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Sample records for mouse forebrain development

  1. Newly identified patterns of Pax2 expression in the developing mouse forebrain

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    Mason John O

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of specific markers expressed in different regions of the developing nervous system provides a useful tool for the study of mouse mutants. One such marker, the transcription factor Pax2, is expressed at the midbrain-hindbrain boundary and in the cerebellum, spinal cord, retina, optic stalk, and optic chiasm. We recently described a group of diencephalic cells that express Pax2 as early as embryonic day (E 10.5, and become part of the eminentia thalami by E11.5. The discovery of this previously undescribed cell population prompted us to examine Pax2 protein expression in the developing mouse forebrain in more detail. Results We determined the expression pattern of Pax2 in the forebrain of wild type mouse embryos between E10.5 and postnatal day (P 15. Pax2 expression was detected in the septum of the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, eminentia thalami and in the subfornical organ. To evaluate Pax2 as a marker for septal cells, we examined Pax2 expression in Pax6Sey/Sey mutants, which have an enlarged septum. We found that Pax2 clearly marks a population of septal cells equivalent to that seen in wild types, indicating its utility as a marker of septal identity. These cells did not express the GABAergic marker calbindin nor the cholinergic marker choline acetyltransferase and were not detectable after P15. Conclusion Pax2 is expressed in populations of cells within the developing septum, hypothalamus, and eminentia thalami. It seems especially useful as a marker of the telencephalic septum, because of its early, strong and characteristic expression in this structure. Further, its expression is maintained in the enlarged septum of Pax6Sey/Sey mutants.

  2. Defects in GPI biosynthesis perturb Cripto signaling during forebrain development in two new mouse models of holoprosencephaly

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    David M. McKean

    2012-07-01

    Holoprosencephaly is the most common forebrain defect in humans. We describe two novel mouse mutants that display a holoprosencephaly-like phenotype. Both mutations disrupt genes in the glycerophosphatidyl inositol (GPI biosynthesis pathway: gonzo disrupts Pign and beaker disrupts Pgap1. GPI anchors normally target and anchor a diverse group of proteins to lipid raft domains. Mechanistically we show that GPI anchored proteins are mislocalized in GPI biosynthesis mutants. Disruption of the GPI-anchored protein Cripto (mouse and TDGF1 (human ortholog have been shown to result in holoprosencephaly, leading to our hypothesis that Cripto is the key GPI anchored protein whose altered function results in an HPE-like phenotype. Cripto is an obligate Nodal co-factor involved in TGFβ signaling, and we show that TGFβ signaling is reduced both in vitro and in vivo. This work demonstrates the importance of the GPI anchor in normal forebrain development and suggests that GPI biosynthesis genes should be screened for association with human holoprosencephaly.

  3. Patterns of cell death in the perinatal mouse forebrain.

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    Mosley, Morgan; Shah, Charisma; Morse, Kiriana A; Miloro, Stephen A; Holmes, Melissa M; Ahern, Todd H; Forger, Nancy G

    2017-01-01

    The importance of cell death in brain development has long been appreciated, but many basic questions remain, such as what initiates or terminates the cell death period. One obstacle has been the lack of quantitative data defining exactly when cell death occurs. We recently created a "cell death atlas," using the detection of activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify apoptosis in the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, and found that the highest rates of cell death were seen at the earliest postnatal ages in most regions. Here we have extended these analyses to prenatal ages and additional brain regions. We quantified cell death in 16 forebrain regions across nine perinatal ages from embryonic day (E) 17 to postnatal day (P) 11 and found that cell death peaks just after birth in most regions. We found greater cell death in several regions in offspring delivered vaginally on the day of parturition compared with those of the same postconception age but still in utero at the time of collection. We also found massive cell death in the oriens layer of the hippocampus on P1 and in regions surrounding the anterior crossing of the corpus callosum on E18 as well as the persistence of large numbers of cells in those regions in adult mice lacking the pro-death Bax gene. Together these findings suggest that birth may be an important trigger of neuronal cell death and identify transient cell groups that may undergo wholesale elimination perinatally. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:47-64, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cloning and characterization of GRIPE, a novel interacting partner of the transcription factor E12 in developing mouse forebrain.

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    Heng, Julian Ik Tsen; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2002-11-08

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors are key contributors to a wide array of developmental processes, including neurogenesis and hematopoiesis. These factors are thought to exert their regulatory influences by binding to cognate promoter-DNA sequences as dimers. Although studies in mice have convincingly demonstrated that neurogenic HLH proteins such as NeuroD are intimately involved in neuronal fate determination, the role of the ubiquitously expressed HLH protein, E12, in mammalian neurogenesis remains ambiguous. To address this, a yeast two-hybrid interaction screen was employed to identify dimerization partners to E12. Screening of an embryonic day 11.5 forebrain library resulted in the cloning of GRIPE, a novel GAP-related interacting protein to E12. GRIPE binds to the HLH region of E12 and may require E12 for nuclear import. Furthermore, GRIPE may negatively regulate E12-dependent target gene transcription. High levels of GRIPE and E12 mRNA were coincidentally detected during embryogenesis, but only GRIPE mRNA levels remained high in adult brain, particularly in neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. These observations were recapitulated through an in vitro model of neurogenesis. Taken together, these results indicate that GRIPE is a novel protein dimerization of which with E12 has important consequences for cells undergoing neuronal differentiation.

  5. Dapper antagonist of catenin-1 cooperates with Dishevelled-1 during postsynaptic development in mouse forebrain GABAergic interneurons.

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    Annie Arguello

    Full Text Available Synaptogenesis has been extensively studied along with dendritic spine development in glutamatergic pyramidal neurons, however synapse development in cortical interneurons, which are largely aspiny, is comparatively less well understood. Dact1, one of 3 paralogous Dact (Dapper/Frodo family members in mammals, is a scaffold protein implicated in both the Wnt/β-catenin and the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity pathways. We show here that Dact1 is expressed in immature cortical interneurons. Although Dact1 is first expressed in interneuron precursors during proliferative and migratory stages, constitutive Dact1 mutant mice have no major defects in numbers or migration of these neurons. However, cultured cortical interneurons derived from these mice have reduced numbers of excitatory synapses on their dendrites. We selectively eliminated Dact1 from mouse cortical interneurons using a conditional knock-out strategy with a Dlx-I12b enhancer-Cre allele, and thereby demonstrate a cell-autonomous role for Dact1 during postsynaptic development. Confirming this cell-autonomous role, we show that synapse numbers in Dact1 deficient cortical interneurons are rescued by virally-mediated re-expression of Dact1 specifically targeted to these cells. Synapse numbers in these neurons are also rescued by similarly targeted expression of the Dact1 binding partner Dishevelled-1, and partially rescued by expression of Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1, a synaptic protein genetically implicated in susceptibility to several major mental illnesses. In sum, our results support a novel cell-autonomous postsynaptic role for Dact1, in cooperation with Dishevelled-1 and possibly Disrupted in Schizophrenia-1, in the formation of synapses on cortical interneuron dendrites.

  6. Forebrain GABAergic projections to locus coeruleus in mouse.

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    Dimitrov, Eugene L; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Usdin, Ted B

    2013-07-01

    The noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) regulates arousal, memory, sympathetic nervous system activity, and pain. Forebrain projections to LC have been characterized in rat, cat, and primates, but not systematically in mouse. We surveyed mouse forebrain LC-projecting neurons by examining retrogradely labeled cells following LC iontophoresis of Fluoro-Gold and anterograde LC labeling after forebrain injection of biotinylated dextran amine or viral tracer. Similar to other species, the central amygdalar nucleus (CAmy), anterior hypothalamus, paraventricular nucleus, and posterior lateral hypothalamic area (PLH) provide major LC inputs. By using mice expressing green fluorescent protein in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, we found that more than one-third of LC-projecting CAmy and PLH neurons are GABAergic. LC colocalization of biotinylated dextran amine, following CAmy or PLH injection, with either green fluorescent protein or glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD)65/67 immunoreactivity confirmed these GABAergic projections. CAmy injection of adeno-associated virus encoding channelrhodopsin-2-Venus showed similar fiber labeling and association with GAD65/67-immunoreactive (ir) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-ir neurons. CAmy and PLH projections were densest in a pericoerulear zone, but many fibers entered the LC proper. Close apposition between CAmy GABAergic projections and TH-ir processes suggests that CAmy GABAergic neurons may directly inhibit noradrenergic principal neurons. Direct LC neuron targeting was confirmed by anterograde transneuronal labeling of LC TH-ir neurons following CAmy or PLH injection of a herpes virus that expresses red fluorescent protein following activation by Cre recombinase in mice that express Cre recombinase in GABAergic neurons. This description of GABAergic projections from the CAmy and PLH to the LC clarifies important forebrain sources of inhibitory control of central nervous system noradrenergic activity.

  7. Cell death atlas of the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus: effects of age and sex.

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    Ahern, Todd H; Krug, Stefanie; Carr, Audrey V; Murray, Elaine K; Fitzpatrick, Emmett; Bengston, Lynn; McCutcheon, Jill; De Vries, Geert J; Forger, Nancy G

    2013-08-01

    Naturally occurring cell death is essential to the development of the mammalian nervous system. Although the importance of developmental cell death has been appreciated for decades, there is no comprehensive account of cell death across brain areas in the mouse. Moreover, several regional sex differences in cell death have been described for the ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, but it is not known how widespread the phenomenon is. We used immunohistochemical detection of activated caspase-3 to identify dying cells in the brains of male and female mice from postnatal day (P) 1 to P11. Cell death density, total number of dying cells, and regional volume were determined in 16 regions of the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain (the anterior hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus; the basolateral, central, and medial amygdala; the lateral and principal nuclei of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis; the caudate-putamen; the globus pallidus; the lateral septum; and the islands of Calleja). All regions showed a significant effect of age on cell death. The timing of peak cell death varied between P1 to P7, and the average rate of cell death varied tenfold among regions. Several significant sex differences in cell death and/or regional volume were detected. These data address large gaps in the developmental literature and suggest interesting region-specific differences in the prevalence and timing of cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Molecular taxonomy of major neuronal classes in the adult mouse forebrain.

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    Sugino, Ken; Hempel, Chris M; Miller, Mark N; Hattox, Alexis M; Shapiro, Peter; Wu, Caizi; Huang, Z Josh; Nelson, Sacha B

    2006-01-01

    Identifying the neuronal cell types that comprise the mammalian forebrain is a central unsolved problem in neuroscience. Global gene expression profiles offer a potentially unbiased way to assess functional relationships between neurons. Here, we carried out microarray analysis of 12 populations of neurons in the adult mouse forebrain. Five of these populations were chosen from cingulate cortex and included several subtypes of GABAergic interneurons and pyramidal neurons. The remaining seven were derived from the somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala and thalamus. Using these expression profiles, we were able to construct a taxonomic tree that reflected the expected major relationships between these populations, such as the distinction between cortical interneurons and projection neurons. The taxonomic tree indicated highly heterogeneous gene expression even within a single region. This dataset should be useful for the classification of unknown neuronal subtypes, the investigation of specifically expressed genes and the genetic manipulation of specific neuronal circuit elements.

  9. Developmental activity variations of DNA polymerase α,δ,ε in mouse forebrains and spleens

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    杨荣武; 陆长德

    1995-01-01

    The levels of DNA polymerase α,δ,ε were examined in the neonatal mouse forebrains andspleens.The levels of DNA polymerase α were determined by the difference of polymerase activity in theabsence and the presence of α specific inhibitor,BuPdGTP,or its monoclonal antibody.The levels of DNApolymerase δ were determined in H · A fractions after separating it from the other two enzymes.The levelsof DNA polymerase ε were identified in H · A fractions by the use of α-monoclonal antibody or BuPdGTP.Results showed that in the mouse forebrain DNA polymerase α,δ,ε activities are the highest before birth,decline sharply following birth and are very low on the 8th day and hardly detectable on the 17th day;as forthe mouse spleen,however,DNA polymerase α,δ,ε activities are the lowest at birth,increase rapidly afterbirth and reach their maxima on the 8th day and then decline gradually but remain in higher levels.Theseresults not only prove that DNA polymerase α and δ take part in cell DNA replication but also suggest thatDNA polymerase ε is involved in DNA replication.

  10. Dynamic behaviour of human neuroepithelial cells in the developing forebrain

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    Subramanian, Lakshmi; Bershteyn, Marina; Paredes, Mercedes F.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2017-01-01

    To understand how diverse progenitor cells contribute to human neocortex development, we examined forebrain progenitor behaviour using timelapse imaging. Here we find that cell cycle dynamics of human neuroepithelial (NE) cells differ from radial glial (RG) cells in both primary tissue and in stem cell-derived organoids. NE cells undergoing proliferative, symmetric divisions retract their basal processes, and both daughter cells regrow a new process following cytokinesis. The mitotic retraction of the basal process is recapitulated by NE cells in cerebral organoids generated from human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In contrast, RG cells undergoing vertical cleavage retain their basal fibres throughout mitosis, both in primary tissue and in older organoids. Our findings highlight developmentally regulated changes in mitotic behaviour that may relate to the role of RG cells to provide a stable scaffold for neuronal migration, and suggest that the transition in mitotic dynamics can be studied in organoid models. PMID:28139695

  11. Ontogenetic distribution of the transcription factor Nkx2.2 in the developing forebrain of Xenopus laevis

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    Laura eDominguez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The expression of the Nkx2.2 gene is involved in the organization of the alar-basal boundary in the forebrain of vertebrates. Its expression in different diencephalic and telencephalic regions, helped to define distinct progenitor domains in mouse and chick. Here we investigated the pattern of Nkx2.2 protein distribution throughout the development of the forebrain of the anuran amphibian, Xenopus laevis. We used immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization techniques for its detection in combination with other essential territorial markers in the forebrain. No expression was observed in the telencephalon. In the alar hypothalamus, Nkx2.2 positive cells were scattered in the suprachiasmatic territory, but also in the supraoptoparaventricular area, as defined by the expression of the transcription factor Otp and the lack of xDll4. In the basal hypothalamus Nkx2.2 expressing cells were localized in the tuberal region, with the exception of the arcuate nucleus, rich in Otp expressing cells. In the diencephalon it was expressed in all three prosomeres (P1-P3 and not in the zona limitans intrathalamica. The presence of Nkx2.2 expressing cells in P3 was restricted to the alar portion, as well as in prosomere P2, whereas in P1 the Nkx2.2 expressing cells were located in the basal plate and identified the alar/basal boundary. These results showed that Nkx2.2 and Sonic hedgehog are expressed in parallel adjacent stripes along the anterior-posterior axis. The results of this study showed a conserved distribution pattern of Nkx2.2 among vertebrates, crucial to recognize subdivisions that are otherwise indistinct, and supported the relevance of this transcription factor in the organization of the forebrain, particularly in the delineation of the alar/basal boundary of the forebrain.

  12. Complex and dynamic patterns of Wnt pathway gene expression in the developing chick forebrain

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    Lumsden Andrew

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wnt signalling regulates multiple aspects of brain development in vertebrate embryos. A large number of Wnts are expressed in the embryonic forebrain; however, it is poorly understood which specific Wnt performs which function and how they interact. Wnts are able to activate different intracellular pathways, but which of these pathways become activated in different brain subdivisions also remains enigmatic. Results We have compiled the first comprehensive spatiotemporal atlas of Wnt pathway gene expression at critical stages of forebrain regionalisation in the chick embryo and found that most of these genes are expressed in strikingly dynamic and complex patterns. Several expression domains do not respect proposed compartment boundaries in the developing forebrain, suggesting that areal identities are more dynamic than previously thought. Using an in ovo electroporation approach, we show that Wnt4 expression in the thalamus is negatively regulated by Sonic hedgehog (Shh signalling from the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI, a known organising centre of forebrain development. Conclusion The forebrain is exposed to a multitude of Wnts and Wnt inhibitors that are expressed in a highly dynamic and complex fashion, precluding simple correlative conclusions about their respective functions or signalling mechanisms. In various biological systems, Wnts are antagonised by Shh signalling. By demonstrating that Wnt4 expression in the thalamus is repressed by Shh from the ZLI we reveal an additional level of interaction between these two pathways and provide an example for the cross-regulation between patterning centres during forebrain regionalisation.

  13. Expanded expression of Sonic Hedgehog in Astyanax cavefish: multiple consequences on forebrain development and evolution.

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    Menuet, Arnaud; Alunni, Alessandro; Joly, Jean-Stéphane; Jeffery, William R; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2007-03-01

    Ventral midline Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signalling is crucial for growth and patterning of the embryonic forebrain. Here, we report how enhanced Shh midline signalling affects the evolution of telencephalic and diencephalic neuronal patterning in the blind cavefish Astyanax mexicanus, a teleost fish closely related to zebrafish. A comparison between cave- and surface-dwelling forms of Astyanax shows that cavefish display larger Shh expression in all anterior midline domains throughout development. This does not affect global forebrain regional patterning, but has several important consequences on specific regions and neuronal populations. First, we show expanded Nkx2.1a expression and higher levels of cell proliferation in the cavefish basal diencephalon and hypothalamus. Second, we uncover an Nkx2.1b-Lhx6-GABA-positive migratory pathway from the subpallium to the olfactory bulb, which is increased in size in cavefish. Finally, we observe heterochrony and enlarged Lhx7 expression in the cavefish basal forebrain. These specific increases in olfactory and hypothalamic forebrain components are Shh-dependent and therefore place the telencephalic midline organisers in a crucial position to modulate forebrain evolution through developmental events, and to generate diversity in forebrain neuronal patterning.

  14. Fgf19 regulated by Hh signaling is required for zebrafish forebrain development.

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    Miyake, Ayumi; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2005-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) signaling plays important roles in brain development. Fgf3 and Fgf8 are crucial for the formation of the forebrain and hindbrain. Fgf8 is also required for the midbrain to form. Here, we identified zebrafish Fgf19 and examined its roles in brain development by knocking down Fgf19 function. We found that Fgf19 expressed in the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain was involved in cell proliferation and cell survival during embryonic brain development. Fgf19 was also essential for development of the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. Regional specification is linked to cell type specification. Fgf19 was also essential for the specification of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons and oligodendrocytes generated in the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon. The cross talk between Fgf and Hh signaling is critical for brain development. In the forebrain, Fgf19 expression was down-regulated on inhibition of Hh but not of Fgf3/Fgf8, and overexpression of Fgf19 rescued partially the phenotype on inhibition of Hh. The present findings indicate that Fgf19 signaling is crucial for forebrain development by interacting with Hh and provide new insights into the roles of Fgf signaling in brain development.

  15. The 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease - Terminal striatal lesions provide a superior measure of neuronal loss and replacement than median forebrain bundle lesions.

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    Bagga, V; Dunnett, S B; Fricker, R A

    2015-07-15

    Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway produce side-biased motor impairments that reflect the motor deficits seen in Parkinson's disease (PD). This toxin-induced model in the rat has been used widely, to evaluate possible therapeutic strategies, but has not been well established in mice. With the advancements in mouse stem cell research we believe the requirement for a mouse model is essential for the therapeutic potential of these and other mouse-derived cells to be efficiently assessed. This aim of this study focused on developing a mouse model of PD using the 129 P2/OLA Hsd mouse strain as this is widely used in the generation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Both unilateral 6-OHDA medial forebrain bundle (MFB) and striatal lesion protocols were compared, with mice analysed for appropriate drug-induced rotational bias. Results demonstrated that lesioned mice responded to d-amphetamine with peak rotation dose at 5mg/kg and 10mg/kg for MFB and striatal lesions respectively. Apomorphine stimulation produced no significant rotational responses, at any dose, in either the MFB or striatal 6-OHDA lesioned mice. Analysis of dopamine neuron loss revealed that the MFB lesion was unreliable with little correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Striatal lesions however were more reliable, with a strong correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Functional recovery of d-amphetamine-induced rotational bias was shown following transplantation of E13 mouse VM tissue into the lesioned striatum; confirming the validity of this mouse model.

  16. CBP regulates the differentiation of interneurons from ventral forebrain neural precursors during murine development.

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    Tsui, David; Voronova, Anastassia; Gallagher, Denis; Kaplan, David R; Miller, Freda D; Wang, Jing

    2014-01-15

    The mechanisms that regulate appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the developing mammalian brain are of significant interest not only because interneurons play key roles in the establishment of neural circuitry, but also because when they are deficient, this can cause epilepsy. In this regard, one genetic syndrome that is associated with deficits in neural development and epilepsy is Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome (RTS), where the transcriptional activator and histone acetyltransferase CBP is mutated and haploinsufficient. Here, we have asked whether CBP is necessary for the appropriate genesis and differentiation of interneurons in the murine forebrain, since this could provide an explanation for the epilepsy that is associated with RTS. We show that CBP is expressed in neural precursors within the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), an area that generates the vast majority of interneurons for the cortex. Using primary cultures of MGE precursors, we show that knockdown of CBP causes deficits in differentiation of these precursors into interneurons and oligodendrocytes, and that overexpression of CBP is by itself sufficient to enhance interneuron genesis. Moreover, we show that levels of the neurotransmitter synthesis enzyme GAD67, which is expressed in inhibitory interneurons, are decreased in the dorsal and ventral forebrain of neonatal CBP(+/-) mice, indicating that CBP plays a role in regulating interneuron development in vivo. Thus, CBP normally acts to ensure the differentiation of appropriate numbers of forebrain interneurons, and when its levels are decreased, this causes deficits in interneuron development, providing a potential explanation for the epilepsy seen in individuals with RTS.

  17. Development of glucocorticoid receptor regulation in the rat forebrain: Implications for adverse effects of glucocorticoids in preterm infants

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    Glucocorticoids are the consensus treatment to avoid respiratory distress in preterm infants but there is accumulating evidence that these agents evoke long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Earlier, we showed that the developing rat forebrain is far more sensitive to glucocorticoi...

  18. Overexpression of SIRT1 in mouse forebrain impairs lipid/glucose metabolism and motor function.

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    Dongmei Wu

    Full Text Available SIRT1 plays crucial roles in glucose and lipid metabolism, and has various functions in different tissues including brain. The brain-specific SIRT1 knockout mice display defects in somatotropic signaling, memory and synaptic plasticity. And the female mice without SIRT1 in POMC neuron are more sensitive to diet-induced obesity. Here we created transgenic mice overexpressing SIRT1 in striatum and hippocampus under the control of CaMKIIα promoter. These mice, especially females, exhibited increased fat accumulation accompanied by significant upregulation of adipogenic genes in white adipose tissue. Glucose tolerance of the mice was also impaired with decreased Glut4 mRNA levels in muscle. Moreover, the SIRT1 overexpressing mice showed decreased energy expenditure, and concomitantly mitochondria-related genes were decreased in muscle. In addition, these mice showed unusual spontaneous physical activity pattern, decreased activity in open field and rotarod performance. Further studies demonstrated that SIRT1 deacetylated IRS-2, and upregulated phosphorylation level of IRS-2 and ERK1/2 in striatum. Meanwhile, the neurotransmitter signaling in striatum and the expression of endocrine hormones in hypothalamus and serum T3, T4 levels were altered. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that SIRT1 in forebrain regulates lipid/glucose metabolism and motor function.

  19. Extraction of total RNA in the developing chicken forebrain

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    Sayed Rasoul Zaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gene expression of Gama-Aminobutyric acid (GABA A receptor subunits may change during development. Procedures in molecular biology are required to understand the gene expression profile GABA A R in chicken. The outcome of the results depends on good-quality high-molecular-weight RNA. Several procedures can be used to isolate RNA from the brain of chicken; however, most of them are time-consuming and require disruption of cells or freeze and thaw in the presence of RNase inhibitors. The aim of this experiment was isolation of RNA from chicken embryonic brain tissues using appropriate RNA extraction kit. Materials and Methods: Fertilized eggs from Ross breed (Gallus gallus were incubated at 38°C and 60% relative humidity in a forced-draft incubator and were turned every 3 h. After 3, 7, 14 and 20 days of incubation, eggs were cooled on ice to induce deep anesthesia. Then whole brains were dissected out. As brains could not be excised in a reproducible way from earlier embryos (embryonic days 4 and 6, whole heads were collected. Chicken embryos between day 7 to 20 and 1 day after birth were decapitated, and their brains removed. Samples were immediately inserted into lysis buffer and stored at −70°C. Total RNA was isolated and a contaminating genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA was digested. RNA quality was checked using gel electrophoresis. Results: We obtained 52 mg/ml to 745 mg/ml with A260/280 1.7-2.2. Only high-quality RNA, with no signs of degradation, was used for further experiments. Conclusion: In conclusion, protocol was found to be suitable for the isolation of total RNA from embryonic chicken cells.

  20. Expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 in distinct neuronal subpopulations in the adult mouse forebrain.

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    Marsicano, G; Lutz, B

    1999-12-01

    Cannabinoids can modulate motor behaviour, learning and memory, cognition and pain perception. These effects correlate with the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and with the presence of endogenous cannabinoids in the brain. In trying to obtain further insights into the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of cannabinoids, CB1-positive neurons were determined in the murine forebrain at a single cell resolution. We performed a double in situ hybridization study to detect mRNA of CB1 in combination with mRNA of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65k, neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK), parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin D28k, respectively. Our results revealed that CB1-expressing cells can be divided into distinct neuronal subpopulations. There is a clear distinction between neurons containing CB1 mRNA either at high levels or low levels. The majority of high CB1-expressing cells are GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurons belonging mainly to the cholecystokinin-positive and parvalbumin-negative type of interneurons (basket cells) and, to a lower extent, to the calbindin D28k-positive mid-proximal dendritic inhibitory interneurons. Only a fraction of low CB1-expressing cells is GABAergic. In the hippocampus, amygdala and entorhinal cortex area, CB1 mRNA is present at low but significant levels in many non-GABAergic cells that can be considered as projecting principal neurons. Thus, a complex mechanism appears to underlie the modulatory effects of cannabinoids. They might act on principal glutamatergic circuits as well as modulate local GABAergic inhibitory circuits. CB1 is very highly coexpressed with CCK. It is known that cannabinoids and CCK often have opposite effects on behaviour and physiology. Therefore, we suggest that a putative cross-talk between cannabinoids and CCK might exist and will be relevant to better understanding of physiology and pharmacology of the cannabinoid system.

  1. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27.

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    Schmook, Maria T; Brugger, Peter C; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth; Prayer, Daniela

    2010-06-01

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average +/- sd: gw 22 +/- 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p = 0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p < 0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided.

  2. Forebrain development in fetal MRI: evaluation of anatomical landmarks before gestational week 27

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    Schmook, Maria T.; Weber, Michael; Kasprian, Gregor; Nemec, Stefan; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology/Division of Neuro- and Musculoskeletal Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Brugger, Peter C. [Medical University of Vienna, Integrative Morphology Group, Center for Anatomy and Cell Biology, Vienna (Austria); Krampl-Bettelheim, Elisabeth [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology / Division of Obstetrics and Feto-maternal Medicine, Vienna (Austria)

    2010-06-15

    Forebrain malformations include some of the most severe developmental anomalies and require early diagnosis. The proof of normal or abnormal prosencephalic development may have an influence on further management in the event of a suspected fetal malformation. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the detectability of anatomical landmarks of forebrain development using in vivo fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before gestational week (gw) 27. MRI studies of 83 singleton fetuses (gw 16-26, average {+-}sd: gw 22 {+-} 2) performed at 1.5 Tesla were assessed. T2-weighted (w) fast spin echo, T1w gradient-echo and diffusion-weighted sequences were screened for the detectability of anatomical landmarks as listed below. The interhemispheric fissure, ocular bulbs, corpus callosum, infundibulum, chiasm, septum pellucidum (SP), profile, and palate were detectable in 95%, 95%, 89%, 87%, 82%, 81%, 78%, 78% of cases. Olfactory tracts were more easily delineated than bulbs and sulci (37% versus 18% and 8%), with significantly higher detection rates in the coronal plane. The pituitary gland could be detected on T1w images in 60% with an increasing diameter with gestational age (p=0.041). The delineation of olfactory tracts (coronal plane), chiasm, SP and pituitary gland were significantly increased after week 21 (p<0.05). Pathologies were found in 28% of cases. This study provides detection rates for anatomical landmarks of forebrain development with fetal MRI before gw 27. Several anatomical structures are readily detectable with routine fetal MRI sequences; thus, if these landmarks are not delineable, it should raise the suspicion of a pathology. Recommendations regarding favorable sequences/planes are provided. (orig.)

  3. Inputs to the dorsal striatum of the mouse reflect the parallel circuit architecture of the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weixing X; Mao, Tianyi; Dudman, Joshua T

    2010-01-01

    The basal ganglia play a critical role in the regulation of voluntary action in vertebrates. Our understanding of the function of the basal ganglia relies heavily upon anatomical information, but continued progress will require an understanding of the specific functional roles played by diverse cell types and their connectivity. An increasing number of mouse lines allow extensive identification, characterization, and manipulation of specified cell types in the basal ganglia. Despite the promise of genetically modified mice for elucidating the functional roles of diverse cell types, there is relatively little anatomical data obtained directly in the mouse. Here we have characterized the retrograde labeling obtained from a series of tracer injections throughout the dorsal striatum of adult mice. We found systematic variations in input along both the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior neuraxes in close agreement with canonical features of basal ganglia anatomy in the rat. In addition to the canonical features we have provided experimental support for the importance of non-canonical inputs to the striatum from the raphe nuclei and the amygdala. To look for organization at a finer scale we have analyzed the correlation structure of labeling intensity across our entire dataset. Using this analysis we found substantial local heterogeneity within the large-scale order. From this analysis we conclude that individual striatal sites receive varied combinations of cortical and thalamic input from multiple functional areas, consistent with some earlier studies in the rat that have suggested the presence of a combinatorial map.

  4. Inputs to the dorsal striatum of the mouse conserve the parallel circuit architecture of the forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weixing X Pan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play a critical role in the regulation of voluntary action in vertebrates. Our understanding of the function of the basal ganglia relies heavily upon anatomical information, but continued progress will require an understanding of the specific functional roles played by diverse cell types and their connectivity. An increasing number of mouse lines allow extensive identification, characterization, and, manipulation of specified cell types in the basal ganglia. Despite the promise of genetically modified mice for elucidating the functional roles of diverse cell types, there is relatively little anatomical data obtained directly in the mouse. Here we have characterized the retrograde labeling obtained from a series of tracer injections throughout the dorsal striatum of adult mice. We found systematic variations in input along both the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior neuraxes in close agreement with canonical features of basal ganglia anatomy in the rat. In addition to the canonical features we have provided experimental support for the importance of non-canonical inputs to the striatum from the raphe nuclei and the amygdala. To look for organization at a finer scale we have analyzed the correlation structure of labeling intensity across our entire dataset. Using this analysis we found substantial local heterogeneity within the large-scale order. From this analysis we conclude that individual striatal sites receive varied combinations of cortical and thalamic input from multiple functional areas, consistent with some earlier studies in the rat that have suggested the presence of a combinatorial map.

  5. Ablation of Ca(V2.1 voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channels in mouse forebrain generates multiple cognitive impairments.

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    Robert Theodor Mallmann

    Full Text Available Voltage-gated Ca(V2.1 (P/Q-type Ca²⁺ channels located at the presynaptic membrane are known to control a multitude of Ca²⁺-dependent cellular processes such as neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Our knowledge about their contributions to complex cognitive functions, however, is restricted by the limited adequacy of existing transgenic Ca(V2.1 mouse models. Global Ca(V2.1 knock-out mice lacking the α1 subunit Cacna1a gene product exhibit early postnatal lethality which makes them unsuitable to analyse the relevance of Ca(V2.1 Ca²⁺ channels for complex behaviour in adult mice. Consequently we established a forebrain specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out model by crossing mice with a floxed Cacna1a gene with mice expressing Cre-recombinase under the control of the NEX promoter. This novel mouse model enabled us to investigate the contribution of Ca(V2.1 to complex cognitive functions, particularly learning and memory. Electrophysiological analysis allowed us to test the specificity of our conditional knock-out model and revealed an impaired synaptic transmission at hippocampal glutamatergic synapses. At the behavioural level, the forebrain-specific Ca(V2.1 knock-out resulted in deficits in spatial learning and reference memory, reduced recognition memory, increased exploratory behaviour and a strong attenuation of circadian rhythmicity. In summary, we present a novel conditional Ca(V2.1 knock-out model that is most suitable for analysing the in vivo functions of Ca(V2.1 in the adult murine forebrain.

  6. Transcriptional Networks Controlled by NKX2-1 in the Development of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Magnus; Flandin, Pierre; Silberberg, Shanni; Su-Feher, Linda; Price, James D; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kim, Carol; Visel, Axel; Nord, Alex S; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-21

    The embryonic basal ganglia generates multiple projection neurons and interneuron subtypes from distinct progenitor domains. Combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and chromatin are thought to regulate gene expression. In the medial ganglionic eminence, the NKX2-1 transcription factor controls regional identity and, with LHX6, is necessary to specify pallidal projection neurons and forebrain interneurons. Here, we dissected the molecular functions of NKX2-1 by defining its chromosomal binding, regulation of gene expression, and epigenetic state. NKX2-1 binding at distal regulatory elements led to a repressed epigenetic state and transcriptional repression in the ventricular zone. Conversely, NKX2-1 is required to establish a permissive chromatin state and transcriptional activation in the sub-ventricular and mantle zones. Moreover, combinatorial binding of NKX2-1 and LHX6 promotes transcriptionally permissive chromatin and activates genes expressed in cortical migrating interneurons. Our integrated approach provides a foundation for elucidating transcriptional networks guiding the development of the MGE and its descendants.

  7. Overexpression of Parkinson’s Disease-Associated Mutation LRRK2 G2019S in Mouse Forebrain Induces Behavioral Deficits and α-Synuclein Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grima, Jonathan C.; Chen, Guanxing; Swing, Debbie; Tessarollo, Lino

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified as an unambiguous cause of late-onset, autosomal-dominant familial Parkinson’s disease (PD) and LRRK2 mutations are the strongest genetic risk factor for sporadic PD known to date. A number of transgenic mice expressing wild-type or mutant LRRK2 have been described with varying degrees of LRRK2-related abnormalities and modest pathologies. None of these studies directly addressed the role of the kinase domain in the changes observed and none of the mice present with robust features of the human disease. In an attempt to address these issues, we created a conditional LRRK2 G2019S (LRRK2 GS) mutant and a functionally negative control, LRRK2 G2019S/D1994A (LRRK2 GS/DA). Expression of LRRK2 GS or LRRK2 GS/DA was conditionally controlled using the tet-off system in which the presence of tetracycline-transactivator protein (tTA) with a CAMKIIα promoter (CAMKIIα-tTA) induced expression of TetP-LRRK2 GS or TetP-LRRK2 GS/DA in the mouse forebrain. Overexpression of LRRK2 GS in mouse forebrain induced behavioral deficits and α-synuclein pathology in a kinase-dependent manner. Similar to other genetically engineered LRRK2 GS mice, there was no significant loss of dopaminergic neurons. These mice provide an important new tool to study neurobiological changes associated with the increased kinase activity from the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, which may ultimately lead to a better understanding of not only the physiologic actions of LRRK2, but also potential pathologic actions that underlie LRRK2 GS-associated PD.

  8. Conditional Knockout of Breast Carcinoma Amplified Sequence 2 (BCAS2) in Mouse Forebrain Causes Dendritic Malformation via β-catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chu-Wei; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lin, Yi-Rou; Chen, Po-Han; Chou, Meng-Hsuan; Lee, Li-Jen; Wang, Pei-Yu; Wu, June-Tai; Tsao, Yeou-Ping; Chen, Show-Li

    2016-01-01

    Breast carcinoma amplified sequence 2 (BCAS2) is a core component of the hPrP19 complex that controls RNA splicing. Here, we performed an exon array assay and showed that β-catenin is a target of BCAS2 splicing regulation. The regulation of dendrite growth and morphology by β-catenin is well documented. Therefore, we generated conditional knockout (cKO) mice to eliminate the BCAS2 expression in the forebrain to investigate the role of BCAS2 in dendrite growth. BCAS2 cKO mice showed a microcephaly-like phenotype with a reduced volume in the dentate gyrus (DG) and low levels of learning and memory, as evaluated using Morris water maze analysis and passive avoidance, respectively. Golgi staining revealed shorter dendrites, less dendritic complexity and decreased spine density in the DG of BCAS2 cKO mice. Moreover, the cKO mice displayed a short dendrite length in newborn neurons labeled by DCX, a marker of immature neurons, and BrdU incorporation. To further examine the mechanism underlying BCAS2-mediated dendritic malformation, we overexpressed β-catenin in BCAS2-depleted primary neurons and found that the dendritic growth was restored. In summary, BCAS2 is an upstream regulator of β-catenin gene expression and plays a role in dendrite growth at least partly through β-catenin. PMID:27713508

  9. Dynamic expression of MEIS1 homeoprotein in E14.5 forebrain and differentiated forebrain-derived neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Benjamin A; Liyanage, Vichithra R B; Zachariah, Robby M; Olson, Carl O; Bailey, Melissa A G; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2013-10-01

    Central nervous system development is controlled by highly conserved homeoprotein transcription factors including HOX and TALE (Three Amino acid Loop Extension). TALE proteins are primarily known as HOX-cofactors and play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and organogenesis. MEIS1 is a TALE member with established expression in the developing central nervous system. MEIS1 is essential for embryonic development and Meis1 knockout mice dies at embryonic day (E) 14.5. However, Meis1/MEIS1 expression in the devolving forebrain, at this critical time-point has not been studied. Here, for the first time we characterize the region-specific expression of MEIS1 in E14.5 mouse forebrain, filling the gap of MEIS1 expression profile between E12.5 and E16.5. Previously, we reported MEIS1 transcriptional regulatory role in neuronal differentiation and established forebrain-derived neural stem cells (NSC) for gene therapy application of neuronal genes. Here, we show the dynamic expression of Meis1/MEIS1 during the differentiation of forebrain-derived NSC toward a glial lineage. Our results show that Meis1/MEIS1 expression is induced during NSC differentiation and is expressed in both differentiated neurons and astrocytes. Confirming these results, we detected MEIS1 expression in primary cultures of in vivo differentiated cortical neurons and astrocytes. We further demonstrate Meis1/MEIS1 expression relative to other TALE family members in the forebrain-derived NSC in the absence of Hox genes. Our data provide evidence that forebrain-derived NSC can be used as an accessible in vitro model to study the expression and function of TALE proteins, supporting their potential role in modulating NSC self-renewal and differentiation.

  10. An Evolutionarily Conserved Network Mediates Development of the zona limitans intrathalamica, a Sonic Hedgehog-Secreting Caudal Forebrain Signaling Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Sena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies revealed new insights into the development of a unique caudal forebrain-signaling center: the zona limitans intrathalamica (zli. The zli is the last brain signaling center to form and the first forebrain compartment to be established. It is the only part of the dorsal neural tube expressing the morphogen Sonic Hedgehog (Shh whose activity participates in the survival, growth and patterning of neuronal progenitor subpopulations within the thalamic complex. Here, we review the gene regulatory network of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements that underlies formation of a shh-expressing delimitated domain in the anterior brain. We discuss evidence that this network predates the origin of chordates. We highlight the contribution of Shh, Wnt and Notch signaling to zli development and discuss implications for the fact that the morphogen Shh relies on primary cilia for signal transduction. The network that underlies zli development also contributes to thalamus induction, and to its patterning once the zli has been set up. We present an overview of the brain malformations possibly associated with developmental defects in this gene regulatory network (GRN.

  11. From pluripotency to forebrain patterning: an in vitro journey astride embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Bertacchi, Michele; Carucci, Nicoletta; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Biagioni, Stefano; Cremisi, Federico

    2014-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used extensively as in vitro models of neural development and disease, with special efforts towards their conversion into forebrain progenitors and neurons. The forebrain is the most complex brain region, giving rise to several fundamental structures, such as the cerebral cortex, the hypothalamus, and the retina. Due to the multiplicity of signaling pathways playing different roles at distinct times of embryonic development, the specification and patterning of forebrain has been difficult to study in vivo. Research performed on ESCs in vitro has provided a large body of evidence to complement work in model organisms, but these studies have often been focused more on cell type production than on cell fate regulation. In this review, we systematically reassess the current literature in the field of forebrain development in mouse and human ESCs with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of early cell fate decisions, taking into consideration the specific culture conditions, exogenous and endogenous molecular cues as described in the original studies. The resulting model of early forebrain induction and patterning provides a useful framework for further studies aimed at reconstructing forebrain development in vitro for basic research or therapy.

  12. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  13. Brain Barriers and a Subpopulation of Astroglial Progenitors of Developing Human Forebrain Are Immunostained for the Glycoprotein YKL-40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnbak, Camilla; Brøchner, Christian B; Larsen, Lars A

    2014-01-01

    YKL-40, a glycoprotein involved in cell differentiation, has been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, angiogenesis, neuroinflammation and glioblastomas. We evaluated YKL-40 protein distribution in the early human forebrain using double-labeling immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry...

  14. The role of sensory organs and the forebrain for the development of the craniofacial shape as revealed by Foxg1-cre-mediated microRNA loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersigo, Jennifer; D'Angelo, Alex; Gray, Brian D; Soukup, Garrett A; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2011-04-01

    Cranial development is critically influenced by the relative growth of distinct elements. Previous studies have shown that the transcription factor Foxg1 is essential the for development of the telencephalon, olfactory epithelium, parts of the eye and the ear. Here we investigate the effects of a Foxg1-cre-mediated conditional deletion of Dicer1 and microRNA (miRNA) depletion on mouse embryos. We report the rapid and complete loss of the telencephalon and cerebellum as well as the severe reduction in the ears and loss of the anterior half of the eyes. These losses result in unexpectedly limited malformations of anterodorsal aspects of the skull. We investigated the progressive disappearance of these initially developing structures and found a specific miRNA of nervous tissue, miR-124, to disappear before reduction in growth of the specific neurosensory areas. Correlated with the absence of miR-124, these areas showed numerous apoptotic cells that stained positive for anticleaved caspase 3 and the phosphatidylserine stain PSVue® before the near or complete loss of those brain and sensory areas (forebrain, cerebellum, anterior retina, and ear). We conclude that Foxg1-cre-mediated conditional deletion of Dicer1 leads to the absence of functional miRNA followed by complete or nearly complete loss of neurons. Embryonic neurosensory development therefore depends critically on miRNA. Our data further suggest that loss of a given neuronal compartment can be triggered using early deletion of Dicer1 and thus provides a novel means to genetically remove specific neurosensory areas to investigate loss of their function on morphology (this study) or signal processing within the brain.

  15. Loss of BAF (mSWI/SNF Complexes Causes Global Transcriptional and Chromatin State Changes in Forebrain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Narayanan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BAF (Brg/Brm-associated factors complexes play important roles in development and are linked to chromatin plasticity at selected genomic loci. Nevertheless, a full understanding of their role in development and chromatin remodeling has been hindered by the absence of mutants completely lacking BAF complexes. Here, we report that the loss of BAF155/BAF170 in double-conditional knockout (dcKO mice eliminates all known BAF subunits, resulting in an overall reduction in active chromatin marks (H3K9Ac, a global increase in repressive marks (H3K27me2/3, and downregulation of gene expression. We demonstrate that BAF complexes interact with H3K27 demethylases (JMJD3 and UTX and potentiate their activity. Importantly, BAF complexes are indispensable for forebrain development, including proliferation, differentiation, and cell survival of neural progenitor cells. Our findings reveal a molecular mechanism mediated by BAF complexes that controls the global transcriptional program and chromatin state in development.

  16. The corpus callosum, the other great forebrain commissures, and the septum pellucidum: anatomy, development, and malformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raybaud, Charles [Division of Neuroradiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Division of Radiology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    There are three telencephalic commissures which are paleocortical (the anterior commissure), archicortical (the hippocampal commissure), and neocortical. In non-placental mammals, the neocortical commissural fibers cross the midline together with the anterior and possibly the hippocampal commissure, across the lamina reuniens (joining plate) in the upper part of the lamina terminalis. In placental mammals, a phylogenetically new feature emerged, which is the corpus callosum: it results from an interhemispheric fusion line with specialized groups of mildline glial cells channeling the commissural axons through the interhemispheric meninges toward the contralateral hemispheres. This concerns the frontal lobe mainly however: commissural fibers from the temporo-occipital neocortex still use the anterior commissure to cross, and the posterior occipito-parietal fibers use the hippocampal commissure, forming the splenium in the process. The anterior callosum and the splenium fuse secondarily to form the complete commissural plate. Given the complexity of the processes involved, commissural ageneses are many and usually associated with other diverse defects. They may be due to a failure of the white matter to develop or to the commissural neurons to form or to migrate, to a global failure of the midline crossing processes or to a selective failure of commissuration affecting specific commissural sites (anterior or hippocampal commissures, anterior callosum), or specific sets of commissural axons (paleocortical, hippocampal, neocortical commissural axons). Severe hemispheric dysplasia may prevent the axons from reaching the midline on one or both sides. Besides the intrinsically neural defects, midline meningeal factors may prevent the commissuration as well (interhemispheric cysts or lipoma). As a consequence, commissural agenesis is a malformative feature, not a malformation by itself. Good knowledge of the modern embryological data may allow for a good understanding of a

  17. Expression of FOXP2 in the developing monkey forebrain: comparison with the expression of the genes FOXP1, PBX3, and MEIS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kaoru; Liu, Fu-Chin; Oishi, Takao; Mori, Takuma; Higo, Noriyuki; Hayashi, Motoharu; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Takahashi, Hiroshi

    2008-07-10

    By using the developing monkey brain as a model for human development, we investigated the expression pattern of the FOXP2 gene, a member of the FOX family of transcription factors in the developing monkey brain, and compared its expression pattern with transcription factors PBX3, MEIS2, and FOXP1. We observed FOXP2 mRNA expression in several brain structures, including the striatum, the islands of Calleja and other basal forebrain regions, the cerebral cortex, and the thalamus. FOXP2 mRNA was preferentially expressed in striosomal compartments during striatal development. The striosomal expression was transient and developmentally down-regulated in a topographical order. Specifically, during the perinatal state, striosomal FOXP2 expression was detected in both the caudate nucleus and the putamen, although expression was more prominent in the caudate nucleus than in the putamen. Striosomal FOXP2 expression declined during the postnatal period, first in the putamen and later in the caudate nucleus. During the same period, we also detected PBX3 mRNA in the striosomal compartment of the developing monkey striatum. FOXP2, as well as PBX3 and MEIS2, was expressed in the islands of Calleja and other cell clusters of the basal forebrain. FOXP2, in combination with PBX3 and MEIS2, may play a pivotal role in the development of striosomal neurons of the striatum and the islands of Calleja.

  18. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors in the Mouse Forebrain Partly Alleviates the Effects of Chronic Early Life Stress on Spatial Memory, Neurogenesis and Synaptic Function in the Dentate Gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Kanatsou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human studies suggests that high expression of brain mineralocorticoid receptors (MR may promote resilience against negative consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. We examined, in mice, whether brain MR overexpression can alleviate the effects of chronic early life stress (ELS on contextual memory formation under low and high stress conditions, and neurogenesis and synaptic function of dentate gyrus granular cells. Male mice were exposed to ELS by housing the dam with limited nesting and bedding material from postnatal day (PND 2 to 9. We investigated the moderating role of MRs by using forebrain-specific transgenic MR overexpression (MR-tg mice. Low-stress contextual (i.e., object relocation memory formation was hampered by ELS in wildtype but not MR-tg mice. Anxiety like behavior and high-stress contextual (i.e., fear memory formation were unaffected by ELS and/or MR expression level. At the cellular level, an interaction effect was observed between ELS and MR overexpression on the number of doublecortin-positive cells, with a significant difference between the wildtype ELS and MR-tg ELS groups. No interaction was found regarding Ki-67 and BrdU staining. A significant interaction between ELS and MR expression was further observed with regard to mEPSCs and mIPSC frequency. The ratio of evoked EPSC/IPSC or NMDA/AMPA responses was unaffected. Overall, these results suggest that ELS affects contextual memory formation under low stress conditions as well as neurogenesis and synaptic transmission in dentate granule cells, an effect that can be alleviated by MR-overexpression.

  19. Functional conservation of a forebrain enhancer from the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii in zebrafish and mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Boon-Hui

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The phylogenetic position of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii is particularly relevant to study the evolution of genes and gene regulation in vertebrates. Here we examine the evolution of Dlx homeobox gene regulation during vertebrate embryonic development with a particular focus on the forebrain. We first identified the elephant shark sequence orthologous to the URE2 cis -regulatory element of the mouse Dlx1/Dlx2 locus (herein named CmURE2. We then conducted a comparative study of the sequence and enhancer activity of CmURE2 with that of orthologous regulatory sequences from zebrafish and mouse. Results The CmURE2 sequence shows a high percentage of identity with its mouse and zebrafish counterparts but is overall more similar to mouse URE2 (MmURE2 than to zebrafish URE2 (DrURE2. In transgenic zebrafish and mouse embryos, CmURE2 displayed enhancer activity in the forebrain that overlapped with that of DrURE2 and MmURE2. However, we detected notable differences in the activity of the three sequences in the diencephalon. Outside of the forebrain, CmURE2 shows enhancer activity in areas such as the pharyngeal arches and dorsal root ganglia where its' counterparts are also active. Conclusions Our transgenic assays show that part of the URE2 enhancer activity is conserved throughout jawed vertebrates but also that new characteristics have evolved in the different groups. Our study demonstrates that the elephant shark is a useful outgroup to study the evolution of regulatory mechanisms in vertebrates and to address how changes in the sequence of cis -regulatory elements translate into changes in their regulatory activity.

  20. Retinoid signaling in control of progenitor cell differentiation during mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duester, Gregg

    2013-12-01

    The vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) serves as a ligand for nuclear RA receptors that control differentiation of progenitor cells important for vertebrate development. Genetic studies in mouse embryos deficient for RA-generating enzymes have been invaluable for deciphering RA function. RA first begins to act during early organogenesis when RA generated in trunk mesoderm begins to function as a diffusible signal controlling progenitor cell differentiation. In neuroectoderm, RA functions as an instructive signal to stimulate neuronal differentiation of progenitor cells in the hindbrain and spinal cord. RA is not required for early neuronal differentiation of the forebrain, but at later stages RA stimulates neuronal differentiation in forebrain basal ganglia. RA also acts as a permissive signal for differentiation by repressing fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in differentiated cells as they emerge from progenitor populations in the caudal progenitor zone and second heart field. In addition, RA signaling stimulates differentiation of spermatogonial germ cells and induces meiosis in male but not female gonads. A more complete understanding of the normal functions of RA signaling during development will guide efforts to use RA as a differentiation agent for therapeutic purposes.

