected for bone strength measurements and serum for bone marker analysis. Bone-related parameters that were altered only...... slightly in the B6 P2X7(-/-) became significantly altered in the BALB/cJ P2X7(-/-) when compared to their wild type littermates. The BALB/cJ P2X7(-/-) showed reduced levels of serum C-telopeptide fragment (s-CTX), higher bone mineral density, and increased bone strength compared to the wild type...

  5. [The genetic control of mouse coat color and its applications in genetics teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wanjin; Morigen, Morigen

    2014-10-01

    Mice are the most commonly used mammalian model. The coat colors of mice are typical Mendelian traits, which have various colors such as white, black, yellow and agouti. The inheritance of mouse coat color is usually stated as an example only in teaching the knowledge of recessive lethal alleles. After searched the related literatures and summarized the molecular mechanisms of mouse coat color inheritance, we further expanded the application of this example into the introduction of the basic concepts of alleles and Mendelian laws, demonstration of the gene structure and function, regulation of gene expression, gene interaction, epigenetic modification, quantitative genetics, as well as evolutionary genetics. By running this example through the whole genetics-teaching lectures, we help the student to form a systemic and developmental view of genetic analysis. At the same time, this teaching approach not only highlights the advancement and integrity of genetics, but also results in a good teaching effect on inspiring the students' interest and attracting students' attention.

  6. Premature birth and diseases in premature infants: common genetic background?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Mikko

    2012-04-01

    It has been proposed that during human evolution, development of obligate bipedalism, narrow birth canal cross-sectional area and the large brain have forced an adjustment in duration of pregnancy (scaling of gestational age; Plunkett 2011). Children compared to other mammals are born with proportionally small brains (compared to adult brains), suggesting shortening of pregnancy duration during recent evolution. Prevalence of both obstructed delivery and premature birth is still exceptionally high. In near term infants, functional maturity and viability is high, and gene variants predisposing to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) are rare. Advanced antenatal and neonatal treatment practices during the new era of medicine allowed survival of also very preterm infants (gestation premature birth. Specific genes associating with diseases in preterm infants may also contribute to the susceptibility to preterm birth. Understanding and applying the knowledge of genetic interactions in normal and abnormal perinatal-neonatal development requires large, well-structured population cohorts, studies involving the whole genome and international interdisciplinary collaboration.

  7. The Power of Mouse Genetics to Review Study Spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    YATSENKO, A. N.; IWAMORI, N.; IWAMORI, T.; MATZUK, M. M.

    2010-01-01

    Approximately 80 million people worldwide are infertile, and nearly half of all infertility cases are attributed to a male factor. Therefore, progress in reproductive genetics becomes crucial for future diagnosis and treatment of infertility. In recent years, enormous progress has been made in this field. More than 400 mutant mouse models with specific reproductive abnormalities have been produced, and numerous human association studies have been discovered. However, the translation of basic science findings to clinical practice remains protracted, with only modest progress in the application of novel findings to clinical genetic testing and cures. To date, the most significant findings in male infertility remain numeric and structural chromosomal abnormalities and Y-chromosome microdeletions in infertile men. Thus, we anticipate that future genetic investigations will focus on infertile men with a normal somatic karyotype but with various spermatozoal defects, like insufficient production of spermatozoa (oligozoospermia), inadequate motility (asthenozoospermia), abnormal morphology (teratozoospermia), or combinations of these defects. Ultimately, basic advances in mammalian nonhuman reproduction will translate to clinical advances in human reproduction and testing for infertile humans, thereby helping to improve diagnostics and health care for infertile patients. PMID:19875488

  8. Methods in Molecular Biology Mouse Genetics: Methods and Protocols | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouse Genetics: Methods and Protocols provides selected mouse genetic techniques and their application in modeling varieties of human diseases. The chapters are mainly focused on the generation of different transgenic mice to accomplish the manipulation of genes of interest, tracing cell lineages, and modeling human diseases.

  9. 宿主的遗传背景对呼吸道感染沙眼衣原体后Treg产生的影响%The different genetic background of inbred mouse strains affect Treg cells during Chlamydia muridarum lung infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵国生; 徐晚雪; 王海萍; 乔赛; 唐莹莹; 任建云; 张永慈; 邢冬红; 黄焕军

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨宿主的遗传背景对呼吸道感染沙眼衣原体后调节性T细胞(Treg)产生的影响.方法 对衣原体感染具有明显易感性差异的C57 BL/6(C57)和C3H/HeN(C3H)小鼠鼻腔吸入1×103 IFU沙眼衣原体小鼠肺炎菌株(Chlamydia muridarum,Cm),于感染后不同天数处死小鼠.利用细胞内细胞因子染色技术检测小鼠脾脏单个核细胞CD4+ CD25+T细胞、Foxp3+ CD4+ CD25+T细胞百分率,利用RT-PCR技术检测小鼠肺组织Treg细胞分泌的相关细胞因子IL-10和IL-2的mRNA表达水平,并比较Cm呼吸道感染不同时期C57和C3H小鼠Treg免疫应答水平的差异.结果 Cm感染在两组小鼠均诱导较高水平的CD4+ CD25+T细胞、Foxp3+ CD4+ CD25+T细胞产生及IL-10、IL-2mRNA表达.感染后第3天和第7天,高易感性的C3H小鼠脾脏CD4+ CD25+T细胞、Foxp3+ CD4+CD25+T细胞扩增水平,以及肺组织细胞因子IL-2 mRNA的表达水平均高于C57小鼠,感染后第14天,C3H小鼠IL-10 mRNA表达水平明显高于C57小鼠.结论 衣原体呼吸道感染在高易感性的C3H小鼠诱导高水平的Treg的增殖及Treg相关细胞因子IL-10、IL-2的表达,从而对衣原体特异的Th1免疫应答抑制作用增强,在小鼠衣原体呼吸道感染易感性差异中发挥重要作用.%Objective To investigate the influence of different host genetic background on Treg cells during Chlamydia lung infection.Methods C3H/HeN and C57BL/6 mice that have different susceptibility to Chlamydia infection were inoculated intranasally with Chlamydia muridarum (Cm).To determine the Treg responses in two mouse strains,intracellular cytokine staining of spleen cells was performed to assay the proliferation of CD4+CD25+ T cells and CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+ T cells.The mRNA expression of IL-10 and IL-2 in the lung was assayed by RT-PCR during the different periods of infection.Results The proliferation of CD4+CD25+ T cells and CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+T cells in the spleen and the mRNA expression of IL-2 in the infected

  10. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Graybeal

    Full Text Available Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and

  11. Strains and stressors: an analysis of touchscreen learning in genetically diverse mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybeal, Carolyn; Bachu, Munisa; Mozhui, Khyobeni; Saksida, Lisa M; Bussey, Timothy J; Sagalyn, Erica; Williams, Robert W; Holmes, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Touchscreen-based systems are growing in popularity as a tractable, translational approach for studying learning and cognition in rodents. However, while mouse strains are well known to differ in learning across various settings, performance variation between strains in touchscreen learning has not been well described. The selection of appropriate genetic strains and backgrounds is critical to the design of touchscreen-based studies and provides a basis for elucidating genetic factors moderating behavior. Here we provide a quantitative foundation for visual discrimination and reversal learning using touchscreen assays across a total of 35 genotypes. We found significant differences in operant performance and learning, including faster reversal learning in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice. We then assessed DBA/2J and C57BL/6J for differential sensitivity to an environmental insult by testing for alterations in reversal learning following exposure to repeated swim stress. Stress facilitated reversal learning (selectively during the late stage of reversal) in C57BL/6J, but did not affect learning in DBA/2J. To dissect genetic factors underlying these differences, we phenotyped a family of 27 BXD strains generated by crossing C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. There was marked variation in discrimination, reversal and extinction learning across the BXD strains, suggesting this task may be useful for identifying underlying genetic differences. Moreover, different measures of touchscreen learning were only modestly correlated in the BXD strains, indicating that these processes are comparatively independent at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Finally, we examined the behavioral structure of learning via principal component analysis of the current data, plus an archival dataset, totaling 765 mice. This revealed 5 independent factors suggestive of "reversal learning," "motivation-related late reversal learning," "discrimination learning," "speed to respond," and "motivation during

  12. Differences in Genetic Background Between Active Smokers, Passive Smokers, and Non-Smokers With Crohn's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, Frans; Nolte, Ilja M.; Kleibeuker, Jan H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Dijkstra, Gerard; Weersma, Rinse K.

    OBJECTIVES: Smoking behavior and genetic variations are important factors for the development of Crohn's disease (CD), but studies investigating the interaction between smoking and genetic background are scarce. We studied allelic associations of 19 confirmed variants located in 14 CD-associated

  13. The genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease : from correlation to causality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uniken Venema, Werna Tc; Voskuil, Michiel D; Dijkstra, Gerard; Weersma, Rinse K; Festen, Eleonora Am

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have greatly improved our insight into the genetic background of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). New high-throughput technologies and large-scale international collaborations have contributed to the identification of 200 independent genetic risk loci for IBD. However, in most of the

  14. Rapid genetic algorithm optimization of a mouse computational model: Benefits for anthropomorphization of neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corina Teodora Bot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While the mouse presents an invaluable experimental model organism in biology, its usefulness in cardiac arrhythmia research is limited in some aspects due to major electrophysiological differences between murine and human action potentials (APs. As previously described, these species-specific traits can be partly overcome by application of a cell-type transforming clamp (CTC to anthropomorphize the murine cardiac AP. CTC is a hybrid experimental-computational dynamic clamp technique, in which a computationally calculated time-dependent current is inserted into a cell in real time, to compensate for the differences between sarcolemmal currents of that cell (e.g., murine and the desired species (e.g., human. For effective CTC performance, mismatch between the measured cell and a mathematical model used to mimic the measured AP must be minimal. We have developed a genetic algorithm (GA approach that rapidly tunes a mathematical model to reproduce the AP of the murine cardiac myocyte under study. Compared to a prior implementation that used a template-based model selection approach, we show that GA optimization to a cell-specific model results in a much better recapitulation of the desired AP morphology with CTC. This improvement was more pronounced when anthropomorphizing neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes to human-like APs than to guinea pig APs. CTC may be useful for a wide range of applications, from screening effects of pharmaceutical compounds on ion channel activity, to exploring variations in the mouse or human genome. Rapid GA optimization of a cell-specific mathematical model improves CTC performance and may therefore expand the applicability and usage of the CTC technique.

  15. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  16. Genetic background impacts soluble and cell wall-bound aromatics in brown midrib mutants of sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the effects that genetic background has on two sorghum brown midrib (bmr) mutants, plant phenolics, lignin biosynthetic enzymes and stem anatomy were evaluated in wild-type (WT), bmr-6, bmr-12 and double-mutants (bmr-6 and bmr-12) in near isogenic , RTx430 and Wheatland backgrounds. The...

  17. Testing an aging gene in long-lived Drosophila strains: increased longevity depends on sex and genetic background

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Spencer, Christine C; Howell, Christine E; Wright, Amber R; Promislow, Daniel E. L

    2003-01-01

    .... Typically, long-lived mutants are identified in relatively short-lived genetic backgrounds, and their effects are rarely tested in genetic backgrounds other than the one in which they were isolated or derived...

  18. No influence of Indy on lifespan in Drosophila after correction for genetic and cytoplasmic background effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne M Toivonen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate whether alterations in mitochondrial metabolism affect longevity in Drosophila melanogaster, we studied lifespan in various single gene mutants, using inbred and outbred genetic backgrounds. As positive controls we included the two most intensively studied mutants of Indy, which encodes a Drosophila Krebs cycle intermediate transporter. It has been reported that flies heterozygous for these Indy mutations, which lie outside the coding region, show almost a doubling of lifespan. We report that only one of the two mutants lowers mRNA levels, implying that the lifespan extension observed is not attributable to the Indy mutations themselves. Moreover, neither Indy mutation extended lifespan in female flies in any genetic background tested. In the original genetic background, only the Indy mutation associated with altered RNA expression extended lifespan in male flies. However, this effect was abolished by backcrossing into standard outbred genetic backgrounds, and was associated with an unidentified locus on the X chromosome. The original Indy line with long-lived males is infected by the cytoplasmic symbiont Wolbachia, and the longevity of Indy males disappeared after tetracycline clearance of this endosymbiont. These findings underscore the critical importance of standardisation of genetic background and of cytoplasm in genetic studies of lifespan, and show that the lifespan extension previously claimed for Indy mutants was entirely attributable to confounding variation from these two sources. In addition, we saw no effects on lifespan of expression knockdown of the Indy orthologues nac-2 and nac-3 in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

  19. Generation of mouse anti-human urate anion exchanger antibody by genetic immunization and its identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guo-shuang; WU Di; CHEN Xiang-mei; SHI Suo-zhu; HONG Quan; ZHANG Ping; LU Yang

    2005-01-01

    Background Human urate anion exchanger (hURAT1) as a major urate transporter expressed on renal tubular epithelial cells regulates blood urate level by reabsorbing uric acid. Antibody is an important tool to study hURAT1. This study aimed, by genetic immunization, to produce mouse anti-hURAT1 polyclonal antibody with high throughput and high specificity and to detect the location of hURAT1 in human kidney.Methods Human renal total RNA was isolated and the entire cDNA of hURAT1 was amplified by RT-PCR. The sequence of intracellular high antigenicity fragment (A280 to R349) was chosen by prediction software of protein antigenicity, and its cDNA was amplified from cDNA of hURAT1, and then cloned into pBQAP-TT vector to construct recombinant plasmid pBQAP-TT-hURAT1-210 for genetic immunization. Mice were inoculated with this recombinant plasmid and two other adjuvant plasmids, pCMVi-GMCSF and pCMVi-Flt3L, which helped to enhance the antibody’s generation. After four weeks, the mice were sacrificed to obtain the anti-hURAT1 antibody from serum. The antibody was identified by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. At the same time, rabbit anti-hURAT1 antibody was produced by protein immunization. The specificity and efficiency between the rabbit and mouse anti-hURAT1 antibody were compared by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry.Results The entire cDNA of hURAT1 and cDNA of its intracellular high immunogenic fragment were amplified successfully. Recombinant plasmid pBQAP-TT-hURAT1-210 for genetic immunization was confirmed by restriction digestion and sequencing. Both the mouse anti-hURAT1 antibody and rabbit anti-hURAT1 antibody recognized 58kD hURAT1 and 64kD glycosylated hURAT1 protein bands in western blot. Immunohistochemically, hURAT1 was located at the brush border membrane of renal proximal tubular cells. In addition, the throughput and specificity of the mouse anti-hURAT1 antibody were higher than those of the rabbit anti-hURAT1 antibody

  20. Genetic background influences embryonic lethality and the occurrence of neural tube defects in Men1 null mice: relevance to genetic modifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Manuel C; Harding, Brian; Reed, Anita A C; Jeyabalan, Jeshmi; Walls, Gerard V; Bowl, Michael R; Sharpe, James; Wedden, Sarah; Moss, Julie E; Ross, Allyson; Davidson, Duncan; Thakker, Rajesh V

    2009-10-01

    Germline mutations of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) gene cause parathyroid, pancreatic and pituitary tumours in man. MEN1 mutations also cause familial isolated primary hyperparathyroidism (FIHP) and the same MEN1 mutations, in different families, can cause either FIHP or MEN1. This suggests a role for genetic background and modifier genes in altering the expression of a mutation. We investigated the effects of genetic background on the phenotype of embryonic lethality that occurs in a mouse model for MEN1. Men1(+/-) mice were backcrossed to generate C57BL/6 and 129S6/SvEv incipient congenic strains, and used to obtain homozygous Men1(-/-) mice. No viable Men1(-/-) mice were obtained. The analysis of 411 live embryos obtained at 9.5-16.5 days post-coitum (dpc) revealed that significant deviations from the expected Mendelian 1:2:1 genotype ratio were first observed at 12.5 and 14.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively (P<0.05). Moreover, live Men1(-/-) embryos were absent by 13.5 and 15.5 dpc in the 129S6/SvEv and C57BL/6 strains respectively thereby indicating an earlier lethality by 2 days in the 129S6/SvEv strain (P<0.01). Men1(-/-) embryos had macroscopic haemorrhages, and histology and optical projection tomography revealed them to have internal haemorrhages, myocardial hypotrophy, pericardial effusion, hepatic abnormalities and neural tube defects. The neural tube defects occurred exclusively in 129S6/SvEv embryos (21 vs 0%, P<0.01). Thus, our findings demonstrate the importance of genetic background in influencing the phenotypes of embryonic lethality and neural tube defects in Men1(-/-) mice, and implicate a role for genetic modifiers.

  1. Genetic expression of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebert, D W; Robinson, J R; Niwa, A; Kumaki, K; Poland, A P

    1975-04-01

    Monooxygenases require NADPH and molecular oxygen during the metabolism of numerous endogenous hydrophobic substrates and carcinogenic and toxic exogenous chemicals. The complexity of these membrane-bound multicomponent drug-metabolizing enzyme systems is reviewed. What "aryl hydrocarbon (benzo[a]pyrene) hydroxylase activity" actually represents is reviewed and discussed. At least two forms of the hydroxylase activity exist and we suggest that they are associated with different molecular species of membrane-bound CO-binding hemoprotein (i.e., they are associated with different enzyme active-sties). At least two, and probably more than two, nonlinked loci are responsible for the genetic expression of new cytochrome P1450 formation and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction--and the stimulation of 10 other monooxygenase "activities"--in the mouse treated with certain aromatic hydrocarbons. The individual variability of hydroxylase activity in an inbred and in a random-bred strain of micr is illustrated. The basal hydroxylase activity appears to be inherited differently from the aromatic hydrocarbon-inducible hydroxylase activity. The potent inducer 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin can stimulate increases in these hepatic monooxygenase activities and p1450 formation in so-called "nonresponsive" mice, whereas inducers such as beta-naphthoflavone and 3-methylcholanthrene cannot. Thus, the genetically "nonresponsive" micr apparently possess the structural and regulatory genes necessary for expression of these inducible monooxygenase activities and associated new formation of cytochrome P1450. We suggest that a mutation has occurred in the "nonresponsive" inbred strains that results in production of an inducer-binding receptor having a diminished affinity for aromatic hydrocarbons.

  2. 1 + 1 = 3: Development and validation of a SNP-based algorithm to identify genetic contributions from three distinct inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, James D; Ranson, Matthew S; Smith, Janebeth C; Gorham, Beverly J; Muirhead, Kristen-Ashley

    2012-12-01

    State-of-the-art, genome-wide assessment of mouse genetic background uses single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) PCR. As SNP analysis can use multiplex testing, it is amenable to high-throughput analysis and is the preferred method for shared resource facilities that offer genetic background assessment of mouse genomes. However, a typical individual SNP query yields only two alleles (A vs. B), limiting the application of this methodology to distinguishing contributions from no more than two inbred mouse strains. By contrast, simple sequence length polymorphism (SSLP) analysis yields multiple alleles but is not amenable to high-throughput testing. We sought to devise a SNP-based technique to identify donor strain origins when three distinct mouse strains potentially contribute to the genetic makeup of an individual mouse. A computational approach was used to devise a three-strain analysis (3SA) algorithm that would permit identification of three genetic backgrounds while still using a binary-output SNP platform. A panel of 15 mosaic mice with contributions from BALB/c, C57Bl/6, and DBA/2 genetic backgrounds was bred and analyzed using a genome-wide SNP panel using 1449 markers. The 3SA algorithm was applied and then validated using SSLP. The 3SA algorithm assigned 85% of 1449 SNPs as informative for the C57Bl/6, BALB/c, or DBA/2 backgrounds, respectively. Testing the panel of 15 F2 mice, the 3SA algorithm predicted donor strain origins genome-wide. Donor strain origins predicted by the 3SA algorithm correlated perfectly with results from individual SSLP markers located on five different chromosomes (n=70 tests). We have established and validated an analysis algorithm based on binary SNP data that can successfully identify the donor strain origins of chromosomal regions in mice that are bred from three distinct inbred mouse strains.

  3. Genetic mouse models for behavioral analysis through transgenic RNAi technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delic, S; Streif, S; Deussing, J M; Weber, P; Ueffing, M; Hölter, S M; Wurst, W; Kühn, R

    2008-10-01

    Pharmacological inhibitors and knockout mice have developed into routine tools to analyze the role of specific genes in behavior. Both strategies have limitations like the availability of inhibitors for only a subset of proteins and the large efforts required to construct specific mouse mutants. The recent emergence of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing provides a fast alternative that can be applied to any coding gene. We established an approach for the efficient generation of transgenic knockdown mice by targeted insertion of short hairpin (sh) RNA vectors into a defined genomic locus and studied the efficiency of gene silencing in the adult brain and the utility of such mice for behavioral analysis. We generated shRNA knockdown mice for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor type 1 (Crhr1), the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrkk2) and the purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 7 (P2rx7) genes and show the ubiquitous expression of shRNA and efficient suppression of the target mRNA and protein in the brain of young and 11-month-old knockdown mice. Knockdown mice for the Crhr1 gene exhibited decreased anxiety-related behavior, an impaired stress response, and thereby recapitulate the phenotype of CRHR1 knockout mice. Our results show the feasibility of gene silencing in the adult brain and validate knockdown mice as new genetic models suitable for behavioral analysis.

  4. Identification of genetic variants associated with maize flowering time using an extremely large multi-genetic background population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowering time is one of the major adaptive traits in domestication of maize and an important selection criterion in breeding. To detect more maize flowering time variants we evaluated flowering time traits using an extremely large multi- genetic background population that contained more than 8000 l...

  5. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study th...

  6. Nasal bone shape is under complex epistatic genetic control in mouse interspecific recombinant congenic strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaétan Burgio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic determinism of cranial morphology in the mouse is still largely unknown, despite the localization of putative QTLs and the identification of genes associated with Mendelian skull malformations. To approach the dissection of this multigenic control, we have used a set of interspecific recombinant congenic strains (IRCS produced between C57BL/6 and mice of the distant species Mus spretus (SEG/Pas. Each strain has inherited 1.3% of its genome from SEG/Pas under the form of few, small-sized, chromosomal segments. RESULTS: The shape of the nasal bone was studied using outline analysis combined with Fourier descriptors, and differential features were identified between IRCS BcG-66H and C57BL/6. An F2 cross between BcG-66H and C57BL/6 revealed that, out of the three SEG/Pas-derived chromosomal regions present in BcG-66H, two were involved. Segments on chromosomes 1 (∼32 Mb and 18 (∼13 Mb showed additive effect on nasal bone shape. The three chromosomal regions present in BcG-66H were isolated in congenic strains to study their individual effect. Epistatic interactions were assessed in bicongenic strains. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that, besides a strong individual effect, the QTL on chromosome 1 interacts with genes on chromosomes 13 and 18. This study demonstrates that nasal bone shape is under complex genetic control but can be efficiently dissected in the mouse using appropriate genetic tools and shape descriptors.

  7. Effect of mouse strain as a background for Alzheimer's disease models on the clearance of amyloid-β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qosa, Hisham; Kaddoumi, Amal

    2016-04-01

    Novel animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are relentlessly being developed and existing ones are being fine-tuned; however, these models face multiple challenges associated with the complexity of the disease where most of these models do not reproduce the full phenotypical disease spectrum. Moreover, different AD models express different phenotypes that could affect their validity to recapitulate disease pathogenesis and/or response to a drug. One of the most important and understudied differences between AD models is differences in the phenotypic characteristics of the background species. Here, we used the brain clearance index (BCI) method to investigate the effect of strain differences on the clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) from the brains of four mouse strains. These mouse strains, namely C57BL/6, FVB/N, BALB/c and SJL/J, are widely used as a background for the development of AD mouse models. Findings showed that while Aβ clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was comparable between the 4 strains, levels of LRP1, an Aβ clearance protein, was significantly lower in SJL/J mice compared to other mouse strains. Furthermore, these mouse strains showed a significantly different response to rifampicin treatment with regard to Aβ clearance and effect on brain level of its clearance-related proteins. Our results provide for the first time an evidence for strain differences that could affect ability of AD mouse models to recapitulate response to a drug, and opens a new research avenue that requires further investigation to successfully develop mouse models that could simulate clinically important phenotypic characteristics of AD.

  8. The W303 genetic background affects the isw2 delta mutant phenotype in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtulcová, P; Frýdlová, I; Janatová, I; Dorosh, A; Hasek, J

    2003-01-01

    We performed detailed phenotypic analysis of the isw2 delta strains of the W303 genetic background and compared its results with those obtained previously in BY-derived genetic background. Shmoolike morphology was observed in the isw2 delta strain of alpha-mating type of the BY strains, but not in its W303-derived counterpart. On the other hand, derepression of a-specific genes in the isw2 delta (MAT alpha) strain was observed in both genetic backgrounds, although to a different extent. Unlike in BY-derived strain hyperactivation of the Ras2/cAMP pathway reduced invasiveness of the isw2 delta strain (MAT alpha) of the W303 background. Sensitivity to Calcofluor White indicating a cell wall-integrity defect was significantly increased in the isw2 delta strains of the W303 background in contrast to BY-derived strains. Our data indicate that the effects of the isw2 deletion strongly depend on the background in which the deletion, is made.

  9. Insights into granulosa cell tumors using spontaneous or genetically engineered mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, So-Youn

    2016-03-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that have been studied for decades. However, their infrequency has delayed efforts to research their etiology. Recently, mutations in human GCTs have been discovered, which has led to further research aimed at determining the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Mouse models have been important tools for studying GCTs, and have provided means to develop and improve diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus far, several genetically modified mouse models, along with one spontaneous mouse model, have been reported. This review summarizes the phenotypes of these mouse models and their applicability in elucidating the mechanisms of granulosa cell tumor development.

  10. GENETIC BACKGROUND BUT NOT METALLOTHIONEIN PHENOTYPE DICTATES SENSITIVITY TO CADMIUM-INDUCED TESTICULAR INJURY IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic Background but not Metallothionein Phenotype Dictates Sensitivity to Cadmium-Induced Testicular Injury in MiceJie Liu1,2, Chris Corton3, David J. Dix4, Yaping Liu1, Michael P. Waalkes2 and Curtis D. Klaassen1 ABSTRACTParenteral administrati...

  11. [Recent progress in genetic background of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teramoto, Shinji

    2016-05-01

    A genetic contribution to develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD) is estimated. However, candidate gene studies on COPD and related phenotypes have not been well replicated. Research on the genetic pathologic background of COPD using genome-wide association studies (GWASs) has progressed in recent years. The novel candidate genes including CHRNA3/5 (cholinergic nicotine receptor alpha 3/5), IREB2 (iron regulatory binding protein 2), HHIP (hedgehog-interacting protein), and FAM13A (family with sequence similarity 13, member A) are identified in multiple populations. However, their pathological roles remain poorly understood. The nicotine dependency, pulmonary development, and pulmonary/systemic inflammatory diathesis may be involved in genetic background of COPD.

  12. Influence of early life exposure, host genetics and diet on the mouse gut microbiome and metabolome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snijders, Antoine M.; Langley, Sasha A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Brislawn, Colin J.; Noecker, Cecilia; Zink, Erika M.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Miller, Darla; Huang, Yurong; Karpen , Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Borenstein, Elhanan A.; Jansson, Janet K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-11-28

    Although the gut microbiome plays important roles in host physiology, health and disease1, we lack understanding of the complex interplay between host genetics and early life environment on the microbial and metabolic composition of the gut.We used the genetically diverse Collaborative Cross mouse system2 to discover that early life history impacts themicrobiome composition, whereas dietary changes have only a moderate effect. By contrast, the gut metabolome was shaped mostly by diet, with specific non-dietary metabolites explained by microbial metabolism. Quantitative trait analysis identified mouse genetic trait loci (QTL) that impact the abundances of specific microbes. Human orthologues of genes in the mouse QTL are implicated in gastrointestinal cancer. Additionally, genes located in mouse QTL for Lactobacillales abundance are implicated in arthritis, rheumatic disease and diabetes. Furthermore, Lactobacillales abundance was predictive of higher host T-helper cell counts, suggesting an important link between Lactobacillales and host adaptive immunity.

  13. Influence of early life exposure, host genetics and diet on the mouse gut microbiome and metabolome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snijders, Antoine M.; Langley, Sasha A.; Kim, Young-Mo; Brislawn, Colin J.; Noecker, Cecilia; Zink, Erika M.; Fansler, Sarah J.; Casey, Cameron P.; Miller, Darla R.; Huang, Yurong; Karpen, Gary H.; Celniker, Susan E.; Brown, James B.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Jansson, Janet K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2016-11-28

    Although the gut microbiome plays important roles in host physiology, health and disease1, we lack understanding of the complex interplay between host genetics and early life environment on the microbial and metabolic composition of the gut.We used the genetically diverse Collaborative Cross mouse system2 to discover that early life history impacts themicrobiome composition, whereas dietary changes have only a moderate effect. By contrast, the gut metabolome was shaped mostly by diet, with specific non-dietary metabolites explained by microbial metabolism. Quantitative trait analysis identified mouse genetic trait loci (QTL) that impact the abundances of specific microbes. Human orthologues of genes in the mouse QTL are implicated in gastrointestinal cancer. Additionally, genes located in mouse QTL for Lactobacillales abundance are implicated in arthritis, rheumatic disease and diabetes. Furthermore, Lactobacillales abundance was predictive of higher host T-helper cell counts, suggesting an important link between Lactobacillales and host adaptive immunity.

  14. Genetic analysis reveals an unexpected role of BMP7 in initiation of ureteric bud outgrowth in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Gonçalves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic analysis in the mouse revealed that GREMLIN1 (GREM1-mediated antagonism of BMP4 is essential for ureteric epithelial branching as the disruption of ureteric bud outgrowth and renal agenesis in Grem1-deficient embryos is restored by additional inactivation of one Bmp4 allele. Another BMP ligand, BMP7, was shown to control the proliferative expansion of nephrogenic progenitors and its requirement for nephrogenesis can be genetically substituted by Bmp4. Therefore, we investigated whether BMP7 in turn also participates in inhibiting ureteric bud outgrowth during the initiation of metanephric kidney development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genetic inactivation of one Bmp7 allele in Grem1-deficient mouse embryos does not alleviate the bilateral renal agenesis, while complete inactivation of Bmp7 restores ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. In mouse embryos lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7, GDNF/WNT11 feedback signaling and the expression of the Etv4 target gene, which regulates formation of the invading ureteric bud tip, are restored. In contrast to the restoration of ureteric bud outgrowth and branching, nephrogenesis remains aberrant as revealed by the premature loss of Six2 expressing nephrogenic progenitor cells. Therefore, very few nephrons develop in kidneys lacking both Grem1 and Bmp7 and the resulting dysplastic phenotype is indistinguishable from the one of Bmp7-deficient mouse embryos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study reveals an unexpected inhibitory role of BMP7 during the onset of ureteric bud outgrowth. As BMP4, BMP7 and GREM1 are expressed in distinct mesenchymal and epithelial domains, the localized antagonistic interactions of GREM1 with BMPs could restrict and guide ureteric bud outgrowth and branching. The robustness and likely significant redundancy of the underlying signaling system is evidenced by the fact that global reduction of Bmp4 or inactivation of Bmp7 are both able to restore ureteric bud outgrowth

  15. Candidate genes detected in transcriptome studies are strongly dependent on genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernille Sarup

    Full Text Available Whole genome transcriptomic studies can point to potential candidate genes for organismal traits. However, the importance of potential candidates is rarely followed up through functional studies and/or by comparing results across independent studies. We have analysed the overlap of candidate genes identified from studies of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster using similar technical platforms. We found little overlap across studies between putative candidate genes for the same traits in the same sex. Instead there was a high degree of overlap between different traits and sexes within the same genetic backgrounds. Putative candidates found using transcriptomics therefore appear very sensitive to genetic background and this can mask or override effects of treatments. The functional importance of putative candidate genes emerging from transcriptome studies needs to be validated through additional experiments and in future studies we suggest a focus on the genes, networks and pathways affecting traits in a consistent manner across backgrounds.

  16. Genetic Background, Maternal Age, and Interaction Effects Mediate Rates of Crossing Over in Drosophila melanogaster Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Chad M; Robinson, Matthew C; Aylor, David L; Singh, Nadia D

    2016-05-03

    Meiotic recombination is a genetic process that is critical for proper chromosome segregation in many organisms. Despite being fundamental for organismal fitness, rates of crossing over vary greatly between taxa. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to phenotypic variation in crossover frequency, as do genotype-environment interactions. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal age influences rates of crossing over in a genotypic-specific manner. Using classical genetic techniques, we estimated rates of crossing over for individual Drosophila melanogaster females from five strains over their lifetime from a single mating event. We find that both age and genetic background significantly contribute to observed variation in recombination frequency, as do genotype-age interactions. We further find differences in the effect of age on recombination frequency in the two genomic regions surveyed. Our results highlight the complexity of recombination rate variation and reveal a new role of genotype by maternal age interactions in mediating recombination rate.

  17. Genetic Background, Maternal Age, and Interaction Effects Mediate Rates of Crossing Over in Drosophila melanogaster Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M. Hunter

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic recombination is a genetic process that is critical for proper chromosome segregation in many organisms. Despite being fundamental for organismal fitness, rates of crossing over vary greatly between taxa. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to phenotypic variation in crossover frequency, as do genotype–environment interactions. Here, we test the hypothesis that maternal age influences rates of crossing over in a genotypic-specific manner. Using classical genetic techniques, we estimated rates of crossing over for individual Drosophila melanogaster females from five strains over their lifetime from a single mating event. We find that both age and genetic background significantly contribute to observed variation in recombination frequency, as do genotype–age interactions. We further find differences in the effect of age on recombination frequency in the two genomic regions surveyed. Our results highlight the complexity of recombination rate variation and reveal a new role of genotype by maternal age interactions in mediating recombination rate.

  18. Using genetic mouse models to gain insight into glaucoma: Past results and future possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Kimberly A; Harder, Jeffrey M; Williams, Pete A; Rausch, Rebecca L; Kiernan, Amy E; Nair, K Saidas; Anderson, Michael G; John, Simon W M; Howell, Gareth R; Libby, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    While all forms of glaucoma are characterized by a specific pattern of retinal ganglion cell death, they are clinically divided into several distinct subclasses, including normal tension glaucoma, primary open angle glaucoma, congenital glaucoma, and secondary glaucoma. For each type of glaucoma there are likely numerous molecular pathways that control susceptibility to the disease. Given this complexity, a single animal model will never precisely model all aspects of all the different types of human glaucoma. Therefore, multiple animal models have been utilized to study glaucoma but more are needed. Because of the powerful genetic tools available to use in the laboratory mouse, it has proven to be a highly useful mammalian system for studying the pathophysiology of human disease. The similarity between human and mouse eyes coupled with the ability to use a combination of advanced cell biological and genetic tools in mice have led to a large increase in the number of studies using mice to model specific glaucoma phenotypes. Over the last decade, numerous new mouse models and genetic tools have emerged, providing important insight into the cell biology and genetics of glaucoma. In this review, we describe available mouse genetic models that can be used to study glaucoma-relevant disease/pathobiology. Furthermore, we discuss how these models have been used to gain insights into ocular hypertension (a major risk factor for glaucoma) and glaucomatous retinal ganglion cell death. Finally, the potential for developing new mouse models and using advanced genetic tools and resources for studying glaucoma are discussed.

  19. The influence of genetic background versus commercial breeding programs on chicken immunocompetence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Mehdi; Mehrabani-Yeganeh, Hassan; Barjesteh, Neda; Nikbakht, Gholamreza; Thompson-Crispi, Kathleen; Charkhkar, Saeid; Mallard, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Immunocompetence of livestock plays an important role in farm profitability because it directly affects health maintenance. Genetics significantly influences the immune system, and the genotypic structure of modern fast-growing chickens has been changed, particularly after decades of breeding for higher production. Therefore, this study was designed to help determine if intensive breeding programs have adversely affected immunocompetence or whether the immune response profiles are controlled to greater extent by genetic background. Thus, 3 indigenous chicken populations from different genetic backgrounds and 2 globally available modern broiler strains, Ross 308 and Cobb 500, were evaluated for various aspects of immune response. These included antibody responses against sheep red blood cells and Brucella abortus antigen, as well as some aspects of cell-mediated immunocompetence by toe web swelling test and in vitro blood mononuclear cell proliferation. Significant differences (P chickens is most likely due to differences in the genetic background between each strain of chicken rather than by commercial selection programs for high production.

  20. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi-host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H; Jeeves, Rose E; Lappin-Scott, Hilary M; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sheppard, Samuel K

    2015-11-01

    Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as Campylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype with different genetic backgrounds. Our approach combines genome-wide association studies with traditional microbiology techniques to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in 102 Campylobacter jejuni isolates. We quantified biofilm formation among the isolates and identified hotspots of genetic variation in homologous sequences that correspond to variation in biofilm phenotypes. Thirteen genes demonstrated a statistically robust association including those involved in adhesion, motility, glycosylation, capsule production and oxidative stress. The genes associated with biofilm formation were different in the host generalist ST-21 and ST-45 clonal complexes, which are frequently isolated from multiple host species and clinical samples. This suggests the evolution of enhanced biofilm from different genetic backgrounds and a possible role in colonization of multiple hosts and transmission to humans.

  1. Genetic analysis of X-linked hybrid sterility in the house mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storchová, Radka; Gregorová, Sona; Buckiová, Daniela; Kyselová, Vendula; Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-07-01

    Hybrid sterility is a common postzygotic reproductive isolation mechanism that appears in the early stages of speciation of various organisms. Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus domesticus represent two recently separated mouse subspecies particularly suitable for genetic studies of hybrid sterility. Here we show that the introgression of Chr X of M. m. musculus origin (PWD/Ph inbred strain, henceforth PWD) into the genetic background of the C57BL/6J (henceforth B6) inbred strain (predominantly of M. m. domesticus origin) causes male sterility. The X-linked hybrid sterility is associated with reduced testes weight, lower sperm count, and morphological abnormalities of sperm heads. The analysis of recombinant Chr Xs in sterile and fertile males as well as quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of several fertility parameters revealed an oligogenic nature of the X-linked hybrid sterility. The Hstx1 locus responsible for male sterility was mapped near DXMit119 in the central part of Chr X. To ensure full sterility, the PWD allele of Hstx1 has to be supported with the PWD allelic form of loci in at least one proximal and/or one distal region of Chr X. Mapping and cloning of Hstx1 and other genes responsible for sterility of B6-X PWD Y B6 males could help to elucidate the special role of Chr X in hybrid sterility and consequently in speciation.

  2. Handling, genetic and housing effects on the mouse stress system, dopamine function, and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gariépy, Jean-Louis; Rodriguiz, Ramona Marie; Jones, Byron C

    2002-08-01

    This research was designed to examine how early stimulation (i.e., handling), subsequent housing conditions and genetic factors interact to produce adult differences in stress regulation. High-aggressive (NC900) and low-aggressive (NC100) mice were handled for 3 weeks potspartum and were subsequently isolated or grouped until observed as adults in an open field or a dyadic test. In NC100, handling abolished the temporal variations seen in open-field activity among the nonhandled subjects and reduced corticosterone (CORT) activation. In NC900, these two measures were unaffected by handling. Only among handled NC100 did subsequent group rearing further reduce CORT activation. By contrast, handling caused an up-regulation of D1 dopamine receptors in both lines, and, in NC100, this effect was increased by group rearing. In a dyadic encounter with another male mouse, subjects of both lines showed handling effects. NC100 froze less rapidly and NC900 attacked more rapidly. This multifactorial design showed that the systemic effects of handling are modulated by genetic background, and that measures of these effects are affected by experience beyond infancy. Our findings also showed that the effects of handling vary when assessed across different physiological systems and across social and nonsocial testing conditions.

  3. New application of intelligent agents in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies unexpected specific genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marocchi Alessandro

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few genetic factors predisposing to the sporadic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS have been identified, but the pathology itself seems to be a true multifactorial disease in which complex interactions between environmental and genetic susceptibility factors take place. The purpose of this study was to approach genetic data with an innovative statistical method such as artificial neural networks to identify a possible genetic background predisposing to the disease. A DNA multiarray panel was applied to genotype more than 60 polymorphisms within 35 genes selected from pathways of lipid and homocysteine metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, coagulation, inflammation, cellular adhesion and matrix integrity, in 54 sporadic ALS patients and 208 controls. Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis Results Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis. An unexpected discovery of a strong genetic background in sporadic ALS using a DNA multiarray panel and analytical processing of the data with advanced artificial neural networks was found. The predictive accuracy obtained with Linear Discriminant Analysis and Standard Artificial Neural Networks ranged from 70% to 79% (average 75.31% and from 69.1 to 86.2% (average 76.6% respectively. The corresponding value obtained with Advanced Intelligent Systems reached an average of 96.0% (range 94.4 to 97.6%. This latter approach allowed the identification of seven genetic variants essential to differentiate cases from controls: apolipoprotein E arg

  4. A new genomic library of melon introgression lines in a cantaloupe genetic background for dissecting desirable agronomical traits

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Genomic libraries of introgression lines (ILs) consist of collections of homozygous lines with a single chromosomal introgression from a donor genotype in a common, usually elite, genetic background, representing the whole donor genome in the full collection. Currently, the only available melon IL collection was generated using Piel de sapo (var. inodorus) as the recurrent background. ILs are not available in genetic backgrounds representing other important market class cultivars, ...

  5. Destabilizing protein polymorphisms in the genetic background direct phenotypic expression of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Gidalevitz

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles.

  6. Genetic background and climatic droplet keratopathy incidence in a Mapuche population from Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, Theodore G; Dulik, Matthew C; Cafaro, Thamara A; Suarez, María F; Urrets-Zavalia, Julio A; Serra, Horacio M

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether the incidence of and susceptibility to climatic droplet keratopathy (CDK), an acquired, often bilateral degenerative corneal disease, is influenced by the genetic background of the individuals who exhibit the disorder. To determine whether the disease expression was influenced by the genetic ancestry of CDK cases in native Mapuche of the northwest area of Patagonia in Argentina, we examined mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome variation in 53 unrelated individuals. Twenty-nine of them were part of the CDK (patient) population, while 24 were part of the control group. The analysis revealed the maternal and paternal lineages that were present in the two study groups. This analysis demonstrated that nearly all persons had a Native American mtDNA background, whereas 50% of the CDK group and 37% of the control group had Native American paternal ancestry, respectively. There was no significant difference in the frequencies of mtDNA haplogroups between the CDK patient and control groups. Although the Y-chromosome data revealed differences in specific haplogroup frequencies between these two groups, there was no statistically significant relationship between individual paternal genetic backgrounds and the incidence or stage of disease. These results indicate a lack of correlation between genetic ancestry as represented by haploid genetic systems and the incidence of CDK in Mapuche populations. In addition, the mtDNA appears to play less of a role in CDK expression than for other complex diseases linked to bioenergetic processes. However, further analysis of the mtDNA genome sequence and other genes involved in corneal function may reveal the more precise role that mitochondria play in the expression of CDK.

  7. The joint effects of background selection and genetic recombination on local gene genealogies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kai; Charlesworth, Brian

    2011-09-01

    Background selection, the effects of the continual removal of deleterious mutations by natural selection on variability at linked sites, is potentially a major determinant of DNA sequence variability. However, the joint effects of background selection and genetic recombination on the shape of the neutral gene genealogy have proved hard to study analytically. The only existing formula concerns the mean coalescent time for a pair of alleles, making it difficult to assess the importance of background selection from genome-wide data on sequence polymorphism. Here we develop a structured coalescent model of background selection with recombination and implement it in a computer program that efficiently generates neutral gene genealogies for an arbitrary sample size. We check the validity of the structured coalescent model against forward-in-time simulations and show that it accurately captures the effects of background selection. The model produces more accurate predictions of the mean coalescent time than the existing formula and supports the conclusion that the effect of background selection is greater in the interior of a deleterious region than at its boundaries. The level of linkage disequilibrium between sites is elevated by background selection, to an extent that is well summarized by a change in effective population size. The structured coalescent model is readily extendable to more realistic situations and should prove useful for analyzing genome-wide polymorphism data.

  8. Characterization of a genetically engineered mouse model of hemophilia A with complete deletion of the F8 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B N; Baldwin, W H; Healey, J F; Parker, E T; Shafer-Weaver, K; Cox, C; Jiang, P; Kanellopoulou, C; Lollar, P; Meeks, S L; Lenardo, M J

    2016-02-01

    ESSENTIALS: Anti-factor VIII (FVIII) inhibitory antibody formation is a severe complication in hemophilia A therapy. We genetically engineered and characterized a mouse model with complete deletion of the F8 coding region. F8(TKO) mice exhibit severe hemophilia, express no detectable F8 mRNA, and produce FVIII inhibitors. The defined background and lack of FVIII in F8(TKO) mice will aid in studying FVIII inhibitor formation. The most important complication in hemophilia A treatment is the development of inhibitory anti-Factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies in patients after FVIII therapy. Patients with severe hemophilia who express no endogenous FVIII (i.e. cross-reacting material, CRM) have the greatest incidence of inhibitor formation. However, current mouse models of severe hemophilia A produce low levels of truncated FVIII. The lack of a corresponding mouse model hampers the study of inhibitor formation in the complete absence of FVIII protein. We aimed to generate and characterize a novel mouse model of severe hemophilia A (designated the F8(TKO) strain) lacking the complete coding sequence of F8 and any FVIII CRM. Mice were created on a C57BL/6 background using Cre-Lox recombination and characterized using in vivo bleeding assays, measurement of FVIII activity by coagulation and chromogenic assays, and anti-FVIII antibody production using ELISA. All F8 exonic coding regions were deleted from the genome and no F8 mRNA was detected in F8(TKO) mice. The bleeding phenotype of F8(TKO) mice was comparable to E16 mice by measurements of factor activity and tail snip assay. Similar levels of anti-FVIII antibody titers after recombinant FVIII injections were observed between F8(TKO) and E16 mice. We describe a new C57BL/6 mouse model for severe hemophilia A patients lacking CRM. These mice can be directly bred to the many C57BL/6 strains of genetically engineered mice, which is valuable for studying the impact of a wide variety of genes on FVIII inhibitor formation on a

  9. Molecular genetic basis for the rhino mouse from Chinese KM subcolony

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ming; XIONG Yuliang; WANG Wanyu; ZHANG Yaping

    2004-01-01

    Both the rhino mouse and hairless mouse resulted from hairless gene mutation, but they show different phenotypes of skin physiology. The rhino mouse has more similar histological characters to human papular alopecia. Therefore rhino mouse is a good experimental animal model for human papular alopecia. This study reports a hairless mouse named rhino KIZ, arose from KM colony in Kunming Institue of Zoology, by systematic studies on morphology, skin histopathology, gene sequence, pedigree and protein domain analysis. The results demonstrate that a C-to-T transition in exon 11 of hr gene (The mutant gene has been applied for a Chinese patent (patent No. 03135280)) results in the rhino KIZ. The rhino KIZ with clear genetic mechanism will be a useful animal model.

  10. Understanding mammalian genetic systems: the challenge of phenotyping in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve D M Brown

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding mammalian genetic systems is predicated on the determination of the relationship between genetic variation and phenotype. Several international programmes are under way to deliver mutations in every gene in the mouse genome. The challenge for mouse geneticists is to develop approaches that will provide comprehensive phenotype datasets for these mouse mutant libraries. Several factors are critical to success in this endeavour. It will be important to catalogue assay and environment and where possible to adopt standardised procedures for phenotyping tests along with common environmental conditions to ensure comparable datasets of phenotypes. Moreover, the scale of the task underlines the need to invest in technological development improving both the speed and cost of phenotyping platforms. In addition, it will be necessary to develop new informatics standards that capture the phenotype assay as well as other factors, genetic and environmental, that impinge upon phenotype outcome.

  11. Genetic context determines susceptibility to intraocular pressure elevation in a mouse pigmentary glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosma Ioan M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DBA/2J (D2 mice develop an age-related form of glaucoma. Their eyes progressively develop iris pigment dispersion and iris atrophy followed by increased intraocular pressure (IOP and glaucomatous optic nerve damage. Mutant alleles of the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 genes are necessary for the iris disease, but it is unknown whether alleles of other D2 gene(s are necessary for the distinct later stages of disease. We initiated a study of congenic strains to further define the genetic requirements and disease mechanisms of the D2 glaucoma. Results To further understand D2 glaucoma, we created congenic strains of mice on the C57BL/6J (B6 genetic background. B6 double-congenic mice carrying D2-derived Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop a D2-like iris disease. B6 single-congenics with only the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 mutations develop milder forms of iris disease. Genetic epistasis experiments introducing a B6 tyrosinase mutation into the congenic strains demonstrated that both the single and double-congenic iris diseases are rescued by interruption of melanin synthesis. Importantly, our experiments analyzing mice at ages up to 27 months indicate that the B6 double-congenic mice are much less prone to IOP elevation and glaucoma than are D2 mice. Conclusion As demonstrated here, the Gpnmb and Tyrp1 iris phenotypes are both individually dependent on tyrosinase function. These results support involvement of abnormal melanosomal events in the diseases caused by each gene. In the context of the inbred D2 mouse strain, the glaucoma phenotype is clearly influenced by more genes than just Gpnmb and Tyrp1. Despite the outward similarity of pigment-dispersing iris disease between D2 and the B6 double-congenic mice, the congenic mice are much less susceptible to developing high IOP and glaucoma. These new congenic strains provide a valuable new resource for further studying the genetic and mechanistic complexity of this form of glaucoma.

  12. Genetic effects of radiation. [Extrapolation of mouse data to man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, P.B.

    1976-01-01

    Data are reviewed from studies on the genetic effects of x radiation in mice and the extrapolation of the findings for estimating genetic hazards in man is discussed. Data are included on the frequency of mutation induction following acute or chronic irradiation of male or female mice at various doses and dose rates.

  13. Multilocus spacer analysis revealed highly homogeneous genetic background of Asian type of Borrelia miyamotoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhacheva, Tatyana A; Salikhova, Irina I; Kovalev, Sergey Y

    2015-04-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a member of the relapsing fever group borreliae, was first isolated in Japan and subsequently found in Ixodes ticks in North America, Europe and Russia. Currently, there are three types of B. miyamotoi: Asian or Siberian (transmitted mainly by Ixodes persulcatus), European (Ixodesricinus) and American (Ixodesscapularis and Ixodespacificus). Despite the great genetic distances between B. miyamotoi types, isolates within a type are characterised by an extremely low genetic variability. In particular, strains of B. miyamotoi of Asian type, isolated in Russia from the Baltic sea to the Far East, have been shown to be identical based on the analysis of several conventional genetic markers, such as 16S rRNA, flagellin, outer membrane protein p66 and glpQ genes. Thus, protein or rRNA - coding genes were shown not to be informative enough in studying genetic diversity of B. miyamotoi within a type. In the present paper, we have attempted to design a new multilocus technique based on eight non-coding intergenic spacers (3686bp in total) and have applied it to the analysis of intra-type genetic variability of В. miyamotoi detected in different regions of Russia and from two tick species, I. persulcatus and Ixodespavlovskyi. However, even though potentially the most variable loci were selected, no genetic variability between studied DNA samples was found, except for one nucleotide substitution in two of them. The sequences obtained were identical to those of the reference strain FR64b. Analysis of the data obtained with the GenBank sequences indicates a highly homogeneous genetic background of B. miyamotoi from the Baltic Sea to the Japanese Islands. In this paper, a hypothesis of clonal expansion of B. miyamotoi is discussed, as well as possible mechanisms for the rapid dissemination of one B. miyamotoi clone over large distances.

  14. Genomic landscapes of endogenous retroviruses unveil intricate genetics of conventional and genetically-engineered laboratory mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang-Hoon; Lim, Debora; Chiu, Sophia; Greenhalgh, David; Cho, Kiho

    2016-04-01

    Laboratory strains of mice, both conventional and genetically engineered, have been introduced as critical components of a broad range of studies investigating normal and disease biology. Currently, the genetic identity of laboratory mice is primarily confirmed by surveying polymorphisms in selected sets of "conventional" genes and/or microsatellites in the absence of a single completely sequenced mouse genome. First, we examined variations in the genomic landscapes of transposable repetitive elements, named the TREome, in conventional and genetically engineered mouse strains using murine leukemia virus-type endogenous retroviruses (MLV-ERVs) as a probe. A survey of the genomes from 56 conventional strains revealed strain-specific TREome landscapes, and certain families (e.g., C57BL) of strains were discernible with defined patterns. Interestingly, the TREome landscapes of C3H/HeJ (toll-like receptor-4 [TLR4] mutant) inbred mice were different from its control C3H/HeOuJ (TLR4 wild-type) strain. In addition, a CD14 knock-out strain had a distinct TREome landscape compared to its control/backcross C57BL/6J strain. Second, an examination of superantigen (SAg, a "TREome gene") coding sequences of mouse mammary tumor virus-type ERVs in the genomes of the 46 conventional strains revealed a high diversity, suggesting a potential role of SAgs in strain-specific immune phenotypes. The findings from this study indicate that unexplored and intricate genomic variations exist in laboratory mouse strains, both conventional and genetically engineered. The TREome-based high-resolution genetics surveillance system for laboratory mice would contribute to efficient study design with quality control and accurate data interpretation. This genetics system can be easily adapted to other species ranging from plants to humans.