  1. Microglia Modulate Wiring of the Embryonic Forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Squarzoni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of microglia, the tissue macrophages of the brain, has been associated with the etiology of several neuropsychiatric disorders. Consistently, microglia have been shown to regulate neurogenesis and synaptic maturation at perinatal and postnatal stages. However, microglia invade the brain during mid-embryogenesis and thus could play an earlier prenatal role. Here, we show that embryonic microglia, which display a transiently uneven distribution, regulate the wiring of forebrain circuits. Using multiple mouse models, including cell-depletion approaches and cx3cr1−/−, CR3−/−, and DAP12−/− mutants, we find that perturbing microglial activity affects the outgrowth of dopaminergic axons in the forebrain and the laminar positioning of subsets of neocortical interneurons. Since defects in both dopamine innervation and cortical networks have been linked to neuropsychiatric diseases, our study provides insights into how microglial dysfunction can impact forebrain connectivity and reveals roles for immune cells during normal assembly of brain circuits.

  2. Developmental specification of forebrain cholinergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaway, Kathryn C; Machold, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons and basal forebrain cholinergic projection neurons, which together comprise the forebrain cholinergic system, regulate attention, memory, reward pathways, and motor activity through the neuromodulation of multiple brain circuits. The importance of these neurons in the etiology of neurocognitive disorders has been well documented, but our understanding of their specification during embryogenesis is still incomplete. All forebrain cholinergic projection neurons and interneurons appear to share a common developmental origin in the embryonic ventral telencephalon, a region that also gives rise to GABAergic projection neurons and interneurons. Significant progress has been made in identifying the key intrinsic and extrinsic factors that promote a cholinergic fate in this precursor population. However, how cholinergic interneurons and projection neurons differentiate from one another during development, as well as how distinct developmental programs contribute to heterogeneity within those two classes, is not yet well understood. In this review we summarize the transcription factors and signaling molecules known to play a role in the specification and early development of striatal and basal forebrain cholinergic neurons. We also discuss the heterogeneity of these populations and its possible developmental origins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasound biomicroscopy in mouse cardiovascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Daniel H.

    2004-05-01

    The mouse is the preferred animal model for studying mammalian cardiovascular development and many human congenital heart diseases. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM), utilizing high-frequency (40-50-MHz) ultrasound, is uniquely capable of providing in vivo, real-time microimaging and Doppler blood velocity measurements in mouse embryos and neonates. UBM analyses of normal and abnormal mouse cardiovascular function will be described to illustrate the power of this microimaging approach. In particular, real-time UBM images have been used to analyze dimensional changes in the mouse heart from embryonic to neonatal stages. UBM-Doppler has been used recently to examine the precise timing of onset of a functional circulation in early-stage mouse embryos, from the first detectable cardiac contractions. In other experiments, blood velocity waveforms have been analyzed to characterize the functional phenotype of mutant mouse embryos having defects in cardiac valve formation. Finally, UBM has been developed for real-time, in utero image-guided injection of mouse embryos, enabling cell transplantation and genetic gain-of-function experiments with transfected cells and retroviruses. In summary, UBM provides a unique and powerful approach for in vivo analysis and image-guided manipulation in normal and genetically engineered mice, over a wide range of embryonic to neonatal developmental stages.

  4. Transplanted neuronal precursors migrate and differentiate in the developing mouse brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; MIN; PENG

    2002-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ), lining the lateral ventricle in forebrain, retains a population of neuronalprecursors with the ability of proliferation in adult mammals. To test the potential of neuronal precursorsin adult mice, we transplanted adult SVZ cells labeled with fluorescent dye PKH26 into the lateral ventricleof the mouse brain in different development stages. The preliminary results indicated that the graftedcells were able to survive and migrate into multiple regions of the recipient brain, including SVZ, the thirdventricle, thalamus, superior colliculus, inferior colliculus, cerebellum and olfactory bulb etc; and the amountof survival cells in different brain regions was correlated with the development stage of the recipient brain.Immunohistochemical studies showed that most of the grafted cells migrating into the specific target couldexpress neuronal or astrocytic marker. Our results revealed that the neuronal precursors in adult SVZstill retained immortality and ability of proliferation, which is likely to be induced by some environmentalfactors.

  5. Efficient in vivo electroporation of the postnatal rodent forebrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Boutin

    Full Text Available Functional gene analysis in vivo represents still a major challenge in biomedical research. Here we present a new method for the efficient introduction of nucleic acids into the postnatal mouse forebrain. We show that intraventricular injection of DNA followed by electroporation induces strong expression of transgenes in radial glia, neuronal precursors and neurons of the olfactory system. We present two proof-of-principle experiments to validate our approach. First, we show that expression of a human isoform of the neural cell adhesion molecule (hNCAM-140 in radial glia cells induces their differentiation into cells showing a neural precursor phenotype. Second, we demonstrate that p21 acts as a cell cycle inhibitor for postnatal neural stem cells. This approach will represent an important tool for future studies of postnatal neurogenesis and of neural development in general.

  6. Slit-Robo signals regulate pioneer axon pathfinding of the tract of the postoptic commissure in the mammalian forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricaño-Cornejo, Itzel; Altick, Amy L; García-Peña, Claudia M; Nural, Hikmet Feyza; Echevarría, Diego; Miquelajáuregui, Amaya; Mastick, Grant S; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo

    2011-10-01

    During early vertebrate forebrain development, pioneer axons establish a symmetrical scaffold descending longitudinally through the rostral forebrain, thus forming the tract of the postoptic commissure (TPOC). In mouse embryos, this tract begins to appear at embryonic day 9.5 (E9.5) as a bundle of axons tightly constrained at a specific dorsoventral level. We have characterized the participation of the Slit chemorepellants and their Robo receptors in the control of TPOC axon projection. In E9.5-E11.5 mouse embryos, Robo1 and Robo2 are expressed in the nucleus origin of the TPOC (nTPOC), and Slit expression domains flank the TPOC trajectory. These findings suggested that these proteins are important factors in the dorsoventral positioning of the TPOC axons. Consistently with this role, Slit2 inhibited TPOC axon growth in collagen gel cultures, and interfering with Robo function in cultured embryos induced projection errors in TPOC axons. Moreover, absence of both Slit1 and Slit2 or Robo1 and Robo2 in mutant mouse embryos revealed aberrant TPOC trajectories, resulting in abnormal spreading of the tract and misprojections into both ventral and dorsal tissues. These results reveal that Slit-Robo signaling regulates the dorsoventral position of this pioneer tract in the developing forebrain.

  7. Expression patterns of developmental regulatory genes show comparable divisions in the telencephalon of Xenopus and mouse: insights into the evolution of the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Loreta; Brox, Aurora; Legaz, Isabel; García-López, Margarita; Puelles, Luis

    2005-09-15

    In this study, we review data on the existence of comparable divisions and subdivisions in the telencephalon of different groups of tetrapods based on expression of some developmental regulatory genes, having a particular focus in the comparison of the anuran amphibian Xenopus and the mouse. The available data on Xenopus, mouse, chick and turtle indicate that apparently all tetrapod groups possess the same molecularly distinct divisions and subdivisions in the telencephalon. This basic organization was likely present in the telencephalon of stem tetrapods. Each division/subdivision is characterized by expression of a unique combination of developmental regulatory genes, and appears to represent a self-regulated and topologically constant histogenetic brain compartment that gives rise to specific groups of cells. This interpretation has an important consequence for searching homologies, since a basic condition for cell groups in different vertebrates to be considered homologous is that they originate in the same compartment. However, evolution may allow individual cell groups derived from comparable (field homologous) subdivisions to be either similar or dissimilar across the vertebrate groups, giving rise to several possible scenarios of evolution, which include both the evolutionary conservation of similar (homologous) cells or the production of novel cell groups. Finally, available data in the lamprey, a jawless fish, suggest that not all telencephalic subdivisions were present at the origin of vertebrates, raising important questions about their evolution.

  8. Forebrain neurogenesis: From embryo to adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Daniel; Picketts, David; Slack, Ruth S.; Schuurmans, Carol

    2017-01-01

    A satellite symposium to the Canadian Developmental Biology Conference 2016 was held on March 16–17, 2016 in Banff, Alberta, Canada, entitled Forebrain Neurogenesis: From embryo to adult. The Forebrain Neurogenesis symposium was a focused, high-intensity meeting, bringing together the top Canadian and international researchers in the field. This symposium reported the latest breaking news, along with ‘state of the art’ techniques to answer fundamental questions in developmental neurobiology. Topics covered ranged from stem cell regulation to neurocircuitry development, culminating with a session focused on neuropsychiatric disorders. Understanding the underlying causes of neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is of great interest as diagnoses of these conditions are climbing at alarming rates. For instance, in 2012, the Centers for Disease Control reported that the prevalence rate of ASD in the U.S. was 1 in 88; while more recent data indicate that the number is as high as 1 in 68 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention MMWR Surveillance Summaries. Vol. 63. No. 2). Similarly, the incidence of ASD is on the rise in Canada, increasing from 1 in 150 in 2000 to 1 in 63 in 2012 in southeastern Ontario (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention). Currently very little is known regarding the deficits underlying these neurodevelopmental conditions. Moreover, the development of effective therapies is further limited by major gaps in our understanding of the fundamental processes that regulate forebrain development and adult neurogenesis. The Forebrain Neurogenesis satellite symposium was thus timely, and it played a key role in advancing research in this important field, while also fostering collaborations between international leaders, and inspiring young researchers.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor signaling is altered in the forebrain of Engrailed-2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, G; Messina, A; Sgadò, P; Baj, G; Casarosa, S; Bozzi, Y

    2016-06-02

    Engrailed-2 (En2), a homeodomain transcription factor involved in regionalization and patterning of the midbrain and hindbrain regions has been associated to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). En2 knockout (En2(-/-)) mice show ASD-like features accompanied by a significant loss of GABAergic subpopulations in the hippocampus and neocortex. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a crucial factor for the postnatal development of forebrain GABAergic neurons, and altered GABA signaling has been hypothesized to underlie the symptoms of ASD. Here we sought to determine whether interneuron loss in the En2(-/-) forebrain might be related to altered expression of BDNF and its signaling receptors. We first evaluated the expression of different BDNF mRNA isoforms in the neocortex and hippocampus of wild-type (WT) and En2(-/-) mice. Quantitative RT-PCR showed a marked down-regulation of several splicing variants of BDNF mRNA in the neocortex but not hippocampus of adult En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT controls. Accordingly, levels of mature BDNF protein were lower in the neocortex but not hippocampus of En2(-/-) mice, as compared to WT. Increased levels of phosphorylated TrkB and decreased levels of p75 receptor were also detected in the neocortex of mutant mice. Accordingly, the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and RhoA, two genes regulated via p75 was significantly altered in forebrain areas of mutant mice. These data indicate that BDNF signaling alterations might be involved in the anatomical changes observed in the En2(-/-) forebrain and suggest a pathogenic role of altered BDNF signaling in this mouse model of ASD.

  10. Patterning of the chick forebrain anlage by the prechordal plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, E M; Kessel, M

    1997-10-01

    We analysed the role of the prechordal plate in forebrain development of chick embryos in vivo. After transplantation to uncommitted ectoderm a prechordal plate induces an ectopic, dorsoventrally patterned, forebrain-like vesicle. Grafting laterally under the anterior neural plate causes ventralization of the lateral side of the forebrain, as indicated by a second expression domain of the homeobox gene NKX2.1. Such a lateral ventralization cannot be induced by the secreted factor Sonic Hedgehog alone, as this is only able to distort the ventral forebrain medially. Removal of the prechordal plate does not reduce the rostrocaudal extent of the anterior neural tube, but leads to significant narrowing and cyclopia. Excision of the head process results in the caudal expansion of the NKX2.1 expression in the ventral part of the anterior neural tube, while PAX6 expression in the dorsal part remains unchanged. We suggest that there are three essential steps in early forebrain patterning, which culminate in the ventralization of the forebrain. First, anterior neuralization occurs at the primitive streak stage, when BMP-4-antagonizing factors emanate from the node and spread in a planar fashion to induce anterior neural ectoderm. Second, the anterior translocation of organizer-derived cells shifts the source of neuralizing factors anteriorly, where the relative concentration of BMP-4-antagonists is thus elevated, and the medial part of the prospective forebrain becomes competent to respond to ventralizing factors. Third, the forebrain anlage is ventralized by signals including Sonic Hedgehog, thereby creating a new identity, the prospective hypothalamus, which splits the eye anlage into two lateral domains.

  11. Expression of the Norrie disease gene (Ndp) in developing and adult mouse eye, ear, and brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Smallwood, Philip; Nathans, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    The Norrie disease gene (Ndp) codes for a secreted protein, Norrin, that activates canonical Wnt signaling by binding to its receptor, Frizzled-4. This signaling system is required for normal vascular development in the retina and for vascular survival in the cochlea. In mammals, the pattern of Ndp expression beyond the retina is poorly defined due to the low abundance of Norrin mRNA and protein. Here we characterize Ndp expression during mouse development by studying a knock-in mouse that carries the coding sequence of human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) inserted at the Ndp locus (NdpAP). In the CNS, NdpAP expression is apparent by E10.5 and is dynamic and complex. The anatomically delimited regions of NdpAP expression observed prenatally in the CNS are replaced postnatally by widespread expression in astrocytes in the forebrain and midbrain, Bergman glia in the cerebellum, and Müller glia in the retina. In the developing and adult cochlea, NdpAP expression is closely associated with two densely vascularized regions, the stria vascularis and a capillary plexus between the organ of Corti and the spiral ganglion. These observations suggest the possibility that Norrin may have developmental and/or homeostatic functions beyond the retina and cochlea. PMID:21055480

  12. Coexpression of high-voltage-activated ion channels Kv3.4 and Cav1.2 in pioneer axons during pathfinding in the developing rat forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chia-Yi; Chu, Dachen; Hwang, Wei-Chao; Tsaur, Meei-Ling

    2012-11-01

    Precise axon pathfinding is crucial for establishment of the initial neuronal network during development. Pioneer axons navigate without the help of preexisting axons and pave the way for follower axons that project later. Voltage-gated ion channels make up the intrinsic electrical activity of pioneer axons and regulate axon pathfinding. To elucidate which channel molecules are present in pioneer axons, immunohistochemical analysis was performed to examine 14 voltage-gated ion channels (Kv1.1-Kv1.3, Kv3.1-Kv3.4, Kv4.3, Cav1.2, Cav1.3, Cav2.2, Nav1.2, Nav1.6, and Nav1.9) in nine axonal tracts in the developing rat forebrain, including the optic nerve, corpus callosum, corticofugal fibers, thalamocortical axons, lateral olfactory tract, hippocamposeptal projection, anterior commissure, hippocampal commissure, and medial longitudinal fasciculus. We found A-type K⁺ channel Kv3.4 in both pioneer axons and early follower axons and L-type Ca²⁺ channel Cav1.2 in pioneer axons and early and late follower axons. Spatially, Kv3.4 and Cav1.2 were colocalized with markers of pioneer neurons and pioneer axons, such as deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), in most fiber tracts examined. Temporally, Kv3.4 and Cav1.2 were expressed abundantly in most fiber tracts during axon pathfinding but were downregulated beginning in synaptogenesis. By contrast, delayed rectifier Kv channels (e.g., Kv1.1) and Nav channels (e.g., Nav1.2) were absent from these fiber tracts (except for the corpus callosum) during pathfinding of pioneer axons. These data suggest that Kv3.4 and Cav1.2, two high-voltage-activated ion channels, may act together to control Ca²⁺ -dependent electrical activity of pioneer axons and play important roles during axon pathfinding.

  13. GRK5 Deficiency Leads to Selective Basal Forebrain Cholinergic Neuronal Vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Minchao; Singh, Prabhakar; Cheng, Shaowu; Zhang, Qiang; Peng, Wei; Ding, XueFeng; Li, Longxuan; Liu, Jun; Premont, Richard T; Morgan, Dave; Burns, Jeffery M; Swerdlow, Russell H; Suo, William Z

    2016-05-19

    Why certain diseases primarily affect one specific neuronal subtype rather than another is a puzzle whose solution underlies the development of specific therapies. Selective basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurodegeneration participates in cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Here, we report the first recapitulation of the selective BFC neuronal loss that is typical of human AD in a mouse model termed GAP. We created GAP mice by crossing Tg2576 mice that over-express the Swedish mutant human β-amyloid precursor protein gene with G protein-coupled receptor kinase-5 (GRK5) knockout mice. This doubly defective mouse displayed significant BFC neuronal loss at 18 months of age, which was not observed in either of the singly defective parent strains or in the wild type. Along with other supporting evidence, we propose that GRK5 deficiency selectively renders BFC neurons more vulnerable to degeneration.

  14. ROCK inhibition prevents early mouse embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Chen, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Yu; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2014-08-01

    ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector that is important for actin assembly and is involved in various cellular functions, including cell contraction, migration, motility, and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we investigated ROCK expression and function during early mouse embryo development. Inhibiting ROCK by Y-27632 treatment at the zygote stage resulted in first cleavage failure, and most embryos failed to develop to the 8-cell stage. When adding Y-27632 at the 8-cell stage, embryos failed to undergo compaction and could not develop into blastocysts. In addition, fluorescence staining intensity analysis indicated that actin expression at blastomere membranes was significantly reduced. After ROCK inhibition, two or more nuclei were observed in a cell, which indicated possible cytokinesis failure. Moreover, after ROCK inhibition with Y-27632, the phosphorylation levels of LIMK1/2, a downstream molecule of ROCK, were decreased at blastomere membranes. Thus, our results showed conserved roles for ROCK in this mammalian embryo model and indicated that a ROCK-LIMK1/2-actin pathway might regulate cleavage and blastocyst formation during early mouse embryo development.

  15. Photobiomodulation of early mouse embryo development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridova-Chailakhyan, T. A.; Fakhranurova, L. I.; Simonova, N. B.; Khramov, R. N.; Manokhin, A. A.; Paskevich, S. I.; Chailakhyan, L. M.

    2008-04-01

    The effect of artificial sunlight (AS) from a xenon source and of converted AS with an additional orange-red luminescent (λ MAX=626 nm) component (AS+L) on the development of mouse zygotes was investigated. A plastic screen with a photoluminophore layer was used for production of this orange-red luminescent (L) component. A single short-term (15 min) exposure produced a long-term stable positive effect on early embryo development of mice, which persisted during several days. After exposure to AS+L, a stimulating influence on preimplantation development was observed, in comparison with the control group without AS exposure. The positive effects were as follows: increase in percent of embryos (P <= 0.05) developed to the blastocyst stage (96.2 %) with hatching from the zona pellucida (80.8 %) within 82-96 hours in vitro compared to the control (67.1 % and 28.8 %, respectively).

  16. Adhesive/Repulsive Codes in Vertebrate Forebrain Morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Cavodeassi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The last fifteen years have seen the identification of some of the mechanisms involved in anterior neural plate specification, patterning, and morphogenesis, which constitute the first stages in the formation of the forebrain. These studies have provided us with a glimpse into the molecular mechanisms that drive the development of an embryonic structure, and have resulted in the realization that cell segregation in the anterior neural plate is essential for the accurate progression of forebrain morphogenesis. This review summarizes the latest advances in our understanding of mechanisms of cell segregation during forebrain development, with and emphasis on the impact of this process on the morphogenesis of one of the anterior neural plate derivatives, the eyes.

  17. Role of ADARs in mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkley, Carl R; Liddicoat, Brian; Hartner, Jochen C

    2012-01-01

    RNA editing by deamination of adenosine to inosine (A-to-I editing) is a physiologically important posttranscriptional mechanism that can regulate expression of genes by modifying their transcripts. A-to-I editing is mediated by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) that can catalytically exchange adenosines to inosines, with varying efficiency, depending on the structure of the RNA substrates. Significant progress in understanding the biological function of mammalian ADARs has been made in the past decade by the creation and analysis of gene-targeted mice with disrupted or modified ADAR alleles. These studies have revealed important roles of ADARs in neuronal and hematopoietic tissue during embryonic and postnatal stages of mouse development.

  18. Meningeal retinoic acid contributes to neocortical lamination and radial migration during mouse brain development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haushalter, Carole; Schuhbaur, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retinoic acid (RA) is a diffusible molecule involved in early forebrain patterning. Its later production in the meninges by the retinaldehyde dehydrogenase RALDH2 coincides with the time of cortical neuron generation. A function of RA in this process has not been adressed directly as Raldh2−/− mouse mutants are embryonic lethal. Here, we used a conditional genetic strategy to inactivate Raldh2 just prior to onset of its expression in the developing meninges. This inactivation does not affect the formation of the cortical progenitor populations, their rate of division, or timing of differentiation. However, migration of late-born cortical neurons is delayed, with neurons stalling in the intermediate zone and exhibiting an abnormal multipolar morphology. This suggests that RA controls the multipolar-to-bipolar transition that occurs in the intermediate zone and allows neurons to start locomotion in the cortical plate. Our work also shows a role for RA in cortical lamination, as deep layers are expanded and a subset of layer IV neurons are not formed in the Raldh2-ablated mutants. These data demonstrate that meninges are a source of extrinsic signals important for cortical development. PMID:28011626

  19. Development of hematopoietic stem cell activity in the mouse embryo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. Müller (Albrecht); A. Medvinsky; J. Strouboulis (John); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe precise time of appearance of the first hematopoietic stem cell activity in the developing mouse embryo is unknown. Recently the aorta-gonad-mesonephros region of the developing mouse embryo has been shown to possess hematopoietic colony-forming activity (CFU-S) in irradiated recipie

  20. Loss of MeCP2 From Forebrain Excitatory Neurons Leads to Cortical Hyperexcitation and Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Peterson, Matthew; Beyer, Barbara; Frankel, Wayne N.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of MECP2 cause Rett syndrome (RTT), a neurodevelopmental disorder leading to loss of motor and cognitive functions, impaired social interactions, and seizure at young ages. Defects of neuronal circuit development and function are thought to be responsible for the symptoms of RTT. The majority of RTT patients show recurrent seizures, indicating that neuronal hyperexcitation is a common feature of RTT. However, mechanisms underlying hyperexcitation in RTT are poorly understood. Here we show that deletion of Mecp2 from cortical excitatory neurons but not forebrain inhibitory neurons in the mouse leads to spontaneous seizures. Selective deletion of Mecp2 from excitatory but not inhibitory neurons in the forebrain reduces GABAergic transmission in layer 5 pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal and somatosensory cortices. Loss of MeCP2 from cortical excitatory neurons reduces the number of GABAergic synapses in the cortex, and enhances the excitability of layer 5 pyramidal neurons. Using single-cell deletion of Mecp2 in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, we show that GABAergic transmission is reduced in neurons without MeCP2, but is normal in neighboring neurons with MeCP2. Together, these results suggest that MeCP2 in cortical excitatory neurons plays a critical role in the regulation of GABAergic transmission and cortical excitability. PMID:24523563

  1. Adult forebrain NMDA receptors gate social motivation and social memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-02-01

    Motivation to engage in social interaction is critical to ensure normal social behaviors, whereas dysregulation in social motivation can contribute to psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, autism, social anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While dopamine is well known to regulate motivation, its downstream targets are poorly understood. Given the fact that the dopamine 1 (D1) receptors are often physically coupled with the NMDA receptors, we hypothesize that the NMDA receptor activity in the adult forebrain principal neurons are crucial not only for learning and memory, but also for the proper gating of social motivation. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining sociability and social memory in inducible forebrain-specific NR1 knockout mice. These mice are ideal for exploring the role of the NR1 subunit in social behavior because the NR1 subunit can be selectively knocked out after the critical developmental period, in which NR1 is required for normal development. We found that the inducible deletion of the NMDA receptors prior to behavioral assays impaired, not only object and social recognition memory tests, but also resulted in profound deficits in social motivation. Mice with ablated NR1 subunits in the forebrain demonstrated significant decreases in sociability compared to their wild type counterparts. These results suggest that in addition to its crucial role in learning and memory, the NMDA receptors in the adult forebrain principal neurons gate social motivation, independent of neuronal development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162111.html FDA Scientists Develop Mouse Model for Zika Research Researchers hope strain of mice will help speed development of vaccines, treatments To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this news ...

  3. Whole-Brain Monosynaptic Afferent Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rongfeng; Jin, Sen; He, Xiaobin; Xu, Fuqiang; Hu, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) robustly modulates many important behaviors, such as arousal, attention, learning and memory, through heavy projections to cortex and hippocampus. However, the presynaptic partners governing BFCS activity still remain poorly understood. Here, we utilized a recently developed rabies virus-based cell-type-specific retrograde tracing system to map the whole-brain afferent inputs of the BFCS. We found that the BFCS receives inputs from multiple cortical areas, such as orbital frontal cortex, motor cortex, and insular cortex, and that the BFCS also receives dense inputs from several subcortical nuclei related to motivation and stress, including lateral septum, central amygdala, paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus, dorsal raphe, and parabrachial nucleus. Interestingly, we found that the BFCS receives inputs from the olfactory areas and the entorhinal–hippocampal system. These results greatly expand our knowledge about the connectivity of the mouse BFCS and provided important preliminary indications for future exploration of circuit function. PMID:27777554

  4. Prenatal pharmacotherapy rescues brain development in a Down's syndrome mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Sandra; Stagni, Fiorenza; Bianchi, Patrizia; Ciani, Elisabetta; Giacomini, Andrea; De Franceschi, Marianna; Moldrich, Randal; Kurniawan, Nyoman; Mardon, Karine; Giuliani, Alessandro; Calzà, Laura; Bartesaghi, Renata

    2014-02-01

    Intellectual impairment is a strongly disabling feature of Down's syndrome, a genetic disorder of high prevalence (1 in 700-1000 live births) caused by trisomy of chromosome 21. Accumulating evidence shows that widespread neurogenesis impairment is a major determinant of abnormal brain development and, hence, of intellectual disability in Down's syndrome. This defect is worsened by dendritic hypotrophy and connectivity alterations. Most of the pharmacotherapies designed to improve cognitive performance in Down's syndrome have been attempted in Down's syndrome mouse models during adult life stages. Yet, as neurogenesis is mainly a prenatal event, treatments aimed at correcting neurogenesis failure in Down's syndrome should be administered during pregnancy. Correction of neurogenesis during the very first stages of brain formation may, in turn, rescue improper brain wiring. The aim of our study was to establish whether it is possible to rescue the neurodevelopmental alterations that characterize the trisomic brain with a prenatal pharmacotherapy with fluoxetine, a drug that is able to restore post-natal hippocampal neurogenesis in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down's syndrome. Pregnant Ts65Dn females were treated with fluoxetine from embryonic Day 10 until delivery. On post-natal Day 2 the pups received an injection of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine and were sacrificed after either 2 h or after 43 days (at the age of 45 days). Untreated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice exhibited a severe neurogenesis reduction and hypocellularity throughout the forebrain (subventricular zone, subgranular zone, neocortex, striatum, thalamus and hypothalamus), midbrain (mesencephalon) and hindbrain (cerebellum and pons). In embryonically treated 2-day-old Ts65Dn mice, precursor proliferation and cellularity were fully restored throughout all brain regions. The recovery of proliferation potency and cellularity was still present in treated Ts65Dn 45-day-old mice. Moreover, embryonic treatment restored

  5. Forebrain Mechanisms of Nociception and Pain: Analysis through Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kenneth L.

    1999-07-01

    Pain is a unified experience composed of interacting discriminative, affective-motivational, and cognitive components, each of which is mediated and modulated through forebrain mechanisms acting at spinal, brainstem, and cerebral levels. The size of the human forebrain in relation to the spinal cord gives anatomical emphasis to forebrain control over nociceptive processing. Human forebrain pathology can cause pain without the activation of nociceptors. Functional imaging of the normal human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) shows synaptically induced increases in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in several regions specifically during pain. We have examined the variables of gender, type of noxious stimulus, and the origin of nociceptive input as potential determinants of the pattern and intensity of rCBF responses. The structures most consistently activated across genders and during contact heat pain, cold pain, cutaneous laser pain or intramuscular pain were the contralateral insula and anterior cingulate cortex, the bilateral thalamus and premotor cortex, and the cerebellar vermis. These regions are commonly activated in PET studies of pain conducted by other investigators, and the intensity of the brain rCBF response correlates parametrically with perceived pain intensity. To complement the human studies, we developed an animal model for investigating stimulus-induced rCBF responses in the rat. In accord with behavioral measures and the results of human PET, there is a progressive and selective activation of somatosensory and limbic system structures in the brain and brainstem following the subcutaneous injection of formalin. The animal model and human PET studies should be mutually reinforcing and thus facilitate progress in understanding forebrain mechanisms of normal and pathological pain.

  6. Cellular and genetic analysis of mouse blastocyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, R A; Spindle, A I

    1979-01-01

    The development of mouse embryos was studied by both cellular and genetic approaches. In the cellular analysis, determination of cell fate in blastocysts and in cell populations derived from them was studied in an attempt to estimate the time that these cells become committed to their fate. In the genetic analysis, existing mutations that are lethal to mouse embryos were used to discern essential features of early development. In this review, the timing of cell determination in the inner cell mass and the primary ectoderm, and the manifestation of defects in mouse embryos that are homozygous for the A/sup y/ allele of the agouti locus were considered.

  7. Role of glucose in cloned mouse embryo development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhiming Han; Rita Vassena; Maggie M. Y. Chi; Santhi Potireddy; Miriam Sutovsky; Kelle H. Moley; Peter Sutovsky; Keith E. Latham

    2008-01-01

    Cloned mouse embryos display a marked preference for glucose-containing culture medium, with enhanced development to the blastocyst stage in glucose-containing medium attributable mainly to an early...

  8. Neurodevelopment genes in lampreys reveal trends for forebrain evolution in craniates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adèle Guérin

    Full Text Available The forebrain is the brain region which has undergone the most dramatic changes through vertebrate evolution. Analyses conducted in lampreys are essential to gain insight into the broad ancestral characteristics of the forebrain at the dawn of vertebrates, and to understand the molecular basis for the diversifications that have taken place in cyclostomes and gnathostomes following their splitting. Here, we report the embryonic expression patterns of 43 lamprey genes, coding for transcription factors or signaling molecules known to be involved in cell proliferation, stemcellness, neurogenesis, patterning and regionalization in the developing forebrain. Systematic expression patterns comparisons with model organisms highlight conservations likely to reflect shared features present in the vertebrate ancestors. They also point to changes in signaling systems -pathways which control the growth and patterning of the neuroepithelium-, which may have been crucial in the evolution of forebrain anatomy at the origin of vertebrates.

  9. A provisional gene regulatory atlas for mouse heart development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailin Chen

    Full Text Available Congenital Heart Disease (CHD is one of the most common birth defects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying normal cardiac development is an important step towards early identification of abnormalities during the developmental program and towards the creation of early intervention strategies. We developed a novel computational strategy for leveraging high-content data sets, including a large selection of microarray data associated with mouse cardiac development, mouse genome sequence, ChIP-seq data of selected mouse transcription factors and Y2H data of mouse protein-protein interactions, to infer the active transcriptional regulatory network of mouse cardiac development. We identified phase-specific expression activity for 765 overlapping gene co-expression modules that were defined for obtained cardiac lineage microarray data. For each co-expression module, we identified the phase of cardiac development where gene expression for that module was higher than other phases. Co-expression modules were found to be consistent with biological pathway knowledge in Wikipathways, and met expectations for enrichment of pathways involved in heart lineage development. Over 359,000 transcription factor-target relationships were inferred by analyzing the promoter sequences within each gene module for overrepresentation against the JASPAR database of Transcription Factor Binding Site (TFBS motifs. The provisional regulatory network will provide a framework of studying the genetic basis of CHD.

  10. Involvement of mouse and porcine PLCζ-induced calcium oscillations in preimplantation development of mouse embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Akihiro, E-mail: ayoneda@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan); Division of Molecular Therapeutics, Center for Food & Medical Innovation, Hokkaido University (Japan); Watanabe, Tomomasa [Laboratory of Animal Breeding and Reproduction, Graduate School of Agriculture, Hokkaido University (Japan)

    2015-05-01

    In mammals, phospholipase Cζ (PLCζ) has the ability to trigger calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) oscillations in oocytes, leading to oocyte activation. Although there is a species-specific difference in the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern, whether PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations affect preimplantation embryonic development remains unclear. Here, we show that Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in mouse PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes stopped just before pronuclear formation, while that in porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes continued for several hours after pronuclei had been formed. This difference of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations in oocytes after pronuclear formation was dependent on the difference in the nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence of PLCζ between the mouse and pig. However, mouse and porcine PLCζ cRNA-injected oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts regardless of the absence or presence of Ca{sup 2+} oscillations after pronuclear formation. Furthermore, the developmental rate of mouse or porcine PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids to the blastocyst stage was not significantly different from that of strontium-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids. These results suggest that the PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern in mouse oocytes is dependent on the NLS sequence of PLCζ and injection of PLCζ may be a useful method for activation of round spermatid-injected and somatic nuclear transferred oocytes. - Highlights: • Porcine PLCζ-induced Ca{sup 2+} oscillations continued after pronuclear formation. • The Ca{sup 2+} oscillatory pattern was dependent on the difference in the NLS sequence of PLCζ. • PLCζ-activated oocytes parthenogenetically developed to blastocysts. • PLCζ-activated oocytes injected with round spermatids developed to blastocysts.

  11. Effect of genistein on mouse blastocyst development in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-hsiung CHAN; Hsiang-yu LU; Nion-heng SHIAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To examine the cytotoxic effects of genistein, an isoflavone compound, on early postimplantation embryonic development in vitro. Methods: Mouse blastocysts were incubated in medium with or without genistein (25 or 50 μmol/L) or daidzein (50 μmol/L) for 24 h. Cell proliferation and growth was investigated by dual differential staining, apoptosis was analyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and apoptotic or necrotic cells were visualized by Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) staining. Implantation and postimplantation development of embryos were measured by in vitro development analysis. Results: TUNEL staining and Annexin-V/PI staining. showed that genistein dose-dependently increased apoptosis in mouse blastocysts, while daidzein, another soy isoflavone, had no such effect. The pretreatment of the blastocysts with genistein caused fewer cells than the control group and this effect was primary in the inner cell mass. The genistein-pretreated blastocysts showed normal levels of implantation on culture dishes in vitro, but significantly fewer genistein-pretreated embryos reached the later stages of embryonic development versus the controls, with many of the former embryos dying at relatively early stages of development. In addition, genistein treatment de-creased the development of morulas into blastocysts, and dietary genistein was found to induce cell apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation in an animal assay model of embryogenesis. Conclusions: Our results collectively indicate that genistein treatment of mouse blastocysts induces apoptosis, decreases cell numbers, retards early postimplantation blastocyst development, and increases early-stage blastocyst death in vitro, while dietary genistein appears to negatively affect mouse embryonic development in vivo by inducing cell apoptosis and inhibiting cell proliferation. These novel findings provide important new insights into the effect of genistein

  12. Distribution of amelotin in mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuguang; Wang, Wanchun; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Juanjuan; Li, Dongliang; Wei, Yahong; Han, Tingting

    2010-01-01

    Amelotin is expressed and secreted by ameloblasts in tooth development, but amelotin distribution during enamel development is not clear. In this report, we first investigated amelotin expression in developing teeth by immunohistochemistry. Amelotin was detected in the enamel matrix at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. Amelotin was also observed at Tomes' processes on the apical ends of secretory ameloblasts. We then compared amelotin gene expression with those of amelogenin, enamelin, and ameloblastin in the mandibles of postnatal mice by RT-PCR. The expression of amelotin was detected as early as in postnatal day 0 mandibles and amelotin was coexpressed with amelogenin, ameloblastin, and enamelin during tooth development. These data strongly suggest that amelotin is an enamel matrix protein expressed at the secretion and maturation stages of enamel development. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cells during mouse development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Orelio (Claudia)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractThe hematopoietic system is comprised of many different cell types that fulfill important physiological functions throughout embryonic and adult stages of mouse development. As the mature blood cells have a limited life-span, the pool of blood cells needs constant replenishing. At the ba

  14. Aquaporin expression patterns in the developing mouse salivary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Helga S; Ruus, Ann-Kristin; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about the presence of the various membrane-located water channels, aquaporins (AQP), during the prenatal and postnatal development of the mouse submandibular salivary gland (SMG). To learn more about AQPs in the developing aspect of salivary glands, we investigated trends in the expression patterns of several AQPs using the embryonic, early postnatal, and young adult mouse SMGs as models. We have chosen AQPs previously found in salivary glands in other animals. Transcripts of AQPs 1, 3, 4, 5, and 8 were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified. Aquaporin proteins 1, 3, 4, and 5, but not AQP protein 8, were detected and quantified using western blotting. The various AQPs showed distinct transcript and protein-expression patterns. The change in trends may indicate that the importance of the various AQPs varies throughout the developmental stages in the mouse SMG. Their presence might be related to cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, apoptosis, transepithelial transport, osmosensing, or cell volume regulation; all roles that in the literature are linked to the various AQPs. Overall, this study demonstrates that AQP presentation varies and has a specific expression pattern during the development of mouse SMG. This feature may be important for glandular anatomical and physiological development.

  15. Subplate in the developing cortex of mouse and human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Zhi; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Oeschger, Franziska M

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The subplate is a largely transient zone containing precocious neurons involved in several key steps of cortical development. The majority of subplate neurons form a compact layer in mouse, but are dispersed throughout a much larger zone in the human. In rodent, subplate neurons are amon...

  16. The atlas of mouse development eHistology resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth; Moss, Julie; Burton, Nick; Roochun, Yogmatee; Armit, Chris; Richardson, Lorna; Baldock, Richard

    2015-06-01

    The Atlas of Mouse Development by Professor Mathew Kaufman is an essential text for understanding mouse developmental anatomy. This definitive and authoritative atlas is still in production and is essential for any biologist working with the mouse embryo, although the last revision dates back to 1994. Here, we announce the eHistology online resource that provides free access to high-resolution colour images digitized from the original histological sections (www.emouseatlas.org/emap/eHistology/index.php) used by Kaufman for the Atlas. The images are provided with the original annotations and plate numbering of the paper atlas and enable viewing the material to cellular resolution. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Genomic analysis of mouse retinal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Blackshaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate retina is comprised of seven major cell types that are generated in overlapping but well-defined intervals. To identify genes that might regulate retinal development, gene expression in the developing retina was profiled at multiple time points using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE. The expression patterns of 1,051 genes that showed developmentally dynamic expression by SAGE were investigated using in situ hybridization. A molecular atlas of gene expression in the developing and mature retina was thereby constructed, along with a taxonomic classification of developmental gene expression patterns. Genes were identified that label both temporal and spatial subsets of mitotic progenitor cells. For each developing and mature major retinal cell type, genes selectively expressed in that cell type were identified. The gene expression profiles of retinal Müller glia and mitotic progenitor cells were found to be highly similar, suggesting that Müller glia might serve to produce multiple retinal cell types under the right conditions. In addition, multiple transcripts that were evolutionarily conserved that did not appear to encode open reading frames of more than 100 amino acids in length ("noncoding RNAs" were found to be dynamically and specifically expressed in developing and mature retinal cell types. Finally, many photoreceptor-enriched genes that mapped to chromosomal intervals containing retinal disease genes were identified. These data serve as a starting point for functional investigations of the roles of these genes in retinal development and physiology.

  18. Fgf16 is required for specification of GABAergic neurons and oligodendrocytes in the zebrafish forebrain.

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    Ayumi Miyake

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor (Fgf signaling plays crucial roles in various developmental processes including those in the brain. We examined the role of Fgf16 in the formation of the zebrafish brain. The knockdown of fgf16 decreased cell proliferation in the forebrain and midbrain. fgf16 was also essential for development of the ventral telencephalon and diencephalon, whereas fgf16 was not required for dorsoventral patterning in the midbrain. fgf16 was additionally required for the specification and differentiation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic interneurons and oligodendrocytes, but not for those of glutamatergic neurons in the forebrain. Cross talk between Fgf and Hedgehog (Hh signaling was critical for the specification of GABAergic interneurons and oligodendrocytes. The expression of fgf16 in the forebrain was down-regulated by the inhibition of Hh and Fgf19 signaling, but not by that of Fgf3/Fgf8 signaling. The fgf16 morphant phenotype was similar to that of the fgf19 morphant and embryos blocked Hh signaling. The results of the present study indicate that Fgf16 signaling, which is regulated by the downstream pathways of Hh-Fgf19 in the forebrain, is involved in forebrain development.

  19. Enhancement of NMRI Mouse Embryo Development In vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abedini, F.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the systematic studies used in the development of human embryo culture media have been done first on mouse embryos. The general use of NMRI outbred mice is a model for toxicology, teratology and pharmacology. NMRI mouse embryo exhibit the two-cell block in vitro. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the effects of four kinds of culture media on the development of zygotes (NMRI after embryo vitrification. One-cell mouse embryos were obtained from NMRI mice after superovulation and mating with adult male NMRI mice. And then randomly divided into 4 groups for culture in four different cultures media including: M16 (A, DMEM/Ham, F-12 (B, DMEM/Ham's F-12 co-culture with Vero cells(C and DMEM/Ham's F-12 co-culture with MEF cells (D. Afterward all of the embryos were vitrified in EFS40 solution and collected. Results of our study revealed, more blastocysts significantly were developed with co-culture with MEF cells in DMEM/Ham's F-12 medium. More research needed to understand the effect of other components of culture medium, and co-culture on NMRI embryo development.

  20. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-06

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance.

  1. Spatiotemporal distribution of PAX6 and MEIS2 expression and total cell numbers in the ganglionic eminence in the early developing human forebrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen B; Lutterodt, Melissa C; Laursen, Henning

    2010-01-01

    in the same time window. We demonstrate by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry that the two homeobox genes are expressed during early fetal brain development in humans. PAX6 mRNA and protein were located in the proliferative zones of the neocortex and in single cells in the cortical preplate at 7...

  2. Dual effects of fluoxetine on mouse early embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Woon [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Changwon Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University, Changwon 630-723 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Changyong [National Institute of Animal Science, RDA, Cheonan 330-801 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eun-Jin [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Ik [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju 660-702 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sook-Young [Fertility Center of CHA Gangnam Medical Center, CHA University, Seoul 135-081 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Young-Woo; Han, Sunkyu; Tak, Hyun-Min; Han, Jaehee [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dawon, E-mail: dawon@gnu.ac.kr [Department of Physiology and Institute of Health Sciences, Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju 660-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, regulates a variety of physiological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis, in mammalian cells. Little is known about the role of fluoxetine in early embryonic development. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of fluoxetine during mouse early embryonic development. Late two-cell stage embryos (2-cells) were cultured in the presence of various concentrations of fluoxetine (1 to 50 μM) for different durations. When late 2-cells were incubated with 5 μM fluoxetine for 6 h, the percentage that developed into blastocysts increased compared to the control value. However, late 2-cells exposed to fluoxetine (5 μM) over 24 h showed a reduction in blastocyst formation. The addition of fluoxetine (5 μM) together with KN93 or KN62 (calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitors) failed to increase blastocyst formation. Fluoxetine treatment inhibited TREK-1 and TREK-2, members of the two-pore domain K{sup +} channel family expressed in mouse embryos, activities, indicating that fluoxetine-induced membrane depolarization in late 2-cells might have resulted from TREK inhibition. In addition, long-term exposure to fluoxetine altered the TREK mRNA expression levels. Furthermore, injection of siRNA targeting TREKs significantly decreased blastocyst formation by ∼ 30% compared to injection of scrambled siRNA. Long-term exposure of fluoxetine had no effect on blastocyst formation of TREK deficient embryos. These results indicate that low-dose and short-term exposures of late 2-cells to fluoxetine probably increase blastocyst formation through activation of CaMKII-dependent signal transduction pathways, whereas long-term exposure decreases mouse early embryonic development through inhibition of TREK channel gating. Highlights: ► Short-term exposure of 2-cells to fluoxetine enhances mouse blastocyst formation. ► The enhancive effect of fluoxetine is resulted from Ca

  3. Clonally Related Forebrain Interneurons Disperse Broadly across Both Functional Areas and Structural Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Christian; Jaglin, Xavier H; Cobbs, Lucy V; Bandler, Rachel C; Streicher, Carmen; Cepko, Constance L; Hippenmeyer, Simon; Fishell, Gord

    2015-09-02

    The medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) gives rise to the majority of mouse forebrain interneurons. Here, we examine the lineage relationship among MGE-derived interneurons using a replication-defective retroviral library containing a highly diverse set of DNA barcodes. Recovering the barcodes from the mature progeny of infected progenitor cells enabled us to unambiguously determine their respective lineal relationship. We found that clonal dispersion occurs across large areas of the brain and is not restricted by anatomical divisions. As such, sibling interneurons can populate the cortex, hippocampus striatum, and globus pallidus. The majority of interneurons appeared to be generated from asymmetric divisions of MGE progenitor cells, followed by symmetric divisions within the subventricular zone. Altogether, our findings uncover that lineage relationships do not appear to determine interneuron allocation to particular regions. As such, it is likely that clonally related interneurons have considerable flexibility as to the particular forebrain circuits to which they can contribute.

  4. Forebrain-Specific Loss of BMPRII in Mice Reduces Anxiety and Increases Object Exploration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofeyah L McBrayer

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of Bone Morphogenic Protein Receptor Type II (BMPRII in learning, memory, and exploratory behavior in mice, a tissue-specific knockout of BMPRII in the post-natal hippocampus and forebrain was generated. We found that BMPRII mutant mice had normal spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze, but showed significantly reduced swimming speeds with increased floating behavior. Further analysis using the Porsolt Swim Test to investigate behavioral despair did not reveal any differences in immobility between mutants and controls. In the Elevated Plus Maze, BMPRII mutants and Smad4 mutants showed reduced anxiety, while in exploratory tests, BMPRII mutants showed more interest in object exploration. These results suggest that loss of BMPRII in the mouse hippocampus and forebrain does not disrupt spatial learning and memory encoding, but instead impacts exploratory and anxiety-related behaviors.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) overexpression in the forebrain results in learning and memory impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Carla; Angelucci, Andrea; D'Antoni, Angela; Dobrossy, Mate D; Dunnett, Stephen B; Berardi, Nicoletta; Brambilla, Riccardo

    2009-03-01

    In this study we analyzed the effect on behavior of a chronic exposure to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), by analysing a mouse line overexpressing BDNF under the alphaCaMKII promoter, which drives the transgene expression exclusively to principal neurons of the forebrain. BDNF transgenic mice and their WT littermates were examined with a battery of behavioral tests, in order to evaluate motor coordination, learning, short and long-term memory formation. Our results demonstrate that chronic BDNF overexpression in the central nervous system (CNS) causes learning deficits and short-term memory impairments, both in spatial and instrumental learning tasks. This observation suggests that a widespread increase in BDNF in forebrain networks may result in adverse effects on learning and memory formation.

  6. NKCC1 controls GABAergic signaling and neuroblast migration in the postnatal forebrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray Kerren

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From an early postnatal period and throughout life there is a continuous production of olfactory bulb (OB interneurons originating from neuronal precursors in the subventricular zone. To reach the OB circuits, immature neuroblasts migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS. In the present study, we employed cultured postnatal mouse forebrain slices and used lentiviral vectors to label neuronal precursors with GFP and to manipulate the expression levels of the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter NKCC1. We investigated the role of this Cl- transporter in different stages of postnatal neurogenesis, including neuroblast migration and integration in the OB networks once they have reached the granule cell layer (GCL. We report that NKCC1 activity is necessary for maintaining normal migratory speed. Both pharmacological and genetic manipulations revealed that NKCC1 maintains high [Cl-]i and regulates the resting membrane potential of migratory neuroblasts whilst its functional expression is strongly reduced at the time cells reach the GCL. As in other developing systems, NKCC1 shapes GABAA-dependent signaling in the RMS neuroblasts. Also, we show that NKCC1 controls the migration of neuroblasts in the RMS. The present study indeed indicates that the latter effect results from a novel action of NKCC1 on the resting membrane potential, which is independent of GABAA-dependent signaling. All in all, our findings show that early stages of the postnatal recruitment of OB interneurons rely on precise, orchestrated mechanisms that depend on multiple actions of NKCC1.

  7. A computational clonal analysis of the developing mouse limb bud.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Marcon

    Full Text Available A comprehensive spatio-temporal description of the tissue movements underlying organogenesis would be an extremely useful resource to developmental biology. Clonal analysis and fate mappings are popular experiments to study tissue movement during morphogenesis. Such experiments allow cell populations to be labeled at an early stage of development and to follow their spatial evolution over time. However, disentangling the cumulative effects of the multiple events responsible for the expansion of the labeled cell population is not always straightforward. To overcome this problem, we develop a novel computational method that combines accurate quantification of 2D limb bud morphologies and growth modeling to analyze mouse clonal data of early limb development. Firstly, we explore various tissue movements that match experimental limb bud shape changes. Secondly, by comparing computational clones with newly generated mouse clonal data we are able to choose and characterize the tissue movement map that better matches experimental data. Our computational analysis produces for the first time a two dimensional model of limb growth based on experimental data that can be used to better characterize limb tissue movement in space and time. The model shows that the distribution and shapes of clones can be described as a combination of anisotropic growth with isotropic cell mixing, without the need for lineage compartmentalization along the AP and PD axis. Lastly, we show that this comprehensive description can be used to reassess spatio-temporal gene regulations taking tissue movement into account and to investigate PD patterning hypothesis.