  15. Quantitative autistic trait measurements index background genetic risk for ASD in Hispanic families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Joshua; Constantino, John Nicholas; Zambrana, Katherine; Martin, Eden; Tunc, Ilker; Zhang, Yi; Abbacchi, Anna; Messinger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that quantitative autistic traits (QATs) of parents reflect inherited liabilities that may index background genetic risk for clinical autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in their offspring. Moreover, preferential mating for QATs has been observed as a potential factor in concentrating autistic liabilities in some families across generations. Heretofore, intergenerational studies of QATs have focused almost exclusively on Caucasian populations-the present study explored these phenomena in a well-characterized Hispanic population. The present study examined QAT scores in siblings and parents of 83 Hispanic probands meeting research diagnostic criteria for ASD, and 64 non-ASD controls, using the Social Responsiveness Scale-2 (SRS-2). Ancestry of the probands was characterized by genotype, using information from 541,929 single nucleotide polymorphic markers. In families of Hispanic children with an ASD diagnosis, the pattern of quantitative trait correlations observed between ASD-affected children and their first-degree relatives (ICCs on the order of 0.20), between unaffected first-degree relatives in ASD-affected families (sibling/mother ICC = 0.36; sibling/father ICC = 0.53), and between spouses (mother/father ICC = 0.48) were in keeping with the influence of transmitted background genetic risk and strong preferential mating for variation in quantitative autistic trait burden. Results from analysis of ancestry-informative genetic markers among probands in this sample were consistent with that from other Hispanic populations. Quantitative autistic traits represent measurable indices of inherited liability to ASD in Hispanic families. The accumulation of autistic traits occurs within generations, between spouses, and across generations, among Hispanic families affected by ASD. The occurrence of preferential mating for QATs-the magnitude of which may vary across cultures-constitutes a mechanism by which background genetic liability

  16. Genetically modified mouse models for premature ovarian failure (POF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarlamudi, Krishna; Reddy, Pradeep; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2010-02-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is a complex disorder that affects approximately 1% of women. POF is characterized by the depletion of functional ovarian follicles before the age of 40 years, and clinically, patients may present with primary amenorrhea or secondary amenorrhea. Although some genes have been hypothesized to be candidates responsible for POF, the etiology of most of the cases is idiopathic, with the underlying causes still unidentified because of the heterogeneity of the disease. In this review, we consider some mutant mouse models that exhibit phenotypes which are comparable to human POF, and we suggest that the use of these mouse models may help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying POF in humans.

  17. Genetic Mouse Models: The Powerful Tools to Study Fat Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xingxing; Williams, Kevin W; Liu, Tiemin

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with a variety of comorbidities that contribute to mortality around the world. Although significant effort has been expended in understanding mechanisms that mitigate the consequences of this epidemic, the field has experienced limited success thus far. The potential ability of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to counteract obesity and metabolic disease in rodents (and potentially in humans) has been a topical realization. Recently, there is also another thermogenic fat cell called beige adipocytes, which are located among white adipocytes and share similar activated responses to cyclic AMP as classical BAT. In this chapter, we review contemporary molecular strategies to investigate the role of adipose tissue depots in metabolism. In particular, we will discuss the generation of adipose tissue-specific knockout and overexpression of target genes in various mouse models. We will also discuss how to use different Cre (cyclization recombination) mouse lines to investigate diverse types of adipocytes.

  18. Creatine uptake in mouse hearts with genetically altered creatine levels

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Creatine plays an important role in energy metabolism in the heart. Cardiomyocytes accumulate creatine via a specific creatine transporter (CrT), the capacity of which is reduced in the failing heart, resulting in lower myocardial creatine concentration. Therefore, to gain insight into how the CrT is regulated, we studied two mouse models of severely altered myocardial creatine levels. Cardiac creatine uptake levels were measured in isolated hearts from creatine-free guanidinoacetate-N-methyl...

  19. Genetically engineered mucin mouse models for inflammation and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Suhasini; Kumar, Sushil; Bafna, Sangeeta; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Wagner, Kay-Uwe; Jain, Maneesh

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are heavily O-glycosylated proteins primarily produced by glandular and ductal epithelial cells, either in membrane-tethered or secretory forms, for providing lubrication and protection from various exogenous and endogenous insults. However, recent studies have linked their aberrant overexpression with infection, inflammation, and cancer that underscores their importance in tissue homeostasis. In this review, we present current status of the existing mouse models that have been developed to gain insights into the functional role(s) of mucins under physiological and pathological conditions. Knockout mouse models for membrane-associated (Muc1 and Muc16) and secretory mucins (Muc2) have helped us to elucidate the role of mucins in providing effective and protective barrier functions against pathological threats, participation in disease progression, and improved our understanding of mucin interaction with biotic and abiotic environmental components. Emphasis is also given to available transgenic mouse models (MUC1 and MUC7), which has been exploited to understand the context-dependent regulation and therapeutic potential of human mucins during inflammation and cancer. PMID:25634251

  20. Towards Transgenic Primates:What can we learn from mouse genetics?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Phillip; L.; TSIEN; Joe; Z.

    2009-01-01

    Considering the great physiological and behavioral similarities with humans,monkeys represent the ideal models not only for the study of complex cognitive behavior but also for the preclinical research and development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases.Various powerful genetic tech-nologies initially developed for making mouse models are being explored for generating transgenic primate models.We review the latest genetic engineering technologies and discuss the potentials and limitations for systematic production of transgenic primates.

  1. Genetic background influences age-related decline in visual and nonvisual retinal responses, circadian rhythms, and sleep.

    OpenAIRE

    Banks, G; Heise, I; Starbuck, B; Osborne, T.; Wisby, L; De Potter, P; Jackson, IJ; Foster, RG; Peirson, SN; Nolan, PM

    2015-01-01

    The circadian system is entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via retinal photoreceptors and regulates numerous aspects of physiology and behavior, including sleep. These processes are all key factors in healthy aging showing a gradual decline with age. Despite their importance, the exact mechanisms underlying this decline are yet to be fully understood. One of the most effective tools we have to understand the genetic factors underlying these processes are genetically inbred mouse ...

  2. Mutualism effectiveness and vertical transmission of symbiotic fungal endophytes in response to host genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundel, Pedro E; Martínez-Ghersa, María A; Omacini, Marina; Cuyeu, Romina; Pagano, Elba; Ríos, Raúl; Ghersa, Claudio M

    2012-12-01

    Certain species of the Pooideae subfamily develop stress tolerance and herbivory resistance through symbiosis with vertically transmitted, asexual fungi. This symbiosis is specific, and genetic factors modulate the compatibility between partners. Although gene flow is clearly a fitness trait in allogamous grasses, because it injects hybrid vigor and raw material for evolution, it could reduce compatibility and thus mutualism effectiveness. To explore the importance of host genetic background in modulating the performance of symbiosis, Lolium multiflorum plants, infected and noninfected with Neotyphodium occultans, were crossed with genetically distant plants of isolines (susceptible and resistant to diclofop-methyl herbicide) bred from two cultivars and exposed to stress. The endophyte improved seedling survival in genotypes susceptible to herbicide, while it had a negative effect on one of the genetically resistant crosses. Mutualism provided resistance to herbivory independently of the host genotype, but this effect vanished under stress. While no endophyte effect was observed on host reproductive success, it was increased by interpopulation plant crosses. Neither gene flow nor herbicide had an important impact on endophyte transmission. Host fitness improvements attributable to gene flow do not appear to result in direct conflict with mutualism while this seems to be an important mechanism for the ecological and contemporary evolution of the symbiotum.

  3. Extending the Spectrum of Radiological Findings in Patients With Severe Osteopetrosis and Different Genetic Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanovsky, Natalia; Rozovsky, Katya; Hiller, Nurith; Weintraub, Michael; Stepensky, Polina

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate radiological findings in a cohort of 22 patients with infantile malignant osteopetrosis in order to establish the correlation between radiological findings and different genetic backgrounds. Clinical files, genetic analysis results, and radiological examinations of children treated for osteopetrosis with bone marrow transplantation in a referral center in the last 5 years were retrospectively evaluated. The study received institutional review board (IRB) approval. Twenty-two patients were included in the study: 18 males, four females, ages 1 month-9 years 10 months, and the median age was 11 months (mean 23 months). There were 12 patients with different mutations in the TCIRG1 gene, five with mutations in the SNX10 gene, four children harbored RANK mutations, and one patient had a CLCN7 mutation. We noted more severe radiological findings in patients with TCIRG1 and RANK mutations, including fractures, osteopetrorickets, hydrocephalus, and hepatomegaly. Varus deformity of the femoral neck was seen exclusively in patients with a TCIRG1 mutation. The variable genetic spectrum of osteopetrosis is associated with a variable radiological presentation. These correlations may be helpful for priorities in genetic analysis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Olfaction in three genetic and two MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kurtenbach

    Full Text Available Various genetic or toxin-induced mouse models are frequently used for investigation of early PD pathology. Although olfactory impairment is known to precede motor symptoms by years, it is not known whether it is caused by impairments in the brain, the olfactory epithelium, or both. In this study, we investigated the olfactory function in three genetic Parkinson's disease (PD mouse models and mice treated with MPTP intraperitoneally and intranasally. To investigate olfactory function, we performed electro-olfactogram recordings (EOGs and an olfactory behavior test (cookie-finding test. We show that neither a parkin knockout mouse strain, nor intraperitoneal MPTP treated animals display any olfactory impairment in EOG recordings and the applied behavior test. We also found no difference in the responses of the olfactory epithelium to odorants in a mouse strain over-expressing doubly mutated α-synuclein, while this mouse strain was not suitable to test olfaction in a cookie-finding test as it displays a mobility impairment. A transgenic mouse expressing mutated α-synuclein in dopaminergic neurons performed equal to control animals in the cookie-finding test. Further we show that intranasal MPTP application can cause functional damage of the olfactory epithelium.

  5. Lung defenses against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in C5-deficient mice with different genetic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerquetti, M C; Sordelli, D O; Bellanti, J A; Hooke, A M

    1986-01-01

    Lung defenses against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were investigated in C5-deficient strains of mice with different genetic backgrounds. We studied pulmonary clearance and cell responses after aerosol exposure to P. aeruginosa in C5-deficient B10.D2/oSnJ and DBA/2J mice and their closest C5-sufficient counterparts, B10.D2/nSnJ and DBA/1J mice. Different patterns of lung clearance and pulmonary cell responses were found for the two C5-deficient strains. C5-deficient B10.D2/oSnJ mice showed defective lung clearance of P. aeruginosa 4 h after challenge compared with C5-sufficient B10.D2/nSnJ animals. This finding was associated with a decreased number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes recruited into the airways during the same time. Interestingly, C5-deficient DBA/2J mice recruited higher numbers of polymorphonuclear leukocytes than did C5-sufficient DBA/1J mice by 4 h after aerosolization. Nevertheless, lung clearance of P. aeruginosa in DBA/2J mice was not as effective as in C5-sufficient DBA/1J mice, suggesting that other functions of C5 besides chemotaxism could be involved. Lung clearance of P. aeruginosa was also investigated in C5-deficient and -sufficient hybrids sharing the same genetic background (DBA/2J X B10.D2). The results suggested that murine lung clearance of P. aeruginosa is markedly affected by lack of C5 in a specific genetic background (B10.D2). PMID:3086235

  6. Persistence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance mutations associated with fitness costs and viral genetic backgrounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Lin Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of drug-resistant pathogens presents an almost-universal challenge for fighting infectious diseases. Transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM can persist in the absence of drugs for considerable time. It is generally believed that differential TDRM-persistence is caused, at least partially, by variations in TDRM-fitness-costs. However, in vivo epidemiological evidence for the impact of fitness costs on TDRM-persistence is rare. Here, we studied the persistence of TDRM in HIV-1 using longitudinally-sampled nucleotide sequences from the Swiss-HIV-Cohort-Study (SHCS. All treatment-naïve individuals with TDRM at baseline were included. Persistence of TDRM was quantified via reversion rates (RR determined with interval-censored survival models. Fitness costs of TDRM were estimated in the genetic background in which they occurred using a previously published and validated machine-learning algorithm (based on in vitro replicative capacities and were included in the survival models as explanatory variables. In 857 sequential samples from 168 treatment-naïve patients, 17 TDRM were analyzed. RR varied substantially and ranged from 174.0/100-person-years;CI=[51.4, 588.8] (for 184V to 2.7/100-person-years;[0.7, 10.9] (for 215D. RR increased significantly with fitness cost (increase by 1.6[1.3,2.0] per standard deviation of fitness costs. When subdividing fitness costs into the average fitness cost of a given mutation and the deviation from the average fitness cost of a mutation in a given genetic background, we found that both components were significantly associated with reversion-rates. Our results show that the substantial variations of TDRM persistence in the absence of drugs are associated with fitness-cost differences both among mutations and among different genetic backgrounds for the same mutation.

  7. The Flowering Repressor SVP Underlies a Novel Arabidopsis thaliana QTL Interacting with the Genetic Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Vigo, Belén; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Alonso-Blanco, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The timing of flowering initiation is a fundamental trait for the adaptation of annual plants to different environments. Large amounts of intraspecific quantitative variation have been described for it among natural accessions of many species, but the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying this genetic variation are mainly being determined in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To find novel A. thaliana flowering QTL, we developed introgression lines from the Japanese accession Fuk, which was selected based on the substantial transgression observed in an F2 population with the reference strain Ler. Analysis of an early flowering line carrying a single Fuk introgression identified Flowering Arabidopsis QTL1 (FAQ1). We fine-mapped FAQ1 in an 11 kb genomic region containing the MADS transcription factor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP). Complementation of the early flowering phenotype of FAQ1-Fuk with a SVP-Ler transgen demonstrated that FAQ1 is SVP. We further proved by directed mutagenesis and transgenesis that a single amino acid substitution in SVP causes the loss-of-function and early flowering of Fuk allele. Analysis of a worldwide collection of accessions detected FAQ1/SVP-Fuk allele only in Asia, with the highest frequency appearing in Japan, where we could also detect a potential ancestral genotype of FAQ1/SVP-Fuk. In addition, we evaluated allelic and epistatic interactions of SVP natural alleles by analysing more than one hundred transgenic lines carrying Ler or Fuk SVP alleles in five genetic backgrounds. Quantitative analyses of these lines showed that FAQ1/SVP effects vary from large to small depending on the genetic background. These results support that the flowering repressor SVP has been recently selected in A. thaliana as a target for early flowering, and evidence the relevance of genetic interactions for the intraspecific evolution of FAQ1/SVP and flowering time. PMID:23382706

  8. Ethnic background and genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Jing

    Full Text Available The clinical use of genetic variation in the evaluation of cancer risk is expanding, and thus understanding how determinants of cancer susceptibility identified in one population can be applied to another is of growing importance. However there is considerable debate on the relevance of ethnic background in clinical genetics, reflecting both the significance and complexity of genetic heritage. We address this via a systematic review of reported associations with cancer risk for 82 markers in 68 studies across six different cancer types, comparing association results between ethnic groups and examining linkage disequilibrium between risk alleles and nearby genetic loci. We find that the relevance of ethnic background depends on the question. If asked whether the association of variants with disease risk is conserved across ethnic boundaries, we find that the answer is yes, the majority of markers show insignificant variability in association with cancer risk across ethnic groups. However if the question is whether a significant association between a variant and cancer risk is likely to reproduce, the answer is no, most markers do not validate in an ethnic group other than the discovery cohort's ancestry. This lack of reproducibility is not attributable to studies being inadequately populated due to low allele frequency in other ethnic groups. Instead, differences in local genomic structure between ethnic groups are associated with the strength of association with cancer risk and therefore confound interpretation of the implied physiologic association tracked by the disease allele. This suggest that a biological association for cancer risk alleles may be broadly consistent across ethnic boundaries, but reproduction of a clinical study in another ethnic group is uncommon, in part due to confounding genomic architecture. As clinical studies are increasingly performed globally this has important implications for how cancer risk stratifiers should be

  9. Evolutionary concepts in ecotoxicology: tracing the genetic background of differential cadmium sensitivities in invertebrate lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallinger, Reinhard; Höckner, Martina

    2013-07-01

    In many toxicological and ecotoxicological studies and experimental setups, the investigator is mainly interested in traditional parameters such as toxicity data and effects of toxicants on molecular, cellular or physiological functions of individuals, species or statistical populations. It is clear, however, that such approaches focus on the phenotype level of animal species, whilst the genetic and evolutionary background of reactions to environmental toxicants may remain untold. In ecotoxicological risk assessment, moreover, species sensitivities towards pollutants are often regarded as random variables in a statistical approach. Beyond statistics, however, toxicant sensitivity of every species assumes a biological significance, especially if we consider that sensitivity traits have developed in lineages of species with common evolutionary roots. In this article, the genetic and evolutionary background of differential Cd sensitivities among invertebrate populations and species and their potential of adaptation to environmental Cd exposure will be highlighted. Important evolutionary and population genetic concepts such as genome structure and their importance for evolutionary adaptation, population structure of affected individuals, as well as micro and macroevolutionary mechanisms of Cd resistance in invertebrate lineages will be stressed by discussing examples of work from our own laboratory along with a review of relevant literature data and a brief discussion of open questions along with some perspectives for further research. Both, differences and similarities in Cd sensitivity traits of related invertebrate species can only be understood if we consider the underlying evolutionary processes and genetic (or epigenetic) mechanisms. Keeping in mind this perception can help us to better understand and interpret more precisely why the sensitivity of some species or species groups towards a certain toxicant (or metal) may be ranked in the lower or higher range of

  10. The flowering repressor SVP underlies a novel Arabidopsis thaliana QTL interacting with the genetic background.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Méndez-Vigo

    Full Text Available The timing of flowering initiation is a fundamental trait for the adaptation of annual plants to different environments. Large amounts of intraspecific quantitative variation have been described for it among natural accessions of many species, but the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying this genetic variation are mainly being determined in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. To find novel A. thaliana flowering QTL, we developed introgression lines from the Japanese accession Fuk, which was selected based on the substantial transgression observed in an F(2 population with the reference strain Ler. Analysis of an early flowering line carrying a single Fuk introgression identified Flowering Arabidopsis QTL1 (FAQ1. We fine-mapped FAQ1 in an 11 kb genomic region containing the MADS transcription factor gene SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP. Complementation of the early flowering phenotype of FAQ1-Fuk with a SVP-Ler transgen demonstrated that FAQ1 is SVP. We further proved by directed mutagenesis and transgenesis that a single amino acid substitution in SVP causes the loss-of-function and early flowering of Fuk allele. Analysis of a worldwide collection of accessions detected FAQ1/SVP-Fuk allele only in Asia, with the highest frequency appearing in Japan, where we could also detect a potential ancestral genotype of FAQ1/SVP-Fuk. In addition, we evaluated allelic and epistatic interactions of SVP natural alleles by analysing more than one hundred transgenic lines carrying Ler or Fuk SVP alleles in five genetic backgrounds. Quantitative analyses of these lines showed that FAQ1/SVP effects vary from large to small depending on the genetic background. These results support that the flowering repressor SVP has been recently selected in A. thaliana as a target for early flowering, and evidence the relevance of genetic interactions for the intraspecific evolution of FAQ1/SVP and flowering time.

  11. Genetic modifier loci of mouse Mfrp(rd6) identified by quantitative trait locus analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Jungyeon; Charette, Jeremy R; Philip, Vivek M; Stearns, Timothy M; Zhang, Weidong; Naggert, Jürgen K; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M

    2014-01-01

    The identification of genes that modify pathological ocular phenotypes in mouse models may improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and lead to new treatment strategies. Here, we identify modifier loci affecting photoreceptor cell loss in homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice, which exhibit a slowly progressive photoreceptor degeneration. A cohort of 63 F2 homozygous Mfrp(rd6) mice from a (B6.C3Ga-Mfrp(rd6)/J × CAST/EiJ) F1 intercross exhibited a variable number of cell bodies in the retinal outer nuclear layer at 20 weeks of age. Mice were genotyped with a panel of single nucleotide polymorphism markers, and genotypes were correlated with phenotype by quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis to map modifier loci. A genome-wide scan revealed a statistically significant, protective candidate locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 and suggestive modifier loci on Chromosomes 6 and 11. Multiple regression analysis of a three-QTL model indicated that the modifier loci on Chromosomes 1 and 6 together account for 26% of the observed phenotypic variation, while the modifier locus on Chromosome 11 explains only an additional 4%. Our findings indicate that the severity of the Mfrp(rd6) retinal degenerative phenotype in mice depends on the strain genetic background and that a significant modifier locus on CAST/EiJ Chromosome 1 protects against Mfrp(rd6)-associated photoreceptor loss.

  12. Genetic background of nonmutant Piebald-Virol-Glaxo rats does not influence nephronophthisis phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yengkopiong JP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Jada Pasquale Yengkopiong, Joseph Daniel Wani LakoJohn Garang Memorial University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bor, Jonglei State, Republic of South SudanBackground: Nephronophthisis (NPHP, which affects multiple organs, is a hereditary cystic kidney disease (CKD, characterized by interstitial fibrosis and numerous fluid-filled cysts in the kidneys. It is caused by mutations in NPHP genes, which encode for ciliary proteins known as nephrocystins. The disorder affects many people across the world and leads to end-stage renal disease. The aim of this study was to determine if the genetic background of the nonmutant female Piebald-Virol-Glaxo (PVG/Seac-/- rat influences phenotypic inheritance of NPHP from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats.Methods: Mating experiments were performed between mutant Lewis polycystic kidney male rats with CKD and nonmutant PVG and Wistar Kyoto female rats without cystic kidney disease to raise second filial and backcross 1 progeny, respectively. Rats that developed cystic kidneys were identified. Systolic blood pressure was determined in each rat at 12 weeks of age using the tail and cuff method. After euthanasia, blood samples were collected and chemistry was determined. Histological examination of the kidneys, pancreas, and liver of rats with and without cystic kidney disease was performed.Results: It was established that the genetic background of nonmutant female PVG rats did not influence the phenotypic inheritance of the CKD from mutant male Lewis polycystic kidney rats. The disease arose as a result of a recessive mutation in a single gene (second filial generation, CKD = 13, non-CKD = 39, Χ2 = 0.00, P ≥ 0.97; backcross 1 generation, CKD = 67, non-CKD = 72, Χ2 = 0.18, P > 0.05 and inherited as NPHP. The rats with CKD developed larger fluid-filled cystic kidneys, higher systolic blood pressure, and anemia, but there were no extrarenal cysts and disease did not lead to

  13. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The YUMM lines: a series of congenic mouse melanoma cell lines with defined genetic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeth, Katrina; Wang, Jake Xiao; Micevic, Goran; Damsky, William; Bosenberg, Marcus W

    2016-09-01

    The remarkable success of immune therapies emphasizes the need for immune-competent cancer models. Elegant genetically engineered mouse models of a variety of cancers have been established, but their effective use is limited by cost and difficulties in rapidly generating experimental data. Some mouse cancer cell lines are transplantable to immunocompetent host mice and have been utilized extensively to study cancer immunology. Here, we describe the Yale University Mouse Melanoma (YUMM) lines, a comprehensive system of mouse melanoma cell lines that are syngeneic to C57BL/6, have well-defined human-relevant driver mutations, and are genomically stable. This will be a useful tool for the study of tumor immunology and genotype-specific cancer biology.

  15. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2009-03-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the isolation of putative homozygous RNAi mutant cells. Candidate clones were confirmed by an independent RNAi-based reporter assay and the causative gene trap integration site was identified using molecular techniques. Our screen identified multiple mutant cell lines of Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a known essential component of the RNAi pathway. This result demonstrates that true RNAi components can be isolated by this screening strategy. Furthermore, Ago2 homozygous mutant ES cells provide a null genetic background to perform mutational analyses of the Ago2 protein. Using genetic rescue, we resolve an important controversy regarding the role of two phenylalanine residues in Ago2 activity.

  16. Cross-packaging of genetically distinct mouse and primate retroviral RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaballah Soumeya

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is unique from other retroviruses in having multiple viral promoters, which can be regulated by hormones in a tissue specific manner. This unique property has lead to increased interest in studying MMTV replication with the hope of developing MMTV based vectors for human gene therapy. However, it has recently been reported that related as well as unrelated retroviruses can cross-package each other's genome raising safety concerns towards the use of candidate retroviral vectors for human gene therapy. Therefore, using a trans complementation assay, we looked at the ability of MMTV RNA to be cross-packaged and propagated by an unrelated primate Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV that has intracellular assembly process similar to that of MMTV. Results Our results revealed that MMTV and MPMV RNAs could be cross-packaged by the heterologous virus particles reciprocally suggesting that pseudotyping between two genetically distinct retroviruses can take place at the RNA level. However, the cross-packaged RNAs could not be propagated further indicating a block at post-packaging events in the retroviral life cycle. To further confirm that the specificity of cross-packaging was conferred by the packaging sequences (ψ, we cloned the packaging sequences of these viruses on expression plasmids that generated non-viral RNAs. Test of these non-viral RNAs confirmed that the reciprocal cross-packaging was primarily due to the recognition of ψ by the heterologous virus proteins. Conclusion The results presented in this study strongly argue that MPMV and MMTV are promiscuous in their ability to cross-package each other's genome suggesting potential RNA-protein interactions among divergent retroviral RNAs proposing that these interactions are more complicated than originally thought. Furthermore, these observations raise the possibility that MMTV and MPMV genomes could also co-package providing substrates for

  17. High Prevalence of Smoking in the Roma Population Seems to Have No Genetic Background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiatal, Szilvia; Tóth, Réka; Moravcsik-Kornyicki, Ágota; Kósa, Zsigmond; Sándor, János; McKee, Martin; Ádány, Róza

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of smoking in Romani of both genders is significantly higher than in the general population. Our aim was to determine whether a genetic susceptibility contributes to the high prevalence of smoking among Roma in a study based on data collected from cross-sectional surveys. Twenty single nucleotide polymorphisms known to be closely related to smoking behavior were investigated in DNA samples of Hungarian Roma (N = 1273) and general (N = 2388) populations. Differences in genotype and allele distribution were investigated. Genetic risk scores (GRSs) were generated to estimate the joint effect of single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes COMT, CHRNA3/4/5, CYP2A6, CTNNA3, DRD2, MAOA, KCNJ6, AGPHD1, ANKK1, TRPC7, GABRA4, and NRXN1. The distribution of scores in study populations was compared. Age, gender, and body mass index were considered as confounding factors. Difference in allele frequencies between the study populations remained significant for 16 polymorphisms after multiple test correction (p smoking behavior of the Roma population could not be accounted for by genetic susceptibility; therefore, interventions aimed at smoking prevention and cessation should focus on cultural and environmental factors. This is the first study designed to determine whether genetic background exists behind the harmful behavior of the smoking of the Roma population. Although the frequencies of susceptible and protective alleles strongly differ between the Hungarian Roma and general populations, it is shown that calculated GRSs being significantly higher in the general population, which do not support the hypothesis on the genetic susceptibility of the Roma population. Interventions aimed at smoking cessation in the Roma population should preferentially target cultural and environmental factors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  18. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F; Fischer, Susan M; Digiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J; Benavides, Fernando

    2012-03-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hr(hr) mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes.

  19. Genetic architecture of skewed X inactivation in the laboratory mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Calaway

    Full Text Available X chromosome inactivation (XCI is the mammalian mechanism of dosage compensation that balances X-linked gene expression between the sexes. Early during female development, each cell of the embryo proper independently inactivates one of its two parental X-chromosomes. In mice, the choice of which X chromosome is inactivated is affected by the genotype of a cis-acting locus, the X-chromosome controlling element (Xce. Xce has been localized to a 1.9 Mb interval within the X-inactivation center (Xic, yet its molecular identity and mechanism of action remain unknown. We combined genotype and sequence data for mouse stocks with detailed phenotyping of ten inbred strains and with the development of a statistical model that incorporates phenotyping data from multiple sources to disentangle sources of XCI phenotypic variance in natural female populations on X inactivation. We have reduced the Xce candidate 10-fold to a 176 kb region located approximately 500 kb proximal to Xist. We propose that structural variation in this interval explains the presence of multiple functional Xce alleles in the genus Mus. We have identified a new allele, Xce(e present in Mus musculus and a possible sixth functional allele in Mus spicilegus. We have also confirmed a parent-of-origin effect on X inactivation choice and provide evidence that maternal inheritance magnifies the skewing associated with strong Xce alleles. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 155 laboratory strains and wild mice we conclude that Xce(a is either a derived allele that arose concurrently with the domestication of fancy mice but prior the derivation of most classical inbred strains or a rare allele in the wild. Furthermore, we have found that despite the presence of multiple haplotypes in the wild Mus musculus domesticus has only one functional Xce allele, Xce(b. Lastly, we conclude that each mouse taxa examined has a different functional Xce allele.

  20. Genetic dissection of GABAergic neural circuits in mouse neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki eTaniguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diverse and flexible cortical functions rely on the ability of neural circuits to perform multiple types of neuronal computations. GABAergic inhibitory interneurons significantly contribute to this task by regulating the balance of activity, synaptic integration, spiking, synchrony, and oscillation in a neural ensemble. GABAergic interneruons display a high degree of cellular diversity in morphology, physiology, connectivity, and gene expression. A considerable number of subtypes of GABAergic interneurons diversify modes of cortical inhibition, enabling various types of information processing in the cortex. Thus, comprehensively understanding fate specification, circuit assembly and physiological function of GABAergic interneurons is a key to elucidate the principles of cortical wiring and function. Recent advances in genetically encoded molecular tools have made a breakthrough to systematically study cortical circuitry at the molecular, cellular, circuit, and whole animal levels. However, the biggest obstacle to fully applying the power of these to analysis of GABAergic circuits was that there were no efficient and reliable methods to express them in subtypes of GABAergic interneurons. Here, I first summarize cortical interneuron diversity and current understanding of mechanisms, by which distinct classes of GABAergic interneurons are generated. I then review recent development in genetically encoded molecular tools for neural circuit research, and genetic targeting of GABAergic interneuron subtypes, particulary focusing on our recent effort to develop and characterize Cre/CreER knockin lines. Finally, I highlight recent success in genetic targeting of chandelier cells (ChCs, the most unique and distinct GABAergic interneuron subtype, and discuss what kind of questions need to be addressed to understand development and function of cortical inhibitory circuits.

  1. Illuminating cancer systems with genetically engineered mouse models and coupled luciferase reporters in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Brandon; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2013-06-01

    Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) is a powerful noninvasive tool that has dramatically accelerated the in vivo interrogation of cancer systems and longitudinal analysis of mouse models of cancer over the past decade. Various luciferase enzymes have been genetically engineered into mouse models (GEMM) of cancer, which permit investigation of cellular and molecular events associated with oncogenic transcription, posttranslational processing, protein-protein interactions, transformation, and oncogene addiction in live cells and animals. Luciferase-coupled GEMMs ultimately serve as a noninvasive, repetitive, longitudinal, and physiologic means by which cancer systems and therapeutic responses can be investigated accurately within the autochthonous context of a living animal.

  2. Migraine pathophysiology: lessons from mouse models and human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michel D; Klever, Roselin R; Terwindt, Gisela M; Ayata, Cenk; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is a common, disabling, and undertreated episodic brain disorder that is more common in women than in men. Unbiased genome-wide association studies have identified 13 migraine-associated variants pointing at genes that cluster in pathways for glutamatergic neurotransmission, synaptic function, pain sensing, metalloproteinases, and the vasculature. The individual pathogenetic contribution of each gene variant is difficult to assess because of small effect sizes and complex interactions. Six genes with large effect sizes were identified in patients with rare monogenic migraine syndromes, in which hemiplegic migraine and non-hemiplegic migraine with or without aura are part of a wider clinical spectrum. Transgenic mouse models with human monogenic-migraine-syndrome gene mutations showed migraine-like features, increased glutamatergic neurotransmission, cerebral hyperexcitability, and enhanced susceptibility to cortical spreading depression, which is the electrophysiological correlate of aura and a putative trigger for migraine. Enhanced susceptibility to cortical spreading depression increased sensitivity to focal cerebral ischaemia, and blocking of cortical spreading depression improved stroke outcome in these mice. Changes in female hormone levels in these mice modulated cortical spreading depression susceptibility in much the same way that hormonal fluctuations affect migraine activity in patients. These findings confirm the multifactorial basis of migraine and might allow new prophylactic options to be developed, not only for migraine but potentially also for migraine-comorbid disorders such as epilepsy, depression, and stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Obesity genetics in mouse and human: back and forth, and back again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Fereshteh T; Clee, Susanne M; Meyre, David

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern. This condition results from a constant and complex interplay between predisposing genes and environmental stimuli. Current attempts to manage obesity have been moderately effective and a better understanding of the etiology of obesity is required for the development of more successful and personalized prevention and treatment options. To that effect, mouse models have been an essential tool in expanding our understanding of obesity, due to the availability of their complete genome sequence, genetically identified and defined strains, various tools for genetic manipulation and the accessibility of target tissues for obesity that are not easily attainable from humans. Our knowledge of monogenic obesity in humans greatly benefited from the mouse obesity genetics field. Genes underlying highly penetrant forms of monogenic obesity are part of the leptin-melanocortin pathway in the hypothalamus. Recently, hypothesis-generating genome-wide association studies for polygenic obesity traits in humans have led to the identification of 119 common gene variants with modest effect, most of them having an unknown function. These discoveries have led to novel animal models and have illuminated new biologic pathways. Integrated mouse-human genetic approaches have firmly established new obesity candidate genes. Innovative strategies recently developed by scientists are described in this review to accelerate the identification of causal genes and deepen our understanding of obesity etiology. An exhaustive dissection of the molecular roots of obesity may ultimately help to tackle the growing obesity epidemic worldwide.

  4. Obesity genetics in mouse and human: back and forth, and back again

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Fereshteh T.; Clee, Susanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health concern. This condition results from a constant and complex interplay between predisposing genes and environmental stimuli. Current attempts to manage obesity have been moderately effective and a better understanding of the etiology of obesity is required for the development of more successful and personalized prevention and treatment options. To that effect, mouse models have been an essential tool in expanding our understanding of obesity, due to the availability of their complete genome sequence, genetically identified and defined strains, various tools for genetic manipulation and the accessibility of target tissues for obesity that are not easily attainable from humans. Our knowledge of monogenic obesity in humans greatly benefited from the mouse obesity genetics field. Genes underlying highly penetrant forms of monogenic obesity are part of the leptin-melanocortin pathway in the hypothalamus. Recently, hypothesis-generating genome-wide association studies for polygenic obesity traits in humans have led to the identification of 119 common gene variants with modest effect, most of them having an unknown function. These discoveries have led to novel animal models and have illuminated new biologic pathways. Integrated mouse-human genetic approaches have firmly established new obesity candidate genes. Innovative strategies recently developed by scientists are described in this review to accelerate the identification of causal genes and deepen our understanding of obesity etiology. An exhaustive dissection of the molecular roots of obesity may ultimately help to tackle the growing obesity epidemic worldwide. PMID:25825681

  5. Early host gene expression responses to a Salmonella infection in the intestine of chickens with different genetic background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemert, van S.; Hoekman, A.J.W.; Smith, M.A.; Rebel, J.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    So far the responses of chickens to Salmonella have not been studied in vivo on a whole genome-wide scale. Furthermore, the influence of the host genetic background on gene expression responses is unknown. In this study gene expression profiles in the chicken (Gallus gallus) intestine of two genetic

  6. Efficacy of EGFR inhibition is modulated by model, sex, genetic background and diet: implications for preclinical cancer prevention and therapy trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica S Rinella

    Full Text Available Molecule-targeted therapies are being widely developed and deployed, but they are frequently less effective in clinical trials than predicted based upon preclinical studies. Frequently, only a single model or genetic background is utilized using diets that are not relevant to that consumed by most cancer patients, which may contribute to the lack of predictability of many preclinical therapeutic studies. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in colorectal cancer was used to investigate potential causes for low predictive values of many preclinical studies. The efficacy of the small molecule EGFR inhibitor AG1478 was evaluated using two mouse models, Apc(Min/+ and azoxymethane (AOM, both sexes on three genetic backgrounds, C57BL/6J (B6 and A/J (A inbred strains and AB6F1 hybrids, and two diets, standard chow (STD or Western-style diet (WD. AG1478 has significant anti-tumor activity in the B6-Apc(Min/+ model with STD but only moderately on the WD and in the AOM model on an A background with a WD but not STD. On the F1 hybrid background AG1478 is effective in the Apc(Min/+ model with either STD or WD, but has only moderate efficacy in the AOM model with either diet. Sex differences were also observed. Unexpectedly, the level of liver EGFR phosphorylation inhibition by AG1478 was not positively correlated with inhibition of tumor growth in the AOM model. Model-dependent interactions between genetic background and diet can dramatically impact preclinical results, and indicate that low predictive values of preclinical studies can be attributed to study designs that do not account for the heterogeneous patient population or the diets they consume. Better-designed preclinical studies should lead to more accurate predictions of therapeutic response in the clinic.

  7. Effect of mutation and genetic background on drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Lukas; Egger, Matthias; Bodmer, Thomas; Altpeter, Ekkehardt; Zwahlen, Marcel; Jaton, Katia; Pfyffer, Gaby E; Borrell, Sonia; Dubuis, Olivier; Bruderer, Thomas; Siegrist, Hans H; Furrer, Hansjakob; Calmy, Alexandra; Fehr, Jan; Stalder, Jesica Mazza; Ninet, Béatrice; Böttger, Erik C; Gagneux, Sebastien

    2012-06-01

    Bacterial factors may contribute to the global emergence and spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). Only a few studies have reported on the interactions between different bacterial factors. We studied drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from a nationwide study conducted from 2000 to 2008 in Switzerland. We determined quantitative drug resistance levels of first-line drugs by using Bactec MGIT-960 and drug resistance genotypes by sequencing the hot-spot regions of the relevant genes. We determined recent transmission by molecular methods and collected clinical data. Overall, we analyzed 158 isolates that were resistant to isoniazid, rifampin, or ethambutol, 48 (30.4%) of which were multidrug resistant. Among 154 isoniazid-resistant strains, katG mutations were associated with high-level and inhA promoter mutations with low-level drug resistance. Only katG(S315T) (65.6% of all isoniazid-resistant strains) and inhA promoter -15C/T (22.7%) were found in molecular clusters. M. tuberculosis lineage 2 (includes Beijing genotype) was associated with any drug resistance (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 3.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 5.6; P mutations (OR, 6.4; 95% CI, 2.0 to 20.7; P = 0.002). We found that the genetic strain background influences the level of isoniazid resistance conveyed by particular mutations (interaction tests of drug resistance mutations across all lineages; P tuberculosis drug resistance mutations were associated with various levels of drug resistance and transmission, and M. tuberculosis lineages were associated with particular drug resistance-conferring mutations and phenotypic drug resistance. Our study also supports a role for epistatic interactions between different drug resistance mutations and strain genetic backgrounds in M. tuberculosis drug resistance.

  8. A molecular pathway analysis informs the genetic background at risk for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafulli, Concetta; Drago, Antonio; Calabrò, Marco; Spina, Edoardo; Serretti, Alessandro

    2015-06-03

    Schizophrenia is a complex mental disorder marked by severely impaired thinking, delusional thoughts, hallucinations and poor emotional responsiveness. The biological mechanisms that lead to schizophrenia may be related to the genetic background of patients. Thus, a genetic perspective may help to unravel the molecular pathways disrupted in schizophrenia. In the present work, we used a molecular pathway analysis to identify the molecular pathways associated with schizophrenia. We collected data of genetic loci previously associated with schizophrenia, identified the genes located in those positions and created the metabolic pathways that are related to those genes' products. These pathways were tested for enrichment (a number of SNPs associated with the phenotype significantly higher than expected by chance) in a sample of schizophrenic patients and controls (4486 and 4477, respectively). The molecular pathway that resulted from the identification of all the genes located in the loci previously found to be associated with schizophrenia was found to be enriched, as expected (permutated p(10(6))=9.9999e-06).We found 60 SNPs amongst 30 different genes with a strong association with schizophrenia. The genes are related to the pathways related to neurodevelopment, apoptosis, vesicle traffic, immune response and MAPK cascade. The pathway related to the toll-like receptor family seemed to play a central role in the modulation/connection of various pathways whose disruption leads to schizophrenia. This pathway is related to the innate immune system, further stressing the role of immunological-related events in increasing the risk to schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Genetic background can result in a marked or minimal effect of gene knockout (GPR55 and CB2 receptor in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Sisay

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1 receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55. Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2 (tm1Zim CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2 (Dgen receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2 (tm1Zim mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational

  10. Glucose metabolism, islet architecture, and genetic homogeneity in imprinting of [Ca2+](i and insulin rhythms in mouse islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig S Nunemaker

    Full Text Available We reported previously that islets isolated from individual, outbred Swiss-Webster mice displayed oscillations in intracellular calcium ([Ca2+](i that varied little between islets of a single mouse but considerably between mice, a phenomenon we termed "islet imprinting." We have now confirmed and extended these findings in several respects. First, imprinting occurs in both inbred (C57BL/6J as well as outbred mouse strains (Swiss-Webster; CD1. Second, imprinting was observed in NAD(PH oscillations, indicating a metabolic component. Further, short-term exposure to a glucose-free solution, which transiently silenced [Ca2+](i oscillations, reset the oscillatory patterns to a higher frequency. This suggests a key role for glucose metabolism in maintaining imprinting, as transiently suppressing the oscillations with diazoxide, a K(ATP-channel opener that blocks [Ca2+](i influx downstream of glucose metabolism, did not change the imprinted patterns. Third, imprinting was not as readily observed at the level of single beta cells, as the [Ca2+](i oscillations of single cells isolated from imprinted islets exhibited highly variable, and typically slower [Ca2+](i oscillations. Lastly, to test whether the imprinted [Ca2+](i patterns were of functional significance, a novel microchip platform was used to monitor insulin release from multiple islets in real time. Insulin release patterns correlated closely with [Ca2+](i oscillations and showed significant mouse-to-mouse differences, indicating imprinting. These results indicate that islet imprinting is a general feature of islets and is likely to be of physiological significance. While islet imprinting did not depend on the genetic background of the mice, glucose metabolism and intact islet architecture may be important for the imprinting phenomenon.

  11. Understanding sex determination in the mouse: genetics, epigenetics and the story of mutual antagonisms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andy Greenfield

    2015-12-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in mouse genetics resources that support research into fundamental mechanisms in organogenesis, including those controlling mammalian sex determinations. Numerous mouse mutants have shed light on molecular pathways of cell fate specification during gonadogenesis and the `decision' as to whether testis or ovary development is achieved. These studies indicate substantial genetic complexity, characterized by redundancy, feedback loops, mutual antagonism between testis-determining and ovary-determining gene regulatory networks and a degree of plasticity in the fully differentiated state of the adult gonad that was not appreciated until conditional loss-of-function studies were performed. One challenge now is to understand how controlled epigenomic changes effect the now familiar sexually dimorphic transcriptomic profiles of the male and female gonads, firstly during primary sex determination, but also in the adult gonad, thereby regulating cellular behaviour during morphogenesis and maintaining the differentiated state.

  12. Genetic Background Influences Adaptation To Cardiac Hypertrophy and Ca2+ Handling Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve B Waters

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability has a profound effect on the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to stress. Consequently, using a variety of inbred mouse strains with known genetic profiles may be powerful models for studying the response to cardiovascular stress. To explore this approach we looked at male C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ mice. Hemodynamic analyses of left ventricular pressures indicated significant differences in 129/SvJ and C57BL/6J mice that implied altered Ca2+ handling. Specifically, 129/SvJ mice demonstrated reduced rates of relaxation and insensitivity to dobutamine(Db. We hypothesized that altered expression of genes controlling the influx and efflux of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was responsible and investigated the expression of several genes involved in maintaining the intracellular and sarcoluminal Ca2+ concentration using quantitative real-time PCR analyses (qRT-PCR. We observed significant differences in baseline gene expression as well as different responses in expression to isoproterenol (ISO challenge. In untreated control animals, 129/SvJ mice expressed 1.68x more ryanodine recptor 2(Ryr2 mRNA than C57BL/6J mice but only 0.37x as much calsequestrin 2(Casq2. After treatment with ISO, sarco(endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase(Serca2 expression was reduced nearly two-fold in 129/SvJ while expression in C57BL/6J was stable. Interestingly, β(1 adrenergic receptor(Adrb1 expression was lower in 129/SvJ compared to C57BL/6J at baseline and lower in both strains after treatment. Metabolically, the brain isoform of creatine kinase(Ckb was up-regulated in response to ISO in C57BL/6J but not in 129/SvJ. These data suggest that the two strains of mice regulate Ca2+ homeostasis via different mechanisms and may be useful in developing personalized therapies in human patients.

  13. Genetic background influences adaptation to cardiac hypertrophy and Ca(2+) handling gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Steve B; Diak, Douglass M; Zuckermann, Matthew; Goldspink, Paul H; Leoni, Lara; Roman, Brian B

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variability has a profound effect on the development of cardiac hypertrophy in response to stress. Consequently, using a variety of inbred mouse strains with known genetic profiles may be powerful models for studying the response to cardiovascular stress. To explore this approach we looked at male C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ mice. Hemodynamic analyses of left ventricular pressures (LVPs) indicated significant differences in 129/SvJ and C57BL/6J mice that implied altered Ca(2+) handling. Specifically, 129/SvJ mice demonstrated reduced rates of relaxation and insensitivity to dobutamine (Db). We hypothesized that altered expression of genes controlling the influx and efflux of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) was responsible and investigated the expression of several genes involved in maintaining the intracellular and sarcoluminal Ca(2+) concentration using quantitative real-time PCR analyses (qRT-PCR). We observed significant differences in baseline gene expression as well as different responses in expression to isoproterenol (ISO) challenge. In untreated control animals, 129/SvJ mice expressed 1.68× more ryanodine receptor 2(Ryr2) mRNA than C57BL/6J mice but only 0.37× as much calsequestrin 2 (Casq2). After treatment with ISO, sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase(Serca2) expression was reduced nearly two-fold in 129/SvJ while expression in C57BL/6J was stable. Interestingly, β (1) adrenergic receptor(Adrb1) expression was lower in 129/SvJ compared to C57BL/6J at baseline and lower in both strains after treatment. Metabolically, the brain isoform of creatine kinase (Ckb) was up-regulated in response to ISO in C57BL/6J but not in 129/SvJ. These data suggest that the two strains of mice regulate Ca(2+) homeostasis via different mechanisms and may be useful in developing personalized therapies in human patients.

  14. Genetic approaches to the molecular/neuronal mechanisms underlying learning and memory in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Akira; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2005-09-01

    Learning and memory is an essential component of human intelligence. To understand its underlying molecular and neuronal mechanisms is currently an extensive focus in the field of cognitive neuroscience. We have employed advanced mouse genetic approaches to analyze the molecular and neuronal bases for learning and memory, and our results showed that brain region-specific genetic manipulations (including transgenic and knockout), inducible/reversible knockout, genetic/chemical kinase inactivation, and neuronal-based genetic approach are very powerful tools for studying the involvements of various molecules or neuronal substrates in the processes of learning and memory. Studies using these techniques may eventually lead to the understanding of how new information is acquired and how learned information is memorized in the brain.

  15. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  16. In-depth metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models in obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui-Young; Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Choi, Cheol Soo

    2014-10-01

    The world-wide prevalence of obesity and diabetes has increased sharply during the last two decades. Accordingly, the metabolic phenotyping of genetically engineered mouse models is critical for evaluating the functional roles of target genes in obesity and diabetes, and for developing new therapeutic targets. In this review, we discuss the practical meaning of metabolic phenotyping, the strategy of choosing appropriate tests, and considerations when designing and performing metabolic phenotyping in mice.

  17. Insights into the genetic basis of systemic sclerosis: immunity in human disease and in mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Minghua Wu, Maureen D Mayes Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunogenetics, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Systemic sclerosis (SSc; scleroderma is a chronic, multisystem autoimmune disease characterized by vasculopathy, fibrosis, and autoantibodies. In the past decade, great efforts have been made to investigate genetic susceptibility for SSc. To date, over 20 gene loci have been identified as risk factors for SSc in large genome-wide association studies and confirmed by independent replication studies. However, the biological relevance of these genetic associations is still largely unknown. Exploring the mechanism behind these risk loci is essential to better understand disease pathogenesis and to identify novel therapeutic targets. Mouse model studies including knockout, knockin and knockdown of these genes can advance our understanding of pathogenic cellular and molecular mechanisms in human disease. Although such mouse model systems do not exactly correspond to human disease, they can provide insight into pathological mechanisms that influence disease pathways. In this review, we discuss recent findings regarding the genetic basis of SSc in the setting of genetic manipulation of these pathways in murine models. Keywords: GWAS, Immunochip study, type I interferon pathway, genetic mutation animal models

  18. Genetic control of mammalian meiotic recombination. I. Variation in exchange frequencies among males from inbred mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Kara E; Cherry, Jonathan P; Lynn, Audrey; Hunt, Patricia A; Hassold, Terry J

    2002-09-01

    Genetic background effects on the frequency of meiotic recombination have long been suspected in mice but never demonstrated in a systematic manner, especially in inbred strains. We used a recently described immunostaining technique to assess meiotic exchange patterns in male mice. We found that among four different inbred strains--CAST/Ei, A/J, C57BL/6, and SPRET/Ei--the mean number of meiotic exchanges per cell and, thus, the recombination rates in these genetic backgrounds were significantly different. These frequencies ranged from a low of 21.5 exchanges in CAST/Ei to a high of 24.9 in SPRET/Ei. We also found that, as expected, these crossover events were nonrandomly distributed and displayed positive interference. However, we found no evidence for significant differences in the patterns of crossover positioning between strains with different exchange frequencies. From our observations of >10,000 autosomal synaptonemal complexes, we conclude that achiasmate bivalents arise in the male mouse at a frequency of 0.1%. Thus, special mechanisms that segregate achiasmate chromosomes are unlikely to be an important component of mammalian male meiosis.

  19. Influence of nociception and stress-induced antinociception on genetic variation in isoflurane anesthetic potency among mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogil, Jeffrey S; Smith, Shad B; O'Reilly, Meghan K; Plourde, Gilles

    2005-10-01

    Genetic background influences anesthetic potency to suppress motor response to noxious stimulation (minimum alveolar concentration [MAC]) as well as nociceptive sensitivity in unmedicated animals. However, the influence on MAC of baseline sensitivity to the noxious stimuli used to assess MAC has virtually never been studied. The authors assessed room air nociceptive sensitivity and isoflurane MAC in multiple mouse strains. Isoflurane requirement for loss of righting response (MACLORR) was also measured. One outbred and 10 inbred mouse strains were tested for latency to respond (in room air) to a tail clip (either 500 g or 2,000 g). Naive mice of the same 11 strains were tested for isoflurane MAC and MACLORR. To assess the role of opioid-mediated stress-induced antinociception, mice were also tested for nociceptive sensitivity after injection of naloxone (10 mg/kg) or saline. Robust strain differences were observed for all measures. The authors found that tail-clip latency (using a 500-g or 2,000-g clip, respectively) correlated significantly with MAC (r = -0.76 and -0.58, respectively) but not MACLORR (r = -0.10 and -0.26). Naloxone produced strain-dependent reductions in open air tail-clip latencies, and these reductions were also strongly correlated with MAC (r = -0.67 and -0.71). The authors suggest that genetic variability in isoflurane MAC (but not MACLORR) may reflect genetic variability in the underlying sensitivity to the noxious stimulus being used to measure MAC. This variable sensitivity to nociception in the awake state is at least partially mediated by endogenous antinociceptive mechanisms activated by the tail-clip stimulus itself.

  20. The perfect host: a mouse host embryo facilitating more efficient germ line transmission of genetically modified embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Taft

    Full Text Available There is a continual need to improve efficiency in creating precise genetic modifications in mice using embryonic stem cells (ESCs. We describe a novel approach resulting in 100% germline transmission from competent injected ESCs. We developed an F1 mouse host embryo (Perfect Host, PH that selectively ablates its own germ cells via tissue-specific induction of diphtheria toxin. This approach allows competent microinjected ESCs to fully dominate the germline, eliminating competition for this critical niche in the developing and adult animal. This is in contrast to conventional methods, where competition from host germ cells results in offspring derived from host cells and ESCs, necessitating extensive breeding of chimeras and genotyping to identify germline. The germline transmission process is also complicated by variability in the actual number of ESCs that colonize the germline niche and the proportion that are germline competent. To validate the PH approach we used ESC lines derived from 129 F1, BALB/cByJ, and BTBR backgrounds as well as an iPS line. Resulting chimeric males produced 194 offspring, all paternally derived from the introduced stem cells, with no offspring being derived from the host genome. We further tested this approach using eleven genetically modified C57BL/6N ESC lines (International Knockout Mouse Consortium. ESC germline transmission was observed in 9/11 (82% lines using PH blastocysts, compared to 6/11 (55% when conventional host blastocysts were used. Furthermore, less than 35% (83/240 of mice born in the first litters from conventional chimeras were confirmed to be of ESC-origin. By comparison, 100% (137/137 of the first litter offspring of PH chimeras were confirmed as ESC-derived. Together, these data demonstrate that the PH approach increases the probability of germline transmission and speeds the generation of ESC derived animals from chimeras. Collectively, this approach reduces the time and costs inherent in the

  1. Antibiotic Resistance, Virulence, and Genetic Background of Community-Acquired Uropathogenic Escherichia coli from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiaoui, Merzouk; Robin, Frédéric; Bakour, Rabah; Hamidi, Moufida; Bonnet, Richard; Messai, Yamina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate antibiotic resistance mechanisms, virulence traits, and genetic background of 150 nonrepetitive community-acquired uropathogenic Escherichia coli (CA-UPEC) from Algeria. A rate of 46.7% of isolates was multidrug resistant. bla genes detected were blaTEM (96.8% of amoxicillin-resistant isolates), blaCTX-M-15 (4%), overexpressed blaAmpC (4%), blaSHV-2a, blaTEM-4, blaTEM-31, and blaTEM-35 (0.7%). All tetracycline-resistant isolates (51.3%) had tetA and/or tetB genes. Sulfonamides and trimethoprim resistance genes were sul2 (60.8%), sul1 (45.9%), sul3 (6.7%), dfrA14 (25.4%), dfrA1 (18.2%), dfrA12 (16.3%), and dfrA25 (5.4%). High-level fluoroquinolone resistance (22.7%) was mediated by mutations in gyrA (S83L-D87N) and parC (S80I-E84G/V or S80I) genes. qnrB5, qnrS1, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were rare (5.3%). Class 1 and/or class 2 integrons were detected (40.7%). Isolates belonged to phylogroups B2+D (50%), A+B1 (36%), and F+C+Clade I (13%). Most of D (72.2%) and 38.6% of B2 isolates were multidrug resistant; they belong to 14 different sequence types, including international successful ST131, ST73, and ST69, reported for the first time in the community in Algeria and new ST4494 and ST4529 described in this study. Besides multidrug resistance, B2 and D isolates possessed virulence factors of colonization, invasion, and long-term persistence. The study highlighted multidrug-resistant CA-UPEC with high virulence traits and an epidemic genetic background.

  2. Sensitivity of the distribution of mutational fitness effects to environment, genetic background, and adaptedness: a case study with Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alethea D; Sharp, Nathaniel P; Agrawal, Aneil F

    2014-03-01

    Heterogeneity in the fitness effects of individual mutations has been found across different environmental and genetic contexts. Going beyond effects on individual mutations, how is the distribution of selective effects, f(s), altered by changes in genetic and environmental context? In this study, we examined changes in the major features of f(s) by estimating viability selection on 36 individual mutations in Drosophila melanogaster across two different environments in two different genetic backgrounds that were either adapted or nonadapted to the two test environments. Both environment and genetic background affected selection on individual mutations. However, the overall distribution f(s) appeared robust to changes in genetic background but both the mean, E(s), and the variance, V(s) were dependent on the environment. Between these two properties, V(s) was more sensitive to environmental change. Contrary to predictions of fitness landscape theory, the match between genetic background and assay environment (i.e., adaptedness) had little effect on f(s).

  3. Eimeria Species and Genetic Background Influence the Serum Protein Profile of Broilers with Coccidiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Elizabeth R.; Cox, Chasity M.; Williams, Patricia M.; McElroy, Audrey P.; Dalloul, Rami A.; Ray, W. Keith; Barri, Adriana; Emmerson, Derek A.; Wong, Eric A.; Webb, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Coccidiosis is an intestinal disease caused by protozoal parasites of the genus Eimeria. Despite the advent of anti-coccidial drugs and vaccines, the disease continues to result in substantial annual economic losses to the poultry industry. There is still much unknown about the host response to infection and to date there are no reports of protein profiles in the blood of Eimeria-infected animals. The objective of this study was to evaluate the serum proteome of two genetic lines of broiler chickens after infection with one of three species of Eimeria. Methodology/Principal Findings Birds from lines A and B were either not infected or inoculated with sporulated oocysts from one of the three Eimeria strains at 15 d post-hatch. At 21 d (6 d post-infection), whole blood was collected and lesion scoring was performed. Serum was harvested and used for 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 1,266 spots were quantitatively assessed by densitometry. Protein spots showing a significant effect of coccidia strain and/or broiler genetic line on density at P<0.05−0.01 (250 spots), P<0.01−0.001 (248 spots), and P<0.001 (314 spots) were excised and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Proteins were identified in 172 spots. A total of 46 different proteins were identified. Of the spots with a corresponding protein identification, 57 showed a main effect of coccidia infection and/or 2-way interaction of coccidia infection×broiler genetic line at P<0.001. Conclusions/Significance Several of the metabolic enzymes identified in this study are potential candidates for early diagnostic markers of E. acervulina infection including malate dehydrogenase 2, NADH dehydrogenase 1 alpha subcomplex 9, and an ATP synthase. These proteins were detected only in Line A birds that were inoculated with E. acervulina. Results from this study provide a basic framework for future research aimed at uncovering the complex

  4. Microsatellite analyses reveal fine-scale genetic structure in grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredsted, T; Pertoldi, C; Schierup, M H; Kappeler, P M

    2005-07-01

    Information on genetic structure can be used to complement direct inferences on social systems and behaviour. We studied the genetic structure of the solitary grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a small, nocturnal primate endemic to western Madagascar, with the aim of getting further insight on its breeding structure. Tissue samples from 167 grey mouse lemurs in an area covering 12.3 km2 in Kirindy Forest were obtained from trapping. The capture data indicated a noncontinuous distribution of individuals in the study area. Using 10 microsatellite markers, significant genetic differentiation in the study area was demonstrated and dispersal was found to be significantly male biased. Furthermore, we observed an overall excess of homozygotes in the total population (F(IT) = 0.131), which we interpret as caused by fine-scale structure with breeding occurring in small units. Evidence for a clumped distribution of identical homozygotes was found, supporting the notion that dispersal distance for breeding was shorter than that for foraging, i.e. the breeding neighbourhood size is smaller than the foraging neighbourhood size. In conclusion, we found a more complex population structure than what has been previously reported in studies performed on smaller spatial scales. The noncontinuous distribution of individuals and the effects of social variables on the genetic structure have implications for the interpretation of social organization and the planning of conservation activities that may apply to other solitary and endangered mammals as well.

  5. Host genetics of severe influenza: from mouse Mx1 to human IRF7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciancanelli, Michael J; Abel, Laurent; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2016-02-01

    Influenza viruses cause mild to moderate respiratory illness in most people, and only rarely devastating or fatal infections. The virulence factors encoded by viral genes can explain seasonal or geographic differences at the population level but are unlikely to account for inter-individual clinical variability. Inherited or acquired immunodeficiencies may thus underlie severe cases of influenza. The crucial role of host genes was first demonstrated by forward genetics in inbred mice, with the identification of interferon (IFN)-α/β-inducible Mx1 as a canonical influenza susceptibility gene. Reverse genetics has subsequently characterized the in vivo role of other mouse genes involved in IFN-α/β and -λ immunity. A series of in vitro studies with mouse and human cells have also refined the cell-intrinsic mechanisms of protection against influenza viruses. Population-based human genetic studies have not yet uncovered variants with a significant impact. Interestingly, human primary immunodeficiencies affecting T and B cells were also not found to predispose to severe influenza. Recently however, human IRF7 was shown to be essential for IFN-α/β- and IFN-λ-dependent protective immunity against primary influenza in vivo, as inferred from a patient with life-threatening influenza revealed to be IRF7-deficient by whole exome sequencing. Next generation sequencing of human exomes and genomes will facilitate the analysis of the human genetic determinism of severe influenza.

  6. Fitness cost due to herbicide resistance may trigger genetic background evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmency, Henri; Menchari, Yosra; Le Corre, Valérie; Délye, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the possible existence of mechanisms counterbalancing the negative pleiotropic effects on development and reproduction that are conferred by alleles responsible for herbicide resistance in the weed Alopecurus myosuroides. We considered three herbicide-resistant, mutant acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACCase) alleles, Leu1781, Asn2041, and Gly2078, found in eight resistant populations. Of these, Gly2078 is the only allele with a known fitness cost. We compared plants homozygous for wild-type ACCase alleles that were siblings of plants carrying a given mutant resistant ACCase allele with plants from three populations where resistance did not evolve. In each of two series of experiments, we measured germination dynamics, seedling vigor, plant height, vegetative biomass, and seed production. The wild-type siblings of plants carrying Gly2078 performed better in the field, on average, than wild-type plants that were sibling of plants carrying other mutant ACCase alleles, and particularly those carrying Leu1781. We propose that rapid evolution of the genetic background of plants from the populations where the Gly2078 allele originally arose could partially counterbalance Gly2078 fitness cost, enhancing the spread of the resistant genotypes.

  7. Genetic background of Escherichia coli isolates from peritoneal dialysis patients with peritonitis and uninfected control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y F; Su, N; Chen, S Y; Hu, W X; Li, F F; Jiang, Z P; Yu, X Q

    2016-03-28

    Escherichia coli is the most common cause of Gram-negative peritonitis resulting in peritoneal function deterioration as well as poor clinical outcome in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. In this study, we analyzed the phylogenetic background and genetic profile of the E. coli isolates and sought to determine the characteristics of specific bacteria associated with peritonitis. E. coli isolates from 56 episodes of peritonitis in 46 PD patient cases and rectal isolates from 57 matched PD control patient cases were compared for both phylogenetic groups and the presence of virulence factors (VFs). There were no significant differences in terms of demographic data between the peritonitis and control groups. Peritonitis isolates exhibited a significantly greater prevalence of 8 VFs. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, kpsMT II (group 2 capsule synthesis) was the strongest VF predictor of peritonitis (OR = 8.02; 95%CI = 3.18-20.25; P peritoneal isolates than rectal isolates (64.3 vs 31.6%, P = 0.001). Our results indicate that the E. coli peritonitis and rectal isolates are different in PD patients. The specific VFs associated with peritonitis isolates may directly contribute to the pathogenesis of peritonitis.

  8. Nucleotide Base Variation of Blast Disease Resistance Gene Pi33 in Rice Selected Broad Genetic Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DWINITA WIKAN UTAMI

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most important crops for human beings, thus increasing productivity are continually persecuted. Blast disease can reduce the rate of productivity of rice cultivation. Therefore, the program of blast disease-resistant varieties needs to do effectively. One of broad-spectrum blast disease-resistant gene is Pi33. This study was aimed to identify the variation in the sequence of nucleotide bases of Pi33 gene in five interspesific lines which derived from Bio46 (IR64/Oryza rufipogon and CT13432 crossing. DNA of five rice lines were amplified using the spesific primer for Pi33, G1010. Amplification results purified through Exonuclease 1 and Shrimp Alkaline Phosphatase protocols. Labelling using fluorescent dyes done before sequencing nucleotide base using CEQ8000 instrument. The results showed that lines number 28 showed introgesion of the three control parent genome (subspecies of Indica, subspecies of Japonica, and O. rufipogon while the Lines number 79, 136, and 143 were identical to Indica genome. Strain number 195 was identical to Japonica genome. These broad genetic background lines promise as durable performance to attack the expansion of the dynamic nature of the pathogen to blast. The result of ortholog sequence analysis found conserved nucleotide base sequence (CAGCAGCC which involved in heterotrimeric G-protein group. This protein has role as plant receptor for recognizing pathogen elicitor in interaction of rice and blast pathogen.

  9. A recessive genetic screen for components of the RNA interference pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2010-01-01

    Several key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway were identified in genetic screens performed in nonmammalian model organisms. To identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway, we developed a recessive genetic screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Recessive genetic screens are feasible in ES cells that are Bloom-syndrome protein (Blm-) deficient. Therefore, we constructed a reporter cell line in Blm-deficient ES cells to isolate RNAi mutants through a simple drug-selection scheme. This chapter describes how we used retroviral gene traps to mutagenize the reporter cell line and select for RNAi mutants. Putative RNAi mutants were confirmed using a separate functional assay. The location of the gene trap was then identified using molecular techniques such as Splinkerette PCR. Our screening strategy successfully isolated several mutant clones of Argonaute2, a vital component of the RNAi pathway.

  10. Network statistics of genetically-driven gene co-expression modules in mouse crosses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Pier eScott-Boyer

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In biology, networks are used in different contexts as ways to represent relationships between entities, such as for instance interactions between genes, proteins or metabolites. Despite progress in the analysis of such networks and their potential to better understand the collective impact of genes on complex traits, one remaining challenge is to establish the biologic validity of gene co-expression networks and to determine what governs their organization. We used WGCNA to construct and analyze seven gene expression datasets from several tissues of mouse recombinant inbred strains (RIS. For six out of the 7 networks, we found that linkage to module QTLs (mQTLs could be established for 29.3% of gene co-expression modules detected in the several mouse RIS. For about 74.6% of such genetically-linked modules, the mQTL was on the same chromosome as the one contributing most genes to the module, with genes originating from that chromosome showing higher connectivity than other genes in the modules. Such modules (that we considered as genetically-driven had network statistic properties (density, centralization and heterogeneity that set them apart from other modules in the network. Altogether, a sizeable portion of gene co-expression modules detected in mouse RIS panels had genetic determinants as their main organizing principle. In addition to providing a biologic interpretation validation for these modules, these genetic determinants imparted on them particular properties that set them apart from other modules in the network, to the point that they can be predicted to a large extent on the basis of their network statistics.

  11. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1.

  12. NIG_MoG: a mouse genome navigator for exploring intersubspecific genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Toyoyuki; Yoshiki, Atsushi; Obata, Yuichi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2015-08-01

    The National Institute of Genetics Mouse Genome database (NIG_MoG; http://molossinus.lab.nig.ac.jp/msmdb/) primarily comprises the whole-genome sequence data of two inbred mouse strains, MSM/Ms and JF1/Ms. These strains were established at NIG and originated from the Japanese subspecies Mus musculus molossinus. NIG_MoG provides visualized genome polymorphism information, browsing single-nucleotide polymorphisms and short insertions and deletions in the genomes of MSM/Ms and JF1/Ms with respect to C57BL/6J (whose genome is predominantly derived from the West European subspecies M. m. domesticus). This allows users, especially wet-lab biologists, to intuitively recognize intersubspecific genome divergence in these mouse strains using visual data. The database also supports the in silico screening of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones that contain genomic DNA from MSM/Ms and the standard classical laboratory strain C57BL/6N. NIG_MoG is thus a valuable navigator for exploring mouse genome polymorphisms and BAC clones that are useful for studies of gene function and regulation based on intersubspecific genome divergence.

  13. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Monnens, L.A.H.

    2006-01-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide (pr

  14. Tumor development, growth characteristics and spectrum of genetic aberrations in the TH-MYCN mouse model of neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Rasmuson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TH-MYCN transgenic neuroblastoma model, with targeted MYCN expression to the developing neural crest, has been used to study neuroblastoma development and evaluate novel targeted tumor therapies. METHODS: We followed tumor development in 395 TH-MYCN (129X1/SvJ mice (125 negative, 206 hemizygous and 64 homozygous mice by abdominal palpations up to 40 weeks of age. DNA sequencing of MYCN in the original plasmid construct and mouse genomic DNA was done to verify the accuracy. Copy number analysis with Affymetrix® Mouse Diversity Genotyping Arrays was used to characterize acquired genetic aberrations. RESULTS: DNA sequencing confirmed presence of human MYCN cDNA in genomic TH-MYCN DNA corresponding to the original plasmid construct. Tumor incidence and growth correlated significantly to transgene status with event-free survival for hemizygous mice at 50%, and 0% for homozygous mice. Hemizygous mice developed tumors at 5.6-19 weeks (median 9.1 and homozygous mice at 4.0-6.9 weeks (5.4. The mean treatment window, time from palpable tumor to sacrifice, for hemizygous and homozygous mice was 15 and 5.2 days, respectively. Hemizygous mice developing tumors as early as homozygous mice had a longer treatment window. Age at tumor development did not influence treatment window for hemizygous mice, whereas treatment window in homozygous mice decreased significantly with increasing age. Seven out of 10 analysed tumors had a flat DNA profile with neither segmental nor numerical chromosomal aberrations. Only three tumors from hemizygous mice showed acquired genetic features with one or more numerical aberrations. Of these, one event corresponded to gain on the mouse equivalent of human chromosome 17. CONCLUSION: Hemizygous and homozygous TH-MYCN mice have significantly different neuroblastoma incidence, tumor growth characteristics and treatment windows but overlap in age at tumor development making correct early genotyping essential to evaluate

  15. Relationship between obesity phenotypes and genetic determinants in a mouse model for juvenile obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmann, Gudrun A; Schäfer, Nadine; Hesse, Claudia; Heise, Sebastian; Neuschl, Christina; Wagener, Asja; Churchill, Gary A; Li, Renhua

    2013-09-16

    Obesity, a state of imbalance between lean mass and fat mass, is important for the etiology of diseases affected by the interplay of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although genome-wide association studies have repeatedly associated genes with obesity and body weight, the mechanisms underlying the interaction between the muscle and adipose tissues remain unknown. Using 351 mice (at 10 wk of age) of an intercross population between Berlin Fat Mouse Inbred (BFMI) and C57BL/6NCrl (B6N) mice, we examined the causal relationships between genetic variations and multiple traits: body lean mass and fat mass, adipokines, and bone mineral density. Furthermore, evidence from structural equation modeling suggests causality among these traits. In the BFMI model, juvenile obesity affects lean mass and impairs bone mineral density via adipokines secreted from the white adipose tissues. While previous studies have indicated that lean mass has a causative effect on adiposity, in the Berlin Fat Mouse model that has been selected for juvenile obesity (at 9 wk of age) for >90 generations, however, the causality is switched from fat mass to lean mass. In addition, linkage studies and statistical modeling have indicated that quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 5 and 6 affect both lean mass and fat mass. These lines of evidence indicate that the muscle and adipose tissues interact with one another and the interaction is modulated by genetic variations that are shaped by selections. Experimental examinations are necessary to verify the biological role of the inferred causalities.

  16. A genetic mouse model to investigate hyperoxic acute lung injury survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prows, Daniel R; Hafertepen, Amanda P; Gibbons, William J; Winterberg, Abby V; Nick, Todd G

    2007-08-20

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a devastating disease that maintains a high mortality rate, despite decades of research. Hyperoxia, a universal treatment for ALI and other critically ill patients, can itself cause pulmonary damage, which drastically restricts its therapeutic potential. We stipulate that having the ability to use higher levels of supplemental O2 for longer periods would improve recovery rates. Toward this goal, a mouse model was sought to identify genes contributing to hyperoxic ALI (HALI) mortality. Eighteen inbred mouse strains were screened in continuous >95% O2. A significant survival difference was identified between sensitive C57BL/6J and resistant 129X1/SvJ strains. Although resistant, only one-fourth of 129X1/SvJ mice survived longer than any C57BL/6J mouse, demonstrating decreased penetrance of resistance. A survival time difference between reciprocal F1 mice implicated a parent-of-origin (imprinting) effect. To further evaluate imprinting and begin to delineate the genetic components of HALI survival, we generated and phenotyped offspring from all four possible intercrosses. Segregation analysis supported maternal inheritance of one or more genes but paternal inheritance of one or more contributor genes. A significant sex effect was demonstrated, with males more resistant than females for all F2 crosses. Survival time ranges and sensitive-to-resistant ratios of the different F2 crosses also supported imprinting and predicted that increased survival is due to dominant resistance alleles contributed by both the resistant and sensitive parental strains. HALI survival is multigenic with a complex mode of inheritance, which should be amenable to genetic dissection with this mouse model.

  17. Study of the common genetic background for rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Gisela; Eyre, Steve; Hinks, Anne; Bowes, John; Morgan, Ann W; Wilson, Anthony G; Wordsworth, Paul; Steer, Sophia; Hocking, Lynne; Thomson, Wendy; Worthington, Jane; Barton, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence is beginning to emerge that there may be susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that are common to both diseases. Objective To investigate single nucleotide polymorphisms that have been reported to be associated with SLE in a UK cohort of patients with RA and controls. Methods 3962 patients with RA and 9275 controls were included in the study. Eleven SNPs mapping to confirmed SLE loci were investigated. These mapped to the TNFSF4, BANK1, TNIP1, PTTG1, UHRF1BP1, ATG5, JAZF1, BLK, KIAA1542, ITGAM and UBE2L3 loci. Genotype frequencies were compared between patients with RA and controls using the trend test. Results The SNPs mapping to the BLK and UBE2L3 loci showed significant evidence for association with RA. Two other SNPs, mapping to ATG5 and KIAA1542, showed nominal evidence for association with RA (p=0.02 and p=0.02, respectively) but these were not significant after applying a Bonferroni correction. Additionally, a significant global enrichment in carriage of SLE alleles in patients with RA compared with controls (p=9.1×10−7) was found. Meta-analysis of this and previous studies confirmed the association of the BLK and UBE2L3 gene with RA at genome-wide significance levels (p<5×10−8). Together, the authors estimate that the SLE and RA overlapping loci, excluding HLA-DRB1 alleles, identified so far explain ∼5.8% of the genetic susceptibility to RA as a whole. Conclusion The findings confirm the association of the BLK and UBE2L3 loci with RA, thus adding to the list of loci showing overlap between RA and SLE. PMID:21068098

  18. Genetic Background, Adipocytokines, and Metabolic Disorders in Postmenopausal Overweight and Obese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygiel-Górniak, Bogna; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Mosor, Maria; Przysławski, Juliusz; Bogacz, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between the genetic background, adipocytokines, and metabolic state in postmenopausal women has not yet been fully described. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between PPAR gamma-2 (Pro12Ala, C1431T) and ADRB3 (Trp64Arg) polymorphisms and serum adipocytokines (adiponectin, visfatin, and resistin) and metabolic disorders in 176 postmenopausal women with increased body mass (BMI ≥ 25 kg m(-2)). The distributions of selected alleles and genotype frequencies were determined with the PCR-RFLP method. The bioimpedance method was used to determine nutritional status, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were applied to determine serum concentrations of adipocytokines. Viscerally obese postmenopausal women had higher body mass, body fat content, serum glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, uric acid, and HOMA-IR and a higher prevalence of the Ala12 allele. In models based on cytokine concentration, higher body mass and glucose concentration (visfatin model, p = 0.008) and higher insulin and triglyceride levels (resistin model, p = 0.002) were observed in visceral fat deposition and this was potentiated by the presence of the T1431 allele. In resistin models, co-existence of Ala12/X polymorphisms with the T1431 allele was associated with higher resistin and triglyceride concentrations (p = 0.045). In postmenopausal women, metabolic parameters are mainly determined by the distribution of body fat, but Ala12/X polymorphism may increase the metabolic disorders and this effect can be enhanced by the T1431 allele.

  19. Illuminating p53 function in cancer with genetically engineered mouse models

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The key role of the p53 protein in tumor suppression is highlighted by its frequent mutation in human cancers and by the completely penetrant cancer predisposition of p53 null mice. Beyond providing definitive evidence for the critical function of p53 in tumor suppression, genetically engineered mouse models have offered numerous additional insights into p53 function. p53 knock-in mice expressing tumor-derived p53 mutants have revealed that these mutants display gain-of-function activities th...

  20. Different thermotolerances in in vitro-produced embryos derived from different maternal and paternal genetic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Miki; Yamanaka, Kenichi; Balboula, Ahmed Zaky; Takahashi, Masashi

    2017-07-21

    The present study evaluated the effects of genetic backgrounds on the developmental competence and thermotolerance of bovine in vitro-produced (IVP) embryos. First, Holstein (Hol) and Japanese Black (JB) oocytes were fertilized with sperm from Hol, JB and a thermotolerant breed (Brahman), and in vitro development was evaluated when the embryos were exposed to heat shock on Day 2 (Day 0 = day of fertilization). Sperm genetic backgrounds affected the developmental competence in controls (P JB) and IVP embryos were evaluated. JB parthenotes showed developmental arrest after Day 4, and the rate of development to the blastocyst stage decreased by heat shock, but not in Hol parthenotes. Heat shock decreased developmental competence after cleavage of IVP embryos regardless of genetic background. The thermotolerance of IVP embryos would be controlled by both maternal and paternal factors but genetic involvement was still unclear. Further evaluation is needed to reveal the genetic contribution to thermotolerance. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  1. Teaching molecular genetics: Chapter 1--Background principles and methods of molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoers, Nine V A M; Monnens, Leo A H

    2006-02-01

    In this first chapter of the series "Teaching molecular genetics," an introduction to molecular genetics is presented. We describe the structure of DNA and genes and explain in detail the central dogma of molecular biology, that is, the flow of genetic information from DNA via RNA to polypeptide (protein). In addition, several basic and frequently used general molecular tools, such as restriction enzymes, Southern blotting, DNA amplification and sequencing are discussed, in order to lay the foundations for the forthcoming chapters.

  2. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the ...

  3. Effect of dietary phosphorus and its interaction with genetic background on global gene expression in porcine muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, A; Rothschild, M F; Stahl, C H

    2007-08-01

    Environmental concerns and costs associated with dietary phosphorus (P) supplementation have lead to attempts to minimize the amount of P added to swine diets. In addition to its requirement for bone growth, dietary P is also necessary for muscular growth. To examine the effects of genetic background and dietary P on global gene expression in the muscle of young pigs, we utilized muscle tissue from 36 gilts sired from two different sire lines. These animals were fed either a P adequate, P deficient or P repletion diets for 14 days and showed differences in growth performance and bone integrity in response to the interaction of genetic background and dietary P. Total RNA from the loin muscle of these animals was obtained for microarray analysis. Significant differences (p<0.01) in gene expression were seen based on the effect of sire line (339 genes), dietary P (18 genes) and the interaction between sire line and dietary P (31 genes). The microarray data were validated by semi-quantitative real-time PCR. These results support our hypothesis that genetic background and dietary P treatment can affect the homeorhetic control of P metabolism in pigs. Genes identified as differentially expressed in this study may be excellent candidate genes for additional work to elucidate genotype specific P requirements as well as to identify a genetic background that can maintain superior growth in a more environmentally friendly manner.

  4. The conditional nature of genetic interactions: the consequences of wild-type backgrounds on mutational interactions in a genome-wide modifier screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Chari

    Full Text Available The phenotypic outcome of a mutation cannot be simply mapped onto the underlying DNA variant. Instead, the phenotype is a function of the allele, the genetic background in which it occurs and the environment where the mutational effects are expressed. While the influence of genetic background on the expressivity of individual mutations is recognized, its consequences on the interactions between genes, or the genetic network they form, is largely unknown. The description of genetic networks is essential for much of biology; yet if, and how, the topologies of such networks are influenced by background is unknown. Furthermore, a comprehensive examination of the background dependent nature of genetic interactions may lead to identification of novel modifiers of biological processes. Previous work in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that wild-type genetic background influences the effects of an allele of scalloped (sd, with respect to both its principal consequence on wing development and its interactions with a mutation in optomotor blind. In this study we address whether the background dependence of mutational interactions is a general property of genetic systems by performing a genome wide dominant modifier screen of the sd(E3 allele in two wild-type genetic backgrounds using molecularly defined deletions. We demonstrate that ~74% of all modifiers of the sd(E3 phenotype are background-dependent due in part to differential sensitivity to genetic perturbation. These background dependent interactions include some with qualitative differences in the phenotypic outcome, as well as instances of sign epistasis. This suggests that genetic interactions are often contingent on genetic background, with flexibility in genetic networks due to segregating variation in populations. Such background dependent effects can substantially alter conclusions about how genes influence biological processes, the potential for genetic screens in alternative wild

  5. Functionality of cryopreserved juvenile ovaries from mutant mice in different genetic background strains after allotransplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, K.Y.; Groot, de S.A.; Woelders, H.; Horst, van der G.T.J.; Themmen, A.P.N.; Colenbrander, B.; Fentener van Vlissingen, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    The rapid expansion of mutant mouse colonies for biomedical research has resulted in lack of space at laboratory animal facilities and increasing risks of losing precious lines. These challenges require cheap and effective methods in addition to freezing embryos and sperm to archive the expanding mu

  6. Massively parallel sequencing reveals the complex structure of an irradiated human chromosome on a mouse background in the Tc1 model of Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Gribble

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is caused by trisomy of chromosome 21 (Hsa21 and presents a complex phenotype that arises from abnormal dosage of genes on this chromosome. However, the individual dosage-sensitive genes underlying each phenotype remain largely unknown. To help dissect genotype--phenotype correlations in this complex syndrome, the first fully transchromosomic mouse model, the Tc1 mouse, which carries a copy of human chromosome 21 was produced in 2005. The Tc1 strain is trisomic for the majority of genes that cause phenotypes associated with DS, and this freely available mouse strain has become used widely to study DS, the effects of gene dosage abnormalities, and the effect on the basic biology of cells when a mouse carries a freely segregating human chromosome. Tc1 mice were created by a process that included irradiation microcell-mediated chromosome transfer of Hsa21 into recipient mouse embryonic stem cells. Here, the combination of next generation sequencing, array-CGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization technologies has enabled us to identify unsuspected rearrangements of Hsa21 in this mouse model; revealing one deletion, six duplications and more than 25 de novo structural rearrangements. Our study is not only essential for informing functional studies of the Tc1 mouse but also (1 presents for the first time a detailed sequence analysis of the effects of gamma radiation on an entire human chromosome, which gives some mechanistic insight into the effects of radiation damage on DNA, and (2 overcomes specific technical difficulties of assaying a human chromosome on a mouse background where highly conserved sequences may confound the analysis. Sequence data generated in this study is deposited in the ENA database, Study Accession number: ERP000439.

  7. Genetic Dissection of Cardiac Remodeling in an Isoproterenol-Induced Heart Failure Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Jen-Chu Wang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to understand the genetic control of cardiac remodeling using an isoproterenol-induced heart failure model in mice, which allowed control of confounding factors in an experimental setting. We characterized the changes in cardiac structure and function in response to chronic isoproterenol infusion using echocardiography in a panel of 104 inbred mouse strains. We showed that cardiac structure and function, whether under normal or stress conditions, has a strong genetic component, with heritability estimates of left ventricular mass between 61% and 81%. Association analyses of cardiac remodeling traits, corrected for population structure, body size and heart rate, revealed 17 genome-wide significant loci, including several loci containing previously implicated genes. Cardiac tissue gene expression profiling, expression quantitative trait loci, expression-phenotype correlation, and coding sequence variation analyses were performed to prioritize candidate genes and to generate hypotheses for downstream mechanistic studies. Using this approach, we have validated a novel gene, Myh14, as a negative regulator of ISO-induced left ventricular mass hypertrophy in an in vivo mouse model and demonstrated the up-regulation of immediate early gene Myc, fetal gene Nppb, and fibrosis gene Lgals3 in ISO-treated Myh14 deficient hearts compared to controls.

  8. Mouse-human experimental epigenetic analysis unmasks dietary targets and genetic liability for diabetic phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multhaup, Michael L.; Seldin, Marcus; Jaffe, Andrew E.; Lei, Xia; Kirchner, Henriette; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Rodriguez, Varenka; Drong, Alexander; Hussain, Mehboob; Lindgren, Cecilia; McCarthy, Mark; Näslund, Erik; Zierath, Juleen R.; Wong, G. William; Feinberg, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Using a functional approach to investigate the epigenetics of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), we combine three lines of evidence – diet-induced epigenetic dysregulation in mouse, epigenetic conservation in humans, and T2D clinical risk evidence – to identify genes implicated in T2D pathogenesis through epigenetic mechanisms related to obesity. Beginning with dietary manipulation of genetically homogeneous mice, we identify differentially DNA-methylated genomic regions. We then replicate these results in adipose samples from lean and obese patients pre- and post-Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, identifying regions where both the location and direction of methylation change is conserved. These regions overlap with 27 genetic T2D risk loci, only one of which was deemed significant by GWAS alone. Functional analysis of genes associated with these regions revealed four genes with roles in insulin resistance, demonstrating the potential general utility of this approach for complementing conventional human genetic studies by integrating cross-species epigenomics and clinical genetic risk. PMID:25565211

  9. Genetic and cellular dissection of the activation of AM14 rheumatoid factor B cells in a mouse model of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Allison; Zheng, Ying Yi; Choi, Seung-Chul; Zeumer, Leilani; Morel, Laurence

    2015-08-01

    The RF-specific AM14 tg BCR has been used as a model to dissect the mechanisms of B cell tolerance to ICs containing nucleic acids. We have shown previously that AM14 RF B cells break tolerance in the TC mouse model of lupus through the dual engagement of the AM14 BCR and TLR9. In this study, we showed that neither the expression of Sle1 or Sle2 susceptibility loci alone was sufficient to activate AM14 RF B cells, suggesting that the production of antichromatin IgG2a(a) autoAg mediated by Sle1 and an intrinsically higher B cell activation mediated by Sle2 were required. We also showed that the B6 genetic background enhanced the selection of AM14 RF B cells to the MZB cell compartment regardless of the expression of the Sle loci and therefore, of their activation into AFCs. Furthermore, some AM14 RF B cells were selected into the B-1a compartment, where they did not differentiate into AFCs. Therefore, it is unlikely that the selection of AM14 RF B cells to the MZB or B-1a cell compartments in TC.AM14(a) mice is responsible for their breach of tolerance. Finally, we showed that the presence of expression of Sle1 in non-tg cells, most likely T cells, is necessary for the activation of AM14 RF B cells into AFCs. Overall, these results suggest a threshold model of activation of AM14 RF B cells on the B6 background with additive genetic and cellular contribution of multiple sources. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi‐host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in C ampylobacter jejuni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H.; Jeeves, Rose E.; Lappin‐Scott, Hilary M.; Asakura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as C ampylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype with different genetic backgrounds. Our approach combines genome‐wide association studies with traditional microbiology techniques to investigate the genetic basis of biofilm formation in 102 C ampylobacter jejuni isolates. We quantified biofilm formation among the isolates and identified hotspots of genetic variation in homologous sequences that correspond to variation in biofilm phenotypes. Thirteen genes demonstrated a statistically robust association including those involved in adhesion, motility, glycosylation, capsule production and oxidative stress. The genes associated with biofilm formation were different in the host generalist ST‐21 and ST‐45 clonal complexes, which are frequently isolated from multiple host species and clinical samples. This suggests the evolution of enhanced biofilm from different genetic backgrounds and a possible role in colonization of multiple hosts and transmission to humans. PMID:26373338

  11. The effects of the genetic background on herbicide resistance fitness cost and its associated dominance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, M; Roux, F; Bérard, A; Reboud, X

    2008-12-01

    The advantage of the resistance conferred by a mutation can sometimes be offset by a high fitness-cost penalty. This balance will affect possible fate of the resistance allele. Few studies have explored the impact of the genetic background on the expression of the resistance fitness cost and none has attempted to measure the variation in fitness-cost dominance. However, both the fitness penalty and its dominance may modify evolutionary trajectory and outcome. Here the impact of Arabidopsis thaliana intraspecific genetic diversity on fitness cost and its associated dominance was investigated by analysing 12 quantitative traits in crosses between a mutant conferring resistance to the herbicide 2,4-D and nine different natural genetic backgrounds. Fitness cost values were found to be more affected by intraspecific genetic diversity than fitness cost dominance, even though this effect depends on the quantitative trait measured. This observation has implications for the choice of the best strategy for preventing herbicide resistance development. In addition, our results pinpoint a potential compensatory improvement of the resistance fitness cost and its associated dominance by the genetic diversity locally present within a species.

  12. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Timothy; Richmond, Phillip A; Dowell, Robin D

    2016-01-01

    Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s) that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  13. Confirming candidate genes for longevity in Drosophila melanogaster using two different genetic backgrounds and selection methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wit, Janneke; Frydenberg, Jane; Sarup, Pernille Merete

    2013-01-01

    Elucidating genes that affect life span or that can be used as biomarkers for ageing has received attention in diverse studies in recent years. Using model organisms and various approaches several genes have been linked to the longevity phenotype. For Drosophila melanogaster those studies have...... usually focussed on one sex and on flies originating from one genetic background, and results from different studies often do not overlap. Using D. melanogaster selected for increased longevity we aimed to find robust longevity related genes by examining gene expression in both sexes of flies originating...... from different genetic backgrounds. Further, we compared expression changes across three ages, when flies were young, middle aged or old, to examine how candidate gene expression changes with the onset of ageing. We selected 10 genes based on their expression differences in prior microarray studies...

  14. Heritability and coefficient of genetic variation analyses of phenotypic traits provide strong basis for high-resolution QTL mapping in the Collaborative Cross mouse genetic reference population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraqi, Fuad A; Athamni, Hanifa; Dorman, Alexandra; Salymah, Yasser; Tomlinson, Ian; Nashif, Aysar; Shusterman, Ariel; Weiss, Ervin; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Mott, Richard; Soller, Morris

    2014-04-01

    Most biological traits of human importance are complex in nature; their manifestation controlled by the cumulative effect of many genetic factors interacting with one another and with the individual's life history. Because of this, mouse genetic reference populations (GRPs) consisting of collections of inbred lines or recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from crosses between inbred lines are of particular value in analysis of complex traits, since massive amounts of data can be accumulated on the individual lines. However, existing mouse GRPs are derived from inbred lines that share a common history, resulting in limited genetic diversity, and reduced mapping precision due to long-range gametic disequilibrium. To overcome these limitations, the Collaborative Cross (CC) a genetically highly diverse collection of mouse RIL was established. The CC, now in advanced stages of development, will eventually consist of about 500 RIL derived from reciprocal crosses of eight divergent founder strains of mice, including three wild subspecies. Previous studies have shown that the CC indeed contains enormous diversity at the DNA level, that founder haplotypes are inherited in expected frequency, and that long-range gametic disequilibrium is not present. We here present data, primarily from our own laboratory, documenting extensive genetic variation among CC lines as expressed in broad-sense heritability (H(2)) and by the well-known "coefficient of genetic variation," demonstrating the ability of the CC resource to provide unprecedented mapping precision leading to identification of strong candidate genes.

  15. Genetically modified mouse models for the study of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Perumal Nagarajan; M Jerald Mahesh Kumar; Ramasamy Venkatesan; Subeer S Majundar; Ramesh C Juyal

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with obesity,insulin resistance,and type 2 diabetes.NAFLD represents a large spectrum of diseases ranging from (1) fatty liver (hepatic steatosis); (2) steatosis with inflammation and necrosis; to (3) cirrhosis.The animal models to study NAFLD/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) are extremely useful,as there are still many events to be elucidated in the pathology of NASH.The study of the established animal models has provided many clues in the pathogenesis of steatosis and steatohepatitis,but these remain incompletely understood.The different mouse models can be classified in two large groups.The first one includes genetically modified (transgenic or knockout) mice that spontaneously develop liver disease,and the second one includes mice that acquire the disease after dietary or pharmacological manipulation.Although the molecular mechanism leading to the development of hepatic steatosis in the pathogenesis of NAFLD is complex,genetically modified animal models may be a key for the treatment of NAFLD.Ideal animal models for NASH should closely resemble the pathological characteristics observed in humans.To date,no single animal model has encompassed the full spectrum of human disease progression,but they can imitate particular characteristics of human disease.Therefore,it is important that the researchers choose the appropriate animal model.This review discusses various genetically modified animal models developed and used in research on NAFLD.

  16. Expression of Drosophila mushroom body mutations in alternative genetic backgrounds: a case study of the mushroom body miniature gene (mbm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belle, J S; Heisenberg, M

    1996-01-01

    Mutations in 12 genes regulating Drosophila melanogaster mushroom body (MB) development were each studied in two genetic backgrounds. In all cases, brain structure was qualitatively or quantitatively different after replacement of the "original" genetic background with that of the Canton Special wild-type strain. The mushroom body miniature gene (mbm) was investigated in detail. mbm supports the maintenance of MB Kenyon cell fibers in third instar larvae and their regrowth during metamorphosis. Adult mbm1 mutant females are lacking many or most Kenyon cell fibers and are impaired in MB-mediated associative odor learning. We show here that structural defects in mbm1 are apparent only in combination with an X-linked, dosage-dependent modifier (or modifiers). In the Canton Special genetic background, the mbm1 anatomical phenotype is suppressed, and MBs develop to a normal size. However, the olfactory learning phenotype is not fully restored, suggesting that submicroscopic defects persist in the MBs. Mutant mbm1 flies with full-sized MBs have normal retention but show a specific acquisition deficit that cannot be attributed to reductions in odor avoidance, shock reactivity, or locomotor behavior. We propose that polymorphic gene interactions (in addition to ontogenetic factors) determine MB size and, concomitantly, the ability to recognize and learn odors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8790424

  17. Expression of Drosophila mushroom body mutations in alternative genetic backgrounds: a case study of the mushroom body miniature gene (mbm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Belle, J S; Heisenberg, M

    1996-09-03

    Mutations in 12 genes regulating Drosophila melanogaster mushroom body (MB) development were each studied in two genetic backgrounds. In all cases, brain structure was qualitatively or quantitatively different after replacement of the "original" genetic background with that of the Canton Special wild-type strain. The mushroom body miniature gene (mbm) was investigated in detail. mbm supports the maintenance of MB Kenyon cell fibers in third instar larvae and their regrowth during metamorphosis. Adult mbm1 mutant females are lacking many or most Kenyon cell fibers and are impaired in MB-mediated associative odor learning. We show here that structural defects in mbm1 are apparent only in combination with an X-linked, dosage-dependent modifier (or modifiers). In the Canton Special genetic background, the mbm1 anatomical phenotype is suppressed, and MBs develop to a normal size. However, the olfactory learning phenotype is not fully restored, suggesting that submicroscopic defects persist in the MBs. Mutant mbm1 flies with full-sized MBs have normal retention but show a specific acquisition deficit that cannot be attributed to reductions in odor avoidance, shock reactivity, or locomotor behavior. We propose that polymorphic gene interactions (in addition to ontogenetic factors) determine MB size and, concomitantly, the ability to recognize and learn odors.

  18. Accelerating discovery for complex neurological and behavioral disorders through systems genetics and integrative genomics in the laboratory mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubier, Jason A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in systems genetics and integrative functional genomics have greatly improved the study of complex neurological and behavioral traits. The methods developed for the integrated characterization of new, high-resolution mouse genetic reference populations and systems genetics enable behavioral geneticists an unprecedented opportunity to address questions of the molecular basis of neurological and psychiatric disorders and their comorbidities. Integrative genomics augment these strategies by enabling rapid informatics-assisted candidate gene prioritization, cross-species translation, and mechanistic comparison across related disorders from a wealth of existing data in mouse and other model organisms. Ultimately, through these complementary approaches, finding the mechanisms and sources of genetic variation underlying complex neurobehavioral disease related traits is becoming tractable. Furthermore, these methods enable categorization of neurobehavioral disorders through their underlying biological basis. Together, these model organism-based approaches can lead to a refinement of diagnostic categories and targeted treatment of neurological and psychiatric disease.

  19. Does the genetic and familial background of males undertaking ICSI affect the outcome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiburg, M.; Alizadeh, B.; Kastrop, P.; Lock, M.; Lans, S.; Giltay, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the success rate of ICSI is (1) related to the etiology of infertility or (2) adversely affected by a family history of potential genetic disorders. Methods: All men with an ICSI indication in our hospital between 1994 and 2005 were included in our cohort study. Data

  20. Influence of genetic background on anthocyanin and copigment composition and behavior during thermoalkaline processing of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visual color is a primary factor for foods purchase; identifying factors that influence in-situ color quality of pigmented maize during processing is important. We used 24 genetically distinct pigmented maize hybrids (red/blue, blue, red, and purple) to investigate the effect of pigment and copigme...

  1. Common and different genetic background for rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Trynka, Gosia; Heskamp, Sandra; Franke, Barbara; van Diemen, Cleo C; Smolonska, Joanna; van Leeuwen, Maria; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Boezen, Hendrika; Postma, Dirkje S; Platteel, Mathieu; Zanen, Pieter; Lammers, Jan-Willem W J; Groen, Hendricus; Mali, Willem P T M; Mulder, Chris J; Tack, Greetje J; Verbeek, Wieke H M; Wolters, Victorien M; Houwen, Roderick H J; Mearin, M Luisa; van Heel, David A; Radstake, Timothy R D J; van Riel, Piet L C M; Wijmenga, Cisca; Barrera, Pilar; Zhernakova, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed genetic risk factors in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Several of the associated genes and underlying pathways are shared by various autoimmune diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and coeliac disease (CD) are two autoimmune

  2. Genetic susceptibility of the arterial wall is an important determinant of atherosclerosis in C57BL/6 and FVB/N mouse strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shim, Jeong; Handberg, Aase; Östergren, Eva-Britt Caroline

    2011-01-01

    How genetic variations among inbred mouse strains translate into differences in atherosclerosis susceptibility is of significant interest for the development of new therapeutic strategies. The objective of the present study was to examine whether genetically controlled arterial wall properties in...... influence atherosclerosis susceptibility in FVB/N (FVB) and C57BL/6 (B6) apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE(-/-)) mouse strains....

  3. Genetic background specific hypoxia resistance in rat is correlated with balanced activation of a cross-chromosomal genetic network centering on physiological homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei eMao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism’s response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN, Dahl salt-sensitive (SS rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 consomic rat strains under normoxia and two-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9BN and SS-18BN represent the most hypoxia resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6BN and SS-YBN segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these consomic rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia-relevant core genetic network was reverse-engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward

  4. Genetic Background Specific Hypoxia Resistance in Rat is Correlated with Balanced Activation of a Cross-Chromosomal Genetic Network Centering on Physiological Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Genetic background of an individual can drastically influence an organism's response upon environmental stress and pathological stimulus. Previous studies in inbred rats showed that compared to Brown Norway (BN), Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rat exerts strong hypoxia susceptibility. However, despite extensive narrow-down approaches via the chromosome substitution methodology, this genome-based physiological predisposition could not be traced back to distinct quantitative trait loci. Upon the completion and public data availability of PhysGen SS-BN consomic (CS) rat platform, I employed systems biology approach attempting to further our understanding of the molecular basis of genetic background effect in light of hypoxia response. I analyzed the physiological screening data of 22 CS rat strains under normoxia and 2-weeks of hypoxia, and cross-compared them to the parental strains. The analyses showed that SS-9(BN) and SS-18(BN) represent the most hypoxia-resistant CS strains with phenotype similar to BN, whereas SS-6(BN) and SS-Y(BN) segregated to the direction of SS. A meta-analysis on the transcriptomic profiles of these CS rat strains under hypoxia treatment showed that although polymorphisms on the substituted BN chromosomes could be directly involved in hypoxia resistance, this seems to be embedded in a more complex trans-chromosomal genetic regulatory network. Via information theory based modeling approach, this hypoxia relevant core genetic network was reverse engineered. Network analyses showed that the protective effects of BN chromosome 9 and 18 were reflected by a balanced activation of this core network centering on physiological homeostasis. Presumably, it is the system robustness constituted on such differential network activation that acts as hypoxia response modifier. Understanding of the intrinsic link between the individual genetic background and the network robustness will set a basis in the current scientific efforts toward personalized medicine.

  5. The Collaborative Cross mouse genetic reference population designed for dissecting complex traits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanifa Abu Toamih Atamni; Mahmoud Egbaria; Yaser Salaymeh; Aysar Nashif; Fuad AIraqi

    2016-01-01

    [ Abstract] Complex traits are multifactorial traits controlled by polygenic host factors.These trait-related phenotypic characteristics and performance including body weight, blood chemistry, immune cell profiles, as well host susceptibility to infectious and chronic diseases.In recent years, tremendous efforts were invested aiming to map the host genetic factors attribute to these traits and subsequently clone the gene/s underlying these loci.In parallel to human studies, a number of mouse models and approaches were developed aimed to enhance the mapping process and the gene cloning.These include of using resources such as F2, backcross, advanced intercross lines, outbred populations, consomic, congenic and recombinant inbred lines (RIL).The constraints of these approaches were the limited resolution mapping of genomic regions of the quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with the trait of interests, and the limited genetic diversity observed in the parental founders.To overcome these limitations, a new genetically highly diverse recombinant inbred lines of mouse population was established, namely the Collaborative Cross (CC), created from full reciprocal mating of 8 divergent strains of mice: A/J, C57BL/6J, 129S1 /SvImJ, NOD/LtJ, NZO/HiLtJ, CAST/Ei, PWK/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ.By intercrossing these eight founders to generate the different CC lines, the genetic makeup of the newly developed resource is completely different from the eight parental lines, and will show heterosis, which subsequently will response differently comparing with their original founders.Finally, our results suggest that it is not essential to defining the phenotypic response of the eight parental lines, prior of assessing the CC lines, because it is believed that genetic interaction of the new genetic makeup of the new lines will reveal new phenotypic response, which completely different from the parental lines.In this report, we present to the community the power of the CC for dissecting

  6. Refinement of the background genetic map of Xq26-q27 and gene localisation for Boerjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gedeon, A.K.; Kozman, H.M.; Mulley, J.C. [Univ. of Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1996-07-12

    A detailed map of genetic markers was constructed around the gene for the X-linked mental retardation syndrome of Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann (BFLS). A multipoint linkage map of framework markers across Xq26-27, based on CEPH families, was integrated with the physical map, based on a YAC contig, to confirm marker order. The remaining genetic markers, which could not be ordered by linkage, were added to create the comprehensive genetic background map, in the order determined by physical mapping, to determine genetic distances between adjacent markers. This background genetic map is applicable to the refinement of the regional localization for any disease gene mapping to this region. The BFLS gene was localized using this background map in an extended version of the family described by Turner et al. The regional localization for BFLS extends between recombination events at DXS425 and DXS105, an interval of 24.6 cM on the background genetic map. The phenotypic findings commonly seen in the feet of affected males and obligate carrier females may represent a useful clinical indicator of carrier status in potential female carriers in the family. Recombination between DXS425 and DXS105 in a female with such characteristic feet suggests that the distal limit of the regional localization for the BFLS gene might reasonably be reduced to DXS294 for the purpose of selecting candidate genes, reducing the interval for the BFLS gene to 15.5 cM. Positional candidate genes from the interval between DXS425 and DXS105 include the SOX3 gene, mapped between DXS51(52A) and DXS98(4D-8). SOX3 may have a role in regulating the development of the nervous system. The HMG-box region of this single exon gene was examined by PCR for a deletion and then sequenced. No deviation from normal was observed, excluding mutations in the conserved HMG-box region as the cause of BFLS in this family. 27 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Genetic linkage studies in familial partial epilepsy: Exclusion of the human chromosome regions syntenic to the El-1 mouse locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes-Cendes, I. [Montreal General Hospital (Canada); Mulley, J.C. [Alelaide Children`s Hospital (Canada); Andermann, E. [Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Recently, six families with a familial form of partial epilepsy were described. All pedigrees showed autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Affected individuals present with predominantly nocturnal seizures with frontal lobe semiology. In 1959, a genetic mouse model for partial epilepsy, the El mouse, was reported. In the El mouse, a major seizure susceptibility gene, El-1, segregates in an autosomal dominant fashion and has been localized to a region distal to the centromere of mouse chromosome 9. Comparative genetic maps between man and mouse have been used for prediction of localization of several human disease genes. Because the region of mouse chromosome 9 that is the most likely to contain the El-1 locus is syntenic to regions on human chromosomes 3q21-p22, 3q21-q23.3, 6q12 and 15q24, we adopted the candidate gene approach as an initial linkage strategy. Twenty-two polymorphic microsatellite markers covering these regions were used for genotyping individuals in the three larger families ascertained, two of which are Australian and one French-Canadian. Negative two-point lod scores were obtained separately for each family. The analysis of all three families combined significantly excludes the candidate regions on chromosomes 3, 6 and 15.