  8. MFng is dispensable for mouse pancreas development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Per; Bergqvist, Ingela; Norlin, Stefan; Edlund, Helena

    2009-04-01

    Notch signaling regulates pancreatic cell differentiation, and mutations of various Notch signaling components result in perturbed pancreas development. Members of the Fringe family of beta1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases, Manic Fringe (MFng), Lunatic Fringe (LFng), and Radical Fringe (RFng), modulate Notch signaling, and MFng has been suggested to regulate pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation. We have characterized the expression of the three mouse Fringe genes in the developing mouse pancreas between embryonic days 9 and 14 and show that the expression of MFng colocalized with the proendocrine transcription factor Ngn3. In contrast, the expression of LFng colocalized with the exocrine marker Ptf1a, whereas RFng was not expressed. Moreover, we show that expression of MFng is lost in Ngn3 mutant mice, providing evidence that MFng is genetically downstream of Ngn3. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses of MFng by the generation of mice that overexpress MFng in early pancreatic progenitor cells and mice with a targeted deletion of MFng provide, however, evidence that MFng is dispensable for pancreas development and function, since no pancreatic defects in these mice were observed.

  9. Behavioral performance of rats following transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, B T; Pulsinelli, W A; Tribuna, J; Davis, H P

    1984-01-01

    Rats subjected to transient forebrain ischemic injury by the method of four vessel occlusion (4-VO) develop irreversible injury to select populations of vulnerable neurons which include pyramidal cells in the CA-1 region of the hippocampus. This brain area is thought to be crucial for learning and memory. Rats subjected to 30 minutes of 4-VO, and then cerebral reperfusion were tested on a radial 8-arm maze task after they had recovered. The data shows that both 4-VO and control animals improve their performance over trials, but that 4-VO rats are impaired on "working" and "reference" tasks. The data suggest that 4-VO rats' impaired "working" performance is permanent, compared to their transient "reference" impairment. Alterations in sensorimotor activity could not account for these performance deficits since control and 4-VO rats demonstrated equivalent choice time per maze arm. Performance deficits in rats following forebrain ischemic injury may be similar to some of the cognitive deficits found in humans survivors of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.

  10. Dcc regulates asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxia Gao

    Full Text Available The guidance receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer ortholog UNC-40 regulates neuronal asymmetry development in Caenorhabditis elegans, but it is not known whether DCC plays a role in the specification of neuronal polarity in vertebrates. To examine the roles of DCC in neuronal asymmetry regulation in vertebrates, we studied zebrafish anterior dorsal telencephalon (ADt neuronal axons. We generated transgenic zebrafish animals expressing the photo-convertible fluorescent protein Kaede in ADt neurons and then photo-converted Kaede to label specifically the ADt neuron axons. We found that ADt axons normally project ventrally. Knock down of Dcc function by injecting antisense morpholino oligonucleotides caused the ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. To examine the axon projection pattern of individual ADt neurons, we labeled single ADt neurons using a forebrain-specific promoter to drive fluorescent protein expression. We found that individual ADt neurons projected axons dorsally or formed multiple processes after morpholino knock down of Dcc function. We further found that knock down of the Dcc ligand, Netrin1, also caused ADt neurons to project axons dorsally. Knockdown of Neogenin1, a guidance receptor closely related to Dcc, enhanced the formation of aberrant dorsal axons in embryos injected with Dcc morpholino. These experiments provide the first evidence that Dcc regulates polarized axon initiation and asymmetric outgrowth of forebrain neurons in vertebrates.

  11. Stepwise development of MAIT cells in mouse and human.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Martin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT cells display two evolutionarily conserved features: an invariant T cell receptor (TCRalpha (iTCRalpha chain and restriction by the nonpolymorphic class Ib major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule, MHC-related molecule 1 (MR1. MR1 expression on thymus epithelial cells is not necessary for MAIT cell development but their accumulation in the gut requires MR1 expressing B cells and commensal flora. MAIT cell development is poorly known, as these cells have not been found in the thymus so far. Herein, complementary human and mouse experiments using an anti-humanValpha7.2 antibody and MAIT cell-specific iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic mice in different genetic backgrounds show that MAIT cell development is a stepwise process, with an intra-thymic selection followed by peripheral expansion. Mouse MAIT cells are selected in an MR1-dependent manner both in fetal thymic organ culture and in double iTCRalpha and TCRbeta transgenic RAG knockout mice. In the latter mice, MAIT cells do not expand in the periphery unless B cells are added back by adoptive transfer, showing that B cells are not required for the initial thymic selection step but for the peripheral accumulation. In humans, contrary to natural killer T (NKT cells, MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype in the thymus as well as in cord blood where they are in low numbers. After birth, MAIT cells acquire a memory phenotype and expand dramatically, up to 1%-4% of blood T cells. Finally, in contrast with NKT cells, human MAIT cell development is independent of the molecular adaptor SAP. Interestingly, mouse MAIT cells display a naïve phenotype and do not express the ZBTB16 transcription factor, which, in contrast, is expressed by NKT cells and the memory human MAIT cells found in the periphery after birth. In conclusion, MAIT cells are selected by MR1 in the thymus on a non-B non-T hematopoietic cell, and acquire a memory phenotype and expand in the

  12. Construction of the human forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, Terry L; Stiles, Joan

    2017-01-01

    The adult human brain is arguably the most complex of biological systems. It contains 86 billion neurons (the information processing cells of the brain) and many more support cells. The neurons, with the assistance of the support cells, form trillions of connections creating complex, interconnected neural networks that support all human thought, feeling, and action. A challenge for modern neuroscience is to provide a model that accounts for this exquisitely complex and dynamic system. One fundamental part of this model is an account of how the human brain develops. This essay describes two important aspects of this developmental story. The first part of the story focuses on the remarkable and dynamic set of events that unfold during the prenatal period to give rise to cell lineage that form the essential substance of the brain, particularly the structures of the cerebral hemispheres. The second part of the story focuses on the formation of the major brain pathways of the cerebrum, the intricate fiber bundles that connect different populations of neurons to form the information processing systems that support all human thought and action. These two aspects of early brain development provide an essential foundation for understanding how the structure, organization, and functioning of the human brain emerge. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1409. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1409 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  13. Murine Asb-17 expression during mouse testis development and spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kye-Seong; Kim, Myung-Sun; Kim, Soo-Kyung; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2004-05-01

    In this study we isolated a murine mAsb-17 from mouse testis by RT-PCR using primers designed based on the sequences from the GenBank database. The sequence analysis showed that mAsb-17 encodes a 295 amino acid polypeptide with a molecular weight of approximately 34 kDa containing two ankyrin repeats and one SOCS box. The amino acid sequence of mASB-17 showed 87.5%, 98.3% and 92.9% identity with that of human, rat and dog, respectively. Interestingly, northern blot analysis showed that mAsb-17 was expressed only in the testis. The expression analysis by RT-PCR for mAsb-17 in mouse indicates that mAsb-17 is expressed from the fourth week after birth to adult, with the highest expression in round spermatids. Both northern blot and RT-PCR analyses suggest that mASB-17 may play essential roles in testis development and spermatogenesis.

  14. Gene expression and dental enamel structure in developing mouse incisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehic, Amer; Risnes, Steinar; Khan, Qalb-E-Saleem; Khuu, Cuong; Osmundsen, Harald

    2010-04-01

    At the mouse incisor tip the initially differentiated ameloblasts produce a thin, prism-free enamel, while further apically, in the immediate adjacent segment, the enamel thickness increases and the four-layered enamel of mouse incisor is formed. Comparative gene-expression profiling was carried out on RNA isolated from these two segments of incisor tooth germs at embryonic day (E)17.5 and at postnatal days (P)0, 1, 2, and 10 using microarrays to measure messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) species present in the segments. Validation of expression data was achieved using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blotting. Bioinformatic data suggested enhanced cellular apoptosis in the incisal tip segment, which, together with diminished expression of the Amelx and Enam genes, may contribute to the production of the thin enamel seen in this tooth segment. For genes exhibiting higher levels of expression in the adjacent segment where complex enamel is being formed, bioinformatic analysis suggested significant associations with cellular functions involving the actin cytoskeleton, cellular development, morphology, and movement. This is suggested to reflect that ameloblasts with Tomes' process are being organized in transverse rows, facilitating the transverse movement that results in prism decussation in the inner enamel of the adjacent segment. Bioinformatic analysis of miRNA expression data lends support to these suggestions.

  15. Forebrain substrates of reward and motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Roy A

    2005-12-01

    Electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle can reward arbitrary acts or motivate biologically primitive, species-typical behaviors like feeding or copulation. The subsystems involved in these behaviors are only partially characterized, but they appear to transsynaptically activate the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. Basal function of the dopamine system is essential for arousal and motor function; phasic activation of this system is rewarding and can potentiate the effectiveness of reward-predictors that guide learned behaviors. This system is phasically activated by most drugs of abuse and such activation contributes to the habit-forming actions of these drugs.

  16. Comparative functional analysis provides evidence for a crucial role for the homeobox gene Nkx2.1/Titf-1 in forebrain evolution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, W.M.R.; Brox, A.; Puelles, L.; Durston, A.J.; Medina, L.

    2008-01-01

    Knockout of the Nkx2.1 (Titf-1) homeobox gene in the mouse leads to severe malformation and size reduction of the basal telencephalon/preoptic area and basal hypothalamus, indicating an important role of this gene in forebrain patterning. Here we show that abrogation of the orthologous gene in the f

  17. Comparative functional analysis provides evidence for a crucial role for the homeobox gene Nkx2.1/Titf-1 in forebrain evolution.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Akker, W.M.R.; Brox, A.; Puelles, L.; Durston, A.J.; Medina, L.

    2008-01-01

    Knockout of the Nkx2.1 (Titf-1) homeobox gene in the mouse leads to severe malformation and size reduction of the basal telencephalon/preoptic area and basal hypothalamus, indicating an important role of this gene in forebrain patterning. Here we show that abrogation of the orthologous gene in the f

  18. Expression of aquaporin isoforms during human and mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felszeghy, S; Módis, L; Németh, P; Nagy, G; Zelles, T; Agre, P; Laurikkala, J; Fejerskov, O; Thesleff, I; Nielsen, S

    2004-04-01

    Previously, we described the development of hyaluronan (HA) deposition in human tooth germ tissues that are consistent with water transport in different stages of tooth development. The aquaporins (AQP) constitute a family of membrane water channels that are expressed in many organs. However, there are no data available about the expression pattern of aquaporin water channels in dental structures. In the present study we have characterised the expression of six different aquaporin isoforms (AQP1-5, AQP-9) in developing human and mouse tooth germs by immunohistochemistry using isoform specific antibodies. In the "bell stage" AQP1 was expressed in endothelial cells of small vessels whereas no other structures of the tooth primordial were labeled. AQP2, AQP3 and AQP9 immunoreactivity was not observed in tooth germs, whereas strong AQP4 and AQP5 expression was observed in dental lamina, inner enamel epithelium, stratum intermedium, stellate reticulum and the outer enamel epithelium. Oral epithelium also exhibited AQP4 and AQP5 immunolabeling. During development of the matrices of the dental hard tissues AQP4 and AQP5 immunostaining was observed in the odontoblasts and their processes, as well as in the secretory ameloblast and their apical processes. Immunolabeling controls were negative. In conclusion, AQP4 and AQP5 are expressed in tooth germ tissues in early development in cells that previously have been shown to express HA and/or CD44, indicating that AQP water channels may play a role for ECM hydration during tooth development.

  19. The Role of Basal Forebrain in Rat Somatosensory Cortex: Impact on Cholinergic Innervation, Sensory Information Processing, and Tactile Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-28

    noradrenergic neurons, as well as from the cholinergic neurons of the brainstem tegmentum (Jones and Cuello , 1989). This suggests that final control over...Jones, B. E., & Cuello , A. C. (1989). Afferents to the basal forebrain cholinergic cell area from pontomesencephalic- catecholamine, serotonin, and...organization in mouse barrel cortex. Brain Research, 165, 327-332. 160 Sofroniew, M. V., Eckenstein, Fo, Thoenen, Ho, & Cuello , A. C. (1982

  20. Development of A Mouse Model of Menopausal Ovarian Cancer

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    Elizabeth R. Smith

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant understanding of the genetic mutations involved in ovarian epithelial cancer and advances in genomic approaches for expression and mutation profiling of tumor tissues, several key questions in ovarian cancer biology remain enigmatic: the mechanism for the well-established impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk remains obscure; questions of the cell of origin of ovarian cancer continue to be debated; and the precursor lesion, sequence, or events in progression remain to be defined. Suitable mouse models should complement the analysis of human tumor tissues and may provide clues to these questions currently perplexing ovarian cancer biology.A potentially useful model is the germ cell-deficient Wv (white spotting variant mutant mouse line, which may be used to study the impact of menopausal physiology on the increased risk of ovarian cancer. The Wv mice harbor a point mutation in c-Kit that reduces the receptor tyrosine kinase activity to about 1-5% (it is not a null mutation. Homozygous Wv mutant females have a reduced ovarian germ cell reservoir at birth and the follicles are rapidly depleted upon reaching reproductive maturity, but other biological phenotypes are minimal and the mice have a normal life span. The loss of ovarian function precipitates changes in hormonal and metabolic activity that model features of menopause in humans. As a consequence of follicle depletion, the Wv ovaries develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis that mark human ovarian aging. Ongoing work will test the possibility of converting the benign epithelial tubular adenomas into neoplastic tumors by addition of an oncogenic mutation, such as of Tp53, to model the genotype and biology of serous ovarian cancer.Model based on the Wv mice may have the potential to gain biological and etiological insights into ovarian cancer development and prevention.

  1. Distribution of syndecan-1 protein in developing mouse teeth

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    Anna eFilatova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Syndecan-1 is a cell surface proteoglycan involved in the regulation of various biological processes such as proliferation, migration, condensation and differentiation of cells, intercellular communication and morphogenesis. The extracellular domain of syndecan-1 can bind to extracellular matrix components and signalling molecules, while its intracellular domain interacts with cytoskeletal proteins, thus allowing the transfer of information about extracellular environment changes into the cell that consequently affect cellular behaviour. Although previous studies have shown syndecan-1 expression during precise stages of tooth development, there is no equivalent study regrouping the expression patterns of syndecan-1 during all stages of odontogenesis. Here we examined the distribution of syndecan-1 protein in embryonic and postnatal developing mouse molars and incisors. Syndecan-1 distribution in mesenchymal tissues such as dental papilla and dental follicle was correlated with proliferating events and its expression was often linked to stem cell niche territories. Syndecan-1 was also expressed in mesenchymal cells that will differentiate into the dentin producing odontoblasts, but not in differentiated functional odontoblasts. In the epithelium, syndecan-1 was detected in all cell layers, by the exception of differentiated ameloblasts that form the enamel. Furthermore, syndecan-1 was expressed in osteoblast precursors and osteoclasts of the alveolar bone that surrounds the developing tooth germs. Taken together these results show the dynamic nature of syndecan-1 expression during odontogenesis and suggest its implication in various processes of tooth development and homeostasis.

  2. Expression patterns of protein kinase D 3 during mouse development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Sylke

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The PKD family of serine/threonine kinases comprises a single member in Drosophila (dPKD, two isoforms in C. elegans (DKF-1 and 2 and three members, PKD1, PKD2 and PKD3 in mammals. PKD1 and PKD2 have been the focus of most studies up to date, which implicate these enzymes in very diverse cellular functions, including Golgi organization and plasma membrane directed transport, immune responses, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Concerning PKD3, a role in the formation of vesicular transport carriers at the trans-Golgi network (TGN and in basal glucose transport has been inferred from in vitro studies. So far, however, the physiological functions of the kinase during development remain unknown. Results We have examined the expression pattern of PKD3 during the development of mouse embryos by immunohistochemistry. Using a PKD3 specific antibody we demonstrate that the kinase is differentially expressed during organogenesis. In the developing heart a strong PKD3 expression is constantly detected from E10 to E16.5. From E12.5 on PKD3 is increasingly expressed in neuronal as well as in the supporting connective tissue and in skeletal muscles. Conclusion The data presented support an important role for PKD3 during development of these tissues.

  3. Forebrain overexpression of CaMKII abolishes cingulate long term depression and reduces mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsien Joe Z

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is known to be important in learning and memory, persistent pain and drug addiction. Glutamate NMDA receptor activation stimulates several protein kinases, which then trigger biochemical cascades that lead to modifications in synaptic efficacy. Genetic and pharmacological techniques have been used to show a role for Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII in synaptic plasticity and memory formation. However, it is not known if increasing CaMKII activity in forebrain areas affects behavioral responses to tissue injury. Using genetic and pharmacological techniques, we were able to temporally and spatially restrict the over expression of CaMKII in forebrain areas. Here we show that genetic overexpression of CaMKII in the mouse forebrain selectively inhibits tissue injury-induced behavioral sensitization, including allodynia and hyperalgesia, while behavioral responses to acute noxious stimuli remain intact. CaMKII overexpression also inhibited synaptic depression induced by a prolonged repetitive stimulation in the ACC, suggesting an important role for CaMKII in the regulation of cingulate neurons. Our results suggest that neuronal CaMKII activity in the forebrain plays a role in persistent pain.

  4. Learning and the motivation to eat: forebrain circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovich, Gorica D

    2011-09-26

    Appetite and eating are not only controlled by energy needs, but also by extrinsic factors that are not directly related to energy balance. Environmental signals that acquire motivational properties through associative learning-learned cues-can override homeostatic signals and stimulate eating in sated states, or inhibit eating in states of hunger. Such influences are important, as environmental factors are believed to contribute to the increased susceptibility to overeating and the rise in obesity in the developed world. Similarly, environmental and social factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of anorexia nervosa and other eating disorders through interactions with the individual genetic background. Nevertheless, how learning enables environmental signals to control feeding, and the underlying brain mechanisms are poorly understood. We developed two rodent models to study how learned cues are integrated with homeostatic signals within functional forebrain networks, and how these networks are modulated by experience. In one model, a cue previously paired with food when an animal was hungry induces eating in sated rats. In the other model, food-deprived rats inhibit feeding when presented with a cue that signals danger, a tone previously paired with footshocks. Here evidence will be reviewed that the forebrain network formed by the amygdala, lateral hypothalamus and medial prefrontal cortex mediates cue-driven feeding, while a parallel amygdalar circuitry mediates suppression of eating by the fear cue. Findings from the animal models may be relevant for understanding aspects of human appetite and eating, and maladaptive mechanisms that could lead to overeating and anorexia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Multimodal nonlinear optical imaging of cartilage development in mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sicong; Xue, Wenqian; Sun, Qiqi; Li, Xuesong; Huang, Jiandong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2017-02-01

    Kinesin-1 is a kind of motor protein responsible for intracellular transportation and has been studied in a variety of tissues. However, its roles in cartilage development are not clear. In this study, a kinesin-1 heavy chain (Kif5b) knockout mouse model is used to study the functions of kinesin-1 in the cartilage development. We developed a multimodal nonlinear optical (NLO) microscope system integrating stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) to investigate the morphological and biomedical characteristics of fresh tibial cartilage from normal and mutant mice at different developmental stages. The combined forward and backward SHG imaging resolved the fine structure of collagen fibrils in the extracellular matrix of cartilage. Meanwhile, the chondrocyte morphology in different zones of cartilage was visualized by label-free SRS and TPEF images. The results show that the fibrillar collagen in the superficial zone of cartilage in postnatal day 10 and 15 (P10 and P15) knockout mice was significantly less than that of control mice. Moreover, we observed distorted morphology and disorganization of columnar arrangement of chondrocytes in the growth plate cartilage of mutant mice. This study reveals the significant roles of kinesin-1 in collagen formation and chondrocyte morphogenesis.

  6. Nrl-Cre transgenic mouse mediates loxP recombination in developing rod photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightman, Diana S; Razafsky, David; Potter, Chloe; Hodzic, Didier; Chen, Shiming

    2016-03-01

    The developing mouse retina is a tractable model for studying neurogenesis and differentiation. Although transgenic Cre mouse lines exist to mediate conditional genetic manipulations in developing mouse retinas, none of them act specifically in early developing rods. For conditional genetic manipulations of developing retinas, a Nrl-Cre mouse line in which the Nrl promoter drives expression of Cre in rod precursors was created. The results showed that Nrl-Cre expression was specific to the retina where it drives rod-specific recombination with a temporal pattern similar to endogenous Nrl expression during retinal development. This Nrl-Cre transgene does not negatively impact retinal structure and function. Taken together, the data suggested that the Nrl-Cre mouse line was a valuable tool to drive Cre-mediated recombination specifically in developing rods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Characterization of mouse Dach2, a homologue of Drosophila dachshund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R J; Shen, W; Sandler, Y I; Heanue, T A; Mardon, G

    2001-04-01

    The Drosophila genes eyeless, eyes absent, sine oculis and dachshund cooperate as components of a network to control retinal determination. Vertebrate homologues of these genes have been identified and implicated in the control of cell fate. We present the cloning and characterization of mouse Dach2, a homologue of dachshund. In situ hybridization studies demonstrate Dach2 expression in embryonic nervous tissues, sensory organs and limbs. This pattern is similar to mouse Dach1, suggesting a partially redundant role for these genes during development. In addition, we determine that Dach2 expression in the forebrain of Pax6 mutants and dermamyotome of Pax3 mutants is not detectably altered. Finally, genetic mapping experiments place mouse Dach2 on the X chromosome between Xist and Esx1. The identification of human DACH2 sequences at Xq21 suggests a possible role for this gene in Allan-Herndon syndrome, Miles-Carpenter syndrome, X-linked cleft palate and/or Megalocornea.

  8. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Cases

    Full Text Available Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5 and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM.

  9. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obry, Antoine; Santin, Mathieu D.; Ben-Yacoub, Sirine; Pâques, Michel; Amsellem-Levera, Sabine; Bribian, Ana; Simonutti, Manuel; Augustin, Sébastien; Debeir, Thomas; Sahel, José Alain; Christ, Annabel; de Castro, Fernando; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Cosette, Pascal; Kozyraki, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM) is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS) and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5) and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM. PMID:26107939

  10. An MRI-based atlas and database of the developing mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Nelson; Mori, Susumu; Yamamoto, Akira; Jiang, Hangyi; Ye, Xin; Xu, Xin; Richards, Linda J; Nathans, Jeremy; Miller, Michael I; Toga, Arthur W; Sidman, Richard L; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2011-01-01

    The advent of mammalian gene engineering and genetically modified mouse models has led to renewed interest in developing resources for referencing and quantitative analysis of mouse brain anatomy. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative characterization of anatomical phenotypes in the developing mouse brain. As an anatomical reference for neuroscience research using mouse models, this paper presents DTI based atlases of ex vivo C57BL/6 mouse brains at several developmental stages. The atlas complements existing histology and MRI-based atlases by providing users access to three-dimensional, high-resolution images of the developing mouse brain, with distinct tissue contrasts and segmentations of major gray matter and white matter structures. The usefulness of the atlas and database was demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the development of major gray matter and white matter structures. Population average images of the mouse brain at several postnatal stages were created using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping and their anatomical variations were quantitatively characterized. The atlas and database enhance our ability to examine the neuroanatomy in normal or genetically engineered mouse strains and mouse models of neurological diseases.

  11. An MRI-based Atlas and Database of the Developing Mouse Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Nelson; Mori, Susumu; Yamamoto, Akira; Jiang, Hangyi; Ye, Xin; Xu, Xin; Richards, Linda J.; Nathans, Jeremy; Miller, Michael I.; W.Toga, Arthur; Sidman, Richard L.; Zhang, Jiangyang

    2010-01-01

    The advent of mammalian gene engineering and genetically modified mouse models has led to renewed interest in developing resources for referencing and quantitative analysis of mouse brain anatomy. In this study, we used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for quantitative characterization of anatomical phenotypes in the developing mouse brain. As an anatomical reference for neuroscience research using mouse models, this paper presents DTI based atlases of ex vivo C57BL/6 mouse brains at several developmental stages. The atlas complements existing histology and MRI-based atlases by providing users access to three-dimensional, high-resolution images of the developing mouse brain, with distinct tissue contrasts and segmentations of major gray matter and white matter structures. The usefulness of the atlas and database was demonstrated by quantitative measurements of the development of major gray matter and white matter structures. Population average images of the mouse brain at several postnatal stages were created using large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping and their anatomical variations were quantitatively characterized. The atlas and database enhance our ability to examine the neuroanatomy in normal or genetically engineered mouse strains and mouse models of neurological diseases. PMID:20656042

  12. Regulators of Collagen Fibrillogenesis during Molar Development in the Mouse

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    Ivana Zvackova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of mammalian teeth and surrounding tissues includes time–space changes in the extracellular matrix composition and organization. This requires complex control mechanisms to regulate its synthesis and remodeling. Fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACITs and a group of small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs are involved in the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. Recently, collagen type XII and collagen type XIV, members of the FACITs family, were found in the peridental mesenchyme contributing to alveolar bone formation. This study was designed to follow temporospatial expression of collagen types XIIa and XIVa in mouse first molar and adjacent tissues from embryonic day 13, when the alveolar bone becomes morphologically apparent around the molar tooth bud, until postnatal day 22, as the posteruption stage. The patterns of decorin, biglycan, and fibromodulin, all members of the SLRPs family and interacting with collagens XIIa and XIVa, were investigated simultaneously. The situation in the tooth was related to what happens in the alveolar bone, and both were compared to the periodontal ligament. The investigation provided a complex localization of the five antigens in soft tissues, the dental pulp, and periodontal ligaments; in the mineralized tissues, predentin/dentin and alveolar bone; and junction between soft and hard tissues. The results illustrated developmentally regulated and tissue-specific changes in the balance of the two FACITs and three SLRPs.

  13. Reduced-folate carrier (RFC is expressed in placenta and yolk sac, as well as in cells of the developing forebrain, hindbrain, neural tube, craniofacial region, eye, limb buds and heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Puttur

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Folate is essential for cellular proliferation and tissue regeneration. As mammalian cells cannot synthesize folates de novo, tightly regulated cellular uptake processes have evolved to sustain sufficient levels of intracellular tetrahydrofolate cofactors to support biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, and some amino acids (serine, methionine. Though reduced-folate carrier (RFC is one of the major proteins mediating folate transport, knowledge of the developmental expression of RFC is lacking. We utilized in situ hybridization and immunolocalization to determine the developmental distribution of RFC message and protein, respectively. Results In the mouse, RFC transcripts and protein are expressed in the E10.0 placenta and yolk sac. In the E9.0 to E11.5 mouse embryo RFC is widely detectable, with intense signal localized to cell populations in the neural tube, craniofacial region, limb buds and heart. During early development, RFC is expressed throughout the eye, but by E12.5, RFC protein becomes localized to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Conclusions Clinical studies show a statistical decrease in the number of neural tube defects, craniofacial abnormalities, cardiovascular defects and limb abnormalities detected in offspring of female patients given supplementary folate during pregnancy. The mechanism, however, by which folate supplementation ameliorates the occurrence of developmental defects is unclear. The present work demonstrates that RFC is present in placenta and yolk sac and provides the first evidence that it is expressed in the neural tube, craniofacial region, limb buds and heart during organogenesis. These findings suggest that rapidly dividing cells in the developing neural tube, craniofacial region, limb buds and heart may be particularly susceptible to folate deficiency.

  14. The effects of naris occlusion on mouse nasal turbinate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, David M; Craven, Brent A; Seeger, Johannes; Weiler, Elke

    2014-06-15

    Unilateral naris occlusion, a standard method for causing odor deprivation, also alters airflow on both sides of the nasal cavity. We reasoned that manipulating airflow by occlusion could affect nasal turbinate development given the ubiquitous role of environmental stimuli in ontogenesis. To test this hypothesis, newborn mice received unilateral occlusion or sham surgery and were allowed to reach adulthood. Morphological measurements were then made of paraffin sections of the whole nasal cavity. Occlusion significantly affected the size, shape and position of turbinates. In particular, the nasoturbinate, the focus of our quantitative analysis, had a more delicate appearance on the occluded side relative to the open side. Occlusion also caused an increase in the width of the dorsal meatus within the non-occluded and occluded nasal fossae, compared with controls, and the position of most turbinates was altered. These results suggest that a mechanical stimulus from respiratory airflow is necessary for the normal morphological development of turbinates. To explore this idea, we estimated the mechanical forces on turbinates caused by airflow during normal respiration that would be absent as a result of occlusion. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were used to construct a three-dimensional model of the mouse nasal cavity that provided the input for a computational fluid dynamics simulation of nasal airflow. The simulation revealed maximum shear stress values for the walls of turbinates in the 1 Pa range, a magnitude that causes remodeling in other biological tissues. These observations raise the intriguing possibility that nasal turbinates develop partly under the control of respiratory mechanical forces.

  15. Glycine receptor α3 and α2 subunits mediate tonic and exogenous agonist-induced currents in forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Lindsay M; Lowes, Daniel C; Salling, Michael C; Carreau-Vollmer, Cyndel; Odean, Naomi N; Blednov, Yuri A; Betz, Heinrich; Harris, R Adron; Harrison, Neil L

    2017-08-22

    Neuronal inhibition can occur via synaptic mechanisms or through tonic activation of extrasynaptic receptors. In spinal cord, glycine mediates synaptic inhibition through the activation of heteromeric glycine receptors (GlyRs) composed primarily of α1 and β subunits. Inhibitory GlyRs are also found throughout the brain, where GlyR α2 and α3 subunit expression exceeds that of α1, particularly in forebrain structures, and coassembly of these α subunits with the β subunit appears to occur to a lesser extent than in spinal cord. Here, we analyzed GlyR currents in several regions of the adolescent mouse forebrain (striatum, prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis). Our results show ubiquitous expression of GlyRs that mediate large-amplitude currents in response to exogenously applied glycine in these forebrain structures. Additionally, tonic inward currents were also detected, but only in the striatum, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex (PFC). These tonic currents were sensitive to both strychnine and picrotoxin, indicating that they are mediated by extrasynaptic homomeric GlyRs. Recordings from mice deficient in the GlyR α3 subunit (Glra3(-/-)) revealed a lack of tonic GlyR currents in the striatum and the PFC. In Glra2(-/Y) animals, GlyR tonic currents were preserved; however, the amplitudes of current responses to exogenous glycine were significantly reduced. We conclude that functional α2 and α3 GlyRs are present in various regions of the forebrain and that α3 GlyRs specifically participate in tonic inhibition in the striatum and PFC. Our findings suggest roles for glycine in regulating neuronal excitability in the forebrain.

  16. Influence of oxygen tension on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal stem cells of midbrain and forebrain origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabbe, Christina; Bak, Sara Thornby; Jensen, Pia; von Linstow, Christian; Martínez Serrano, Alberto; Hansen, Claus; Meyer, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease (PD), but protocols for controlled dopaminergic differentiation are not yet available. Here we investigated the influence of oxygen on dopaminergic differentiation of human fetal NSCs derived from the midbrain and forebrain. Cells were differentiated for 10 days in vitro at low, physiological (3%) versus high, atmospheric (20%) oxygen tension. Low oxygen resulted in upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and increased the proportion of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells in both types of cultures (midbrain: 9.1 ± 0.5 and 17.1 ± 0.4 (Pcells). Regardless of oxygen levels, the content of TH-ir cells with mature neuronal morphologies was higher for midbrain as compared to forebrain cultures. Proliferative Ki67-ir cells were found in both types of cultures, but the relative proportion of these cells was significantly higher for forebrain NSCs cultured at low, as compared to high, oxygen tension. No such difference was detected for midbrain-derived cells. Western blot analysis revealed that low oxygen enhanced β-tubulin III and GFAP expression in both cultures. Up-regulation of β-tubulin III was most pronounced for midbrain cells, whereas GFAP expression was higher in forebrain as compared to midbrain cells. NSCs from both brain regions displayed less cell death when cultured at low oxygen tension. Following mictrotransplantation into mouse striatal slice cultures predifferentiated midbrain NSCs were found to proliferate and differentiate into substantial numbers of TH-ir neurons with mature neuronal morphologies, particularly at low oxygen. In contrast, predifferentiated forebrain NSCs microtransplanted using identical conditions displayed little proliferation and contained few TH-ir cells, all of which had an immature appearance. Our data may reflect differences in dopaminergic differentiation capacity and region-specific requirements

  17. Modulation of Dishevelled and Vangl2 by All-trans-retinoic Acid in the Developing Mouse Central Nervous System and its Relationship to Teratogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The response to exposure to all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) during embryogenesis varies from physiologic to severe teratogenic effects and is dependent upon the dose and the stage of development in all species. Vangl2 and Dishevelled genes play key roles in establishing planar cell polarity and regulating convergent extension movements during the neurula period. The effects of RA-mediated teratogenesis might be due to its misregulation of Vangl2 and Dishevelled genes. The aim of this study is to monitor the modulation of Vangl2 and Dishevelled in Kunming mouse embryos following maternal treatment with a single oral dose of 30 mg/(kg body weight) of RA during the neurula period. Exposure of 7.75 d embryos to RA induced characteristic morphological changes. The most obvious external effect was the failure of neural tube closure in the midbrain and forebrain regions in 10 d embryos, resulting in exencephaly in later embryos. RA treatment also led to a pronounced decrease of Vangl2 mRNA at 4 and 18 h and a pronounced increase at 66 h after maternal treatment, as detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Western blot analysis showed a marked decrease of Vangl2 protein at 18 and 42 h and a marked increase at 66 and 90 h after maternal treatment. Dishevelledl/2/3 mRNA was significantly down-regulated at 4 and 18 h and upregulated at 42 h in the fetus after RA treatment, except for an up-regulation of Dishevelled3 at 66 h. The Dishevelled2 mRNA and its protein matched each other. These results hinted that Vangl2 and Dishevelled genes might take part in RA teratogenesis of mouse embryos.

  18. Modulation of Dishevelled and Vangl2 by all-trans-retinoic acid in the developing mouse central nervous system and its relationship to teratogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanping; Liu, Kai; Gao, Yingmao; Li, Shaoling

    2007-09-01

    The response to exposure to all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) during embryogenesis varies from physiologic to severe teratogenic effects and is dependent upon the dose and the stage of development in all species. Vangl2 and Dishevelled genes play key roles in establishing planar cell polarity and regulating convergent extension movements during the neurula period. The effects of RA-mediated teratogenesis might be due to its misregulation of Vangl2 and Dishevelled genes. The aim of this study is to monitor the modulation of Vangl2 and Dishevelled in Kunming mouse embryos following maternal treatment with a single oral dose of 30 mg/(kg body weight) of RA during the neurula period. Exposure of 7.75 d embryos to RA induced characteristic morphological changes. The most obvious external effect was the failure of neural tube closure in the midbrain and forebrain regions in 10 d embryos, resulting in exencephaly in later embryos. RA treatment also led to a pronounced decrease of Vangl2 mRNA at 4 and 18 h and a pronounced increase at 66 h after maternal treatment, as detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Western blot analysis showed a marked decrease of Vangl2 protein at 18 and 42 h and a marked increase at 66 and 90 h after maternal treatment. Dishevelled1/2/3 mRNA was significantly down-regulated at 4 and 18 h and up-regulated at 42 h in the fetus after RA treatment, except for an up-regulation of Dishevelled3 at 66 h. The Dishevelled2 mRNA and its protein matched each other. These results hinted that Vangl2 and Dishevelled genes might take part in RA teratogenesis of mouse embryos.

  19. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors and apoptotic cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko, E-mail: mfunada@ncnp.go.jp

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB{sub 2} receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain. - Highlights: • Synthetic cannabinoids (classical cannabinoids, non-classical cannabinoids, and aminoalkylindole derivatives) induce cytotoxicity in mouse forebrain cultures. • Synthetic cannabinoid-induced cytotoxicity towards forebrain cultures is mediated by the CB{sub 1} receptor, but not by the CB{sub 2} receptor, and involves caspase-dependent apoptosis. • A high concentration of synthetic cannabinoids may be toxic to neuronal cells that express CB{sub 1} receptors.

  20. Development of neural precursor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xuan; LI Hai-di; Li Shu-nong; XU Hai-wei; XU Ling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the serum-free culture conditions for differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells)into neural precursor cells (NPC) and compare the effects of human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) as the feeder layer of ES with that of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF)in vitro. Methods: Mouse ES cells were cultured in or not in feeder layer cells medium containing or not leukemia inhibitory factor to suppress their differentiation. Immunocytochemical method was used to identify NPC by detecting nestin antigen and alkaline phosphatase. Results: The ES cells cultured in HEF were positive to alkaline phosphatase. Serum-free medium allowed the differentiation of ES cells into NPC. Conclusion:HEF could replace MEF and keep the undifferentiated condition of ES cells with more benefits. NPC of high purity could be cultured from ES cells by serum-free culture method.

  1. Revisiting mouse peritoneal macrophages: heterogeneity, development and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Dos Anjos Cassado

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tissue macrophages play a crucial role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and also contribute to inflammatory and reparatory responses during pathogenic infection and tissue injury. The high heterogeneity of these macrophages is consistent with their adaptation to distinct tissue environments and specialization to develop niche-specific functions. Although peritoneal macrophages are one of best-studied macrophage populations, only recently it was demonstrated the co-existence of two subsets in mouse PerC, which exhibit distinct phenotypes, functions and origins. These macrophage subsets have been classified according to their morphology as LPMs (large peritoneal macrophages and SPMs (small peritoneal macrophages. LPMs, the most abundant subset under steady-state conditions, express high levels of F4/80 and low levels of class II molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. LPMs appear to be originated from embriogenic precursors, and their maintenance in PerC is regulated by expression of specific transcription factors and tissue-derived signals. Conversely, SPMs, a minor subset in unstimulated PerC, have a F4/80lowMHC-IIhigh phenotype and are generated from bone-marrow-derived myeloid precursors. In response to infectious or inflammatory stimuli, the cellular composition of PerC is dramatically altered, where LPMs disappear and SPMs become the prevalent population together with their precursor, the inflammatory monocyte. SPMs appear to be the major source of inflammatory mediators in PerC during infection whereas LPMs contribute for gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT-independent and retinoic acid-dependent IgA production by peritoneal B-1 cells. In the last years, considerable efforts have been made to broaden our understanding of LPM and SPM origin, transcriptional regulation and functional profile. This review addresses these issues, focusing on the impact of tissue-derived signals and external stimulation in the complex

  2. Pax6 interactions with chromatin and identification of its novel direct target genes in lens and forebrain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Xie

    Full Text Available Pax6 encodes a specific DNA-binding transcription factor that regulates the development of multiple organs, including the eye, brain and pancreas. Previous studies have shown that Pax6 regulates the entire process of ocular lens development. In the developing forebrain, Pax6 is expressed in ventricular zone precursor cells and in specific populations of neurons; absence of Pax6 results in disrupted cell proliferation and cell fate specification in telencephalon. In the pancreas, Pax6 is essential for the differentiation of α-, β- and δ-islet cells. To elucidate molecular roles of Pax6, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments combined with high-density oligonucleotide array hybridizations (ChIP-chip were performed using three distinct sources of chromatin (lens, forebrain and β-cells. ChIP-chip studies, performed as biological triplicates, identified a total of 5,260 promoters occupied by Pax6. 1,001 (133 of these promoter regions were shared between at least two (three distinct chromatin sources, respectively. In lens chromatin, 2,335 promoters were bound by Pax6. RNA expression profiling from Pax6⁺/⁻ lenses combined with in vivo Pax6-binding data yielded 76 putative Pax6-direct targets, including the Gaa, Isl1, Kif1b, Mtmr2, Pcsk1n, and Snca genes. RNA and ChIP data were validated for all these genes. In lens cells, reporter assays established Kib1b and Snca as Pax6 activated and repressed genes, respectively. In situ hybridization revealed reduced expression of these genes in E14 cerebral cortex. Moreover, we examined differentially expressed transcripts between E9.5 wild type and Pax6⁻/⁻ lens placodes that suggested Efnb2, Fat4, Has2, Nav1, and Trpm3 as novel Pax6-direct targets. Collectively, the present studies, through the identification of Pax6-direct target genes, provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of Pax6 gene control during mouse embryonic development. In addition, the present data demonstrate that Pax6

  3. The primary brain vesicles revisited: are the three primary vesicles (forebrain/midbrain/hindbrain) universal in vertebrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoyuki; Yoshimoto, Masami; Ito, Hironobu

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that three primary brain vesicles (forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain vesicles) develop into five secondary brain vesicles in all vertebrates (von Baer's scheme). We reviewed previous studies in various vertebrates to see if this currently accepted scheme of brain morphogenesis is a rule applicable to vertebrates in general. Classical morphological studies on lamprey, shark, zebrafish, frog, chick, Chinese hamster, and human embryos provide only partial evidence to support the existence of von Baer's primary vesicles at early stages. Rather, they suggest that early brain morphogenesis is diverse among vertebrates. Gene expression and fate map studies on medaka, chick, and mouse embryos show that the fates of initial brain vesicles do not accord with von Baer's scheme, at least in medaka and chick brains. The currently accepted von Baer's scheme of brain morphogenesis, therefore, is not a universal rule throughout vertebrates. We propose here a developmental hourglass model as an alternative general rule: Brain morphogenesis is highly conserved at the five-brain vesicle stage but diverges more extensively at earlier and later stages. This hypothesis does not preclude the existence of deep similarities in molecular prepatterns at early stages.

  4. Mosaic Subventricular Origins of Forebrain Oligodendrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Kasum; Berninger, Benedikt; Raineteau, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In the perinatal as well as the adult CNS, the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain is the largest and most active source of neural stem cells (NSCs) that generates neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelin forming cells of the CNS. Recent advances in the field are beginning to shed light regarding SVZ heterogeneity, with the existence of spatially segregated microdomains that are intrinsically biased to generate phenotypically distinct neuronal populations. Although most research has focused on this regionalization in the context of neurogenesis, newer findings underline that this also applies for the genesis of OLs under the control of specific patterning molecules. In this mini review, we discuss the origins as well as the mechanisms that induce and maintain SVZ regionalization. These come in the flavor of specific signaling ligands and subsequent initiation of transcriptional networks that provide a basis for subdividing the SVZ into distinct lineage-specific microdomains. We further emphasize canonical Wnts and FGF2 as essential signaling pathways for the regional genesis of OL progenitors from NSCs of the dorsal SVZ. This aspect of NSC biology, which has so far received little attention, may unveil new avenues for appropriately recruiting NSCs in demyelinating diseases. PMID:27047329

  5. Mosaic subventricular origins of forebrain oligodendroglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasum eAzim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the perinatal as well as the adult CNS, the subventricular zone (SVZ of the forebrain is the largest and most active source of neural stem cells (NSCs that generates neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs, the myelin forming cells of the CNS. Recent advances in the field are beginning to shed light regarding SVZ heterogeneity, with the existence of spatially segregated microdomains that are intrinsically biased to generate phenotypically distinct neuronal populations. Although most research has focused on this regionalization in the context of neurogenesis, newer findings underline that this also applies for the genesis of OLs under the control of specific patterning molecules. In this mini review, we discuss the origins as well as the mechanisms that induce and maintain SVZ regionalization. These come in the flavor of specific signaling ligands and subsequent initiation of transcriptional networks that provide a basis for subdividing the SVZ into distinct lineage-specific microdomains. We further emphasize canonical Wnt and FGF2 as essential signaling pathways for the regional genesis of OL progenitors from NSCs of the dorsal SVZ. This aspect of NSC biology, which has so far received little attention, may unveil new avenues for appropriately recruiting NSCs in demyelinating diseases.

  6. ZNF 197L is dispensable in mouse development | Tang | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... We used gene trap method to identify mice gene of unknown function and to establish their mouse line. Here, we found one ... The insertion of trap vector into the first intron of this gene resulted in mutation.

  7. Tinkering with cusp patterning : Developmental Genetic Mechanisms in Mouse Molar Development

    OpenAIRE

    Harjunmaa, Enni

    2012-01-01

    Teeth display considerable morphological variability, which mammals have been able to use to their advantage. Consequently, mammal teeth provide a bountiful research subject that combines information on development, functional proper-ties, and thanks to their durable substance, evolutionary history. This thesis work is focused on the patterning of cusps, the peaks that form the shape of the tooth crown, in the mouse. Mouse tooth development has been studied extensively and offers a wide ...

  8. Vascular development and hemodynamic force in the mouse yolk sac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica D Garcia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Vascular remodeling of the mouse embryonic yolk sac is a highly dynamic process dependent on multiple genetic signaling pathways as well as biomechanical factors regulating proliferation, differentiation, migration, cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. During this early developmental window, the initial primitive vascular network of the yolk sac undergoes a dynamic remodeling process concurrent with the onset of blood flow, in which endothelial cells establish a branched, hierarchical structure of large vessels and smaller capillary beds. In this review, we will describe the molecular and biomechanical regulators which guide vascular remodeling in the mouse embryonic yolk sac, as well as live imaging methods for characterizing endothelial cell and hemodynamic function in cultured embryos.

  9. Forebrain neuroanatomy of the neonatal and juvenile dolphin (T. truncatus and S. coeruloalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolisi, Roberta; Peruffo, Antonella; Messina, Silvia; Panin, Mattia; Montelli, Stefano; Giurisato, Maristella; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dolphin functional neuroanatomy mostly derives from post-mortem studies and non-invasive approaches (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging), due to limitations in experimentation on cetaceans. As a consequence the availability of well-preserved tissues for histology is scarce, and detailed histological analyses are referred mainly to adults. Here we studied the neonatal/juvenile brain in two species of dolphins, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), with special reference to forebrain regions. We analyzed cell density in subcortical nuclei, white/gray matter ratio, and myelination in selected regions at different anterior-posterior levels of the whole dolphin brain at different ages, to better define forebrain neuroanatomy and the developmental stage of the dolphin brain around birth. The analyses were extended to the periventricular germinal layer and the cerebellum, whose delayed genesis of the granule cell layer is a hallmark of postnatal development in the mammalian nervous system. Our results establish an atlas of the young dolphin forebrain and, on the basis of occurrence/absence of delayed neurogenic layers, confirm the stage of advanced brain maturation in these animals with respect to most terrestrial mammals.

  10. Forebrain neuroanatomy of the neonatal and juvenile dolphin (T. truncatus and S. coeruloalba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolisi, Roberta; Peruffo, Antonella; Messina, Silvia; Panin, Mattia; Montelli, Stefano; Giurisato, Maristella; Cozzi, Bruno; Bonfanti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of dolphin functional neuroanatomy mostly derives from post-mortem studies and non-invasive approaches (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging), due to limitations in experimentation on cetaceans. As a consequence the availability of well-preserved tissues for histology is scarce, and detailed histological analyses are referred mainly to adults. Here we studied the neonatal/juvenile brain in two species of dolphins, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) and the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), with special reference to forebrain regions. We analyzed cell density in subcortical nuclei, white/gray matter ratio, and myelination in selected regions at different anterior–posterior levels of the whole dolphin brain at different ages, to better define forebrain neuroanatomy and the developmental stage of the dolphin brain around birth. The analyses were extended to the periventricular germinal layer and the cerebellum, whose delayed genesis of the granule cell layer is a hallmark of postnatal development in the mammalian nervous system. Our results establish an atlas of the young dolphin forebrain and, on the basis of occurrence/absence of delayed neurogenic layers, confirm the stage of advanced brain maturation in these animals with respect to most terrestrial mammals. PMID:26594155

  11. Forebrain neuroanatomy of the neonatal and juvenile dolphin (T. truncatus & S. coeruloalba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eParolisi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of dolphin functional neuroanatomy mostly derives from post-mortem studies and non-invasive approaches (i.e. magnetic resonance imaging, due to limitations in experimentation on cetaceans. As a consequence the availability of well-preserved tissues for histology is scarce, and detailed histological analyses are referred mainly to adults. Here we studied the neonatal/juvenile brain in two species of dolphins, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus and the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba, with special reference to forebrain regions. We analyzed cell density in subcortical nuclei, white/grey matter ratio, and myelination in selected regions at different anterior-posterior levels of the whole dolphin brain at different ages, to better define forebrain neuroanatomy and the developmental stage of the dolphin brain around birth. The analysis were extended to the periventricular germinal layer and the cerebellum, whose delayed genesis of the granule cell layer is a hallmark of postnatal development in the mammalian nervous system. Our results establish an atlas of the young dolphin forebrain and, on the basis of occurrence/absence of delayed neurogenic layers, confirm the stage of advanced brain maturation in these animals with respect to most terrestrial mammals.

  12. Dynamics of muscle fibre growth during postnatal mouse development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gnocchi Viola F

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postnatal growth in mouse is rapid, with total skeletal muscle mass increasing several-fold in the first few weeks. Muscle growth can be achieved by either an increase in muscle fibre number or an increase in the size of individual myofibres, or a combination of both. Where myofibre hypertrophy during growth requires the addition of new myonuclei, these are supplied by muscle satellite cells, the resident stem cells of skeletal muscle. Results Here, we report on the dynamics of postnatal myofibre growth in the mouse extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle, which is essentially composed of fast type II fibres in adult. We found that there was no net gain in myofibre number in the EDL between P7 and P56 (adulthood. However, myofibre cross-sectional area increased by 7.6-fold, and length by 1.9-fold between these ages, resulting in an increase in total myofibre volume of 14.1-fold: showing the extent of myofibre hypertrophy during the postnatal period. To determine how the number of myonuclei changes during this period of intense muscle fibre hypertrophy, we used two complementary mouse models: 3F-nlacZ-E mice express nlacZ only in myonuclei, while Myf5nlacZ/+ mice have β-galactosidase activity in satellite cells. There was a ~5-fold increase in myonuclear number per myofibre between P3 and P21. Thus myofibre hypertrophy is initially accompanied by a significant addition of myonuclei. Despite this, the estimated myonuclear domain still doubled between P7 and P21 to 9.2 × 103 μm3. There was no further addition of myonuclei from P21, but myofibre volume continued to increase, resulting in an estimated ~3-fold expansion of the myonuclear domain to 26.5 × 103 μm3 by P56. We also used our two mouse models to determine the number of satellite cells per myofibre during postnatal growth. Satellite cell number in EDL was initially ~14 satellite cells per myofibre at P7, but then fell to reach the adult level of ~5 by P21. Conclusions

  13. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40-70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Chick homeobox gene cDlx expression demarcates the forebrain anlage, indicating the onset of forebrain regional specification at gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghjid, S; Siddiqui, M A

    2000-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a chick homeobox-containing gene, cDlx, which shows greater than 85% homology to the homeodomain of other vertebrate Distal-less genes. Northern blot analysis and in situ hybridization studies reveal that cDlx expression is developmentally regulated and is tissue specific. In particular, the developmental expression pattern is characterized by an early appearance of cDlx transcript in the prospective forebrain region of gastrulating embryos. During neurulation, cDlx is consistently expressed in a spatially restricted domain in the presumptive ventral forebrain region of the neural plate that will give rise to the hypothalamus and the adenohypophysis. Our data support the notion that members of the Dlx gene family are part of a homeobox gene code in forebrain pattern formation and suggest that regional specification of the forebrain occurs at much earlier stages than previously thought. The homeobox gene cDlx may thus play a role in defining forebrain regional identity as early as gastrulation.

  15. Genetic mouse models to study blood–brain barrier development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Sohet, Fabien; Daneman, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex physiological structure formed by the blood vessels of the central nervous system (CNS) that tightly regulates the movement of substances between the blood and the neural tissue. Recently, the generation and analysis of different genetic mouse models has allowed for greater understanding of BBB development, how the barrier is regulated during health, and its response to disease. Here we discuss: 1) Genetic mouse models that have been used to study th...

  16. The mouse olfactory peduncle. 3. Development of neurons, glia and centrifugal afferents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eBrunjes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present series of studies was designed to provide a general overview of the development of the region connecting the olfactory bulb to the forebrain. The olfactory peduncle contains several structures involved in processing odor information with the anterior olfactory nucleus (cortex being the largest and most studied. Results indicate that considerable growth occurs in the peduncle from postnatal day (P10-P20, with reduced expansion from P20-P30. No evidence was found for the addition of new projection or interneurons during the postnatal period. GABAergic cells decreased in both number and density after P10. Glial populations exhibited different patterns of development, with astrocytes declining in density from P10-P30, and both oligodendrocytes and microglia increasing through the interval. Myelination in the anterior commissure emerged between P11-14. Dense cholinergic innervation was observed at P10 and remained relatively stable through P30, while considerable maturation of serotonergic innervation occurred through the period. Unilateral naris occlusion from P1-P30 resulted in about a 30% reduction in the size of the ipsilateral peduncle but few changes were observed on the contralateral side. The ipsilateral peduncle also exhibited higher densities of GAD67- containing interneurons and cholinergic fibers suggesting a delay in normal developmental pruning. Lower densities of interneurons expressing CCK, somatostatin and NPY and in myelin basic protein staining were also observed. Understanding variations in developmental trajectories within the olfactory peduncle may be an important tool for unravelling the functions of the region.

  17. Development of mouse hepatocyte lines permissive for hepatitis C virus (HCV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Hassan Aly

    Full Text Available The lack of a suitable small animal model for the analysis of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection has hampered elucidation of the HCV life cycle and the development of both protective and therapeutic strategies against HCV infection. Human and mouse harbor a comparable system for antiviral type I interferon (IFN induction and amplification, which regulates viral infection and replication. Using hepatocytes from knockout (ko mice, we determined the critical step of the IFN-inducing/amplification pathways regulating HCV replication in mouse. The results infer that interferon-beta promoter stimulator (IPS-1 or interferon A receptor (IFNAR were a crucial barrier to HCV replication in mouse hepatocytes. Although both IFNARko and IPS-1ko hepatocytes showed a reduced induction of type I interferons in response to viral infection, only IPS-1-/- cells circumvented cell death from HCV cytopathic effect and significantly improved J6JFH1 replication, suggesting IPS-1 to be a key player regulating HCV replication in mouse hepatocytes. We then established mouse hepatocyte lines lacking IPS-1 or IFNAR through immortalization with SV40T antigen. Expression of human (hCD81 on these hepatocyte lines rendered both lines HCVcc-permissive. We also found that the chimeric J6JFH1 construct, having the structure region from J6 isolate enhanced HCV replication in mouse hepatocytes rather than the full length original JFH1 construct, a new finding that suggests the possible role of the HCV structural region in HCV replication. This is the first report on the entry and replication of HCV infectious particles in mouse hepatocytes. These mouse hepatocyte lines will facilitate establishing a mouse HCV infection model with multifarious applications.

  18. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Forebrain [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  10. Cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on primary neuronal cells of the forebrain: the involvement of cannabinoid CB1 receptors and apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiyama, Ken-ichi; Funada, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    The abuse of herbal products containing synthetic cannabinoids has become an issue of public concern. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the acute cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids on mouse brain neuronal cells. Cytotoxicity induced by synthetic cannabinoid (CP-55,940, CP-47,497, CP-47,497-C8, HU-210, JWH-018, JWH-210, AM-2201, and MAM-2201) was examined using forebrain neuronal cultures. These synthetic cannabinoids induced cytotoxicity in the forebrain cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. The cytotoxicity was suppressed by preincubation with the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, but not with the selective CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Furthermore, annexin-V-positive cells were found among the treated forebrain cells. Synthetic cannabinoid treatment induced the activation of caspase-3, and preincubation with a caspase-3 inhibitor significantly suppressed the cytotoxicity. These synthetic cannabinoids induced apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent mechanism in the forebrain cultures. Our results indicate that the cytotoxicity of synthetic cannabinoids towards primary neuronal cells is mediated by the CB1 receptor, but not by the CB2 receptor, and further suggest that caspase cascades may play an important role in the apoptosis induced by these synthetic cannabinoids. In conclusion, excessive synthetic cannabinoid abuse may present a serious acute health concern due to neuronal damage or deficits in the brain.

  11. Evidence for sequential appearance of cartilage matrix proteins in developing mouse limbs and in cultures of mouse mesenchymal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, A; Heinegard, D; Solursh, M

    1987-01-01

    The initiation of synthesis and the accumulation of four cartilage matrix proteins (type II collagen and three noncollagenous proteins, one of Mr 148, one of Mr 59, and an oligometric protein of Mr above 500 with 100-kDa subunits, respectively) were studied in developing mouse limbs and in cultures of limb bud mesenchyme by means of immunolocalization. On day 13 of gestation, type II collagen was observed throughout the entire humerus, whereas the 148-kDa protein was localized only in the central portion. Neither the 100-kDa-subunit protein nor the 59-kDa protein could be demonstrated in the humerus at that stage. On day 14 1/2, type II collagen and the 148-kDa protein were codistributed throughout the humerus. The 100-kDa-subunit protein was detectable in the periphery of the humerus, whereas little 59-kDa protein could yet be demonstrated. On day 18, all four proteins being studied could be detected immunologically in the developing mouse humerus. They differed in immunolocalization. Type Ii collagen, the 148-kDa protein, and the 100-kDa-subunit protein were codistributed throughout the distal and proximal parts of the cartilage. However, the 148-kDa protein could no longer be detected immunochemically in the outermost part of the cartilage in the proximal shoulder joint. The 148-kDa protein codistributed with type II collagen and the 100-kDa-subunit protein in the distal cartilaginous region, where joint development was less advanced. On the other hand, the 59-kDa protein was not demonstrated directly within the hyaline cartilaginous structures, but surrounded the entire structure. This protein was also present in the same part of the proximal joint region as that in which the 148-kDa protein was not detected. To develop an in vitro model for studies of skeletogenesis, mesenchymal cells prepared from mouse limb buds were cultured as micromass cultures at high initial cell density to favor chondrogenesis. On day 3 of culture, type II collagen was the only protein

  12. Immunohistochemical localization of TGF-B1 during morphogenetic movements of the developing mouse palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J M; Robinson, R A; Solursh, M

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-B1) may play an important role in developmentally active tissues in which it is found in high concentrations. We localized TGF-B1 in the developing fetal mouse palate immunohistochemically using a polyclonal antibody. Mouse fetal palates at 12-17 days (inclusive) of gestation were examined and specific focal concentrations of TGF-B1 identified regions undergoing active morphogenesis. The association of TGF-B1 with aggregates of mesenchymal cells in the palate and chondroblasts, rhabdomyocytes, and epithelia of the craniofacial complex strongly implicates its role in proliferation and differentiation in the developing mouse palate. We believe these findings have important bearing on the normal development of the palate as well as cleft anomalies.

  13. Characterization of progenitor domains in the developing mouse thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vue, Tou Yia; Aaker, Joshua; Taniguchi, Aya; Kazemzadeh, Christina; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Martin, Donna M; Martin, James F; Treier, Mathias; Nakagawa, Yasushi

    2007-11-01

    To understand the molecular basis of the specification of thalamic nuclei, we analyzed the expression patterns of various transcription factors and defined progenitor cell populations in the embryonic mouse thalamus. We show that the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor Olig3 is expressed in the entire thalamic ventricular zone and the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI). Next, we define two distinct progenitor domains within the thalamus, which we name pTH-R and pTH-C, located caudal to the ZLI. pTH-R is immediately caudal to the ZLI and expresses Nkx2.2, Mash1, and Olig3. pTH-C is caudal to pTH-R and expresses Ngn1, Ngn2, and Olig3. Short-term lineage analysis of Olig3-, Mash1-, Ngn1-, and Ngn2-expressing progenitor cells as well as tracing the Pitx2 cell lineage suggests that pTH-C is the only major source of thalamic nuclei containing neurons that project to the cerebral cortex, whereas pTH-R and ZLI are likely to produce distinct postmitotic populations outside of the cortex-projecting part of the thalamus. To determine if pTH-C is composed of subdomains, we characterized expression of the homeodomain protein Dbx1 and the bHLH protein Olig2. We show that Dbx1 is expressed in caudodorsal-high to rostroventral-low gradient within pTH-C. Analysis of heterozygous Dbx1(nlslacZ) knockin mice demonstrated that Dbx1-expressing progenitors preferentially give rise to caudodorsal thalamic nuclei. Olig2 is expressed in an opposite gradient within pTH-C to that of Dbx1. These results establish the molecular heterogeneity within the progenitor cells of the thalamus, and suggest that such heterogeneity contributes to the specification of thalamic nuclei.

  14. Collection of superovulated mouse oocytes continuously by surgery and their development after activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Min-kang; Zhang Tian

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To establish a new way to collect superovulated oocytes or zygotes repeatedly from an individual mouse. Methods: Superovulations were induced by injection PMSG and hCG in Kunming strain mice. The ampullaes of oviduct of all anaesthetised mouse were put in a specially designed "U" sink and released. The second and third times of PMSG injection were made on the sixth day and eleventh day after the first superovulation injection. The capacity of development was examined by in vitro culture of parthenogenesis activation oocytes. Results: Development to blastocyst stage was not significantly different between the first and second time collection. The percentage of blastocyst stage in CD and Sr++ treatment was significantly higher (P<0.05) than the oocytes treated in CB and Sr++. Conclusion: This method enables us to collect oocytes or zygotes repeatedly from one individual mouse in an interval as short as 5 days and without influence on the quality of oocytes.

  15. Association of basal forebrain volumes and cognition in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, D; Grothe, M; Fischer, F U; Heinsen, H; Kilimann, I; Teipel, S; Fellgiebel, A

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain cholinergic system (BFCS) is known to undergo moderate neurodegenerative alterations during normal aging and severe atrophy in Alzheimer's disease (AD). It has been suggested that functional and structural alterations of the BFCS mediate cognitive performance in normal aging and AD. But, it is still unclear to what extend age-associated cognitive decline can be related to BFCS in normal aging. We analyzed the relationship between BFCS volume and cognition using MRI and a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery in a cohort of 43 healthy elderly subjects spanning the age range from 60 to 85 years. Most notably, we found significant associations between general intelligence and BFCS volumes, specifically within areas corresponding to posterior nuclei of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (Ch4p) and the nucleus subputaminalis (NSP). Associations between specific cognitive domains and BFCS volumes were less pronounced. Supplementary analyses demonstrated that especially the volume of NSP but also the volume of Ch4p was related to the volume of widespread temporal, frontal, and parietal gray and white matter regions. Volumes of these gray and white matter regions were also related to general intelligence. Higher volumes of Ch4p and NSP may enhance the effectiveness of acetylcholine supply in related gray and white matter regions underlying general intelligence and hence explain the observed association between the volume of Ch4p as well as NSP and general intelligence. Since general intelligence is known to attenuate the degree of age-associated cognitive decline and the risk of developing late-onset AD, the BFCS might, besides the specific contribution to the pathophysiology in AD, constitute a mechanism of brain resilience in normal aging.

  16. DNA methylation in mouse embryonic stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Tom; Gilbert, Nick; Ramsahoye, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian development is associated with considerable changes in global DNA methylation levels at times of genomic reprogramming. Normal DNA methylation is essential for development but, despite considerable advances in our understanding of the DNA methyltransferases, the reason that development fails when DNA methylation is deficient remains unclear. Furthermore, although much is known about the enzymes that cause DNA methylation, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms or significance of active demethylation in early development. In this review, we discuss the roles of the various DNA methyltransferases and their likely functions in development.

  17. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-04-26

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs.

  18. Development of the Nonobese Diabetic Mouse and Contribution of Animal Models for Understanding Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In 1974, the discovery of a mouse and a rat that spontaneously developed hyperglycemia led to the development of 2 autoimmune diabetes models: nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse and Bio-Breeding rat. These models have contributed to our understanding of autoimmune diabetes, provided tools to dissect autoimmune islet damage, and facilitated development of early detection, prevention, and treatment of type 1 diabetes. The genetic characterization, monoclonal antibodies, and congenic strains have made NOD mice especially useful. Although the establishment of the inbred NOD mouse strain was documented by Makino et al (Jikken Dobutsu. 1980;29:1–13), this review will focus on the not-as-well-known history leading to the discovery of a glycosuric female mouse by Yoshihiro Tochino. This discovery was spearheaded by years of effort by Japanese scientists from different disciplines and dedicated animal care personnel and by the support of the Shionogi Pharmaceutical Company, Osaka, Japan. The history is based on the early literature, mostly written in Japanese, and personal communications especially with Dr Tochino, who was involved in diabetes animal model development and who contributed to the release of NOD mice to the international scientific community. This article also reviews the scientific contributions made by the Bio-Breeding rat to autoimmune diabetes. PMID:28291161

  19. Three-dimensional imaging of the developing mouse female reproductive organs with optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Jason C.; Wang, Shang; Behringer, Richard R.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Infertility is a known major health concern and is estimated to impact ~15% of couples in the U.S. The majority of failed pregnancies occur before or during implantation of the fertilized embryo into the uterus. Understanding the mechanisms regulating development by studying mouse reproductive organs could significantly contribute to an improved understanding of normal development of reproductive organs and developmental causes of infertility in humans. Towards this goal, we report a three-dimensional (3D) imaging study of the developing mouse reproductive organs (ovary, oviduct, and uterus) using optical coherence tomography (OCT). In our study, OCT was used for 3D imaging of reproductive organs without exogenous contrast agents and provides micro-scale spatial resolution. Experiments were conducted in vitro on mouse reproductive organs ranging from the embryonic day 14.5 to adult stages. Structural features of the ovary, oviduct, and uterus are presented. Additionally, a comparison with traditional histological analysis is illustrated. These results provide a basis for a wide range of infertility studies in mouse models. Through integration with traditional genetic and molecular biology approaches, this imaging method can improve understanding of ovary, oviduct, and uterus development and function, serving to further contribute to our understanding of fertility and infertility.

  20. A microfluidic system supports single mouse embryo culture leading to full-term development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esteves, Telma Cristina; Rossem, van Fleur; Nordhoff, Verena; Schlatt, Stefan; Boiani, Michele; Le Gac, Séverine

    2013-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the feasibility of application of a microfluidic system for in vitro culture of pre-implantation mouse embryos, with subsequent development to full-term upon embryo transfer. Specifically, embryos cultured in groups in nL volume chambers achieve pre-implantation develo

  1. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransén-Pettersson, Nina; Duarte, Nadia; Nilsson, Julia; Lundholm, Marie; Mayans, Sofia; Larefalk, Åsa; Hannibal, Tine D.; Hansen, Lisbeth; Schmidt-Christensen, Anja; Ivars, Fredrik; Cardell, Susanna; Palmqvist, Richard; Rozell, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF) mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT) induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders. PMID:27441847

  2. Aquaporin 11 in the developing mouse submandibular gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Helga S; Ruus, Ann-Kristin; Schreurs, Olav; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2010-02-01

    Several aquaporins (AQPs) have been detected in mature and embryonic mammalian salivary glands (AQP1 and AQP3-AQP8). However, AQP11 has, to our knowledge, never before been described in salivary glands, but is known to be important in, for example, kidney development in mice. We therefore thought it relevant to investigate if AQP11 was present during salivary organogenesis. The submandibular salivary gland (SMG) from CD1 mice was studied during prenatal development and early postnatal development, and also in young adult male and female mice. The expression trend of the AQP11 transcript was detected using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the temporal-spatial pattern was observed using in situ hybridization. The AQP11 transcript was first detected at embryonic day 13.5 and showed a more or less constitutive expression trend during the prenatal and early postnatal SMG development. Spatial studies demonstrated that the AQP11 transcript was present in the developing and mature duct structures at all stages studied. In the end pieces, the AQP11 transcript was reduced during glandular development. Our results point to an important role for AQP11 during salivary gland development.

  3. Development of the cerebellar cortex in the mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiangshu Cheng; Jin Du; Dongming Yu; Qiying Jiang; Yanqiu Hu; Lei Wang; Mingshan Li; Jinbo Deng

    2011-01-01

    The cerebellum is a highly conserved structure in the central nervous system of vertebrates, and is involved in the coordination of voluntary motor behavior. Supporting this function, the cerebellar cortex presents a layered structure which requires precise spatial and temporal coordination of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and apoptosis events. The formation of the layered structure in the developing cerebellum remains unclear. The present study investigated the development of the cerebellar cortex. The results demonstrate that the primordium of the cerebellum comprises the ependymal, mantle, and marginal layers at embryonic day 12 (E12). Subsequently, the laminated cerebellar cortex undergoes cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, and at about postnatal day 0 (P0), the cerebellar cortex presents an external granular layer, a molecular layer, a Purkinje layer, and an internal granular layer. The external granular layer is thickest at P6/7 and disappears at P20. From P0 to P30, the internal granular cells and the Purkinje cells gradually differentiate and develop until maturity. Apoptotic neurons are evident in the layered structure in the developing cerebellar cortex. The external granular layer disappears gradually because of cell migration and apoptosis. The cells of the other layers primarily undergo differentiation, development, and apoptosis.

  4. BMP4 signaling mediates Zeb family in developing mouse tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jeong-Oh; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cho, Kyoung-Won; Nakagawa, Eizo; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Cho, Sung-Won; Jung, Han-Sung

    2012-06-01

    Tooth morphogenesis is regulated by sequential and reciprocal interaction between oral epithelium and neural-crest-derived ectomesenchyme. The interaction is controlled by various signal molecules such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), Hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and Wnt. Zeb family is known as a transcription factor, which is essential for neural development and neural-crest-derived tissues, whereas the role of the Zeb family in tooth development remains unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the expression profiles of Zeb1 and Zeb2 during craniofacial development focusing on mesenchyme of palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ from E12.5 to E16.5. In addition, we examined the interaction between Zeb family and BMP4 during tooth development. Both Zeb1 and Zeb2 were expressed at mesenchyme of the palate, hair follicle, and tooth germ throughout the stages. In the case of tooth germ at the cap stage, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 was lost in epithelium-separated dental mesenchyme. However, the expression of Zeb1 and Zeb2 in the dental mesenchyme was recovered by Bmp4 signaling via BMP4-soaked bead and tissue recombination. Our results suggest that Zeb1 and Zeb2, which were mediated by BMP4, play an important role in neural-crest-derived craniofacial organ morphogenesis, such as tooth development.

  5. Follicle-stimulating hormone accelerates mouse oocyte development in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeestere, Isabelle; Streiff, Agathe K; Suzuki, João; Al-Khabouri, Shaima; Mahrous, Enas; Tan, Seang Lin; Clarke, Hugh J

    2012-07-01

    During folliculogenesis, oocytes grow and acquire developmental competence in a mutually dependent relationship with their adjacent somatic cells. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) plays an essential and well-established role in the differentiation of somatic follicular cells, but its function in the development of the oocyte has still not been elucidated. We report here that oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice, which cannot produce FSH, grow at the same rate and reach the same size as those of wild-type mice. Consistent with this observation, the granulosa cells of Fshb(-/-) mice express the normal quantity of mRNA encoding Kit ligand, which has been implicated in oocyte growth. Oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice also accumulate normal quantities of cyclin B1 and CDK1 proteins and mitochondrial DNA. Moreover, they acquire the ability to complete meiotic maturation in vitro and undergo transition from non-surrounded nucleolus to surrounded nucleolus. However, these events of late oocyte development are significantly delayed. Following in vitro maturation and fertilization, only a small number of embryos derived from oocytes of Fshb(-/-) mice reach the blastocyst stage. Administration of equine chorionic gonadotropin, which provides FSH activity, 48 h before in vitro maturation increases the number of blastocysts obtained subsequently. These results indicate that FSH is not absolutely required for oocyte development in vivo but that this process occurs more rapidly in its presence. We suggest that FSH may coordinate the development of the germline and somatic compartments of the follicle, ensuring that ovulation releases a developmentally competent egg.

  6. Genetic and epigenetic control of early mouse development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    A decade after cloning the sheep Dolly, the induction of pluripotency by transcription factors has further revolutionized the possibilities of reprogramming a cell's identity, with exciting prospects for personalized medicine. Establishing totipotency during natural reproduction remains, however,...... extensive epigenetic reprogramming. This may underlie the efficient acquisition of totipotency during subsequent preimplantation development....

  7. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Issa, Radwan, E-mail: rabuissa@umich.edu

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Conditional knockout of Rac1 using Nkx2.5 Cre line is lethal at E13.5. • The myocardium of the mutant is thin and disorganized. • The phenotype is not due to cardiomyocyte low proliferation or apoptosis. • The phenotype is due to specific defect in cardiomyocyte adhesion. - Abstract: Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell–cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  8. Basal forebrain neurons suppress amygdala kindling via cortical but not hippocampal cholinergic projections in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferencz, I; Leanza, G; Nanobashvili, A; Kokaia, M; Lindvall, O

    2000-06-01

    Intraventricular administration of the immunotoxin 192 IgG-saporin in rats has been shown to cause a selective loss of cholinergic afferents to the hippocampus and cortical areas, and to facilitate seizure development in hippocampal kindling. Here we demonstrate that this lesion also accelerates seizure progression when kindling is induced by electrical stimulations in the amygdala. However, whereas intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin facilitated the development of the initial stages of hippocampal kindling, the same lesion promoted the late stages of amygdala kindling. To explore the role of various parts of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in amygdala kindling, selective lesions of the cholinergic projections to either hippocampus or cortex were produced by intraparenchymal injections of 192 IgG-saporin into medial septum/vertical limb of the diagonal band or nucleus basalis, respectively. Cholinergic denervation of the cortical regions caused acceleration of amygdala kindling closely resembling that observed after the more widespread lesion induced by intraventricular 192 IgG-saporin. In contrast, removal of the cholinergic input to the hippocampus had no effect on the development of amygdala kindling. These data indicate that basal forebrain cholinergic neurons suppress kindling elicited from amygdala, and that this dampening effect is mediated via cortical but not hippocampal projections.

  9. Hes1 is required for appropriate morphogenesis and differentiation during mouse thyroid gland development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Carre

    Full Text Available Notch signalling plays an important role in endocrine development, through its target gene Hes1. Hes1, a bHLH transcriptional repressor, influences progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Recently, Hes1 was shown to be expressed in the thyroid and regulate expression of the sodium iodide symporter (Nis. To investigate the role of Hes1 for thyroid development, we studied thyroid morphology and function in mice lacking Hes1. During normal mouse thyroid development, Hes1 was detected from E9.5 onwards in the median anlage, and at E11.5 in the ultimobranchial bodies. Hes1(-/- mouse embryos had a significantly lower number of Nkx2-1-positive progenitor cells (p<0.05 at E9.5 and at E11.5. Moreover, Hes1(-/- mouse embryos showed a significantly smaller total thyroid surface area (-40 to -60% compared to wild type mice at all study time points (E9.5-E16.5. In both Hes1(-/- and wild type mouse embryos, most Nkx2-1-positive thyroid cells expressed the cell cycle inhibitor p57 at E9.5 in correlation with low proliferation index. In Hes1(-/- mouse embryos, fusion of the median anlage with the ultimobranchial bodies was delayed by 3 days (E16.5 vs. E13.5 in wild type mice. After fusion of thyroid anlages, hypoplastic Hes1(-/- thyroids revealed a significantly decreased labelling area for T4 (-78% and calcitonin (-65% normalized to Nkx2-1 positive cells. Decreased T4-synthesis might be due to reduced Nis labelling area (-69%. These findings suggest a dual role of Hes1 during thyroid development: first, control of the number of both thyrocyte and C-cell progenitors, via a p57-independent mechanism; second, adequate differentiation and endocrine function of thyrocytes and C-cells.

  10. Relevance of LIF and EGF on Mouse Preimplantation Embryo Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Amiri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Recent evidence suggests that Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF, a member ofinterleukin-6 family, has biological actions on preimplantation embryo development. Alsoit is established that Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF, a strong mitosis-promoting agent,improves the preimplantation embryo development by increasing the cell metabolism andproliferation. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effects of these factors,alone and in combination together, on preimplantation and development of the embryo.Materials and Methods: Six to eight weeks old NMRI mice were super ovulated by injectionof 10IU PMSG and 10IU hCG, then the mated mice were killed 46 hours later. Theiroviducts were flushed, two-cell embryos collected and divided randomly to the four groupsas following: Control, treatment 1 (LIF, treatment 2 (EGF, treatment 3 (LIF+EGF. In eachgroup, the embryos were cultured in an incubator at 37°C with 5% CO2 and 90% humidityfor 72hrs. The state of embryo development was evaluated in 24,36,48,60 and 72hrsfollowing the embryos cultures. By the end of the cultures, cell apoptosis was studiedby the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferas-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNELtechnique.Results: Significant difference was detected in the rate of hatching in the LIF and LIF+EGFgroups. This difference was also seen in the rate of blastocyst formation after 36hrs(p<0.05 and in the average of the total cell number (p<0.05 after 72hrs. In comparison tothe apoptotic index, there was no significant difference between the control and treatmentgroups.Conclusion: The findings in this study show a beneficial effect of LIF and EGF on theblastocyst formation, hatching and its total cell numbers in vitro.

  11. Immunologic glycosphingolipidomics and NKT cell development in mouse thymus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yunsen; Thapa, Prakash; Hawke, David

    2009-01-01

    Invariant NKT cells are a hybrid cell type of Natural Killer cells and T cells, whose development is dependent on thymic positive selection mediated by double positive thymocytes through their recognition of natural ligands presented by CD1d, a nonpolymorphic, non-MHC, MHC-like antigen presenting...... for identifying additional ligands for NKT cells. Our results also provide early insights into cellular lipidomics studies, with a specific focus on the important immunological functions of glycosphingolipids....

  12. Involvement of insulin in early development of mouse one-cell stage embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that growth factors and hormones play important roles in cell prolif-eration and differentiation during early embryonic development. In the present study, we examined the expression and localization of insulin in the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos by quantitative ELISA, RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. In the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage em-bryos, expression of insulin was uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. We also examined the expres-sion, activity and localization of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and p70S6K. The expression of mTOR and p70S6K was not significantly different at the cell cycle of mouse one-cell stage embryos. mTOR and S6K were distributed evenly in the cytoplasm at G1, G2 and M phase phase, but at S phase, the distribution of mTOR and S6K was around the pronucleus. At different phases, the activity of mTOR fluctuated. We also used the PI3K specific inhibitor-Wortmannin to investigate the cleavage rate of eggs. The result showed that the rate obviously decreased. When the mTOR specific inhibitor Rapa-mycin was used, the first mitotic division of the mouse one-cell stage embryo was delayed. These re-sults suggested that insulin was expressed both in mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos, and may play functional roles in regulation of mouse early embryogenesis by activating the signal pathway of PI3K/PKB/mTOR/S6K.

  13. Involvement of insulin in early development of mouse one-cell stase embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU BingZhi; YU DaHai; ZHANG Zhe; DENG Xin; XU XiaoYan; FENG Chen; LI YanXiao; CUI Cheng; SU WenHui; ZHAO HongMei

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that growth factors and hormones play important roles in cell prolif-eration and differentiation during early embryonic development. In the present study, we examined the expression and localization of insulin in the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos by quantitative ELISA, RT-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence. In the mouse oocytes and one-cell stage em-bryos, expression of insulin was uniformly distributed in the cytoplasm. We also examined the expres-sion, activity and localization of mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and p70S6K. The expression of mTOR and p70S6K was not significantly different at the cell cycle of mouse one-cell stage embryos. mTOR and S6K were distributed evenly in the cytoplasm at G1, G2 and M phase phase, but at S phase, the distribution of mTOR and S6K was around the pronucleus. At different phases, the activity of mTOR fluctuated. We also used the PI3K specific inhibitor-Wortmannin to investigate the cleavage rate of eggs. The result showed that the rate obviously decreased. When the mTOR specific inhibitor Rapa-mycin was used, the first mitotic division of the mouse one-cell stage embryo was delayed. These re-suits suggested that insulin was expressed both in mouse oocytes and one-cell stage embryos, and may play functional roles in regulation of mouse early embryogenesis by activating the signal pathway of PI3K/PKB/mTOR/S6K.

  14. Modulatory Effects of Mild Carbon Monoxide Exposure in the Developing Mouse Cochlea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ivan A; Acuna, Dora; Edmond, John

    2017-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is well known as a highly toxic poison at high concentrations, yet in physiologic amounts it is an endogenous biological messenger in organs such as the internal ear and brain. In this study we tested the hypothesis that chronic very mild CO exposure at concentrations 25-ppm increases the expression of oxidative stress protecting enzymes within the cellular milieu of the developing inner ear (cochlea) of the normal CD-1 mouse. In addition we tested also the hypothesis that CO can decrease the pre-existing condition of oxidative stress in the mouse model for the human medical condition systemic lupus erythematosus by increasing two protective enzymes heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD-2). CD-1 and MRL/lpr mice were exposed to mild CO concentrations (25 ppm in air) from prenatal only and prenatal followed by early postnatal day 5 to postnatal day 20. The expression of cell markers specific for oxidative stress, and related neural/endothelial markers were investigated at the level of the gene products by immunohistochemistry, proteomics and mRNA expression (quantitative real time-PCR). We found that in the CD-1 and MRL/lpr mouse cochlea SOD-2 and HO-1 were upregulated. In this mouse model of autoimmune disease defense mechanism are attenuated, thus mild CO exposure is beneficial. Several genes (mRNA) and proteins detected by proteomics involved in cellular protection were upregulated in the CO exposed CD-1 mouse and the MRL/lpr mouse.

  15. Detrimental effects of microgravity on mouse preimplantation development in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayaka Wakayama

    Full Text Available Sustaining life beyond Earth either on space stations or on other planets will require a clear understanding of how the space environment affects key phases of mammalian reproduction. However, because of the difficulty of doing such experiments in mammals, most studies of reproduction in space have been carried out with other taxa, such as sea urchins, fish, amphibians or birds. Here, we studied the possibility of mammalian fertilization and preimplantation development under microgravity (microG conditions using a three-dimensional (3D clinostat, which faithfully simulates 10(-3 G using 3D rotation. Fertilization occurred normally in vitro under microG. However, although we obtained 75 healthy offspring from microG-fertilized and -cultured embryos after transfer to recipient females, the birth rate was lower than among the 1G controls. Immunostaining demonstrated that in vitro culture under microG caused slower development and fewer trophectoderm cells than in 1G controls but did not affect polarization of the blastocyst. These results suggest for the first time that fertilization can occur normally under microG environment in a mammal, but normal preimplantation embryo development might require 1G.

  16. Live imaging of mitosis in the developing mouse embryonic cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Silver, Debra L

    2014-06-04

    Although of short duration, mitosis is a complex and dynamic multi-step process fundamental for development of organs including the brain. In the developing cerebral cortex, abnormal mitosis of neural progenitors can cause defects in brain size and function. Hence, there is a critical need for tools to understand the mechanisms of neural progenitor mitosis. Cortical development in rodents is an outstanding model for studying this process. Neural progenitor mitosis is commonly examined in fixed brain sections. This protocol will describe in detail an approach for live imaging of mitosis in ex vivo embryonic brain slices. We will describe the critical steps for this procedure, which include: brain extraction, brain embedding, vibratome sectioning of brain slices, staining and culturing of slices, and time-lapse imaging. We will then demonstrate and describe in detail how to perform post-acquisition analysis of mitosis. We include representative results from this assay using the vital dye Syto11, transgenic mice (histone H2B-EGFP and centrin-EGFP), and in utero electroporation (mCherry-α-tubulin). We will discuss how this procedure can be best optimized and how it can be modified for study of genetic regulation of mitosis. Live imaging of mitosis in brain slices is a flexible approach to assess the impact of age, anatomy, and genetic perturbation in a controlled environment, and to generate a large amount of data with high temporal and spatial resolution. Hence this protocol will complement existing tools for analysis of neural progenitor mitosis.

  17. Slit and robo expression in the developing mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James M; Thompson, Felisa Y; Brooks, Sherry K; Shannon, John M; Akeson, Ann L

    2004-06-01

    Mammalian lung development is mediated through complex interactions between foregut endoderm and surrounding mesenchyme. As airway branching progresses, the mesenchyme undergoes dramatic remodeling and differentiation. Little is understood about the mechanisms that direct mesenchymal organization during lung development. A screen for candidate genes mediating this process identified Slit, a ligand for the Roundabout (Robo) receptor previously associated with guidance of axonal projections during central nervous system development. Here, we demonstrate by in situ hybridization that two Slit genes (Slit-2 and Slit-3) and two Robo genes (Robo-1 and Robo-2) are expressed in fetal lung mesenchyme. Slit-2 and Robo-1 expression is present throughout mesenchyme at midgestation and is not detectable by newborn day 1. Slit-3 and Robo-2 expression is restricted to specific, complementary subsets of mesenchyme. Robo-2 is expressed in mesenchymal cells immediately adjacent to large airways, whereas Slit-3 expression predominates in mesenchyme remote from airway epithelium. The temporal and spatial distribution of Slit and Robo mRNAs indicate that these genes may direct the functional organization and differentiation of fetal lung mesenchyme.

  18. Development of layer 1 neurons in the mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Yao, Xing-Hua; Fu, Yinghui; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2014-10-01

    Layer 1 of the neocortex harbors a unique group of neurons that play crucial roles in synaptic integration and information processing. Although extensive studies have characterized the properties of layer 1 neurons in the mature neocortex, it remains unclear how these neurons progressively acquire their distinct morphological, neurochemical, and physiological traits. In this study, we systematically examined the dynamic development of Cajal-Retzius cells and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons in layer 1 during the first 2 postnatal weeks. Cajal-Retzius cells underwent morphological degeneration after birth and gradually disappeared from layer 1. The majority of GABAergic interneurons showed clear expression of at least 1 of the 6 distinct neurochemical markers, including Reelin, GABA-A receptor subunit delta (GABAARδ), neuropeptide Y, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), calretinin, and somatostatin from postnatal day 8. Furthermore, according to firing pattern, layer 1 interneurons can be divided into 2 groups: late-spiking (LS) and burst-spiking (BS) neurons. LS neurons preferentially expressed GABAARδ, whereas BS neurons preferentially expressed VIP. Interestingly, both LS and BS neurons exhibited a rapid electrophysiological and morphological development during the first postnatal week. Our results provide new insights into the molecular, morphological, and functional developments of the neurons in layer 1 of the neocortex.

  19. Spatiotemporal Analysis of a Glycolytic Activity Gradient Linked to Mouse Embryo Mesoderm Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Vinay; Prior, Nicole; Snaebjornsson, Marteinn T; Kuehne, Andreas; Sonnen, Katharina F; Kress, Jana; Stein, Frank; Schultz, Carsten; Sauer, Uwe; Aulehla, Alexander

    2017-02-27

    How metabolism is rewired during embryonic development is still largely unknown, as it remains a major technical challenge to resolve metabolic activities or metabolite levels with spatiotemporal resolution. Here, we investigated metabolic changes during development of organogenesis-stage mouse embryos, focusing on the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). We measured glycolytic labeling kinetics from (13)C-glucose tracing experiments and detected elevated glycolysis in the posterior, more undifferentiated PSM. We found evidence that the spatial metabolic differences are functionally relevant during PSM development. To enable real-time quantification of a glycolytic metabolite with spatiotemporal resolution, we generated a pyruvate FRET-sensor reporter mouse line. We revealed dynamic changes in cytosolic pyruvate levels as cells transit toward a more anterior PSM state. Combined, our approach identifies a gradient of glycolytic activity across the PSM, and we provide evidence that these spatiotemporal metabolic changes are intrinsically linked to PSM development and differentiation.

  20. Forebrain activation in REM sleep: an FDG PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, E A; Mintun, M A; Wiseman, M; Kupfer, D J; Moore, R Y

    1997-10-03

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a behavioral state characterized by cerebral cortical activation with dreaming as an associated behavior. The brainstem mechanisms involved in the generation of REM sleep are well-known, but the forebrain mechanisms that might distinguish it from waking are not well understood. We report here a positron emission tomography (PET) study of regional cerebral glucose utilization in the human forebrain during REM sleep in comparison to waking in six healthy adult females using the 18F-deoxyglucose method. In REM sleep, there is relative activation, shown by increased glucose utilization, in phylogenetically old limbic and paralimbic regions which include the lateral hypothalamic area, amygdaloid complex, septal-ventral striatal areas, and infralimbic, prelimbic, orbitofrontal, cingulate, entorhinal and insular cortices. The largest area of activation is a bilateral, confluent paramedian zone which extends from the septal area into ventral striatum, infralimbic, prelimbic, orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex. There are only small and scattered areas of apparent deactivation. These data suggest that an important function of REM sleep is the integration of neocortical function with basal forebrain-hypothalamic motivational and reward mechanisms. This is in accordance with views that alterations in REM sleep in psychiatric disorders, such as depression, may reflect dysregulation in limbic and paralimbic structures.

  1. Basal forebrain thermoregulatory mechanism modulates auto-regulated sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hruda N Mallick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of body temperature and sleep are two physiological mechanisms that are vital for our survival. Interestingly neural structures implicated in both these functions are common. These areas include the medial preoptic area, the lateral preoptic area, the ventrolateral preoptic area, the median preoptic nucleus and the medial septum, which form part of the basal forebrain.When given a choice, rats prefer to stay at an ambient temperature of 270C, though the maximum sleep was observed when they were placed at 300C. Ambient temperature around 270C should be considered as the thermoneutral temperature for rats in all sleep studies. At this temperature the diurnal oscillations of sleep and body temperature are properly expressed. The warm sensitive neurons of the preoptic area mediate the increase in sleep at 300C. Promotion of sleep during the rise in ambient temperature from 270C to 300C, serve a thermoregulatory function. Autonomous thermoregulatory changes in core body temperature and skin temperature could act as an input signal to modulate neuronal activity in sleep-promoting brain areas. The studies presented here show that the neurons of the basal forebrain play a key role in regulating sleep. Basal forebrain thermoregulatory system is a part of the global homeostatic sleep regulatory mechanism, which is auto-regulated.

  2. Effective PCR-based detection of Naegleria fowleri from cultured sample and PAM-developed mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Heekyoung; Seong, Gi-Sang; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Eun; Park, Mi Yeoun; Lee, Won-Ja; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2015-10-01

    Increasing numbers of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis (PAM) cases due to Naegleria fowleri are becoming a serious issue in subtropical and tropical countries as a Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD). To establish a rapid and effective diagnostic tool, a PCR-based detection technique was developed based on previous PCR methods. Four kinds of primer pairs, Nfa1, Nae3, Nf-ITS, and Naegl, were employed in the cultured amoebic trophozoites and a mouse with PAM experimentally developed by N. fowleri inoculation (PAM-mouse). For the extraction of genomic DNA from N. fowleri trophozoites (1×10(6)), simple boiling with 10μl of PBS (pH 7.4) at 100°C for 30min was found to be the most rapid and efficient procedure, allowing amplification of 2.5×10(2) trophozoites using the Nfa-1 primer. The primers Nfa1 and Nae3 amplified only N. fowleri DNA, whereas the ITS primer detected N. fowleri and N. gruberi DNA. Using the PAM-mouse brain tissue, the Nfa1 primer was able to amplify the N. fowleri DNA 4 days post infection with 1ng/μl of genomic DNA being detectable. Using the PAM-mouse CSF, amplification of the N. fowleri DNA with the Nae3 primer was possible 5 days post infection showing a better performance than the Nfa1 primer at day 6.

  3. Expression of dynamin II in odontoblast during mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jong-Hwa; Choi, Baik-Dong; Park, Jin-Ju; Jeong, Soon-Jeong; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Jae-Duk; Lim, Do-Seon; Kim, Byung-Hoon; Cho, Yong-Ick; Jeong, Moon-Jin

    2011-08-01

    Odontoblasts secrete a collagen-based matrix and release numerous membrane-bound matrix vesicles, which are involved in dentin formation during tooth development. Dynamin II is a GTPase protein that contributes a variety of vesicular budding events, such as endocytotic membrane fission, caveolae internalization and protein trafficking in the Golgi apparatus. However, the expression and function of dynamin II in odontoblasts has not been reported. Therefore, this study examined the expression and possible role of dynamin II in odontoblasts during tooth development and mineralization. The levels of mRNA and protein expression in MDPC23 cells were significantly high at the early stages of differentiation and then decreased gradually thereafter. Immunohistochemistry showed that dynamin II was not expressed near the region of the odontoblasts at embryonic day 17 (E17) and E21. However, dynamin II was expressed strongly in the odontoblast layer at postnatal day 1 (PN1) and decreased gradually at PN3 and PN5. In addition, at PN15 in the functional stage, the dynamin II protein was also expressed in the odontoblast process as well as adjacent to the nuclear region. In conclusion, dynamin II may be involved in the transport of vesicles containing collageneous and non-collageneous proteins for dentin formation in odontoblast, suggesting that it is a good nanomolecule as a candidate to regulate the secretion of collagen on the bone and other nano material.

  4. Germline Chd8 haploinsufficiency alters brain development in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gompers, Andrea L; Su-Feher, Linda; Ellegood, Jacob; Copping, Nycole A; Riyadh, M Asrafuzzaman; Stradleigh, Tyler W; Pride, Michael C; Schaffler, Melanie D; Wade, A Ayanna; Catta-Preta, Rinaldo; Zdilar, Iva; Louis, Shreya; Kaushik, Gaurav; Mannion, Brandon J; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Afzal, Veena; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A; Dickel, Diane E; Lerch, Jason P; Crawley, Jacqueline N; Zarbalis, Konstantinos S; Silverman, Jill L; Nord, Alex S

    2017-08-01

    The chromatin remodeling gene CHD8 represents a central node in neurodevelopmental gene networks implicated in autism. We examined the impact of germline heterozygous frameshift Chd8 mutation on neurodevelopment in mice. Chd8(+/del5) mice displayed normal social interactions with no repetitive behaviors but exhibited cognitive impairment correlated with increased regional brain volume, validating that phenotypes of Chd8(+/del5) mice overlap pathology reported in humans with CHD8 mutations. We applied network analysis to characterize neurodevelopmental gene expression, revealing widespread transcriptional changes in Chd8(+/del5) mice across pathways disrupted in neurodevelopmental disorders, including neurogenesis, synaptic processes and neuroimmune signaling. We identified a co-expression module with peak expression in early brain development featuring dysregulation of RNA processing, chromatin remodeling and cell-cycle genes enriched for promoter binding by Chd8, and we validated increased neuronal proliferation and developmental splicing perturbation in Chd8(+/del5) mice. This integrative analysis offers an initial picture of the consequences of Chd8 haploinsufficiency for brain development.

  5. A voltammetric and mathematical analysis of histaminergic modulation of serotonin in the mouse hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Srimal; Abdalla, Aya; Robke, Rhiannon; Nijhout, H Frederik; Reed, Michael C; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2016-08-01

    Histamine and serotonin are neuromodulators which facilitate numerous, diverse neurological functions. Being co-localized in many brain regions, these two neurotransmitters are thought to modulate one another's chemistry and are often implicated in the etiology of disease. Thus, it is desirable to interpret the in vivo chemistry underlying neurotransmission of these two molecules to better define their roles in health and disease. In this work, we describe a voltammetric approach to monitoring serotonin and histamine simultaneously in real time. Via electrical stimulation of the axonal bundles in the medial forebrain bundle, histamine release was evoked in the mouse premammillary nucleus. We found that histamine release was accompanied by a rapid, potent inhibition of serotonin in a concentration-dependent manner. We developed mathematical models to capture the experimental time courses of histamine and serotonin, which necessitated incorporation of an inhibitory receptor on serotonin neurons. We employed pharmacological experiments to verify that this serotonin inhibition was mediated by H3 receptors. Our novel approach provides fundamental mechanistic insights that can be used to examine the full extent of interconnectivity between histamine and serotonin in the brain. Histamine and serotonin are co-implicated in many of the brain's functions. In this paper, we develop a novel voltammetric method for simultaneous real-time monitoring of histamine and serotonin in the mouse premammillary nucleus. Electrical stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle evokes histamine and inhibits serotonin release. We show voltammetrically, mathematically, and pharmacologically that this serotonin inhibition is H3 receptor mediated.

  6. Effect of Clenbuterol Hydrochloride on the in vitro Development of Mouse Embryo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of clenbuterol hydrochloride on the in vitro devel-opment of both 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryos.Methods The cultural systems of both 1-cell and 2-cell mouse embryo were used todetermine the effect of clenbuterol hydrochloride at doses of 1 ng/mL, 3 ng/mL, and10 ng/mL on developmental rates of mouse embryos.Results When 1-cell embryos cultured with 1 ng/mL of clenbuterol hydrochloride,developmental rates from the 4-cell stage to blastocyst stage were significantly lowerthan those in the control group (P< 0. 05), but on dosages of 3 ng/mL and 10ng/mL,the inhibiting effects on embryo development were significantly increased (P< 0. 01).When 2-cell embryos cultured with 1 ng/mL of clenbuterol hydrochloride, obvious dif-ferences in developmental rates were not found between the 2-cell embryo group and thecontrol (P> 0. 05). However, at levels of 3 ng/mL and 10 ng/mL, significant de-crease of developmental rates in 2-cell embryos was observed from the 4-cell and fromthe 8-cell stage, respectively (P< 0. 05). Embryos cultured with clenbuterol hydrochlo-ride appeared to have more granules, fragments and degeneration than those in thecontrol.Conclusion Clenbuterol hydrochloride has a toxic effect on the mouse embryos, and theeffect is in a dose-dependent. 1-cell mouse embryos cultured with clenbuterolhydrochloride could be easily inhibited at 2-cell stage, but the effect of clenbuterolhydrochloride on development of the late 2-cell embryos would be reduced.

  7. Echocardiographic Assessment of Embryonic and Fetal Mouse Heart Development: A Focus on Haemodynamics and Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Hahurij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Heart development is a complex process, and abnormal development may result in congenital heart disease (CHD. Currently, studies on animal models mainly focus on cardiac morphology and the availability of hemodynamic data, especially of the right heart half, is limited. Here we aimed to assess the morphological and hemodynamic parameters of normal developing mouse embryos/fetuses by using a high-frequency ultrasound system. Methods. A timed breeding program was initiated with a WT mouse line (Swiss/129Sv background. All recordings were performed transabdominally, in isoflurane sedated pregnant mice, in hearts of sequential developmental stages: 12.5, 14.5, and 17.5 days after conception (n=105. Results. Along development the heart rate increased significantly from 125 ± 9.5 to 219 ± 8.3 beats per minute. Reliable flow measurements could be performed across the developing mitral and tricuspid valves and outflow tract. M-mode measurements could be obtained of all cardiac compartments. An overall increase of cardiac systolic and diastolic function with embryonic/fetal development was observed. Conclusion. High-frequency echocardiography is a promising and useful imaging modality for structural and hemodynamic analysis of embryonic/fetal mouse hearts.

  8. Local homogeneity of cell cycle length in developing mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, L.; Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the amount of variation in the length of the cell cycle for cells in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium (PVE) of the developing cortex of mice on embryonic day 14. Our measurements were made in three cortical regions (i.e., the neocortex, archicortex, and periarchicortex) using three different methods: the cumulative labeling method (CLM), the percent labeled mitoses (PLM) method, and a comparison of the time needed for the PLM to ascend from 0 to 100% with the time needed for the PLM to descend from 100 to 0%. These 3 different techniques provide different perspectives on the cytokinetic parameters. Theoretically, CLM gives an estimate for a maximum value of the total length of the cell cycle (TC), whereas PLM gives an estimate of a minimum value of TC. The difference between these two estimates indicates that the range for TC is +/-1% of the mean TC for periarchicortex, +/-7% for neocortex, and +/-8% for archicortex. This was confirmed by a lengthening of the PLM descent time in comparison with its ascent time. The sharpness of the transitions and the flatness of the plateau of the PLM curves indicate that 99% of the proliferating cells are within this narrow estimated range for TC; hence, only approximately 1% deviate outside of a relatively restricted range from the average TC of the population. In the context of the possible existence within the cortical PVE of two populations with markedly dissimilar cell cycle kinetics from the mean, one such population must comprise approximately 99% of the total population, and the other, if it exists, is only approximately 1% of the total. This seems to be true for all three cortical regions. The narrow range of TC indicates a homogeneity in the cell cycle length for proliferating cells in three different cortical regions, despite the fact that progenitor cells of different lineages may be present. It further predicts the existence of almost synchronous interkinetic nuclear movements of the

  9. Properties of mouse retinal ganglion cell dendritic growth during postnatal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The property of dendritic growth dynamics during development is a subject of intense interest.Here,we investigated the dendritic motility of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during different developmental stages,using ex vivo mouse retina explant culture,Semliki Forest Virus transfection and time-lapse observations.The results illustrated that during development,the dendritic motility underwent a change from rapid growth to a relatively stable state,i.e.,at P0 (day of birth),RGC dendrites were in a highly active state,whereas at postnatal 13 (P13) they were more stable,and at P3 and P8,the RGCs were in an intermediate state.At any given developmental stage,RGCs of different types displayed the same dendritic growth rate and extent.Since the mouse is the most popular mammalian model for genetic manipulation,this study provided a methodological foundation for further exploring the regulatory mechanisms of dendritic development.