  8. Cancer resistance of SR/CR mice in the genetic knockout backgrounds of leukocyte effector mechanisms: determinations for functional requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Anne M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spontaneous Regression/Complete Resistant (SR/CR mice are a colony of cancer-resistant mice that can detect and rapidly destroy malignant cells with innate cellular immunity, predominately mediated by granulocytes. Our previous studies suggest that several effector mechanisms, such as perforin, granzymes, or complements, may be involved in the killing of cancer cells. However, none of these effector mechanisms is known as critical for granulocytes. Additionally, it is unclear which effector mechanisms are required for the cancer killing activity of specific leukocyte populations and the survival of SR/CR mice against the challenges of lethal cancer cells. We hypothesized that if any of these effector mechanisms was required for the resistance to cancer cells, its functional knockout in SR/CR mice should render them sensitive to cancer challenges. This was tested by cross breeding SR/CR mice into the individual genetic knockout backgrounds of perforin (Prf-/-, superoxide (Cybb-/, or inducible nitric oxide (Nos2-/. Methods SR/CR mice were bred into individual Prf-/-, Cybb-/-, or Nos2-/- genetic backgrounds and then challenged with sarcoma 180 (S180. Their overall survival was compared to controls. The cancer killing efficiency of purified populations of macrophages and neutrophils from these immunodeficient mice was also examined. Results When these genetically engineered mice were challenged with cancer cells, the knockout backgrounds of Prf-/-, Cybb-/-, or Nos2-/- did not completely abolish the SR/CR cancer resistant phenotype. However, the Nos2-/- background did appear to weaken the resistance. Incidentally, it was also observed that the male mice in these immunocompromised backgrounds tended to be less cancer-resistant than SR/CR controls. Conclusion Despite the previously known roles of perforin, superoxide or nitric oxide in the effector mechanisms of innate immune responses, these effector mechanisms were not required

  9. An acid phosphatase locus expressed in mouse kidney (Apk) and its genetic location on chromosome 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womack, J E; Auerbach, S B

    1978-04-01

    A genetic locus controlling the electrophoretic mobility of an acid phosphatase in mouse kidney is described. This locus, called acid phosphatase-kidney (Apk), is not expressed in erythrocytes, liver, spleen, heart, lung, brain, skeletal muscle, stomach, or testes. The product of Apk hydrolyzes the substrate naphthol AS-MX phosphoric acid but is not active on alpha-naphthylphosphate or 4-methylumbelliferylphosphate. It is not inactivated by 50 C for 1 hr, nor is its electrophoretic mobility altered by incubation with neuraminidase. The locus is invariant among 31 inbred strains (Apka), with a variant allele (Apkm) observed only in Mus musculus molossinus. Codominant expression was observed in F1 hybrids of M. m. molossinus and inbred strains. Apk was mapped on Chr 10, near the neurological mutant waltzer (v).

  10. Insights into obesity and diabetes at the intersection of mouse and human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Melkam A; Attie, Alan D

    2014-10-01

    Many of our insights into obesity and diabetes come from studies in mice carrying natural or induced mutations. In parallel, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in humans have identified numerous genes that are causally associated with obesity and diabetes, but discovering the underlying mechanisms required in-depth studies in mice. We discuss the advantages of studying natural variation in mice and summarize several examples where the combination of human and mouse genetics opened windows into fundamental physiological pathways. A noteworthy example is the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) and its role in energy balance. The pathway was delineated by discovering the gene responsible for the Agouti mutation in mice. With more targeted phenotyping, we predict that additional pathways relevant to human pathophysiology will be discovered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cyclooxygenase 2: understanding the pathophysiological role through genetically altered mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Sanz, Paloma; Hortelano, Sonsoles; Bosca, Lisardo; Casado, Marta

    2006-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) -1 and -2 catalyze the first step in the biosynthesis of prostanoids. COX-1 is constitutively expressed in many tissues and seems to be involved in the housekeeping function of prostanoids. COX-2, the inducible isoform, accounts for the elevated production of prostaglandins in response to various inflammatory stimuli, hormones and growth factors. COX-2 expression has been also associated with cell growth regulation, tissue remodelling and carcinogenesis. More of these characteristics have been elucidate through using COX selective inhibitors. Recent advances in transgenic and gene-targeting approaches allow a sophisticated manipulation of the mouse genome by gene addition, gene deletion or gene modifications. The development of COX-2 genetically altered mice has provided models to elucidate the physiological and pathophysiological roles of this enzyme.

  12. Translating human genetics into mouse: the impact of ultra-rapid in vivo genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aida, Tomomi; Imahashi, Risa; Tanaka, Kohichi

    2014-01-01

    Gene-targeted mutant animals, such as knockout or knockin mice, have dramatically improved our understanding of the functions of genes in vivo and the genetic diversity that characterizes health and disease. However, the generation of targeted mice relies on gene targeting in embryonic stem (ES) cells, which is a time-consuming, laborious, and expensive process. The recent groundbreaking development of several genome editing technologies has enabled the targeted alteration of almost any sequence in any cell or organism. These technologies have now been applied to mouse zygotes (in vivo genome editing), thereby providing new avenues for simple, convenient, and ultra-rapid production of knockout or knockin mice without the need for ES cells. Here, we review recent achievements in the production of gene-targeted mice by in vivo genome editing. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  13. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  14. Genetically engineered mouse models to evaluate the role of Wnt secretion in bone development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bart O

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in components of the Wnt signaling pathway are associated with altered bone development and homeostasis in several human diseases. We created genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) that mimic the cellular defect associated with the Porcupine mutations in patients with Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. These GEMMs were established by utilizing mice containing a conditionally inactivatable allele of Wntless/GPR177 (a gene encoding a protein required for the transport of Porcupine-modified ligand to the plasma membrane for secretion). We crossed this strain to another which drives cre-mediated gene deletion in mature osteoblasts (Osteocalcin-cre) resulted in mice lacking the ability to secrete Wnt ligands in this cell type. These mice displayed severely reduced bone mass and provide a model to understand the effects of disrupting the ability to secrete Wnt ligands on the skeletal system.

  15. Analysis of mouse model pathology: a primer for studying the anatomic pathology of genetically engineered mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardiff, Robert D; Miller, Claramae H; Munn, Robert J

    2014-06-02

    This primer of pathology is intended to introduce investigators to the structure (morphology) of cancer with an emphasis on genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models (GEMMs). We emphasize the necessity of using the entire biological context for the interpretation of anatomic pathology. Because the primary investigator is responsible for almost all of the information and procedures leading up to microscopic examination, they should also be responsible for documentation of experiments so that the microscopic interpretation can be rendered in context of the biology. The steps involved in this process are outlined, discussed, and illustrated. Because GEMMs are unique experimental subjects, some of the more common pitfalls are discussed. Many of these errors can be avoided with attention to detail and continuous quality assurance.

  16. Genetic background and phenotypic characterization over two farrowings of leg conformation defects in Landrace and Large White sows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sevilla, X Fernàndez; Fàbrega, E; Tibau, J; Casellas, J

    2009-05-01

    A Bayesian threshold animal model was applied to evaluate the prevalence over 2 farrowings and genetic background of overall leg conformation score and the presence or absence of 6 specific leg defects (abnormal hoof growth, splay footed, plantigradism, straight pasterns, sickle-hocked legs, and the presence of swelling or injuries) in purebred Landrace and Large White sows. Data sets contained phenotypic records from 2,477 and 1,550 Landrace and Large White females, respectively, at the end of the growing period. Leg conformation data from first and second farrowings were available for 223 and 191 Landrace sows and 213 and 193 Large White sows, respectively. Overall leg conformation deteriorated with age, with statistically relevant differences between females at the end of the growing period, first farrowing (FF), and second farrowing (SF). In a similar way, the prevalence of the 6 specific leg defects increased between the end of the growing period and FF (with the exception of straight pasterns in the Landrace population). Differences between FF and second farrowing were statistically relevant for hoof growth (highest posterior density regions at 95% did not overlap), plantigradism, sickle-hocked legs, and overall leg conformation score in Landrace and for sickle-hocked leg and overall leg conformation score in Large White. The statistical relevance of the genetic background was tested through the Bayes factor (BF) between the model with the additive genetic component and the model with 0 heritability (nonheritable). Heritability (h(2)) was discarded (BF 100) of genetic background was obtained for overall leg conformation score in Landrace and Large White sows (h(2) = 0.27 and 0.38, respectively), hoof growth in both breeds (h(2) = 0.22 and 0.26, respectively), and plantigradism (h(2) = 0.34) and the presence of swelling or injuries in Landrace (h(2) = 0.27). Note that a BF > 100 implies that the model with infinitesimal genetic effects was more than 100 times

  17. A CRISPR Path to Engineering New Genetic Mouse Models for Cardiovascular Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Joseph M.; Zhu, Qiuyu Martin; Lowenstein, Charles J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous efforts to target the mouse genome for the addition, subtraction, or substitution of biologically informative sequences required complex vector design and a series of arduous steps only a handful of labs could master. The facile and inexpensive clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) method has now superseded traditional means of genome modification such that virtually any lab can quickly assemble reagents for developing new mouse models for cardiovascular research. Here we briefly review the history of CRISPR in prokaryotes, highlighting major discoveries leading to its formulation for genome modification in the animal kingdom. Core components of CRISPR technology are reviewed and updated. Practical pointers for two-component and three-component CRISPR editing are summarized with a number of applications in mice including frameshift mutations, deletion of enhancers and non-coding genes, nucleotide substitution of protein-coding and gene regulatory sequences, incorporation of loxP sites for conditional gene inactivation, and epitope tag integration. Genotyping strategies are presented and topics of genetic mosaicism and inadvertent targeting discussed. Finally, clinical applications and ethical considerations are addressed as the biomedical community eagerly embraces this astonishing innovation in genome editing to tackle previously intractable questions. PMID:27102963

  18. Genetic recombination variation in wild Robertsonian mice: on the role of chromosomal fusions and Prdm9 allelic background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capilla, Laia; Medarde, Nuria; Alemany-Schmidt, Alexandra; Oliver-Bonet, Maria; Ventura, Jacint; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of formal models to explain how chromosomal rearrangements can be fixed in a population in the presence of gene flow, few empirical data are available regarding the mechanisms by which genome shuffling contributes to speciation, especially in mammals. In order to shed light on this intriguing evolutionary process, here we present a detailed empirical study that shows how Robertsonian (Rb) fusions alter the chromosomal distribution of recombination events during the formation of the germline in a Rb system of the western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus). Our results indicate that both the total number of meiotic crossovers and the chromosomal distribution of recombination events are reduced in mice with Rb fusions and that this can be related to alterations in epigenetic signatures for heterochromatinization. Furthermore, we detected novel house mouse Prdm9 allelic variants in the Rb system. Remarkably, mean recombination rates were positively correlated with a decrease in the number of ZnF domains in the Prdm9 gene. The suggestion that recombination can be modulated by both chromosomal reorganizations and genetic determinants that control the formation of double-stranded breaks during meiosis opens new avenues for understanding the role of recombination in chromosomal speciation. PMID:24850922

  19. A common genetic background could explain early-onset Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Zanin, Valentina; Girardelli, Martina; Magnolato, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Martellossi, Stefano; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Crovella, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease, in which environmental, microbial and genetic factors play important roles. CD is characterized by a chronic granulomatous inflammation by necrotic scarring with aspects of full-thickness wall. In spite of affecting mainly young adults, sometimes, CD can be present in the first year of life (early onset Crohn disease, EOCD) showing an unpredictable course and being often more severe than at older ages. In this paper we propose the hypothesis that EOCD patients should be analyzed using a Mendelian approach with family studies aimed to identify new loci directly involved in the early onset Crohn's disease. So we will leave the classic association study approach used until now for the identification of genes responsible for susceptibility to CD and propose linkage family analysis as alternative and powerful tool for the identification of new genetic variants associated with familiar cases of EOCD.

  20. Sardinians genetic background explained by runs of homozygosity and genomic regions under positive selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Di Gaetano

    Full Text Available The peculiar position of Sardinia in the Mediterranean sea has rendered its population an interesting biogeographical isolate. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic population structure, as well as to estimate Runs of Homozygosity and regions under positive selection, using about 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms genotyped in 1077 Sardinian individuals. Using four different methods--fixation index, inflation factor, principal component analysis and ancestry estimation--we were able to highlight, as expected for a genetic isolate, the high internal homogeneity of the island. Sardinians showed a higher percentage of genome covered by RoHs>0.5 Mb (F(RoH%0.5 when compared to peninsular Italians, with the only exception of the area surrounding Alghero. We furthermore identified 9 genomic regions showing signs of positive selection and, we re-captured many previously inferred signals. Other regions harbor novel candidate genes for positive selection, like TMEM252, or regions containing long non coding RNA. With the present study we confirmed the high genetic homogeneity of Sardinia that may be explained by the shared ancestry combined with the action of evolutionary forces.

  1. Protective Effect of R Allele of PON1 Gene on the Coronary Artery Disease in the Presence of Specific Genetic Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Balcerzyk

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Genetic susceptibility to CAD may be determined by polymorphic variants of genes encoding isoforms involved in the processes important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, including lipids disorders. Participation of single polymorphic variants is relatively small, however its significance may increase in the presence of specific genetic or environmental background.

  2. The LEGSKO mouse: a mouse model of age-related nuclear cataract based on genetic suppression of lens glutathione synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjun Fan

    Full Text Available Age-related nuclear cataracts are associated with progressive post-synthetic modifications of crystallins from various physical chemical and metabolic insults, of which oxidative stress is a major factor. The latter is normally suppressed by high concentrations of glutathione (GSH, which however are very low in the nucleus of the old lens. Here we generated a mouse model of oxidant stress by knocking out glutathione synthesis in the mouse in the hope of recapitulating some of the changes observed in human age-related nuclear cataract (ARNC. A floxed Gclc mouse was generated and crossed with a transgenic mouse expressing Cre in the lens to generate the LEGSKO mouse in which de novo GSH synthesis was completely abolished in the lens. Lens GSH levels were reduced up to 60% in homozygous LEGSKO mice, and a decreasing GSH gradient was noticed from cortical to nuclear region at 4 months of age. Oxidation of crystallin methionine and sulfhydryls into sulfoxides was dramatically increased, but methylglyoxal hydroimidazolones levels that are GSH/glyoxalase dependent were surprisingly normal. Homozygous LEGSKO mice developed nuclear opacities starting at 4 months that progressed into severe nuclear cataract by 9 months. We conclude that the LEGSKO mouse lens mimics several features of human ARNC and is thus expected to be a useful model for the development of anti-cataract agents.

  3. Genetic mapping of escalated aggression in wild-derived mouse strain MSM/Ms: association with serotonin-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aki eTakahashi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese wild-derived mouse strain MSM/Ms (MSM retains a wide range of traits related to behavioral wildness, including high levels of emotionality and avoidance of humans. In this study, we observed that MSM showed a markedly higher level of aggression than the standard laboratory strain C57BL/6J. Whereas almost all MSM males showed high frequencies of attack bites and pursuit in the resident-intruder test, only a few C57BL/6J males showed aggressive behaviors, with these behaviors observed at only a low frequency. Sexually mature MSM males in their home cages killed their littermates, or sometimes female pair-mates. To study the genetic and neurobiological mechanisms that underlie the escalated aggression observed in MSM mice, we analyzed reciprocal F1 crosses and five consomic strains of MSM (Chr 4, 13, 15, X and Y against the background of C57BL/6J. We identified two chromosomes, Chr 4 and Chr 15, which were involved in the heightened aggression observed in MSM. These chromosomes had different effects on aggression: whereas MSM Chr 15 increased agitation and initiation of aggressive events, MSM Chr 4 induced a maladaptive level of aggressive behavior. Expression analysis of mRNAs of serotonin receptors, serotonin transporter and Tph2, an enzyme involved in serotonin synthesis in seven brain areas, indicated several differences among MSM, C57BL/6J, and their consomic strains. We found that Tph2 expression in the midbrain was increased in the Chr 4 consomic strain, as well as in MSM, and that there was a strong positive genetic correlation between aggressive behavior and Tph2 expression at the mRNA level. Therefore, it is possible that increased expression of the Tph2 gene is related to escalated aggression observed in MSM.

  4. Genetic Background and Population Genetics of Hungarian Brown Trout Populations Using PCR-RFLP and Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágnes Ősz

    2015-12-01

    4 University of West Hungary, Mosonmagyaróvár Vár 2., 9200 Mosonmagyaróvár, Hungary Based on the analyses of the mitochondrial DNA of several European brown trout populations, five evolutionary lineages of brown trout were indentified (Atlantic, Danubian, Mediterranean, Adriatic, Marble. The species is bred primarily for stock enhancement of natural waters, however the most hatchery-maintained broodstocks originate from the Atlantic lineage. Due to the hydrogeography of Hungary our stocks should theoretically belong to the Danubian lineage; however, this has not been investigated earlier by genetic studies. For our genetic analysis, 702 fin clips were collected from two brown trout broodstocks (Lillafüred and Szilvásvárad as well as populations of natural streams (Bán, Jósva, Kemence, Apátkút, Bittva and Kölöntés in Hungary. Sequencing of the control region in mitochondrial DNA, three PCR-RFLP (mitochondrial DNA control region, lactate dehydrogenase and somatolactin genes and five microsatellite markers were used to distinguish between Danubian and Atlantic lineages of brown trout. The proportion of the mitochondrial haplotype of the Danubian lineage was low, with the exception of the Apátkúti, Kölöntés streams and Szilvásvárad broodstock. Analyses of nuclear PCR-RFLP and microsatellites markers showed various distributions of alleles characteristic of the Atlantic or Danubian lineages, although the Atlantic genotype has dominated in all population. In case of the analyses of microsatellites the polymorphism varied greatly at all locations. In addition we found several alleles that were not described earlier in other populations. Those alleles probably would be typical of Hungarian brown trout populations. Overall the populations were effectively in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for both PCR-RFLP and microsatellite markers. The remarkably high proportion of allochthonous Atlantic alleles in the analyzed sites is a clear indicator of the import

  5. Moroccan mitochondrial genetic background suggests prehistoric human migrations across the Gibraltar Strait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhouda, Taha; Martínez-Redondo, Diana; Gómez-Durán, Aurora; Elmtili, Noureddine; Idaomar, Mouhamed; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Montoya, Julio; López-Pérez, Manuel José; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2009-11-01

    Migrations into Africa from the Levant have greatly determined the mitochondrial genetic landscape of North Africa. After analyzing samples from North Morocco to Spain, we show that three fourths of the Moroccan individuals belong to Western Eurasian haplogroups and the frequencies of these are much more similar to those of the Iberian Peninsula than to those of the Middle East. This is particularly true for the mitochondrial haplogroups H1, H3 and V, which experienced a late-glacial expansion from this region, that repopulated much of Central and Northern Europe. Iberian Peninsula was also a source for prehistoric migrations to North Africa.

  6. A catalog of the mouse gut metagenome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Liang; Feng, Qiang; Liang, Suisha;

    2015-01-01

    We established a catalog of the mouse gut metagenome comprising ∼2.6 million nonredundant genes by sequencing DNA from fecal samples of 184 mice. To secure high microbiome diversity, we used mouse strains of diverse genetic backgrounds, from different providers, kept in different housing laborato...

  7. Influence of Genetic Background on Anthocyanin and Copigment Composition and Behavior during Thermoalkaline Processing of Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Amy; Yang, Liyi; Dykes, Linda; Murray, Seth; Awika, Joseph M

    2015-06-10

    Visual color is a primary quality factor for foods purchase; identifying factors that influence in situ color quality of pigmented maize during processing is important. Twenty-four genetically distinct pigmented maize hybrids (red/blue, blue, red, and purple) were used to investigate the effect of pigment and copigment composition on color stability during nixtamalization and tortilla chip processing. The red/blue and blue samples generally contained higher proportions of acylated anthocyanins (mainly cyanidin-3-(6″-malonylglucoside)) than the red and purple color classes. Phenolic amides were the major extractable copigments in all samples (450-764 μg/g), with red samples containing the most putrescines and blue samples containing the most spermidines. Even though samples with higher proportions of acylated anthocyanins retained more pigments during processing, this did not relate to final product color quality. In general, the red/blue samples retained their color quality the best and thus are good candidates for genetic improvement for direct processing into alkalized products.

  8. Recent perspectives on the genetic background of neural tube defects with special regard to iniencephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joó, József Gábor

    2009-04-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare and mostly lethal type of neural tube defect. The pattern of inheritance of this group of malformations is multifactorial, rendering the identification of the underlying causes. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the genetic basis of human neurulation. Essential signaling pathways of the development of the CNS include the planar cell polarity pathway, which is important for the initiation of neural tube closure, as well as the sonic hedgehog pathway, which regulates the neural plate bending. Genes influencing the different stages of neurulation have been investigated for their eventual role in the development of these malformations. Among the environmental factors, folic acid seems to be the most important modifier of the risk of human neural tube defects. Genes of the folate metabolism pathways have also been investigated to identify mutations resulting in increased risk of neural tube defects. In this review we have attempted to summarize the knowledge on iniencephaly and neural tube defects, with special regard to genetic factors of the etiology.

  9. Primer on medical genomics part II: Background principles and methods in molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tefferi, Ayalew; Wieben, Eric D; Dewald, Gordon W; Whiteman, David A H; Bernard, Matthew E; Spelsberg, Thomas C

    2002-08-01

    The nucleus of every human cell contains the full complement of the human genome, which consists of approximately 30,000 to 70,000 named and unnamed genes and many intergenic DNA sequences. The double-helical DNA molecule in a human cell, associated with special proteins, is highly compacted into 22 pairs of autosomal chromosomes and an additional pair of sex chromosomes. The entire cellular DNA consists of approximately 3 billion base pairs, of which only 1% is thought to encode a functional protein or a polypeptide. Genetic information is expressed and regulated through a complex system of DNA transcription, RNA processing, RNA translation, and posttranslational and cotranslational modification of proteins. Advances in molecular biology techniques have allowed accurate and rapid characterization of DNA sequences as well as identification and quantification of cellular RNA and protein. Global analytic methods and human genetic mapping are expected to accelerate the process of identification and localization of disease genes. In this second part of an educational series in medical genomics, selected principles and methods in molecular biology are recapped, with the intent to prepare the reader for forthcoming articles with a more direct focus on aspects of the subject matter.

  10. Cumulative BRCA mutation analysis in the Greek population confirms that homogenous ethnic background facilitates genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsigginou, Alexandra; Vlachopoulos, Fotios; Arzimanoglou, Iordanis; Zagouri, Flora; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2015-01-01

    Screening for BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations has long moved from the research lab to the clinic as a routine clinical genetic testing. BRCA molecular alteration pattern varies among ethnic groups which makes it already a less straightforward process to select the appropriate mutations for routine genetic testing on the basis of known clinical significance. The present report comprises an in depth literature review of the so far reported BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 molecular alterations in Greek families. Our analysis of Greek cumulative BRCA 1 and 2 molecular data, produced by several independent groups, confirmed that six recurrent deleterious mutations account for almost 60 % and 70 % of all BRCA 1 and 2 and BRCA 1 mutations, respectively. As a result, it makes more sense to perform BRCA mutation analysis in the clinic in two sequential steps, first conventional analysis for the six most prevalent pathogenic mutations and if none identified, a second step of New Generation Sequencing-based whole genome or whole exome sequencing would follow. Our suggested approach would enable more clinically meaningful, considerably easier and less expensive BRCA analysis in the Greek population which is considered homogenous.

  11. Understanding the Basis of Auriculocondylar Syndrome: Insights From Human and Mouse Genetic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouthier, David E.; Passos Bueno, Maria Rita; Tavares, Andre L.P.; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Amiel, Jeanne; Gordon, Christopher T.

    2014-01-01

    Among human birth defect syndromes, malformations affecting the face are perhaps the most striking due to cultural and psychological expectations of facial shape. One such syndrome is auriculocondylar syndrome (ACS), in which patients present with defects in ear and mandible development. Affected structures arise from cranial neural crest cells, a population of cells in the embryo that reside in the pharyngeal arches and give rise to most of the bone, cartilage and connective tissue of the face. Recent studies have found that most cases of ACS arise from defects in signaling molecules associated with the endothelin signaling pathway. Disruption of this signaling pathway in both mouse and zebrafish results in loss of identity of neural crest cells of the mandibular portion of the first pharyngeal arch and the subsequent repatterning of these cells, leading to homeosis of lower jaw structures into more maxillary-like structures. These findings illustrate the importance of endothelin signaling in normal human craniofacial development and illustrate how clinical and basic science approaches can coalesce to improve our understanding of the genetic basis of human birth syndromes. Further, understanding the genetic basis for ACS that lies outside of known endothelin signaling components may help elucidate unknown aspects critical to the establishment of neural crest cell patterning during facial morphogenesis. PMID:24123988

  12. Generation of Mouse Haploid Somatic Cells by Small Molecules for Genome-wide Genetic Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Quan He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of derivation of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells (haESCs has provided a powerful tool for large-scale functional analysis of the mammalian genome. However, haESCs rapidly become diploidized after differentiation, posing challenges for genetic analysis. Here, we show that the spontaneous diploidization of haESCs happens in metaphase due to mitotic slippage. Diploidization can be suppressed by small-molecule-mediated inhibition of CDK1 and ROCK. Through ROCK inhibition, we can generate haploid somatic cells of all three germ layers from haESCs, including terminally differentiated neurons. Using piggyBac transposon-based insertional mutagenesis, we generated a haploid neural cell library harboring genome-wide mutations for genetic screening. As a proof of concept, we screened for Mn2+-mediated toxicity and identified the Park2 gene. Our findings expand the applications of mouse haploid cell technology to somatic cell types and may also shed light on the mechanisms of ploidy maintenance.

  13. Differential Cotton leaf crumple virus-VIGS-mediated gene silencing and viral genome localization in different Gossypium hirsutum genetic backgrounds

    KAUST Repository

    Idris, Ali

    2010-12-01

    A Cotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV)-based gene silencing vector containing a fragment of the Gossypium hirsutum Magnesium chelatase subunit I was used to establish endogenous gene silencing in cotton of varied genetic backgrounds. Biolistic inoculation resulted in systemic and persistent photo-bleaching of the leaves and bolls of the seven cultivars tested, however, the intensity of silencing was variable. CLCrV-VIGS-mediated expression of green fluorescent protein was used to monitor the in planta distribution of the vector, indicating successful phloem invasion in all cultivars tested. Acala SJ-1, one of the cotton cultivars, was identified as a particularly optimal candidate for CLCrV-VIGS-based cotton reverse-genetics. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Virulence Genes, Genetic Diversity, Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Phylogenetic Background of Escherichia coli Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The epidemiology of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC in urban and rural communities in Iran was never investigated prior to this study. Objectives The aims of this study were to detect the frequency of virulence genes and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and phylogenetic background of Escherichia coli isolates collected from urban and rural communities. Materials and Methods A total of 100 E. coli isolates were collected from urine samples of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs residing in two different locations, and confirmed by current biochemical tests. The phylogenetic groups were determined by the triplex-polymerase chain reaction (PCR method, and multiplex PCRs were used to detect eight Vf genes (fimH, iucD, irp2, hlyA, ompT, iha, iroN, and cnf1. The susceptibility profile of E. coli isolates was determined by the disk diffusion method. Results Ninety-five percent of UPEC showed at least one of the virulence genes, the most prevalent being fimH (95%, followed by irp2 (89%, iucD (69%, ompT (67%, iroN (29%, and iha (29%. The various combinations of detected genes were designated as virulence patterns. Phylogenetic groups, B2 (55% and D (22%, comprised the majority of isolated strains. Phenotypic tests showed that 92%, 74% and 71% of the isolates were resistant to ampicillin, ceftizoxime and cefixime, respectively. Conclusions These findings indicate that the UPEC isolates had eight virulence factors with high frequencies. Moreover, these results suggest a direct connection between virulence factors, gene diversity, phylogenetic background, and antimicrobial resistance in UPEC isolates.

  15. [Permanent neonatal diabetes with known genetic background: oral drugs in treatment of childhood diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gach, Agnieszka; Gadzicka, Anna; Młynarski, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    Diabetes, which is diagnosed before 6 months of age, is patogenetically different than type 1 diabetes. This kind of diabetes also known as a neonatal diabetes is genetically determined with monogenic mode of inheritance. Most of these patients are carriers of heterozygous mutation in the KCNJ11 or ABCC8 gene. These mutations may activate the Kir6.2/SUR1 potassium channel in the beta cells and disturb insulin secretion, which in consequence leads to diabetes. This patological phenomenon is reversible if sulfonylureas are used as a first line therapy. In the current paper a systematic review of clinical aspects of sulfonylurea treatment in neonatal diabetes has been performed. This gives the further evidence that knowlegde of the patogenesis of neonatal diabetes may be easily transferred to bedside and clinical practice.

  16. [Clinical and genetic background of familial myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Péter Attila; Kállay, Krisztián; Marosvári, Dóra; Benyó, Gábor; Szőke, Anita; Csomor, Judit; Bödör, Csaba

    2016-02-21

    Myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia are mainly sporadic diseases, however, rare familial cases exist. These disorders are considered rare, but are likely to be more common than currently appreciated, and are characterized by the autosomal dominant mutations of hematopoietic transcription factors. These syndromes have typical phenotypic features and are associated with an increased risk for developing overt malignancy. Currently, four recognized syndromes could be separated: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA, familial myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia with mutated GATA2, familial platelet disorder with propensity to myeloid malignancy with RUNX1 mutations, and telomere biology disorders due to mutations of TERC or TERT. Furthermore, there are new, emerging syndromes associated with germline mutations in novel genes including ANKRD26, ETV6, SRP72 or DDX41. This review will discuss the current understanding of the genetic basis and clinical presentation of familial leukemia and myelodysplasia.

  17. Genetic mapping of social interaction behavior in B6/MSM consomic mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Tomihara, Kazuya; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2010-05-01

    Genetic studies are indispensable for understanding the mechanisms by which individuals develop differences in social behavior. We report genetic mapping of social interaction behavior using inter-subspecific consomic strains established from MSM/Ms (MSM) and C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Two animals of the same strain and sex, aged 10 weeks, were introduced into a novel open-field for 10 min. Social contact was detected by an automated system when the distance between the centers of the two animals became less than approximately 12 cm. In addition, detailed behavioral observations were made of the males. The wild-derived mouse strain MSM showed significantly longer social contact as compared to B6. Analysis of the consomic panel identified two chromosomes (Chr 6 and Chr 17) with quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for lengthened social contact in MSM mice and two chromosomes (Chr 9 and Chr X) with QTL that inhibited social contact. Detailed behavioral analysis of males identified four additional chromosomes associated with social interaction behavior. B6 mice that contained Chr 13 from MSM showed more genital grooming and following than the parental B6 strain, whereas the presence of Chr 8 and Chr 12 from MSM resulted in a reduction of those behaviors. Longer social sniffing was observed in Chr 4 consomic strain than in B6 mice. Although the frequency was low, aggressive behavior was observed in a few pairs from consomic strains for Chrs 4, 13, 15 and 17, as well as from MSM. The social interaction test has been used as a model to measure anxiety, but genetic correlation analysis suggested that social interaction involves different aspects of anxiety than are measured by open-field test.

  18. Genetic dissection of the mouse brain using high-field magnetic resonance microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, A; Johnson, G A; Williams, R W

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has demonstrated that variation in brain structure is associated with differences in behavior and disease state. However, it has rarely been practical to prospectively test causal models that link anatomical and functional differences in humans. In the present study we have combined classical mouse genetics with high-field MR to systematically explore and test such structure-functional relations across multiple brain regions. We segmented 33 regions in two parental strains-C57BL/6J (B) and DBA/2J (D)-and in nine BXD recombinant inbred strains. All strains have been studied extensively for more than 20 years using a battery of genetic, functional, anatomical, and behavioral assays. We compared levels of variation within and between strains and sexes, by region, and by system. Average within-strain variation had a coefficient of variation (CV) of 1.6% for the whole brain; while the CV ranged from 2.3 to 3.6% for olfactory bulbs, cortex and cerebellum, and up to approximately 18% for septum and laterodorsal thalamic nucleus. Variation among strain averages ranged from 6.7% for cerebellum, 7.6% for whole brain, 9.0% for cortex, up to approximately 26% for the ventricles, laterodorsal thalamic nucleus, and the interpeduncular nucleus. Heritabilities averaged 0.60+/-0.18. Sex differences were not significant with the possible (and unexpected) exception of the pons ( approximately 20% larger in males). A correlation matrix of regional volumes revealed high correlations among functionally related parts of the CNS (e.g., components of the limbic system), and several high correlations between regions that are not anatomically connected, but that may nonetheless be functionally or genetically coupled.

  19. Anti-angiogenesis therapy based on the bone marrow-derived stromal cells genetically engineered to express sFlt-1 in mouse tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen X-C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone marrow-derived stromal cells (BMSCs are important for development, tissue cell replenishment, and wound healing in physiological and pathological conditions. BMSCs were found to preferably reach sites undergoing the process of cell proliferation, such as wound and tumor, suggesting that BMSCs may be used as a vehicle for gene therapy of tumor. Methods Mouse BMSCs were loaded with recombinant adenoviruses which express soluble Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 (sFlt-1. The anti-angiogenesis of sFlt-1 in BMSCs was determined using endothelial cells proliferation inhibition assay and alginate encapsulation assay. The anti-tumor effects of BMSCs expressing sFlt-1 through tail-vein infusion were evaluated in two mouse tumor metastases models. Results BMSCs genetically modified with Adv-GFP-sFlt-1 could effectively express and secret sFlt-1. BMSCs loaded with sFlt-1 gene could preferentially home to tumor loci and decrease lung metastases and prolong lifespan in mouse tumor model through inducing anti-angiogenesis and apoptosis in tumors. Conclusion We demonstrated that BMSCs might be employed as a promising vehicle for tumor gene therapy which can effectively not only improve the concentration of anticancer therapeutics in tumors, but also modify the tumor microenvironment.

  20. Response to dietary phosphorus deficiency is affected by genetic background in growing pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, L S; Qu, A; Cutler, S A; Mahajan, A; Lonergan, S M; Rothschild, M F; Weber, T E; Kerr, B J; Stahl, C H

    2008-10-01

    Concern over the environmental effect of P excretion from pig production has led to reduced dietary P supplementation. To examine how genetics influence P utilization, 94 gilts sired by 2 genetic lines (PIC337 and PIC280) were housed individually and fed either a P-adequate diet (PA) or a 20% P-deficient diet (PD) for 14 wk. Initially and monthly, blood samples were collected and BW recorded after an overnight fast. Growth performance and plasma indicators of P status were determined monthly. At the end of the trial, carcass traits, meat quality, bone strength, and ash percentage were determined. Pigs fed the PD diet had decreased (P < 0.05) plasma P concentrations and poorer G:F (P < 0.05) over the length of the trial. After 4 wk on trial, pigs fed the PD diet had increased (P < 0.05) plasma 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) and decreased (P < 0.05) plasma parathyroid hormone compared with those fed the PA diet. At the end of the trial, pigs fed the PD diet had decreased (P < 0.05) BW, HCW, and percentage fat-free lean and tended to have decreased LM area (P = 0.06) and marbling (P = 0.09) and greater (P = 0.12) 10th-rib backfat than pigs fed the PA diet. Additionally, animals fed the PD diet had weaker bones and also decreased (P < 0.05) ash percentage and increased (P < 0.05) concentrations of 1alpha-hydroxylase and parathyroid hormone receptor mRNA in kidney tissue. Regardless of dietary treatment, PIC337-sired pigs consumed more feed and gained more BW than their PIC280-sired counterparts (P < 0.05) during the study. The PIC337-sired pigs also had greater (P < 0.05) HCW, larger (P < 0.01) LM area, and tended to have (P = 0.07) greater dressing percentage. Meat from the PIC337-sired pigs also tended to have greater (P = 0.12) concentrations of lactate but decreased (P = 0.07) concentrations of total glucose units 24 h postslaughter. Although plasma 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) concentrations were elevated (P < 0.05) in all the animals fed the PD diet, this elevation due to P deficiency

  1. Novel pancreatic cancer cell lines derived from genetically engineered mouse models of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma: applications in diagnosis and therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María P Torres

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains one of the most lethal human malignancies with poor prognosis. Despite all advances in preclinical research, there have not been significant translation of novel therapies into the clinics. The development of genetically engineered mouse (GEM models that produce spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Although these PDAC mouse models are ideal for studying potential therapies and specific genetic mutations, there is a need for developing syngeneic cell lines from these models. In this study, we describe the successful establishment and characterization of three cell lines derived from two (PDAC mouse models. The cell line UN-KC-6141 was derived from a pancreatic tumor of a Kras(G12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC mouse at 50 weeks of age, whereas UN-KPC-960 and UN-KPC-961 cell lines were derived from pancreatic tumors of Kras(G12D;Trp53(R172H;Pdx1-Cre (KPC mice at 17 weeks of age. The cancer mutations of these parent mice carried over to the daughter cell lines (i.e. Kras(G12D mutation was observed in all three cell lines while Trp53 mutation was observed only in KPC cell lines. The cell lines showed typical cobblestone epithelial morphology in culture, and unlike the previously established mouse PDAC cell line Panc02, expressed the ductal marker CK19. Furthermore, these cell lines expressed the epithelial-mesenchymal markers E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and also, Muc1 and Muc4 mucins. In addition, these cell lines were resistant to the chemotherapeutic drug Gemcitabine. Their implantation in vivo produced subcutaneous as well as tumors in the pancreas (orthotopic. The genetic mutations in these cell lines mimic the genetic compendium of human PDAC, which make them valuable models with a high potential of translational relevance for examining diagnostic markers and therapeutic drugs.

  2. Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing

    OpenAIRE

    Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S.; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V.; McConkey, Marie E.; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C.; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes[superscript 1], but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing[superscript 2, 3, 4] to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic ...

  3. Genetic ablation of NMDA receptor subunit NR3B in mouse reveals motoneuronal and nonmotoneuronal phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Stephan; Kanki, Hiroaki; Fukui, Yasuyuki; Takao, Keizo; Fukaya, Masahiro; Hynynen, Meri N; Churchill, Michael J; Shefner, Jeremy M; Bronson, Roderick T; Brown, Robert H; Watanabe, Masahiko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Hayashi, Yasunori

    2007-09-01

    NR3B is a modulatory subunit of the NMDA receptor, abundantly expressed in both cranial and spinal somatic motoneurons and at lower levels in other regions of the brain as well. Recently, we found the human NR3B gene (GRIN3B) to be highly genetically heterogeneous, and that approximately 10% of the normal European-American population lacks NR3B due to homozygous occurrence of a null allele in the gene. Therefore, it is especially important to understand the phenotypic consequences of the genetic loss of NR3B in both humans and animal models. We here provide results of behavioral analysis of mice genetically lacking NR3B, which is an ideal animal model due to homogeneity in genetic and environmental background. The NR3B(-/-) mice are viable and fertile. Consistent with the expression of NR3B in somatic motoneurons, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a moderate but significant impairment in motor learning or coordination, and decreased activity in their home cages. Remarkably, the NR3B(-/-) mice showed a highly increased social interaction with their familiar cage mates in their home cage but moderately increased anxiety-like behaviour and decreased social interaction in a novel environment, consistent with the inhibitory role of NR3B on the functions of NMDA receptors. This work is the first reporting of the functional significance of NR3B in vivo and may give insight into the contribution of genetic variability of NR3B in the phenotypic heterogeneity among human population.

  4. Dentate gyrus network dysfunctions precede the symptomatic phase in a genetic mouse model of seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana eToader

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuit disturbances that lead to hyperexcitability in the cortico-hippocampal network are one of the landmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy. The dentate gyrus (DG network plays an important role in regulating the excitability of the entire hippocampus by filtering and integrating information received via the perforant path. Here, we investigated possible epileptogenic abnormalities in the function of the DG neuronal network in the Synapsin II (Syn II knockout mouse (Syn II-/-, a genetic mouse model of epilepsy. Syn II is a presynaptic protein whose deletion in mice reproducibly leads to generalized seizures starting at the age of two months. We made use of a high-resolution microelectrode array (4096 electrodes and patch-clamp recordings, and found that in acute hippocampal slices of young pre-symptomatic (3-6 weeks-old Syn II-/- mice excitatory synaptic output of the mossy fibers is reduced. Moreover, we showed that the main excitatory neurons present in the polymorphic layer of the DG, hilar mossy cells, display a reduced excitability. We also provide evidence of a predominantly inhibitory regulatory output from mossy cells to granule cells, through feed-forward inhibition, and show that the excitatory-inhibitory ratio is increased in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic Syn II-/- mice. These results support the key role of the hilar mossy neurons in maintaining the normal excitability of the hippocampal network and show that the late epileptic phenotype of the Syn II-/- mice is preceded by neuronal circuitry dysfunctions. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in the Syn II-/- mice and open the possibility for early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions.

  5. A genetic basis for a postmeiotic X versus Y chromosome intragenomic conflict in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Cocquet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intragenomic conflicts arise when a genetic element favours its own transmission to the detriment of others. Conflicts over sex chromosome transmission are expected to have influenced genome structure, gene regulation, and speciation. In the mouse, the existence of an intragenomic conflict between X- and Y-linked multicopy genes has long been suggested but never demonstrated. The Y-encoded multicopy gene Sly has been shown to have a predominant role in the epigenetic repression of post meiotic sex chromatin (PMSC and, as such, represses X and Y genes, among which are its X-linked homologs Slx and Slxl1. Here, we produced mice that are deficient for both Sly and Slx/Slxl1 and observed that Slx/Slxl1 has an opposite role to that of Sly, in that it stimulates XY gene expression in spermatids. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency rescues the sperm differentiation defects and near sterility caused by Sly deficiency and vice versa. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency also causes a sex ratio distortion towards the production of male offspring that is corrected by Sly deficiency. All in all, our data show that Slx/Slxl1 and Sly have antagonistic effects during sperm differentiation and are involved in a postmeiotic intragenomic conflict that causes segregation distortion and male sterility. This is undoubtedly what drove the massive gene amplification on the mouse X and Y chromosomes. It may also be at the basis of cases of F1 male hybrid sterility where the balance between Slx/Slxl1 and Sly copy number, and therefore expression, is disrupted. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a competition occurring between X and Y related genes in mammals. It also provides a biological basis for the concept that intragenomic conflict is an important evolutionary force which impacts on gene expression, genome structure, and speciation.

  6. Genetic Enhancement of Limb Defects in a Mouse Model of Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOPEZ-BURKS, MARTHA E.; SANTOS, ROSAYSELA; KAWAUCHI, SHIMAKO; CALOF, ANNE L.; LANDER, ARTHUR D.

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is characterized by a wide variety of structural and functional abnormalities in almost every organ system of the body. CdLS is now known to be caused by mutations that disrupt the function of the cohesin complex or its regulators, and studies of animal models and cell lines tell us that the effect of these mutations is to produce subtle yet pervasive dysregulation of gene expression. With many hundreds of mostly small gene expression changes occurring in every cell type and tissue, identifying the etiology of any particular birth defect is very challenging. Here we focus on limb abnormalities, which are commonly seen in CdLS. In the limb buds of the Nipbl-haploinsufficient mouse (Nipbl+/− mouse), a model for the most common form of CdLS, modest gene expression changes are observed in several candidate pathways whose disruption is known to cause limb abnormalities, yet the limbs of Nipbl+/− mice develop relatively normally. We hypothesized that further impairment of candidate pathways might produce limb defects similar to those seen in CdLS, and performed genetic experiments to test this. Focusing on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp), and Hox gene pathways, we show that decreasing Bmp or Hox function (but not Shh function) enhances polydactyly in Nipbl+/− mice, and in some cases produces novel skeletal phenotypes. However, frank limb reductions, as are seen in a subset of individuals with CdLS, do not occur, suggesting that additional signaling and/or gene regulatory pathways are involved in producing such dramatic changes. PMID:27120109

  7. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Shi

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1. TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2 mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6 mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD family of recombinant inbred (RI strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options.

  8. Influence of sex and genetic background on anxiety-related and stress-induced behaviour of prodynorphin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenberger, Iris; Lutsch, Christian; Herzog, Herbert; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The role of dynorphin/kappa opioid receptors in epilepsy and addiction are well accepted, but their function in emotional control is not yet fully understood. Data obtained from different strains of prodynorphin (Pdyn)- and kappa opioid receptor (KOP)-deficient mice do not provide a consistent picture of the functions of Dyn/KOP in anxiety, suggesting the influence of testing conditions and/or genetic background. Therefore, we investigated the behaviour and neurochemistry of male and female Pdyn KO mice on the balb/c and C57Bl/6N background. Consistent with our results obtained from male mice on the C57bl/6N background, we observed a less anxious phenotype in the elevated plus maze, open-field and light-dark test in male mice on the balb/c background. Female mice on the balb/c background also displayed less anxiety like behaviour; however these data reflect high trait anxiety and inter-individual differences. In contrast, female mice on the C57Bl/6N background displayed low trait anxiety and a paradigm-dependent reduction of anxiety. No differences were observed in the forced swim test, while balb/c Pdyn KO mice displayed prolonged immobility in the tail suspension test. In line with our previous results, we observed reduced CRH mRNA in the central amygdala in all groups of mice. In contrast, the recently observed CRH mRNA reduction in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus appears restricted to male, but not female mice. Our data support previous data suggesting a pronounced impact of endogenous prodynorphin-derived peptides on anxiety. Moreover, our data support the idea that the less anxious phenotype manifests only at elevated stress levels.

  9. Influence of sex and genetic background on anxiety-related and stress-induced behaviour of prodynorphin-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Kastenberger

    Full Text Available The role of dynorphin/kappa opioid receptors in epilepsy and addiction are well accepted, but their function in emotional control is not yet fully understood. Data obtained from different strains of prodynorphin (Pdyn- and kappa opioid receptor (KOP-deficient mice do not provide a consistent picture of the functions of Dyn/KOP in anxiety, suggesting the influence of testing conditions and/or genetic background. Therefore, we investigated the behaviour and neurochemistry of male and female Pdyn KO mice on the balb/c and C57Bl/6N background. Consistent with our results obtained from male mice on the C57bl/6N background, we observed a less anxious phenotype in the elevated plus maze, open-field and light-dark test in male mice on the balb/c background. Female mice on the balb/c background also displayed less anxiety like behaviour; however these data reflect high trait anxiety and inter-individual differences. In contrast, female mice on the C57Bl/6N background displayed low trait anxiety and a paradigm-dependent reduction of anxiety. No differences were observed in the forced swim test, while balb/c Pdyn KO mice displayed prolonged immobility in the tail suspension test. In line with our previous results, we observed reduced CRH mRNA in the central amygdala in all groups of mice. In contrast, the recently observed CRH mRNA reduction in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus appears restricted to male, but not female mice. Our data support previous data suggesting a pronounced impact of endogenous prodynorphin-derived peptides on anxiety. Moreover, our data support the idea that the less anxious phenotype manifests only at elevated stress levels.

  10. Measuring and modeling for the assessment of the genetic background behind cognitive processes in donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navas, Francisco Javier; Jordana, Jordi; León, José Manuel; Arando, Ander; Pizarro, Gabriela; McLean, Amy Katherine; Delgado, Juan Vicente

    2017-09-14

    New productive niches can offer new commercial perspectives linked to donkeys' products and human therapeutic or leisure applications. However, no assessment for selection criteria has been carried out yet. First, we assessed the animal inherent features and environmental factors that may potentially influence several cognitive processes in donkeys. Then, we aimed at describing a practical methodology to quantify such cognitive processes, seeking their inclusion in breeding and conservation programmes, through a multifactorial linear model. Sixteen cognitive process-related traits were scored on a problem-solving test in a sample of 300 Andalusian donkeys for three consecutive years from 2013 to 2015. The linear model assessed the influence and interactions of four environmental factors, sex as an animal-inherent factor, age as a covariable, and the interactions between these factors. Analyses of variance were performed with GLM procedure of SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 24.0 software to assess the relative importance of each factor. All traits were significantly (Pprocesses, and stimulus which was not significant (Pprocesses. The development of complex multifactorial models to study cognitive processes may counteract the inherent variability in behavior genetics and the estimation and prediction of related breeding parameters, key for the implementation of successful conservation programmes in apparently functionally misplaced endangered breeds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. An Enterobacter plasmid as a new genetic background for the transposon Tn1331

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavi MR

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad R Alavi1,2, Vlado Antonic2, Adrien Ravizee1, Peter J Weina3, Mina Izadjoo1,2, Alexander Stojadinovic21Division of Wound Biology and Translational Research, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and American Registry of Pathology, Washington DC, 2Combat Wound Initiative Program, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington DC, 3The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, MD, USABackground: Genus Enterobacter includes important opportunistic nosocomial pathogens that could infect complex wounds. The presence of antibiotic resistance genes in these microorganisms represents a challenging clinical problem in the treatment of these wounds. In the authors’ screening of antibiotic-resistant bacteria from complex wounds, an Enterobacter species was isolated that harbors antibiotic-resistant plasmids conferring resistance to Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to identify the resistance genes carried by one of these plasmids.Methods: The plasmids from the Enterobacter isolate were propagated in E. coli and one of the plasmids, designated as pR23, was sequenced by the Sanger method using fluorescent dye-terminator chemistry on a genetic analyzer. The assembled sequence was annotated by search of the GenBank database.Results: Plasmid pR23 is composed of the transposon Tn1331 and a backbone plasmid that is identical to the plasmid pPIGDM1 from Enterobacter agglomerans. The multidrug-resistance transposon Tn1331, which confers resistance to aminoglycoside and beta lactam antibiotics, has been previously isolated only from Klebsiella. The Enterobacter plasmid pPIGDM1, which carries a ColE1-like origin of replication and has no apparent selective marker, appears to provide a backbone for propagation of Tn1331 in Enterobacter. The recognition sequence of Tn1331 transposase for insertion into pPIGDM1 is the pentanucleotide TATTA, which occurs only once throughout the length of this plasmid.Conclusion: Transposition of Tn1331 into

  12. Marker-assisted introgression of five QTLs controlling fruit quality traits into three tomato lines revealed interactions between QTLs and genetic backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, L; Duffé, P; Buret, M; Servin, B; Hospital, F; Causse, M

    2004-08-01

    The evaluation of organoleptic quality of tomato fruit requires physical, chemical and sensory analyses, which are expensive and difficult to assess. Therefore, their practical use in phenotypic selection is difficult. In a previous study, the genetic control of several traits related to organoleptic quality of fresh-market tomato fruit was investigated. Five chromosome regions strongly involved in organoleptic quality attributes were then chosen to be introgressed into three different recipient lines through marker-assisted selection. A marker-assisted backcross (MABC) strategy was performed, as all the favorable alleles for quality traits were provided by the same parental tomato line, whose fruit weight (FW) and firmness were much lower than those of the lines commonly used to develop fresh market varieties. Three improved lines were obtained after three backcrossing and two selfing generations. The implementation of the MABC scheme is described. The three improved lines were crossed together and with the recipient lines in a half-diallel mating scheme, and the simultaneous effect of the five quantitative trait locus (QTL) regions was compared in different genetic backgrounds. Significant effects of the introgressed regions and of the genetic backgrounds were shown. Additive effects were detected for soluble solid and reducing sugar content in two genetic backgrounds. A partially dominant effect on titratable acidity was detected in only one genetic background. In contrast, additive to dominant unfavorable effects of the donor alleles were detected for FW and locule number in the three genetic backgrounds. Recessive QTL effects on firmness were only detected in the two firmest genetic backgrounds. Comparison of the hybrids in the half-diallel gave complementary information on the effects of: (1) the alleles at the selected regions, (2) the genetic backgrounds and (3) their interaction. Breeding efficiency strongly varied according to the recipient parent, and

  13. Use of a genetically engineered mouse model as a preclinical tool for HER2 breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Creedon

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2-targeted therapies presents a major clinical problem. Although preclinical studies have identified a number of possible mechanisms, clinical validation has been difficult. This is most likely to reflect the reliance on cell-line models that do not recapitulate the complexity and heterogeneity seen in human tumours. Here, we show the utility of a genetically engineered mouse model of HER2-driven breast cancer (MMTV-NIC to define mechanisms of resistance to the pan-HER family inhibitor AZD8931. Genetic manipulation of MMTV-NIC mice demonstrated that loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN conferred de novo resistance to AZD8931, and a tumour fragment transplantation model was established to assess mechanisms of acquired resistance. Using this approach, 50% of tumours developed resistance to AZD8931. Analysis of the resistant tumours showed two distinct patterns of resistance: tumours in which reduced membranous HER2 expression was associated with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and resistant tumours that retained HER2 expression and an epithelial morphology. The plasticity of the EMT phenotype was demonstrated upon re-implantation of resistant tumours that then showed a mixed epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype. Further AZD8931 treatment resulted in the generation of secondary resistant tumours that again had either undergone EMT or retained their original epithelial morphology. The data provide a strong rationale for basing therapeutic decisions on the biology of the individual resistant tumour, which can be very different from that of the primary tumour and will be specific to individual patients.

  14. Neuropeptide Y-Y2 receptor knockout mice: influence of genetic background on anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambello, E; Zanetti, L; Hédou, G F; Angelici, O; Arban, R; Tasan, R O; Sperk, G; Caberlotto, L

    2011-03-10

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been extensively studied in relation to anxiety and depression but of the seven NPY receptors known to date, it is not yet clear which one is mainly involved in mediating its effects in emotional behavior. Mice lacking the NPY-Y2 receptors were previously shown to be less anxious due to their improved ability to cope with stressful situations. In the present study, the behavioral phenotype including the response to challenges was analyzed in NPY-Y2 knockout (KO) mice backcrossed in to congenic C57BL/6 background. In the elevated plus-maze (EPM) and the forced swim test (FST), the anxiolytic-like or antidepressant-like phenotype of the NPY-Y2 KO mice could not be confirmed, although this study differs from the previous one only with regard to the genetic background of the mice. In addition, no differences in response to acute stress or to the antidepressant desipramine in the FST were detected between wild type (WT) and NPY-Y2 KO animals. These results suggest that the genetic background of the animals appears to have a strong influence on the behavioral phenotype of NPY-Y2 KO mice. Additionally, to further characterize the animals by their biochemical response to a challenge, the neurochemical changes induced by the anxiogenic compound yohimbine were measured in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of NPY-Y2 KO and compared to WT mice. Dopamine (DA) levels were significantly increased by yohimbine in the WT but unaffected in the KO mice, suggesting that NPY-Y2 receptor exerts a direct control over both the tonic and phasic release of DA and that, although the anxiety-like behavior of these NPY-Y2 KO mice is unaltered, there are clear modifications of DA dynamics. However, yohimbine led to a significant increase in noradrenaline (NA) concentration and a slight reduction in serotonin concentration that were identical for both phenotypes.