  10. Effect of PMSG/hCG Superovulation on Mouse Embryonic Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bao-jiang; XUE Hong-yan; CHEN Li-ping; DAI Yan-feng; GUO Ji-tong; LI Xi-he

    2013-01-01

    Kunming mouse strain is widely used in China, and the superovulation was administrated with 10 IU PMSG combined with 10 IU hCG. In this study, the effects of the exogenous gonadotropins on superovulation of Kunming mice and embryo quality derived from the superovulated mice were assessed. Female mice at 6-8-wk old were superovulated with 0, 5, 7.5 and 10 IU PMSG/hCG and mated with male mice. The embryos were retrieved at 2.5 d post coitum. No statistic difference was observed for the number of 2-cell embryos collected per mouse between control and 5 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group, but the number significantly increased for 7.5 and 10 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group (P0.05). This indicated that exogenous gonadotropins have no effects on development of Kunming mouse embryos. The quality of blastocyst was assessed by labelling with Hoechst and propidium iodide for inner cell mass and trophectoderm cells, the result showed that ICM/TE ratio significantly decreased for 10 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group compared with control, 5 and 7.5 IU PMSG/hCG treatment group (P<0.05). This suggested that the embryo quality of Kunming mouse has been affected by high dose of gonadotropins.

  11. The first exon duplication mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy: A tool for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulin, Adeline; Wein, Nicolas; Simmons, Tabatha R; Rutherford, Andrea M; Findlay, Andrew R; Yurkoski, Jacqueline A; Kaminoh, Yuuki; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-11-01

    Exon duplication mutations account for up to 11% of all cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and a duplication of exon 2 is the most common duplication in patients. For use as a platform for testing of duplication-specific therapies, we developed a mouse model that carries a Dmd exon 2 duplication. By using homologous recombination we duplicated exon 2 within intron 2 at a location consistent with a human duplication hotspot. mRNA analysis confirms the inclusion of a duplicated exon 2 in mouse muscle. Dystrophin expression is essentially absent by immunofluorescent and immunoblot analysis, although some muscle specimens show very low-level trace dystrophin expression. Phenotypically, the mouse shows similarities to mdx, the standard laboratory model of DMD. In skeletal muscle, areas of necrosis and phagocytosis are seen at 3 weeks, with central nucleation prominent by four weeks, recapitulating the "crisis" period in mdx. Marked diaphragm fibrosis is noted by 6 months, and remains unchanged at 12 months. Our results show that the Dup2 mouse is both pathologically (in degree and distribution) and physiologically similar to mdx. As it recapitulates the most common single exon duplication found in DMD patients, this new model will be a useful tool to assess the potential of duplicated exon skipping.

  12. Basal forebrain degeneration precedes and predicts the cortical spread of Alzheimer's pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Taylor W.; Nathan Spreng, R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Leslie M Shaw; Khachaturian, Zaven

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable debate whether Alzheimer's disease (AD) originates in basal forebrain or entorhinal cortex. Here we examined whether longitudinal decreases in basal forebrain and entorhinal cortex grey matter volume were interdependent and sequential. In a large cohort of age-matched older adults ranging from cognitively normal to AD, we demonstrate that basal forebrain volume predicts longitudinal entorhinal degeneration. Models of parallel degeneration or entorhinal origin received ne...

  13. Computational analysis of the spatial distribution of mitotic spindle angles in mouse developing airway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Nan; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2013-02-01

    Investigating the spatial information of cellular processes in tissues during mouse embryo development is one of the major technical challenges in development biology. Many imaging methods are still limited to the volumes of tissue due to tissue opacity, light scattering and the availability of advanced imaging tools. For analyzing the mitotic spindle angle distribution in developing mouse airway epithelium, we determined spindle angles in mitotic epithelial cells on serial sections of whole airway of mouse embryonic lungs. We then developed a computational image analysis to obtain spindle angle distribution in three dimensional airway reconstructed from the data obtained from all serial sections. From this study, we were able to understand how mitotic spindle angles are distributed in a whole airway tube. This analysis provides a potentially fast, simple and inexpensive alternative method to quantitatively analyze cellular process at subcellular resolution. Furthermore, this analysis is not limited to the size of tissues, which allows to obtain three dimensional and high resolution information of cellular processes in cell populations deeper inside intact organs.

  14. VPS35 regulates developing mouse hippocampal neuronal morphogenesis by promoting retrograde trafficking of BACE1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Lei Wang

    2012-10-01

    VPS35, a major component of the retromer, plays an important role in the selective endosome-to-Golgi retrieval of membrane proteins. Dysfunction of retromer is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders, but its function in developing mouse brain remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence for VPS35 promoting dendritic growth and maturation, and axonal protein transport in developing mouse hippocampal neurons. Embryonic hippocampal CA1 neurons suppressing Vps35 expression by in utero electroporation of its micro RNAs displayed shortened apical dendrites, reduced dendritic spines, and swollen commissural axons in the neonatal stage, those deficits reflecting a defective protein transport/trafficking in developing mouse neurons. Further mechanistic studies showed that Vps35 depletion in neurons resulted in an impaired retrograde trafficking of BACE1 (β1-secretase and altered BACE1 distribution. Suppression of BACE1 expression in CA1 neurons partially rescued both dendritic and axonal deficits induced by Vps35-deficiency. These results thus demonstrate that BACE1 acts as a critical cargo of retromer in vitro and in vivo, and suggest that VPS35 plays an essential role in regulating apical dendritic maturation and in preventing axonal spheroid formation in developing hippocampal neurons.

  15. Expression of Slit and Robo genes in the developing mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medioni, Caroline; Bertrand, Nicolas; Mesbah, Karim; Hudry, Bruno; Dupays, Laurent; Wolstein, Orit; Washkowitz, Andrew J; Papaioannou, Virginia E; Mohun, Timothy J; Harvey, Richard P; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2010-12-01

    Development of the mammalian heart is mediated by complex interactions between myocardial, endocardial, and neural crest-derived cells. Studies in Drosophila have shown that the Slit-Robo signaling pathway controls cardiac cell shape changes and lumen formation of the heart tube. Here, we demonstrate by in situ hybridization that multiple Slit ligands and Robo receptors are expressed in the developing mouse heart. Slit3 is the predominant ligand transcribed in the early mouse heart and is expressed in the ventral wall of the linear heart tube and subsequently in chamber but not in atrioventricular canal myocardium. Furthermore, we identify that the homeobox gene Nkx2-5 is required for early ventral restriction of Slit3 and that the T-box transcription factor Tbx2 mediates repression of Slit3 in nonchamber myocardium. Our results suggest that patterned Slit-Robo signaling may contribute to the control of oriented cell growth during chamber morphogenesis of the mammalian heart.

  16. Limited participation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/2C receptors in the clozapine-induced Fos-protein expression in rat forebrain regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebens, JB; Kuipers, SD; Koch, T; Ter Horst, GJ; Korf, J

    2000-01-01

    Through the development of tolerance following long-term clozapine treatment, we investigated whether 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/2C receptors participate in the clozapine-induced Fos-protein expression in the rat forebrain. Tolerance exists when the acutely increased Fos responses to a challenge dose of the

  17. Developing Novel Automated Apparatus for Studying Battery of Social Behaviors in Mutant Mouse Models for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    S.S., et al., Development of a mouse test for repetitive , restricted behaviors : relevance to autism . Behav Brain Res, 2008. 188(1): p. 178-94. 6...for autism spectrum disorders -in search of biomarkers Q3. Behav. Brain. Res. (2012). 30. Karvat, G. & Kimchi, T. Systematic autistic-like behavioral ...12 4 Introduction Genetic analyses to determine a specific heritable factor underlying susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASD

  18. The morphology and intrinsic excitability of developing mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Qu

    Full Text Available The retinal ganglion cells (RGCs have diverse morphology and physiology. Although some studies show that correlations between morphological properties and physiological properties exist in cat RGCs, these properties are much less distinct and their correlations are unknown in mouse RGCs. In this study, using three-dimensional digital neuron reconstruction, we systematically analyzed twelve morphological parameters of mouse RGCs as they developed in the first four postnatal weeks. The development of these parameters fell into three different patterns and suggested that contact from bipolar cells and eye opening might play important roles in RGC morphological development. Although there has been a general impression that the morphological parameters are not independent, such as RGCs with larger dendritic fields usually have longer but sparser dendrites, there was not systematic study and statistical analysis proving it. We used Pearson's correlation coefficients to determine the relationship among these morphological parameters and demonstrated that many morphological parameters showed high statistical correlation. In the same cells we also measured seven physiological parameters using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, focusing on intrinsic excitability. We previously reported the increase in intrinsic excitability in mouse RGCs during early postnatal development. Here we showed that strong correlations also existed among many physiological parameters that measure the intrinsic excitability. However, Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed very limited correlation across morphological and physiological parameters. In addition, principle component analysis failed to separate RGCs into clusters using combined morphological and physiological parameters. Therefore, despite strong correlations within the morphological parameters and within the physiological parameters, postnatal mouse RGCs had only limited correlation between morphology and

  19. Influence of interferon-gamma on the differentiation of cholinergic neurons in rat embryonic basal forebrain and septal nuclei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanhong Luo; Lin An

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) can make neurons in basal forebrain and septal nuclei differentiate into cholinergic neurons by treating the cells in cerebral cortex of newborn rats, without the inhibition from IFN-γ antibody. The important effect of IFN-γ on the development and differentiation of neurons has been found by some scholars.OBJ ECTIVE:To investigate whether IFN-γ has differentiational effect on cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain and septal nuclei, and make clear that the increased number of cholinergic neurons is resulted by cell differentiation or cell proliferation.DESIGN: Controlled observation trial.SETTING: Department of Cell Biology, Medical School, Beijing University.MATERIALS: Sixty-eight female Wistar rats at embryonic 16 days, weighing 250 to 350 g, were enrolled in this study, and they were provided by the Experimental Animal Center, Medical School, Beijing University.IFN-γ was the product of Gibco Company.METHODS: This study was carried out in the Department of Cell Biology, Medical School, Beijing University and Daheng Image Company of Chinese Academy of Sciences during September 1995 to December 2002.The female Wistar rats at embryonic 16 days were sacrificed, and their fetuses were taken out. Primary culture of the isolated basal forebrain and septal nuclei was performed. The cultured nerve cells were assigned into 3 groups: control group (nothing added), IFN-γ group(1×105 U/L interferon), IFN-γ+ IFN-γ antibody group (1 ×105 U/L IFN-γ± IFN-γ antibody). The specific marker enzyme (choline acetyl transferase) of cholinergic neuron was stained with immunohistochemical method. Choline acetyl transferase positive cells were counted, and 14C-acetyl CoA was used as substrate to detect the activity of choline acetyl transferase, so as to reflect the differentiational effect of IFN-γ on cholinergic neuron in basal forebrain and septal nuclei. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell circle and detect the proliferation of

  20. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

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    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  1. Regulation of embryonic size in early mouse development in vitro culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaki, Tomoka; Kawai, Ikuma; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2014-08-01

    Mammals self-regulate their body size throughout development. In the uterus, embryos are properly regulated to be a specific size at birth. Previously, size and cell number in aggregated embryos, which were made from two or more morulae, and half embryos, which were halved at the 2-cell stage, have been analysed in vivo in preimplantation and post-implantation development in mice. Here, we examined whether or not the mouse embryo has the capacity to self-regulate growth using an in vitro culture system. To elucidate embryonic histology, cells were counted in aggregated or half embryos in comparison with control embryos. Both double- and triple-aggregated embryos contained more cells than did control embryos during all culture periods, and the relative growth ratios showed no growth inhibition in an in vitro culture system. Meanwhile, half embryos contained fewer cells than control embryos, but the number grew throughout the culture period. Our data suggest that the growth of aggregated embryos is not affected and continues in an in vitro culture system. On the other hand, the growth of half embryos accelerates and continues in an in vitro culture system. This situation, in turn, implied that post-implantation mouse embryos might have some potential to regulate their own growth and size as seen by using an in vitro culture system without uterus factors. In conclusion, our results indicated that embryos have some ways in which to regulate their own size in mouse early development.

  2. Functional studies of signaling pathways in peri-implantation development of the mouse embryo by RNAi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Graham

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of gene function in the mouse have relied mainly on gene targeting via homologous recombination. However, this approach is difficult to apply in specific windows of time, and to simultaneously knock-down multiple genes. Here we report an efficient method for dsRNA-mediated gene silencing in late cleavage-stage mouse embryos that permits examination of phenotypes at post-implantation stages. Results We show that introduction of Bmp4 dsRNA into intact blastocysts by electroporation recapitulates the genetic Bmp4 null phenotype at gastrulation. It also reveals a novel role for Bmp4 in the regulation the anterior visceral endoderm specific gene expression and its positioning. We also show that RNAi can be used to simultaneously target several genes. When applied to the three murine isoforms of Dishevelled, it leads to earlier defects than previously observed in double knock-outs. These include severe delays in post-implantation development and defects in the anterior midline and neural folds at headfold stages. Conclusion Our results indicate that the BMP4 signalling pathway contributes to the development of the anterior visceral endoderm, and reveal an early functional redundancy between the products of the murine Dishevelled genes. The proposed approach constitutes a powerful tool to screen the functions of genes that govern the development of the mouse embryo.

  3. Early B lymphocyte development: Similarities and differences in human and mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michiko; Ichii; Kenji; Oritani; Yuzuru; Kanakura

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells through a series of distinct stages. Early B cell development proceeds in bone marrow until immature B cells migrate out to secondary lymphoid tissues, such as a spleen and lymph nodes, after completion of immunoglobulin heavy and light chain rearrangement. Although the information about the regulation by numerous factors, including signaling molecules, transcription factors, epigenetic changes and the microenvironment, could provide the clinical application, our knowledge on human B lymphopoiesis is limited. However, with great methodological advances, significant progress for understanding B lymphopoiesis both in human and mouse has been made. In this review, we summarize the experimental models for studies about human adult B lymphopoiesis, and the role of microenvironment and signaling molecules, such as cytokines, transforming growth factor-β superfamily, Wnt family and Notch family, with point-by-point comparison between human and mouse.

  4. Expression analysis of the entire MMP and TIMP gene families during mouse tissue development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Robert K; Sampieri, Clara L; Pennington, Caroline J; Gill, Sean E; Schultz, Gilbert A; Edwards, Dylan R

    2004-04-09

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs) cleave many extracellular proteins, including matrix, growth factors, and receptors. We profiled the RNA levels of every MMP, several ADAMs, and inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs and RECK) in numerous mouse tissues during development and in the uterus during pregnancy. Observations include: most secreted MMPs are expressed at low to undetectable levels in tissues, whereas membrane-bound MMPs, ADAMs and inhibitors are abundant; almost every proteinase and inhibitor is present in the uterus or placenta at some time during gestation; the mouse collagenases mColA and mColB are found exclusively in the uterus and testis; and each tissue has its unique signature of proteinase and inhibitor expression.

  5. Development of a touch-screen-based paradigm for assessing working memory in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Chuljung; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2015-03-01

    Assessing the working memory of the rodent by using a touch-screen system has several advantages (e.g., allowing highly accurate data collection and flexibility in memory task design). However, there is currently no available testing paradigm utilizing touch-screen systems that can assess working memory in the mouse. In this study, we developed a touch-screen testing paradigm in which mice were trained to choose a location that is matched to a sample location after a time delay. Consistent with previous studies, this study showed that mice could not only learn the rule in the delayed matched to position (DMTP), but also could retain a transitory memory of the sample position during delay. This indicates that a touch-screen system can provide a DMTP testing platform to assess working memory in the mouse.

  6. Visualization of the medial forebrain bundle using diffusion tensor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardian eHana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging is a technique that enables physicians the portrayal of white matter tracts in vivo. We used this technique in order to depict the medial forebrain bundle in 15 consecutive patients between 2012 and 2015. Men and women of all ages were included. There were 6 women and 9 men. The mean age was 58,6 years (39-77. Nine patients were candidates for an eventual deep brain stimulation. Eight of them suffered from Parkinson`s disease and one had multiple sclerosis. The remaining 6 patients suffered from different lesions which were situated in the frontal lobe. These were 2 metastasis, 2 meningiomas, 1 cerebral bleeding and 1 glioblastoma. We used a 3DT1-sequence for the navigation. Furthermore T2- and DTI- sequences were performed. The FOV was 200 x 200 mm², slice thickness 2 mm, and an acquisition matrix of 96 x 96 yielding nearly isotropic voxels of 2 x 2 x 2 mm. 3-Tesla-MRI was carried out strictly axial using 32 gradient directions and one b0-image. We used Echo-Planar-Imaging (EPI and ASSET parallel imaging with an acceleration factor of 2. b-value was 800 s/mm². The maximal angle was 50°. Additional scanning time was less than 9 minutes. We were able to visualize the medial forebrain bundle in 12 of our patients bilaterally and in the remaining 3 patients we depicted the medial forebrain bundle on one side. It was the contralateral side of the lesion. These were 2 meningiomas and one metastasis. Portrayal of the medial forebrain bundle is possible for everyday routine for neurosurgical interventions. As part of the reward circuitry it might be of substantial importance for neurosurgeons during deep brain stimulation in patients with psychiatric disorders. Furthermore it might explain at a certain extent character changes in patients with lesions in the frontal lobe. Surgery in this part of the brain should always take the preservation of this white matter tract into account.

  7. Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Orexin Neurons: Effects on Attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Monda, Vincenzo; Esposito, Maria; Precenzano, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Chieffi, Sergio; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino; Messina, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) cholinergic system has an important role in attentive functions. The cholinergic system can be activated by different inputs, and in particular, by orexin neurons, whose cell bodies are located within the postero-lateral hypothalamus. Recently the orexin-producing neurons have been proved to promote arousal and attention through their projections to the BF. The aim of this review article is to summarize the evidence showing that the orexin system contributes to attentional processing by an increase in cortical acetylcholine release and in cortical neurons activity. PMID:28197081

  8. Loss of all 3 Extended Synaptotagmins does not affect normal mouse development, viability or fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Michel G; Moss, Tom

    2016-09-01

    The extended synaptotagmins, E-Syt1, 2 and 3, are multiple C2 domain membrane proteins that are tethered to the endoplasmic reticulum and interact in a calcium dependent manner with plasma membrane phospholipids to form endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junctions. These junctions have been implicated in the exchange of phospholipids between the 2 organelles. The E-Syts have further been implicated in receptor signaling and endocytosis and can interact directly with fibroblast growth factor and other cell surface receptors. Despite these multiple functions, the search for a requirement in vivo has been elusive. Most recently, we found that the genes for E-Syt2 and 3 could be inactivated without effect on mouse development, viability, fertility or morphology. We have now created insertion and deletion mutations in the last of the mouse E-Syt genes. We show that E-Syt1 is specifically expressed throughout the embryonic skeleton during the early stages of chrondrogenesis in a pattern quite distinct from that of E-Syt2 or 3. Despite this, E-Syt1 is also not required for mouse development and propagation. We further show that even the combined inactivation of all 3 E-Syt genes has no effect on mouse viability or fertility in the laboratory. However, this inactivation induces an enhancement in the expression of the genes encoding Orp5/8, Orai1, STIM1 and TMEM110, endoplasmic reticulum - plasma membrane junction proteins that potentially could compensate for E-Syt loss. Given the multiple functions suggested for the E-Syts and their evolutionary conservation, our unexpected findings suggest that they may only provide a survival advantage under specific conditions that have as yet to be identified.

  9. Treatment of beta amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42)-induced basal forebrain cholinergic damage by a non-classical estrogen signaling activator in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakowsky, Andrea; Potapov, Kyoko; Kim, SooHyun; Peppercorn, Katie; Tate, Warren P.; Ábrahám, István M.

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a loss in cholinergic innervation targets of basal forebrain which has been implicated in substantial cognitive decline. Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ1–42) accumulates in AD that is highly toxic for basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons. Although the gonadal steroid estradiol is neuroprotective, the administration is associated with risk of off-target effects. Previous findings suggested that non-classical estradiol action on intracellular signaling pathways has ameliorative potential without estrogenic side effects. After Aβ1–42 injection into mouse basal forebrain, a single dose of 4-estren-3α, 17β-diol (estren), the non-classical estradiol pathway activator, restored loss of cholinergic cortical projections and also attenuated the Aβ1–42-induced learning deficits. Estren rapidly and directly phosphorylates c-AMP-response–element-binding-protein and extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase-1/2 in BFC neurons and restores the cholinergic fibers via estrogen receptor-α. These findings indicated that selective activation of non-classical intracellular estrogen signaling has a potential to treat the damage of cholinergic neurons in AD. PMID:26879842

  10. Development and Function of the Mouse Vestibular System in the Absence of Gravity Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this research was that the absence of gravity perception, such as would occur in space, would affect the development and function of the vestibular and central nervous systems. Further, we postulated that these effects would be more significant at specific stages of post-natal development of the animal. We also proposed the use of molecular genetic approaches that would provide important information as to the hierarchy of gene function during the development and subsequent function of the vestibular system. The tilted (tlt) mutant mouse has been characterized as lacking the ability to provide sensory input to the gravity receptors. The tlt/tlt mutant mice were a particularly attractive model for the study of vestibular function since the primary defect was limited to the receptor part of the vestibular system, and there were no detectable abnormal phenotypes in other organ systems. The goal of the proposed studies was to assess immediate and delayed effects of the lack of gravity perception on the vestibular system. Particular attention was paid to characterizing primarily affected periods of vestibular morphogenesis, and to identifying downstream genetic pathways that are altered in the CNS of the tlt/tlt mutant mouse. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the postnatal morphogenesis of the CNS in the tlt mutant mouse, using detailed morphometric analysis of isolated vestibular ganglia and brain tissue at different stages of postnatal development and assessment of apoptotic cell death; (2) to examine the expression of selected genes implicated by mutational analysis to be important in vestibular development or function by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry in the mutant mice; and (3) to identify other genes involved in vestibular development and function, using differential cloning strategies to isolate genes whose expression is changed in the mutant versus normal vestibular system.

  11. Rabbit Forebrain cholinergic system : Morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varga, C; Hartig, W; Grosche, J; Luiten, PGM; Seeger, J; Brauer, K; Harkany, T; Härtig, Wolfgang; Keijser, Jan N.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output p

  12. Demonstration of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor-like immunoreactivity in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; Matsuyama, T.; Strosberg, A.D.; Traber, J.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor protein (mAChR) in the rat forebrain and upper brainstem was described by using a monoclonal antibody (M35) raised against mAChR purified from bovine forebrain homogenates. A method is investigated for light microscopic (LM) and electronmicroscop

  13. BCL11B regulates epithelial proliferation and asymmetric development of the mouse mandibular incisor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateryna Kyrylkova

    Full Text Available Mouse incisors grow continuously throughout life with enamel deposition uniquely on the outer, or labial, side of the tooth. Asymmetric enamel deposition is due to the presence of enamel-secreting ameloblasts exclusively within the labial epithelium of the incisor. We have previously shown that mice lacking the transcription factor BCL11B/CTIP2 (BCL11B hereafter exhibit severely disrupted ameloblast formation in the developing incisor. We now report that BCL11B is a key factor controlling epithelial proliferation and overall developmental asymmetry of the mouse incisor: BCL11B is necessary for proliferation of the labial epithelium and development of the epithelial stem cell niche, which gives rise to ameloblasts; conversely, BCL11B suppresses epithelial proliferation, and development of stem cells and ameloblasts on the inner, or lingual, side of the incisor. This bidirectional action of BCL11B in the incisor epithelia appears responsible for the asymmetry of ameloblast localization in developing incisor. Underlying these spatio-specific functions of BCL11B in incisor development is the regulation of a large gene network comprised of genes encoding several members of the FGF and TGFβ superfamilies, Sprouty proteins, and Sonic hedgehog. Our data integrate BCL11B into these pathways during incisor development and reveal the molecular mechanisms that underlie phenotypes of both Bcl11b(-/- and Sprouty mutant mice.

  14. Molecular Diversity of Midbrain Development in Mouse, Human, and Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Manno, Gioele; Gyllborg, Daniel; Codeluppi, Simone; Nishimura, Kaneyasu; Salto, Carmen; Zeisel, Amit; Borm, Lars E; Stott, Simon R W; Toledo, Enrique M; Villaescusa, J Carlos; Lönnerberg, Peter; Ryge, Jesper; Barker, Roger A; Arenas, Ernest; Linnarsson, Sten

    2016-10-06

    Understanding human embryonic ventral midbrain is of major interest for Parkinson's disease. However, the cell types, their gene expression dynamics, and their relationship to commonly used rodent models remain to be defined. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing to examine ventral midbrain development in human and mouse. We found 25 molecularly defined human cell types, including five subtypes of radial glia-like cells and four progenitors. In the mouse, two mature fetal dopaminergic neuron subtypes diversified into five adult classes during postnatal development. Cell types and gene expression were generally conserved across species, but with clear differences in cell proliferation, developmental timing, and dopaminergic neuron development. Additionally, we developed a method to quantitatively assess the fidelity of dopaminergic neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells, at a single-cell level. Thus, our study provides insight into the molecular programs controlling human midbrain development and provides a foundation for the development of cell replacement therapies.

  15. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xu; Chengqi Xin; Qiang Lin; Feng Ding; Wei Gong; Yuanyuan Zhou; Jun Yu; Peng Cui; Songnian Hu

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of reg-ulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regula-tion. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence;Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal develop-ment. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  16. A New Mouse Model That Spontaneously Develops Chronic Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Fransén-Pettersson

    Full Text Available Here we characterize a new animal model that spontaneously develops chronic inflammation and fibrosis in multiple organs, the non-obese diabetic inflammation and fibrosis (N-IF mouse. In the liver, the N-IF mouse displays inflammation and fibrosis particularly evident around portal tracts and central veins and accompanied with evidence of abnormal intrahepatic bile ducts. The extensive cellular infiltration consists mainly of macrophages, granulocytes, particularly eosinophils, and mast cells. This inflammatory syndrome is mediated by a transgenic population of natural killer T cells (NKT induced in an immunodeficient NOD genetic background. The disease is transferrable to immunodeficient recipients, while polyclonal T cells from unaffected syngeneic donors can inhibit the disease phenotype. Because of the fibrotic component, early on-set, spontaneous nature and reproducibility, this novel mouse model provides a unique tool to gain further insight into the underlying mechanisms mediating transformation of chronic inflammation into fibrosis and to evaluate intervention protocols for treating conditions of fibrotic disorders.

  17. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

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    Satoshi Ohtsuka

    Full Text Available Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  18. Connectome and Maturation Profiles of the Developing Mouse Brain Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalhalikar, Madhura; Parker, Drew; Ghanbari, Yasser; Smith, Alex; Hua, Kegang; Mori, Susumu; Abel, Ted; Davatzikos, Christos; Verma, Ragini

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive effort to establish a structural mouse connectome using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging coupled with connectivity analysis tools. This work lays the foundation for imaging-based structural connectomics of the mouse brain, potentially facilitating a whole-brain network analysis to quantify brain changes in connectivity during development, as well as deviations from it related to genetic effects. A connectomic trajectory of maturation during postnatal ages 2-80 days is presented in the C57BL/6J mouse strain, using a whole-brain connectivity analysis, followed by investigations based on local and global network features. The global network measures of density, global efficiency, and modularity demonstrated a nonlinear relationship with age. The regional network metrics, namely degree and local efficiency, displayed a differential change in the major subcortical structures such as the thalamus and hippocampus, and cortical regions such as visual and motor cortex. Finally, the connectomes were used to derive an index of "brain connectivity index," which demonstrated a high correlation (r = 0.95) with the chronological age, indicating that brain connectivity is a good marker of normal age progression, hence valuable in detecting subtle deviations from normality caused by genetic, environmental, or pharmacological manipulations.

  19. Gpr177/mouse Wntless is essential for Wnt-mediated craniofacial and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jiang; Ivy Yu, Hsiao-Man; Maruyama, Takamitsu; Mirando, Anthony J; Hsu, Wei

    2011-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Gpr177, the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wls/Evi/Srt, is required for establishment of the anterior-posterior axis. The Gpr177 null phenotype is highly reminiscent to the loss of Wnt3, the earliest abnormality among all Wnt knockouts in mice. The expression of Gpr177 in various cell types and tissues lead us to hypothesize that reciprocal regulation of Wnt and Gpr177 is essential for the Wnt-dependent developmental and pathogenic processes. Here, we create a new mouse strain permitting conditional inactivation of Gpr177. The loss of Gpr177 in the Wnt1-expressing cells causes mid/hindbrain and craniofacial defects which are far more severe than the Wnt1 knockout, but resemble the double knockout of Wnt1 and Wnt3a as well as β-catenin deletion in the Wnt1-expressing cells. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Gpr177 in Wnt1-mediated development of the mouse embryo, suggesting an overlapping function of Wnt family members in the Wnt1-expressing cells.

  20. E-cadherin promotes incorporation of mouse epiblast stem cells into normal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Nishikawa-Torikai, Satomi; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mouse epiblast stem cells (mEpiSCs) are pluripotent stem cells derived from epiblasts of postimplantation mouse embryos. Their pluripotency is distinct from that of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) in several cell biological criteria. One of the distinctions is that mEpiSCs contribute either not at all or at much lower efficiency to chimeric embryos after blastocyst injection compared to mESCs. However, here we showed that mEpiSCs can be incorporated into normal development after blastocyst injection by forced expression of the E-cadherin transgene for 2 days in culture. Using this strategy, mEpiSCs gave rise to live-born chimeras from 5% of the manipulated blastocysts. There were no obvious signs of reprogramming of mEpiSCs toward the mESC-like state during the 2 days after induction of the E-cadherin transgene, suggesting that mEpiSCs possess latent ability to integrate into the normal developmental process as its origin, epiblasts.

  1. Diversity of human and mouse homeobox gene expression in development and adult tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunwell, Thomas L; Holland, Peter W H

    2016-11-03

    Homeobox genes encode a diverse set of transcription factors implicated in a vast range of biological processes including, but not limited to, embryonic cell fate specification and patterning. Although numerous studies report expression of particular sets of homeobox genes, a systematic analysis of the tissue specificity of homeobox genes is lacking. Here we analyse publicly-available transcriptome data from human and mouse developmental stages, and adult human tissues, to identify groups of homeobox genes with similar expression patterns. We calculate expression profiles for 242 human and 278 mouse homeobox loci across a combination of 59 human and 12 mouse adult tissues, early and late developmental stages. This revealed 20 human homeobox genes with widespread expression, primarily from the TALE, CERS and ZF classes. Most homeobox genes, however, have greater tissue-specificity, allowing us to compile homeobox gene expression lists for neural tissues, immune tissues, reproductive and developmental samples, and for numerous organ systems. In mouse development, we propose four distinct phases of homeobox gene expression: oocyte to zygote; 2-cell; 4-cell to blastocyst; early to mid post-implantation. The final phase change is marked by expression of ANTP class genes. We also use these data to compare expression specificity between evolutionarily-based gene classes, revealing that ANTP, PRD, LIM and POU homeobox gene classes have highest tissue specificity while HNF, TALE, CUT and CERS are most widely expressed. The homeobox genes comprise a large superclass and their expression patterns are correspondingly diverse, although in a broad sense related to an evolutionarily-based classification. The ubiquitous expression of some genes suggests roles in general cellular processes; in contrast, most human homeobox genes have greater tissue specificity and we compile useful homeobox datasets for particular tissues, organs and developmental stages. The identification of a

  2. Cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of Marfan syndrome develops into two distinctive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jin; Petrashevskaya, Natalia; Marshall, Shannon; Krawczyk, Melissa; Talan, Mark

    2016-01-15

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a systemic disorder of connective tissue caused by mutations in fibrillin-1. Cardiac dysfunction in MFS has not been characterized halting the development of therapies of cardiac complication in MFS. We aimed to study the age-dependent cardiac remodeling in the mouse model of MFS FbnC1039G+/- mouse [Marfan heterozygous (HT) mouse] and its association with valvular regurgitation. Marfan HT mice of 2-4 mo demonstrated a mild hypertrophic cardiac remodeling with predominant decline of diastolic function and increased transforming growth factor-β canonical (p-SMAD2/3) and noncanonical (p-ERK1/2 and p-p38 MAPK) signaling and upregulation of hypertrophic markers natriuretic peptides atrium natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide. Among older HT mice (6-14 mo), cardiac remodeling was associated with two distinct phenotypes, manifesting either dilated or constricted left ventricular chamber. Dilatation of left ventricular chamber was accompanied by biochemical evidence of greater mechanical stress, including elevated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation and higher brain natriuretic peptide expression. The aortic valve regurgitation was registered in 20% of the constricted group and 60% of the dilated group, whereas mitral insufficiency was observed in 40% of the constricted group and 100% of the dilated group. Cardiac dysfunction was not associated with the increase of interstitial fibrosis and nonmyocyte proliferation. In the mouse model fibrillin-1, haploinsufficiency results in the early onset of nonfibrotic hypertrophic cardiac remodeling and dysfunction, independently from valvular abnormalities. MFS heart is vulnerable to stress-induced cardiac dilatation in the face of valvular regurgitation, and stress-activated MAPK signals represent a potential target for cardiac management in MFS.

  3. Estradiol selectively enhances auditory function in avian forebrain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caras, Melissa L; O'Brien, Matthew; Brenowitz, Eliot A; Rubel, Edwin W

    2012-12-01

    Sex steroids modulate vertebrate sensory processing, but the impact of circulating hormone levels on forebrain function remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that circulating sex steroids modulate single-unit responses in the avian telencephalic auditory nucleus, field L. We mimicked breeding or nonbreeding conditions by manipulating plasma 17β-estradiol levels in wild-caught female Gambel's white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii). Extracellular responses of single neurons to tones and conspecific songs presented over a range of intensities revealed that estradiol selectively enhanced auditory function in cells that exhibited monotonic rate level functions to pure tones. In these cells, estradiol treatment increased spontaneous and maximum evoked firing rates, increased pure tone response strengths and sensitivity, and expanded the range of intensities over which conspecific song stimuli elicited significant responses. Estradiol did not significantly alter the sensitivity or dynamic ranges of cells that exhibited non-monotonic rate level functions. Notably, there was a robust correlation between plasma estradiol concentrations in individual birds and physiological response properties in monotonic, but not non-monotonic neurons. These findings demonstrate that functionally distinct classes of anatomically overlapping forebrain neurons are differentially regulated by sex steroid hormones in a dose-dependent manner.

  4. The mouse anterior chamber angle and trabecular meshwork develop without cell death

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    Zabaleta Adriana

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The iridocorneal angle forms in the mammalian eye from undifferentiated mesenchyme between the root of the iris and cornea. A major component is the trabecular meshwork, consisting of extracellular matrix organized into a network of beams, covered in trabecular endothelial cells. Between the beams, channels lead to Schlemm's canal for the drainage of aqueous humor from the eye into the blood stream. Abnormal development of the iridocorneal angle that interferes with ocular fluid drainage can lead to glaucoma in humans. Little is known about the precise mechanisms underlying angle development. There are two main hypotheses. The first proposes that morphogenesis involves mainly cell differentiation, matrix deposition and assembly of the originally continuous mesenchymal mass into beams, channels and Schlemm's canal. The second, based primarily on rat studies, proposes that cell death and macrophages play an important role in forming channels and beams. Mice provide a potentially useful model to understand the origin and development of angle structures and how defective development leads to glaucoma. Few studies have assessed the normal structure and development of the mouse angle. We used light and electron microscopy and a cell death assay to define the sequence of events underlying formation of the angle structures in mice. Results The mouse angle structures and developmental sequence are similar to those in humans. Cell death was not detectable during the period of trabecular channel and beam formation. Conclusions These results support morphogenic mechanisms involving organization of cellular and extracellular matrix components without cell death or atrophy.

  5. Analysis of Presenilin 1 and 2 interacting proteins in mouse cerebral cortex during development.

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    Kumar, Ashish; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    In our previous report, we showed that Presenilin (PS)1 and 2 have differential expression profile from early embryonic stages till adulthood in mouse cerebral cortex, suggesting that both of these proteins are crucial for brain development. Genetic manipulation studies have also shown the involvement of PS1 in brain development, but PS2 remains largely unexplored. In order to understand how PS1 and 2 mediate developmental functions, we have investigated the interaction of PS1 and 2 with proteins of mouse cerebral cortex during development. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) combined with MALDI-MS/MS analysis revealed 12 interacting partners of PS1 and 11 partners of PS2. The interacting proteins were different for PS1 and 2, and involved in cell division, glycolysis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. Densitometric analysis of protein bands visualized after SDS-PAGE separation of Co-IP proteins revealed variation in their amount and degree of interaction during different developmental stages of mice. Further, immunoblot based validation of PS1 interacting protein Notch-1 showed maximum interaction at embryonic day (E) 12.5, decline at E18.5, upregulation from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P20 and thereafter reduction at P45 and 20 weeks. In-silico analysis of PS and its interacting proteins indicated conformation based interaction through common type of secondary structures having alpha helical, extended beta strand and random coil, and CK2, PKC phosphorylation and myristoylation motifs. Taken together, our study showed that PS1 and PS2 interact to varying extent with different proteins of mouse cerebral cortex and suggests their interaction based on specific conformation and involvement in diverse functions essential for the brain development.

  6. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

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    Wei Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy, 59,257,530 (adolescence and 72,729,636 (adulthood reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  7. Adolescent mouse takes on an active transcriptomic expression during postnatal cerebral development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axonrepulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. Copyright © 2014. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Adolescent Mouse Takes on An Active Transcriptomic Expression During Postnatal Cerebral Development

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axon. repulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum. © 2014 .

  9. Alpha-1 antitrypsin protein and gene therapies decrease autoimmunity and delay arthritis development in mouse model

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    Atkinson Mark A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT is a multi-functional protein that has anti-inflammatory and tissue protective properties. We previously reported that human AAT (hAAT gene therapy prevented autoimmune diabetes in non-obese diabetic (NOD mice and suppressed arthritis development in combination with doxycycline in mice. In the present study we investigated the feasibility of hAAT monotherapy for the treatment of chronic arthritis in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Methods DBA/1 mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen (bCII to induce arthritis. These mice were pretreated either with hAAT protein or with recombinant adeno-associated virus vector expressing hAAT (rAAV-hAAT. Control groups received saline injections. Arthritis development was evaluated by prevalence of arthritis and arthritic index. Serum levels of B-cell activating factor of the TNF-α family (BAFF, antibodies against both bovine (bCII and mouse collagen II (mCII were tested by ELISA. Results Human AAT protein therapy as well as recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV8-mediated hAAT gene therapy significantly delayed onset and ameliorated disease development of arthritis in CIA mouse model. Importantly, hAAT therapies significantly reduced serum levels of BAFF and autoantibodies against bCII and mCII, suggesting that the effects are mediated via B-cells, at least partially. Conclusion These results present a new drug for arthritis therapy. Human AAT protein and gene therapies are able to ameliorate and delay arthritis development and reduce autoimmunity, indicating promising potential of these therapies as a new treatment strategy for RA.

  10. Cholinergic basal forebrain structures are involved in the mediation of the arousal effect of noradrenaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelkes, Zoltán; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Stenberg, Dag

    2013-12-01

    Cholinergic basal forebrain structures are implicated in cortical arousal and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Cholinergic neurones are innervated by noradrenergic terminals, noradrenaline excites them via alpha-1 receptors and microinjection of noradrenaline into the basal forebrain enhances wakefulness. However, it is not known to what extent the cholinergic versus non-cholinergic basal forebrain projection neurones contribute to the arousing effects of noradrenaline. To elucidate the roles of cholinergic basal forebrain structures we administered methoxamine, an alpha-1-adrenergic agonist into the basal forebrain, in intact animals and again after selective destruction of the basal forebrain cholinergic cells by 192 IgG-saporin. In eight male Han-Wistar rats implanted with electroencephalogram/electromyogram electrodes, a microdialysis probe targeted into the basal forebrain was perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid for 6 h on a baseline day, and with cerebrospinal fluid in the first and with methoxamine in the second 3-h period of the subsequent day. The sleep-wake activity was recorded for 24 h on both days. Saporin was then injected into the basal forebrain and 2 weeks later the same experimental schedule (with cerebrospinal fluid and methoxamine) was repeated. In the intact animals, methoxamine exhibited a robust arousing effect and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and REM sleep was suppressed. Lesioning of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurones abolished almost completely the NREM sleep-suppressing effect of methoxamine, whereas the REM sleep-suppressing effect remained intact. Thus, the basal forebrain cholinergic neurones mediate, at least in part, cortical arousal and non-REM sleep-suppression, but they are not involved in the REM sleep-suppressing effects of noradrenaline. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging and micro-computed tomography combined atlas of developing and adult mouse brains for stereotaxic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, M; Zhang, J; Miller, M I; Sidman, R L; Mori, S

    2009-09-15

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: postnatal day (P) 7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140-P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo magnetic resonance imaging adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains.

  12. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Micro-Computed Tomography Combined Atlas of Developing and Adult Mouse Brains for Stereotaxic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Manisha; Zhang, Jiangyang; Miller, Michael I.; Sidman, Richard L.; Mori, Susumu

    2009-01-01

    Stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are important in neuroscience research for targeting of specific internal brain structures during surgical operations. The effectiveness of stereotaxic surgery depends on accurate mapping of the brain structures relative to landmarks on the skull. During postnatal development in the mouse, rapid growth-related changes in the brain occur concurrently with growth of bony plates at the cranial sutures, therefore adult mouse brain atlases cannot be used to precisely guide stereotaxis in developing brains. In this study, three-dimensional stereotaxic atlases of C57BL/6J mouse brains at six postnatal developmental stages: P7, P14, P21, P28, P63 and in adults (P140–P160) were developed, using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and micro-computed tomography (CT). At present, most widely-used stereotaxic atlases of the mouse brain are based on histology, but the anatomical fidelity of ex vivo atlases to in vivo mouse brains has not been evaluated previously. To account for ex vivo tissue distortion due to fixation as well as individual variability in the brain, we developed a population-averaged in vivo MRI adult mouse brain stereotaxic atlas, and a distortion-corrected DTI atlas was generated by nonlinearly warping ex vivo data to the population-averaged in vivo atlas. These atlas resources were developed and made available through a new software user-interface with the objective of improving the accuracy of targeting brain structures during stereotaxic surgery in developing and adult C57BL/6J mouse brains. PMID:19490934

  13. Shh and Gli3 regulate formation of the telencephalic-diencephalic junction and suppress an isthmus-like signaling source in the forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rash, Brian G; Grove, Elizabeth A

    2011-11-15

    In human holoprosencephaly (HPE), the forebrain does not separate fully into two hemispheres. Further, the border between the telencephalon and diencephalon, the telencephalic/diencephalic junction (TDJ), is often indistinct, and the ventricular system can be blocked at the third ventricle, creating a forebrain 'holosphere'. Mice deficient in Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) have previously been described to show HPE and associated cyclopia. Here we report that the third ventricle is blocked in Shh null mutants, similar to human HPE, and that characteristic telencephalic and diencephalic signaling centers, the cortical hem and zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI), are merged, obliterating the TDJ. The resulting forebrain holosphere comprises Foxg1-positive telencephalic- and Foxg1-negative diencephalic territories. Loss of one functional copy of Gli3 in Shh nulls rescues ventricular collapse and substantially restores the TDJ. Characteristic regional gene expression patterns are rescued on the telencephalic side of the TDJ but not in the diencephalon. Further analysis of compound Shh;Gli3 mutants revealed an unexpected type of signaling center deregulation. In Shh;Gli3 mutants, adjacent rings of Fgf8 and Wnt3a expression are induced in the diencephalon at the ZLI, reminiscent of the Fgf8/Wnt1-expressing isthmic organizer. Neither Shh nor Gli3 single mutants show this forebrain double ring of Fgf/Wnt expression; thus both Shh and Gli3 are independently required to suppress it. Adjacent tissue is not respecified to a midbrain/hindbrain fate, but shows overgrowth, consistent with ectopic mitogen expression. Our observations indicate that the separation of the telencephalon and diencephalon depends on interactions between Shh and Gli3, and, moreover, demonstrate that both Shh and Gli3 suppress a potential Fgf/Wnt signaling source in the forebrain. That optional signaling centers are actively repressed in normal development is a striking new insight into the processes of vertebrate

  14. Role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis:learning from mouse models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Su; Min Jin; Lin Chen

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)/fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling plays essential roles in bone development and diseases. Missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs in humans can cause various congenital bone diseases, including chondrodysplasia syndromes, craniosynostosis syndromes and syndromes with dysregulated phosphate metabolism. FGF/FGFR signaling is also an important pathway involved in the maintenance of adult bone homeostasis. Multiple kinds of mouse models, mimicking human skeleton diseases caused by missense mutations in FGFs and FGFRs, have been established by knock-in/out and transgenic technologies. These genetically modified mice provide good models for studying the role of FGF/FGFR signaling in skeleton development and homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the mouse models of FGF signaling-related skeleton diseases and recent progresses regarding the molecular mechanisms, underlying the role of FGFs/FGFRs in the regulation of bone development and homeostasis. This review also provides a perspective view on future works to explore the roles of FGF signaling in skeletal development and homeostasis.

  15. Temporal and spatial expression pattern of Nnat during mouse eye development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sel, Saadettin; Patzel, Eva; Poggi, Lucia; Kaiser, Delia; Kalinski, Thomas; Schicht, Martin; Paulsen, Friedrich; Nass, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Neuronatin (Nnat) was initially identified as a highly expressed gene in neonatal mammalian brain. In this study, we analyze the spatial and temporal expression pattern of Nnat during mouse eye development as well as in the adult. The expression of Nnat was analyzed on mRNA as well as protein level. The presence of Nnat transcripts in the adult retina was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Nnat protein expression was evaluated by Western blot and immunohistochemistry during eye development at embryonic day (E) 12, 15, 16 and postnatal day (P) 7, 14, 30 and 175 (adult). Immunohistochemical studies of the developing mouse eye revealed Nnat expression in embryonic and adult neuroretina as well as in corneal epithelial, stromal, endothelial cells and in lens epithelium. Expression of Nnat was detected from E12 onwards and was also present in adult eyes. The expression pattern suggests that Nnat may play an important role during eye development and in the maintenance of mature eye. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Near-infrared laser irradiation improves the development of mouse pre-implantation embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoo, Masaki; Mori, Miho

    2017-05-27

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of near-infrared laser irradiation on the in vitro development of mouse embryos. Female ICR mice were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), and mated with male mice. Two-cell stage embryos were collected 40 h after administering hCG and cultured in M16 medium. Two-cell embryos (0 h after culture), 8-cell embryos (approx. 30 h after culture), morula (approx. 48 h after culture), and blastocysts (approx. 73 h after culture) were irradiated at 904 nm for 60 s. These embryos were cultured in a time-lapse monitoring system and the timing of blastocyst hatching was evaluated. Some of the irradiated blastocysts were transferred to the uterine horns of pseudopregnant recipients immediately after irradiation. Pregnancy rates, and offspring growth and fertility, were evaluated. Near-infrared laser irradiation increased the speed of in vitro mouse embryo development. In irradiated blastocysts, hatching was faster than in control (non-irradiated) blastocysts (18.4 vs. 28.2 h, P infrared laser irradiation improves the quality of mouse embryo development in vitro, and increases the live birth rate without affecting the normality of the offspring. Thus, the near-infrared laser method may enhance the quality of embryos and contribute to improvements in reproductive technologies in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase: expression pattern during testicular development in mouse and evolutionary conservation in spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayernia, Karim; Diaconu, Mihaela; Aumüller, Gerhard; Wennemuth, Gunther; Schwandt, Iris; Kleene, Kenneth; Kuehn, Hartmut; Engel, Wolfgang

    2004-04-01

    Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPx) is a selenoprotein belonging to the family of glutathione peroxidases and has been implicated in antioxidative defense and spermatogenesis. PHGPx accounts for almost the entire selenium content of mammalian testis. In an attempt to verify the expression pattern of PHGPx, testes of mouse mutants with arrest at different stages of germ cell development and testes of mice at different ages were subjected to immunostaining with a monoclonal anti-PHGPx antibody. PHGPx was detected in Leydig cells of testes in all developmental stages. In the seminiferous tubuli, the PHGPx staining was first observed in testes of 21-day-old mice which is correlated with the appearance of the first spermatids. This result was confirmed when the testes of mutant mice with defined arrest of germ cell development were used. An immunostaining was observed in the seminiferous tubuli of olt/olt and qk/qk mice which show an arrest at spermatid differentiation. In Western blot analysis of proteins extracted from testes of mutant mice and from developing testes, two signals at 19- and 22-kDa were observed which confirm the existence of two PHGPx forms in testicular cells. In mouse spermatozoa, a subcellular localization of PHGPx and sperm mitochondria-associated cysteine-rich protein (SMCP) was demonstrated, indicating the localization of PHGPx in mitochondria of spermatozoa midpiece. For verifying the midpiece localization of PHGPx in other species, spermatozoa of Drosophila melanogaster, frog, fish, cock, mouse, rat, pig, bull, and human were used in immunostaining using anti-PHGPx antibody. A localization of PHGPx was found in the midpiece of spermatozoa in all species examined. In electronmicroscopical analysis, PHGPx signals were found in the mitochondria of midpiece. These results indicate a conserved crucial role of PHGPx during sperm function and male fertility.

  18. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

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    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  19. A brain-specific gene cluster isolated from the region of the mouse obesity locus is expressed in the adult hypothalamus and during mouse development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laig-Webster, M.; Lim, M.E.; Chehab, F.F. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The molecular defect underlying an autosomal recessive form of genetic obesity in a classical mouse model C57 BL/6J-ob/ob has not yet been elucidated. Whereas metabolic and physiological disturbances such as diabetes and hypertension are associated with obesity, the site of expression and the nature of the primary lesion responsible for this cascade of events remains elusive. Our efforts aimed at the positional cloning of the ob gene by YAC contig mapping and gene identification have resulted in the cloning of a brain-specific gene cluster from the ob critical region. The expression of this gene cluster is remarkably complex owing to the multitude of brain-specific mRNA transcripts detected on Northern blots. cDNA cloning of these transcripts suggests that they are expressed from different genes as well as by alternate splicing mechanisms. Furthermore, the genomic organization of the cluster appears to consist of at least two identical promoters displaying CpG islands characteristic of housekeeping genes, yet clearly involving tissue-specific expression. Sense and anti-sense synthetic RNA probes were derived from a common DNA sequence on 3 cDNA clones and hybridized to 8-16 days mouse embryonic stages and mouse adult brain sections. Expression in development was noticeable as of the 11th day of gestation and confined to the central nervous system mainly in the telencephalon and spinal cord. Coronal and sagittal sections of the adult mouse brain showed expression only in 3 different regions of the brain stem. In situ hybridization to mouse hypothalamus sections revealed the presence of a localized and specialized group of cells expressing high levels of mRNA, suggesting that this gene cluster may also be involved in the regulation of hypothalamic activities. The hypothalamus has long been hypothesized as a primary candidate tissue for the expression of the obesity gene mainly because of its well-established role in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake.