  15. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice—activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs—toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen. PMID:25402627

  16. Genetic dissection of Pax6 dosage requirements in the developing mouse eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Silberman, Noa; Kalich, Tomer; Oron-Karni, Varda; Marquardt, Till; Kroeber, Markus; Tamm, Ernst R; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2005-08-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Pax6/PAX6 has been implicated in a number of congenital eye disorders in humans and mice, such as aniridia and Small-eye, which affect the development and function of the lens, cornea, anterior eye segment and neuroretina. However, the widespread distribution of Pax6/PAX6 protein within the developing and adult eye preclude the identification and direct study of the ocular tissues affected by a reduction in Pax6/PAX6 dosage. Here, we employed Cre/loxP-mediated inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in either the lens/cornea or the distal optic cup to dissect the tissue-specific sensitivity to Pax6 haploinsufficiency. Exclusive inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in the lens recapitulates the Small-eye lens and corneal defects, while only mildly affects iris morphology in a non-cell-autonomous fashion. Conversely, selective inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in the distal optic cup revealed primarily cell-autonomous dosage requirements for proper iris differentiation, with no affects on either lens or corneal morphology. Pax6 dosage within the distal optic cup is found here to influence the number of progenitors destined for the anterior ocular structures, the timing of iris muscle-cell differentiation and iris stroma development. Taken together, we genetically dissected the complex mouse Small-eye phenotype, thereby pinpointing the underlying Pax6/PAX6 haploinsufficiency to autonomous dosage requirements within the developing iris and lens/cornea tissues.

  17. Genetic and molecular analysis of chlorambucil-induced germ-line mutations in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinchik, E.M.; Bangham, J.W.; Hunsicker, P.R.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Russell, L.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Kwon, B.S. (Indiana Univ. School of Medicine, Indianapolis (USA)); Jackson, I.J. (Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (England))

    1990-02-01

    Eighteen variants recovered from specific locus mutation rate experiments involving the mutagen chlorambucil were subjected to several genetic and molecular analyses. Most mutations were found to be homozygous lethal. Because lethality is often presumptive evidence for multilocus-deletion events, 10 mutations were analyzed by Southern blot analysis with probes at, or closely linked to, several of the specific locus test markers, namely, albino (c), brown (b), and dilute (d). All eight mutations (two c; three b; two d; and one dilute-short ear (Df(d se))) that arose in post-spermatogonial germ cells were deleted for DNA sequences. No evidence for deletion of two d-se region probes was obtained for the remaining two d mutations that arose in stem-cell spermatogonia. Six of the primary mutants also produced low litter sizes (semisterility). Karyotypic analysis has, to date, confirmed the presence of reciprocal translocations in four of the six. The high frequency of deletions and translocations among the mutations induced in post-spermatogonial stages by chlorambucil, combined with its overall high efficiency in inducing mutations in these stages, should make chlorambucil mutagenesis useful for generating experimentally valuable germ-line deletions throughout the mouse genome.

  18. The storm and stress of adolescence: insights from human imaging and mouse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, B J; Jones, Rebecca M; Levita, Liat; Libby, Victoria; Pattwell, Siobhan S; Ruberry, Erika J; Soliman, Fatima; Somerville, Leah H

    2010-04-01

    The characterization of adolescence as a time of "storm and stress" remains an open debate. Intense and frequent negative affect during this period has been hypothesized to explain the increased rates of affective disorders, suicide, and accidental death during this time of life. Yet some teens emerge from adolescence with minimal turmoil. We provide a neurobiological model of adolescence that proposes an imbalance in the development of subcortical limbic (e.g., amygdala) relative to prefrontal cortical regions as a potential mechanism for heightened emotionality during this period. Empirical support for this model is provided from recent behavioral and human imaging studies on the development of emotion regulation. We then provide examples of environmental factors that may exacerbate imbalances in amygdala-ventrofrontal function increasing risk for anxiety related behaviors. Finally we present data from human and mouse studies to illustrate how genetic factors may enhance or diminish this risk. Together, these studies provide a converging methods approach for understanding the highly variable stress and turmoil experienced in adolescence.

  19. Spatial Impairment and Memory in Genetic Disorders: Insights from Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Ah Lee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research across the cognitive and brain sciences has begun to elucidate some of the processes that guide navigation and spatial memory. Boundary geometry and featural landmarks are two distinct classes of environmental cues that have dissociable neural correlates in spatial representation and follow different patterns of learning. Consequently, spatial navigation depends both on the type of cue available and on the type of learning provided. We investigated this interaction between spatial representation and memory by administering two different tasks (working memory, reference memory using two different environmental cues (rectangular geometry, striped landmark in mouse models of human genetic disorders: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWScrm+/p− mice, n = 12 and Beta-catenin mutation (Thr653Lys-substituted mice, n = 12. This exploratory study provides suggestive evidence that these models exhibit different abilities and impairments in navigating by boundary geometry and featural landmarks, depending on the type of memory task administered. We discuss these data in light of the specific deficits in cognitive and brain function in these human syndromes and their animal model counterparts.

  20. Recombinase-Dependent Mouse Lines for Chemogenetic Activation of Genetically Defined Cell Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale R. Sciolino

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemogenetic technologies, including the mutated human Gq-coupled M3 muscarinic receptor (hM3Dq, have greatly facilitated our ability to directly link changes in cellular activity to altered physiology and behavior. Here, we extend the hM3Dq toolkit with recombinase-responsive mouse lines that permit hM3Dq expression in virtually any cell type. These alleles encode a fusion protein designed to increase effective expression levels by concentrating hM3Dq to the cell body and dendrites. To illustrate their broad utility, we targeted three different genetically defined cell populations: noradrenergic neurons of the compact, bilateral locus coeruleus and two dispersed populations, Camk2a+ neurons and GFAP+ glia. In all three populations, we observed reproducible expression and confirmed that activation of hM3Dq is sufficient to dose-dependently evoke phenotypic changes, without extreme phenotypes associated with hM3Dq overexpression. These alleles offer the ability to non-invasively control activity of diverse cell types to uncover their function and dysfunction at any developmental stage.

  1. Polarization in Raman spectroscopy helps explain bone brittleness in genetic mouse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowski, Alexander J.; Pence, Isaac J.; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Zein-Sabatto, Ahbid; Huszagh, Meredith C.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry S.

    2014-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy (RS) has been extensively used to characterize bone composition. However, the link between bone biomechanics and RS measures is not well established. Here, we leveraged the sensitivity of RS polarization to organization, thereby assessing whether RS can explain differences in bone toughness in genetic mouse models for which traditional RS peak ratios are not informative. In the selected mutant mice-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) or matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) knock-outs-toughness is reduced but differences in bone strength do not exist between knock-out and corresponding wild-type controls. To incorporate differences in the RS of bone occurring at peak shoulders, a multivariate approach was used. Full spectrum principal components analysis of two paired, orthogonal bone orientations (relative to laser polarization) improved genotype classification and correlation to bone toughness when compared to traditional peak ratios. When applied to femurs from wild-type mice at 8 and 20 weeks of age, the principal components of orthogonal bone orientations improved age classification but not the explanation of the maturation-related increase in strength. Overall, increasing polarization information by collecting spectra from two bone orientations improves the ability of multivariate RS to explain variance in bone toughness, likely due to polarization sensitivity to organizational changes in both mineral and collagen.

  2. Spatial Impairment and Memory in Genetic Disorders: Insights from Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Ah; Tucci, Valter; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2017-01-01

    Research across the cognitive and brain sciences has begun to elucidate some of the processes that guide navigation and spatial memory. Boundary geometry and featural landmarks are two distinct classes of environmental cues that have dissociable neural correlates in spatial representation and follow different patterns of learning. Consequently, spatial navigation depends both on the type of cue available and on the type of learning provided. We investigated this interaction between spatial representation and memory by administering two different tasks (working memory, reference memory) using two different environmental cues (rectangular geometry, striped landmark) in mouse models of human genetic disorders: Prader-Willi syndrome (PWScrm+/p− mice, n = 12) and Beta-catenin mutation (Thr653Lys-substituted mice, n = 12). This exploratory study provides suggestive evidence that these models exhibit different abilities and impairments in navigating by boundary geometry and featural landmarks, depending on the type of memory task administered. We discuss these data in light of the specific deficits in cognitive and brain function in these human syndromes and their animal model counterparts. PMID:28208764

  3. Polyandry and the decrease of a selfish genetic element in a wild house mouse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manser, Andri; Lindholm, Anna K; König, Barbara; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2011-09-01

    Despite deleterious effects on individuals, the t haplotype is a selfish genetic element present in many house mouse populations. By distorting the transmission ratio, +/t males transmit the t haplotype to up to 90% of their offspring. However, t/t individuals perish in utero. Theoretical models based on these properties predict a much higher t frequency than observed, leading to the t paradox. Here, we use empirical field data and theoretical approaches to investigate whether polyandry is a female counterstrategy against the negative fitness consequences of such distorters. We found a significant decrease of the t frequency over a period of 5.5 years that cannot be explained by the effect of transmission ratio distortion and recessive lethals, despite significantly higher life expectancy of +/t females compared to +/+ females. We quantified life-history data and homozygous and heterozygous fitness effects. Population subdivision and inbreeding were excluded as evolutionary forces influencing the t system. The possible influence of polyandry on the t system was then investigated by applying a stochastic model to this situation. Simulations show that polyandry can explain the observed t dynamics, making it a biologically plausible explanation for low t frequencies in natural populations in general. © 2011 The Author(s).

  4. Effect of the genetic background on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosome of natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmanová, J

    1975-01-01

    Newly established test stocks made it possible to follow the effect of three different defined genetic backgrounds (first and third chromosomes) on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosomes isolated from four natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. One background was composed of the chromosomes with inversions obtained from the stock (see article) and another two backgrounds were of the standard type consisting one-half of the original chromosomes from the natural population and one-half of the chromosomes of the stocks Oregon R or Samarkand. Using the analysis of variance significant differences in RF values were found between and within populations and especially between the different backgrounds. Some simple and double interactions between the above factors played a role. The highest RF values were obtained on the background [corrected] with inversions. The effect of the different genetic backgrounds [corrected] by the action of the genetic modifiers of RF. The different genetic backgrounds affected the variations in RF values in individual populations and the different populations reacted differentially to the changed genetic background. The design of the experiment permitted an estimation of the causal compoenents of variance and heritability of RF from the sib analysis. The additive component of variance was present in only two of the populations under test; the respective estimates of heritability were very low.

  5. Functional crosstalk in culture between macrophages and trigeminal sensory neurons of a mouse genetic model of migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franceschini Alessia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enhanced activity of trigeminal ganglion neurons is thought to underlie neuronal sensitization facilitating the onset of chronic pain attacks, including migraine. Recurrent headache attacks might establish a chronic neuroinflammatory ganglion profile contributing to the hypersensitive phenotype. Since it is difficult to study this process in vivo, we investigated functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons in primary cultures from trigeminal sensory ganglia of wild-type (WT or knock-in (KI mice expressing the Cacna1a gene mutation (R192Q found in familial hemiplegic migraine-type 1. After studying the number and morphology of resident macrophages in culture, the consequences of adding host macrophages on macrophage phagocytosis and membrane currents mediated by pain-transducing P2X3 receptors on sensory neurons were examined. Results KI ganglion cultures constitutively contained a larger number of active macrophages, although no difference in P2X3 receptor expression was found. Co-culturing WT or KI ganglia with host macrophages (active as much as resident cells strongly stimulated single cell phagocytosis. The same protocol had no effect on P2X3 receptor expression in WT or KI co-cultures, but it largely enhanced WT neuron currents that grew to the high amplitude constitutively seen for KI neurons. No further potentiation of KI neuronal currents was observed. Conclusions Trigeminal ganglion cultures from a genetic mouse model of migraine showed basal macrophage activation together with enhanced neuronal currents mediated by P2X3 receptors. This phenotype could be replicated in WT cultures by adding host macrophages, indicating an important functional crosstalk between macrophages and sensory neurons.

  6. Identification of the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant using a combination of mouse and human genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutnikova, Hana; Laakso, Markku; Lu, Lu;

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major health problem of largely unknown genetic origins. To identify new genes responsible for hypertension, genetic analysis of recombinant inbred strains of mice followed by human association studies might prove powerful and was exploited in our current study. Using a set of 2...... that UBP1 and its functional partners are components of a network controlling blood pressure....... recombinant BXD strains of mice we identified a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for blood pressure (BP) on distal chromosome 9. The association analysis of markers encompassing the syntenic region on human chromosome 3 gave in an additive genetic model the strongest association for rs17030583 C/T and rs2291897...... complementarities of mouse and human genetic approaches, identifies the UBP1 locus as a critical blood pressure determinant. UBP1 plays a role in cholesterol and steroid metabolism via the transcriptional activation of CYP11A, the rate-limiting enzyme in pregnenolone and aldosterone biosynthesis. We suggest...

  7. Evidence That Transition from Health to Psychotic Disorder Can Be Traced to Semi-Ubiquitous Environmental Effects Operating against Background Genetic Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nierop, Martine; Janssens, Mayke; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Kahn, Rene S.; Meijer, Carin J.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk

    2013-01-01

    Background: In order to assess the importance of environmental and genetic risk on transition from health to psychotic disorder, a prospective study of individuals at average (n=462) and high genetic risk (n=810) was conducted. Method: A three-year cohort study examined the rate of transition to psy

  8. Lights on for HIF-1α: Genetically Enhanced Mouse Cardiomyocytes for Heart Tissue Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amke R. Hesse

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1 is a suitable marker for tissue oxygenation. We intended to develop cardiomyocytes (CMs expressing the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1α fused to the firefly luciferase (ODD-Luc followed by proof-of-concept for its applicability in the assessment of heart muscle oxygenation. Methods and Results: We first generated embryonic stem cell (ESC lines (ODD-Luc ESCs from a Tg ROSA26 ODD-Luc/+ mouse. Subsequent CMs selection was facilitated by stable integration of an antibiotic resistance expressed under the control of the αMHC promoter. ODD-Luc ESCs showed a strong Luc-signal within 1 h of hypoxia (1% oxygen, which coincided with endogenous HIF-1α. Engineered heart muscle (EHM constructed with ODD-Luc CMs confirmed the utility of the model to sense hypoxia, and monitor reoxygenation also in a multicellular heart muscle model. Pharmacologically induced inotropy/chronotropy under isoprenaline resulted in enhanced Luc-signal suggesting enhanced oxygen consumption, leading to notable myocardial hypoxia. Conclusions: ODD-Luc-CMs can be used to monitor dynamic changes of cardiomyocyte oxygenation in living heart muscle samples. We provide proof-of-concept for pharmacologically induced myocardial interventions and envision applications of the developed model in drug screens and fundamental studies of ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  9. Ultrasonic and sensory characterization of dry-cured ham fat from Iberian pigs with different genetics and feeding backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niñoles, L; Sanjuan, N; Ventanas, S; Benedito, J

    2008-11-01

    The textural and ultrasonic properties of the subcutaneous fat from five batches of dry-cured hams from animals with different genetics (Iberian, Iberian×Duroc) and type of feeding ("montanera", concentrate feeds with different oleic acid content) were studied and related to the sensory traits (oiliness and brightness) of their biceps femoris muscle. The different genetics and feeding backgrounds found in the batches brought about differences in their ultrasonic velocities (average velocity from 4 to 20°C ranged from 1608 to 1650m/s) and textural parameters (maximum force at 8°C ranged from 11 to 21N). On average, batches with lower textural parameters had lower velocities and higher sensory scores. Ultrasonic measurements were used to carry out a discriminant analysis which allowed 78.3% of the samples to be correctly classified in the batches considered. Therefore, ultrasonic and sensory techniques could be useful in the characterization and differentiation of dry-cured hams from Iberian pigs.

  10. [Genetic background in common forms of obesity - from studies on identical twins to candidate genes of obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendlová, Běla; Lukášová, Petra; Vaňková, Markéta; Vejražková, Daniela; Bradnová, Olga; Včelák, Josef; Stanická, Soňa; Zamrazilová, Hana; Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Dušátková, Lenka; Kunešová, Marie; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2014-01-01

    Common obesity is a result of interaction between genes and environmental/lifestyle factors, with heritability estimates 40-70%. Not only the susceptibility to obesity but also the success of weight management depends on the genetic background of each individual. This paper summarizes the up-to-date knowledge on genetic causes of common obesities. Introduction of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to an identification of a total of 32 variants associated with obesity/BMI and 14 with body fat distribution. Further, a great progress in revealing the mechanisms regulating the energy balance was also noted. However, the proportion of explained variance for BMI is still low, suggesting other mechanisms such as gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, rare gene variants, copy number variants polymorphisms, or epigenetic modifications and microRNAs regulating gene transcription. In summary, we present results of our studies on obesity risk variants in Czech adults, children and adolescents including those evaluating the influence of selected gene variants on the outcomes of weight management.

  11. Genes and personality characteristics: Possible association of the genetic background with intelligence and decision making in 830 Caucasian Greek subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinos, Georgios; Naziris, Nikolaos; Limnaios, Stefanos A; Drakoulis, Nikolaos

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that intelligence consists of a variety of interactional and cognitive skills and abilities (e.g. tradecraft; critical and divergent thinking; perception of foreign information). Decision making is defined as the conscious choice between given options, relating to a problem. Both genetic background and environment comprise key elements for personality characteristics of the human being. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency distribution of rs324420, rs1800497, rs363050, rs6265, rs1328674 polymorphisms known to be involved in individual personality characteristics, in 830 Greek Subjects. The study is independent from direct clinical measurements (e.g. IQ measurements; physiological tests). The population of the volunteers is described, based on genotype, sex, with the respective gene frequencies, including the Minor Allele Frequency (MAF). A potential influence of the volunteer gender with the above characteristics (based on genotypes and alleles) is examined and finally, volunteers are classified as follows: A volunteer receives + 1, for each genotype/allele, which enhances his intelligence or his decision-making. In contrast, he receives - 1, for each genotype/allele, which relegates the individual characteristic. No statistically significant gender-characteristics correlation is observed. According to their genetic profile, a rate of 92.5%, of the volunteers may be characterized by prudence and temperance of thought, with only a small proportion of them (7.5%) may be classified as genetically spontaneous and adventurous. Regarding intelligence, the study population may lay around average and a little above it, at a rate of 96.3%, while the edges of the scale suggest only a 0.5% of the volunteers, who, although the "smartest", somehow seem to lack prudence. In conclusion, individuals with low cognitive ability may be more prudent than others and vice versa, while the "smartest" ones tend to be more risky, in decision

  12. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the set...

  13. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the settin

  14. Progression of Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Remodelling under Optimal Medical Therapy in CHF Patients: Role of Individual Genetic Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Rigolli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Neurohormonal systems play an important role in chronic heart failure (CHF. Due to interindividual heterogeneity in the benefits of therapy, it may be hypothesized that polymorphisms of neurohormonal systems may affect left ventricular (LV remodelling and systolic function. We aimed to assess whether genetic background of maximally treated CHF patients predicts variations in LV systolic function and volumes. Methods and Results. We prospectively studied 131 CHF outpatients on optimal treatment for at least six months. Echocardiographic evaluations were performed at baseline and after 12 months. Genotype analysis for ACE I/D, β1adrenergic receptor (AR Arg389Gly, β2AR Arg16Gly, and β2AR Gln27Glu polymorphisms was performed. No differences in baseline characteristics were detected among subgroups. ACE II was a significant predictor of improvement of LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume (=.003 and =.002, respectively but not of LV ejection fraction (LVEF; β1AR389 GlyGly was related to improvement of LVEF (=.02 and LV end-systolic volume (=.01. The predictive value of polymorphisms remained after adjustment for other clinically significant predictors (<.05 for all. Conclusions. ACE I/D and β1AR Arg389Gly polymorphisms are independent predictors of reverse remodeling and systolic function recovery in CHF patients under optimal treatment.

  15. Dimethylaminoparthenolide and gemcitabine: a survival study using a genetically engineered mouse model of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pancreatic cancer remains one of the deadliest cancers due to lack of early detection and absence of effective treatments. Gemcitabine, the current standard-of-care chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer, has limited clinical benefit. Treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with gemcitabine has been shown to induce the activity of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) which regulates the expression of genes involved in the inflammatory response and tumorigenesis. It has therefore been proposed that gemcitabine-induced NF-κB activation may result in chemoresistance. We hypothesize that NF-κB suppression by the novel inhibitor dimethylaminoparthenolide (DMAPT) may enhance the effect of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer. Methods The efficacy of DMAPT and gemcitabine was evaluated in a chemoprevention trial using the mutant Kras and p53-expressing LSL-KrasG12D/+; LSL-Trp53R172H; Pdx-1-Cre mouse model of pancreatic cancer. Mice were randomized to treatment groups (placebo, DMAPT [40 mg/kg/day], gemcitabine [50 mg/kg twice weekly], and the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine). Treatment was continued until mice showed signs of ill health at which time they were sacrificed. Plasma cytokine levels were determined using a Bio-Plex immunoassay. Statistical tests used included log-rank test, ANOVA with Dunnett’s post-test, Student’s t-test, and Fisher exact test. Results Gemcitabine or the combination DMAPT/gemcitabine significantly increased median survival and decreased the incidence and multiplicity of pancreatic adenocarcinomas. The DMAPT/gemcitabine combination also significantly decreased tumor size and the incidence of metastasis to the liver. No significant differences in the percentages of normal pancreatic ducts or premalignant pancreatic lesions were observed between the treatment groups. Pancreata in which no tumors formed were analyzed to determine the extent of pre-neoplasia; mostly normal ducts or low grade pancreatic lesions were

  16. An estrogen-induced endometrial hyperplasia mouse model recapitulating human disease progression and genetic aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chieh-Hsiang; Almomen, Aliyah; Wee, Yin Shen; Jarboe, Elke A; Peterson, C Matthew; Janát-Amsbury, Margit M

    2015-07-01

    Endometrial hyperplasia (EH) is a condition originating from uterine endometrial glands undergoing disordered proliferation including the risk to progress to endometrial adenocarcinoma. In recent years, a steady increase in EH cases among younger women of reproductive age accentuates the demand of therapeutic alternatives, which emphasizes that an improved disease model for therapeutic agents evaluation is concurrently desired. Here, a new hormone-induced EH mouse model was developed using a subcutaneous estradiol (E2)-sustained releasing pellet, which elevates the serum E2 level in mice, closely mimicking the effect known as estrogen dominance with underlying, pathological E2 levels in patients. The onset and progression of EH generated within this model recapitulate a clinically relevant, pathological transformation, beginning with disordered proliferation developing to simple EH, advancing to atypical EH, and then progressing to precancerous stages, all following a chronologic manner. Although a general increase in nuclear progesterone receptor (PR) expression occurred after E2 expression, a total loss in PR was noted in some endometrial glands as disease advanced to simple EH. Furthermore, estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the nucleus of endometrial cells was reduced in disordered proliferation and increased when EH progressed to atypical EH and precancerous stages. This EH model also resembles other pathological patterns found in human disease such as leukocytic infiltration, genetic aberrations in β-catenin, and joint phosphatase and tensin homolog/paired box gene 2 (PTEN/PAX2) silencing. In summary, this new and comprehensively characterized EH model is cost-effective, easily reproducible, and may serve as a tool for preclinical testing of therapeutic agents and facilitate further investigation of EH.

  17. Novel Mouse Models of Methylmalonic Aciduria Recapitulate Phenotypic Traits with a Genetic Dosage Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forny, Patrick; Schumann, Anke; Mustedanagic, Merima; Mathis, Déborah; Wulf, Marie-Angela; Nägele, Nadine; Langhans, Claus-Dieter; Zhakupova, Assem; Heeren, Joerg; Scheja, Ludger; Fingerhut, Ralph; Peters, Heidi L; Hornemann, Thorsten; Thony, Beat; Kölker, Stefan; Burda, Patricie; Froese, D Sean; Devuyst, Olivier; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2016-09-23

    Methylmalonic aciduria (MMAuria), caused by deficiency of methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT), usually presents in the newborn period with failure to thrive and metabolic crisis leading to coma or even death. Survivors remain at risk of metabolic decompensations and severe long term complications, notably renal failure and neurological impairment. We generated clinically relevant mouse models of MMAuria using a constitutive Mut knock-in (KI) allele based on the p.Met700Lys patient mutation, used homozygously (KI/KI) or combined with a knockout allele (KO/KI), to study biochemical and clinical MMAuria disease aspects. Transgenic Mut(ki/ki) and Mut(ko/ki) mice survive post-weaning, show failure to thrive, and show increased methylmalonic acid, propionylcarnitine, odd chain fatty acids, and sphingoid bases, a new potential biomarker of MMAuria. Consistent with genetic dosage, Mut(ko/ki) mice have lower Mut activity, are smaller, and show higher metabolite levels than Mut(ki/ki) mice. Further, Mut(ko/ki) mice exhibit manifestations of kidney and brain damage, including increased plasma urea, impaired diuresis, elevated biomarkers, and changes in brain weight. On a high protein diet, mutant mice display disease exacerbation, including elevated blood ammonia, and catastrophic weight loss, which, in Mut(ki/ki) mice, is rescued by hydroxocobalamin treatment. This study expands knowledge of MMAuria, introduces the discovery of new biomarkers, and constitutes the first in vivo proof of principle of cobalamin treatment in mut-type MMAuria. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Evaluation of genetically inactivated alpha toxin for protection in multiple mouse models of Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Brady

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a leading cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections. Development of a vaccine against this pathogen is an important goal. While S. aureus protective antigens have been identified in the literature, the majority have only been tested in a single animal model of disease. We wished to evaluate the ability of one S. aureus vaccine antigen to protect in multiple mouse models, thus assessing whether protection in one model translates to protection in other models encompassing the full breadth of infections the pathogen can cause. We chose to focus on genetically inactivated alpha toxin mutant HlaH35L. We evaluated the protection afforded by this antigen in three models of infection using the same vaccine dose, regimen, route of immunization, adjuvant, and challenge strain. When mice were immunized with HlaH35L and challenged via a skin and soft tissue infection model, HlaH35L immunization led to a less severe infection and decreased S. aureus levels at the challenge site when compared to controls. Challenge of HlaH35L-immunized mice using a systemic infection model resulted in a limited, but statistically significant decrease in bacterial colonization as compared to that observed with control mice. In contrast, in a prosthetic implant model of chronic biofilm infection, there was no significant difference in bacterial levels when compared to controls. These results demonstrate that vaccines may confer protection against one form of S. aureus disease without conferring protection against other disease presentations and thus underscore a significant challenge in S. aureus vaccine development.

  19. Development of genetically flexible mouse models of sarcoma using RCAS-TVA mediated gene delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah Kabaroff

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies and unfortunately there are limited functional genomics platforms to assess the molecular pathways contributing to sarcomagenesis. Thus, novel model systems are needed to validate which genes should be targeted for therapeutic intervention. We hypothesized that delivery of oncogenes into mouse skeletal muscle using a retroviral (RCAS-TVA system would result in sarcomagenesis. We also sought to determine if the cell type transformed (mesenchymal progenitors vs. terminally differentiated tissues would influence sarcoma biology. Cells transduced with RCAS vectors directing the expression of oncoproteins KrasG12D, c-Myc and/or Igf2 were injected into the hindlimbs of mice that expressed the retroviral TVA receptor in neural/mesenchymal progenitors, skeletal/cardiac muscle or ubiquitously (N-tva, AKE and BKE strains respectively. Disrupting the G1 checkpoint CDKN2 (p16/p19-/- resulted in sarcoma in 30% of p16/p19-/- xN-tva mice with a median latency of 23 weeks (range 8-40 weeks. A similar incidence occurred in p16/p19-/- xBKE mice (32%, however, a shorter median latency (10.4 weeks was observed. p16/p19-/- xAKE mice also developed sarcomas (24% incidence; median 9 weeks yet 31% of mice also developed lung sarcomas. Gene-anchored PCR demonstrated retroviral DNA integration in 86% of N-tva, 93% of BKE and 88% of AKE tumors. KrasG12D was the most frequent oncogene isolated. Oncogene delivery by the RCAS-TVA system can generate sarcomas in mice with a defective cell cycle checkpoint. Sarcoma biology differed between the different RCAS models we created, likely due to the cell population being transformed. This genetically flexible system will be a valuable tool for sarcoma research.

  20. The functional and anatomical dissection of somatosensory subpopulations using mouse genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E Le Pichon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The word somatosensation comes from joining the Greek word for body (soma with a word for perception (sensation. Somatosensory neurons comprise the largest sensory system in mammals and have nerve endings coursing throughout the skin, viscera, muscle, and bone. Their cell bodies reside in a chain of ganglia adjacent to the dorsal spinal cord (the dorsal root ganglia and at the base of the skull (the trigeminal ganglia. While the neuronal cell bodies are intermingled within the ganglia, the somatosensory system is in reality composed of numerous sub-systems, each specialized to detect distinct stimuli, such as temperature and touch. Historically, somatosensory neurons have been classified using a diverse host of anatomical and physiological parameters, such as the size of the cell body, degree of myelination, histological labeling with markers, specialization of the nerve endings, projection patterns in the spinal cord and brainstem, receptive tuning, and conduction velocity of their action potentials. While useful, the picture that emerged was one of heterogeneity, with many markers at least partially overlapping. More recently, by capitalizing on advances in molecular techniques, researchers have identified specific ion channels and sensory receptors expressed in subsets of sensory neurons. These studies have proved invaluable as they allow genetic access to small subsets of neurons for further molecular dissection. Data being generated from transgenic mice favor the model whereby an array of dedicated neurons is responsible for selectively encoding different modalities. Here we review the current knowledge of the different sensory neuron subtypes in the mouse, the markers used to study them, and the neurogenetic strategies used to define their anatomical projections and functional roles.

  1. The functional and anatomical dissection of somatosensory subpopulations using mouse genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Pichon, Claire E; Chesler, Alexander T

    2014-01-01

    The word somatosensation comes from joining the Greek word for body (soma) with a word for perception (sensation). Somatosensory neurons comprise the largest sensory system in mammals and have nerve endings coursing throughout the skin, viscera, muscle, and bone. Their cell bodies reside in a chain of ganglia adjacent to the dorsal spinal cord (the dorsal root ganglia) and at the base of the skull (the trigeminal ganglia). While the neuronal cell bodies are intermingled within the ganglia, the somatosensory system is in reality composed of numerous sub-systems, each specialized to detect distinct stimuli, such as temperature and touch. Historically, somatosensory neurons have been classified using a diverse host of anatomical and physiological parameters, such as the size of the cell body, degree of myelination, histological labeling with markers, specialization of the nerve endings, projection patterns in the spinal cord and brainstem, receptive tuning, and conduction velocity of their action potentials. While useful, the picture that emerged was one of heterogeneity, with many markers at least partially overlapping. More recently, by capitalizing on advances in molecular techniques, researchers have identified specific ion channels and sensory receptors expressed in subsets of sensory neurons. These studies have proved invaluable as they allow genetic access to small subsets of neurons for further molecular dissection. Data being generated from transgenic mice favor a model whereby an array of dedicated neurons is responsible for selectively encoding different modalities. Here we review the current knowledge of the different sensory neuron subtypes in the mouse, the markers used to study them, and the neurogenetic strategies used to define their anatomical projections and functional roles.

  2. The consequence of natural selection on genetic variation in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Eli; Birney, Ewan; Gross, Cornelius T

    2010-04-01

    Laboratory mouse strains are known to have emerged from recent interbreeding between individuals of Mus musculus isolated populations. As a result of this breeding history, the collection of polymorphisms observed between laboratory mouse strains is likely to harbor the effects of natural selection between reproductively isolated populations. Until now no study has systematically investigated the consequences of this breeding history on gene evolution. Here we have used a novel, unbiased evolutionary approach to predict the founder origin of laboratory mouse strains and to assess the balance between ancient and newly emerged mutations in the founder subspecies. Our results confirm a contribution from at least four distinct subspecies. Additionally, our method allowed us to identify regions of relaxed selective constraint among laboratory mouse strains. This unique structure of variation is likely to have significant consequences on the use of mouse to find genes underlying phenotypic variation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Genetic Ablation of Type III Adenylyl Cyclase Exerts Region-Specific Effects on Cilia Architecture in the Mouse Nose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary C Challis

    Full Text Available We recently reported that olfactory sensory neurons in the dorsal zone of the mouse olfactory epithelium exhibit drastic location-dependent differences in cilia length. Furthermore, genetic ablation of type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII, a key olfactory signaling protein and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, disrupts the cilia length pattern and results in considerably shorter cilia, independent of odor-induced activity. Given the significant impact of ACIII on cilia length in the dorsal zone, we sought to further investigate the relationship between cilia length and ACIII level in various regions throughout the mouse olfactory epithelium. We employed whole-mount immunohistochemical staining to examine olfactory cilia morphology in phosphodiesterase (PDE 1C-/-;PDE4A-/- (simplified as PDEs-/- hereafter and ACIII-/- mice in which ACIII levels are reduced and ablated, respectively. As expected, PDEs-/- animals exhibit dramatically shorter cilia in the dorsal zone (i.e., where the cilia pattern is found, similar to our previous observation in ACIII-/- mice. Remarkably, in a region not included in our previous study, ACIII-/- animals (but not PDEs-/- mice have dramatically elongated, comet-shaped cilia, as opposed to characteristic star-shaped olfactory cilia. Here, we reveal that genetic ablation of ACIII has drastic, location-dependent effects on cilia architecture in the mouse nose. These results add a new dimension to our current understanding of olfactory cilia structure and regional organization of the olfactory epithelium. Together, these findings have significant implications for both cilia and sensory biology.

  4. Host genetics and environmental factors regulate ecological succession of the mouse colon tissue-associated microbiota.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The integration of host genetics, environmental triggers and the microbiota is a recognised factor in the pathogenesis of barrier function diseases such as IBD. In order to determine how these factors interact to regulate the host immune response and ecological succession of the colon tissue-associated microbiota, we investigated the temporal interaction between the microbiota and the host following disruption of the colonic epithelial barrier. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Oral administration of DSS was applied as a mechanistic model of environmental damage of the colon and the resulting inflammation characterized for various parameters over time in WT and Nod2 KO mice. RESULTS: In WT mice, DSS damage exposed the host to the commensal flora and led to a migration of the tissue-associated bacteria from the epithelium to mucosal and submucosal layers correlating with changes in proinflammatory cytokine profiles and a progressive transition from acute to chronic inflammation of the colon. Tissue-associated bacteria levels peaked at day 21 post-DSS and declined thereafter, correlating with recruitment of innate immune cells and development of the adaptive immune response. Histological parameters, immune cell infiltration and cytokine biomarkers of inflammation were indistinguishable between Nod2 and WT littermates following DSS, however, Nod2 KO mice demonstrated significantly higher tissue-associated bacterial levels in the colon. DSS damage and Nod2 genotype independently regulated the community structure of the colon microbiota. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of these experiments demonstrate the integration of environmental and genetic factors in the ecological succession of the commensal flora in mammalian tissue. The association of Nod2 genotype (and other host polymorphisms and environmental factors likely combine to influence the ecological succession of the tissue-associated microflora accounting in part for their

  5. Shared genetic background for regulation of mood and sleep: association of GRIA3 with sleep duration in healthy Finnish women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utge, Siddheshwar; Kronholm, Erkki; Partonen, Timo; Soronen, Pia; Ollila, Hanna M; Loukola, Anu; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Paunio, Tiina

    2011-10-01

    Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night appears to be optimal, since both shorter and longer sleep times are related to increased morbidity and mortality. Depressive disorder is almost invariably accompanied by disturbed sleep, leading to decreased sleep duration, and disturbed sleep may be a precipitating factor in the initiation of depressive illness. Here, we examined whether, in healthy individuals, sleep duration is associated with genes that we earlier found to be associated with depressive disorder. Population-based molecular genetic study. Regression analysis of 23 risk variants for depressive disorder from 12 genes to sleep duration in healthy individuals. Three thousand, one hundred, forty-seven individuals (25-75 y) from population-based Health 2000 and FINRISK 2007 samples. We found a significant association of rs687577 from GRIA3 on the X-chromosome with sleep duration in women (permutation-based corrected empirical P=0.00001, β=0.27; Bonferroni corrected P=0.0052; f=0.11). The frequency of C/C genotype previously found to increase risk for depression in women was highest among those who slept for 8 hours or less in all age groups younger than 70 years. Its frequency decreased with the lengthening of sleep duration, and those who slept for 9 to 10 hours showed a higher frequency of C/A or A/A genotypes, when compared with the midrange sleepers (7-8 hours) (permutation-based corrected empirical P=0.0003, OR=1.81). The GRIA3 polymorphism that was previously found to be associated with depressive disorder in women showed an association with sleep duration in healthy women. Mood disorders and short sleep may share a common genetic background and biologic mechanisms that involve glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  6. Insulin-like signaling (IIS) responses to temperature, genetic background, and growth variation in garter snakes with divergent life histories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reding, Dawn M; Addis, Elizabeth A; Palacios, Maria G; Schwartz, Tonia S; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2016-07-01

    The insulin/insulin-like signaling pathway (IIS) has been shown to mediate life history trade-offs in mammalian model organisms, but the function of this pathway in wild and non-mammalian organisms is understudied. Populations of western terrestrial garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans) around Eagle Lake, California, have evolved variation in growth and maturation rates, mortality senescence rates, and annual reproductive output that partition into two ecotypes: "fast-living" and "slow-living". Thus, genes associated with the IIS network are good candidates for investigating the mechanisms underlying ecological divergence in this system. We reared neonates from each ecotype for 1.5years under two thermal treatments. We then used qPCR to compare mRNA expression levels in three tissue types (brain, liver, skeletal muscle) for four genes (igf1, igf2, igf1r, igf2r), and we used radioimmunoassay to measure plasma IGF-1 and IGF-2 protein levels. Our results show that, in contrast to most mammalian model systems, igf2 mRNA and protein levels exceed those of igf1 and suggest an important role for igf2 in postnatal growth in reptiles. Thermal rearing treatment and recent growth had greater impacts on IGF levels than genetic background (i.e., ecotype), and the two ecotypes responded similarly. This suggests that observed ecotypic differences in field measures of IGFs may more strongly reflect plastic responses in different environments than evolutionary divergence. Future analyses of additional components of the IIS pathway and sequence divergence between the ecotypes will further illuminate how environmental and genetic factors influence the endocrine system and its role in mediating life history trade-offs.

  7. A forward genetic screen with a thalamocortical axon reporter mouse yields novel neurodevelopment mutants and a distinct emx2 mutant phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vock Vita M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dorsal thalamus acts as a gateway and modulator for information going to and from the cerebral cortex. This activity requires the formation of reciprocal topographic axon connections between thalamus and cortex. The axons grow along a complex multistep pathway, making sharp turns, crossing expression boundaries, and encountering intermediate targets. However, the cellular and molecular components mediating these steps remain poorly understood. Results To further elucidate the development of the thalamocortical system, we first created a thalamocortical axon reporter line to use as a genetic tool for sensitive analysis of mutant mouse phenotypes. The TCA-tau-lacZ reporter mouse shows specific, robust, and reproducible labeling of thalamocortical axons (TCAs, but not the overlapping corticothalamic axons, during development. Moreover, it readily reveals TCA pathfinding abnormalities in known cortical mutants such as reeler. Next, we performed an unbiased screen for genes involved in thalamocortical development using random mutagenesis with the TCA reporter. Six independent mutant lines show aberrant TCA phenotypes at different steps of the pathway. These include ventral misrouting, overfasciculation, stalling at the corticostriatal boundary, and invasion of ectopic cortical cell clusters. An outcross breeding strategy coupled with a genomic panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms facilitated genetic mapping with small numbers of mutant mice. We mapped a ventral misrouting mutant to the Emx2 gene, and discovered that some TCAs extend to the olfactory bulbs in this mutant. Mapping data suggest that other lines carry mutations in genes not previously known for roles in thalamocortical development. Conclusions These data demonstrate the feasibility of a forward genetic approach to understanding mammalian brain morphogenesis and wiring. A robust axonal reporter enabled sensitive analysis of a specific axon tract inside the

  8. Generation of mouse models of myeloid malignancy with combinatorial genetic lesions using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckl, Dirk; Kowalczyk, Monika S; Yudovich, David; Belizaire, Roger; Puram, Rishi V; McConkey, Marie E; Thielke, Anne; Aster, Jon C; Regev, Aviv; Ebert, Benjamin L

    2014-09-01

    Genome sequencing studies have shown that human malignancies often bear mutations in four or more driver genes, but it is difficult to recapitulate this degree of genetic complexity in mouse models using conventional breeding. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas9 system of genome editing to overcome this limitation. By delivering combinations of small guide RNAs (sgRNAs) and Cas9 with a lentiviral vector, we modified up to five genes in a single mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC), leading to clonal outgrowth and myeloid malignancy. We thereby generated models of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with cooperating mutations in genes encoding epigenetic modifiers, transcription factors and mediators of cytokine signaling, recapitulating the combinations of mutations observed in patients. Our results suggest that lentivirus-delivered sgRNA:Cas9 genome editing should be useful to engineer a broad array of in vivo cancer models that better reflect the complexity of human disease.

  9. Genetic regulation of life span, metabolism, and body weight in Pohn, a new wild-derived mouse strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Rong; Flurkey, Kevin; Meng, Qingying; Astle, Mike C; Harrison, David E

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) of longevity identified in human and mouse are significantly colocalized, suggesting that common mechanisms are involved. However, the limited number of strains that have been used in mouse longevity studies undermines the ability to identify longevity genes. We crossed C57BL/6J mice with a new wild-derived strain, Pohn, and identified two life span QTL-Ls1 and Ls2. Interestingly, homologous human longevity QTL colocalize with Ls1. We also defined new QTL for metabolic heat production and body weight. Both phenotypes are significantly correlated with life span. We found that large clone ratio, an in vitro indicator for cellular senescence, is not correlated with life span, suggesting that cell senescence and intrinsic aging are not always associated. Overall, by using Pohn mice, we identified new QTL for longevity-related traits, thus facilitating the exploration of the genetic regulation of aging.

  10. Genes and personality characteristics: Possible association of the genetic background with intelligence and decision making in 830 Caucasian Greek subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Marinos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that intelligence consists of a variety of interactional and cognitive skills and abilities (e.g. tradecraft; critical and divergent thinking; perception of foreign information. Decision making is defined as the conscious choice between given options, relating to a problem. Both genetic background and environment comprise key elements for personality characteristics of the human being. The aim of this study is to determine the frequency distribution of rs324420, rs1800497, rs363050, rs6265, rs1328674 polymorphisms known to be involved in individual personality characteristics, in 830 Greek Subjects. The study is independent from direct clinical measurements (e.g. IQ measurements; physiological tests. The population of the volunteers is described, based on genotype, sex, with the respective gene frequencies, including the Minor Allele Frequency (MAF. A potential influence of the volunteer gender with the above characteristics (based on genotypes and alleles is examined and finally, volunteers are classified as follows: A volunteer receives +1, for each genotype/allele, which enhances his intelligence or his decision-making. In contrast, he receives −1, for each genotype/allele, which relegates the individual characteristic. No statistically significant gender-characteristics correlation is observed. According to their genetic profile, a rate of 92.5%, of the volunteers may be characterized by prudence and temperance of thought, with only a small proportion of them (7.5% may be classified as genetically spontaneous and adventurous. Regarding intelligence, the study population may lay around average and a little above it, at a rate of 96.3%, while the edges of the scale suggest only a 0.5% of the volunteers, who, although the “smartest”, somehow seem to lack prudence. In conclusion, individuals with low cognitive ability may be more prudent than others and vice versa, while the “smartest” ones tend to be more risky, in

  11. Lactic Acid Bacteria Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Toxicity of Graphene Oxide by Maintaining Normal Intestinal Permeability under different Genetic Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunli; Yu, Xiaoming; Jia, Ruhan; Yang, Ruilong; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is safe and useful for food and feed fermentation. We employed Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the possible beneficial effect of LAB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus) pretreatment against toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) and the underlying mechanisms. LAB prevented GO toxicity on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in wild-type nematodes. LAB blocked translocation of GO into secondary targeted organs through intestinal barrier by maintaining normal intestinal permeability in wild-type nematodes. Moreover, LAB prevented GO damage on the functions of both primary and secondary targeted organs in exposed nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes (sod-2, sod-3, gas-1, and aak-2) to GO toxicity by sustaining normal intestinal permeability. LAB also sustained the normal defecation behavior in both wild-type nematodes and nematodes with mutations of susceptible genes. Therefore, the beneficial role of LAB against GO toxicity under different genetic backgrounds may be due to the combinational effects on intestinal permeability and defecation behavior. Moreover, the beneficial effects of LAB against GO toxicity was dependent on the function of ACS-22, homologous to mammalian FATP4 to mammalian FATP4. Our study provides highlight on establishment of pharmacological strategy to protect intestinal barrier from toxicity of GO.

  12. A specific superoxide dismutase mutation is on the same genetic background in sporadic and familial cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayward, C.; Brock, D.J.H. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Swingler, R.J. [Dundee Royal Infirmary (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a degenerative disease of motor neurons, causing progressive muscular atrophy, weakness, and death from respiratory failure, often within 2-3 years. Although most cases are sporadic, some 5%-10% are inherited as autosomal dominants with age-dependent penetrance. An ALS locus has been mapped to chromosome 21q, and causative mutations identified in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. A majority of SOD1 mutations have been found in cases with a clear family history of ALS. However, we and others have also described SOD1 mutations in patients where the disease appears to be sporadic. This is especially true for the missense mutation in codon 113 of the SOD1 gene, which substitutes threonine for isoleucine (I113T). One explanation for this finding is that this codon is a mutational hot spot with sporadic cases representing new mutations. Another is that the inherited nature of the cases is disguised by the reduced penetrance of this specific mutation. We have now shown that each of six unrelated cases of I113T mutation that we have collected in the Scottish population occurs on the same genetic background. Association analysis of multiple flanking loci on chromosome 21q supports the conclusion of a founder effect, with the original mutational event occurring {ge}10 generations ago. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Phenolic Contents and Compositions in Skins of Red Wine Grape Cultivars among Various Genetic Backgrounds and Originations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze and compare the phenolic characteristics of red wine grapes with diverse genetic backgrounds, skin phenolics among 21 different cultivars belonging to Vitis vinifera L., East Asian and North American Vitis species and hybrids, as well as 2 varieties of muscadine grapes were estimated by HPLC-MS/MS. There were 45 anthocyanins, 28 flavonols, 8 flavan-3-ols, 9 cinnamic acids, 5 benzoic acids, 5 ellagic acids and 2 stilbenes detected in all the samples. Total contents of each phenolic type varied significantly among the different grape cultivars investigated. There was also a large variability in the phenolic compositions of different grape groups. The differences in anthocyanin composition were obvious between V. vinifera and non-V. vinifera grapes and also between the grapes originating from Eurasia and North America. Quercetin-3-glucuronide and quercetin-3-glucoside were marker flavonol compounds for Euvitis grape skins. Flavan-3-ol monomers were dominant in the skins of muscadine and non-V. amurensis East Asian grapes, whereas polymers were more common in V. vinifera and North American grapes. The muscadine grapes were very rich in flavonols, flavan-3-ols and ellagic acids. Via principal component analysis, these grape cultivars were clustered into three groups according to their characteristic phenolic content and composition.

  14. Genetically modified neural stem cells for a local and sustained delivery of neuroprotective factors to the dystrophic mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Gila; Sun, Jing; Petrowitz, Bettina; Riecken, Kristoffer; Kruszewski, Katharina; Jankowiak, Wanda; Kunst, Frank; Skevas, Christos; Richard, Gisbert; Fehse, Boris; Bartsch, Udo

    2013-12-01

    A continuous intraocular delivery of neurotrophic factors (NFs) is being explored as a strategy to rescue photoreceptor cells and visual functions in degenerative retinal disorders that are currently untreatable. To establish a cell-based intraocular delivery system for a sustained administration of NFs to the dystrophic mouse retina, we used a polycistronic lentiviral vector to genetically modify adherently cultivated murine neural stem (NS) cells. The vector concurrently encoded a gene of interest, a reporter gene, and a resistance gene and thus facilitated the selection, cloning, and in vivo tracking of the modified cells. To evaluate whether modified NS cells permit delivery of functionally relevant quantities of NFs to the dystrophic mouse retina, we expressed a secretable variant of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in NS cells and grafted the cells into the vitreous space of Pde6b(rd1) and Pde6b(rd10) mice, two animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. In both mouse lines, grafted cells attached to the retina and lens, where they differentiated into astrocytes and some neurons. Adverse effects of the transplanted cells on the morphology of host retinas were not observed. Importantly, the CNTF-secreting NS cells significantly attenuated photoreceptor degeneration in both mutant mouse lines. The neuroprotective effect was significantly more pronounced when clonally derived NS cell lines selected for high expression levels of CNTF were grafted into Pde6b(rd1) mice. Intravitreal transplantations of modified NS cells may thus represent a useful method for preclinical studies aimed at evaluating the therapeutic potential of a cell-based intraocular delivery of NFs in mouse models of photoreceptor degeneration.

  15. Tinkering with cusp patterning : Developmental Genetic Mechanisms in Mouse Molar Development

    OpenAIRE

    Harjunmaa, Enni

    2012-01-01

    Teeth display considerable morphological variability, which mammals have been able to use to their advantage. Consequently, mammal teeth provide a bountiful research subject that combines information on development, functional proper-ties, and thanks to their durable substance, evolutionary history. This thesis work is focused on the patterning of cusps, the peaks that form the shape of the tooth crown, in the mouse. Mouse tooth development has been studied extensively and offers a wide ...

  16. Introducing DartMouse: The Mouse Speed Congenic Facility at Dartmouth Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, H.; Tomlinson, C.; Fiering, S.; Gorham, J.D.; Muirhead, K.

    2010-01-01

    CF-9 DartMouse™ is the Mouse Speed Congenic Facility at Dartmouth Medical School. Use of DartMouse allows for the rapid introgression of modified genes onto any inbred strain of mouse. Speed congenic strains of mice are achievable in 5 generations (1 to 1.5 years), versus 10 generations (∼3 years) required by conventional back-crossing. The application of DartMouse services saves both money and time for researchers using the laboratory mouse for any number of pre-clinical disease models. DartMouse is a complete service facility that works closely with clients at and outside of Dartmouth, helping to design appropriate breeding schemes to optimize back-crossing speed and efficiency. Clients supply mouse tail snips. DartMouse isolates genomic DNA, performs and analyzes complete genome-wide scans, and returns data in graphical and spreadsheet formats. DartMouse discusses results with clients and makes specific recommendations on breeder selection. DartMouse uses “SNP-Chip” technology on an Illumina BeadStation 500 Platform. Chips use a 377 SNP array covering the mouse genome with an average interval density of <7 cM. Turnaround time from receipt of tails to results is typically <2 weeks. One of DartMouse's most popular services is the “background check” in which the genetic background of supposedly fully back-crossed mice can be thoroughly assessed across all chromosomes. DartMouse was inaugurated in the summer of 2008, and received ARRA-funding in the fall of 2009. Our plans are to make DartMouse a regional and national core facility for the generation of speed congenic mice and for the verification of genetic background for conventionally back-crossed mice.

  17. Genetic Architecture of Group A Streptococcal Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections in the Mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chella Krishnan, Karthickeyan; Mukundan, Santhosh; Alagarsamy, Jeyashree;

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variations play an important role in several pathogenic diseases, and we have previously provided strong evidences that these genetic variations contribute significantly to differences in susceptibility and clinical outcomes of invasive Group A Streptococcus (GAS) infections, includi...

  18. Genetic loci for ventricular dilatation in the LEW/Jms rat with fetal-onset hydrocephalus are influenced by gender and genetic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayorga David A

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The LEW/Jms rat strain has inherited hydrocephalus, with more males affected than females and an overall expression rate of 28%. This study aimed to determine chromosomal positions for genetic loci causing the hydrocephalus. Methods An F1 backcross was made to the parental LEW/Jms strain from a cross with non-hydrocephalic Fischer 344 rats. BC1 rats were generated for two specific crosses: the first with a male LEW/Jms rat as parent and grandparent, [(F × L × L], designated B group, and the second with a female LEW/Jms rat as the parent and grandparent [L × (L × F], designated C group. All hydrocephalic and a similar number of non-hydrocephalic rats from these two groups were genotyped with microsatellite markers and the data was analyzed separately for each sex by MAPMAKER. Results The frequency of hydrocephalus was not significantly different between the two groups (18.2 and 19.9 %, but there was a significant excess of males in the B group. The mean severity of hydrocephalus, measured as the ventricle-to-brain width ratio, was ranked as B group Conclusion Phenotypic expression of hydrocephalus in Lew/Jms, although not X-linked, has a strong male bias. One, and possibly two chromosomal regions are associated with the hydrocephalus.