  20. Effects of Placental Isoferritin on the Mouse Embryo Development in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ying; WU Chaoying; SUN Yongyu

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of placental isoferritin (PLF) on mouse embryo development in vitro, mice 2-cell embryos were co-cultured with human first trimester decidual cells at different concentrations of PLF in vitro. The following changes of the above system were observed under an invert microscope and the number of embryos were recorded and the embryos were classified. The results showed there was no significant difference in the percentage of embryos development to 4-cell,8-cell and morula (P>0.05). PLF at the doses of 10 and 100 U/mL significantly enhanced more em-bryos development to the blastocyst and hatching blastocyst (P0.05). It was concluded that PLF at the concentration of 10--100 U/mL had no significant effects on the early development of mice embryos, however, PLF could promote the growth, differentiation, and hatching of preimplantion blastocysts.

  1. Development of syngeneic monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies to mouse monoclonal anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai M

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-idiotype antibodies (Ab2 play an important role in the homeostasis of immune responses and are related to the development and the disease activity of certain autoimmune diseases. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is considered one of the target antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune chronic active hepatitis (AIH. We previously developed a mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 8D7 which recognizes rat and human ASGPR. In this study, to help investigate the anti-ASGPR antibody-anti-idiotype antibody network in patients with AIH, we developed a syngeneic mouse monoclonal Ab2 to the 8D7 anti-ASGPR antibody (Ab1. One clone, designated as 3C8, tested positive for specific reactivity to 8D7-Ab1 and did not bind to other irrelevant immunoglobulins. By competitive inhibition assays, the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to liver membrane extracts, i.e., the crude antigen preparation, was inhibited by 3C8-Ab2 in a dose-dependent manner, and the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to 3C8-Ab2 was inhibited by the liver membrane extracts. In the immunohistochemical analysis, 3C8-Ab2 blocked the specific staining of sinusoidal margins of rat hepatocytes by 8D7-Ab1. These results suggest that 3C8 anti-idiotype antibody recognizes the specific idiotypic determinants within the antigen-binding site of 8D7-Ab1.

  2. Spatiotemporal expression of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN during mouse tooth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu; Li, Lingyun; Wang, Ding; Li, Shu; Chen, Zhi; An, Zhengwen

    2016-06-01

    Caveolin-1 is a scaffolding protein involved in the formation of cholesterol-rich caveolae lipid rafts within the plasma membrane and is capable of collecting signaling molecules into the caveolae and regulating their activity, including extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN). However, detailed expression patterns of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN in the developing dental germ are largely unknown. The present study investigated the expression patterns of caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN in the developing mouse tooth germ by immunohistochemistry and real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the bud stage, caveolin-1 expression was initiated in the epithelium bud and mesenchymal cells, while EMMPRIN was weakly expressed at this stage. At the cap stage, caveolin-1 protein was located in the lingual part of the tooth germ; however, EMMPRIN protein was located in the labial part. From the bell stage to 2 days postnatal, caveolin-1 expression was detected in the ameloblasts and cervical loop area; with EMMPRIN expression in the ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction results showed that both caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN mRNA levels increased gradually with progression of developmental stages, and peaked at day two postnatal. The current finding suggests that both caveolin-1 and EMMPRIN take part in mouse tooth development, especially in the differentiation and organization of odontogenic tissues.

  3. Loss of ATF2 function leads to cranial motoneuron degeneration during embryonic mouse development.

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    Julien Ackermann

    Full Text Available The AP-1 family transcription factor ATF2 is essential for development and tissue maintenance in mammals. In particular, ATF2 is highly expressed and activated in the brain and previous studies using mouse knockouts have confirmed its requirement in the cerebellum as well as in vestibular sense organs. Here we present the analysis of the requirement for ATF2 in CNS development in mouse embryos, specifically in the brainstem. We discovered that neuron-specific inactivation of ATF2 leads to significant loss of motoneurons of the hypoglossal, abducens and facial nuclei. While the generation of ATF2 mutant motoneurons appears normal during early development, they undergo caspase-dependent and independent cell death during later embryonic and foetal stages. The loss of these motoneurons correlates with increased levels of stress activated MAP kinases, JNK and p38, as well as aberrant accumulation of phosphorylated neurofilament proteins, NF-H and NF-M, known substrates for these kinases. This, together with other neuropathological phenotypes, including aberrant vacuolisation and lipid accumulation, indicates that deficiency in ATF2 leads to neurodegeneration of subsets of somatic and visceral motoneurons of the brainstem. It also confirms that ATF2 has a critical role in limiting the activities of stress kinases JNK and p38 which are potent inducers of cell death in the CNS.

  4. Cytotoxic Effects of 2-Bromopropane on Embryonic Development in Mouse Blastocysts

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    Wen-Hsiung Chan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available 2-Bromopropane (2-BP, an alternative to ozone-depleting solvents, is used as a cleaning solvent. Here, we examined the cytotoxic effects of 2-bromopropane (2-BP on mouse embryos at the blastocyst stage, subsequent embryonic attachment and outgrowth in vitro, and in vivo implantation via embryo transfer. Mouse blastocysts were incubated in medium with or without 2-BP (2.5, 5 or 10 μM for 24 h. Cell proliferation and growth were investigated with dual differential staining, apoptosis was analyzed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL analysis, and implantation and post-implantation development of embryos were assessed using in vitro development analysis and in vivo embryo transfer, respectively. Blastocysts treated with 5 or 10 μM 2-BP displayed significantly increased apoptosis, and decreased inner cell mass (ICM and trophectoderm (TE cell number. Additionally, the implantation success rates of 2-BP-pretreated blastocysts were lower than those of untreated controls. In vitro treatment with 5 or 10 μM 2-BP was associated with increased resorption of postimplantation embryos, and decreased placental and fetal weights. Our results collectively indicate that in vitro exposure to 2-BP induces apoptosis, suppresses implantation rates after transfer to host mice, and retards early postimplantation development.

  5. Aquaporin 5 distribution pattern during development of the mouse sublingual salivary gland.

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    Aure, Marit H; Larsen, Helga S; Ruus, Ann-Kristin; Galtung, Hilde K

    2011-10-01

    Aquaporin 5 (AQP5) is important in salivary fluid secretion, and has been found in acinar cells of salivary glands in several species. Recently, studies have shown the AQP5 transcript and protein expression patterns as well as the temporal-spatial protein distribution during development of the mouse submandibular salivary gland. The AQP5 distribution pattern of the closely located sublingual gland (SLG) is, however, not well known. Thus, in this study, the Aqp5 RNA expression pattern and the temporal-spatial distribution of AQP5 protein in prenatal development and in adult mouse SLG was investigated. SLGs from embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) to 18.5 and postnatal days 0 (P0), 25, and 60 were examined using real time PCR and immunohistochemistry. The Aqp5 transcript was detected from E13.5 and was found to increase towards birth and in young adults. The protein was first detected in a scattered pattern in the canalicular stage and became more organized in the luminal membrane of the acinar cells towards birth. During all postnatal developmental stages studied, AQP5 was localized in the luminal and lateral membrane of acinar cells. AQP5 was also detected in the intercalated duct and additional apical membrane staining in the entire intralobular duct was found in the terminal bud stage. These results indicate that AQP5 plays a role during embryonic salivary gland development.

  6. Effect of mouse nerve growth factor on brain development in premature infants

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    Yi Ban; Zhong-He Wan

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of application of mouse nerve growth factor in neonatal period on brain development in premature infants.Methods:A total of 37 cases of premature infants given birth in our hospital from 1st January, 2015 to 30th December, 2015 were selected as research subjects and divided into observation group (n=18) and control group (n=19) according to different ways of intervention. Control group didn’t receive exogenous drugs, observation group received mouse nerve growth factor (NGF) treatment in neonatal period, and then differences in results of brain magnetic resonance imaging, electroencephalogram, brainstem auditory evoked potential, scores of Gesell developmental scale, levels of NSE, S-100β, 8-OHdG and 8-I-PGF2α and levels of TLR-4, TNF-α, IL-18 and so on of two groups after intervention were compared.Results:Proportions of normal MRI, EEG and BAEP of observation group were higher than those of control group, and proportions of severely abnormal were significantly lower than those of control group; scores of Gesell developmental scale motor, adaptive behavior, language and social skills of observation group in 3 months and 6 months of corrected gestational age were higher than those of control group; serum NSE, S-100β, 8-OHdG and 8-I-PGF2α levels of observation group after 3 months and 6 months of corrected gestational age were lower than those of control group ; serum TLR-4, TNF-α, IL-18, NF-κB and MMP-9 levels of observation group after 6 months of corrected gestational age were lower than those of control group, and levels of EGF and SOD were higher than those of control group.Conclusion: Application of mouse nerve growth factor in neonatal period of premature infants helps to promote nerve cell growth and development and optimize brain function of premature infants, and it has active clinical significance.

  7. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model.

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    Martínez-García, Cristina; Izquierdo, Adriana; Velagapudi, Vidya; Vivas, Yurena; Velasco, Ismael; Campbell, Mark; Burling, Keith; Cava, Fernando; Ros, Manuel; Oresic, Matej; Vidal-Puig, Antonio; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD) through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2) knockout (KO) mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27(Kip1) expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice.

  8. Accelerated renal disease is associated with the development of metabolic syndrome in a glucolipotoxic mouse model

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    Cristina Martínez-García

    2012-09-01

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome are at high risk of developing chronic kidney disease (CKD through unclear pathogenic mechanisms. Obesity and diabetes are known to induce glucolipotoxic effects in metabolically relevant organs. However, the pathogenic role of glucolipotoxicity in the aetiology of diabetic nephropathy is debated. We generated a murine model, the POKO mouse, obtained by crossing the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARγ2 knockout (KO mouse into a genetically obese ob/ob background. We have previously shown that the POKO mice showed: hyperphagia, insulin resistance, hyperglycaemia and dyslipidaemia as early as 4 weeks of age, and developed a complete loss of normal β-cell function by 16 weeks of age. Metabolic phenotyping of the POKO model has led to investigation of the structural and functional changes in the kidney and changes in blood pressure in these mice. Here we demonstrate that the POKO mouse is a model of renal disease that is accelerated by high levels of glucose and lipid accumulation. Similar to ob/ob mice, at 4 weeks of age these animals exhibited an increased urinary albumin:creatinine ratio and significantly increased blood pressure, but in contrast showed a significant increase in the renal hypertrophy index and an associated increase in p27Kip1 expression compared with their obese littermates. Moreover, at 4 weeks of age POKO mice showed insulin resistance, an alteration of lipid metabolism and glomeruli damage associated with increased transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ and parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP expression. At this age, levels of proinflammatory molecules, such as monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and fibrotic factors were also increased at the glomerular level compared with levels in ob/ob mice. At 12 weeks of age, renal damage was fully established. These data suggest an accelerated lesion through glucolipotoxic effects in the renal pathogenesis in POKO mice.

  9. Low cost labeling with highlighter ink efficiently visualizes developing blood vessels in avian and mouse embryos.

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    Takase, Yuta; Tadokoro, Ryosuke; Takahashi, Yoshiko

    2013-12-01

    To understand how blood vessels form to establish the intricate network during vertebrate development, it is helpful if one can visualize the vasculature in embryos. We here describe a novel labeling method using highlighter ink, easily obtained in stationery stores with a low cost, to visualize embryo-wide vasculatures in avian and mice. We tested 50 different highlighters for fluorescent microscopy with filter sets equipped in a standard fluorescent microscope. The yellow and violet inks yielded fluorescent signals specifically detected by the filters used for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) detections, respectively. When the ink solution was infused into chicken/quail and mouse embryos, vasculatures including large vessels and capillaries were labeled both in living and fixed embryos. Ink-infused embryos were further subjected to histological sections, and double stained with antibodies including QH-1 (quail), α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), and PECAM-1 (mouse), revealing that the endothelial cells were specifically labeled by the infused highlighter ink. Highlighter-labeled signals were detected with a resolution comparable to or higher than signals of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-lectin and Rhodamine-dextran, conventionally used for angiography. Furthermore, macroconfocal microscopic analyses with ink-infused embryos visualized fine vascular structures of both embryo proper and extra-embryonic plexus in a Z-stack image of 2400 μm thick with a markedly high resolution. Together, the low cost highlighter ink serves as an alternative reagent useful for visualization of blood vessels in developing avian and mouse embryos and possibly in other animals.

  10. EXPRESSION OF PCNA, AKP AND ACP DURING DEVELOPMENT OF MOUSE FORE STOMACH CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hong-xu; KONG Xiang-hui; LI Chun-mei; LIU Dan-dan; XING Wen-hui; HU Ping; XU Cun-shuan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To find out the relationship of the expressions of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (proliferating cell nuclear antigen, PCNA), alkaline phosphotase (alkaline phosphotase, AKP) and acid phosphotase (acid phosphotase, ACP) with the development of mouse fore stomach cancerization. Methods: The animal models, including the various stages during the development of NIH mouse fore stomach carcinoma, were made by N-Nitrososarcosineethylester (N-Nitrososarcosineethylester, NSEE). The mice were sacrificed on the 14th, 28th, 42nd, 56th, 70th and 84th days respectively after mice were irrigated with NSEE. The fore stomach was taken out and dissected. The methods of histopathology, immunohistochemistry and isoenzyme electrophoresis were adopted to study the dynamic changes of cell shape and expression of PCNA, AKP and ACP. Results: On the 42nd and 56th days after NSEE treatment, the expression of PCNA increased gradually along with the cancerization. Comparing with the control, there were significant differences (P<0.05). On the 70th and 84th days, the expression of PCNA increased further (compared with the control P<0.01). The activity of AKP increased gradually along with the cancerization. On the 14th, 28th, 42nd and 56th days, there were significant differences (P<0.05); on the 70th and 84th days, the activity of AKP increased further (P<0.01). The activity of ACP also increased on the 14th, 28th, 42nd and 56th days, and there were significant differences on the 70th days (P<0.05) and on the 84th days (P<0.01) compared with the control. Conclusion: During the carcinogenesis of NIH mouse fore stomach, the expressions of PCNA, AKP and ACP increased gradually and were consisted with the changes of cell shapes.

  11. Expression of 14-3-3 protein isoforms in mouse oocytes, eggs and ovarian follicular development

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    De Santanu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 14-3-3 (YWHA proteins are a highly conserved, ubiquitously expressed family of proteins. Seven mammalian isoforms of 14-3-3 are known (β, γ, ε, ζ, η, τ and, σ. These proteins associate with many intracellular proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes including regulation of the cell cycle, metabolism and protein trafficking. We are particularly interested in the role of 14-3-3 in meiosis in mammalian eggs and the role 14-3-3 proteins may play in ovarian function. Therefore, we examined the expression of 14-3-3 proteins in mouse oocyte and egg extracts by Western blotting after polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, viewed fixed cells by indirect immunofluorescence, and examined mouse ovarian cells by immunohistochemical staining to study the expression of the different 14-3-3 isoforms. Results We have determined that all of the mammalian 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in mouse eggs and ovarian follicular cells including oocytes. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of isolated oocytes and eggs confirmed the presence of all of the isoforms with characteristic differences in some of their intracellular localizations. For example, some isoforms (β, ε, γ, and ζ are expressed more prominently in peripheral cytoplasm compared to the germinal vesicles in oocytes, but are uniformly dispersed within eggs. On the other hand, 14-3-3η is diffusely dispersed in the oocyte, but attains a uniform punctate distribution in the egg with marked accumulation in the region of the meiotic spindle apparatus. Immunohistochemical staining detected all isoforms within ovarian follicles, with some similarities as well as notable differences in relative amounts, localizations and patterns of expression in multiple cell types at various stages of follicular development. Conclusions We found that mouse oocytes, eggs and follicular cells within the ovary express all seven isoforms of the 14-3-3 protein. Examination of the

  12. Use of somatic mutations to quantify random contributions to mouse development

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    Zhou Wenyu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The C. elegans cell fate map, in which the lineage of its approximately 1000 cells is visibly charted beginning from the zygote, represents a developmental biology milestone. Nematode development is invariant from one specimen to the next, whereas in mammals, aspects of development are probabilistic, and development exhibits variation between even genetically identical individuals. Consequently, a single defined cell fate map applicable to all individuals cannot exist. Results To determine the extent to which patterns of cell lineage are conserved between different mice, we have employed the recently developed method of “phylogenetic fate mapping” to compare cell fate maps in siblings. In this approach, somatic mutations arising in individual cells are used to retrospectively deduce lineage relationships through phylogenetic and—as newly investigated here—related analytical approaches based on genetic distance. We have cataloged genomic mutations at an average of 110 mutation-prone polyguanine (polyG tracts for about 100 cells clonally isolated from various corresponding tissues of each of two littermates of a hypermutable mouse strain. Conclusions We find that during mouse development, muscle and fat arise from a mixed progenitor cell pool in the germ layer, but, contrastingly, vascular endothelium in brain derives from a smaller source of progenitor cells. Additionally, formation of tissue primordia is marked by establishment of left and right lateral compartments, with restricted cell migration between divisions. We quantitatively demonstrate that development represents a combination of stochastic and deterministic events, offering insight into how chance influences normal development and may give rise to birth defects.

  13. Sequential Shh expression in the development of the mouse upper functional incisor.

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    Hovorakova, Maria; Smrckova, Lucie; Lesot, Herve; Lochovska, Katerina; Peterka, Miroslav; Peterkova, Renata

    2013-11-01

    The mouse incisor is a frequently used model in studies of the molecular control of organ development. The appropriate interpretation of data on normogenesis is essential for understanding the data obtained in mutant mice. For this reason, we performed a very detailed investigation of the development of the upper incisor in wild-type mice from embryonic day (ED) 11.5 till 14.5. A combination of histology, whole mount in situ hybridization, computer-aided three-dimensional reconstructions, and fluorescent microscopy, has been used. Several sonic hedgehog (Shh) expression domains have been detected in the upper incisor region during early prenatal development. At ED11.5-13.5, there was a single Shh positive domain present in the anterior part of left or right upper jaw arches, corresponding to the epithelial thickening. More posteriorly, a new Shh expression domain appeared in the incisor bud in the developmentally more advanced ED13.5 embryos. At ED14.5, only this posterior Shh expression in the incisor germ remained detectable. This study brings new insights into the early development of the upper incisor in mice and completes the data on normal mouse incisor development. The temporal-spatial pattern of Shh expression reflects the development of two tooth generations, being detectable in two successive, antero-posteriorly located areas in the prospective incisor region in the upper jaw. The first, anterior and superficial Shh expression domain reflects the rudimentary tooth development suppressed during evolution. Only the subsequent, posterior and deeper Shh expression region, appearing at ED13.5, correlates with the prospective upper functional incisor in wild-type mice.

  14. Deep sequencing analysis of the developing mouse brain reveals a novel microRNA

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    Piltz Sandra

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that can exert multilevel inhibition/repression at a post-transcriptional or protein synthesis level during disease or development. Characterisation of miRNAs in adult mammalian brains by deep sequencing has been reported previously. However, to date, no small RNA profiling of the developing brain has been undertaken using this method. We have performed deep sequencing and small RNA analysis of a developing (E15.5 mouse brain. Results We identified the expression of 294 known miRNAs in the E15.5 developing mouse brain, which were mostly represented by let-7 family and other brain-specific miRNAs such as miR-9 and miR-124. We also discovered 4 putative 22-23 nt miRNAs: mm_br_e15_1181, mm_br_e15_279920, mm_br_e15_96719 and mm_br_e15_294354 each with a 70-76 nt predicted pre-miRNA. We validated the 4 putative miRNAs and further characterised one of them, mm_br_e15_1181, throughout embryogenesis. Mm_br_e15_1181 biogenesis was Dicer1-dependent and was expressed in E3.5 blastocysts and E7 whole embryos. Embryo-wide expression patterns were observed at E9.5 and E11.5 followed by a near complete loss of expression by E13.5, with expression restricted to a specialised layer of cells within the developing and early postnatal brain. Mm_br_e15_1181 was upregulated during neurodifferentiation of P19 teratocarcinoma cells. This novel miRNA has been identified as miR-3099. Conclusions We have generated and analysed the first deep sequencing dataset of small RNA sequences of the developing mouse brain. The analysis revealed a novel miRNA, miR-3099, with potential regulatory effects on early embryogenesis, and involvement in neuronal cell differentiation/function in the brain during late embryonic and early neonatal development.

  15. Overview of Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Breast Cancer Used in Translational Biology and Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenow, Kirsty R; Smalley, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous condition with no single standard of treatment and no definitive method for determining whether a tumor will respond to therapy. The development of murine models that faithfully mimic specific human breast cancer subtypes is critical for the development of patient-specific treatments. While the artificial nature of traditional in vivo xenograft models used to characterize novel anticancer treatments has limited clinical predictive value, the development of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) makes it possible to study the therapeutic responses in an intact microenvironment. GEMMs have proven to be an experimentally tractable platform for evaluating the efficacy of novel therapeutic combinations and for defining the mechanisms of acquired resistance. Described in this overview are several of the more popular breast cancer GEMMs, including details on their value in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of this disorder.

  16. Immunodeficient mouse model for human hematopoietic stem cell engraftment and immune system development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryee, Ken-Edwin; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Immunodeficient mice engrafted with human immune systems provide an exciting model to study human immunobiology in an in vivo setting without placing patients at risk. The essential parameter for creation of these "humanized models" is engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) that will allow for optimal development of human immune systems. However, there are a number of strategies to generate humanized mice and specific protocols can vary significantly among different laboratories. Here we describe a protocol for the co-implantation of human HSC with autologous fetal liver and thymic tissues into immunodeficient mice to create a humanized model with optimal human T cell development. This model, often referred to as the Thy/Liv or BLT (bone marrow, liver, thymus) mouse, develops a functional human immune system, including HLA-restricted human T cells, B cells, and innate immune cells.

  17. Intracerebral inoculation of mouse-passaged Saffold virus type 3 affects cerebellar development in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Osamu; Suzuki, Tadaki; Yokoyama, Masaru; Iwata-Yoshikawa, Naoko; Nakajima, Noriko; Sato, Hironori; Hasegawa, Hideki; Taguchi, Fumihiro; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Noriyo

    2016-08-31

    Saffold virus (SAFV), a human cardiovirus, is occasionally detected in infants with neurological disorders, including meningitis and cerebellitis. We recently reported that SAFV type 3 isolates infect cerebellar glial cells, but not large neurons, in mice. However, the impact of this infection remained unclear. Here, we determined the neuropathogenesis of SAFV type 3 in the cerebella of neonatal ddY mice using SAFV passaged in the cerebellum of neonatal BALB/c mice. The virus titer in the cerebellum increased following inoculation of each of five passaged strains. The fifth passaged strain harbored amino acid substitutions in the VP2 (H160R and Q239R) and VP3 (K62M) capsid proteins. Molecular modeling of the capsid proteins suggested that the VP2-H160R and VP3-K62M mutations alter the structural dynamics of the receptor binding surface via formation of a novel hydrophobic interaction between the VP2 puff B and VP3 knob regions. When compared with the original strain, the passaged strain showed altered growth characteristics in human-derived astroglial cell lines and higher replication in the brains of neonatal mice. In addition, the passaged strain was more neurovirulent than the original strain, while both strains infected astroglial and neural progenitor cells in the mouse brain. Intracerebral inoculation of either the original or passaged strain affected brain Purkinje cell dendrites, and a high titer of the passaged strain induced cerebellar hypoplasia in neonatal mice. Thus, infection by mouse-passaged SAFV affected cerebellar development in neonatal mice. This animal model contributes to the understanding of the neuropathogenicity of SAFV infections in infants. Saffold virus (SAFV) is a candidate neuropathogenic agent in infants and children, but the neuropathogenicity of the virus has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we evaluated the pathogenicity of two clinical SAFV isolates in mice. Similar to other neurotropic picornaviruses, these isolates showed

  18. Localization of extracellular matrix components in developing mouse salivary glands by confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in developing organisms is well established. Proteoglycans and interstitial collagens are required for the growth, morphogenesis, and differentiation of epithelial organs and the distribution of these molecules has been described. However, much less is known about other ECM macromolecules in developing epithelial organs. We used confocal microscopy to examine the distribution of laminin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, fibronectin, and collagen types I, IV, and V, in mouse embryonic salivary glands. Organ rudiments were isolated from gestational day 13 mouse embryos and cultured for 24, 48, or 72 hours. Whole mounts were stained by indirect immunofluorescence and then examined using a Zeiss Laser Scan Microscope. We found that each ECM component examined had a distinct distribution and that the distribution of some molecules varied with culture time. Laminin was mainly restricted to the basement membrane. BM-1 proteoglycan was concentrated in the basement membrane and also formed a fine network throughout the mesenchyme. Type IV collagen was mainly located in the basement membrane of the epithelium, but it was also present throughout the mesenchyme. Type V collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at 24 hours, but at 48 hours was principally located in the basement membrane. Type I collagen was distributed throughout the mesenchyme at all culture times, and accumulated in the clefts and particularly at the epithelial-mesenchymal interface as time in culture increased. Fibronectin was observed throughout the mesenchyme at all times.

  19. Defective craniofacial development and brain function in a mouse model for depletion of intracellular inositol synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Murata, Takuya; Watanabe, Akiko; Hida, Akiko; Ohba, Hisako; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Mishima, Kazuo; Gondo, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2014-04-11

    myo-Inositol is an essential biomolecule that is synthesized by myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) from inositol monophosphate species. The enzymatic activity of IMPase is inhibited by lithium, a drug used for the treatment of mood swings seen in bipolar disorder. Therefore, myo-inositol is thought to have an important role in the mechanism of bipolar disorder, although the details remain elusive. We screened an ethyl nitrosourea mutant mouse library for IMPase gene (Impa) mutations and identified an Impa1 T95K missense mutation. The mutant protein possessed undetectable enzymatic activity. Homozygotes died perinatally, and E18.5 embryos exhibited striking developmental defects, including hypoplasia of the mandible and asymmetric fusion of ribs to the sternum. Perinatal lethality and morphological defects in homozygotes were rescued by dietary myo-inositol. Rescued homozygotes raised on normal drinking water after weaning exhibited a hyper-locomotive trait and prolonged circadian periods, as reported in rodents treated with lithium. Our mice should be advantageous, compared with those generated by the conventional gene knock-out strategy, because they carry minimal genomic damage, e.g. a point mutation. In conclusion, our results reveal critical roles for intracellular myo-inositol synthesis in craniofacial development and the maintenance of proper brain function. Furthermore, this mouse model for cellular inositol depletion could be beneficial for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical effect of lithium and myo-inositol-mediated skeletal development.

  20. Defective Craniofacial Development and Brain Function in a Mouse Model for Depletion of Intracellular Inositol Synthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Murata, Takuya; Watanabe, Akiko; Hida, Akiko; Ohba, Hisako; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Mishima, Kazuo; Gondo, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2014-01-01

    myo-Inositol is an essential biomolecule that is synthesized by myo-inositol monophosphatase (IMPase) from inositol monophosphate species. The enzymatic activity of IMPase is inhibited by lithium, a drug used for the treatment of mood swings seen in bipolar disorder. Therefore, myo-inositol is thought to have an important role in the mechanism of bipolar disorder, although the details remain elusive. We screened an ethyl nitrosourea mutant mouse library for IMPase gene (Impa) mutations and identified an Impa1 T95K missense mutation. The mutant protein possessed undetectable enzymatic activity. Homozygotes died perinatally, and E18.5 embryos exhibited striking developmental defects, including hypoplasia of the mandible and asymmetric fusion of ribs to the sternum. Perinatal lethality and morphological defects in homozygotes were rescued by dietary myo-inositol. Rescued homozygotes raised on normal drinking water after weaning exhibited a hyper-locomotive trait and prolonged circadian periods, as reported in rodents treated with lithium. Our mice should be advantageous, compared with those generated by the conventional gene knock-out strategy, because they carry minimal genomic damage, e.g. a point mutation. In conclusion, our results reveal critical roles for intracellular myo-inositol synthesis in craniofacial development and the maintenance of proper brain function. Furthermore, this mouse model for cellular inositol depletion could be beneficial for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical effect of lithium and myo-inositol-mediated skeletal development. PMID:24554717

  1. Expressional changes in cerebrovascular receptors after experimental transient forebrain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sara; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Edvinsson, Lars

    2012-01-01

    of vasoconstrictive endothelin and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors in cerebral arteries. Experimental transient forebrain ischemia of varying durations was induced in male wistar rats, followed by reperfusion for 48 hours. Neurological function was assessed daily by three different tests and cerebrovascular expression......Global ischemic stroke is one of the most prominent consequences of cardiac arrest, since the diminished blood flow to the brain results in cell damage and sometimes permanently impaired neurological function. The post-arrest period is often characterised by cerebral hypoperfusion due to subacute...... the insult, a phenomenon that leads to increased contraction of cerebral arteries, reduced perfusion of the affected area and worsened ischemic damage. Based on these findings, the aim of the present study was to investigate if transient global cerebral ischemia is associated with upregulation...

  2. Effects of Mifepristone (RU486) on Development and Ultrastructure of Mouse Blastocysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin LIU; Zi-neng WANG; Wei-jie ZHU

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate effects of mifepristone (MP) on the development and ultrastructure of mouse blastocysts in vivoMethods Sixty female mice were equally divided into 4 groups: control group (group A), 1.9 mg/kg MP group (group B), 5.6 mg/kg MP group (group C), and 16.8 mg/kg MP group (group D). The female mice of 4 groups undertook a superovulation method.The development of obtained blastocysts was evaluated, and ultrastructural changes of the blastocysts were observed by transmission electron microscope.Results In comparison with group A, the development rate of blastocysts in group B showed no difference (P>0.05), while the development rate of blastocysts in both group C and group D was significantly lower (P<0. 05). With doses of 5.6 mg/kg and 16.8 mg/kg, the blastocysts showed granular appearance of the cytoplasm, irregular cell borders, enlarged perivitelline space and degeneration. Ultrastructure of the blastocysts in group B was similar to group A, except a little number of fat droplets in the cytoplasm. In group C, the microvilli on apical surface was decreased in number or even disappeared, mitochondria were under developed, a lot of filamentous crystals were found tn the cytoplasm. Cellular junctions were defected. In group D, the blastocyst cells were irregular in shape, mitochondria were frequently vacuolated, the nucleolus was enlarged, nuclear membrane was ruptured, and chromatin was slack.Conclusion MP could damage to the ultrastructure of mouse blastocyst, and was responsible for the inhibition of blastocyst development. The inhibitory effect of MP would be in a dose-dependent fashion.

  3. Development of a mouse model of abdominal cutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction.

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    Daniel John Womac

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Autologous tissue transfer, in addition to replacing tissue that was lost during injury or surgery, offers women an excellent option to improve cosmetic appearance and self-confidence following mastectomy due to breast cancer. However, flap necrosis is a complication in obese patients undergoing this procedure. We created a mouse model to study the flap-related complications that leads to decreased flap survival in autologous breast reconstruction. METHODS: Left superficial inferior epigastric (SIE pedicle abdominal-cutaneous flaps were elevated in 8 week-old, obese ob/ob male mice and their lean littermates. Flaps were followed by serial photography. Area of flap necrosis was measured at 7 days. Statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: Necrosis was observed at the distal margin of the flaps, in both lean and obese groups. Lean left SIE flaps (n = 8 had a total area flap necrosis of 9.1% at 7 days whereas obese left SIE flaps (n = 8 had a total area flap necrosis of 45.5% at 7 days. Obese flaps had a statistically significant increase in necrosis compared to the lean flaps, p = 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant difference between flap survival in lean and obese SIE pedicle flaps in our mouse model. We have developed the first flap model of obesity utilizing the superficial epigastric pedicle in the mouse. This model is optimal for future studies to dissect out mechanisms that lead to the complications related to flap survival for breast reconstruction, especially in obese subjects.

  4. MrgX Is Not Essential for Cell Growth and Development in the Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Kaoru; Matzuk, Martin M.; Pereira-Smith, Olivia M.

    2005-01-01

    MRGX is one of the members of MORF4/MRG family of transcriptional regulators, which are involved in cell growth regulation and cellular senescence. We have shown that MRGX and MRG15 associate with Rb in nucleoprotein complexes and regulate B-myb promoter activity. To elucidate the functions of MRGX and to explore its potential role in modulating cell growth in vivo, we have generated MrgX-deficient mice. Characterization of the expression pattern of mouse MrgX demonstrated it was ubiquitously expressed in all tissues of adult mice and also during embryogenesis and overlapped with its homolog Mrg15. MRGX and MRG15 proteins localize predominantly to the chromatin fraction in the nucleus, although a small amount of both proteins localized to the nuclear matrix. Whereas disruption of Mrg15 results in embryonic lethality, absence of MrgX did not impair mouse development and MrgX null mice are healthy and fertile. MrgX-deficient and wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) also had similar growth rates and showed no differences in cell cycle-related gene expression in response to serum stimulation. Mrg15 expression in MrgX-deficient tissues and MEFs was not upregulated compared with wild-type tissues and MEFs. MRG15 is highly conserved with orthologs present from humans to yeast and is essential for survival of mice. In contrast, MRGX, which evolved later, is expressed only in vertebrates, suggesting that the lack of phenotype of MrgX-deficient mice is secondary to a compensatory effect by the evolutionarily conserved MRG15 protein but not vice versa. PMID:15923606

  5. p120 Catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas.

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    Hendley, Audrey M; Provost, Elayne; Bailey, Jennifer M; Wang, Yue J; Cleveland, Megan H; Blake, Danielle; Bittman, Ross W; Roeser, Jeffrey C; Maitra, Anirban; Reynolds, Albert B; Leach, Steven D

    2015-03-01

    The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120(f/f) pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in the adult and developing mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Tuhina; Verma, Amrisha; Li, Qiuhong

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence that a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) exists in the retina and plays an important role in retinal neurovascular function. We have recently shown that increased expression of ACE2 and angiotensin (1-7) [Ang (1-7)], two components of the protective axis of the RAS, in the retina via adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery, conferred protection against diabetes-induced retinopathy. We hypothesized that the protective molecular and cellular mechanisms of Ang (1-7) are mediated by its receptor, Mas, and the expression level and cellular localization dictate the response to Ang (1-7) and activation of subsequent protective signaling pathways. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and cellular localization of the Mas receptor in adult and developing mouse retinas. The cellular localization of the Mas receptor protein was determined with immunofluorescence of the eyes of adult and postnatal day 1 (P1), P5, P7, P15, and P21 mice using the Mas receptor-specific antibody, and mRNA was detected with in situ hybridization of paraffin-embedded sections. Western blotting and real-time reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR analysis were performed to determine the relative levels of the Mas protein and mRNA in adult and developing retinas, as well as in cultured retinal Müller glial and RPE cells. In the adult eye, the Mas receptor protein was abundantly present in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and photoreceptor cells; a lower level of expression was observed in endothelial cells, Müller glial cells, and other neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina. In the developing retina, Mas receptor mRNA and protein expression was detected in the inner retina at P1, and the expression levels increased with age to reach the adult level and pattern by P15. In the adult mouse retina, Mas receptor mRNA was expressed at a much higher level when compared to angiotensin II (Ang II) type I (AT1R) and type II (AT2R) receptor m

  7. The structure of the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) ovary during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hułas, M; Gawron, A

    2002-01-01

    The study presents the structure of the ovaries of the spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) during the first months of life. The ovaries in neonate females exhibit a large number of primordial and primary follicles, sometimes clustered in nests. The growing follicles were also observed within the ovary at that period. The first, early antral follicles appeared in the ovary during the second week of life. In the group of 60-day old females, the structure of the ovaries was characterized by a significant increase in the connective tissue elements. Moreover, ovarian follicles at various stages of development were observed, except for the antral ones with cumulus oophorus. The first mature follicles were identified in 3-month old females. In the ovarian follicles, apoptosis occurs at all stages of follicle development, especially in the early antral follicles. In the atretic follicles, apoptotic cells were identified in the layer of granulosa cells.

  8. Rapamycin Influences the Efficiency of Fertilization and Development in the Mouse: A Role for Autophagic Activation

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    Geun-Kyung Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR regulates cellular processes such as cell growth, metabolism, transcription, translation, and autophagy. Rapamycin is a selective inhibitor of mTOR, and induces autophagy in various systems. Autophagy contributes to clearance and recycling of macromolecules and organelles in response to stress. We previously reported that vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes show acute increases in autophagy during warming, and suggested that it is a natural response to cold stress. In this follow-up study, we examined whether the modulation of autophagy influences survival, fertilization, and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed mouse oocytes. We used rapamycin to enhance autophagy in metaphase II (MII oocytes before and after vitrification. The oocytes were then subjected to in vitro fertilization (IVF. The fertilization and developmental rates of vitrified-warmed oocytes after rapamycin treatment were significantly lower than those for control groups. Modulation of autophagy with rapamycin treatment shows that rapamycin-induced autophagy exerts a negative influence on fertilization and development of vitrified-warmed oocytes.

  9. The mouse fidgetin gene defines a new role for AAA family proteins in mammalian development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G A; Mahaffey, C L; Nystuen, A; Letts, V A; Frankel, W N

    2000-10-01

    The mouse mutation fidget arose spontaneously in a heterogeneous albino stock. This mutant mouse is characterized by a side-to-side head-shaking and circling behaviour, due to reduced or absent semicircular canals. Fidget mice also have small eyes, associated with cell-cycle delay and insufficient growth of the retinal neural epithelium, and lower penetrance skeletal abnormalities, including pelvic girdle dysgenesis, skull bone fusions and polydactyly. By positional cloning, we found the gene mutated in fidget mice, fidgetin (Fign), which encodes a new member of the 'meiotic' or subfamily-7 (SF7; ref. 7) group of ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities (AAA proteins). We also discovered two closely related mammalian genes. AAA proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate a variety of functions, including membrane fusion, proteolysis, peroxisome biogenesis, endosome sorting and meiotic spindle formation, but functions for the SF7 AAA proteins are largely unknown. Fidgetin is the first mutant AAA protein found in a mammalian developmental mutant, thus defining a new role for these proteins in embryonic development.

  10. Uterine Activin-Like Kinase 4 Regulates Trophoblast Development During Mouse Placentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jia; Fullerton, Paul T; Monsivais, Diana; Clementi, Caterina; Su, Gloria H; Matzuk, Martin M

    2015-12-01

    The placenta is the first organ to develop after fertilization. It forms an interface between the maternal uterus and growing fetus to allow nutrient uptake, waste elimination, and gas exchange for a successful pregnancy in both mice and humans. In the past 2 decades, in vivo and in vitro approaches have been used to show that several members of the TGF-β superfamily regulate embryo implantation and placental development. Nodal, a TGF-β superfamily ligand, is essential for mesendoderm formation and left-right axis patterning during embryogenesis, and Nodal null mutants exhibit abnormal placental organization with expansion of trophoblast giant cells and a decrease of spongiotrophoblast and labyrinth. To better understand the importance of Nodal signaling in the uterus, we established a mouse model to conditionally ablate activin-like kinase 4 (ALK4; the Nodal type 1 receptor) using Cre recombinase driven by the progesterone receptor promoter sequences (Pgr-Cre). Alk4 conditional knockout females are subfertile due to placental abnormalities and fetal loss in pregnancy, with a placental disorganization phenotype similar to what is observed in Nodal null mice. Thus, Nodal likely functions as an indirect regulator of placental development by binding to type 1 and type 2 receptors on maternal decidual cells to stimulate expression of unknown regulators of placental development. Our findings not only describe the generation of a mouse model that enables study of Nodal signaling in placentation but also provides insights into the pathogenesis of pregnancy complications in humans, including spontaneous abortion, preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction, and preterm birth.

  11. Rybp, a polycomb complex-associated protein, is required for mouse eye development

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    Schreiber-Agus Nicole

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rybp (Ring1 and YY1 binding protein is a zinc finger protein which interacts with the members of the mammalian polycomb complexes. Previously we have shown that Rybp is critical for early embryogenesis and that haploinsufficiency of Rybp in a subset of embryos causes failure of neural tube closure. Here we investigated the requirement for Rybp in ocular development using four in vivo mouse models which resulted in either the ablation or overexpression of Rybp. Results Our results demonstrate that loss of a single Rybp allele in conventional knockout mice often resulted in retinal coloboma, an incomplete closure of the optic fissure, characterized by perturbed localization of Pax6 but not of Pax2. In addition, about one half of Rybp-/- Rybp+/+ chimeric embryos also developed retinal colobomas and malformed lenses. Tissue-specific transgenic overexpression of Rybp in the lens resulted in abnormal fiber cell differentiation and severe lens opacification with increased levels of AP-2α and Sox2, and reduced levels of βA4-crystallin gene expression. Ubiquitous transgenic overexpression of Rybp in the entire eye caused abnormal retinal folds, corneal neovascularization, and lens opacification. Additional changes included defects in anterior eye development. Conclusion These studies establish Rybp as a novel gene that has been associated with coloboma. Other genes linked to coloboma encode various classes of transcription factors such as BCOR, CBP, Chx10, Pax2, Pax6, Six3, Ski, Vax1 and Vax2. We propose that the multiple functions for Rybp in regulating mouse retinal and lens development are mediated by genetic, epigenetic and physical interactions between these genes and proteins.

  12. Characterisation of microRNA expression in post-natal mouse mammary gland development

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    Karagavriilidou Konstantina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The differential expression pattern of microRNAs (miRNAs during mammary gland development might provide insights into their role in regulating the homeostasis of the mammary epithelium. Our aim was to analyse these regulatory functions by deriving a comprehensive tissue-specific combined miRNA and mRNA expression profile of post-natal mouse mammary gland development. We measured the expression of 318 individual murine miRNAs by bead-based flow-cytometric profiling of whole mouse mammary glands throughout a 16-point developmental time course, including juvenile, puberty, mature virgin, gestation, lactation, and involution stages. In parallel whole-genome mRNA expression data were obtained. Results One third (n = 102 of all murine miRNAs analysed were detected during mammary gland development. MicroRNAs were represented in seven temporally co-expressed clusters, which were enriched for both miRNAs belonging to the same family and breast cancer-associated miRNAs. Global miRNA and mRNA expression was significantly reduced during lactation and the early stages of involution after weaning. For most detected miRNA families we did not observe systematic changes in the expression of predicted targets. For miRNA families whose targets did show changes, we observed inverse patterns of miRNA and target expression. The data sets are made publicly available and the combined expression profiles represent an important community resource for mammary gland biology research. Conclusion MicroRNAs were expressed in likely co-regulated clusters during mammary gland development. Breast cancer-associated miRNAs were significantly enriched in these clusters. The mechanism and functional consequences of this miRNA co-regulation provide new avenues for research into mammary gland biology and generate candidates for functional validation.

  13. Development of cardiac parasympathetic neurons, glial cells, and regional cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fregoso, S P; Hoover, D B

    2012-09-27

    Very little is known about the development of cardiac parasympathetic ganglia and cholinergic innervation of the mouse heart. Accordingly, we evaluated the growth of cholinergic neurons and nerve fibers in mouse hearts from embryonic day 18.5 (E18.5) through postnatal day 21(P21). Cholinergic perikarya and varicose nerve fibers were identified in paraffin sections immunostained for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Satellite cells and Schwann cells in adjacent sections were identified by immunostaining for S100β calcium binding protein (S100) and brain-fatty acid binding protein (B-FABP). We found that cardiac ganglia had formed in close association to the atria and cholinergic innervation of the atrioventricular junction had already begun by E18.5. However, most cholinergic innervation of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, developed postnatally (P0.5-P21) along with a doubling of the cross-sectional area of cholinergic perikarya. Satellite cells were present throughout neonatal cardiac ganglia and expressed primarily B-FABP. As they became more mature at P21, satellite cells stained strongly for both B-FABP and S100. Satellite cells appeared to surround most cardiac parasympathetic neurons, even in neonatal hearts. Mature Schwann cells, identified by morphology and strong staining for S100, were already present at E18.5 in atrial regions that receive cholinergic innervation at later developmental times. The abundance and distribution of S100-positive Schwann cells increased postnatally along with nerve density. While S100 staining of cardiac Schwann cells was maintained in P21 and older mice, Schwann cells did not show B-FABP staining at these times. Parallel development of satellite cells and cholinergic perikarya in the cardiac ganglia and the increase in abundance of Schwann cells and varicose cholinergic nerve fibers in the atria suggest that neuronal-glial interactions could be important for development of the parasympathetic nervous

  14. Muscle patterning in mouse and human abdominal wall development and omphalocele specimens of humans.

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    Nichol, Peter F; Corliss, Robert F; Yamada, Shigehito; Shiota, Kohei; Saijoh, Yukio

    2012-12-01

    Human omphalocele is a congenital defect of the abdominal wall in which the secondary abdominal wall structures (muscle and connective tissue) in an area centered around the umbilicus are replaced by a translucent membranous layer of tissue. Histological examination of omphalocele development and moreover the staging of normal human abdominal wall development has never been described. We hypothesized that omphalocele is the result of an arrest in the secondary abdominal wall development and predicted that we would observe delays in myoblast maturation and an arrest in secondary abdominal wall development. To look for evidence in support of our hypothesis, we performed a histological analysis of normal human abdominal wall development and compared this to mouse. We also conducted the first histological analysis of two human specimens with omphalocele. In these two omphalocele specimens, secondary abdominal wall development appears to have undergone an arrest around Carnegie Stage 19. In both specimens disruptions in the unidirectional orientation of myofibers were observed in the external and internal obliques, and rectus abdominis but not in the transversus abdominis. These latter findings support a model of normal abdominal wall development in which positional information instructs the orientation of myoblasts as they organize into individual muscle groups.

  15. Expression of planar cell polarity genes during development of the mouse CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissir, Fadel; Goffinet, André M

    2006-02-01

    Atypical cadherin (Celsr3) and the receptor Frizzled3 (Fzd3) are crucial for the development of axonal tracts in the mouse CNS. Celsr3 and Fzd3 are orthologues of the Drosophila'planar cell polarity' (PCP) genes flamingo/starry night (fmi/stan) and frizzled, respectively. Reasoning that Celsr3 and Fzd3 might interact with PCP orthologues in mammals like they do in flies, we used mRNA in situ hybridization to compare the expression of Celsr3 and Fzd3 with that of dishevelled 1, 2 and 3 (Dvl1-3), van gogh-like 1 and 2 (Vangl1, 2), and prickle-like 1 and 2 (Prickle1, 2), during mouse CNS development, from embryonic day 10.5 to postnatal day 21. With the relative exception of Vangl1, all genes were expressed in the developing CNS. Although Celsr3- and Fzd3-deficient mice have similar phenotypes, Fzd3 expression was more widespread than that of Celsr3. Vangl2 and Dvl2 were preferentially expressed in ventricular zones, in keeping with their role during neural tube closure, where they could be partners of Celsr1. Dvl1 had a broad expression, reminiscent of that of Celsr2, and may be involved in neural maintenance. A large overlap in the expression territories of Dvl genes suggested redundancy. Vangl1 and Prickle1 had expression canvases different from each other and from other candidates, indicating unrelated function. Like Celsr3, Dvl3 and Prickle2 were expressed more strongly in postmitotic neurons than in precursors. Thus, the analogy between the PCP and Celsr3-Fzd3 genetic networks is limited, but may include Dvl3 and/or Prickle2.

  16. Analysis of the role of Igf2 in adrenal tumour development in transgenic mouse models.

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    Coralie Drelon

    Full Text Available Adrenal cortical carcinomas (ACC are rare but aggressive tumours associated with poor prognosis. The two most frequent alterations in ACC in patients are overexpression of the growth factor IGF2 and constitutive activation of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Using a transgenic mouse model, we have previously shown that constitutive active β-catenin is a bona fide adrenal oncogene. However, although all these mice developed benign adrenal hyperplasia, malignant progression was infrequent, suggesting that secondary genetic events were required for aggressive tumour development. In the present paper, we have tested IGF2 oncogenic properties by developing two distinct transgenic mouse models of Igf2 overexpression in the adrenal cortex. Our analysis shows that despite overexpression levels ranging from 7 (basal to 87 (ACTH-induced fold, Igf2 has no tumour initiating potential in the adrenal cortex. However, it induces aberrant accumulation of Gli1 and Pod1-positive progenitor cells, in a hedgehog-independent manner. We have also tested the hypothesis that Igf2 may cooperate with Wnt signalling by mating Igf2 overexpressing lines with mice that express constitutive active β-catenin in the adrenal cortex. We show that the combination of both alterations has no effect on tumour phenotype at stages when β-catenin-induced tumours are benign. However, there is a mild promoting effect at later stages, characterised by increased Weiss score and proliferation. Formation of malignant tumours is nonetheless a rare event, even when Igf2 expression is further increased by ACTH treatment. Altogether these experiments suggest that the growth factor IGF2 is a mild contributor to malignant adrenocortical tumourigenesis.