  19. Pathophysiology and genetics of obesity and diabetes in the New Zealand obese mouse: a model of the human metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Reinhart; Scherneck, Stephan; Schürmann, Annette; Joost, Hans-Georg

    2012-01-01

    The New Zealand Obese (NZO) mouse is one of the most thoroughly investigated polygenic models for the human metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. It presents the main characteristics of the disease complex, including early-onset obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. As a consequence of this syndrome, a combination of lipotoxicity and glucotoxicity produces beta-cell failure and apoptosis resulting in hypoinsulinemia and diabetic hyperglycemia. With NZO as a breeding partner, several adipogenic and diabetogenic gene variants have been identified by hypothesis-free positional cloning (Tbc1d1, Zfp69) or by combining genetic screens and candidate gene approaches (Pctp, Abcg1, Nmur2, Lepr). This chapter summarizes the present knowledge of the NZO strain and describes its pathophysiology as well as the known underlying genetic defects.

  20. Acoustically dimorphic advertisement calls separate morphologically and genetically homogenous populations of the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, T; Neveu, H; Rumpler, Y; Wilden, I; Zimmermann, E

    1998-01-01

    Sexual advertisement calls of male mouse lemurs from two neighbouring demes in a dry deciduous forest of western Madagascar were recorded during the breeding season. Demes were located about 1.5 km apart with no geographic barrier between them. They were characterised morphometrically and genotyped by RAPD fingerprinting. According to univariate and multivariate statistical analysis, demes differed neither in body measurements, nor in the banding patterns produced by RAPD fingerprinting. The acoustic pattern of the advertisement call, however, showed significant differences: Six variables of the frequency and time domain differed between the demes. Discriminant function analysis revealed that one variable, total call duration, was sufficient to classify more than 89% of the calls correctly to the corresponding deme. We postulate that these differences are comparable to dialects in birds, because demes were morphologically and genetically indistinguishable and no barrier prevented genetic exchange between them. Possible explanations for the emergence of dialects in a prosimian species are outlined.

  1. Impact of the genetic background on the composition of the chicken plasma MiRNome in response to a stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Endale Ahanda

    Full Text Available Circulating extra-cellular microRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as promising minimally invasive markers in human medicine. We evaluated miRNAs isolated from total plasma as biomarker candidates of a response to an abiotic stress (feed deprivation in a livestock species. Two chicken lines selected for high (R+ and low (R- residual feed intake were chosen as an experimental model because of their extreme divergence in feed intake and energy metabolism. Adult R+ and R- cocks were sampled after 16 hours of feed deprivation and again four hours after re-feeding. More than 292 million sequence reads were generated by small RNA-seq of total plasma RNA. A total of 649 mature miRNAs were identified; after quality filtering, 148 miRNAs were retained for further analyses. We identified 23 and 19 differentially abundant miRNAs between feeding conditions and between lines respectively, with only two miRNAs identified in both comparisons. We validated a panel of six differentially abundant miRNAs by RT-qPCR on a larger number of plasma samples and checked their response to feed deprivation in liver. Finally, we evaluated the conservation and tissue distribution of differentially abundant miRNAs in plasma across a variety of red jungle fowl tissues. We show that the chicken plasma miRNome reacts promptly to the alteration of the animal physiological condition driven by a feed deprivation stress. The plasma content of stress-responsive miRNAs is strongly influenced by the genetic background, with differences reflecting the phenotypic divergence acquired through long-term selection, as evidenced by the profiles of conserved miRNAs with a regulatory role in energy metabolism (gga-miR-204, gga-miR-let-7f-5p and gga-miR-122-5p. These results reinforce the emerging view in human medicine that even small genetic differences can have a considerable impact on the resolution of biomarker studies, and provide support for the emerging interest in miRNAs as potential novel and

  2. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiTommaso, Tia; Jones, Lynelle K; Cottle, Denny L; Gerdin, Anna-Karin; Vancollie, Valerie E; Watt, Fiona M; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Bradley, Allan; Steel, Karen P; Sundberg, John P; White, Jacqueline K; Smyth, Ian M

    2014-10-01

    The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP). A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1), while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1). The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  3. Identification of genes important for cutaneous function revealed by a large scale reverse genetic screen in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tia DiTommaso

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The skin is a highly regenerative organ which plays critical roles in protecting the body and sensing its environment. Consequently, morbidity and mortality associated with skin defects represent a significant health issue. To identify genes important in skin development and homeostasis, we have applied a high throughput, multi-parameter phenotype screen to the conditional targeted mutant mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute's Mouse Genetics Project (Sanger-MGP. A total of 562 different mouse lines were subjected to a variety of tests assessing cutaneous expression, macroscopic clinical disease, histological change, hair follicle cycling, and aberrant marker expression. Cutaneous lesions were associated with mutations in 23 different genes. Many of these were not previously associated with skin disease in the organ (Mysm1, Vangl1, Trpc4ap, Nom1, Sparc, Farp2, and Prkab1, while others were ascribed new cutaneous functions on the basis of the screening approach (Krt76, Lrig1, Myo5a, Nsun2, and Nf1. The integration of these skin specific screening protocols into the Sanger-MGP primary phenotyping pipelines marks the largest reported reverse genetic screen undertaken in any organ and defines approaches to maximise the productivity of future projects of this nature, while flagging genes for further characterisation.

  4. Radiation-induced intestinal neoplasia in a genetically-predisposed mouse (Min)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellender, M.; Larder, S.M.; Harrison, J.D.; Cox, R.; Silver, A.R.J. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    A mouse lineage with inherited predisposition to multiple intestinal neoplasia (min) has been proposed as a model to study human colorectal cancer. Min mice are heterozygous for the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene implicated in human familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). There is an increased risk of intestinal cancer in humans following radiation exposure and the min mouse model may be used to further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved. The present study showed a 2 Gy dose of x-rays doubles the tumour numbers in the murine gastrointestinal tract of F1 min heterozygotes. The distribution of tumours through the gut was also recorded. (authors)

  5. Genetic variation in hippocampal microRNA expression differences in C57BL/6 J X DBA/2 J (BXD recombinant inbred mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsons Michael J

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background miRNAs are short single-stranded non-coding RNAs involved in post-transcriptional gene regulation that play a major role in normal biological functions and diseases. Little is currently known about how expression of miRNAs is regulated. We surveyed variation in miRNA abundance in the hippocampus of mouse inbred strains, allowing us to take a genetic approach to the study of miRNA regulation, which is novel for miRNAs. The BXD recombinant inbred panel is a very well characterized genetic reference panel which allows quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis of miRNA abundance and detection of correlates in a large store of brain and behavioural phenotypes. Results We found five suggestive trans QTLs for the regulation of miRNAs investigated. Further analysis of these QTLs revealed two genes, Tnik and Phf17, under the miR-212 regulatory QTLs, whose expression levels were significantly correlated with miR-212 expression. We found that miR-212 expression is correlated with cocaine-related behaviour, consistent with a reported role for this miRNA in the control of cocaine consumption. miR-31 is correlated with anxiety and alcohol related behaviours. KEGG pathway analysis of each miRNA’s expression correlates revealed enrichment of pathways including MAP kinase, cancer, long-term potentiation, axonal guidance and WNT signalling. Conclusions The BXD reference panel allowed us to establish genetic regulation and characterize biological function of specific miRNAs. QTL analysis enabled detection of genetic loci that regulate the expression of these miRNAs. eQTLs that regulate miRNA abundance are a new mechanism by which genetic variation influences brain and behaviour. Analysis of one of these QTLs revealed a gene, Tnik, which may regulate the expression of a miRNA, a molecular pathway and a behavioural phenotype. Evidence of genetic covariation of miR-212 abundance and cocaine related behaviours is strongly supported by previous

  6. Sheltering behavior and locomotor activity in 11 genetically diverse common inbred mouse strains using home-cage monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Loos

    Full Text Available Functional genetic analyses in mice rely on efficient and in-depth characterization of the behavioral spectrum. Automated home-cage observation can provide a systematic and efficient screening method to detect unexplored, novel behavioral phenotypes. Here, we analyzed high-throughput automated home-cage data using existing and novel concepts, to detect a plethora of genetic differences in spontaneous behavior in a panel of commonly used inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ, FVB/NJ, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ and CAST/EiJ. Continuous video-tracking observations of sheltering behavior and locomotor activity were segmented into distinguishable behavioral elements, and studied at different time scales, yielding a set of 115 behavioral parameters of which 105 showed highly significant strain differences. This set of 115 parameters was highly dimensional; principal component analysis identified 26 orthogonal components with eigenvalues above one. Especially novel parameters of sheltering behavior and parameters describing aspects of motion of the mouse in the home-cage showed high genetic effect sizes. Multi-day habituation curves and patterns of behavior surrounding dark/light phase transitions showed striking strain differences, albeit with lower genetic effect sizes. This spontaneous home-cage behavior study demonstrates high dimensionality, with a strong genetic contribution to specific sets of behavioral measures. Importantly, spontaneous home-cage behavior analysis detects genetic effects that cannot be studied in conventional behavioral tests, showing that the inclusion of a few days of undisturbed, labor extensive home-cage assessment may greatly aid gene function analyses and drug target discovery.

  7. Genetic variations regulate alternative splicing in the 5' untranslated regions of the mouse glioma-associated oncogene 1, Gli1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaphiropoulos Peter G

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing is one of the key mechanisms that generate biological diversity. Even though alternative splicing also occurs in the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of mRNAs, the understanding of the significance and the regulation of these variations is rather limited. Results We investigated 5' UTR mRNA variants of the mouse Gli1 oncogene, which is the terminal transcriptional effector of the Hedgehog (HH signaling pathway. In addition to identifying novel transcription start sites, we demonstrated that the expression ratio of the Gli1 splice variants in the 5' UTR is regulated by the genotype of the mouse strain analyzed. The GT allele, which contains the consensus intronic dinucleotides at the 5' splice site of intron 1B, favors exon 1B inclusion, while the GC allele, having a weaker 5' splice site sequence, promotes exon 1B skipping. Moreover, the alternative Gli1 5' UTRs had an impact on translational capacity, with the shorter and the exon 1B-skipped mRNA variants being most effective. Conclusions Our findings implicate novel, genome-based mechanisms as regulators of the terminal events in the mouse HH signaling cascade.

  8. Identifying genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, though differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor was examined using a two-choice feeding system and the Student’s t statistic. To eliminate the confounding effect of processin...

  9. Genetic markers of wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with flavor preference using a mouse (Mus musculus) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole wheat products provide critical nutrients for human health, differences in wheat flavor are not well understood. Using the house mouse as a model system, flavor preference and discrimination were examined using a two-choice feeding system and 24-h trials and the Student’s t statistic. To elimi...

  10. A Quantitative Volumetric Micro-Computed Tomography Method to Analyze Lung Tumors in Genetically Engineered Mouse Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian B. Haines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two genetically engineered, conditional mouse models of lung tumor formation, K-rasLSL-G12D and K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H, are commonly used to model human lung cancer. Developed by Tyler Jacks and colleagues, these models have been invaluable to study in vivo lung cancer initiation and progression in a genetically and physiologically relevant context. However, heterogeneity, multiplicity and complexity of tumor formation in these models make it challenging to monitor tumor growth in vivo and have limited the application of these models in oncology drug discovery. Here, we describe a novel analytical method to quantitatively measure total lung tumor burden in live animals using micro-computed tomography imaging. Applying this methodology, we studied the kinetics of tumor development and response to targeted therapy in vivo in K-ras and K-ras/p53 mice. Consistent with previous reports, lung tumors in both models developed in a time- and dose (Cre recombinase-dependent manner. Furthermore, the compound K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mice developed tumors faster and more robustly than mice harboring a single K-rasLSL-G12D oncogene, as expected. Erlotinib, a small molecule inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor, significantly inhibited tumor growth in K-rasLSL-G12D/p53LSL-R270H mice. These results demonstrate that this novel imaging technique can be used to monitor both tumor progression and response to treatment and therefore supports a broader application of these genetically engineered mouse models in oncology drug discovery and development.

  11. Meiotic nondisjunction in the mouse: methodology for genetic testing and comparison with other methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L. B.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: genetic method for detecting sex-chromosome nondisjunction; events that can produce nondisjunction in mammals; biological parameters that may maximize induced meiotic ND; comparison with other measures of germline chromosomal damage in mammals; comparison with other methods for detecting meiotic nondisjunction in mammals; and application of the genetic method for detecting nondisjunction. (HLW)

  12. Contribution of Genetic Background, Traditional Risk Factors, and HIV-Related Factors to Coronary Artery Disease Events in HIV-Positive Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. Methods In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the Metabochip, we genotyped 1875 HIV-positive, white individuals enrolled in 24 HIV observational studies, including 571 participants with a first CAD event during the 9-year study period and 1304 controls matched on sex and cohort. Results A genetic risk score built from 23 CAD-associated SNPs contributed significantly to CAD (P = 2.9×10−4). In the final multivariable model, participants with an unfavorable genetic background (top genetic score quartile) had a CAD odds ratio (OR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–2.04). This effect was similar to hypertension (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), hypercholesterolemia (OR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16–1.96), diabetes (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49), ≥1 year lopinavir exposure (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), and current abacavir treatment (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.17–2.07). The effect of the genetic risk score was additive to the effect of nongenetic CAD risk factors, and did not change after adjustment for family history of CAD. Conclusions In the setting of HIV infection, the effect of an unfavorable genetic background was similar to traditional CAD risk factors and certain adverse antiretroviral exposures. Genetic testing may provide prognostic information complementary to family history of CAD. PMID:23532479

  13. Genetic variation responsible for mouse strain differences in integrin {alpha}{sub 2} expression is associated with altered platelet responses to collagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tong-Tong; Larrucea, Susana; Souza, Shiloe; Leal, Suzanne M.; Lopez, Jose A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Bray, Paul F.

    2003-11-01

    Formation of a thrombus at the site of an injured vessel requires the coordinated action of critical platelet plasma membrane adhesion molecules. The most important initial contact of platelets with the exposed endothelial collagen and von Willebrand factor (VWF) involves the binding of glycoprotein (GP) Ib{alpha} to immobilized VWF. The VWF-GPIb{alpha} interaction is ''fast-on'' and relatively ''fast-off,'' and results in a rolling of platelets along the exposed subendothelium. This slowing of the platelets allows binding of the activating collagen-receptor, GPVI, to its ligand, resulting in activation of platelet integrins and subsequent firm adhesion, where the reactions between receptor and ligand are relatively ''slow-on'' but irreversible. The binding of integrin {alpha}{sub 2} {beta}{sub 1} underlying firm adhesion. Intracellular signaling between and through these adhesive receptors plays a crucial role in platelet adhesion and aggregation. The importance of the GPIb-IX-V and {alpha}{sub IIb} {beta}{sub 3} in normal hemostasis is under scored by the bleeding diatheses that have been reported in patients with quantitative or qualitative deficiencies of the genes that encode them. Mouse models are now commonplace for studying hemostasis and thrombosis, and important insights pertaining to the major platelet adhesive receptors have been gleaned from mouse studies involving targeted disruptions of the genes for GPIb{alpha}, GPVI, and integrin chains 2,9,10 1,4 IIb 11 and 3.12 A variety of different mouse strains have been used to assess hemostasis. For example, the FVB strain is typically used for transgenic experiments, the 129/Sv strain is used to derive embryonic stem (ES) cells, and the C57 strain is used for uniform background breeding studies. Different strains may exhibit different levels of gene expression, a feature that has been used to elucidate crucial gene regions regulating transcription

  14. Mannan-binding lectin in diabetic kidney disease: the impact of mouse genetics in a type 1 diabetes model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jakob; Bjerre, Mette; RamachandraRao, Satish Posettihalli

    2012-01-01

    of diabetic kidney disease is observed in one animal strain. However, this involvement may differ among the animal strains. We thus examined the impact of the genetic background on the role of MBL in diabetic nephropathy. MATERIALS/METHODS: C57BL/6JBomTac and 129S6/SvEvTac mice were compared. In both strains......, experimental type 1 diabetes was induced in wild-type (WT) and MBL-knockout (MBL-KO) mice by streptozotocin. Nondiabetic WT and MBL-KO mice were used as controls. We tested if MBL modified the diabetes-induced kidney changes by two-way ANOVA allowing for interaction. RESULTS: MBL aggravated diabetes....... CONCLUSIONS: Strain-specific MBL effects were found on downstream diabetic kidney changes. This emphasizes the importance of genetic background in this model of diabetic complications....

  15. Urban park characteristics, genetic variation, and historical demography of white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus populations in New York City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Munshi-South

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Severe fragmentation is a typical fate of native remnant habitats in cities, and urban wildlife with limited dispersal ability are predicted to lose genetic variation in isolated urban patches. However, little information exists on the characteristics of urban green spaces required to conserve genetic variation. In this study, we examine whether isolation in New York City (NYC parks results in genetic bottlenecks in white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus, and test the hypotheses that park size and time since isolation are associated with genetic variability using nonlinear regression and information-theoretic model selection. White-footed mice have previously been documented to exhibit male-biased dispersal, which may create disparities in genetic variation between males and females in urban parks. We use genotypes of 18 neutral microsatellite data and four different statistical tests to assess this prediction. Given that sex-biased dispersal may create disparities between population genetic patterns inferred from bi- vs. uni-parentally inherited markers, we also sequenced a 324 bp segment of the mitochondrial D-loop for independent inferences of historical demography in urban P. leucopus. We report that isolation in urban parks does not necessarily result in genetic bottlenecks; only three out of 14 populations in NYC parks exhibited a signature of a recent bottleneck at 18 neutral microsatellite loci. Mouse populations in larger urban parks, or parks that have been isolated for shorter periods of time, also do not generally contain greater genetic variation than populations in smaller parks. These results suggest that even small networks of green spaces may be sufficient to maintain the evolutionary potential of native species with certain characteristics. We also found that isolation in urban parks results in weak to nonexistent sex-biased dispersal in a species known to exhibit male-biased dispersal in less fragmented environments. In

  16. In vivo regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase in the genetic mutant hph-1 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Richard S; Hyland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    The hph-1 mouse has low liver activity of GTP cyclohydrolase 1, the rate limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)). BH(4) is the cofactor for phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and in the early stages of life the hph-1 mouse is hyperphenylalaninemic. At approximately 15 days after birth the blood phenylalanine levels normalize. During this period the animals provide an in vivo model which can be used to study the regulatory effects of phenylalanine on PAH, and for related pediatric metabolic disease in humans; from birth to youth. We therefore, examined; liver PAH activity using BH(4) and 6-methyltetrahydropterin (6MPH(4)) as cofactor; PAH total enzyme concentration by Western blotting using the PH8 antibody, and PAH state of phosphorylation using the PH7 antibody from 4 to 18 days after birth. The findings were compared to the wild type animals that are not hyperphenylalaninemic during this period. PAH (6MPH(4)) activity and total protein (PH8 antibody) rose steadily in the hph-1 mice. In control mice, both activity and total protein fluctuated. The degree of phosphorylation of PAH in the mutants and the state of activation (as measured by the 6MPH(4)/BH(4) activity ratio) increased as phenylalanine levels rose, and decreased when they fell. Similar patterns were not seen in the control animals. These studies provide in vivo evidence that phenylalanine concentration regulates the activity of PAH in the hph-1 mouse and that this acts via a mechanism that includes phosphorylation of the PAH molecule. The kinetic values (K(m) and V(max)) for mouse PAH are also reported.

  17. Cross-species genetics converge to TLL2 for mouse avoidance behavior and human bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mooij-van Malsen, J G; van Lith, H A; Laarakker, M C; Brandys, M K; Oppelaar, H; Collier, D A; Olivier, B; Breen, G; Kas, M J

    2013-01-01

    Interspecies genetic analysis of neurobehavioral traits is critical for identifying neurobiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders, and for developing models for translational research. Recently, after screening a chromosome substitution strain panel in an automated home cage environmen

  18. Recovery of native genetic background in admixed populations using haplotypes, phenotypes, and pedigree information--using Cika cattle as a case breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simčič, Mojca; Smetko, Anamarija; Sölkner, Johann; Seichter, Doris; Gorjanc, Gregor; Kompan, Dragomir; Medugorac, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain unbiased estimates of the diversity parameters, the population history, and the degree of admixture in Cika cattle which represents the local admixed breeds at risk of extinction undergoing challenging conservation programs. Genetic analyses were performed on the genome-wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Illumina Bovine SNP50 array data of 76 Cika animals and 531 animals from 14 reference populations. To obtain unbiased estimates we used short haplotypes spanning four markers instead of single SNPs to avoid an ascertainment bias of the BovineSNP50 array. Genome-wide haplotypes combined with partial pedigree and type trait classification show the potential to improve identification of purebred animals with a low degree of admixture. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated unique genetic identity of Cika animals. Genetic distance matrix presented by rooted Neighbour-Net suggested long and broad phylogenetic connection between Cika and Pinzgauer. Unsupervised clustering performed by the admixture analysis and two-dimensional presentation of the genetic distances between individuals also suggest Cika is a distinct breed despite being similar in appearance to Pinzgauer. Animals identified as the most purebred could be used as a nucleus for a recovery of the native genetic background in the current admixed population. The results show that local well-adapted strains, which have never been intensively managed and differentiated into specific breeds, exhibit large haplotype diversity. They suggest a conservation and recovery approach that does not rely exclusively on the search for the original native genetic background but rather on the identification and removal of common introgressed haplotypes would be more powerful. Successful implementation of such an approach should be based on combining phenotype, pedigree, and genome-wide haplotype data of the breed of interest and a spectrum of reference breeds which potentially have had

  19. Xenograft and genetically engineered mouse model systems of osteosarcoma and Ewing's sarcoma: tumor models for cancer drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Valerie B; Kamara, Davida F; Kolb, E Anders

    2014-01-01

    Introduction There are > 75 histological types of solid tumors that are classified into two major groups: bone and soft-tissue sarcomas. These diseases are more prevalent in children, and pediatric sarcomas tend to be highly aggressive and rapidly progressive. Sarcomas in adults may follow a more indolent course, but aggressive tumors are also common. Sarcomas that are metastatic at diagnosis, or recurrent following therapy, remain refractory to current treatment options with dismal overall survival rates. A major focus of clinical trials, for patients with sarcoma, is to identify novel and more effective therapeutic strategies targeted to genomic or proteomic aberrations specific to the malignant cells. Critical to the understanding of the potential for targeted therapies are models of disease that are representative of clinical disease and predictive of relevant clinical responses. Areas covered In this article, the authors discuss the use of mouse xenograft models and genetically engineered mice in cancer drug discovery. The authors provide a special focus on models for the two most common bone sarcomas: osteosarcoma (OS) and Ewing's sarcoma (ES). Expert opinion Predicting whether a new anticancer agent will have a positive therapeutic index in patients with OS and ES remains a challenge. The use of mouse sarcoma models for understanding the mechanisms involved in the response of tumors to new treatments is an important step in the process of drug discovery and the development of clinically relevant therapeutic strategies for these diseases. PMID:23844615

  20. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. I. Non-specific esterase activity and regional histology of the epididymis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blecher, S R; Kirkeby, S

    1978-01-01

    As a base line for future cell genetical studies the authors record the distribution of non-specific esterase reaction in the various histologically distinguishable cell types of the mouse epididymis. The findings are correlated with previous descriptions of the lobar structure of the organ...

  1. Impaired fear extinction learning and cortico-amygdala circuit abnormalities in a common genetic mouse strain

    OpenAIRE

    Hefner, Kathryn; Whittle, Nigel; Juhasz, Jaynann; Norcross, Maxine; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Saksida, Lisa M.; Bussey, Timothy J.; Singewald, Nicolas; Holmes, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Fear extinction is a form of new learning that results in the inhibition of conditioned fear. Trait deficits in fear extinction are a risk factor for anxiety disorders. There are few examples of naturally-occurring animal models of impaired extinction. The present study compared fear extinction in a panel of inbred mouse strains. This strain survey revealed an impairment in fear extinction in 129/SvImJ (129S1). The phenotypic specificity of this deficit was evaluated by comparing 129S1 and C5...

  2. Reverse genetic studies of mitochondrial DNA-based diseases using a mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Nakada, Kazuto; Sato, Akitsugu; Hayashi, Jun-Ichi

    2008-01-01

    In the situation that it would not be able to produce model animals for mitochondrial diseases caused by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) with pathogenic mutations, we succeeded in generating mice with pathogenic deletion mutant mtDNA (ΔmtDNA), named “mito-mice”, by direct introduction of mitochondria with ΔmtDNA into mouse zygotes. In the mito-mice, accumulation of ΔmtDNA induced mitochondrial respiration defects in various tissues, resulting in mitochondrial disease phenotypes, such as low body we...

  3. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:27725886

  4. The effect of wheat-rye translocation 1BL.1RS in a different quality genetic background on biological traits in wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A sample of 139 varieties of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., predominantly Serbian winter wheat varieties originated in the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad, has been examined for presence of 1BL/1RS wheat-rye translocation. Two genotype groups consisted of varieties possessing and lacking the translocation have been compared. Stem rust, leaf rust, powdery mildew as well as, winter hardiness were studied. The influence of 1BL/1RS translocation was also studied in a light of wheat seed storage protein (glutenin and gliadin genetic background composition. Genotypes having the translocation appeared to be more tolerant to stem rust, and leaf rust, but more susceptible to powdery mildew. These effects were slightly modified depending on the examined genetic background, but the effect of the rye 1RS translocated chromosome arm was the main cause for the observed differences.

  5. Fine genetic mapping of the Hyp mutation on mouse chromosome X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Lisheng; Desbarats, M.; Cornibert, S.; Malo, D.; Ecarot, B. [McGill Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1996-03-01

    The hypophosphatemic (Hyp) mouse is the murine homolog of hypophosphatemic vitamin-D-resistant rickets (HYP) in human. Despite extensive investigations in the Hyp mouse, the pathophysiology of this X-linked dominant disorder remains unclear. As a first step toward cloning the Hyp gene, we have generated a high-resolution linkage map in the vicinity of the Hyp locus using two independent backcross panels segregating the Hyp mutation, one generated from an interspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus spretus and the other from an intrasubspecific mating between C57BL/6J-Hyp/Hyp and Mus musculus castaneus. Linkage analyses in 1101 backcross progeny using a total of 23 DNA markers favor the following gene order from the centromere: DXMit13-(DXMit11, DXMit34)-(DXMit36, Alas2)-(Hyp, DXMit80)-DXMit98-(DXMit28, DXMit33, DXMit70)-Pdhal-DXMit20. This study has localized Hyp to a region of approximately 1 cM flanked by the proximal markers DXMit36 and Alas2 and the distal marker DSMit98. One microsatellite marker, DXMit80, was found to be very tightly linked to Hyp, as it was nonrecombinant with Hyp among all the progeny of both backcrosses corresponding to 1101 meioses. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Mouse models for studying genetic influences on factors determining smoking cessation success in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, F. Scott; Markou, Athina; Levin, Edward D.; Uhl, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Humans differ in their ability to quit using addictive substances, including nicotine, the major psychoactive ingredient in tobacco. For tobacco smoking, a substantial body of evidence, largely derived from twin studies, indicates that approximately half of these individual differences in ability to quit are heritable [1, 2], genetic influences that likely overlap with those for other addictive substances [3]. Both twin and molecular genetic studies support overlapping influences on nicotine addiction vulnerability and smoking cessation success, although there is little formal analysis of the twin data that supports this important point [2, 3]. None of the current datasets provides clear data concerning which heritable factors might provide robust dimensions around which individuals differ in ability to quit smoking. One approach to this problem is to test mice with genetic variations in genes that contain human variants that alter quit-success. This review considers which features of quit success should be included in a comprehensive approach to elucidating the genetics of quit success, and how those features may be modeled in mice. PMID:22304675

  7. Effect of genetic background and diet on plasma fibrinogen in mice. Possible relation with susceptibility to atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rezaee, F.; Maas, A.; Maat, M.P.M.de; Verheijen, J.H.; Koopman, J.

    2002-01-01

    Many epidemiological studies suggest that elevated plasma fibrinogen concentrations form one of the most important independent risk factors in blood for cardiovascular disease and particularly atherosclerosis in humans. To clarify the effect of genetic factors, diets and their interactions on plasma

  8. Genetic background impacts developmental potential of enteric neural crest-derived progenitors in the Sox10Dom model of Hirschsprung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Lauren C; Cantrell, V Ashley; Weller, Kevin P; Mosher, Jack T; Southard-Smith, E Michelle

    2010-11-15

    Abnormalities in the development of enteric neural crest-derived progenitors (ENPs) that generate the enteric nervous system (ENS) can lead to aganglionosis in a variable portion of the distal gastrointestinal tract. Cumulative evidence suggests that variation of aganglionosis is due to gene interactions that modulate the ability of ENPs to populate the intestine; however, the developmental processes underlying this effect are unknown. We hypothesized that differences in enteric ganglion deficits could be attributable to the effects of genetic background on early developmental processes, including migration, proliferation, or lineage divergence. Developmental processes were investigated in congenic Sox10(Dom) mice, an established Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) model, on distinct inbred backgrounds, C57BL/6J (B6) and C3HeB/FeJ (C3Fe). Immuno-staining on whole-mount fetal gut tissue and dissociated cell suspensions was used to assess migration and proliferation. Flow cytometry utilizing the cell surface markers p75 and HNK-1 was used to isolate live ENPs for analysis of developmental potential. Frequency of ENPs was reduced in Sox10(Dom) embryos relative to wild-type embryos, but was unaffected by genetic background. Both migration and developmental potential of ENPs in Sox10(Dom) embryos were altered by inbred strain background with the most highly significant differences seen for developmental potential between strains and genotypes. In vivo imaging of fetal ENPs and postnatal ganglia demonstrates that altered lineage divergence impacts ganglia in the proximal intestine. Our analysis demonstrates that genetic background alters early ENS development and suggests that abnormalities in lineage diversification can shift the proportions of ENP populations and thus may contribute to ENS deficiencies in vivo.

  9. The role of Smad signaling in vascular and hematopoietic development revealed by studies using genetic mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Smads are intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily signaling. In this review, we focus on the genetic mouse models for Smad pathways, which have provided functional evidence regarding the complex circuitry in angiogenesis and hematopoiesis during development. In the early stages of vascular development, TGF-β signaling is a contri buting factor in angiogenesis and vascular maturation. Whereas in the later embryogenesis, selected molecules of Smad pathways, such as TGF-β type II receptor (TbRII), ALK5, and Smad5, seem to be dispensable for vessel morphogenesis and integrity. TGF-β signaling is not required in the induction of hematopoietic precursors from mesoderm, but inhibits the subsequent expansion of committed hematopoietic precursors. By contrast, bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) has long been acknowledged pivotal in mesoderm induction and hematopoietic commitment during development. However, recent genetic evidence shows the BMP4-ALK3 axis is not crucial for the formation of hematopoietic cells from FLK1+ mesoderm. Because of the highly redundant mechanisms within the Smad pathways, the precise role of the Smad signaling involved in vascular and hematopoietic development remains nebulous. The generation of novel cell lineage restricted Cre transgenes would shed new light on the future relevant investigations.

  10. Mannan-Binding Lectin in Diabetic Kidney Disease: The Impact of Mouse Genetics in a Type 1 Diabetes Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Appel Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL is involved in the development of diabetic nephropathy. MBL is a part of the innate immune system where it can activate the complement system. Serum MBL level predicts later renal impairment in diabetes patients. Direct involvement of MBL in the development of diabetic kidney disease is observed in one animal strain. However, this involvement may differ among the animal strains. We thus examined the impact of the genetic background on the role of MBL in diabetic nephropathy. Materials/Methods. C57BL/6JBomTac and 129S6/SvEvTac mice were compared. In both strains, experimental type 1 diabetes was induced in wild-type (WT and MBL-knockout (MBL-KO mice by streptozotocin. Nondiabetic WT and MBL-KO mice were used as controls. We tested if MBL modified the diabetes-induced kidney changes by two-way ANOVA allowing for interaction. Results. MBL aggravated diabetes-induced kidney growth and glomerulus enlargement in C57BL/6JBomTac mice. MBL did not modify diabetes effects on glomerular basement membrane thickness or mesangial volume in any strain. Diabetes-induced changes in renal gene transcription of growth factors and matrix components were unaffected by MBL. Conclusions. Strain-specific MBL effects were found on downstream diabetic kidney changes. This emphasizes the importance of genetic background in this model of diabetic complications.

  11. Mouse Aortic Ring Assay: A New Approach of the Molecular Genetics of Angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masson Véronique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis, a key step in many physiological and pathological processes, involves proteolysis of the extracellular matrix. To study the role of two enzymatic families, serine-proteases and matrix metalloproteases in angiogenesis, we have adapted to the mouse, the aortic ring assay initially developed in the rat. The use of deficient mice allowed us to demonstrate that PAI-1 is essential for angiogenesis while the absence of an MMP, MMP-11, did not affect vessel sprouting. We report here that this model is attractive to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis, to identify, characterise or screen "pro- or anti-angiogenic agents that could be used for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent diseases. Approaches include using recombinant proteins, synthetic molecules and adenovirus-mediated gene transfer.

  12. Genetic effects of 1,3-butadiene on the mouse testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkworth, M H; Anderson, D; Hughes, J A; Jackson, L I; Yu, T W; Nieschlag, E

    1998-01-16

    1,3-Butadiene is a known male mouse germ-cell mutagen, to which humans may either be occupationally or environmentally exposed. Prolonged exposure to moderate or high doses in male mice can cause dominant lethal mutations and one report has indicated that 10 week inhalation administration of low doses can result in the production of malformed foetuses. The present study had dual purposes: (a) to attempt to clarify the suspected ability of sub-chronic (6 h/day, 5 days/wk, 10 weeks) low-dose exposure to 1,3-butadiene to induce heritable mutations in mouse male germ cells: (b) investigation of the relationships between testicular DNA damage, testicular DNA repair and foetal outcome. Adult male mice were exposed to low or moderate doses of 1,3-butadiene by inhalation sub-chronically or for a single 6 h period and either used for mating (sub-chronic exposure only) or for studies of DNA damage and repair. Litter size, dominant lethality and numbers of abnormal foetuses were determined the day preceding the normal day of parturition. Testicular DNA damage and repair were assessed by the Comet assay (for DNA damage) and the unscheduled DNA synthesis assay (for DNA repair). 1,3-Butadiene caused a statistically significant increase in dominant lethality at 125 ppm but not 12.5 ppm. No significant increase in DNA repair was found with either dose level or exposure period while only 6 h exposure to 125 ppm caused a small but significant increase in DNA damage as detected by the Comet assay. These effects demonstrate the reproductive genotoxicity of (125 ppm) 1,3-butadiene but do not confirm its ability to cause abnormalities in the offspring via the sperm. It is suggested that the relationship between 1,3-butadiene-induced DNA damage, DNA repair and heritable defects in the offspring may depend on the pattern of metabolites produced.

  13. Somatic genetics empowers the mouse for modeling and interrogating developmental and disease processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrette, Sean F; Xu, Tian

    2011-07-01

    With recent advances in genomic technologies, candidate human disease genes are being mapped at an accelerated pace. There is a clear need to move forward with genetic tools that can efficiently validate these mutations in vivo. Murine somatic mutagenesis is evolving to fulfill these needs with tools such as somatic transgenesis, humanized rodents, and forward genetics. By combining these resources one is not only able to model disease for in vivo verification, but also to screen for mutations and pathways integral to disease progression and therapeutic intervention. In this review, we briefly outline the current advances in somatic mutagenesis and discuss how these new tools, especially the piggyBac transposon system, can be applied to decipher human biology and disease.

  14. Enhanced biofilm formation and multi‐host transmission evolve from divergent genetic backgrounds in C ampylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Murray, Susan; Yahara, Koji; Mageiros, Leonardos; Bowen, Ryan; Jones, Nathan H.; Jeeves, Rose E.; Lappin‐Scott, Hilary M.; Asakura, Hiroshi; Sheppard, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Multicellular biofilms are an ancient bacterial adaptation that offers a protective environment for survival in hostile habitats. In microaerophilic organisms such as C ampylobacter, biofilms play a key role in transmission to humans as the bacteria are exposed to atmospheric oxygen concentrations when leaving the reservoir host gut. Genetic determinants of biofilm formation differ between species, but little is known about how strains of the same species achieve the biofilm phenotype...

  15. Genetic knockout of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor gene alters hippocampal long-term potentiation in a background strain-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Ronald K; Graw, Sharon; Choo, Kevin S; Stevens, Karen E; Leonard, Sherry; Dell'Acqua, Mark L

    2016-08-01

    Reduced α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) function is linked to impaired hippocampal-dependent sensory processing and learning and memory in schizophrenia. While knockout of the Chrna7 gene encoding the α7nAChR on a C57/Bl6 background results in changes in cognitive measures, prior studies found little impact on hippocampal synaptic plasticity in these mice. However, schizophrenia is a multi-genic disorder where complex interactions between specific genetic mutations and overall genetic background may play a prominent role in determining phenotypic penetrance. Thus, we compared the consequences of knocking out the α7nAChR on synaptic plasticity in C57/Bl6 and C3H mice, which differ in their basal α7nAChR expression levels. Homozygous α7 deletion in C3H mice, which normally express higher α7nAChR levels, resulted in impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal CA1 synapses, while C3H α7 heterozygous mice maintained robust LTP. In contrast, homozygous α7 deletion in C57 mice, which normally express lower α7nAChR levels, did not alter LTP, as had been previously reported for this strain. Thus, the threshold of Chrna7 expression required for LTP may be different in the two strains. Measurements of auditory gating, a hippocampal-dependent behavioral paradigm used to identify schizophrenia-associated sensory processing deficits, was abnormal in C3H α7 knockout mice confirming that auditory gating also requires α7nAChR expression. Our studies highlight the importance of genetic background on the regulation of synaptic plasticity and could be relevant for understanding genetic and cognitive heterogeneity in human studies of α7nAChR dysfunction in mental disorders.

  16. Genetic Ablation of the ClC-2 Cl- Channel Disrupts Mouse Gastric Parietal Cell Acid Secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghali P Nighot

    Full Text Available The present studies were designed to examine the effects of ClC-2 ablation on cellular morphology, parietal cell abundance, H/K ATPase expression, parietal cell ultrastructure and acid secretion using WT and ClC-2-/- mouse stomachs. Cellular histology, morphology and proteins were examined using imaging techniques, electron microscopy and western blot. The effect of histamine on the pH of gastric contents was measured. Acid secretion was also measured using methods and secretagogues previously established to give maximal acid secretion and morphological change. Compared to WT, ClC-2-/- gastric mucosal histological organization appeared disrupted, including dilation of gastric glands, shortening of the gastric gland region and disorganization of all cell layers. Parietal cell numbers and H/K ATPase expression were significantly reduced by 34% (P<0.05 and 53% (P<0.001 respectively and cytoplasmic tubulovesicles appeared markedly reduced on electron microscopic evaluation without evidence of canalicular expansion. In WT parietal cells, ClC-2 was apparent in a similar cellular location as the H/K ATPase by immunofluorescence and appeared associated with tubulovesicles by immunogold electron microscopy. Histamine-stimulated [H+] of the gastric contents was significantly (P<0.025 lower by 9.4 fold (89% in the ClC-2-/- mouse compared to WT. Histamine/carbachol stimulated gastric acid secretion was significantly reduced (range 84-95%, P<0.005 in ClC-2-/- compared to WT, while pepsinogen secretion was unaffected. Genetic ablation of ClC-2 resulted in reduced gastric gland region, reduced parietal cell number, reduced H/K ATPase, reduced tubulovesicles and reduced stimulated acid secretion.

  17. Mouse and Human Genetic Analyses Associate Kalirin with Ventral Striatal Activation during Impulsivity and with Alcohol Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Oliver, Yolanda; Carvalho, Fabiana M.; Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Quinlan, Erin B.; Jia, Tianye; Walker-Tilley, Tom; Rulten, Stuart L.; Pearl, Frances M. G.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J.; Bokde, Arun L. W.; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J.; Flor, Herta; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Gowland, Penny; Paillere Martinot, Marie-Laure; Paus, Tomáš; Rietschel, Marcella; Robbins, Trevor W.; Smolka, Michael N.; Schumann, Gunter; Stephens, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders including drug addiction. To investigate genetic associations with impulsivity and initiation of drug taking, we took a two-step approach. First, we identified genes whose expression level in prefrontal cortex, striatum and accumbens were associated with impulsive behavior in the 5-choice serial reaction time task across 10 BXD recombinant inbred (BXD RI) mouse strains and their progenitor C57BL/6J and DBA2/J strains. Behavioral data were correlated with regional gene expression using GeneNetwork (www.genenetwork.org), to identify 44 genes whose probability of association with impulsivity exceeded a false discovery rate of < 0.05. We then interrogated the IMAGEN database of 1423 adolescents for potential associations of SNPs in human homologs of those genes identified in the mouse study, with brain activation during impulsive performance in the Monetary Incentive Delay task, and with novelty seeking scores from the Temperament and Character Inventory, as well as alcohol experience. There was a significant overall association between the human homologs of impulsivity-related genes and percentage of premature responses in the MID task and with fMRI BOLD-response in ventral striatum (VS) during reward anticipation. In contrast, no significant association was found between the polygenic scores and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Univariate association analyses revealed that the G allele (major) of the intronic SNP rs6438839 in the KALRN gene was significantly associated with increased VS activation. Additionally, the A-allele (minor) of KALRN intronic SNP rs4634050, belonging to the same haplotype block, was associated with increased frequency of binge drinking. PMID:27092175

  18. Analysis of the cartilage proteome from three different mouse models of genetic skeletal diseases reveals common and discrete disease signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Bell

    2013-06-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia are genetic skeletal diseases resulting from mutations in cartilage structural proteins. Electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry previously showed that the appearance of the cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM in targeted mouse models of these diseases is disrupted; however, the precise changes in ECM organization and the pathological consequences remain unknown. Our aim was to determine the effects of matrilin-3 and COMP mutations on the composition and extractability of ECM components to inform how these detrimental changes might influence cartilage organization and degeneration. Cartilage was sequentially extracted using increasing denaturants and the extraction profiles of specific proteins determined using SDS-PAGE/Western blotting. Furthermore, the relative composition of protein pools was determined using mass spectrometry for a non-biased semi-quantitative analysis. Western blotting revealed changes in the extraction of matrilins, COMP and collagen IX in mutant cartilage. Mass spectrometry confirmed quantitative changes in the extraction of structural and non-structural ECM proteins, including proteins with roles in cellular processes such as protein folding and trafficking. In particular, genotype-specific differences in the extraction of collagens XII and XIV and tenascins C and X were identified; interestingly, increased expression of several of these genes has recently been implicated in susceptibility and/or progression of murine osteoarthritis. We demonstrated that mutation of matrilin-3 and COMP caused changes in the extractability of other cartilage proteins and that proteomic analyses of Matn3 V194D, Comp T585M and Comp DelD469 mouse models revealed both common and discrete disease signatures that provide novel insight into skeletal disease mechanisms and cartilage degradation.

  19. Mouse and human genetic analyses associate kalirin with ventral striatal activation during impulsivity and with alcohol misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda ePeña-Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is associated with a spectrum of psychiatric disorders including drug addiction. To investigate genetic associations with impulsivity and initiation of drug taking, we took a two-step approach. First, we identified genes whose expression level in prefrontal cortex, striatum and accumbens were associated with impulsive behaviour in the 5-choice serial reaction time task across 10 BXD recombinant inbred (BXD RI mouse strains and their progenitor C57BL/6J and DBA2/J strains. Behavioural data were correlated with regional gene expression using GeneNetwork (www.genenetwork.org, to identify 44 genes whose probability of association with impulsivity exceeded a false discovery rate of <0.05. We then interrogated the IMAGEN database of 1423 adolescents for potential associations of SNPs in human homologues of those genes identified in the mouse study, with brain activation during impulsive performance in the Monetary Incentive Delay task, and with novelty seeking scores from the Temperament and Character Inventory, as well as alcohol-experience. There was a significant overall association between the human homologues of impulsivity-related genes and percentage of premature responses in the MID task and with fMRI BOLD-response in ventral striatum (VS during reward anticipation. In contrast, no significant association was found between the polygenic scores and anterior cingulate cortex activation. Univariate association analyses revealed that the G allele (major of the intronic SNP rs6438839 in the KALRN gene was significantly associated with increased VS activation. Additionally, the A-allele (minor of KALRN intronic SNP rs4634050, belonging to the same haplotype block, was associated with increased frequency of binge drinking.

  20. Lights on for HIF-1α: genetically enhanced mouse cardiomyocytes for heart tissue imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Amke R; Levent, Elif; Zieseniss, Anke; Tiburcy, Malte; Zimmermann, Wolfram H; Katschinski, Dörthe M

    2014-01-01

    The hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a suitable marker for tissue oxygenation. We intended to develop cardiomyocytes (CMs) expressing the oxygen-dependent degradation domain of HIF-1α fused to the firefly luciferase (ODD-Luc) followed by proof-of-concept for its applicability in the assessment of heart muscle oxygenation. We first generated embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines (ODD-Luc ESCs) from a Tg ROSA26 ODD-Luc/+ mouse. Subsequent CMs selection was facilitated by stable integration of an antibiotic resistance expressed under the control of the αMHC promoter. ODD-Luc ESCs showed a strong Luc-signal within 1 h of hypoxia (1% oxygen), which coincided with endogenous HIF-1α. Engineered heart muscle (EHM) constructed with ODD-Luc CMs confirmed the utility of the model to sense hypoxia, and monitor reoxygenation also in a multicellular heart muscle model. Pharmacologically induced inotropy/chronotropy under isoprenaline resulted in enhanced Luc-signal suggesting enhanced oxygen consumption, leading to notable myocardial hypoxia. ODD-Luc-CMs can be used to monitor dynamic changes of cardiomyocyte oxygenation in living heart muscle samples. We provide proof-of-concept for pharmacologically induced myocardial interventions and envision applications of the developed model in drug screens and fundamental studies of ischemia/reperfusion injury. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. High-resolution genetic mapping in the diversity outbred mouse population identifies Apobec1 as a candidate gene for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Tangi L; Gatti, Daniel M; Quizon, Pamela; Weinstock, George M; Jung, Kuo-Chen; Zhao, Liyang; Hua, Kunjie; Pomp, Daniel; Bennett, Brian J

    2014-10-23

    Inbred mice exhibit strain-specific variation in susceptibility to atherosclerosis and dyslipidemia that renders them useful in dissecting the genetic architecture of these complex diseases. Traditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping studies using inbred strains often identify large genomic regions, containing many genes, due to limited recombination and/or sample size. This hampers candidate gene identification and translation of these results into possible risk factors and therapeutic targets. An alternative approach is the use of multiparental outbred lines for genetic mapping, such as the Diversity Outbred (DO) mouse panel, which can be more informative than traditional two-parent crosses and can aid in the identification of causal genes and variants associated with QTL. We fed 292 female DO mice either a high-fat, cholesterol-containing (HFCA) diet, to induce atherosclerosis, or a low-fat, high-protein diet for 18 wk and measured plasma lipid levels before and after diet treatment. We measured markers of atherosclerosis in the mice fed the HFCA diet. The mice were genotyped on a medium-density single-nucleotide polymorphism array and founder haplotypes were reconstructed using a hidden Markov model. The reconstructed haplotypes were then used to perform linkage mapping of atherosclerotic lesion size as well as plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose. Among our highly significant QTL we detected a ~100 kb QTL interval for atherosclerosis on Chromosome 6, as well as a 1.4 Mb QTL interval on Chromosome 9 for triglyceride levels at baseline and a coincident 22.2 Mb QTL interval on Chromosome 9 for total cholesterol after dietary treatment. One candidate gene within the Chromosome 6 peak region associated with atherosclerosis is Apobec1, the apolipoprotein B (ApoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, which plays a role in the regulation of ApoB, a critical component of low-density lipoprotein, by editing ApoB mRNA. This study demonstrates the value

  2. Effectiveness of vaccination with recombinant HpaA from Helicobacter pylori is influenced by host genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Philip; Doidge, Christopher; Pinczower, Gideon; Wilson, John; Harbour, Stacey; Swierczak, Agnieszka; Lee, Adrian

    2007-07-01

    Several studies have explored the production and immunogenicity of HpaA as a potential protective antigen against Helicobacter pylori but little is known regarding its protective capabilities. We therefore evaluated the protective efficacy of recombinant HpaA (rHpaA) as a candidate vaccine antigen against H. pylori. To explore the impact of genetic diversity, inbred and outbred mice were prophylactically and therapeutically immunized with rHpaA adjuvanted with cholera toxin (CT). Prophylactic immunization induced a reduction in bacterial colonization in BALB/c and QS mice, but was ineffective in C57BL/6 mice, despite induction of antigen-specific antibodies. By contrast, therapeutic immunization was effective in all three strains of mice. Prophylactic immunization with CT-adjuvanted rHpaA was more effective when delivered via the nasal route than following intragastric delivery in BALB/c mice. However, HpaA-mediated protection was inferior to that induced by bacterial lysate. Hence, protective efficacy is inducible with vaccines containing HpaA, most relevantly shown in an outbred population of mice. The effectiveness of protection induced by HpaA antigen was influenced by host genetics and was less effective than lysate. HpaA therefore has potential for the development of effective immunization against H. pylori but this would probably entail the antigen to be one component of a multiantigenic vaccine.

  3. [Recent perspectives on the development of the central nervous system and the genetic background of neural tube defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joó, József Gábor

    2009-05-10

    Neural tube defects are rare and mostly lethal malformations. The pattern of inheritance of these malformations is multifactorial, rendering the identification of the underlying causes. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate the genetic basis of the development of the central nervous system. Essential signaling pathways of the development of the central nervous system include the planar cell polarity pathway, which is important for the initiation of neural tube closure as well as sonic hedgehog pathway, which regulates the neural plate bending. Genes and their mutations influencing the different stages of neurulation have been investigated for their eventual role in the development of these malformations. Among the environmental factors, folic acid seems to be the most important modifier of the risk of human neural tube defects. Genes of the folate metabolism pathways have also been investigated to identify mutations resulting in increased risk of NTDs. In this review the author has attempted to summarize the knowledge on neural tube defects, with special regard to genetic factors of the etiology.

  4. The Protective Effect of Minocycline in a Paraquat-Induced Parkinson's Disease Model in Drosophila is Modified in Altered Genetic Backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arati A. Inamdar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies link the herbicide paraquat to increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD. We previously reported that Drosophila exposed to paraquat recapitulate PD symptoms, including region-specific degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. Minocycline, a tetracycline derivative, exerts ameliorative effects in neurodegenerative disease models, including Drosophila. We investigated whether our environmental toxin-based PD model could contribute to an understanding of cellular and genetic mechanisms of minocycline action and whether we could assess potential interference with these drug effects in altered genetic backgrounds. Cofeeding of minocycline with paraquat prolonged survival, rescued mobility defects, blocked generation of reactive oxygen species, and extended dopaminergic neuron survival, as has been reported previously for a genetic model of PD in Drosophila. We then extended this study to identify potential interactions of minocycline with genes regulating dopamine homeostasis that might modify protection against paraquat and found that deficits in GTP cyclohydrolase adversely affect minocycline rescue. We further performed genetic studies to identify signaling pathways that are necessary for minocycline protection against paraquat toxicity and found that mutations in the Drosophila genes that encode c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK and Akt/Protein kinase B block minocycline rescue.

  5. Skewed Helper T-Cell Responses to IL-12 Family Cytokines Produced by Antigen-Presenting Cells and the Genetic Background in Behcet’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Shimizu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Behcet’s disease (BD is a multisystemic inflammatory disease and is characterized by recurrent attacks on eyes, brain, skin, and gut. There is evidence that skewed T-cell responses contributed to its pathophysiology in patients with BD. Recently, we found that Th17 cells, a new helper T (Th cell subset, were increased in patients with BD, and both Th type 1 (Th1 and Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were overactivated. Several researches revealed that genetic polymorphisms in Th1/Th17 cell differentiation signaling pathways were associated with the onset of BD. Here, we summarize current findings on the Th cell subsets, their contribution to the pathogenesis of BD and the genetic backgrounds, especially in view of IL-12 family cytokine production and pattern recognition receptors of macrophages/monocytes.

  6. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E; Alberts, David; Bowden, G Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M; Surh, Young-Joon; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-11-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17.