  17. Intact fetal ovarian cord formation promotes mouse oocyte survival and development

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    Pera Renee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Female reproductive potential, or the ability to propagate life, is limited in mammals with the majority of oocytes lost before birth. In mice, surviving perinatal oocytes are enclosed in ovarian follicles for subsequent oocyte development and function in the adult. Before birth, fetal germ cells of both sexes develop in clusters, or germline cysts, in the undifferentiated gonad. Upon sex determination of the fetal gonad, germ cell cysts become organized into testicular or ovarian cord-like structures and begin to interact with gonadal somatic cells. Although germline cysts and testicular cords are required for spermatogenesis, the role of cyst and ovarian cord formation in mammalian oocyte development and female fertility has not been determined. Results Here, we examine whether intact fetal ovarian germ and somatic cell cord structures are required for oocyte development using mouse gonad re-aggregation and transplantation to disrupt gonadal organization. We observed that germ cells from disrupted female gonad prior to embryonic day e13.5 completed prophase I of meiosis but did not survive following transplantation. Furthermore, re-aggregated ovaries from e13.5 to e15.5 developed with a reduced number of oocytes. Oocyte loss occurred before follicle formation and was associated with an absence of ovarian cord structure and ovary disorganization. However, disrupted ovaries from e16.5 or later were resistant to the re-aggregation impairment and supported robust oocyte survival and development in follicles. Conclusions Thus, we demonstrate a critical window of oocyte development from e13.5 to e16.5 in the intact fetal mouse ovary, corresponding to the establishment of ovarian cord structure, which promotes oocyte interaction with neighboring ovarian somatic granulosa cells before birth and imparts oocytes with competence to survive and develop in follicles. Because germline cyst and ovarian cord structures are conserved in the

  18. Effects of Nicotinamide on Mouse Skin Tumor Development and lts Mode of Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KRISHNA P. GUPTA

    1999-01-01

    Nicotinamide (NA), a naturally occuring vitamin and a protease inhibitor, has been shown to be effective in treating some skin ailments. It inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell differentiation. This report shows the effects of NA on mouse skin tumor development and on the critical events involved in this process. NA reduced tumor growth, inhibited the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol- 13-acetate (TPA) induced ornithine decarboxylase activity, but induced the transglutaminase activity which was inhibited by TPA under different experimental conditions.The effects of NA on ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and transglutaminase (TG) indicated that nicotinamide (NA) probably programmmed the cells for their death in the natural course of time, I.e. Programed cell death. This observation indicates that NA might be a better agent for the detailed study and for the better use in prevention of cancer alone or in combination with other drugs.

  19. Genetically engineered mouse models to evaluate the role of Wnt secretion in bone development and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Bart O

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in components of the Wnt signaling pathway are associated with altered bone development and homeostasis in several human diseases. We created genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) that mimic the cellular defect associated with the Porcupine mutations in patients with Goltz Syndrome/Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. These GEMMs were established by utilizing mice containing a conditionally inactivatable allele of Wntless/GPR177 (a gene encoding a protein required for the transport of Porcupine-modified ligand to the plasma membrane for secretion). We crossed this strain to another which drives cre-mediated gene deletion in mature osteoblasts (Osteocalcin-cre) resulted in mice lacking the ability to secrete Wnt ligands in this cell type. These mice displayed severely reduced bone mass and provide a model to understand the effects of disrupting the ability to secrete Wnt ligands on the skeletal system.

  20. Three-dimensional Organization of Layered Apical Cytoskeletal Networks Associated with Mouse Airway Tissue Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kazuhiro; Nishida, Tomoki; Inoue, Kanako; Tsukita, Sachiko

    2017-03-01

    The cytoskeleton is an essential cellular component that enables various sophisticated functions of epithelial cells by forming specialized subcellular compartments. However, the functional and structural roles of cytoskeletons in subcellular compartmentalization are still not fully understood. Here we identified a novel network structure consisting of actin filaments, intermediate filaments, and microtubules directly beneath the apical membrane in mouse airway multiciliated cells and in cultured epithelial cells. Three-dimensional imaging by ultra-high voltage electron microscopy and immunofluorescence revealed that the morphological features of each network depended on the cell type and were spatiotemporally integrated in association with tissue development. Detailed analyses using Odf2 mutant mice, which lack ciliary basal feet and apical microtubules, suggested a novel contribution of the intermediate filaments to coordinated ciliary beating. These findings provide a new perspective for viewing epithelial cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis through the structure and function of apical cytoskeletal networks.

  1. Development of granular pial cells and granular perithelial cells in the spinal cords of mouse and rabbit.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Free cells containing large dense granules first appear in the leptomeninges of spinal cord at E14 in the mouse and at E16 in the rabbit. These ages represent a similar stage of development of the spinal cord and meninges. Despite the early appearance of granular pial cells, granular perithelial cells are not found around blood vessels in the spinal cord until 5 days postnatum in the mouse and E28 in the rabbit. The first appearance of granular perithelial cells coincides with the development...

  2. Relationship between action potential sodium channels and muscarinic receptors in mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mack, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Cholinergic agonists and antagonists were tested for their ability to influence stimulated and unstimulated /sup 22/Na uptake in preparations of forebrain and hindbrain in mice in vitro. In mouse forebrain, atropine and pirenzepine decreased stimulated sodium uptake. Dicyclomine decreased stimulated uptake in both the forebrain and hindbrain. McN-A-343 decreased stimulated sodium uptake in the forebrain. The effects of sodium channel ligands on muscarinic receptors was investigated in forebrain and hindbrain preparations. In the forebrain, veratridine and aconitine appeared to inhibit the binding of (/sup 3/H)QNB in a competitive manner. Tetrodotoxin alone had not effect on binding, but enhanced the inhibition by veratridine, with no effect on aconitine inhibition. In the hindbrain, veratridine appeared to inhibit (/sup 3/H)QNB binding non-competitively and competitively. The addition of magnesium increased the K/sub i/ value in the veratridine inhibition. GTP enhanced the inhibition by veratridine. Tetrodotoxin increased the K/sub i/ value of the veratridine inhibition curve. Tetrodotoxin alone also inhibited (/sup 3/H)QNB binding. Tetrodotoxin inhibited QNB binding in both a non-competitive and uncompetitive manner.

  3. Sexual differentiation in the developing mouse brain: contributions of sex chromosome genes.

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    Wolstenholme, J T; Rissman, E F; Bekiranov, S

    2013-03-01

    Neural sexual differentiation begins during embryogenesis and continues after birth for a variable amount of time depending on the species and brain region. Because gonadal hormones were the first factors identified in neural sexual differentiation, their role in this process has eclipsed investigation of other factors. Here, we use a mouse with a spontaneous translocation that produces four different unique sets of sex chromosomes. Each genotype has one normal X-chromosome and a unique second sex chromosome creating the following genotypes: XY(*x) , XX, XY(*) , XX(Y) (*) . This Y(*) mouse line is used by several laboratories to study two human aneuploid conditions: Turner and Klinefelter syndromes. As sex chromosome number affects behavior and brain morphology, we surveyed brain gene expression at embryonic days 11.5 and 18.5 to isolate X-chromosome dose effects in the developing brain as possible mechanistic changes underlying the phenotypes. We compared gene expression differences between gonadal males and females as well as individuals with one vs. two X-chromosomes. We present data showing, in addition to genes reported to escape X-inactivation, a number of autosomal genes are differentially expressed between the sexes and in mice with different numbers of X-chromosomes. Based on our results, we can now identify the genes present in the region around the chromosomal break point that produces the Y(*) model. Our results also indicate an interaction between gonadal development and sex chromosome number that could further elucidate the role of sex chromosome genes and hormones in the sexual differentiation of behavior.

  4. Inhibition of fumonisin B1 cytotoxicity by nanosilicate platelets during mouse embryo development.

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    Yu-Jing Liao

    Full Text Available Nanosilicate platelets (NSP, the form of natural silicate clay that was exfoliated from montmorillonite (MMT, is widely used as a feed additive for its high non-specific binding capacity with mycotoxins such as fumonisin B1 (FB1, and has been evaluated its safety for biomedical use including cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and lethal dosage (LD. In the study, we further examined its toxicity on the development of CD1 mouse embryos and its capacity to prevent teratogenesis-induced by FB1. In vitro cultures, NSP did not disturb the development and the quality of intact pre-implantation mouse embryos. Further, newborn mice from females consumed with NSP showed no abnormalities. NSP had an unexpected high adsorption capacity in vitro. In contrast to female mice consumed with FB1 only, a very low residual level of FB1 in the circulation, reduced incidence of neutral tube defects and significantly increased fetal weight were observed in the females consumed with FB1 and NSP, suggesting a high alleviation effect of NSP on FB1 in vivo. Furthermore, FB1 treatment disturbed the gene expression of sphingolipid metabolism enzymes (longevity assurance homolog 5, LASS 5; sphingosine kinase 1, Sphk1; sphingosine kinase 2, Sphk2; sphingosine 1- phosphate lyase, Sgpl1; sphingosine 1-phosphate phosphatase, Sgpp1 in the maternal liver, uterus, fetus, and placenta, but NSP administration reversed the perturbations. Based on these findings, we conclude that NSP is a feasible and effective agent for supplementary use in reducing the toxicity of FB1 to animals.

  5. Development of a mouse-feline chimeric antibody against feline tumor necrosis factor-alpha

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    DOKI, Tomoyoshi; TAKANO, Tomomi; HOHDATSU, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal inflammatory disease caused by FIP virus infection. Feline tumor necrosis factor (fTNF)-alpha is closely involved in the aggravation of FIP pathology. We previously described the preparation of neutralizing mouse anti-fTNF-alpha monoclonal antibody (mAb 2–4) and clarified its role in the clinical condition of cats with FIP using in vitro systems. However, administration of mouse mAb 2–4 to cat may lead to a production of feline anti-mouse antibodies. In the present study, we prepared a mouse-feline chimeric mAb (chimeric mAb 2–4) by fusing the variable region of mouse mAb 2–4 to the constant region of feline antibody. The chimeric mAb 2–4 was confirmed to have fTNF-alpha neutralization activity. Purified mouse mAb 2–4 and chimeric mAb 2–4 were repeatedly administered to cats, and the changes in the ability to induce feline anti-mouse antibody response were investigated. In the serum of cats treated with mouse mAb 2–4, feline anti-mouse antibody production was induced, and the fTNF-alpha neutralization effect of mouse mAb 2–4 was reduced. In contrast, in cats treated with chimeric mAb 2–4, the feline anti-mouse antibody response was decreased compared to that of mouse mAb 2–4-treated cats. PMID:27264736

  6. Different expression patterns of Lin28 and Lin28b in mouse molar development.

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    Dong, Ning; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Tiantian; Zhao, Lin; Tian, Jiangang; Ruan, Jianping

    2017-10-01

    The RNA-binding proteins Lin28 and Lin28b are expressed in many developing tissues and are involved in the biosynthesis of the microRNA let-7 family and embryogenesis processes. However, their roles in mammalian tooth development remain ill-defined. The spatiotemporal expressions of Lin28 and Lin28b during mouse molar odontogenesis from day E11.5 to P21 were examined through immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Both Lin28 and Lin28b were initially expressed in dental epithelium, but the expression patterns varied thereafter. Lin28 was expressed in tooth germ from early embryonic stages and was consistently expressed in the ameloblasts and odontoblasts throughout all stages of tooth development. However, positive staining of Lin28b gradually faded out with tooth germ development, before finally disappearing in tooth organ cells after birth. These results indicate that Lin28 was spatiotemporally expressed in tooth germ throughout tooth development progression and may play an active role in ameloblast and odontoblast differentiation, as well as matrix secretion and the mineralization of enamel and dentin. Its paralogue Lin28b may have a distinct function in tooth germ formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Circadian Rhythm Regulates Development of Enamel in Mouse Mandibular First Molar.

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    Tao, Jiang; Zhai, Yue; Park, Hyun; Han, Junli; Dong, Jianhui; Xie, Ming; Gu, Ting; Lewi, Keidren; Ji, Fang; Jia, William

    2016-01-01

    Rhythmic incremental growth lines and the presence of melatonin receptors were discovered in tooth enamel, suggesting possible role of circadian rhythm. We therefore hypothesized that circadian rhythm may regulate enamel formation through melatonin receptors. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of melatonin receptors (MTs) and amelogenin (AMELX), a maker of enamel formation, during tooth germ development in mouse. Using qRT-PCR and immunocytochemistry, we found that mRNA and protein levels of both MTs and AMELX in normal mandibular first molar tooth germs increased gradually after birth, peaked at 3 or 4 day postnatal, and then decreased. Expression of MTs and AMELX by immunocytochemistry was significantly delayed in neonatal mice raised in all-dark or all-light environment as well as the enamel development. Furthermore, development of tooth enamel was also delayed showing significant immature histology in those animals, especially for newborn mice raised in all daylight condition. Interestingly, disruption in circadian rhythm in pregnant mice also resulted in delayed enamel development in their babies. Treatment with melatonin receptor antagonist 4P-PDOT in pregnant mice caused underexpression of MTs and AMELX associated with long-lasting deficiency in baby enamel tissue. Electromicroscopic evidence demonstrated increased necrosis and poor enamel mineralization in ameloblasts. The above results suggest that circadian rhythm is important for normal enamel development at both pre- and postnatal stages. Melatonin receptors were partly responsible for the regulation.

  8. Development and Characterization of Uterine Glandular Epithelium Specific Androgen Receptor Knockout Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaesung Peter; Zheng, Yu; Skulte, Katherine A; Handelsman, David J; Simanainen, Ulla

    2015-11-01

    While estrogen action is the major driver of uterine development, androgens acting via the androgen receptor (AR) may also promote uterine growth as suggested by uterine phenotypes in global AR knockout (ARKO) female mice. Because AR is expressed in uterine endometrial glands, we generated (Cre/loxP) uterine gland epithelium-specific ARKO (ugeARKO) to determine the role of endometrial gland-specific androgen actions. However, AR in uterine gland epithelium may not be required for normal uterine development and function because ugeARKO females had normal uterine development and fertility. To determine if exogenous androgens acting via AR can fully support uterine growth in the absence of estrogens, the ARKO and ugeARKO females were ovariectomized and treated with supraphysiological doses of testosterone or dihydrotestosterone (nonaromatizable androgen). Both dihydrotestosterone and testosterone supported full uterine regrowth in wild-type females while ARKO females had no regrowth (comparable to ovariectomized only). These findings suggest that androgens acting via AR can promote full uterine regrowth in the absence of estrogens. The ugeARKO had 50% regrowth when compared to intact uterine glands, and histomorphologically, both the endometrial and myometrial areas were significantly (P glandular epithelial AR located in the endometrium may indirectly modify myometrial development. Additionally, to confirm Cre function in endometrial glands, we generated uge-specific PTEN knockout mouse model. The ugePTEN knockout females developed severe endometrial hyperplasia and therefore present a novel model for future research.

  9. Rapid and simple method for in vivo ex utero development of mouse embryo explants.

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    Gonçalves, André B; Thorsteinsdóttir, Sólveig; Deries, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The in utero development of mammals drastically reduces the accessibility of the mammalian embryo and therefore limits the range of experimental manipulation that can be done to study functions of genes or signaling pathways during embryo development. Over the past decades, tissue and organ-like culture methods have been developed with the intention of reproducing in vivo situations. Developing accessible and simple techniques to study and manipulate embryos is an everlasting challenge. Herein, we describe a reliable and quick technique to culture mid-gestation explanted mouse embryos on top of a floating membrane filter in a defined medium. Viability of the cultured tissues was assessed by apoptosis and proliferation analysis showing that cell proliferation is normal and there is only a slight increase in apoptosis after 12h of culture compared to embryos developing in utero. Moreover, differentiation and morphogenesis proceed normally as assessed by 3D imaging of the transformation of the myotome into deep back muscles. Not only does muscle cell differentiation occur as expected, but so do extracellular matrix organization and the characteristic splitting of the myotome into the three epaxial muscle groups. Our culture method allows for the culture and manipulation of mammalian embryo explants in a very efficient way, and it permits the manipulation of in vivo developmental events in a controlled environment. Explants grown under these ex utero conditions simulate real developmental events that occur in utero.

  10. A small molecule p75NTR ligand, LM11A-31, reverses cholinergic neurite dystrophy in Alzheimer's disease mouse models with mid- to late-stage disease progression.

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    Danielle A Simmons

    Full Text Available Degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons contributes significantly to the cognitive deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD and has been attributed to aberrant signaling through the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR. Thus, modulating p75NTR signaling is considered a promising therapeutic strategy for AD. Accordingly, our laboratory has developed small molecule p75NTR ligands that increase survival signaling and inhibit amyloid-β-induced degenerative signaling in in vitro studies. Previous work found that a lead p75NTR ligand, LM11A-31, prevents degeneration of cholinergic neurites when given to an AD mouse model in the early stages of disease pathology. To extend its potential clinical applications, we sought to determine whether LM11A-31 could reverse cholinergic neurite atrophy when treatment begins in AD mouse models having mid- to late stages of pathology. Reversing pathology may have particular clinical relevance as most AD studies involve patients that are at an advanced pathological stage. In this study, LM11A-31 (50 or 75 mg/kg was administered orally to two AD mouse models, Thy-1 hAPPLond/Swe (APPL/S and Tg2576, at age ranges during which marked AD-like pathology manifests. In mid-stage male APPL/S mice, LM11A-31 administered for 3 months starting at 6-8 months of age prevented and/or reversed atrophy of basal forebrain cholinergic neurites and cortical dystrophic neurites. Importantly, a 1 month LM11A-31 treatment given to male APPL/S mice (12-13 months old with late-stage pathology reversed the degeneration of cholinergic neurites in basal forebrain, ameliorated cortical dystrophic neurites, and normalized increased basal forebrain levels of p75NTR. Similar results were seen in female Tg2576 mice. These findings suggest that LM11A-31 can reduce and/or reverse fundamental AD pathologies in late-stage AD mice. Thus, targeting p75NTR is a promising approach to reducing AD-related degenerative processes that have

  11. Breaches of the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

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    Li, Jing; Yu, Miao; Feng, Gang; Hu, Huaiyu; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-11-07

    A subset of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has central nervous system manifestations. There are good mouse models for these CMDs that include POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout and Large(myd) mice with all exhibiting defects in dentate gyrus. It is not known how the abnormal dentate gyrus is formed during the development. In this study, we conducted a detailed morphological examination of the dentate gyrus in adult and newborn POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout, and Large(myd) mice by immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses. We observed that the pial basement membrane overlying the dentate gyrus was disrupted and there was ectopia of granule cell precursors through the breached pial basement membrane. Besides these, the knockout dentate gyrus exhibited reactive gliosis in these mouse models. Thus, breaches in the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

  12. Lesions of the basal forebrain cholinergic system in mice disrupt idiothetic navigation.

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    Adam S Hamlin

    Full Text Available Loss of integrity of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is a consistent feature of Alzheimer's disease, and measurement of basal forebrain degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging is emerging as a sensitive diagnostic marker for prodromal disease. It is also known that Alzheimer's disease patients perform poorly on both real space and computerized cued (allothetic or uncued (idiothetic recall navigation tasks. Although the hippocampus is required for allothetic navigation, lesions of this region only mildly affect idiothetic navigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that the cholinergic medial septo-hippocampal circuit is important for idiothetic navigation. Basal forebrain cholinergic neurons were selectively lesioned in mice using the toxin saporin conjugated to a basal forebrain cholinergic neuronal marker, the p75 neurotrophin receptor. Control animals were able to learn and remember spatial information when tested on a modified version of the passive place avoidance test where all extramaze cues were removed, and animals had to rely on idiothetic signals. However, the exploratory behaviour of mice with cholinergic basal forebrain lesions was highly disorganized during this test. By contrast, the lesioned animals performed no differently from controls in tasks involving contextual fear conditioning and spatial working memory (Y maze, and displayed no deficits in potentially confounding behaviours such as motor performance, anxiety, or disturbed sleep/wake cycles. These data suggest that the basal forebrain cholinergic system plays a specific role in idiothetic navigation, a modality that is impaired early in Alzheimer's disease.

  13. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

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    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  14. Forebrain commissures and visual memory: a new approach.

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    Doty, R W; Ringo, J L; Lewine, J D

    1988-08-01

    The primary purpose of these exploratory experiments was to determine: (1) whether the forebrain commissures can provide full accessibility of the mnemonic store to either hemisphere when the taks involves memory for 'events' (images) rather than, as in essentially all previous tests on split-brain animals, memory for 'rules' (discrimination habits); and (2) whether the anterior commissure (AC) alone is capable of such function. Macaques, with optic chiasm transected to allow limitation of direct visual input to one or the other hemisphere, were trained on tasks requiring recognition of previously viewed photographic slides. For one task, delayed-matching-to-sample (DMTS), the animal was presented with a 'sample' image, and then 0-15s later was required to choose that image in preference to a second image concurrently displayed. On the other task, running recognition (RR), a series of images was presented, some of which were repetitions of images previously seen in that session, and the animal was required to signal its recognition of these repetitions. For either task the initial presentation could be made to one eye and hemisphere, and subsequent recognition required of the other. In such circumstance, if all forebrain commissures were divided, such interhemispheric recognition was no longer possible. For the DMTS task if either the AC or 5 mm of the splenium of the corpus callosum were available, interhemispheric recognition was basically equivalent to that using the same eye and hemisphere. However, interhemispheric accuracy with the RR task, while well above chance levels, was consistently inferior to that achieved intrahemispherically when complex scenes or objects were viewed. This is probably a consequence mostly of the differing visual fields of the two eyes, since interhemispheric accuracy was greatly improved by use of images having approximately identical right and left halves. No consistent hemispheric specialization nor difference in direction of

  15. ARX/Arx is expressed in germ cells during spermatogenesis in both marsupial and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongshi; Pask, Andrew J; Hu, Yanqiu; Shaw, Geoff; Renfree, Marilyn B

    2014-03-01

    The X-linked aristaless gene, ARX, is essential for the development of the gonads, forebrain, olfactory bulb, pancreas, and skeletal muscle in mice and humans. Mutations cause neurological diseases, often accompanied by ambiguous genitalia. There are a disproportionately high number of testis and brain genes on the human and mouse X chromosomes. It is still unknown whether the X chromosome accrued these genes during its evolution or whether genes that find themselves on the X chromosome evolve such roles. ARX was originally autosomal in mammals and remains so in marsupials, whereas in eutherian mammals it translocated to the X chromosome. In this study, we examined autosomal ARX in tammars and compared it with the X-linked Arx in mice. We detected ARX mRNA in the neural cells of the forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain, and olfactory bulbs in developing tammars, consistent with the expression in mice. ARX was detected by RT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization in the developing tammar wallaby gonads of both sexes, suggestive of a role in sexual development as in mice. We also detected ARX/Arx mRNA in the adult testis in both tammars and mice, suggesting a potential novel role for ARX/Arx in spermiogenesis. ARX transcripts were predominantly observed in round spermatids. Arx mRNA localization distributions in the mouse adult testis suggest that it escaped meiotic sex chromosome inactivation during spermatogenesis. Our findings suggest that ARX in the therian mammal ancestor already played a role in male reproduction before it was recruited to the X chromosome in eutherians.

  16. Genetic dissection of Pax6 dosage requirements in the developing mouse eye.

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    Davis-Silberman, Noa; Kalich, Tomer; Oron-Karni, Varda; Marquardt, Till; Kroeber, Markus; Tamm, Ernst R; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2005-08-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the transcription factor Pax6/PAX6 has been implicated in a number of congenital eye disorders in humans and mice, such as aniridia and Small-eye, which affect the development and function of the lens, cornea, anterior eye segment and neuroretina. However, the widespread distribution of Pax6/PAX6 protein within the developing and adult eye preclude the identification and direct study of the ocular tissues affected by a reduction in Pax6/PAX6 dosage. Here, we employed Cre/loxP-mediated inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in either the lens/cornea or the distal optic cup to dissect the tissue-specific sensitivity to Pax6 haploinsufficiency. Exclusive inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in the lens recapitulates the Small-eye lens and corneal defects, while only mildly affects iris morphology in a non-cell-autonomous fashion. Conversely, selective inactivation of a single Pax6 allele in the distal optic cup revealed primarily cell-autonomous dosage requirements for proper iris differentiation, with no affects on either lens or corneal morphology. Pax6 dosage within the distal optic cup is found here to influence the number of progenitors destined for the anterior ocular structures, the timing of iris muscle-cell differentiation and iris stroma development. Taken together, we genetically dissected the complex mouse Small-eye phenotype, thereby pinpointing the underlying Pax6/PAX6 haploinsufficiency to autonomous dosage requirements within the developing iris and lens/cornea tissues.

  17. Loss of Axin2 Causes Ocular Defects During Mouse Eye Development

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    Alldredge, Ashley; Fuhrmann, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The scaffold protein Axin2 is an antagonist and universal target of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Disruption of Axin2 may lead to developmental eye defects; however, this has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Axin2 during ocular and extraocular development in mouse. Methods Animals heterozygous and homozygous for a Axin2lacZ knock-in allele were analyzed at different developmental stages for reporter expression, morphology as well as for the presence of ocular and extraocular markers using histologic and immunohistochemical techniques. Results During early eye development, the Axin2lacZ reporter was expressed in the periocular mesenchyme, RPE, and optic stalk. In the developing retina, Axin2lacZ reporter expression was initiated in ganglion cells at late embryonic stages and robustly expressed in subpopulations of amacrine and horizontal cells postnatally. Activation of the Axin2lacZ reporter overlapped with labeling of POU4F1, PAX6, and Calbindin. Germline deletion of Axin2 led to variable ocular phenotypes ranging from normal to severely defective eyes exhibiting microphthalmia, coloboma, lens defects, and expanded ciliary margin. These defects were correlated with abnormal tissue patterning in individual affected tissues, such as the optic fissure margins in the ventral optic cup and in the expanded ciliary margin. Conclusions Our results reveal a critical role for Axin2 during ocular development, likely by restricting the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. PMID:27701636

  18. Changes in Nuclear Orientation Patterns of Chromosome 11 during Mouse Plasmacytoma Development

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    Ann-Kristin Schmälter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying changes in nuclear architecture is a unique approach toward the understanding of nuclear remodeling during tumor development. One aspect of nuclear architecture is the orientation of chromosomes in the three-dimensional nuclear space. We studied mouse chromosome 11 in lymphocytes of [T38HxBALB/c]N mice with a reciprocal translocation between chromosome X and 11 (T38HT(X;11 exhibiting a long chromosome T(11;X and a short chromosome T(X;11 and in fast-onset plasmacytomas (PCTs induced in the same strain. We determined the three-dimensional orientation of chromosome 11 using a mouse chromosome 11 specific multicolor banding probe. We also examined the nuclear position of the small translocation chromosome T(X;11 which contains cytoband 11E2 and parts of E1. Chromosomes can point either with their centromeric or with their telomeric end toward the nuclear center or periphery, or their position is found in parallel to the nuclear border. In T38HT(X;11 nuclei, the most frequently observed orientation pattern was with both chromosomes 11 in parallel to the nuclear border (“PP”. PCT cells showed nuclei with two or more copies of chromosome 11. In PCTs, the most frequent orientation pattern was with one chromosome in parallel and the other pointing with its centromeric end toward the nuclear periphery (“CP”. There is a significant difference between the orientation patterns observed in T38HT(X;11 and in PCT nuclei (P < .0001.

  19. Genotoxicity induced by monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)) in mouse thymic developing T cells.

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    Xu, Huan; Medina, Sebastian; Lauer, Fredine T; Douillet, Christelle; Liu, Ke Jian; Stýblo, Miroslav; Burchiel, Scott W

    2017-09-05

    Drinking water exposure to arsenic is known to cause immunotoxicity. Our previous studies demonstrated that monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(+3)) was the major arsenical species presented in mouse thymus cells after a 30 d drinking water exposure to arsenite (As(+3)). MMA(+3) was also showed to be ten times more toxic than As(+3) on the suppression of IL-7/STAT5 signaling in the double negative (DN) thymic T cells. In order to examine the genotoxicity induced by low to moderate doses of MMA(+3), isolated mouse thymus cells were treated with 5, 50 and 500nMMMA(+3) for 18h in vitro. MMA(+3) suppressed the proliferation of thymus cells in a dose dependent manner. MMA(+3) at 5nM induced DNA damage in DN not double positive (DP) cells. Differential sensitivity to double strand breaks and reactive oxygen species generation was noticed between DN and DP cells at 50nM, but the effects were not seen at the high dose (500nM). A stronger apoptotic effect induced by MMA(+3) was noticed in DN cells than DP cells at low doses (5 and 50nM), which was negated by the strong apoptosis induction at the high dose (500nM). Analysis of intracellular MMA(+3) concentrations in DN and DP cells, revealed that more MMA(+3) accumulated in the DN cells after the in vitro treatment. Collectively, these results suggested that MMA(+3) could directly induce strong genotoxicity in the early developing T cells in the thymus. The DN cells were much more sensitive to MMA(+3) induced genotoxicity and apoptosis than DP cells, probably due to the higher intracellular levels of MMA(+3). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Redundant role of protein kinase C delta and epsilon during mouse embryonic development.

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    Sergio Carracedo

    Full Text Available Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon are mediators of important cellular events, such as cell proliferation, migration or apoptosis. The formation of blood vessels, i.e., vasculo- and angiogenesis, is a process where these isoforms have also been shown to participate. However, mice deficient in either Protein Kinase C delta or epsilon are viable and therefore their individual contribution to the formation of the vasculature appeared so far dispensable. In this study, we show that double null mutation of Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon causes embryonic lethality at approximately E9.5. At this stage, whole mount staining of the endothelial marker CD31 in double null embryos revealed defective blood vessel formation. Moreover, culture of double deficient mouse allantois showed impaired endothelial cell organization, and analyses of double deficient embryo sections showed dilated vessels, decreased endothelial-specific adherent junctions, and decreased contact of endothelial cells with mural cells. Protein kinase C delta and epsilon also appeared essential for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, since α-smooth muscle actin, a classical marker for vascular smooth muscle cells, was almost undetectable in double deficient embryonic aorta at E9.5. Subsequent qPCR analyses showed decreased VE-cadherin, Vegfr2, Cd31, Cdh2, Ets1, and Fli-1, among other angiogenesis related transcripts in double deficient embryos. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time an in vivo redundant role between members of the novel Protein Kinase C subfamily that allows for mutual compensation during mouse embryonic development, with vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as an obvious common function of these two Protein Kinase Cs. Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon might therefore be useful targets for inhibiting vasculo- and/or angiogenesis.

  1. Redundant role of protein kinase C delta and epsilon during mouse embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carracedo, Sergio; Sacher, Frank; Brandes, Gudrun; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon are mediators of important cellular events, such as cell proliferation, migration or apoptosis. The formation of blood vessels, i.e., vasculo- and angiogenesis, is a process where these isoforms have also been shown to participate. However, mice deficient in either Protein Kinase C delta or epsilon are viable and therefore their individual contribution to the formation of the vasculature appeared so far dispensable. In this study, we show that double null mutation of Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon causes embryonic lethality at approximately E9.5. At this stage, whole mount staining of the endothelial marker CD31 in double null embryos revealed defective blood vessel formation. Moreover, culture of double deficient mouse allantois showed impaired endothelial cell organization, and analyses of double deficient embryo sections showed dilated vessels, decreased endothelial-specific adherent junctions, and decreased contact of endothelial cells with mural cells. Protein kinase C delta and epsilon also appeared essential for vascular smooth muscle cell differentiation, since α-smooth muscle actin, a classical marker for vascular smooth muscle cells, was almost undetectable in double deficient embryonic aorta at E9.5. Subsequent qPCR analyses showed decreased VE-cadherin, Vegfr2, Cd31, Cdh2, Ets1, and Fli-1, among other angiogenesis related transcripts in double deficient embryos. Taken together, these data suggest for the first time an in vivo redundant role between members of the novel Protein Kinase C subfamily that allows for mutual compensation during mouse embryonic development, with vasculogenesis/angiogenesis as an obvious common function of these two Protein Kinase Cs. Protein Kinase C delta and epsilon might therefore be useful targets for inhibiting vasculo- and/or angiogenesis.

  2. Regional energy balance in rat brain after transient forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsinelli, W A; Duffy, T E

    1983-05-01

    Phosphocreatine, ATP, and glucose were severely depleted, and the lactate levels were increased in the paramedian neocortex, dorsal-lateral striatum, and CA1 zone of hippocampus of rats exposed to 30 min of forebrain ischemia. Upon recirculation of the brain, phosphocreatine, ATP, and lactate concentrations recovered to control values in the paramedian neocortex and CA1 zone of hippocampus and to near-control values in the striatum. The phosphocreatine and ATP concentrations then fell and the lactate levels rose in the striatum after 6-24 h, and in the CA1 zone of hippocampus after 24-72 h. The initial recovery and subsequent delayed changes in the phosphocreatine, ATP, and lactate concentrations in the striatum and hippocampus coincided with the onset and progression of morphological injury in these brain regions. The results suggest that cells in these regions regain normal or near-normal mitochondrial function and are viable, in terms of energy production, for many hours before unknown mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal before unknown mechanisms cause irreversible neuronal injury.

  3. Dopamine receptor gene expression by enkephalin neurons in rat forebrain

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    Le Moine, C.; Normand, E.; Guitteny, A.F.; Fouque, B.; Teoule, R.; Bloch, B. (Universite de Bordeaux II (France))

    1990-01-01

    In situ hybridization experiments were performed with brain sections from normal, control and haloperidol-treated rats to identify and map the cells expressing the D2 dopamine receptor gene. D2 receptor mRNA was detected with radioactive or biotinylated oligonucleotide probes. D2 receptor mRNA was present in glandular cells of the pituitary intermediate lobe and in neurons of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and forebrain, especially in caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, and piriform cortex. Hybridization with D2 and preproenkephalin A probes in adjacent sections, as well as combined hybridization with the two probes in the same sections, demonstrated that all detectable enkephalin neurons in the striatum contained the D2 receptor mRNA. Large neurons in caudate putamen, which were unlabeled with the preproenkephalin A probe and which may have been cholinergic, also expressed the D2 receptor gene. Haloperidol treatment (14 or 21 days) provoked an increase in mRNA content for D2 receptor and preproenkephalin A in the striatum. This suggests that the increase in D2 receptor number observed after haloperidol treatment is due to increased activity of the D2 gene. These results indicate that in the striatum, the enkephalin neurons are direct targets for dopamine liberated from mesostriatal neurons.

  4. Probing forebrain to hindbrain circuit functions in Xenopus.

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    Kelley, Darcy B; Elliott, Taffeta M; Evans, Ben J; Hall, Ian C; Leininger, Elizabeth C; Rhodes, Heather J; Yamaguchi, Ayako; Zornik, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The vertebrate hindbrain includes neural circuits that govern essential functions including breathing, blood pressure and heart rate. Hindbrain circuits also participate in generating rhythmic motor patterns for vocalization. In most tetrapods, sound production is powered by expiration and the circuitry underlying vocalization and respiration must be linked. Perception and arousal are also linked; acoustic features of social communication sounds-for example, a baby's cry-can drive autonomic responses. The close links between autonomic functions that are essential for life and vocal expression have been a major in vivo experimental challenge. Xenopus provides an opportunity to address this challenge using an ex vivo preparation: an isolated brain that generates vocal and breathing patterns. The isolated brain allows identification and manipulation of hindbrain vocal circuits as well as their activation by forebrain circuits that receive sensory input, initiate motor patterns and control arousal. Advances in imaging technologies, coupled to the production of Xenopus lines expressing genetically encoded calcium sensors, provide powerful tools for imaging neuronal patterns in the entire fictively behaving brain, a goal of the BRAIN Initiative. Comparisons of neural circuit activity across species (comparative neuromics) with distinctive vocal patterns can identify conserved features, and thereby reveal essential functional components.

  5. Taurine Induces Proliferation of Neural Stem Cells and Synapse Development in the Developing Mouse Brain

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    Shivaraj, Mattu Chetana; Marcy, Guillaume; Low, Guoliang; Ryu, Jae Ryun; Zhao, Xianfeng; Rosales, Francisco J.; Goh, Eyleen L. K.

    2012-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid present in high concentrations in mammalian tissues. It has been implicated in several processes involving brain development and neurotransmission. However, the role of taurine in hippocampal neurogenesis during brain development is still unknown. Here we show that taurine regulates neural progenitor cell (NPC) proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the developing brain as well as in cultured early postnatal (P5) hippocampal progenitor cells and hippocampal slices derived from P5 mice brains. Taurine increased cell proliferation without having a significant effect on neural differentiation both in cultured P5 NPCs as well as cultured hippocampal slices and in vivo. Expression level analysis of synaptic proteins revealed that taurine increases the expression of Synapsin 1 and PSD 95. We also found that taurine stimulates the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 indicating a possible role of the ERK pathway in mediating the changes that we observed, especially in proliferation. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for taurine in neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation in developing brain and suggest the involvement of the ERK1/2 pathways in mediating these actions. Our study also shows that taurine influences the levels of proteins associated with synapse development. This is the first evidence showing the effect of taurine on early postnatal neuronal development using a combination of in vitro, ex-vivo and in vivo systems. PMID:22916184

  6. Epigenetic Modifications Unlock the Milk Protein Gene Loci during Mouse Mammary Gland Development and Differentiation

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    Rijnkels, Monique; Freeman-Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Potluri, Vani; Wang, Liguo; Li, Wei; Lemay, Danielle G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Unlike other tissues, development and differentiation of the mammary gland occur mostly after birth. The roles of systemic hormones and local growth factors important for this development and functional differentiation are well-studied. In other tissues, it has been shown that chromatin organization plays a key role in transcriptional regulation and underlies epigenetic regulation during development and differentiation. However, the role of chromatin organization in mammary gland development and differentiation is less well-defined. Here, we have studied the changes in chromatin organization at the milk protein gene loci (casein, whey acidic protein, and others) in the mouse mammary gland before and after functional differentiation. Methodology/Principal Findings Distal regulatory elements within the casein gene cluster and whey acidic protein gene region have an open chromatin organization after pubertal development, while proximal promoters only gain open-chromatin marks during pregnancy in conjunction with the major induction of their expression. In contrast, other milk protein genes, such as alpha-lactalbumin, already have an open chromatin organization in the mature virgin gland. Changes in chromatin organization in the casein gene cluster region that are present after puberty persisted after lactation has ceased, while the changes which occurred during pregnancy at the gene promoters were not maintained. In general, mammary gland expressed genes and their regulatory elements exhibit developmental stage- and tissue-specific chromatin organization. Conclusions/Significance A progressive gain of epigenetic marks indicative of open/active chromatin on genes marking functional differentiation accompanies the development of the mammary gland. These results support a model in which a chromatin organization is established during pubertal development that is then poised to respond to the systemic hormonal signals of pregnancy and lactation to achieve the

  7. Doublecortin-like knockdown in the adult mouse brain : implications for neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saaltink, Dirk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    The results in this thesis showed for the first time doublecortin-like (DCL)-specific expression in the adult mouse brain. Besides the expected regions with the capacity to generate new neurons (hippocampus and olfactory forebrain), DCL expression was found in three novel brain areas namely

  8. Doublecortin-like knockdown in the adult mouse brain : implications for neurogenesis, neuroplasticity and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saaltink, Dirk-Jan

    2014-01-01

    The results in this thesis showed for the first time doublecortin-like (DCL)-specific expression in the adult mouse brain. Besides the expected regions with the capacity to generate new neurons (hippocampus and olfactory forebrain), DCL expression was found in three novel brain areas namely hypothal

  9. Automated microinjection of recombinant BCL-X into mouse zygotes enhances embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Liu

    Full Text Available Progression of fertilized mammalian oocytes through cleavage, blastocyst formation and implantation depends on successful implementation of the developmental program, which becomes established during oogenesis. The identification of ooplasmic factors, which are responsible for successful embryo development, is thus crucial in designing possible molecular therapies for infertility intervention. However, systematic evaluation of molecular targets has been hampered by the lack of techniques for efficient delivery of molecules into embryos. We have developed an automated robotic microinjection system for delivering cell impermeable compounds into preimplantation embryos with a high post-injection survival rate. In this paper, we report the performance of the system on microinjection of mouse embryos. Furthermore, using this system we provide the first evidence that recombinant BCL-XL (recBCL-XL protein is effective in preventing early embryo arrest imposed by suboptimal culture environment. We demonstrate that microinjection of recBCL-XL protein into early-stage embryos repairs mitochondrial bioenergetics, prevents reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, and enhances preimplantation embryo development. This approach may lead to a possible treatment option for patients with repeated in vitro fertilization (IVF failure due to poor embryo quality.

  10. Development and application of an oral challenge mouse model for studying Clostridium perfringens type D infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E; Sayeed, Sameera; Fisher, Derek J; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Vicki; Rood, Julian I; McClane, Bruce A; Saputo, Julian; Uzal, Francisco A

    2007-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D isolates cause enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and probably cattle. While the major disease signs and lesions of type D animal disease are usually attributed to epsilon toxin, a class B select agent, these bacteria typically produce several lethal toxins. Understanding of disease pathogenesis and development of improved vaccines are hindered by the lack of a small-animal model mimicking natural disease caused by type D isolates. Addressing this need, we developed an oral challenge mouse model of C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia. When BALB/c mice with a sealed anus were inoculated by intragastric gavage with type D isolates, 7 of 10 type D isolates were lethal, as defined by spontaneous death or severe clinical signs necessitating euthanasia. The lethalities of the seven type D isolates varied between 14 and 100%. Clinical signs in the lethally challenged mice included seizures, convulsions, hyperexcitability, and/or depression. Mild intestinal gas distention and brain edema were observed at necropsy in a few mice, while histology showed multifocal acute tubular necrosis of the kidney and edema in the lungs of most challenged mice that developed a clinical response. When the lethality of type D isolates in this model was compared with in vitro toxin production, only a limited correlation was observed. However, mice could be protected against lethality by intravenous passive immunization with an epsilon toxin antibody prior to oral challenge. This study provides an economical new model for studying the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type D infections.

  11. Development and Application of an Oral Challenge Mouse Model for Studying Clostridium perfringens Type D Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E.; Sayeed, Sameera; Fisher, Derek J.; Poon, Rachael; Adams, Vicki; Rood, Julian I.; McClane, Bruce A.; Saputo, Julian; Uzal, Francisco A.

    2007-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type D isolates cause enterotoxemia in sheep, goats, and probably cattle. While the major disease signs and lesions of type D animal disease are usually attributed to epsilon toxin, a class B select agent, these bacteria typically produce several lethal toxins. Understanding of disease pathogenesis and development of improved vaccines are hindered by the lack of a small-animal model mimicking natural disease caused by type D isolates. Addressing this need, we developed an oral challenge mouse model of C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia. When BALB/c mice with a sealed anus were inoculated by intragastric gavage with type D isolates, 7 of 10 type D isolates were lethal, as defined by spontaneous death or severe clinical signs necessitating euthanasia. The lethalities of the seven type D isolates varied between 14 and 100%. Clinical signs in the lethally challenged mice included seizures, convulsions, hyperexcitability, and/or depression. Mild intestinal gas distention and brain edema were observed at necropsy in a few mice, while histology showed multifocal acute tubular necrosis of the kidney and edema in the lungs of most challenged mice that developed a clinical response. When the lethality of type D isolates in this model was compared with in vitro toxin production, only a limited correlation was observed. However, mice could be protected against lethality by intravenous passive immunization with an epsilon toxin antibody prior to oral challenge. This study provides an economical new model for studying the pathogenesis of C. perfringens type D infections. PMID:17562765

  12. Coordination of tooth morphogenesis and neuronal development through tissue interactions: lessons from mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Keijo; Kettunen, Päivi

    2014-07-15

    In addition to being an advantageous model to investigate general molecular mechanisms of organ formation, the tooth is a distinct target organ for peripheral nerve innervation. These nerves are required for the function and protection of the teeth and, as shown in fish, also for their regeneration. This review focuses on recent findings of the local tissue interactions and molecular signaling mechanisms that regulate the early nerve arrival and patterning of mouse mandibular molar tooth sensory innervation. Dental sensory nerve growth and patterning is a stepwise process that is intimately linked to advancing tooth morphogenesis. In particular, nerve growth factor and semaphorin 3A serve as essential functions during and are iteratively used at different stages of tooth innervation. The tooth germ controls development of its own nerve supply, and similar to the development of the tooth organ proper, tissue interactions between dental epithelial and mesenchymal tissues control the establishment of tooth innervation. Tgf-β, Wnt, and Fgf signaling, which regulate tooth formation, are implicated to mediate these interactions. Therefore, tissue interactions mediated by conserved signal families may constitute key mechanism for the integration of tooth organogenesis and development of its peripheral nerve supply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of Antiviral Innate Immunity During In Vitro Differentiation of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, William; Acharya, Dhiraj; Wang, Ruoxing; Wang, Jundi; Gurung, Chandan; Chen, Bohan; Bai, Fengwei; Guo, Yan-Lin

    2016-04-15

    The innate immunity of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) has recently emerged as an important issue in ESC biology and in ESC-based regenerative medicine. We have recently reported that mouse ESCs (mESCs) do not have a functional type I interferon (IFN)-based antiviral innate immunity. They are deficient in expressing IFN in response to viral infection and have limited ability to respond to IFN. Using fibroblasts (FBs) as a cell model, the current study investigated the development of antiviral mechanisms during in vitro differentiation of mESCs. We demonstrate that mESC-differentiated FBs (mESC-FBs) share extensive similarities with naturally differentiated FBs in morphology, marker expression, and growth pattern, but their development of antiviral mechanisms lags behind. Nonetheless, the antiviral mechanisms are inducible during mESC differentiation as demonstrated by the transition of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), a key transcription factor for IFN expression, from its inactive state in mESCs to its active state in mESC-FBs and by increased responses of mESC-FBs to viral stimuli and IFN during their continued in vitro propagation. Together with our previously published study, the current data provide important insights into molecular basis for the deficiency of IFN expression in mESCs and the development of antiviral innate immunity during mESC differentiation.

  14. Histidine-rich glycoprotein can prevent development of mouse experimental glioblastoma.

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    Maria Kärrlander

    Full Text Available Extensive angiogenesis, formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels, is an important feature of malignant glioma. Several antiangiogenic drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or its receptors are currently in clinical trials as therapy for high-grade glioma and bevacizumab was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. However, the modest efficacy of these drugs and emerging problems with anti-VEGF treatment resistance welcome the development of alternative antiangiogenic therapies. One potential candidate is histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG, a plasma protein with antiangiogenic properties that can inhibit endothelial cell adhesion and migration. We have used the RCAS/TV-A mouse model for gliomas to investigate the effect of HRG on brain tumor development. Tumors were induced with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B, in the presence or absence of HRG. We found that HRG had little effect on tumor incidence but could significantly inhibit the development of malignant glioma and completely prevent the occurrence of grade IV tumors (glioblastoma.

  15. Expression of macro non-coding RNAs Meg8 and Irm in mouse embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Tiantian; He, Hongjuan; Han, Zhengbin; Zeng, Tiebo; Huang, Zhijun; Liu, Qi; Gu, Ning; Chen, Yan; Sugimoto, Kenkichi; Jiang, Huijie; Wu, Qiong

    2012-07-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) Meg8 and Irm were previously identified as alternatively splicing isoforms of Rian gene. Ascertaining ncRNAs spatiotemporal expression patterns is crucial for understanding the physiological roles of ncRNAs during tissue and organ development. In this study in mouse embryos, we focused on the developmental regulation expression of imprinted macro ncRNAs, Meg8 and Irm by using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR). The in situ hybridization results showed that Meg8 and Irm were expressed in the developing brain at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E11.5, while Irm expression signals were strikingly detected in the somite, where Meg8 expression signals were undetectable. By E15.5, they were expressed in brain, tongue, liver, lung and neuroendocrine tissues, while Irm displayed more restricted expression in tongue and skeletal muscle than Meg8. Furthermore, quantitative analysis confirmed that they were highly expressed in tongue and brain at E12.5, E15.5 and E18.5. These results indicated that Meg8 and Irm might be coordinately expressed and functionally correlated in diverse of organs. Notably, Irm was more closely associated with morphogenesis of skeletal muscle in contrast to Meg8 during embryonic development.

  16. Cytoarchitecture of mouse and human subventricular zone in developing cerebral neocortex.

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    Tabata, Hidenori; Yoshinaga, Satoshi; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2012-01-01

    During cerebral neocortical development, excitatory neurons are generated from radial glial cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) or from secondary progenitor cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ); these neurons then migrate toward the pial surface. We have observed that post-mitotic neurons generated directly in the VZ accumulated just above the VZ with a multipolar morphology, while secondary progenitor cells having a long ascending process left the VZ faster than the post-mitotic neurons. Recent observations of human developing neocortex have revealed the existence of radial glia-like progenitors (oRG cells) in the SVZ. This type of progenitor was first thought to be human specific; however, similar cells have also been found in mouse neocortex, and the morphology of these cells resembled that of some of the secondary progenitor cells that we had previously observed, suggesting the existence of a common architecture for the developing neocortex among mammals. In this review, we discuss the nature of the SVZ and its similarities and differences between humans and mice.

  17. The Role of Type IV Collagen in Developing Lens in Mouse Fetuses

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    Mehdi Jalali

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sExtracellular matrix (ECM and basement membrane (BM play important roles in many developmental processes during development and after birth. Among the components of the BM, collagen fibers specially type IV are the most important parts. The aim of this study was to determine the time when collagen type IV appears in the BM of lens structure during mouse embryonic development.Materials and MethodsIn this experimental study, 22 female Balb/C mice were randomly selected and were kept under normal condition, finding vaginal plug was assumed as day zero of pregnancy. From embryonic day 10 to 20, all specimens were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and their heads were fixed, serially sectioned and immunohistochemistry study for tracing collagen type IV in lens were carried out.ResultsOur data revealed that collagen type IV appeared at the early stage of gestation day 12 in BM of anterior epithelial lens cells and the amount of this protein gradually increased until days 15-17 in ECM and posterior capsule epithelium. After this period, severe reaction was not observed in any part of the lens.ConclusionThese findings establish the important role of collagen IV in developing optic cup and any changes during critical period of pregnancy may be result in severe visual system defect

  18. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

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    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  19. Effects of melatonin on in vitro development of mouse two-cell embryos cultured in HTF medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiu-Zhi; Wen, Qing; Shi, Jian-Min; Liang-Wang; Zeng, Shen-Ming; Tian, Jian-Hui; Zhou, Guang-Bin; Zhu, Shi-En; Liu, Guo-Shi

    2010-01-01

    Melatonin is capable of improving the developmental capacity of ovine, porcine and bovine embryos in vitro. However, whether melatonin possesses similar benefits to the in vitro mouse embryonic development has yet to be determined. In this study, we assessed the effects of various concentrations of melatonin (10-13 to 10-3 M) on the in-vitro development of mouse embryos cultured in HTF medium for 96 hr; embryos cultured without melatonin were used as control. The in vitro development of mouse two-cell embryos significantly benefited from treatment with melatonin in a concentration-dependent manner. The effects of melatonin on the rates of blastocyst formation, hatching/hatched blastocysts and cell number per blastocyst were bi-phasic; all significantly increased by melatonin at 10-13 to 10-5 M and decreased by melatonin at 10-3 M. Maximal benefit of melatonin on in vitro mouse 2-cell embryo development was achieved at a concentration of 10-9 M. In comparison to control, 10-9 M melatonin increased blastocyst formation rate from 48.08 +/- 5.25% to 82.08 +/- 2.34% (p HTF medium.