  7. Genetic interactions between Shox2 and Hox genes during the regional growth and development of the mouse limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Stanley J; Wang, Fan; Cobb, John

    2014-11-01

    The growth and development of the vertebrate limb relies on homeobox genes of the Hox and Shox families, with their independent mutation often giving dose-dependent effects. Here we investigate whether Shox2 and Hox genes function together during mouse limb development by modulating their relative dosage and examining the limb for nonadditive effects on growth. Using double mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in single embryos, we first show that Shox2 and Hox genes have associated spatial expression dynamics, with Shox2 expression restricted to the proximal limb along with Hoxd9 and Hoxa11 expression, juxtaposing the distal expression of Hoxa13 and Hoxd13. By generating mice with all possible dosage combinations of mutant Shox2 alleles and HoxA/D cluster deletions, we then show that their coordinated proximal limb expression is critical to generate normally proportioned limb segments. These epistatic interactions tune limb length, where Shox2 underexpression enhances, and Shox2 overexpression suppresses, Hox-mutant phenotypes. Disruption of either Shox2 or Hox genes leads to a similar reduction in Runx2 expression in the developing humerus, suggesting their concerted action drives cartilage maturation during normal development. While we furthermore provide evidence that Hox gene function influences Shox2 expression, this regulation is limited in extent and is unlikely on its own to be a major explanation for their genetic interaction. Given the similar effect of human SHOX mutations on regional limb growth, Shox and Hox genes may generally function as genetic interaction partners during the growth and development of the proximal vertebrate limb.

  8. Roles of interferon-gamma and its target genes in schizophrenia: Proteomics-based reverse genetics from mouse to human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Jae; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kwon, Joseph; Joo, Jaesoon; Lee, Sujeong; Nah, Seong-Su; Kim, Il-Chul; Jang, Ik-Soon; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Seung Il; Chung, Joo-Ho; Choi, Jong-Soon

    2012-06-01

    A decreased production of interferon gamma (IFNG) has been observed in acute schizophrenia. In order to explore the possible relationship between IFNG and schizophrenia, we attempted to analyze the differentially expressed proteins in the brains of interferon-gamma knockout (Ifng-KO) mice. Five upregulated and five downregulated proteins were identified with 2D gels and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS analyses in Ifng-KO mouse brain. Of the identified proteins, we focused on creatine kinase brain (CKB) and triose phosphate isomerase 1 (TPI1). Consistent with the proteomic data, reverse transcriptase-mediated PCR, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry analyses confirmed that the levels of gene expressions of Ckb and Tpi1 were downregulated and upregulated, respectively. When we analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of their human orthologous genes in a Korean population, the promoter SNPs of CKB and TPI1 were weakly associated with schizophrenia. In addition, IFNG polymorphisms were associated with schizophrenia. These results suggest that IFNG and proteins affected by IFNG may play a role in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  9. Genetic Elimination of GABAergic Neurotransmission Reveals Two Distinct Pacemakers for Spontaneous Waves of Activity in the Developing Mouse Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Curtis R.; Weir, Keiko; Scott, Adina; Moen, Samantha P.; Barger, Zeke; Folch, Albert; Hevner, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Many structures of the mammalian CNS generate propagating waves of electrical activity early in development. These waves are essential to CNS development, mediating a variety of developmental processes, such as axonal outgrowth and pathfinding, synaptogenesis, and the maturation of ion channel and receptor properties. In the mouse cerebral cortex, waves of activity occur between embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 8 and originate in pacemaker circuits in the septal nucleus and the piriform cortex. Here we show that genetic knock-out of the major synthetic enzyme for GABA, GAD67, selectively eliminates the picrotoxin-sensitive fraction of these waves. The waves that remain in the GAD67 knock-out have a much higher probability of propagating into the dorsal neocortex, as do the picrotoxin-resistant fraction of waves in controls. Field potential recordings at the point of wave initiation reveal different electrical signatures for GABAergic and glutamatergic waves. These data indicate that: (1) there are separate GABAergic and glutamatergic pacemaker circuits within the piriform cortex, each of which can initiate waves of activity; (2) the glutamatergic pacemaker initiates waves that preferentially propagate into the neocortex; and (3) the initial appearance of the glutamatergic pacemaker does not require preceding GABAergic waves. In the absence of GAD67, the electrical activity underlying glutamatergic waves shows greatly increased tendency to burst, indicating that GABAergic inputs inhibit the glutamatergic pacemaker, even at stages when GABAergic pacemaker circuitry can itself initiate waves. PMID:24623764

  10. Establishment of new murine embryonic stem cell lines for the generation of mouse models of human genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Sukoyan

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells are totipotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of blastocysts. Recently, the development of appropriate culture conditions for the differentiation of these cells into specific cell types has permitted their use as potential therapeutic agents for several diseases. In addition, manipulation of their genome in vitro allows the creation of animal models of human genetic diseases and for the study of gene function in vivo. We report the establishment of new lines of murine embryonic stem cells from preimplantation stage embryos of 129/Sv mice. Most of these cells had a normal karyotype and an XY sex chromosome composition. The pluripotent properties of the cell lines obtained were analyzed on the basis of their alkaline phosphatase activity and their capacity to form complex embryoid bodies with rhythmically contracting cardiomyocytes. Two lines, USP-1 and USP-3, with the best in vitro characteristics of pluripotency were used in chimera-generating experiments. The capacity to contribute to the germ line was demonstrated by the USP-1 cell line. This cell line is currently being used to generate mouse models of human diseases.

  11. Genetically Modified Mouse Models Used for Studying the Role of the AT2 Receptor in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Avila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The actions of Angiotensin II have been implicated in many cardiovascular conditions. It is widely accepted that the cardiovascular effects of Angiotensin II are mediated by different subtypes of receptors: AT1 and AT2. These membrane-bound receptors share a part of their nucleic acid but seem to have different distribution and pathophysiological actions. AT1 mediates most of the Angiotensin II actions since it is ubiquitously expressed in the cardiovascular system of the normal adult. Moreover AT2 is highly expressed in the developing fetus but its expression in the cardiovascular system is low and declines after birth. However the expression of AT2 appears to be modulated by pathological states such as hypertension, myocardial infarction or any pathology associated to tissue remodeling or inflammation. The specific role of this receptor is still unclear and different studies involving in vivo and in vitro experiments have shown conflicting data. It is essential to clarify the role of the AT2 receptor in the different pathological states as it is a potential site for an effective therapeutic regimen that targets the Angiotensin II system. We will review the different genetically modified mouse models used to study the AT2 receptor and its association with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

  12. Genetic deletion of transglutaminase 2 does not rescue the phenotypic deficits observed in R6/2 and zQ175 mouse models of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana B Menalled

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of CAG repeats in the huntingtin gene. Tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2, a multi-functional enzyme, was found to be increased both in HD patients and in mouse models of the disease. Furthermore, beneficial effects have been reported from the genetic ablation of TG2 in R6/2 and R6/1 mouse lines. To further evaluate the validity of this target for the treatment of HD, we examined the effects of TG2 deletion in two genetic mouse models of HD: R6/2 CAG 240 and zQ175 knock in (KI. Contrary to previous reports, under rigorous experimental conditions we found that TG2 ablation had no effect on either motor or cognitive deficits, or on the weight loss. In addition, under optimal husbandry conditions, TG2 ablation did not extend R6/2 lifespan. Moreover, TG2 deletion did not change the huntingtin aggregate load in cortex or striatum and did not decrease the brain atrophy observed in either mouse line. Finally, no amelioration of the dysregulation of striatal and cortical gene markers was detected. We conclude that TG2 is not a valid therapeutic target for the treatment of HD.

  13. The genetics of multiple sclerosis: principles, background and updated results of the United Kingdom systematic genome screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chataway, J; Feakes, R; Coraddu, F; Gray, J; Deans, J; Fraser, M; Robertson, N; Broadley, S; Jones, H; Clayton, D; Goodfellow, P; Sawcer, S; Compston, A

    1998-10-01

    Genetic susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is implicated on the basis of classical family studies and phenotype analyses. The only reproducible legacy from the candidate gene approach has been the discovery of population associations with alleles of the major histocompatibility complex. Systematic genome scanning has since been applied using a panel of anonymous markers to identify areas of linkage in co-affected siblings. Here, we describe the principles of genome screening and update the UK survey of multiple sclerosis. This identified 20 regions of potential interest, but in none was there unequivocal linkage. In theory, attempting to replicate these findings in a second set of sibling pair families is the most appropriate way to distinguish true from false positives, but unfortunately the number of families required to do this reliably is prohibitively large. We used three approaches to increase the definition achieved by the screen: (i) the number of sibling pairs typed in an identified region of potential linkage was extended; (ii) the information extraction was increased in an identified region; and (iii) a search was made for missed regions of potential linkage. Each of these approaches has considerable limitations. A chromosome-by-chromosome account is given to direct future searches. Although an additional marker placed distal to the 'hit' on chromosome 14q increased linkage in this area, and typing extra sibling pairs increased linkage on chromosomes 6p and 17q, evidence for linkage was more commonly reduced and no additional regions of interest were found. A further refinement of the genome screen was undertaken by conditioning for the presence of HLA-DR15. This produced a surprising degree of segregation among the regions of interest, which divided into two distinct groups depending on DR15 sharing: the DR15-sharing cohort comprised loci on chromosomal areas 1p, 17q and X; and the DR15-non-sharing cohort was made up of loci on 1cen, 3p, 7p, 14q and

  14. Prdm1 functions in the mesoderm of the second heart field, where it interacts genetically with Tbx1, during outflow tract morphogenesis in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Stéphane D; Mayeuf-Louchart, Alicia; Watanabe, Yusuke; Brzezinski, Joseph A; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Congenital heart defects affect at least 0.8% of newborn children and are a major cause of lethality prior to birth. Malformations of the arterial pole are particularly frequent. The myocardium at the base of the pulmonary trunk and aorta and the arterial tree associated with these great arteries are derived from splanchnic mesoderm of the second heart field (SHF), an important source of cardiac progenitor cells. These cells are controlled by a gene regulatory network that includes Fgf8, Fgf10 and Tbx1. Prdm1 encodes a transcriptional repressor that we show is also expressed in the SHF. In mouse embryos, mutation of Prdm1 affects branchial arch development and leads to persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA), indicative of neural crest dysfunction. Using conditional mutants, we show that this is not due to a direct function of Prdm1 in neural crest cells. Mutation of Prdm1 in the SHF does not result in PTA, but leads to arterial pole defects, characterized by mis-alignment or reduction of the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and abnormalities in the arterial tree, defects that are preceded by a reduction in outflow tract size and loss of caudal pharyngeal arch arteries. These defects are associated with a reduction in proliferation of progenitor cells in the SHF. We have investigated genetic interactions with Fgf8 and Tbx1, and show that on a Tbx1 heterozygote background, conditional Prdm1 mutants have more pronounced arterial pole defects, now including PTA. Our results identify PRDM1 as a potential modifier of phenotypic severity in TBX1 haploinsufficient DiGeorge syndrome patients.

  15. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. V. Histochemical evidence for androgen inducibility of beta-glucuronidase in the epididymis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blecher, S R; Kirkeby, S

    1982-01-01

    The enzyme beta-glucuronidase (beta G) is shown, by histochemical methods, to be androgen inducible in the mouse epididymis. This trait has previously been believed to exist only in the kidney. Its presence in the genital tract constitutes a valuable tool in study of the developmental genetics of...... of the reproductive system. Data presented here and previously imply co-ordinated genetic control of heterogeneous lysosomal populations. The results reported also provide a system for study of X-chromosomal activation, and of the developmental androgen dependence of the epididymis....

  16. A novel anesthesia regime enables neurofunctional studies and imaging genetics across mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrinovic, Marija M; Hankov, Georges; Schroeter, Aileen; Bruns, Andreas; Rudin, Markus; von Kienlin, Markus; Künnecke, Basil; Mueggler, Thomas

    2016-04-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has revolutionized neuroscience by opening a unique window that allows neurocircuitry function and pathological alterations to be probed non-invasively across brain disorders. Here we report a novel sustainable anesthesia procedure for small animal neuroimaging that overcomes shortcomings of anesthetics commonly used in rodent fMRI. The significantly improved preservation of cerebrovascular dynamics enhances sensitivity to neural activity changes for which it serves as a proxy in fMRI readouts. Excellent cross-species/strain applicability provides coherence among preclinical findings and is expected to improve translation to clinical fMRI investigations. The novel anesthesia procedure based on the GABAergic anesthetic etomidate was extensively validated in fMRI studies conducted in a range of genetically engineered rodent models of autism and strains commonly used for transgenic manipulations. Etomidate proved effective, yielded long-term stable physiology with basal cerebral blood flow of ~0.5 ml/g/min and full recovery. Cerebrovascular responsiveness of up to 180% was maintained as demonstrated with perfusion- and BOLD-based fMRI upon hypercapnic, pharmacological and sensory stimulation. Hence, etomidate lends itself as an anesthetic-of-choice for translational neuroimaging studies across rodent models of brain disorders.

  17. Cis-effects on meiotic recombination across distinct a1-sh2 intervals in a common Zea genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hong; Schnable, Patrick S

    2005-08-01

    Genetic distances across the a1-sh2 interval varied threefold in three near-isogenic stocks that carry structurally distinct teosinte A1 Sh2 haplotypes (from Z. mays spp. mexicana Chalco, Z. mays spp. parviglumis, and Z. luxurians) and a common maize a1::rdt sh2 haplotype. In each haplotype >85% of recombination events resolved in the proximal 10% of the approximately 130-kb a1-sh2 interval. Even so, significant differences in the distributions of recombination breakpoints were observed across subintervals among haplotypes. Each of the three previously detected recombination hot spots was detected in at least one of the three teosinte haplotypes and two of these hot spots were not detected in at least one teosinte haplotype. Moreover, novel hot spots were detected in two teosinte haplotypes. Due to the near-isogenic nature of the three stocks, the observed variation in the distribution of recombination events is the consequence of cis-modifications. Although generally negatively correlated with rates of recombination per megabase, levels of sequence polymorphisms do not fully account for the nonrandom distribution of recombination breakpoints. This study also suggests that estimates of linkage disequilibrium must be interpreted with caution when considering whether a gene has been under selection.

  18. Interaction of environment conditions and genotypes on expression of genetic background in micro-phenophases of strawberry mixed flower bud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selamovska Ana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is differentiation or micro-phenophases of reproductive organs on two junebearing strawberry (Fragaria x anannassa varieties senga sengana and pocahontas, depending on climate conditions, rosettes ordering and cultivate manner (orchard mulched on black foil and orchard on bare soil. The beginning of differentiation of flower buds is genetic characteristic depending on climate conditions (insulations, day length, higher midday and night air temperatures from 1.05 till the beginning of differentiation, the sum of rainfalls from the beginning of May until the end of July, order of rosettes and cultivate manner The sum of effective temperatures over 10ºC from 1st of May till the beginning of differentiation has no influence on beginning of flower buds differentiation. First morphological changes of the apical meristem were started in the first decade of August that has coincided with the day length of 14 hours and day insulations of 9.3 hours. Micro-phenophases were undergoing almost at the same time in both varieties, only the beginning at pocahontas was 2-3 days earlier. Primary rosettes differ 10-15 days earlier than the secondary rosettes. Plants that grown on black foil had 7-10 days earlier flower bud differentiation compared to those grown on bare soil.

  19. Ontogeny of mouse vestibulo-ocular reflex following genetic or environmental alteration of gravity sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Beraneck

    Full Text Available The vestibular organs consist of complementary sensors: the semicircular canals detect rotations while the otoliths detect linear accelerations, including the constant pull of gravity. Several fundamental questions remain on how the vestibular system would develop and/or adapt to prolonged changes in gravity such as during long-term space journey. How do vestibular reflexes develop if the appropriate assembly of otoliths and semi-circular canals is perturbed? The aim of present work was to evaluate the role of gravity sensing during ontogeny of the vestibular system. In otoconia-deficient mice (ied, gravity cannot be sensed and therefore maculo-ocular reflexes (MOR were absent. While canals-related reflexes were present, the ied deficit also led to the abnormal spatial tuning of the horizontal angular canal-related VOR. To identify putative otolith-related critical periods, normal C57Bl/6J mice were subjected to 2G hypergravity by chronic centrifugation during different periods of development or adulthood (Adult-HG and compared to non-centrifuged (control C57Bl/6J mice. Mice exposed to hypergravity during development had completely normal vestibulo-ocular reflexes 6 months after end of centrifugation. Adult-HG mice all displayed major abnormalities in maculo-ocular reflexe one month after return to normal gravity. During the next 5 months, adaptation to normal gravity occurred in half of the individuals. In summary, genetic suppression of gravity sensing indicated that otolith-related signals might be necessary to ensure proper functioning of canal-related vestibular reflexes. On the other hand, exposure to hypergravity during development was not sufficient to modify durably motor behaviour. Hence, 2G centrifugation during development revealed no otolith-specific critical period.

  20. Analysis of DNA methylation variation in wheat genetic background after alien chromatin introduction based on methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    During the process of alien germplasm introduced into wheat genome by chromosome engineering,extensive genetic variations of genome structure and gene expression in recipient could be induced.In this study,we performed GISH(genome in situ hybridization)and AFLP(amplified fragment length polymorphism) on wheat-rye chromosome transIocation lines and their parents to detect the identity in genomic structure of different translocation lines.The results showed that the genome primary structure variations were not obviously detected in different translocation lines except the same 1RS chromosome translocation.Methylation sensitive amplification polymorphism(MSAP)analyses on genomic DNA showed that the ratios of fully-methylated sites were significantly increased in translocation lines(CN12,20.15%;CN17,20.91%;CN18,22.42%),but the ratios of hemimethylated sites were significantly lowered(CN12,21.41%;CN17,23.43%;CN18,22.42%),whereas 16.37%were fully-methylated and 25.44%were hemimethylated in case of their wheat parent.Twenty-nine classes of methylation patterns were identified in a comparative assay of cytosine methylation patterns between wheat-rye translocation lines and their wheat parent,including 13 hypermethylation patterns(33.74%),9 demethylation patterns(22.76%)and 7 uncertain patterns(4.07%).In further sequence analysis,the alterations of methylation pattern affected both repetitive DNA sequences,such as retrotransposons and tandem repetitive sequences,and low-copy DNA.

  1. Genome survey sequencing and genetic background characterization of Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis (Rhodophyta based on next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    Full Text Available Gracilariopsis lemaneiformis has a high economic value and is one of the most important aquaculture species in China. Despite it is economic importance, it has remained largely unstudied at the genomic level. In this study, we conducted a genome survey of Gp. lemaneiformis using next-generation sequencing (NGS technologies. In total, 18.70 Gb of high-quality sequence data with an estimated genome size of 97 Mb were obtained by HiSeq 2000 sequencing for Gp. lemaneiformis. These reads were assembled into 160,390 contigs with a N50 length of 3.64 kb, which were further assembled into 125,685 scaffolds with a total length of 81.17 Mb. Genome analysis predicted 3490 genes and a GC% content of 48%. The identified genes have an average transcript length of 1,429 bp, an average coding sequence size of 1,369 bp, 1.36 exons per gene, exon length of 1,008 bp, and intron length of 191 bp. From the initial assembled scaffold, transposable elements constituted 54.64% (44.35 Mb of the genome, and 7737 simple sequence repeats (SSRs were identified. Among these SSRs, the trinucleotide repeat type was the most abundant (up to 73.20% of total SSRs, followed by the di- (17.41%, tetra- (5.49%, hexa- (2.90%, and penta- (1.00% nucleotide repeat type. These characteristics suggest that Gp. lemaneiformis is a model organism for genetic study. This is the first report of genome-wide characterization within this taxon.

  2. Quantitative trait locus mapping with background control in genetic populations of clonal F1 and double cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyan; Li, Huihui; Ding, Junqiang; Wu, Jianyu; Wang, Jiankang

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we considered five categories of molecular markers in clonal F1 and double cross populations, based on the number of distinguishable alleles and the number of distinguishable genotypes at the marker locus. Using the completed linkage maps, incomplete and missing markers were imputed as fully informative markers in order to simplify the linkage mapping approaches of quantitative trait genes. Under the condition of fully informative markers, we demonstrated that dominance effect between the female and male parents in clonal F1 and double cross populations can cause the interactions between markers. We then developed an inclusive linear model that includes marker variables and marker interactions so as to completely control additive effects of the female and male parents, as well as the dominance effect between the female and male parents. The linear model was finally used for background control in inclusive composite interval mapping (ICIM) of quantitative trait locus (QTL). The efficiency of ICIM was demonstrated by extensive simulations and by comparisons with simple interval mapping, multiple-QTL models and composite interval mapping. Finally, ICIM was applied in one actual double cross population to identify QTL on days to silking in maize.

  3. Oppositional defiant- and conduct disorder-like problems: neurodevelopmental predictors and genetic background in boys and girls, in a nationwide twin study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Kerekes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous research has supported gender-specific aetiological factors in oppositional defiant disorder (ODD and conduct disorder (CD. The aims of this study were to identify gender-specific associations between the behavioural problems–ODD/CD-like problems–and the neurodevelopmental disorders–attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, autism spectrum disorder (ASD–and to investigate underlying genetic effects.Methods. 17,220 twins aged 9 or 12 were screened using the Autism–Tics, AD/HD and other Comorbidities inventory. The main covariates of ODD- and CD-like problems were investigated, and the relative importance of unique versus shared hereditary and environmental effects was estimated using twin model fitting.Results. Social interaction problems (one of the ASD subdomains was the strongest neurodevelopmental covariate of the behavioural problems in both genders, while ADHD-related hyperactivity/impulsiveness in boys and inattention in girls stood out as important covariates of CD-like problems. Genetic effects accounted for 50%–62% of the variance in behavioural problems, except in CD-like problems in girls (26%. Genetic and environmental effects linked to ADHD and ASD also influenced ODD-like problems in both genders and, to a lesser extent, CD-like problems in boys, but not in girls.Conclusions. The gender-specific patterns should be considered in the assessment and treatment, especially of CD.

  4. A possible correlation between the host genetic background in the epidemiology of Hepatitis B virus in the Amazon region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. C. R. Santos

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available The Amazon region of Brazil is an area of great interest because of the large distribution of hepatitis B virus in specific Western areas. Seven urban communities and 24 Indian groups were visited in a total of 4,244 persons. Each individual was interviewed in order to obtain demographic and familial information. Whole blood was collected for serology and genetic determinations. Eleven genetic markers and three HBV markers were tested. Among the most relevant results it was possible to show that (i there was a large variation of previous exposure to HBV in both urban and non-urban groups ranging from 0 to 59.2%; (ii there was a different pattern of epidemiological distribution of HBV that was present even among a same linguistic Indian group, with mixed patterns of correlation between HBsAg and anti-HBs and (iii the prevalence of HBV markers (HBsAg and anti-HBs were significantly higher (P=0.0001 among the Indian population (18.8% than the urban groups (12.5%. Its possible that the host genetic background could influence and modulate the replication of the virus in order to generate HB carrier state.

  5. The mecA homolog mecC confers resistance against β-lactams in Staphylococcus aureus irrespective of the genetic strain background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhausen, Britta; Kriegeskorte, André; Schleimer, Nina; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2014-07-01

    In staphylococci, methicillin resistance is mediated by mecA-encoded penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has a low affinity for beta-lactams. Recently, a novel PBP2a homolog was described as being encoded by mecC, which shares only 70% similarity to mecA. To prove that mecC is the genetic determinant that confers methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, a mecC knockout strain was generated. The S. aureus ΔmecC strain showed considerably reduced oxacillin and cefoxitin MICs (0.25 and 4 μg/ml, respectively) compared to those of the corresponding wild-type methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strain (8 and 16 μg/ml, respectively). Complementing the mutant in trans with wild-type mecC restored the resistance to oxacillin and cefoxitin. By expressing mecC and mecA in different S. aureus clonal lineages, we found that mecC mediates resistance irrespective of the genetic strain background, yielding oxacillin and cefoxitin MIC values comparable to those with mecA. In addition, we showed that mecC expression is inducible by oxacillin, which supports the assumption that a functional beta-lactam-dependent regulatory system is active in MRSA strains possessing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type XI. In summary, we showed that mecC is inducible by oxacillin and mediates beta-lactam resistance in SCCmec type XI-carrying strains as well as in different S. aureus genetic backgrounds. Furthermore, our results could explain the comparatively low MICs for clinical mecC-harboring S. aureus isolates. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Genetic background contributes to the co-morbidity of anxiety and depression with audiogenic seizure propensity and responses to fluoxetine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisova, Karine Yu; Fedotova, Irina B; Surina, Natalia M; Nikolaev, Georgy M; Perepelkina, Olga V; Kostina, Zoya A; Poletaeva, Inga I

    2017-03-01

    Anxiety and depression are the most frequent comorbidities of different types of convulsive and non-convulsive epilepsies. Increased anxiety and depression-like phenotype have been described in the genetic absence epilepsy models as well as in models of limbic epilepsy and acquired seizure models, suggesting a neurobiological connection. However, whether anxiety and/or depression are comorbid to audiogenic epilepsy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether anxiety or depression-like behavior can be found in rat strains with different susceptibility to audiogenic seizures (AS) and whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects this co-morbidity. Behavior in the elevated plus-maze and the forced swimming test was studied in four strains: Wistar rats non-susceptible to AS; Krushinsky-Molodkina (KM) strain, selectively bred for AS propensity from outbred Wistar rats; and a selection lines bred for maximal AS expression (strain "4") and for a lack of AS (strain "0") from KM×Wistar F2 hybrids. Effects of chronic antidepressant treatment on AS and behavior were also evaluated. Anxiety and depression levels were higher in KM rats (with AS) compared with Wistar rats (without AS), indicating the comorbidity with AS. However, in strains "4" and "0" with contrasting AS expression, but with a genetic background close to KM rats, anxiety and depression were not as divergent as in KMs versus Wistars. Fluoxetine treatment exerted an antidepressant effect in all rat strains irrespective of its effect on AS. Genetic background contributes substantively to the co-morbidity of anxiety and depression with AS propensity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and diversity of enterotoxin genes with genetic background of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different origins in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Guoxiang; Bao, Guangyu; Cao, Yongzhong; Yan, Wenguang; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Xiaorong; Zhou, Liping; Wu, Yantao

    2015-10-15

    Staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE) induce toxin-mediated diseases, such as food poisoning. In the present study, 568 isolates from different sources were tested for the prevalence of 18 SE genes and performed spa typing. In addition, we characterized the relationships between the distribution of SE genes and molecular clones based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing in selected 250 isolates. Approximately 54.40% of the isolates from different sources harbored one or more SE genes forming 120 distinct gene profiles. Seven genes, sea, seb, seg, seo, sem, seq, and sel were more frequently detected. The distributions of the SE genes among the isolates from human, animals, and foodborne origins were highly different with isolates from environments (P0.05). We identified two important gene clusters, sea-sek-seq, which is closely related to hospital-acquired (HA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-III, and the egc cluster, which accounts for nearly half of all genes. Approximately 71% isolates could be typed by spa, yielding 103 spa types, of which 18 spa types were primary types. In clonal complex (CC) 239, an important Asian HA-MRSA-III clone from humans, nearly all isolates harbored complete or partial sea-sek-seq cluster; the main spa types were t030 and t037. In CC630, an important new community-associated (CA) MRSA-V CC in China, only sporadic SE genes, three main spa types, t4549, t2196, and t377 were observed. The egc cluster coexisting with other genes was present in isolates of CC5, CC9, CC1281, CC1301, CC30 and sequence type (ST) 25, but completely absent in isolates of CC239, CC59, CC7, and CC88. The results illustrate the genetic clonal diversity and the identity of S. aureus isolates from different sources with respect to SE genes and highlight a correlation between SE genes or gene clusters and CCs, spa, and MRSA clones. The foodborne and human origin isolates were the main

  8. Mitochondrial genetic background modifies the relationship between traffic-related air pollution exposure and systemic biomarkers of inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharine Wittkopp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria are the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Human mitochondrial haplogroups are linked to differences in ROS production and oxidative-stress induced inflammation that may influence disease pathogenesis, including coronary artery disease (CAD. We previously showed that traffic-related air pollutants were associated with biomarkers of systemic inflammation in a cohort panel of subjects with CAD in the Los Angeles air basin. OBJECTIVE: We tested whether air pollutant exposure-associated inflammation was stronger in mitochondrial haplogroup H than U (high versus low ROS production in this panel (38 subjects and 417 observations. METHODS: Inflammation biomarkers were measured weekly in each subject (≤ 12 weeks, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 soluble receptor and tumor necrosis factor-soluble receptor II. We determined haplogroup by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Air pollutants included nitrogen oxides (NOx, carbon monoxide (CO, organic carbon, elemental and black carbon (EC, BC; and particulate matter mass, three size fractions (<0.25 µm, 0.25-2.5 µm, and 2.5-10 µm in aerodynamic diameter. Particulate matter extracts were analyzed for organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, and in vitro oxidative potential of aqueous extracts. Associations between exposures and biomarkers, stratified by haplogroup, were analyzed by mixed-effects models. RESULTS: IL-6 and TNF-α were associated with traffic-related air pollutants (BC, CO, NOx and PAH, and with mass and oxidative potential of quasi-ultrafine particles <0.25 µm. These associations were stronger for haplogroup H than haplogroup U. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that mitochondrial haplogroup U is a novel protective factor for air pollution-related systemic inflammation in this small group of subjects.

  9. Novel frem1-related mouse phenotypes and evidence of genetic interactions with gata4 and slit3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler F Beck

    Full Text Available The FRAS1-related extracellular matrix 1 (FREM1 gene encodes an extracellular matrix protein that plays a critical role in the development of multiple organ systems. In humans, recessive mutations in FREM1 cause eye defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, renal anomalies and anorectal malformations including anteriorly placed anus. A similar constellation of findings-microphthalmia, cryptophthalmos, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, renal agenesis and rectal prolapse-have been described in FREM1-deficient mice. In this paper, we identify a homozygous Frem1 missense mutation (c.1687A>T, p.Ile563Phe in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-derived mouse strain, crf11, with microphthalmia, cryptophthalmos, renal agenesis and rectal prolapse. This mutation affects a highly conserved residue in FREM1's third CSPG domain. The p.Ile563Phe change is predicted to be deleterious and to cause decreased FREM1 protein stability. The crf11 allele also fails to complement the previously described eyes2 allele of Frem1 (p.Lys826* providing further evidence that the crf11 phenotype is due to changes affecting Frem1 function. We then use mice bearing the crf11 and eyes2 alleles to identify lung lobulation defects and decreased anogenital distance in males as novel phenotypes associated with FREM1 deficiency in mice. Due to phenotypic overlaps between FREM1-deficient mice and mice that are deficient for the retinoic acid-responsive transcription factor GATA4 and the extracellular matrix protein SLIT3, we also perform experiments to look for in vivo genetic interactions between the genes that encode these proteins. These experiments reveal that Frem1 interacts genetically with Gata4 in the development of lung lobulation defects and with Slit3 in the development of renal agenesis. These results demonstrate that FREM1-deficient mice faithfully recapitulate many of the phenotypes seen in individuals with FREM1 deficiency and that variations in GATA4 and SLIT3 expression

  10. Immunity against the mouse mammary tumour virus : immunologic events during tumour growth and studies on vaccination in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.C. Creemers (Paula)

    1978-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of mouse mammary tumours is a complex phenomenon, to which environmental factors, genetic background and the presence of an oncovirus contribute. The mammary tumour virus (MTV) of the mouse, first discovered by Bittner (1936), is a so-called B-type particle (Bernhard, 1958) a

  11. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  12. Immune Status, Strain Background, and Anatomic Site of Inoculation Affect Mouse Papillomavirus (MmuPV1) Induction of Exophytic Papillomas or Endophytic Trichoblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, John P.; Proctor, Mary; Ingle, Arvind; Silva, Kathleen A.; Dadras, Soheil S.; Jenson, A. Bennett; Ghim, Shin-je

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) induce papillomas, premalignant lesions, and carcinomas in a wide variety of species. PVs are classified first based on their host and tissue tropism and then their genomic diversities. A laboratory mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1 (formerly MusPV), was horizontally transmitted within an inbred colony of NMRI-Foxn1nu/Foxn1nu (nude; T cell deficient) mice of an unknown period of time. A ground-up, filtered papilloma inoculum was not capable of infecting C57BL/6J wild-type mice; however, immunocompetent, alopecic, S/RV/Cri-ba/ba (bare) mice developed small papillomas at injection sites that regressed. NMRI-Foxn1nu and B6.Cg-Foxn1nu, but not NU/J-Foxn1nu, mice were susceptible to MmuPV1 infection. B6 congenic strains, but not other congenic strains carrying the same allelic mutations, lacking B- and T-cells, but not B-cells alone, were susceptible to infection, indicating that mouse strain and T-cell deficiency are critical to tumor formation. Lesions initially observed were exophytic papillomas around the muzzle, exophytic papillomas on the tail, and condylomas of the vaginal lining which could be induced by separate scarification or simultaneous scarification of MmuPV1 at all four sites. On the dorsal skin, locally invasive, poorly differentiated tumors developed with features similar to human trichoblastomas. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant differences between the normal skin in these anatomic sites and in papillomas versus trichoblastomas. The primarily dysregulated genes involved molecular pathways associated with cancer, cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell morphology, and connective tissue development and function. Although trichoepitheliomas are benign, aggressive tumors, few of the genes commonly associated with basal cell carcinoma or squamous cells carcinoma were highly dysregulated. PMID:25474466

  13. Molecular cloning of a highly conserved mouse and human integral membrane protein (Itm1) and genetic mapping to mouse chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Guizhu; Tylzanowski, P. [Univ. of Antwerp (Belgium); Deleersnijder, W. [N.V. Innogenetics, Ghent (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-02-01

    We have isolated and characterized a novel cDNA coding for a highly hydrophobic protein (B5) from a fetal mouse mandibular condyle cDNA library. The full-length mouse B5 cDNA is 3095 nucleotides long and contains a potential open reading frame coding for a protein of 705 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of 80.5 kDa. The B5 mRNA is differentially polyadenylated, with the most abundant transcript having a length of 2.7 kb. The human homolog of B5 was isolated from a cDNA testis library. The predicted amino acid sequence of the human B5 is 98.5% identical to that of mouse. The most striking feature of the B5 protein is the presence of numerous (10-14) potential transmembrane domains, characteristic of an integral membrane protein. Similarity searches in public databanks reveal that B5 is 58% similar to the T12A2.2 gene of Caenorhabditis elegans and 60% similar to the STT3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Futhermore, the report of an EST sequence (Accession No. Z13858) related to the human B5, but identical to the STT3 gene, indicates that B5 belongs to a larger gene family coding for novel putative transmembrane proteins. This family exhibits a remarkable degree of conservation in different species. The gene for B5, designated Itm1 (Integral membrane protein 1), is located on mouse chromosome 9. 28 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Genetic Science Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Mouse Party on Learn.Genetics.utah.edu Students doing the Tree of Genetic Traits activity Learn.Genetics is one of the most widely used science education websites in the world The Community Genetics ...

  15. Genome-wide association mapping and biochemical markers reveal that seed ageing and longevity are intricately affected by genetic background and developmental and environmental conditions in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Manuela; Kranner, Ilse; Neumann, Kerstin; Rolletschek, Hardy; Seal, Charlotte E; Colville, Louise; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Börner, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Globally, over 7.4 million accessions of crop seeds are stored in gene banks, and conservation of genotypic variation is pivotal for breeding. We combined genetic and biochemical approaches to obtain a broad overview of factors that influence seed storability and ageing in barley (Hordeum vulgare). Seeds from a germplasm collection of 175 genotypes from four continents grown in field plots with different nutrient supply were subjected to two artificial ageing regimes. Genome-wide association mapping revealed 107 marker trait associations, and hence, genotypic effects on seed ageing. Abiotic and biotic stresses were found to affect seed longevity. To address aspects of abiotic, including oxidative, stress, two major antioxidant groups were analysed. No correlation was found between seed deterioration and the lipid-soluble tocochromanols, nor with oil, starch and protein contents. Conversely, the water-soluble glutathione and related thiols were converted to disulphides, indicating a strong shift towards more oxidizing intracellular conditions, in seeds subjected to long-term dry storage at two temperatures or to two artificial ageing treatments. The data suggest that intracellular pH and (bio)chemical processes leading to seed deterioration were influenced by the type of ageing or storage. Moreover, seed response to ageing or storage treatment appears to be significantly influenced by both maternal environment and genetic background. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Characterization of near-isogenic lines carrying QTL for high spikelet number with the genetic background of an indica rice variety IR64 (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Daisuke; Tagle, Analiza G; Ebron, Leodegario A; Fukuta, Yoshimichi; Kobayashi, Nobuya

    2012-03-01

    Total spikelet number per panicle (TSN) is one of the most important traits associated with rice yield potential. This trait was assessed in a set of 334 chromosomal segment introgression lines (ILs: BC(3)-derived lines), developed from new plant type (NPT) varieties as donor parents and having the genetic background of an indica-type rice variety IR64. Among the 334 ILs, five lines which had different donor parents and showed significantly higher TSN than IR64 were used for genetic analysis. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis was conducted using F(2) populations derived from crosses between IR64 and these ILs. As a result, a QTL for high TSN (one from each NPT donor variety) was detected on common region of the long arm of chromosome 4. The effect of the QTL was confirmed by an increase in TSN of five near-isogenic lines (NILs) developed in the present study. The variation in TSN was found among these NILs, attributing to the panicle architecture in the numbers of primary, secondary and tertiary branches. The NILs for TSN and the SSR markers linked to the TSN QTLs are expected to be useful materials for research and breeding to enhance the yield potential of rice varieties.

  17. Evaluation of a Method Using Three Genomic Guided Escherichia coli Markers for Phylogenetic Typing of E. coli Isolates of Various Genetic Backgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, Kouta; Ueda, Shuhei; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Hirai, Itaru

    2015-06-01

    Genotyping and characterization of bacterial isolates are essential steps in the identification and control of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections. Recently, one novel genotyping method using three genomic guided Escherichia coli markers (GIG-EM), dinG, tonB, and dipeptide permease (DPP), was reported. Because GIG-EM has not been fully evaluated using clinical isolates, we assessed this typing method with 72 E. coli collection of reference (ECOR) environmental E. coli reference strains and 63 E. coli isolates of various genetic backgrounds. In this study, we designated 768 bp of dinG, 745 bp of tonB, and 655 bp of DPP target sequences for use in the typing method. Concatenations of the processed marker sequences were used to draw GIG-EM phylogenetic trees. E. coli isolates with identical sequence types as identified by the conventional multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method were localized to the same branch of the GIG-EM phylogenetic tree. Sixteen clinical E. coli isolates were utilized as test isolates without prior characterization by conventional MLST and phylogenetic grouping before GIG-EM typing. Of these, 14 clinical isolates were assigned to a branch including only isolates of a pandemic clone, E. coli B2-ST131-O25b, and these results were confirmed by conventional typing methods. Our results suggested that the GIG-EM typing method and its application to phylogenetic trees might be useful tools for the molecular characterization and determination of the genetic relationships among E. coli isolates.

  18. Plant Genetic Background Increasing the Efficiency and Durability of Major Resistance Genes to Root-knot Nematodes Can Be Resolved into a Few Resistance QTLs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbary, Arnaud; Djian-Caporalino, Caroline; Marteu, Nathalie; Fazari, Ariane; Caromel, Bernard; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe; Palloix, Alain

    2016-01-01

    With the banning of most chemical nematicides, the control of root-knot nematodes (RKNs) in vegetable crops is now based essentially on the deployment of single, major resistance genes (R-genes). However, these genes are rare and their efficacy is threatened by the capacity of RKNs to adapt. In pepper, several dominant R-genes are effective against RKNs, and their efficacy and durability have been shown to be greater in a partially resistant genetic background. However, the genetic determinants of this partial resistance were unknown. Here, a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was performed on the F2:3 population from the cross between Yolo Wonder, an accession considered partially resistant or resistant, depending on the RKN species, and Doux Long des Landes, a susceptible cultivar. A genetic linkage map was constructed from 130 F2 individuals, and the 130 F3 families were tested for resistance to the three main RKN species, Meloidogyne incognita, M. arenaria, and M. javanica. For the first time in the pepper-RKN pathosystem, four major QTLs were identified and mapped to two clusters. The cluster on chromosome P1 includes three tightly linked QTLs with specific effects against individual RKN species. The fourth QTL, providing specific resistance to M. javanica, mapped to pepper chromosome P9, which is known to carry multiple NBS–LRR repeats, together with major R-genes for resistance to nematodes and other pathogens. The newly discovered cluster on chromosome P1 has a broad spectrum of action with major additive effects on resistance. These data highlight the role of host QTLs involved in plant-RKN interactions and provide innovative potential for the breeding of new pepper cultivars or rootstocks combining quantitative resistance and major R-genes, to increase both the efficacy and durability of RKN control by resistance genes. PMID:27242835

  19. Plant genetic background increasing the efficiency and durability of major resistance genes to root-knot nematodes can be resolved into a few resistance QTLs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud eBarbary

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the banning of most chemical nematicides, the control of root-knot nematodes (RKNs in vegetable crops is now based essentially on the deployment of single, major resistance genes (R-genes. However, these genes are rare and their efficacy is threatened by the capacity of RKNs to adapt. In pepper, several dominant R-genes are effective against RKNs, and their efficacy and durability have been shown to be greater in a partially resistant genetic background. However, the genetic determinants of this partial resistance were unknown. Here, a QTL analysis was performed on the F2:3 population from the cross between Yolo Wonder, an accession considered partially resistant or resistant, depending on the RKN species, and Doux Long des Landes, a susceptible cultivar. A genetic linkage map was constructed from 130 F2 individuals, and the 130 F3 families were tested for resistance to the three main RKN species, M. incognita, M. arenaria and M. javanica. For the first time in the pepper-RKN pathosystem, four major QTLs were identified and mapped to two clusters. The cluster on chromosome P1 includes three tightly linked QTLs with specific effects against individual RKN species. The fourth QTL, providing specific resistance to M. javanica, mapped to pepper chromosome P9, which is known to carry multiple NBS-LRR repeats, together with major R-genes for resistance to nematodes and other pathogens. The newly discovered cluster on chromosome P1 has a broad spectrum of action with major additive effects on resistance. These data highlight the role of host QTLs involved in plant-RKN interactions and provide innovative potential for the breeding of new pepper cultivars or rootstocks combining quantitative resistance and major R-genes, to increase both the efficacy and durability of RKN control by resistance genes.

  20. MouseCyc: a curated biochemical pathways database for the laboratory mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Evsikov, Alexei V.; Dolan, Mary E.; Genrich, Michael P; Patek, Emily; Bult, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Linking biochemical genetic data to the reference genome for the laboratory mouse is important for comparative physiology and for developing mouse models of human biology and disease. We describe here a new database of curated metabolic pathways for the laboratory mouse called MouseCyc . MouseCyc has been integrated with genetic and genomic data for the laboratory mouse available from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and with pathway data from other organisms, including human.

  1. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Chen

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry, have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  2. In vivo models of brain tumors: roles of genetically engineered mouse models in understanding tumor biology and use in preclinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Iva; Huillard, Emmanuelle

    2014-10-01

    Although our knowledge of the biology of brain tumors has increased tremendously over the past decade, progress in treatment of these deadly diseases remains modest. Developing in vivo models that faithfully mirror human diseases is essential for the validation of new therapeutic approaches. Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) provide elaborate temporally and genetically controlled systems to investigate the cellular origins of brain tumors and gene function in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, they can prove to be valuable tools for testing targeted therapies. In this review, we discuss GEMMs of brain tumors, focusing on gliomas and medulloblastomas. We describe how they provide critical insights into the molecular and cellular events involved in the initiation and maintenance of brain tumors, and illustrate their use in preclinical drug testing.

  3. Transgenic mouse models generated by hydrodynamic transfection for genetic studies of liver cancer and preclinical testing of anti-cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hye-Lim; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Lee, Jong Doo; Ro, Simon Weonsang

    2016-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide; however, the genetic mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are incompletely understood. Genetically engineered mouse (GEM) models of HCC have been developed to elucidate the role of individual cancer-related genes in hepatocarcinogenesis. However, the expensive and time-consuming processes related to generating a GEM model discourage the development of diverse genotype models. Recently, a simple and inexpensive liver-specific transgenic approach was developed, in which a hydrodynamics-based transfection (HT) method was coupled with the Sleeping Beauty transposase system. Various HT models in which different oncogenic pathways are activated and/or tumor-suppressing pathways inactivated have been developed in recent years. The applicability of HT models in liver cancer research is expected to broaden and ultimately elucidate the cooperation between oncogenic signaling pathways and aid in designing molecular therapy to target altered pathways.

  4. Genetic background (DDD/Sgn versus C57BL/6J) strongly influences postnatal growth of male mice carrying the Ay allele at the agouti locus: identification of quantitative trait loci associated with diabetes and body weight loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Mice carrying the Ay allele at the agouti locus become obese and are heavier than their non-Ay littermates. However, this does not hold true for the genetic background of the DDD mouse strain. At 22 weeks of age, DDD.Cg-Ay females are heavier than DDD females, whereas DDD.Cg-Ay males are lighter than DDD males. This study aimed to determine the possible cause and identify the genes responsible for the lower body weight of DDD.Cg-Ay males. Results Growth curves of DDD.Cg-Ay mice were analyzed and compared with those of B6.Cg-Ay mice from 5 to 25 weeks. In DDD.Cg-Ay males, body weight gain stopped between 16 and 17 weeks and the body weight gradually decreased; thus, the lower body weight was a consequence of body weight loss. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in backcrossed (BC) males of DDD × (B6 × DDD.Cg-Ay) F1-Ay mice. For the body weight at 25 weeks, significant QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1 and 4. The DDD allele was associated with a lower body weight at both loci. In particular, the QTL on chromosome 4 interacted with the Ay allele. Furthermore, suggestive QTLs for plasma glucose and high molecular weight adiponectin levels were coincidentally mapped to chromosome 4. The DDD allele was associated with increased glucose and decreased adiponectin levels. When the body weight at 25 weeks and plasma glucose levels were considered as dependent and independent variables, respectively, BC Ay males were classified into two groups according to statistical analysis using the partition method. Mice of one group had significantly higher glucose and lower adiponectin levels than those of the other group and exhibited body weight loss as observed with DDD-Ay males. Conclusions The lower body weight of DDD.Cg-Ay male mice was a consequence of body weight loss. Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor causing body weight loss. The QTL on distal chromosome 4 contained the major responsible genes

  5. The genetic background affects composition, oxidative stability and quality traits of Iberian dry-cured hams: purebred Iberian versus reciprocal Iberian × Duroc crossbred pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Verónica; Ventanas, Sonia; Ventanas, Jesús; Estévez, Mario

    2014-02-01

    This study examined the physico-chemical characteristics, oxidative stability and sensory properties of Iberian cry-cured hams as affected by the genetic background of the pigs: purebred Iberian (PBI) pigs vs reciprocal cross-bred Iberian × Duroc pigs (IB × D pigs: Iberian dams × Duroc sires; D × IB pigs: Duroc dams × Iberian sires). Samples from PBI pigs contained significantly higher amounts of IMF, monounsaturated fatty acids, heme pigments and iron than those from crossbred pigs. The extent of lipid and protein oxidation was significantly larger in dry-cured hams of crossbred pigs than in those from PBI pigs. Dry-cured hams from PBI pigs were defined by positive sensory properties (i.e. redness, brightness and juiciness) while hams from crossbred pigs were ascribed to negative ones (i.e. hardness, bitterness and sourness). Hams from PBI pigs displayed a superior quality than those from crossbred pigs. The position of the dam or the sire in reciprocal Iberian × Duroc crosses had no effect on the quality of Iberian hams.

  6. An orthogonal comparison of the proteome of human embryonic stem cells with that of human induced pluripotent stem cells of different genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faradonbeh, Mojtaba Zamani; Gharechahi, Javad; Mollamohammadi, Sepideh; Pakzad, Mohammad; Taei, Adeleh; Rassouli, Hassan; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2012-06-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide an invaluable resource for drug or toxicology screening, medical research and patient-specific cell therapy. However, the potential applications of iPSCs are largely dependent on the degree of similarity between iPSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs). In the present study, we analyzed the proteome of human ESCs and hiPSCs with different genetic background. We carried out an orthogonal contrast analysis of the proteome pattern of two human ESC lines (Royan H5 and Royan H6) and two hiPSC lines from a normal individual, three hiPSC lines from a normal individual with Bombay blood group phenotype, and two hiPSC lines from a patient with tyrosinemia. Forty-nine protein spots showed statistically significant differences between two human ESC lines and seven human iPSCs. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 48 proteins belonging to different biological processes, including cytoskeleton organization, energy and metabolic processes, protein synthesis and processing, signal transduction, cell growth and proliferation, cellular trafficking, transcription, calcium binding and immune response. Our results showed that hESCs and hiPSCs had subtle differences at the proteome level thus warranting more detailed and systematic examinations of these cells.

  7. Genetic background alters the severity and onset of neuromuscular disease caused by the loss of ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (usp14.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea G Marshall

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified and characterized an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU induced mutation in Usp14 (nmf375 that leads to adult-onset neurological disease. The nmf375 mutation causes aberrant splicing of Usp14 mRNA, resulting in a 95% reduction in USP14. We previously showed that loss of USP14 in ataxia (ax (J mice results in reduced ubiquitin levels, motor endplate disease, Purkinje cell axonal dystrophy and decreased hippocampal paired pulse facilitation (PPF during the first 4-6 weeks of life, and early postnatal lethality by two months of age. Although the loss of USP14 is comparable between the nmf375 and ax (J mice, the nmf375 mice did not exhibit these ax (J developmental abnormalities. However, by 12 weeks of age the nmf375 mutants present with ubiquitin depletion and motor endplate disease, indicating a continual role for USP14-mediated regulation of ubiquitin pools and neuromuscular junction (NMJ structure in adult mice. The observation that motor endplate disease was only seen after ubiquitin depletion suggests that the preservation of NMJ structure requires the stable maintenance of synaptic ubiquitin pools. Differences in genetic background were shown to affect ubiquitin expression and dramatically alter the phenotypes caused by USP14 deficiency.

  8. New progress in genetic background of vitiligo immunology%白癜风免疫学遗传背景新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王倩倩; 项蕾红

    2014-01-01

    近来白癜风致病基因被证实可以调控与白癜风相关自身免疫性疾病的发病,这说明白癜风与其他自身免疫性疾病发病密切关联,它们有共同的致病因素,受共同易感基因调控。因此探讨白癜风免疫学遗传背景可以为白癜风的治疗提供良好的科研基础。%Recently, vitiligo pathogenic genes were confirmed to regulate the incidence of vitiligo associated autoimmune diseases, which indicated that vitiligo and some other autoimmune diseases may be closely related. Common pathogenetic factors and predisposing genes regulation may affect both vitiligo and vitiligo associated autoimmune diseases. Therefore, the investigation of the genetic background of vitiligo immunology will provide good scientific research basement for the vitiligo treatment.

  9. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  10. Culture and establishment of self-renewing human and mouse adult liver and pancreas 3D organoids and their genetic manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broutier, Laura; Andersson-Rolf, Amanda; Hindley, Christopher J; Boj, Sylvia F; Clevers, Hans; Koo, Bon-Kyoung; Huch, Meritxell

    2016-09-01

    Adult somatic tissues have proven difficult to expand in vitro, largely because of the complexity of recreating appropriate environmental signals in culture. We have overcome this problem recently and developed culture conditions for adult stem cells that allow the long-term expansion of adult primary tissues from small intestine, stomach, liver and pancreas into self-assembling 3D structures that we have termed 'organoids'. We provide a detailed protocol that describes how to grow adult mouse and human liver and pancreas organoids, from cell isolation and long-term expansion to genetic manipulation in vitro. Liver and pancreas cells grow in a gel-based extracellular matrix (ECM) and a defined medium. The cells can self-organize into organoids that self-renew in vitro while retaining their tissue-of-origin commitment, genetic stability and potential to differentiate into functional cells in vitro (hepatocytes) and in vivo (hepatocytes and endocrine cells). Genetic modification of these organoids opens up avenues for the manipulation of adult stem cells in vitro, which could facilitate the study of human biology and allow gene correction for regenerative medicine purposes. The complete protocol takes 1-4 weeks to generate self-renewing 3D organoids and to perform genetic manipulation experiments. Personnel with basic scientific training can conduct this protocol.

  11. Genetic deletion of mouse platelet glycoprotein Ibbeta produces a Bernard-Soulier phenotype with increased alpha-granule size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazunobu; Martinez, Constantino; Russell, Susan; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan; Fiering, Steven; Ware, Jerry

    2004-10-15

    Here we report the characterization of a mouse model of the Bernard-Soulier syndrome generated by a targeted disruption of the gene encoding the glycoprotein (GP) Ibbeta subunit of the GP Ib-IX complex. Similar to a Bernard-Soulier model generated by disruption of the mouse GP Ibalpha subunit, GP Ibbeta(Null) mice display macrothrombocytopenia and a severe bleeding phenotype. When examined by transmission electron microscopy, the large platelets produced by a GP Ibbeta(Null) genotype revealed alpha-granules with increased size as compared with the alpha-granules from control mouse platelets. Data are presented linking the overexpression of a septin protein, SEPT5, to the presence of larger alpha-granules in the GP Ibbeta(Null) platelet. The SEPT5 gene resides approximately 250 nucleotides 5' to the GP Ibbeta gene and has been associated with modulating exocytosis from neurons and platelets as part of a presynaptic protein complex. Fusion mRNA transcripts present in megakaryocytes can contain both the SEPT5 and GP Ibbeta coding sequences as a result in an imperfect polyadenylation signal within the 3' end of both the human and mouse SEPT5 genes. We observed a 2- to 3-fold increase in SEPT5 protein levels in platelets from GP Ibbeta(Null) mice. These results implicate SEPT5 levels in the maintenance of normal alpha-granule size and may explain the variant granules associated with human GP Ibbeta mutations and the Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

  12. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  13. 黑龙江省主栽糯稻遗传背景研究%Research on Genetic Background of Main Cultivated Glutinous Rice in Heilongjiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宇强; 刘晴; 高世伟; 聂守军; 谢树鹏; 魏中华; 王翠玲; 刘立超

    2016-01-01

    选取黑龙江省近年审定的糯稻品种,对其遗传背景进行分析,试图挖掘其系谱中的骨干亲本,为糯稻品种的选育和改良提供理论依据。结果表明,大部分通过审定的糯稻品种都含有日本水稻的血缘;一些骨干亲本能够直接育成或衍生出糯稻品种,为优秀的糯稻品种选育奠定了基础。今后,应加强骨干亲本的筛选和利用,以为糯稻品种的选育和改良提供帮助。%The genetic backgrounds of main glutinous rice were analyzed in this study, which were approved in recent years in Hei-longjiang Province. The author tries to find out the mainstay parents in pedigree, provides theoretical basis for glutinous rice variety breeding and improvement. The results showed that most of the glutinous rice approved contain the consanguinity of Japanese rice, some mainstay parents can directly breed or derived glutinous rice varieties and lay the foundations for the breeding of glutinous rice. The authors suggested that future breeding program, emphysives on the selection and utilization of mainstay parents.

  14. Effects of feeding deoxynivalenol (DON)-contaminated wheat to laying hens and roosters of different genetic background on the reproductive performance and health of the newly hatched chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahem, Mohammad; Kersten, Susanne; Valenta, Hana; Breves, Gerhard; Beineke, Andreas; Hermeyer, Kathrin; Dänicke, Sven

    2014-08-01

    A total of 216 23-week-old laying hens from two different genetic backgrounds (half of the birds were Lohmann brown [LB] and [LSL] hens, respectively) and 24 adult roosters were assigned to a feeding trial to study the effect of increasing concentrations of deoxynivalenol (DON) in the diet (0, 5, 10 mg/kg) on the reproductive performance of hens and roosters, and the health of the newly hatched chicks. Hatchability was adversely affected by the presence of DON in LB hens' diet, while the hatchability of the LSL chicks was significantly higher than LB chicks. An interaction effect between DON in the hens' diet and the breed was noticed on fertility, as the fertility was decreased in the eggs of LB hens receiving 10 mg/kg DON in their diet and increased in the eggs of LSL hens fed 10 mg/kg DON. Moreover, spleen relative weight was significantly decreased in the chicks hatched from eggs of hens fed contaminated diets, while gizzard relative weight was significantly decreased in LB chicks with 10 mg/kg DON in their diet compared with the control group. On the other hand, the chicks' haematology and organ histopathology were not affected by the dietary treatment. Additionally, the presence of DON in the roosters' diet had no effect on fertility (the percentage of fertile eggs of all laid eggs). Consequently, the current results indicate a negative impact of DON in LB hens' diet on fertility and hatchability, indicating that the breed of the hens seems to be an additional factor influencing the effect of DON on reproductive performance of the laying hens.

  15. Qualitative analysis of mouse specific-locus mutations: information on genetic organization, gene expression, and the chromosomal nature of induced lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, L.B.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of mouse specific-locus (SL) mutations at three loci has identified over 33 distinct complementation groups - most of which are probably overlapping deficiencies - and 13 to 14 new functional units. The complementation maps that have been generated for the d-se and c regions include numerous vital functions; however, some of the genes in these regions are non-vital. At such loci, hypomorphic mutants must represent intragenic alterations, and some viable nulls could conceivably be intragenic lesions also. Analysis of SL mutations has provided information on genetic expression. Homozygous deficiencies can be completely viable or can kill at any one of a range of developmental stages. Heterozygonus deficiencies of up to 6 cM or more in genetic length have been recovered and propagated. The time of death of homozygous and the degree of inviability of heterozygous deficiencies are related more to specific content of the missing segment than to its length. Combinations of deficiencies with x-autosome translocations that inactivate the homologous region in a mosaic fashion have shown that organismic lethals are not necessarily cell lethal. The spectrum of mutations induced depends on the nature of the mutagen and the type of germ cell exposed. Radiation of spermatogonia produces intragenic as well as null mutations. Spontaneous mutations have an admixture of types not present in populations of mutations induced in germ cells, and this raises doubts concerning the accuracy of doubling-dose calculations in genetic risk estimation. The analysis of SL mutations has yielded genetic tools for the construction of detailed gene-dosage series, cis-trans comparisons, the mapping of known genes and identification of new genes, genetic rescue of various types, and the identification and isolation of DNA sequences. (ERB)

  16. Differential Insulin Secretion of High-Fat Diet-Fed C57BL/6NN and C57BL/6NJ Mice: Implications of Mixed Genetic Background in Metabolic Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Attané

    Full Text Available Many metabolic studies employ tissue-specific gene knockout mice, which requires breeding of floxed gene mice, available mostly on C57BL/6N (NN genetic background, with cre or Flp recombinase-expressing mice, available on C57BL/6J (JJ background, resulting in the generation of mixed C57BL/6NJ (NJ genetic background mice. Recent awareness of many genetic differences between NN and JJ strains including the deletion of nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (nnt, necessitates examination of the consequence of mixed NJ background on glucose tolerance, beta cell function and other metabolic parameters. Male mice with NN and NJ genetic background were fed with normal or high fat diets (HFD for 12 weeks and glucose and insulin homeostasis were studied. Genotype had no effect on body weight and food intake in mice fed normal or high fat diets. Insulinemia in the fed and fasted states and after a glucose challenge was lower in HFD-fed NJ mice, even though their glycemia and insulin sensitivity were similar to NN mice. NJ mice showed mild glucose intolerance. Moreover, glucose- but not KCl-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets was decreased in HFD-fed NJ vs NN mice without changes in insulin content and beta cell mass. Under normal diet, besides reduced fed insulinemia, NN and NJ mice presented similar metabolic parameters. However, HFD-fed NJ mice displayed lower fed and fasted insulinemia and glucose-induced insulin secretion in vivo and ex vivo, as compared to NN mice. These results strongly caution against using unmatched mixed genetic background C57BL/6 mice for comparisons, particularly under HFD conditions.

  17. Genetic Dissection of Ventral Folding Morphogenesis in Mouse: Embryonic Visceral Endoderm-supplied BMP2 Positions Head and Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Svetlana; Lacy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Ventral folding morphogenesis, a vital morphogenetic process in amniotes, mediates gut endoderm internalization, linear heart tube formation, ventral body wall closure and encasement of the fetus in extraembryonic membranes. Aberrant ventral folding morphogenesis underlies a number of birth defects, such as gastroschisis and ectopia cordis in human and misplacement of head and heart in mouse. Recent cell lineage-specific mouse mutant analyses identified the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) pathway and Anterior Visceral Endoderm (AVE) as key regulators of anterior ventral folding morphogenesis. Loss of BMP2 expression solely from embryonic visceral endoderm (EmVE) and the AVE blocks formation of foregut invagination, and simultaneously, aberrantly positions the heart anterior/dorsal to the head, suggesting a mechanistic link between foregut and head/heart morphogenesis. PMID:23706163

  18. Protection from Severe Influenza Virus Infections in Mice Carrying the Mx1 Influenza Virus Resistance Gene Strongly Depends on Genetic Background.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza virus infections represent a serious threat to human health. Both extrinsic and intrinsic factors determine the severity of influenza. The MX dynamin-like GTPase 1 (Mx1) gene has been shown to confer strong resistance to influenza A virus infections in mice. Most laboratory mouse strains, including C57BL/6J, carry nonsense or deletion mutations in Mx1 and thus a nonfunctional allele, whereas wild-derived mouse strains carry a wild-type Mx1 allele. Congenic C57BL/6J (B6-Mx1 ...

  19. Genetic mapping in mice reveals the involvement of Pcdh9 in long-term social and object recognition and sensorimotor development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruining, Hilgo; Matsui, Asuka; Oguro-Ando, Asami; Kahn, René S.; Van'T Spijker, Heleen M.; Akkermans, Guus; Stiedl, Oliver; Van Engeland, Herman; Koopmans, Bastijn; Van Lith, Hein A.; Oppelaar, Hugo; Tieland, Liselotte; Nonkes, Lourens J.; Yagi, Takeshi; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Burbach, J. Peter H; Yamamoto, Nobuhiko; Kas, Martien J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative genetic analysis of basic mouse behaviors is a powerful tool to identify novel genetic phenotypes contributing to neurobehavioral disorders. Here, we analyzed genetic contributions to single-trial, long-term social and nonsocial recognition and subsequently studied the functi

  20. The interfascicular trigeminal nucleus: a precerebellar nucleus in the mouse defined by retrograde neuronal tracing and genetic fate mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yuhong; Tvrdik, Petr; Makki, Nadja; Machold, Robert; Paxinos, George; Watson, Charles

    2013-02-15

    We have found a previously unreported precerebellar nucleus located among the emerging fibers of the motor root of the trigeminal nerve in the mouse, which we have called the interfascicular trigeminal nucleus (IF5). This nucleus had previously been named the tensor tympani part of the motor trigeminal nucleus (5TT) in rodent brain atlases, because it was thought to be a subset of small motor neurons of the motor trigeminal nucleus innervating the tensor tympani muscle. However, following injection of retrograde tracer in the cerebellum, the labeled neurons in IF5 were found to be choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) negative, indicating that they are not motor neurons. The cells of IF5 are strongly labeled in mice from Wnt1Cre and Atoh1 CreER lineage fate mapping, in common with the major precerebellar nuclei that arise from the rhombic lip and that issue mossy fibers. Analysis of sections from mouse Hoxa3, Hoxb1, and Egr2 Cre labeled lineages shows that the neurons of IF5 arise from rhombomeres caudal to rhombomere 4, most likely from rhombomeres 6-8. We conclude that IF5 is a significant precerebellar nucleus in the mouse that shares developmental gene expression characteristics with mossy fiber precerebellar nuclei that arise from the caudal rhombic lip.

  1. Genetic background (DDD/Sgn versus C57BL/6J) strongly influences postnatal growth of male mice carrying the A(y) allele at the agouti locus: identification of quantitative trait loci associated with diabetes and body weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Jun-ichi; Satou, Kunio

    2013-05-04

    Mice carrying the A(y) allele at the agouti locus become obese and are heavier than their non-A(y) littermates. However, this does not hold true for the genetic background of the DDD mouse strain. At 22 weeks of age, DDD.Cg-A(y) females are heavier than DDD females, whereas DDD.Cg-A(y) males are lighter than DDD males. This study aimed to determine the possible cause and identify the genes responsible for the lower body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) males. Growth curves of DDD.Cg-A(y) mice were analyzed and compared with those of B6.Cg-A(y) mice from 5 to 25 weeks. In DDD.Cg-A(y) males, body weight gain stopped between 16 and 17 weeks and the body weight gradually decreased; thus, the lower body weight was a consequence of body weight loss. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in backcrossed (BC) males of DDD × (B6 × DDD.Cg-A(y)) F(1)-A(y) mice. For the body weight at 25 weeks, significant QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1 and 4. The DDD allele was associated with a lower body weight at both loci. In particular, the QTL on chromosome 4 interacted with the A(y) allele. Furthermore, suggestive QTLs for plasma glucose and high molecular weight adiponectin levels were coincidentally mapped to chromosome 4. The DDD allele was associated with increased glucose and decreased adiponectin levels. When the body weight at 25 weeks and plasma glucose levels were considered as dependent and independent variables, respectively, BC A(y) males were classified into two groups according to statistical analysis using the partition method. Mice of one group had significantly higher glucose and lower adiponectin levels than those of the other group and exhibited body weight loss as observed with DDD-A(y) males. The lower body weight of DDD.Cg-A(y) male mice was a consequence of body weight loss. Diabetes mellitus has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor causing body weight loss. The QTL on distal chromosome 4 contained the major responsible genes. This QTL

  2. Biological significance of DNA adducts: comparison of increments over background for various biomarkers of genotoxicity in L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Andreas; Richter, Ingrid; Lutz, Ursula; Wanek, Paul; Stopper, Helga; Lutz, Werner K

    2009-08-01

    DNA is affected by background damage of the order of one lesion per one hundred thousand nucleotides, with depurination and oxidative damage accounting for a major part. This damage contributes to spontaneous mutation and cancer. DNA adducts can be measured with high sensitivity, with limits of detection lower than one adduct per one billion nucleotides. Minute exposures to an exogenous DNA-reactive agent may therefore result in measurable adduct formation, although, as an increment over total DNA damage, a small increment in mutation cannot be measured and would be considered negligible. Here, we investigated whether this discrepancy also holds for adducts that are present as background induced by oxidative stress. L5178Y tk(+/-) mouse lymphoma cells were incubated for 4h with hydrogen peroxide (0, 0.8, 4, 20, 100, 500muM) or cumene hydroperoxide (0, 0.37, 1.1, 3.3, 10muM). Five endpoints of genotoxicity were measured in parallel from aliquots of three replicates of large batches of cells: Two DNA adducts, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) and 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (varepsilondAdo) measured by LC-MS/MS, as well as strand breaks assessed with the comet assay and in vitro micronucleus test, and gene mutation as assessed using the thymidine kinase gene mutation assay. Background measures of 8-oxodGuo and varepsilondAdo were 500-1000 and 50-90 adducts per 10(9) nucleotides. Upon treatment, neither hydrogen peroxide nor cumene hydroperoxide significantly increased the DNA adduct levels above control. In contrast, dose-related increases above background were observed with both oxidants in the comet assay, the micronucleus test and the gene mutation assay. Differences in sensitivity of the assays were quantified by estimating the concentration of oxidant that resulted in a doubling of the background measure. We conclude that the increase in DNA breakage and mutation induced by hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide observed in our in vitro

  3. Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1-Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    1   AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0067 TITLE: Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1 -Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered...Mar 2014 - 14 Mar 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Testing Current and Developing Novel Therapies for NF1 - Mutant Sarcomas in a Genetically Engineered...Patients with Neurofibromatosis type 1 ( NF1 ) are at increased risk for developing malignant tumors of the connective tissue called soft-tissue sarcomas

  4. Effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor on behavior and key members of the brain serotonin system in mouse strains genetically predisposed to behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumenko, Vladimir S; Bazovkina, Daria V; Semenova, Alina A; Tsybko, Anton S; Il'chibaeva, Tatyana V; Kondaurova, Elena M; Popova, Nina K

    2013-12-01

    The effect of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on behavior and on the serotonin (5-HT) system of a mouse strain predisposed to depressive-like behavior, ASC/Icg (Antidepressant Sensitive Cataleptics), in comparison with the parental "nondepressive" CBA/Lac mice was studied. Within 7 days after acute administration, GDNF (800 ng, i.c.v.) decreased cataleptic immobility but increased depressive-like behavioral traits in both investigated mouse strains and produced anxiolytic effects in ASC mice. The expression of the gene encoding the key enzyme for 5-HT biosynthesis in the brain, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph-2), and 5-HT1A receptor gene in the midbrain as well as 5-HT2A receptor gene in the frontal cortex were increased in GDNF-treated ASC mice. At the same time, GDNF decreased 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor gene expression in the hippocampus of ASC mice. GDNF failed to change Tph2, 5-HT1A , or 5-HT2A receptor mRNA levels in CBA mice as well as 5-HT transporter gene expression and 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptor functional activity in both investigated mouse strains. The results show 1) a GDNF-induced increase in the expression of key genes of the brain 5-HT system, Tph2, 5-HT1A , and 5-HT2A receptors, and 2) significant genotype-dependent differences in the 5-HT system response to GDNF treatment. The data suggest that genetically defined cross-talk between neurotrophic factors and the brain 5-HT system underlies the variability in behavioral response to GDNF.

  5. Efficient genetic manipulation of the NOD-Rag1-/-IL2RgammaC-null mouse by combining in vitro fertilization and CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Cowley, Dale O; Banner, Debra; Holle, Eric; Zhang, Liguo; Su, Lishan

    2014-06-17

    Humanized mouse models have become increasingly important and widely used in modeling human diseases in biomedical research. Immunodeficient mice such as NOD-Rag1-/-IL2RgammaC-null (NRG) or NOD-SCID-IL2RgammaC-null (NSG) mice are critical for efficient engraftment of human cells or tissues. However, their genetic modification remains challenging due to a lack of embryonic stem cells and difficulty in the collection of timed embryos after superovulation. Here, we report the generation of gene knockout NRG mice by combining in vitro fertilization (IVF) and CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Sufficient numbers of fertilized embryos were produced through IVF, and a high rate of Fah gene targeting was achieved with microinjection of Cas9 mRNA, gRNA and single strand oligonucleotide DNA (ssDNA) into the embryos. The technology paves the way to construct NRG or NSG mutant mice to facilitate new humanized mouse models. The technology can also be readily adapted to introduce mutations in other species such as swine and non-human primates.

  6. Mutantes rin, norA, og c e hp em diferentes backgrounds genotípicos de tomateiro Rin, norA, og c and hp mutants in tomatos with different genetic backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Ventura Faria

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a viabilidade do emprego isolado e simultâneo dos mutantes rin, norA, og c e hp em heterozigose, em genótipos de tomateiro, visando à melhoria da qualidade pós-colheita dos frutos. Foram avaliados 18 genótipos que diferem quanto às combinações entre estes locos em dois diferentes backgrounds (FloraDade e background experimental. Contrastes não ortogonais foram estabelecidos para quantificar os efeitos dos alelos mutantes, isoladamente ou combinados em um mesmo genótipo, em dois backgrounds, sobre a produção total e produção precoce de frutos, massa média, firmeza, coloração externa, teores de licopeno e betacaroteno dos frutos. Os alelos norA e rin em heterozigose, no background FloraDade, desaceleraram a taxa de perda de firmeza e reduziram os teores de licopeno e betacaroteno nos frutos maduros. As combinações heterozigotas entre o mutante rin e os mutantes norA, og c e hp aumentaram a firmeza dos frutos. O efeito do genótipo rin+/rin nor+/norA sobre a firmeza dos frutos foi o somatório dos efeitos individuais dos locos. O alelo rin mostrou-se, individualmente, mais eficiente do que norA, em prolongar a firmeza dos frutos. Os genótipos og c+/og c e hp+/hp, juntos ou isolados, aumentaram a coloração dos frutos rin+/rin. Recomenda-se a utilização dos genótipos rin+/rin nor+/norA no desenvolvimento de híbridos longa vida, buscando-se, contudo, backgrounds que sofram prejuízo menor sobre a coloração dos frutos e adicionando-se mutantes og c+/og c e hp+/hp.The objective of this work was to assess the viability of single and simultaneous use of rin, norA, og c and hp as heterozygotes in tomato genotypes in order to improve post-harvest fruit quality. Eighteen genotypes differing in combinations among these loci in two backgrounds (Floradade and experimental background were evaluated. Contrasts were used to quantify the effects of single and simultaneous application of mutant loci

  7. Two genetic determinants acquired late in Mus evolution regulate the inclusion of exon 5, which alters mouse APOBEC3 translation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like editing complex 3 (mA3, an intracellular antiviral factor, has 2 allelic variations that are linked with different susceptibilities to beta- and gammaretrovirus infections among various mouse strains. In virus-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice, mA3 transcripts are more abundant than those in susceptible BALB/c mice both in the spleen and bone marrow. These strains of mice also express mA3 transcripts with different splicing patterns: B6 mice preferentially express exon 5-deficient (Δ5 mA3 mRNA, while BALB/c mice produce exon 5-containing full-length mA3 mRNA as the major transcript. Although the protein product of the Δ5 mRNA exerts stronger antiretroviral activities than the full-length protein, how exon 5 affects mA3 antiviral activity, as well as the genetic mechanisms regulating exon 5 inclusion into the mA3 transcripts, remains largely uncharacterized. Here we show that mA3 exon 5 is indeed a functional element that influences protein synthesis at a post-transcriptional level. We further employed in vitro splicing assays using genomic DNA clones to identify two critical polymorphisms affecting the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 transcripts: the number of TCCT repeats upstream of exon 5 and the single nucleotide polymorphism within exon 5 located 12 bases upstream of the exon 5/intron 5 boundary. Distribution of the above polymorphisms among different Mus species indicates that the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 mRNA is a relatively recent event in the evolution of mice. The widespread geographic distribution of this exon 5-including genetic variant suggests that in some Mus populations the cost of maintaining an effective but mutagenic enzyme may outweigh its antiviral function.

  8. Molecular Targeted Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Flk1 Reveals Diagnosis and Prognosis Potential in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Prostate Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim W. Xuan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Molecular imaging techniques used to detect the initiation of disease have the potential to provide the best opportunity for early treatment and cure. This report aimed at testing the possibility that Flk1+ (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, a crucial angiogenesis factor of most tumor cells, could be a molecular targeted imaging marker for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer. We performed Flk1-targeted microbubble-enhanced ultrasound (US imaging of prostate cancer in a genetically engineered mouse model with normal-appearing intact US (negative prostates and with three different tumor sizes (small, medium, and large. Higher levels of Flk1+ molecular signals were identified in the intact US (negative prostate group by US-targeted imaging and immunohistochemical analysis. The increase in Flk1+ expression occurred prior to the angiogenesis switch-on phase and vascularity peak. After this peak accumulation stage of Flk1+ molecules, lower and stabilized levels of Flk1+ signals were maintained together with tumor growth from small, to medium, to large size. In a longitudinal observation in a subset (n = 5 of mice with established tumors, elevated Flk1+ signals were observed in tissues surrounding the prostate cancer, for example, the ipsilateral boundary zones between two developing tumor lobes, new tumor blood vessel recruits, the urethra border, and the pelvic node basin. The potential of Flk1-targeted US imaging as a predictive imaging tool was confirmed by correlation studies of three-dimensional US B-mode imaging, gross pathology, and histology analyses. The results of the application in a genetically engineered mouse model with prostate cancer of molecular Flk1-targeted US imaging support the contention that Flk1 can be used as a molecular imaging marker for small tumors undetectable by microimaging and as a molecular diagnostic and prognosis marker for tumor metastasis and progression.

  9. Genetic knock-down of HDAC3 does not modify disease-related phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Moumné

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an autosomal dominant progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expansion of a CAG/polyglutamine repeat for which there are no disease modifying treatments. In recent years, transcriptional dysregulation has emerged as a pathogenic process that appears early in disease progression and has been recapitulated across multiple HD models. Altered histone acetylation has been proposed to underlie this transcriptional dysregulation and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, have been shown to improve polyglutamine-dependent phenotypes in numerous HD models. However potent pan-HDAC inhibitors such as SAHA display toxic side-effects. To better understand the mechanism underlying this potential therapeutic benefit and to dissociate the beneficial and toxic effects of SAHA, we set out to identify the specific HDAC(s involved in this process. For this purpose, we are exploring the effect of the genetic reduction of specific HDACs on HD-related phenotypes in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. The study presented here focuses on HDAC3, which, as a class I HDAC, is one of the preferred targets of SAHA and is directly involved in histone deacetylation. To evaluate a potential benefit of Hdac3 genetic reduction in R6/2, we generated a mouse carrying a critical deletion in the Hdac3 gene. We confirmed that the complete knock-out of Hdac3 is embryonic lethal. To test the effects of HDAC3 inhibition, we used Hdac3(+/- heterozygotes to reduce nuclear HDAC3 levels in R6/2 mice. We found that Hdac3 knock-down does not ameliorate physiological or behavioural phenotypes and has no effect on molecular changes including dysregulated transcripts. We conclude that HDAC3 should not be considered as the major mediator of the beneficial effect induced by SAHA and other HDAC inhibitors in HD.

  10. Two genetic determinants acquired late in Mus evolution regulate the inclusion of exon 5, which alters mouse APOBEC3 translation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mouse apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like editing complex 3 (mA3, an intracellular antiviral factor, has 2 allelic variations that are linked with different susceptibilities to beta- and gammaretrovirus infections among various mouse strains. In virus-resistant C57BL/6 (B6 mice, mA3 transcripts are more abundant than those in susceptible BALB/c mice both in the spleen and bone marrow. These strains of mice also express mA3 transcripts with different splicing patterns: B6 mice preferentially express exon 5-deficient (Δ5 mA3 mRNA, while BALB/c mice produce exon 5-containing full-length mA3 mRNA as the major transcript. Although the protein product of the Δ5 mRNA exerts stronger antiretroviral activities than the full-length protein, how exon 5 affects mA3 antiviral activity, as well as the genetic mechanisms regulating exon 5 inclusion into the mA3 transcripts, remains largely uncharacterized. Here we show that mA3 exon 5 is indeed a functional element that influences protein synthesis at a post-transcriptional level. We further employed in vitro splicing assays using genomic DNA clones to identify two critical polymorphisms affecting the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 transcripts: the number of TCCT repeats upstream of exon 5 and the single nucleotide polymorphism within exon 5 located 12 bases upstream of the exon 5/intron 5 boundary. Distribution of the above polymorphisms among different Mus species indicates that the inclusion of exon 5 into mA3 mRNA is a relatively recent event in the evolution of mice. The widespread geographic distribution of this exon 5-including genetic variant suggests that in some Mus populations the cost of maintaining an effective but mutagenic enzyme may outweigh its antiviral function.

  11. Background Material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandersen, Marianne; Hyytiäinen, Kari; Saraiva, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders.......This document serves as a background material to the BONUS Pilot Scenario Workshop, which aims to develop harmonised regional storylines of socio-ecological futures in the Baltic Sea region in a collaborative effort together with other BONUS projects and stakeholders....

  12. Histochemical studies on genetical control of hormonal enzyme inducibility in the mouse. VI. Effects of short term castration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, K; Kirkeby, S; Blecher, S R

    1983-01-01

    The regional histology and esterase activity of the mouse epididymis after 24, 48, and 72 hr castration is reported. Differential sensitivity to androgen deprivation among the various epithelial cell types is described, allowing of positive identification of the cell types previously observed...... to survive long-term castration. The possibility of an androgen binding protein, as described in the rat and rabbit, is suggested on morphological grounds. The epididymal body appears to contain a class of highly androgen sensitive cells that degenerate rapidly following castration and a second class...

  13. Identification of multiple genetic loci in the mouse controlling immobility time in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elnaga, Ahmed F; Torigoe, Daisuke; Fouda, Mohamed M; Darwish, Ragab A; Abou-Ismail, Usama A; Morimatsu, Masami; Agui, Takashi

    2015-05-01

    Depression is one of the most famous psychiatric disorders in humans in all over the countries and considered a complex neurobehavioral trait and difficult to identify causal genes. Tail suspension test (TST) and forced swimming test (FST) are widely used for assessing depression-like behavior and antidepressant activity in mice. A variety of antidepressant agents are known to reduce immobility time in both TST and FST. To identify genetic determinants of immobility duration in both tests, we analyzed 101 F2 mice from an intercross between C57BL/6 and DBA/2 strains. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using 106 microsatellite markers revealed three loci (two significant and one suggestive) and five suggestive loci controlling immobility time in the TST and FST, respectively. Results of QTL analysis suggest a broad description of the genetic architecture underlying depression, providing underpinnings for identifying novel molecular targets for antidepressants to clear the complex genetic mechanisms of depressive disorders.

  14. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  15. Pegylated liposomal formulation of doxorubicin overcomes drug resistance in a genetically engineered mouse model of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füredi, András; Szebényi, Kornélia; Tóth, Szilárd; Cserepes, Mihály; Hámori, Lilla; Nagy, Veronika; Karai, Edina; Vajdovich, Péter; Imre, Tímea; Szabó, Pál; Szüts, Dávid; Tóvári, József; Szakács, Gergely

    2017-09-10

    Success of cancer treatment is often hampered by the emergence of multidrug resistance (MDR) mediated by P-glycoprotein (ABCB1/Pgp). Doxorubicin (DOX) is recognized by Pgp and therefore it can induce therapy resistance in breast cancer patients. In this study our aim was to evaluate the susceptibility of the pegylated liposomal formulation of doxorubicin (PLD/Doxil®/Caelyx®) to MDR. We show that cells selected to be resistant to DOX are cross-resistant to PLD and PLD is also ineffective in an allograft model of doxorubicin-resistant mouse B-cell leukemia. In contrast, PLD was far more efficient than DOX as reflected by a significant increase of both relapse-free and overall survival of Brca1(-/-);p53(-/-) mammary tumor bearing mice. Increased survival could be explained by the delayed onset of drug resistance. Consistent with the higher Pgp levels needed to confer resistance, PLD administration was able to overcome doxorubicin insensitivity of the mouse mammary tumors. Our results indicate that the favorable pharmacokinetics achieved with PLD can effectively overcome Pgp-mediated resistance, suggesting that PLD therapy could be a promising strategy for the treatment of therapy-resistant breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  17. Lipidomic and metabolomic characterization of a genetically modified mouse model of the early stages of human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Anne Julie; Weir, Jacquelyn M; De Souza, David Peter;

    2016-01-01

    The early mechanisms regulating progression towards beta cell failure in type 1 diabetes (T1D) are poorly understood, but it is generally acknowledged that genetic and environmental components are involved. The metabolomic phenotype is sensitive to minor variations in both, and accordingly reflec...

  18. Genetic control of the innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sweet Matthew

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Susceptibility to infectious diseases is directed, in part, by the interaction between the invading pathogen and host macrophages. This study examines the influence of genetic background on host-pathogen interactions, by assessing the transcriptional responses of macrophages from five inbred mouse strains to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, a major determinant of responses to gram-negative microorganisms. Results The mouse strains examined varied greatly in the number, amplitude and rate of induction of genes expressed in response to LPS. The response was attenuated in the C3H/HeJlpsd strain, which has a mutation in the LPS receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4. Variation between mouse strains allowed clustering into early (C57Bl/6J and DBA/2J and delayed (BALB/c and C3H/ARC transcriptional phenotypes. There was no clear correlation between gene induction patterns and variation at the Bcg locus (Slc11A1 or propensity to bias Th1 versus Th2 T cell activation responses. Conclusion Macrophages from each strain responded to LPS with unique gene expression profiles. The variation apparent between genetic backgrounds provides insights into the breadth of possible inflammatory responses, and paradoxically, this divergence was used to identify a common transcriptional program that responds to TLR4 signalling, irrespective of genetic background. Our data indicates that many additional genetic loci control the nature and the extent of transcriptional responses promoted by a single pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP, such as LPS.

  19. Cross-species analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of MAPK-driven colorectal cancer identifies hallmarks of the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Belmont

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Effective treatment options for advanced colorectal cancer (CRC are limited, survival rates are poor and this disease continues to be a leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite being a highly heterogeneous disease, a large subset of individuals with sporadic CRC typically harbor relatively few established ‘driver’ lesions. Here, we describe a collection of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs of sporadic CRC that combine lesions frequently altered in human patients, including well-characterized tumor suppressors and activators of MAPK signaling. Primary tumors from these models were profiled, and individual GEMM tumors segregated into groups based on their genotypes. Unique allelic and genotypic expression signatures were generated from these GEMMs and applied to clinically annotated human CRC patient samples. We provide evidence that a Kras signature derived from these GEMMs is capable of distinguishing human tumors harboring KRAS mutation, and tracks with poor prognosis in two independent human patient cohorts. Furthermore, the analysis of a panel of human CRC cell lines suggests that high expression of the GEMM Kras signature correlates with sensitivity to targeted pathway inhibitors. Together, these findings implicate GEMMs as powerful preclinical tools with the capacity to recapitulate relevant human disease biology, and support the use of genetic signatures generated in these models to facilitate future drug discovery and validation efforts.

  20. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan J Kipp

    Full Text Available We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States.

  1. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Evan J; Mariscal, Jacqueline; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, Margaret; Waldrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris) and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri) at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States. PMID:27759765

  2. Analysis of tumor metabolism reveals mitochondrial glucose oxidation in genetically diverse, human glioblastomas in the mouse brain in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Valencia, Isaac; Yang, Chendong; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Cho, Steve; Baek, Hyeonman; Yang, Xiao-Li; Rajagopalan, Kartik N.; Maddie, Melissa; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Zhao, Zhenze; Cai, Ling; Good, Levi; Tu, Benjamin P.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce E.; Matés, José M.; Pascual, Juan M.; Maher, Elizabeth A.; Malloy, Craig R.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Bachoo, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Dysregulated metabolism is a hallmark of cancer cell lines, but little is known about the fate of glucose and other nutrients in tumors growing in their native microenvironment. To study tumor metabolism in vivo, we used an orthotopic mouse model of primary human glioblastoma (GBM). We infused 13C-labeled nutrients into mice bearing three independent GBM lines, each with a distinct set of mutations. All three lines displayed glycolysis, as expected for aggressive tumors. They also displayed unexpected metabolic complexity, oxidizing glucose via pyruvate dehydrogenase and the citric acid cycle, and using glucose to supply anaplerosis and other biosynthetic activities. Comparing the tumors to surrounding brain revealed obvious metabolic differences, notably the accumulation of a large glutamine pool within the tumors. Many of these same activities were conserved in cells cultured ex vivo from the tumors. Thus GBM cells utilize mitochondrial glucose oxidation during aggressive tumor growth in vivo. PMID:22682223

  3. Genetically engineered Lactococcus lactis protect against house dust mite allergy in a BALB/c mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunqing Ai

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccine based on lactic acid bacteria is an attractive concept for the prevention and treatment of allergic diseases, but their mechanisms of action in vivo are poorly understood. Therefore, we sought to investigate how recombinant major dust mite allergen Der p2-expressing Lactococcus lactis as a mucosal vaccine induced the immune tolerance against house dust mite allergy in a mouse model.Three strains of recombinant L. lactis producing Der p2 in different cell components (extracellular, intracellular and cell wall were firstly constructed. Their prophylactic potential was evaluated in a Der p2-sensitised mouse model, and immunomodulation properties at the cellular level were determined by measuring cytokine production in vitro.Der p2 expressed in the different recombinant L. lactis strains was recognized by a polyclonal anti-Der p2 antibody. Oral treatment with the recombinant L. lactis prior sensitization significantly prevented the development of airway inflammation in the Der p2-sensitized mice, as determined by the attenuation of inflammatory cells infiltration in the lung tissues and decrease of Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage. In addition, the serum allergen-specific IgE levels were significantly reduced, and the levels of IL-4 in the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes cell cultures were also markedly decreased upon allergen stimulation in the mice fed with the recombinant L. lactis strains. These protective effects correlated with a significant up-regulation of regulatory T cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes.Oral pretreatment with live recombinant L. lactis prevented the development of allergen-induced airway inflammation primarily by the induction of specific mucosal immune tolerance.

  4. Genetic knock-down of HDAC7 does not ameliorate disease pathogenesis in the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline L Benn

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is an inherited, progressive neurological disorder caused by a CAG/polyglutamine repeat expansion, for which there is no effective disease modifying therapy. In recent years, transcriptional dysregulation has emerged as a pathogenic process that appears early in disease progression. Administration of histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors such as suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA have consistently shown therapeutic potential in models of HD, at least partly through increasing the association of acetylated histones with down-regulated genes and by correcting mRNA abnormalities. The HDAC enzyme through which SAHA mediates its beneficial effects in the R6/2 mouse model of HD is not known. Therefore, we have embarked on a series of genetic studies to uncover the HDAC target that is relevant to therapeutic development for HD. HDAC7 is of interest in this context because SAHA has been shown to decrease HDAC7 expression in cell culture systems in addition to inhibiting enzyme activity. After confirming that expression levels of Hdac7 are decreased in the brains of wild type and R6/2 mice after SAHA administration, we performed a genetic cross to determine whether genetic reduction of Hdac7 would alleviate phenotypes in the R6/2 mice. We found no improvement in a number of physiological or behavioral phenotypes. Similarly, the dysregulated expression levels of a number of genes of interest were not improved suggesting that reduction in Hdac7 does not alleviate the R6/2 HD-related transcriptional dysregulation. Therefore, we conclude that the beneficial effects of HDAC inhibitors are not predominantly mediated through the inhibition of HDAC7.

  5. A new humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model combines the genetic features, pathogenesis of neurons and glia and late disease onset of SCA3/MJD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switonski, Pawel M; Szlachcic, Wojciech J; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J; Figiel, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3/MJD) is a neurodegenerative disease triggered by the expansion of CAG repeats in the ATXN3 gene. Here, we report the generation of the first humanized ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model (Ki91), which provides insights into the neuronal and glial pathology of SCA3/MJD. First, mutant ataxin-3 accumulated in cell nuclei across the Ki91 brain, showing diffused immunostaining and forming intranuclear inclusions. The humanized allele revealed expansion and contraction of CAG repeats in intergenerational transmissions. CAG mutation also exhibited age-dependent tissue-specific expansion, which was most prominent in the cerebellum, pons and testes of Ki91 animals. Moreover, Ki91 mice displayed neuroinflammatory processes, showing astrogliosis in the cerebellar white matter and the substantia nigra that paralleled the transcriptional deregulation of Serpina3n, a molecular sign of neurodegeneration and brain damage. Simultaneously, the cerebellar Purkinje cells in Ki91 mice showed neurodegeneration, a pronounced decrease in Calbindin D-28k immunoreactivity and a mild decrease in cell number, thereby modeling the degeneration of the cerebellum observed in SCA3. Moreover, these molecular and cellular neuropathologies were accompanied by late behavioral deficits in motor coordination observed in rotarod and static rod tests in heterozygous Ki91 animals. In summary, we created an ataxin-3 knock-in mouse model that combines the molecular and behavioral disease phenotypes with the genetic features of SCA3. This model will be very useful for studying the pathogenesis and responses to therapy of SCA3/MJD and other polyQ disorders.

  6. The genetic basis of obesity and type 2 diabetes: lessons from the new zealand obese mouse, a polygenic model of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Hans-Georg

    2010-01-01

    The New Zealand obese (NZO) mouse is a polygenic model of severe obesity and type 2 diabetes-like hyperglycaemia. Outcross experiments with lean strains have led to the identification of numerous susceptibility loci (quantitative trait loci (QTL)) for adiposity and/or hyperglycaemia. Several major QTL were successfully introgressed into lean strains, and two responsible genes, the RabGAP Tbc1d1 and the transcription factor Zfp69, were so far identified by a conventional strategy of positional cloning. Tbc1d1 controls substrate utilization in muscle; SJL mice carry a loss-of-function variant that shifts substrate oxidation from glucose to fat and suppresses adiposity as well as development of diabetes. The zinc finger domain transcription factor Zfp69 appears to regulate triglyceride storage in adipose tissue. Its normal allele Zfp69 causes a redistribution of triglycerides from gonadal stores to liver, and consequently enhances diabetes when introgressed from SJL into NZO, whereas the loss-of-function variant present in NZO and C57BL/6J reduces the prevalence of diabetes. Data from human patients suggest that the orthologs of both genes may play a role in the pathogenesis of the human metabolic syndrome. In addition to Tbc1d1 and Zfp69, variants of Lepr, Pctp, Abcg1, and Nmur2 located in other QTL were identified as potential candidates by sequencing and functional studies. These results indicate that dissection of the genetic basis of obesity and diabetes in mouse models can identify novel regulatory mechanisms that are relevant for the human disease.

  7. Preservation Analysis of Macrophage Gene Coexpression Between Human and Mouse Identifies PARK2 as a Genetically Controlled Master Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Codoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules. Six modules were found preserved (P < 10−4 in macrophages from 86 mice of the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. One of these modules was significantly [false discovery rate (FDR = 8.9 × 10−11] enriched for genes belonging to the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS pathway. This pathway was also found significantly (FDR < 10−4 enriched in susceptibility genes for Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington diseases. We further conducted an expression quantitative trait loci analysis to identify SNP that could regulate macrophage OXPHOS gene expression in humans. This analysis identified the PARK2 rs192804963 as a trans-acting variant influencing (minimal P-value = 4.3 × 10−8 the expression of most OXPHOS genes in humans. Further experimental work demonstrated that PARK2 knockdown expression was associated with increased OXPHOS gene expression in THP1 human macrophages. This work provided strong new evidence that PARK2 participates to the regulatory networks associated with oxidative phosphorylation and suggested that PARK2 genetic variations could act as a trans regulator of OXPHOS gene macrophage expression in humans.

  8. Genetic expression of hexokinase and glucose phosphate isomerase in late-stage mouse preimplantation embryos: transcription activities in glucose/phosphate-containing HTF and glucose/phosphate-free P1 media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M D; Batey, D W; Behr, B; Barro, J

    1997-04-01

    In mouse and human preimplantation development, pyruvate is consumed preferentially during early embryogenesis; however, during the morula and blastocyst stages, glucose is the preferred energy substrate. Studies have suggested that the glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase and glucose phosphate isomerase, are important enzymes in glucose metabolism during these later stages of human and mouse preimplantation development. In order to investigate the genetic activities of these enzymes in late-stage mouse embryos developing in vitro, we analysed hexokinase and glucose phosphate isomerase transcription activities by qualitative RNA assays using reverse transcriptase-nested polymerase chain reaction amplification of individual mouse morulae and early blastocysts incubated in glucose/phosphate-free preimplantation stage one (P1) medium and glucose/phosphate-containing human tubal fluid (HTF) medium. We observed an increased incidence of hexokinase transcripts in the population of blastocysts compared with morulae, and differences in transcript incidence between early blastocysts developing in HTF medium and in P1 medium. In contrast, glucose phosphate isomerase transcripts were consistantly present in all embryos analysed, and appear to be constitutively expressed during late-stage mouse embryogenesis. The different activity patterns of the two glycolytic genes may reflect different mechanisms of gene regulation or differential transcript stability during the later stages of mouse preimplantation development.

  9. Somatic point mutations in mtDNA control region are influenced by genetic background and associated with healthy aging: a GEHA study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate con...

  10. Genetic Effects and Heterosis of Yield and Yield Component Traits Based on Gossypium Barbadense Chromosome Segment Substitution Lines in Two Gossypium Hirsutum Backgrounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Botao Li

    Full Text Available We hybridized 10 chromosome segment substitution lines (CSSLs each from two CSSL populations and produced 50 F1 hybrids according to North Carolina Design II. We analyzed the genetic effects and heterosis of yield and yield components in the F1 hybrids and parents in four environments via the additive-dominance genetic model. Yield and yield components of the CSSLs were controlled by combined additive and dominance effects, and lint percentage was mainly controlled by additive effects, but boll weight, boll number, seedcotton yield and lint yield were mainly controlled by dominance effects. We detected significant interaction effects between genetics and the environment for all yields traits. Similar interactions were detected between two CSSL populations (Pop CCRI 36 and Pop CCRI 45. Significant positive mid-parent heterosis was detected for all yield traits in both populations, and significant positive better-parent heterosis was also detected for all yield traits except lint percentage. The differences among parents were relatively small, but significant heterosis was detected for yield and yield components. Therefore, the relationship between heterosis and genetic distance for yield traits is complicated and requires further study. These CSSLs represent useful tools for improving yield and yield components in cotton.

  11. Fine genetic map of mouse chromosome 10 around the polycystic kidney disease gene, jcpk, and ankyrin 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryda, E.C.; Ling, H.; Rathbun, D.E. [New York State Department of Health, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A chlorambucil (CHL)-induced mutation of the jcpk (juvenile congenital polycystic kidney disease) gene causes a severe early onset polycystic kidney disease. In an intercross involving Mus musculus castaneus, jcpk was precisely mapped 0.2 cM distal to D10Mit115 and 0.8 cM proximal to D10Mit173. In addition, five genes, Cdc2a, Col6al, Col6a2, Bcr, and Ank3 were mapped in both this jcpk intercross and a (BALB/c X CAST/Ei)F{sub 1} x BALB/c backcross. All five genes were eliminated as possible candidates for jcpk based on the mapping data. The jcpk intercross allowed the orientation of the Ank3 gene relative to the centromere to be determined. D10Mit115, D10Mit173, D10Mit199, and D10Mit200 were separated genetically in this cross. The order and genetic distances of all markers and gene loci mapped in the jcpk intercross were consistent with those derived from the BALB/c backcross, indicating that the CHL-induced lesion has not generated any gross chromosomal abnormalities detectable in these studies. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Douglas E; Bronson, Roderick T; Li, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions) have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1) and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion) were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/-) male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these two events

  13. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas E Linn

    Full Text Available Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1 and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/- male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these

  14. Phylogeography of the South China field mouse (Apodemus draco on the southeastern Tibetan Plateau reveals high genetic diversity and glacial refugia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenxin Fan

    Full Text Available The southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau (SEMTP is a particularly interesting region due to its topographic complexity and unique geologic history, but phylogeographic studies that focus on this region are rare. In this study, we investigated the phylogeography of the South China field mouse, Apodemus draco, in order to assess the role of geologic and climatic events on the Tibetan Plateau in shaping its genetic structure. We sequenced mitochondrial cytochrome b (cyt b sequences in 103 individuals from 47 sampling sites. In addition, 23 cyt b sequences were collected from GenBank for analyses. Phylogenetic, demographic and landscape genetic methods were conducted. Seventy-six cyt b haplotypes were found and the genetic diversity was extremely high (π = 0.0368; h = 0.989. Five major evolutionary clades, based on geographic locations, were identified. Demographic analyses implied subclade 1A and subclade 1B experienced population expansions at about 0.052-0.013 Mya and 0.014-0.004 Mya, respectively. The divergence time analysis showed that the split between clade 1 and clade 2 occurred 0.26 Mya, which fell into the extensive glacial period (EGP, 0.5-0.17 Mya. The divergence times of other main clades (2.20-0.55 Mya were congruent with the periods of the Qingzang Movement (3.6-1.7 Mya and the Kun-Huang Movement (1.2-0.6 Mya, which were known as the most intense uplift events in the Tibetan Plateau. Our study supported the hypothesis that the SEMTP was a large late Pleistocene refugium, and further inferred that the Gongga Mountain Region and Hongya County were glacial refugia for A. draco in clade 1. We hypothesize that the evolutionary history of A. draco in the SEMTP primarily occurred in two stages. First, an initial divergence would have been shaped by uplift events of the Tibetan Plateau. Then, major glaciations in the Pleistocene added complexity to its demographic history and genetic structure.

  15. Differential impact of cysteine cathepsins on genetic mouse models of de novo carcinogenesis: cathepsin B as emerging therapeutic target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eReinheckel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal cysteine cathepsins belong to a family of 11 human proteolytic enzymes. Some of them correlate with progression in a variety of cancers and therefore are considered as potential therapeutic targets. Until recently, the contribution of individual cathepsins to tumorigenesis and tumor progression remained unknown. By crossing various types of mouse cancer models with mice where specific cathepsins have been ablated, we contributed to this gap of knowledge and will summarize the results in this report. The employed models are the Rip1-Tag2 model for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the K14-HPV16 model for squamous skin and cervical cancers, and the MMTV-PyMT model for metastasizing breast cancer, the KPC model for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and the APCmin mice developing early stages of intestinal neoplasia. All models harbor mutations in relevant tumor suppressors and/or cell-type specific expression of potent oncogenes, which initiate de novo carcinogenesis in the targeted tissues. In all these models deletion of cathepsin B led to suppression of the aggressiveness of the respective cancer phenotype. Cathepsin B may network with other proteases as it was shown for cathepsin X/Z. In contrast, deletion of cathepsin L was beneficial in the RiP1-Tag2 model, but enhanced tumorigenesis in the APCmin, and the K14-HPV16 mice. A logical consequence of these results would be to further pursue selective inhibition of cathepsin B. Moreover, it became clear that cathepsins B and S derived from cells of the tumor microenvironment support cancer growth. Strikingly, delivery of broad spectrum cysteine cathepsin inhibitors in the tumor microenvironment disrupts the permissive ecosystem of the cancer and results in impaired growth or even in regression of the tumor. In addition, combination of cysteine cathepsin inhibition and standard chemotherapy improves the therapeutic response of the latter.

  16. iPLA2• Knockout Mouse, a Genetic Model for Progressive Human Motor Disorders, Develops Age-Related Neuropathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Helene; Taha, Ameer Y.; Cheon, Yewon; Kim, Hyung-Wook; Turk, John; Rapoport, Stanley I.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 group VIa (iPLA2β) preferentially releases docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from the sn-2 position of phospholipids. Mutations of its gene, PLA2G6, are found in patients with several progressive motor disorders, including Parkinson disease. At 4 months, PLA2G6 knockout mice (iPLA2β−/−) show minimal neuropathology but altered brain DHA metabolism. By 1 year, they develop motor disturbances, cerebellar neuronal loss, and striatal α-synuclein accumulation. We hypothesized that older iPLA2β−/− mice also would exhibit inflammatory and other neuropathological changes. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were performed on whole brain homogenate from 15 to 20-month old male iPLA2β−/− or wild-type (WT) mice. These older iPLA2β−/− mice compared with WT showed molecular evidence of microglial (CD-11b, iNOS) and astrocytic (glial fibrillary acidic protein) activation, disturbed expression of enzymes involved in arachidonic acid metabolism, loss of neuroprotective brain derived neurotrophic factor, and accumulation of cytokine TNF-α messenger ribonucleic acid, consistent with neuroinflammatory pathology. There was no evidence of synaptic loss, of reduced expression of dopamine active reuptake transporter, or of accumulation of the Parkinson disease markers Parkin or Pink1. iPLA2γ expression was unchanged. iPLA2β deficient mice show evidence of neuroinflammation and associated neuropathology with motor dysfunction in later life. These pathological biomarkers could be used to assess efficacy of dietary intervention, antioxidants or other therapies on disease progression in this mouse model of progressive human motor diseases associated with a PLA2G6 mutation. PMID:24919816

  17. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  18. Genetic background for development of resistance mutations within the HCV NS3 protease-helicase in direct acting antiviral naive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikos, Georgios; Jabara, Cassandra B; Ahmad, Monazza Q; Herrmann, Eva; Zeuzem, Stefan; Welsch, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Subtype-specific response to ketoamide NS3 protease inhibitors is observed in patients with genotype 1 HCV infection. Whether the genetic diversity in the molecular target site of ketoamide compounds prior to treatment plays a role for resistance development and lower treatment response in subtype 1a is poorly understood. Using a public database, we retrieved worldwide NS3-sequence information of 581 dominant HCV variants from patients chronically infected with genotype 1 that were naive to direct-acting antivirals. We applied measures from phylogeny to study the pretreatment genetic diversity and complexity in NS3 full-length as well as the protease-helicase interface for subtype 1a and 1b, respectively. We found polymorphic sites more frequently in variants of subtype 1b than subtype 1a. Moreover, a significantly higher number of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions were found in subtype 1b (P<0.001). Transitions were more frequent than transversions, most notably in subtype 1a, whereas the higher average number of nucleotide differences per site was found in subtype 1b. A comparison of NS3 full-length versus domain interface residues for both subtypes revealed a significant difference only for synonymous substitutions (P<0.001). Our study suggests that the nature of a mismatch nucleotide exchange in NS3 may constitute an important viral genetic factor for response to ketoamide protease inhibitors. Our analysis further suggests that the subtype-specific pace of resistance development seen in clinical trials is not primarily related to differences in genetic diversity in the direct acting antiviral naive population, but rather appears to correlate with the natural frequency of transition mutations characteristic of each subtype.

  19. Arthroscopic removal of palmar/plantar osteochondral fragments (POF) in the metacarpo- and metatarso-phalangeal joints of standardbred trotters--outcome and possible genetic background to POF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roneus, B; Arnason, T; Collinder, E; Rasmussen, M

    1998-01-01

    A clinical material of 133 Standardbred horses with palmar/plantar osteochondral fragments (POF) in the metacarpo- and metatarsophalangeal joints were studied. All horses had their fragments removed with arthroscopic surgery. 102 of the horses were 3 years old or younger when surgery was performed. Anatomical localisations of the fragments were in agreement with earlier reports. There was no statistical significant difference in month of birth in the POF--group compared to the total population. Eighty % of the horses that had raced before surgery came back to racing. The racing performance relative to their contemporaries remained the same after the POF operation. 65% of the horses that had not raced before surgery raced after the operation. The breeding index BLUP (Best Linear Unbiased Prediction) was used to evaluate if the POF-horses differed genetically in racing ability from the total population. The average BLUP value of the POF group was 103.4 (+/- 0.65), while the mean BLUP value of the total population was 98.9. This difference was highly significant and indicated that these POF horses belonged to a selected group. A homogeneity test of allele frequencies in blood type systems was performed to evaluate if any genetic difference was persistent between POF horses compared to the total population. The statistical analysis of gene frequencies for alleles in blood type systems indicated a genetic discrimination in blood type systems D and Tf.

  20. Mouse genome database 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.