  20. Phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 Regulates Dendritic Spine Development of Cortical Neuron in the Mouse Hippocampus

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    Xiaohua Jin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proper density and morphology of dendritic spines are important for higher brain functions such as learning and memory. However, our knowledge about molecular mechanisms that regulate the development and maintenance of dendritic spines is limited. We recently reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is required for the development and maintenance of dendritic spines of cortical neurons in the mouse brain. Previous in vitro studies have suggested the involvement of Cdk5 substrates in the formation of dendritic spines; however, their role in spine development has not been tested in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2 in the dendritic spines of cultured hippocampal neurons and in vivo in the mouse brain. When we eliminated CRMP2 phosphorylation in CRMP2KI/KI mice, the densities of dendritic spines significantly decreased in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in the mouse brain. These results indicate that phosphorylation of CRMP2 by Cdk5 is important for dendritic spine development in cortical neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

  1. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  2. Expression of the retinoic acid-metabolizing enzymes RALDH2 and CYP26b1 during mouse postnatal testis development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Wen Wu; Ru-Yao Wang; Qiang-Su Guo; Chen Xu

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To study the expression pattern of the retinoic acid metabolizing enzymes RALDH2 and CYP26bl during mouse postnatal testis development at both mRNA and protein levels. Methods: Real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were performed to determine the relative quantity of RALDH2 and CYP26bl at both mRNA and protein levels at postnatal day 1, 5, 10, 20, and in adult mice (70 days testes). Testicular localization of RALDH2 and CYP26bl during mouse postnatal development was examined using immunohistochemistry assay. Results: Aldhla 2 transcripts and its protein RALDH2 began to increase at postnatal day 10, and remained at a high level through postnatal day 20 to adulthood. Cyp26bl transcripts and CYP26bl protein did not change significantly during mouse postnatal testis development. RALDH2 was undetectable in the postnatal 1, 5 and 10 day testes using immunohis- tochemistry assay. At postnatal day 20 it was detected in pachytene spermatocytes. Robust expression of RALDH2 was restricted in round spermatids in the adult mouse testis. In the developing and adult testis, CYP26bl protein was confined to the peritubular myoepithelial cells. Conclusion: Our results indicate that following birth, the level of retinoic acid in the seminiferous tubules might begin to increase at postnatal day 10, and maintain a high level through postnatal day 20 to adulthood. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 569-576)

  3. In-silico QTL mapping of postpubertal mammary ductal development in the mouse uncovers potential human breast cancer risk loci

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    Genetic background plays a dominant role in mammary gland development and breast cancer (BrCa). Despite this, the role of genetics is only partially understood. This study used strain-dependent variation in an inbred mouse mapping panel, to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying structura...

  4. Embryonic and postnatal development of GABA, calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the mouse claustral complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, José Carlos; Real, M Angeles; Olmos, Luis; Legaz, Isabel; Medina, Loreta; Guirado, Salvador

    2005-01-03

    We analyzed the development of immunoreactive expression patterns for the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the calcium-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the embryonic and postnatal mouse claustral complex. Each calcium-binding protein shows a different temporal and spatial pattern of development. Calbindin-positive cells start to be seen very early during embryogenesis and increase dramatically until birth, thus becoming the most abundant cell type during embryonic development, especially in the ventral pallial part of the claustrum. The distribution of calbindin neurons throughout the claustrum during embryonic development partly parallels that of GABA neurons, suggesting that at least part of the calbindin neurons of the claustral complex are GABAergic and originate in the subpallium. Parvalbumin cells, on the other hand, start to be seen only postnatally, and their number then increases while the density of calbindin neurons decreases. Based on calretinin expression in axons, the core/shell compartments of the dorsal claustrum start to be clearly seen at embryonic day 18.5 and may be related to the development of the thalamoclaustral input. Comparison with the expression of Cadherin 8, a marker of the developing dorsolateral claustrum, indicates that the core includes a central part of the dorsolateral claustrum, whereas the shell includes a peripheral area of the dorsolateral claustrum, plus the adjacent ventromedial claustrum. The present data on the spatiotemporal developmental patterns of several subtypes of GABAergic neurons in the claustral complex may help for future studies on temporal lobe epilepsies, which have been related to an alteration of the GABAergic activity.

  5. Deletion of forebrain glycine transporter 1 enhances conditioned freezing to a reliable, but not an ambiguous, cue for threat in a conditioned freezing paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubroqua, Sylvain; Singer, Philipp; Yee, Benjamin K

    2014-10-15

    Enhanced expression of Pavlovian aversive conditioning but not appetitive conditioning may indicate a bias in the processing of threatening or fearful events. Mice with disruption of glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) in forebrain neurons exhibit such a bias, but they are at the same time highly sensitive to manipulations that hinder the development of the conditioned response (CR) suggesting that the mutation may modify higher cognitive processes that extract predictive information between environmental cues. Here, we further investigated the development of fear conditioning in forebrain neuronal GlyT1 knockout mice when the predictiveness of a tone stimulus for foot-shock was rendered ambiguous by interspersing [tone→no shock] trials in-between [tone→shock] trials during acquisition. The CR to the ambiguous tone CS (conditioned stimulus) was compared with that generated by an unambiguous CS that was always followed by the shock US (unconditioned stimulus) during acquisition. We showed that rendering the CS ambiguous as described significantly attenuated the CR in the mutants, but it was not sufficient to modify the CR in the control mice. It is concluded that disruption of GlyT1 in forebrain neurons does not increase the risk of forming spurious and potentially maladaptive fear associations.

  6. Up-regulation of HP1γ expression during neuronal maturation promotes axonal and dendritic development in mouse embryonic neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshiro, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Yusuke; Furuta, Yasuhide; Okabe, Shigeo; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2015-02-01

    Immature neurons undergo morphological and physiological changes including axonal and dendritic development to establish neuronal networks. As the transcriptional status changes at a large number of genes during neuronal maturation, global changes in chromatin modifiers may take place in this process. We now show that the amount of heterochromatin protein 1γ (HP1γ) increases during neuronal maturation in the mouse neocortex. Knockdown of HP1γ suppressed axonal and dendritic development in mouse embryonic neocortical neurons in culture, and either knockdown or knockout of HP1γ impaired the projection of callosal axons of superficial layer neurons to the contralateral hemisphere in the developing neocortex. Conversely, forced expression of HP1γ facilitated axonal and dendritic development, suggesting that the increase of HP1γ is a rate limiting step in neuronal maturation. These results together show an important role for HP1γ in promoting axonal and dendritic development in maturing neurons.

  7. Early physical and motor development of mouse offspring exposed to valproic acid throughout intrauterine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorac, Jelena; Pešić, Vesna; Pavković, Željko; Martać, Ljiljana; Kanazir, Selma; Filipović, Ljupka; Sekulić, Slobodan

    2016-09-15

    Clinical research has identified developmental delay and physical malformations in children prenatally exposed to the antiepileptic drug (AED) valproic acid (VPA). However, the early signs of neurodevelopmental deficits, their evolution during postnatal development and growth, and the dose effects of VPA are not well understood. The present study aimed to examine the influence of maternal exposure to a wide dose range (50, 100, 200 and 400mg/kg/day) of VPA during breeding and gestation on early physical and neuromotor development in mice offspring. Body weight gain, eye opening, the surface righting reflex (SRR) and tail suspension test (TST) were examined in the offspring at postnatal days 5, 10 and 15. We observed that: (1) all tested doses of VPA reduced the body weight of the offspring and the timing of eye opening; (2) offspring exposed to VPA displayed immature forms of righting and required more time to complete the SRR; (3) latency for the first immobilization in the TST is shorter in offspring exposed to higher doses of VPA; however, mice in all groups exposed to VPA exhibited atypical changes in this parameter during the examined period of maturation; (4) irregularities in swinging and curling activities were observed in animals exposed to higher doses of VPA. This study points to delayed somatic development and postponed maturation of the motor system in all of the offspring prenatally exposed to VPA, with stronger effects observed at higher doses. The results implicate that the strategy of continuous monitoring of general health and achievements in motor milestones during the early postnatal development in prenatally VPA-exposed offspring, irrespectively of the dose applied, could help to recognize early developmental irregularities.

  8. Genetic interplay between the transcription factors Sp8 and Emx2 in the patterning of the forebrain

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    Stoykova Anastasia

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The forebrain consists of multiple structures necessary to achieve elaborate functions. Proper patterning is, therefore, a prerequisite for the generation of optimal functional areas. Only a few factors have been shown to control the genetic networks that establish early forebrain patterning. Results and conclusion Using conditional inactivation, we show that the transcription factor Sp8 has an essential role in the molecular and functional patterning of the developing telencephalon along the anteroposterior axis by modulating the expression gradients of Emx2 and Pax6. Moreover, Sp8 is essential for the maintenance of ventral cell identity in the septum and medial ganglionic eminence (MGE. This is probably mediated through a positive regulatory interaction with Fgf8 in the medial wall, and Nkx2.1 in the rostral MGE anlage, and independent of SHH and WNT signaling. Furthermore, Sp8 is required during corticogenesis to sustain a normal progenitor pool, and to control preplate splitting, as well as the specification of cellular diversity within distinct cortical layers.

  9. Effect of Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI on Mouse Embryos Preimplantational Development

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    Claudia Cârstea

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the in vitro culture (IVC of preimplantation embryos is associated with changes in gene expression. It is however, not known if the method of fertilization affects the global pattern of gene expression. We compared the development of mouse blastocysts produced by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI versus blastocysts fertilized in vivo and cultured in vitro from the zygote stage (IVC. At the end of cultivation (96 hrs for blastocyst stage embryos, expanded blastocysts of each group were randomly selected, and ICM and total cells number were differentially stained. The total cell number of blastocysts was estimated by counting the total number of nuclei using DAPI staining. Cell number for inner cell mass (ICM was estimated by counting the OCT4 (POU5FL positive cells. Digitally recombined, composite images were analyzed using the Zeiss Axion Vision software and Zeiss Apotome. All 5–10 optical sections were divided using a standard grid over each layer to count all. Comparing the total cells and the ICM cells number, it appears that each method of fertilization has a unique pattern development. The developmental rate and the total cell number of the blastocyst were significantly lower in ICSI versus in vivo fertilized embryos which affect the embryonic developmental rate and the total cell number of blastocysts.

  10. C-peptide promotes lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasic, Dusica; Marx, Nikolaus; Sukhova, Galina; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Grüb, Miriam; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Rottbauer, Wolfgang; Walcher, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    Patients with insulin resistance and early type 2 diabetes exhibit an increased propensity to develop a diffuse and extensive pattern of arteriosclerosis. Typically, these patients show elevated serum levels of the proinsulin cleavage product C-peptide and immunohistochemical data from our group revealed C-peptide deposition in early lesions of these individuals. Moreover, in vitro studies suggest that C-peptide could promote atherogenesis. This study examined whether C-peptide promotes vascular inflammation and lesion development in a mouse model of arteriosclerosis. ApoE-deficient mice on a high fat diet were treated with C-peptide or control injections for 12 weeks and the effect on lesion size and plaque composition was analysed. C-peptide treatment significantly increased C-peptide blood levels by 4.8-fold without having an effect on glucose or insulin levels, nor on the lipid profile. In these mice, C-peptide deposition in atherosclerotic plaques was significantly increased compared with controls. Moreover, lesions of C-peptide-treated mice contained significantly more macrophages (1.6 ± 0.3% versus 0.7 ± 0.2% positive area; P arteriosclerosis support the hypothesis that C-peptide may have an active role in atherogenesis in patients with diabetes and insulin resistance.

  11. Cytotoxic Effects of Dillapiole on Embryonic Development of Mouse Blastocysts in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Wen-Hsiung Chan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We examined the cytotoxic effects of dillapiole, a phenylpropanoid with antileishmanial, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, and acaricidal activities, on the blastocyst stage of mouse embryos, subsequent embryonic attachment and outgrowth in vitro, and in vivo implantation via embryo transfer. Blastocysts treated with 2.5–10 μM dillapiole exhibited a significant increase in apoptosis and corresponding decrease in total cell number. Notably, the implantation success rates of blastocysts pretreated with dillapiole were lower than those of their control counterparts. Moreover, in vitro treatment with 2.5–10 μM dillapiole was associated with increased resorption of post-implantation embryos and decreased fetal weight. Our results collectively indicate that dillapiole induces apoptosis and retards early post-implantation development, both in vitro and in vivo. However, the extent to which this organic compound exerts teratogenic effects on early human development is not known at present. Further studies are required to establish effective protection strategies against the cytotoxic effects of dillapiole.

  12. Mouse Germ Cell Development in-vivo and in-vitro

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    Deshira Saiti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian development, primordial germ cells (PGCs represent the initial population of cells that are committed to the germ cell lineage. PGCs segregate early in development, triggered by signals from the extra-embryonic ectoderm. They are distinguished from surrounding cells by their unique gene expression patterns. Some of the more common genes used to identify them are Blimp1, Oct3/4, Fragilis, Stella, c-Kit, Mvh, Dazl and Gcna1. These genes are involved in regulating their migration and differentiation, and in maintaining the pluripotency of these cells. Recent research has demonstrated the possibility of obtaining PGCs, and subsequently, mature germ cells from a starting population of embryonic stem cells (ESCs in culture. This phenomenon has been investigated using a variety of methods, and ESC lines of both mouse and human origin. Embryonic stem cells can differentiate into germ cells of both the male and female phenotype and in one case has resulted in the birth of live pups from the fertilization of oocytes with ESC derived sperm. This fi nding leads to the prospect of using ESC derived germ cells as a treatment for sterility. This review outlines the evolvement of germ cells from ESCs in vitro in relation to in vivo events.

  13. A mouse model for monitoring islet cell genesis and developing therapies for diabetes

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    Yoshinori Shimajiri

    2011-03-01

    Transient expression of the transcription factor neurogenin-3 marks progenitor cells in the pancreas as they differentiate into islet cells. We developed a transgenic mouse line in which the surrogate markers secreted alkaline phosphatase (SeAP and enhanced green florescent protein (EGFP can be used to monitor neurogenin-3 expression, and thus islet cell genesis. In transgenic embryos, cells expressing EGFP lined the pancreatic ducts. SeAP was readily detectable in embryos, in the media of cultured embryonic pancreases and in the serum of adult animals. Treatment with the γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT, which blocks Notch signaling, enhanced SeAP secretion rates and increased the number of EGFP-expressing cells as assayed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS and immunohistochemistry in cultured pancreases from embryos at embryonic day 11.5, but not in pancreases harvested 1 day later. By contrast, treatment with growth differentiation factor 11 (GDF11 reduced SeAP secretion rates. In adult mice, partial pancreatectomy decreased, whereas duct ligation increased, circulating SeAP levels. This model will be useful for studying signals involved in islet cell genesis in vivo and developing therapies that induce this process.

  14. Development of a clinically-precise mouse model of rectal cancer.

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    Hiroyuki Kishimoto

    Full Text Available Currently-used rodent tumor models, including transgenic tumor models, or subcutaneously growing tumors in mice, do not sufficiently represent clinical cancer. We report here development of methods to obtain a highly clinically-accurate rectal cancer model. This model was established by intrarectal transplantation of mouse rectal cancer cells, stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP, followed by disrupting the epithelial cell layer of the rectal mucosa by instilling an acetic acid solution. Early-stage tumor was detected in the rectal mucosa by 6 days after transplantation. The tumor then became invasive into the submucosal tissue. The tumor incidence was 100% and mean volume (±SD was 1232.4 ± 994.7 mm(3 at 4 weeks after transplantation detected by fluorescence imaging. Spontaneous lymph node metastasis and lung metastasis were also found approximately 4 weeks after transplantation in over 90% of mice. This rectal tumor model precisely mimics the natural history of rectal cancer and can be used to study early tumor development, metastasis, and discovery and evaluation of novel therapeutics for this treatment-resistant disease.

  15. Development of S/MAR minicircles for enhanced and persistent transgene expression in the mouse liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyros, Orestis; Wong, Suet Ping; Fedonidis, Constantinos; Tolmachov, Oleg; Waddington, Simon N; Howe, Steven J; Niceta, Marcello; Coutelle, Charles; Harbottle, Richard P

    2011-05-01

    We have previously described the development of a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) episomal vector system for in vivo application and demonstrated its utility to sustain transgene expression in the mouse liver for at least 6 months following a single administration. Subsequently, we observed that transgene expression is sustained for the lifetime of the animal. The level of expression, however, does drop appreciably over time. We hypothesised that by eliminating the bacterial components in our vectors, we could improve their performance since bacterial sequences have been shown to be responsible for the immunotoxicity of the vector and the silencing of its expression when applied in vivo. We describe here the development of a minimally sized S/MAR vector, which is devoid of extraneous bacterial sequences. This minicircle vector comprises an expression cassette and an S/MAR moiety, providing higher and more sustained transgene expression for several months in the absence of selection, both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast to the expression of our original S/MAR plasmid vector, the novel S/MAR minicircle vectors mediate increased transgene expression, which becomes sustained at about twice the levels observed immediately after administration. These promising results demonstrate the utility of minimally sized S/MAR vectors for persistent, atoxic gene expression.

  16. PDK1-Akt pathway regulates radial neuronal migration and microtubules in the developing mouse neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yasuhiro; Higuchi, Maiko; Oishi, Koji; Kishi, Yusuke; Okazaki, Tomohiko; Sakai, Hiroshi; Miyata, Takaki; Nakajima, Kazunori; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2016-05-24

    Neurons migrate a long radial distance by a process known as locomotion in the developing mammalian neocortex. During locomotion, immature neurons undergo saltatory movement along radial glia fibers. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the speed of locomotion are largely unknown. We now show that the serine/threonine kinase Akt and its activator phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) regulate the speed of locomotion of mouse neocortical neurons through the cortical plate. Inactivation of the PDK1-Akt pathway impaired the coordinated movement of the nucleus and centrosome, a microtubule-dependent process, during neuronal migration. Moreover, the PDK1-Akt pathway was found to control microtubules, likely by regulating the binding of accessory proteins including the dynactin subunit p150(glued) Consistent with this notion, we found that PDK1 regulates the expression of cytoplasmic dynein intermediate chain and light intermediate chain at a posttranscriptional level in the developing neocortex. Our results thus reveal an essential role for the PDK1-Akt pathway in the regulation of a key step of neuronal migration.

  17. NOMA-GAP/ARHGAP33 regulates synapse development and autistic-like behavior in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, S; Rivalan, M; Strauss, U; Stoenica, L; Trimbuch, T; Rademacher, N; Parthasarathy, S; Lajkó, D; Rosenmund, C; Shoichet, S A; Winter, Y; Tarabykin, V; Rosário, M

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric developmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and schizophrenia, are typically characterized by alterations in social behavior and have been linked to aberrant dendritic spine and synapse development. Here we show, using genetically engineered mice, that the Cdc42 GTPase-activating multiadaptor protein, NOMA-GAP, regulates autism-like social behavior in the mouse, as well as dendritic spine and synapse development. Surprisingly, we were unable to restore spine morphology or autism-associated social behavior in NOMA-GAP-deficient animals by Cre-mediated deletion of Cdc42 alone. Spine morphology can be restored in vivo by re-expression of wild-type NOMA-GAP or a mutant of NOMA-GAP that lacks the RhoGAP domain, suggesting that other signaling functions are involved. Indeed, we show that NOMA-GAP directly interacts with several MAGUK (membrane-associated guanylate kinase) proteins, and that this modulates NOMA-GAP activity toward Cdc42. Moreover, we demonstrate that NOMA-GAP is a major regulator of PSD-95 in the neocortex. Loss of NOMA-GAP leads to strong upregulation of serine 295 phosphorylation of PSD-95 and moreover to its subcellular mislocalization. This is associated with marked loss of surface α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor and defective synaptic transmission, thereby providing a molecular basis for autism-like social behavior in the absence of NOMA-GAP.

  18. Development and rescue of human familial hypercholesterolaemia in a xenograft mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig-Choisat, Beatrice; Wang, Lili; Legras, Xavier; Saha, Pradip K.; Chen, Leon; Bell, Peter; Pankowicz, Francis P.; Hill, Matthew C.; Barzi, Mercedes; Leyton, Claudia Kettlun; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Kruse, Robert L.; Himes, Ryan W.; Goss, John A.; Wilson, James M.; Chan, Lawrence; Lagor, William R.; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of lipid metabolism are a major cause of human morbidity, but no animal model entirely recapitulates human lipoprotein metabolism. Here we develop a xenograft mouse model using hepatocytes from a patient with familial hypercholesterolaemia caused by loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). Like familial hypercholesterolaemia patients, our familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice develop hypercholesterolaemia and a 'humanized‘ serum profile, including expression of the emerging drug targets cholesteryl ester transfer protein and apolipoprotein (a), for which no genes exist in mice. We go on to replace the missing LDLR in familial hypercholesterolaemia liver chimeric mice using an adeno-associated virus 9-based gene therapy and restore normal lipoprotein profiles after administration of a single dose. Our study marks the first time a human metabolic disease is induced in an experimental animal model by human hepatocyte transplantation and treated by gene therapy. Such xenograft platforms offer the ability to validate human experimental therapies and may foster their rapid translation into the clinic. PMID:26081744

  19. Microdrop preparation factors influence culture-media osmolality, which can impair mouse embryo preimplantation development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, J E; Cabrera, L; Xu, X; Smith, G D

    2012-02-01

    Because media osmolality can impact embryo development, the effect of conditions during microdrop preparation on osmolality was examined. Various sizes of microdrops were prepared under different laboratory conditions. Drops were pipetted directly onto a dish and covered by oil (standard method) or pipetted on the dish, overlaid with oil before removing the underlying media and replaced with fresh media (wash-drop method). Drops were made at 23°C or on a heated stage (37°C) and with or without airflow. Osmolality was assessed at 5 min and 24h. The biological impact of osmolality change was demonstrated by culturing 1-cell mouse embryos in media with varying osmolality. Reduced drop volume, increased temperature and standard method were associated with a significant increase in osmolality at both 5 min and 24h (P-values media with elevated osmolality (>310mOsm/kg; P<0.05). Procedures in the IVF laboratory can alter osmolality and impact embryo development.

  20. Long non-coding RNA expression profiling of mouse testis during postnatal development.

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    Jin Sun

    Full Text Available Mammalian testis development and spermatogenesis play critical roles in male fertility and continuation of a species. Previous research into the molecular mechanisms of testis development and spermatogenesis has largely focused on the role of protein-coding genes and small non-coding RNAs, such as microRNAs and piRNAs. Recently, it has become apparent that large numbers of long (>200 nt non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are transcribed from mammalian genomes and that lncRNAs perform important regulatory functions in various developmental processes. However, the expression of lncRNAs and their biological functions in post-natal testis development remain unknown. In this study, we employed microarray technology to examine lncRNA expression profiles of neonatal (6-day-old and adult (8-week-old mouse testes. We found that 8,265 lncRNAs were expressed above background levels during post-natal testis development, of which 3,025 were differentially expressed. Candidate lncRNAs were identified for further characterization by an integrated examination of genomic context, gene ontology (GO enrichment of their associated protein-coding genes, promoter analysis for epigenetic modification, and evolutionary conservation of elements. Many lncRNAs overlapped or were adjacent to key transcription factors and other genes involved in spermatogenesis, such as Ovol1, Ovol2, Lhx1, Sox3, Sox9, Plzf, c-Kit, Wt1, Sycp2, Prm1 and Prm2. Most differentially expressed lncRNAs exhibited epigenetic modification marks similar to protein-coding genes and tend to be expressed in a tissue-specific manner. In addition, the majority of differentially expressed lncRNAs harbored evolutionary conserved elements. Taken together, our findings represent the first systematic investigation of lncRNA expression in the mammalian testis and provide a solid foundation for further research into the molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs function in mammalian testis development and spermatogenesis.

  1. Development of mouse embryos cryopreserved by an ultra-rapid method of freezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L; Quinn, P

    1989-01-01

    High concentrations of cryoprotectant combined with sucrose were utilized in an ultra-rapid freezing protocol for mouse preimplantation embryos. Dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO, 1.5 or 3.5 M) or propanediol (PROH, 1.5 or 3.0 M) combined with 0.25 M sucrose were used as freezing solutions. One-, 2- or 8-cell embryos were placed directly into these solutions at room temperature, loaded into straws and plunged into liquid nitrogen within 2-3 min. The straws were rapidly thawed and the embryos expelled into the solution in which they were frozen for 10 min. The cryoprotectants were then removed by single- or multi-step dilution. Survival and development of the embryos in vitro and in vivo were assessed. DMSO (1.5 M) and both concentrations of PROH were totally inadequate as a cryoprotectant in this freezing protocol. A concentration of 3.5 M DMSO gave high survival and development rates when a multi-step dilution procedure was used, but not with a single-step dilution. One-cell embryos gave 71% survival, 35% in-vitro development and 10% in-vivo viability; 2-cell embryos showed 87% survival, 77% in-vitro development and 66% in-vivo viability; and 8-cell embryos showed 97% survival, 87% in-vitro development and 62% in-vivo viability. The results for the 2- and 8-cell stages compared favourably with non-frozen controls, which had 71% in-vivo viability. This method of cryopreservation is therefore fast and viable.

  2. Junctophilin-2 is necessary for T-tubule maturation during mouse heart development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Julia O.; Chiang, David Y.; Wang, Wei; Beavers, David L.; Dixit, Sayali S.; Skapura, Darlene G.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Song, Long-Sheng; Ackerman, Michael J.; Wehrens, Xander H.T.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Transverse tubules (TTs) provide the basic subcellular structures that facilitate excitation–contraction (EC) coupling, the essential process that underlies normal cardiac contractility. Previous studies have shown that TTs develop within the first few weeks of life in mammals but the molecular determinants of this development have remained elusive. This study aims to elucidate the role of junctophilin-2 (JPH2), a junctional membrane complex protein, in the maturation of TTs in cardiomyocytes. Methods and results Using a novel cardiac-specific short-hairpin-RNA-mediated JPH2 knockdown mouse model (Mus musculus; αMHC-shJPH2), we assessed the effects of the loss of JPH2 on the maturation of the ventricular TT structure. Between embryonic day (E) 10.5 and postnatal day (P) 10, JPH2 mRNA and protein levels were reduced by >70% in αMHC-shJPH2 mice. At P8 and P10, knockdown of JPH2 significantly inhibited the maturation of TTs, while expression levels of other genes implicated in TT development remained mostly unchanged. At the same time, intracellular Ca2+ handling was disrupted in ventricular myocytes from αMHC- shJPH2 mice, which developed heart failure by P10 marked by reduced ejection fraction, ventricular dilation, and premature death. In contrast, JPH2 transgenic mice exhibited accelerated TT maturation by P8. Conclusion Our findings suggest that JPH2 is necessary for TT maturation during postnatal cardiac development in mice. In particular, JPH2 may be critical in anchoring the invaginating sarcolemma to the sarcoplasmic reticulum, thereby enabling the maturation of the TT network. PMID:23715556

  3. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Kruppel-like factor 2 is required for normal mouse cardiac development.

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    Aditi R Chiplunkar

    Full Text Available Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 is expressed in endothelial cells in the developing heart, particularly in areas of high shear stress, such as the atrioventricular (AV canal. KLF2 ablation leads to myocardial thinning, high output cardiac failure and death by mouse embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5 in a mixed genetic background. This work identifies an earlier and more fundamental role for KLF2 in mouse cardiac development in FVB/N mice. FVB/N KLF2-/- embryos die earlier, by E11.5. E9.5 FVB/N KLF2-/- hearts have multiple, disorganized cell layers lining the AV cushions, the primordia of the AV valves, rather than the normal single layer. By E10.5, traditional and endothelial-specific FVB/N KLF2-/- AV cushions are hypocellular, suggesting that the cells accumulating at the AV canal have a defect in endothelial to mesenchymal transformation (EMT. E10.5 FVB/N KLF2-/- hearts have reduced glycosaminoglycans in the cardiac jelly, correlating with the reduced EMT. However, the number of mesenchymal cells migrating from FVB/N KLF2-/- AV explants into a collagen matrix is reduced considerably compared to wild-type, suggesting that the EMT defect is not due solely to abnormal cardiac jelly. Echocardiography of E10.5 FVB/N KLF2-/- embryos indicates that they have abnormal heart function compared to wild-type. E10.5 C57BL/6 KLF2-/- hearts have largely normal AV cushions. However, E10.5 FVB/N and C57BL/6 KLF2-/- embryos have a delay in the formation of the atrial septum that is not observed in a defined mixed background. KLF2 ablation results in reduced Sox9, UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (Ugdh, Gata4 and Tbx5 mRNA in FVB/N AV canals. KLF2 binds to the Gata4, Tbx5 and Ugdh promoters in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, indicating that KLF2 could directly regulate these genes. In conclusion, KLF2-/- heart phenotypes are genetic background-dependent. KLF2 plays a role in EMT through its regulation of important cardiovascular genes.

  5. Gene expression signature of cerebellar hypoplasia in a mouse model of Down syndrome during postnatal development

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    Vitalis Tania

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21. The mechanisms by which this aneuploidy produces the complex and variable phenotype observed in people with Down syndrome are still under discussion. Recent studies have demonstrated an increased transcript level of the three-copy genes with some dosage compensation or amplification for a subset of them. The impact of this gene dosage effect on the whole transcriptome is still debated and longitudinal studies assessing the variability among samples, tissues and developmental stages are needed. Results We thus designed a large scale gene expression study in mice (the Ts1Cje Down syndrome mouse model in which we could measure the effects of trisomy 21 on a large number of samples (74 in total in a tissue that is affected in Down syndrome (the cerebellum and where we could quantify the defect during postnatal development in order to correlate gene expression changes to the phenotype observed. Statistical analysis of microarray data revealed a major gene dosage effect: for the three-copy genes as well as for a 2 Mb segment from mouse chromosome 12 that we show for the first time as being deleted in the Ts1Cje mice. This gene dosage effect impacts moderately on the expression of euploid genes (2.4 to 7.5% differentially expressed. Only 13 genes were significantly dysregulated in Ts1Cje mice at all four postnatal development stages studied from birth to 10 days after birth, and among them are 6 three-copy genes. The decrease in granule cell proliferation demonstrated in newborn Ts1Cje cerebellum was correlated with a major gene dosage effect on the transcriptome in dissected cerebellar external granule cell layer. Conclusion High throughput gene expression analysis in the cerebellum of a large number of samples of Ts1Cje and euploid mice has revealed a prevailing gene dosage effect on triplicated genes. Moreover using an enriched cell

  6. Systems toxicology approaches enable mechanistic comparison of spontaneous and cigarette smoke-related lung tumor development in the A/J mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The A/J mouse is highly susceptible to lung tumor induction and has been widely used as a screening model in carcinogenicity testing and chemoprevention studies. However, the A/J mouse model has several disadvantages. Most notably, it develops lung tumors spontaneously. Moreover, there is a considerable gap in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of pulmonary chemical carcinogenesis in the A/J mouse. Therefore, we examined the differences between spontaneous and cigarette smoke-rela...

  7. Tooth-bone morphogenesis during postnatal stages of mouse first molar development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungová, Vlasta; Radlanski, Ralf J; Tucker, Abigail S; Renz, Herbert; Míšek, Ivan; Matalová, Eva

    2011-06-01

    The first mouse molar (M1) is the most common model for odontogenesis, with research particularly focused on prenatal development. However, the functional dentition forms postnatally, when the histogenesis and morphogenesis of the tooth is completed, the roots form and the tooth physically anchors into the jaw. In this work, M1 was studied from birth to eruption, assessing morphogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis, and correlating these with remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. The M1 completed crown formation between postnatal (P) days 0-2, and the development of the tooth root was initiated at P4. From P2 until P12, cell proliferation in the dental epithelium reduced and shifted downward to the apical region of the forming root. In contrast, proliferation was maintained or increased in the mesenchymal cells of the dental follicle. At later stages, before tooth eruption (P20), cell proliferation suddenly ceased. This withdrawal from the cell cycle correlated with tooth mineralization and mesenchymal differentiation. Apoptosis was observed during all stages of M1 postnatal morphogenesis, playing a role in the removal of cells such as osteoblasts in the mandibular region and working together with osteoclasts to remodel the bone around the developing tooth. At more advanced developmental stages, apoptotic cells and bodies accumulated in the cell layers above the tooth cusps, in the path of eruption. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the developing postnatal tooth and bone indicates that the alveolar crypts form by resorption underneath the primordia, whereas the ridges form by active bone growth between the teeth and roots to form a functional complex. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Anatomy © 2011 Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. Distinct expression of Cbln family mRNAs in developing and adult mouse brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Eriko; Iijima, Takatoshi; Yuzaki, Michisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2006-08-01

    Cbln1 belongs to the C1q and tumour necrosis factor superfamily, and plays crucial roles as a cerebellar granule cell-derived transneuronal regulator for synapse integrity and plasticity in Purkinje cells. Although Cbln2-Cbln4 are also expressed in the brain and could form heteromeric complexes with Cbln1, their precise expressions remain unclear. Here, we investigated gene expression of the Cbln family in developing and adult C57BL mouse brains by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blot, and high-resolution in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses. In the adult brain, spatial patterns of mRNA expression were highly differential depending on Cbln subtypes. Notably, particularly high levels of Cbln mRNAs were expressed in some nuclei and neurons, whereas their postsynaptic targets often lacked or were low for any Cbln mRNAs, as seen for cerebellar granule cells/Purkinje cells, entorhinal cortex/hippocampus, intralaminar group of thalamic nuclei/caudate-putamen, and dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus/central nucleus of the inferior colliculus. In the developing brain, Cbln1, 2, and 4 mRNAs appeared as early as embryonic day 10-13, and exhibited transient up-regulation during the late embryonic and neonatal periods. For example, Cbln2 mRNA was expressed in the cortical plate of the developing neocortex, displaying a high rostromedial to low caudolateral gradient. In contrast, Cbln3 mRNA was selective to cerebellar granule cells throughout development, and its onset was as late as postnatal day 7-10. These results will provide a molecular-anatomical basis for future studies that characterize roles played by the Cbln family.

  9. Exercise prevents development of autonomic dysregulation and hyperalgesia in a mouse model of chronic muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabharwal, Rasna; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sluka, Kathleen A; Chapleau, Mark W

    2016-02-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain (CMP) conditions, like fibromyalgia, are associated with widespread pain and alterations in autonomic functions. Regular physical activity prevents the development of CMP and can reduce autonomic dysfunction. We tested if there were alterations in autonomic function of sedentary mice with CMP, and whether exercise reduced the autonomic dysfunction and pain induced by CMP. Chronic musculoskeletal pain was induced by 2 intramuscular injections of pH 5.0 in combination with a single fatiguing exercise task. A running wheel was placed into cages so that the mouse had free access to it for either 5 days or 8 weeks (exercise groups) and these animals were compared to sedentary mice without running wheels. Autonomic function and nociceptive withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle were assessed before and after induction of CMP in exercised and sedentary mice. In sedentary mice, we show decreased baroreflex sensitivity, increased blood pressure variability, decreased heart rate variability, and decreased withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle 24 hours after induction of CMP. There were no sex differences after induction of the CMP in any outcome measure. We further show that both 5 days and 8 weeks of physical activity prevent the development of autonomic dysfunction and decreases in withdrawal threshold induced by CMP. Thus, this study uniquely shows the development of autonomic dysfunction in animals with chronic muscle hyperalgesia, which can be prevented with as little as 5 days of physical activity, and suggest that physical activity may prevent the development of pain and autonomic dysfunction in people with CMP.

  10. Tooth-bone morphogenesis during postnatal stages of mouse first molar development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lungová, Vlasta; Radlanski, Ralf J; Tucker, Abigail S; Renz, Herbert; Míšek, Ivan; Matalová, Eva

    2011-01-01

    The first mouse molar (M1) is the most common model for odontogenesis, with research particularly focused on prenatal development. However, the functional dentition forms postnatally, when the histogenesis and morphogenesis of the tooth is completed, the roots form and the tooth physically anchors into the jaw. In this work, M1 was studied from birth to eruption, assessing morphogenesis, proliferation and apoptosis, and correlating these with remodeling of the surrounding bony tissue. The M1 completed crown formation between postnatal (P) days 0–2, and the development of the tooth root was initiated at P4. From P2 until P12, cell proliferation in the dental epithelium reduced and shifted downward to the apical region of the forming root. In contrast, proliferation was maintained or increased in the mesenchymal cells of the dental follicle. At later stages, before tooth eruption (P20), cell proliferation suddenly ceased. This withdrawal from the cell cycle correlated with tooth mineralization and mesenchymal differentiation. Apoptosis was observed during all stages of M1 postnatal morphogenesis, playing a role in the removal of cells such as osteoblasts in the mandibular region and working together with osteoclasts to remodel the bone around the developing tooth. At more advanced developmental stages, apoptotic cells and bodies accumulated in the cell layers above the tooth cusps, in the path of eruption. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the developing postnatal tooth and bone indicates that the alveolar crypts form by resorption underneath the primordia, whereas the ridges form by active bone growth between the teeth and roots to form a functional complex. PMID:21418206

  11. Age-related intraneuronal elevation of αII-spectrin breakdown product SBDP120 in rodent forebrain accelerates in 3×Tg-AD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yan; Zhu, Hai-Xia; Li, Jian-Ming; Luo, Xue-Gang; Patrylo, Peter R; Rose, Gregory M; Streeter, Jackson; Hayes, Ron; Wang, Kevin K W; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Jeromin, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Spectrins line the intracellular surface of plasmalemma and play a critical role in supporting cytoskeletal stability and flexibility. Spectrins can be proteolytically degraded by calpains and caspases, yielding breakdown products (SBDPs) of various molecular sizes, with SBDP120 being largely derived from caspase-3 cleavage. SBDPs are putative biomarkers for traumatic brain injury. The levels of SBDPs also elevate in the brain during aging and perhaps in Alzheimer's disease (AD), although the cellular basis for this change is currently unclear. Here we examined age-related SBDP120 alteration in forebrain neurons in rats and in the triple transgenic model of AD (3×Tg-AD) relative to non-transgenic controls. SBDP120 immunoreactivity (IR) was found in cortical neuronal somata in aged rats, and was prominent in the proximal dendrites of the olfactory bulb mitral cells. Western blot and densitometric analyses in wild-type mice revealed an age-related elevation of intraneuronal SBDP120 in the forebrain which was more robust in their 3×Tg-AD counterparts. The intraneuronal SBDP120 occurrence was not spatiotemporally correlated with transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression, β-amyloid plaque development, or phosphorylated tau expression over various forebrain regions or lamina. No microscopically detectable in situ activated caspase-3 was found in the nuclei of SBDP120-containing neurons. The present study demonstrates the age-dependent intraneuronal presence of an αII-spectrin cleavage fragment in mammalian forebrain which is exacerbated in a transgenic model of AD. This novel neuronal alteration indicates that impairments in membrane protein metabolism, possibly due to neuronal calcium mishandling and/or enhancement of calcium sensitive proteolysis, occur during aging and in transgenic AD mice.

  12. Age-related intraneuronal elevation of αII-spectrin breakdown product SBDP120 in rodent forebrain accelerates in 3×Tg-AD mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cai

    Full Text Available Spectrins line the intracellular surface of plasmalemma and play a critical role in supporting cytoskeletal stability and flexibility. Spectrins can be proteolytically degraded by calpains and caspases, yielding breakdown products (SBDPs of various molecular sizes, with SBDP120 being largely derived from caspase-3 cleavage. SBDPs are putative biomarkers for traumatic brain injury. The levels of SBDPs also elevate in the brain during aging and perhaps in Alzheimer's disease (AD, although the cellular basis for this change is currently unclear. Here we examined age-related SBDP120 alteration in forebrain neurons in rats and in the triple transgenic model of AD (3×Tg-AD relative to non-transgenic controls. SBDP120 immunoreactivity (IR was found in cortical neuronal somata in aged rats, and was prominent in the proximal dendrites of the olfactory bulb mitral cells. Western blot and densitometric analyses in wild-type mice revealed an age-related elevation of intraneuronal SBDP120 in the forebrain which was more robust in their 3×Tg-AD counterparts. The intraneuronal SBDP120 occurrence was not spatiotemporally correlated with transgenic amyloid precursor protein (APP expression, β-amyloid plaque development, or phosphorylated tau expression over various forebrain regions or lamina. No microscopically detectable in situ activated caspase-3 was found in the nuclei of SBDP120-containing neurons. The present study demonstrates the age-dependent intraneuronal presence of an αII-spectrin cleavage fragment in mammalian forebrain which is exacerbated in a transgenic model of AD. This novel neuronal alteration indicates that impairments in membrane protein metabolism, possibly due to neuronal calcium mishandling and/or enhancement of calcium sensitive proteolysis, occur during aging and in transgenic AD mice.

  13. Pallial origin of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and horizontal limb of the diagonal band nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombero, Ana; Bueno, Carlos; Saglietti, Laura; Rodenas, Monica; Guimera, Jordi; Bulfone, Alexandro; Martinez, Salvador

    2011-10-01

    The majority of the cortical cholinergic innervation implicated in attention and memory originates in the nucleus basalis of Meynert and in the horizontal limb of the diagonal band nucleus of the basal prosencephalon. Functional alterations in this system give rise to neuropsychiatric disorders as well as to the cognitive alterations described in Parkinson and Alzheimer's diseases. Despite the functional importance of these basal forebrain cholinergic neurons very little is known about their origin and development. Previous studies suggest that they originate in the medial ganglionic eminence of the telencephalic subpallium; however, our results identified Tbr1-expressing, reelin-positive neurons migrating from the ventral pallium to the subpallium that differentiate into cholinergic neurons in the basal forebrain nuclei projecting to the cortex. Experiments with Tbr1 knockout mice, which lack ventropallial structures, confirmed the pallial origin of cholinergic neurons in Meynert and horizontal diagonal band nuclei. Also, we demonstrate that Fgf8 signaling in the telencephalic midline attracts these neurons from the pallium to follow a tangential migratory route towards the basal forebrain.

  14. Impact of basal forebrain cholinergic inputs on basolateral amygdala neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Cagri T; Pare, Denis; Zaborszky, Laszlo

    2015-01-14

    In addition to innervating the cerebral cortex, basal forebrain cholinergic (BFc) neurons send a dense projection to the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). In this study, we investigated the effect of near physiological acetylcholine release on BLA neurons using optogenetic tools and in vitro patch-clamp recordings. Adult transgenic mice expressing cre-recombinase under the choline acetyltransferase promoter were used to selectively transduce BFc neurons with channelrhodopsin-2 and a reporter through the injection of an adeno-associated virus. Light-induced stimulation of BFc axons produced different effects depending on the BLA cell type. In late-firing interneurons, BFc inputs elicited fast nicotinic EPSPs. In contrast, no response could be detected in fast-spiking interneurons. In principal BLA neurons, two different effects were elicited depending on their activity level. When principal BLA neurons were quiescent or made to fire at low rates by depolarizing current injection, light-induced activation of BFc axons elicited muscarinic IPSPs. In contrast, with stronger depolarizing currents, eliciting firing above ∼ 6-8 Hz, these muscarinic IPSPs lost their efficacy because stimulation of BFc inputs prolonged current-evoked afterdepolarizations. All the effects observed in principal neurons were dependent on muscarinic receptors type 1, engaging different intracellular mechanisms in a state-dependent manner. Overall, our results suggest that acetylcholine enhances the signal-to-noise ratio in principal BLA neurons. Moreover, the cholinergic engagement of afterdepolarizations may contribute to the formation of stimulus associations during fear-conditioning tasks where the timing of conditioned and unconditioned stimuli is not optimal for the induction of synaptic plasticity.

  15. Cholinergic Neurons Excite Cortically Projecting Basal Forebrain GABAergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; McKenna, James T.; Zant, Janneke C.; Winston, Stuart; Basheer, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    The basal forebrain (BF) plays an important role in the control of cortical activation and attention. Understanding the modulation of BF neuronal activity is a prerequisite to treat disorders of cortical activation involving BF dysfunction, such as Alzheimer's disease. Here we reveal the interaction between cholinergic neurons and cortically projecting BF GABAergic neurons using immunohistochemistry and whole-cell recordings in vitro. In GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, BF cholinergic (choline acetyltransferase-positive) neurons were intermingled with GABAergic (GFP+) neurons. Immunohistochemistry for the vesicular acetylcholine transporter showed that cholinergic fibers apposed putative cortically projecting GABAergic neurons containing parvalbumin (PV). In coronal BF slices from GAD67-GFP knock-in or PV-tdTomato mice, pharmacological activation of cholinergic receptors with bath application of carbachol increased the firing rate of large (>20 μm diameter) BF GFP+ and PV (tdTomato+) neurons, which exhibited the intrinsic membrane properties of cortically projecting neurons. The excitatory effect of carbachol was blocked by antagonists of M1 and M3 muscarinic receptors in two subpopulations of BF GABAergic neurons [large hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) and small Ih, respectively]. Ion substitution experiments and reversal potential measurements suggested that the carbachol-induced inward current was mediated mainly by sodium-permeable cation channels. Carbachol also increased the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic currents. Furthermore, optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic neurons/fibers caused a mecamylamine- and atropine-sensitive inward current in putative GABAergic neurons. Thus, cortically projecting, BF GABAergic/PV neurons are excited by neighboring BF and/or brainstem cholinergic neurons. Loss of cholinergic neurons in Alzheimer's disease may impair cortical activation, in part, through disfacilitation of BF cortically

  16. Age- and Sex-Dependent Changes in Androgen Receptor Expression in the Developing Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Houng-Wei; Taniguchi, Saori; Samoza, Jason; Ridder, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    During the perinatal period, male mice are exposed to higher levels of testosterone (T) than females, which promotes sexual dimorphism in their brain structures and behaviors. In addition to acting via estrogen receptors after being locally converted into estradiol by aromatase, T also acts directly through androgen receptor (AR) in the brain. Therefore, we hypothesized that AR expression in the developing mouse cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic. To test our hypothesis, we measured and determined AR mRNA and protein levels in mouse cortex/hippocampus collected on the day of birth (PN0) and 7 (PN7), 14 (PN14), and 21 (PN21) days after birth. We demonstrated that, as age advanced, AR mRNA levels increased in the cortex/hippocampus of both sexes but showed no sex difference. Two AR proteins, the full-length (110 kDa) and a smaller isoform (70 kDa), were detected in the developing mouse cortex/hippocampus with an age-dependent increase in protein levels of both AR isoforms at PN21 and a transient masculine increase in expression of the full-length AR protein on PN7. Thus, we conclude that the postnatal age and sex differences in AR protein expression in combination with the sex differences in circulating T may cause sexual differentiation of the mouse cortex/hippocampus.

  17. Age- and Sex-Dependent Changes in Androgen Receptor Expression in the Developing Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houng-Wei Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the perinatal period, male mice are exposed to higher levels of testosterone (T than females, which promotes sexual dimorphism in their brain structures and behaviors. In addition to acting via estrogen receptors after being locally converted into estradiol by aromatase, T also acts directly through androgen receptor (AR in the brain. Therefore, we hypothesized that AR expression in the developing mouse cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic. To test our hypothesis, we measured and determined AR mRNA and protein levels in mouse cortex/hippocampus collected on the day of birth (PN0 and 7 (PN7, 14 (PN14, and 21 (PN21 days after birth. We demonstrated that, as age advanced, AR mRNA levels increased in the cortex/hippocampus of both sexes but showed no sex difference. Two AR proteins, the full-length (110 kDa and a smaller isoform (70 kDa, were detected in the developing mouse cortex/hippocampus with an age-dependent increase in protein levels of both AR isoforms at PN21 and a transient masculine increase in expression of the full-length AR protein on PN7. Thus, we conclude that the postnatal age and sex differences in AR protein expression in combination with the sex differences in circulating T may cause sexual differentiation of the mouse cortex/hippocampus.

  18. Excitatory Hindbrain-Forebrain Communication Is Required for Cisplatin-Induced Anorexia and Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Holland, Ruby A; Zheng, Huiyuan; Rinaman, Linda; Grill, Harvey J; De Jonghe, Bart C

    2017-01-11

    characterize the excitatory nature of neural projections activated by cisplatin in rats and reveal the necessity of specific hindbrain-forebrain projections for cisplatin-induced anorexia and weight loss. Together, these findings help to characterize the neural mechanisms mediating cisplatin-induced anorexia, advancing opportunities to develop better-tolerated chemotherapies and adjuvant therapies to prevent anorexia and concurrent nutritional deficiencies during cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/370362-09$15.00/0.

  19. Vulnerability of mossy fiber targets in the rat hippocampus to forebrain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M; Buzsáki, G

    1993-09-01

    Much of the work on forebrain ischemia in the hippocampus has focused on the phenomenon of delayed neuronal death in CA1. It is established that dentate granule cells and CA3 pyramidal cells are resistant to ischemia. However, much less is known about interneuronal involvement in CA3 or ischemic injury in the dentate hilus other than the fact that somatostatin neurons in the latter lose their immunoreactivity. We combined two sensitive methods--heat-shock protein (HSP72) immunocytochemistry and a newly developed Gallyas silver stain for demonstrating impaired cytoskeletal elements--to investigate the extent of ischemic damage to CA3 and the dentate hilus using the four-vessel-occlusion model for inducing forebrain ischemia. HSP72-like immunoreactivity was induced in neuronal populations previously shown to be vulnerable to ischemia. In addition, a distinct subset of interneurons in CA3 was also extremely sensitive to ischemia, even more so than the CA1 pyramidal cells. These neurons are located in the stratum lucidum of CA3 and possess a very high density of dendritic spines. In silver preparations, they were among the first to be impregnated as "dark" neurons, before CA1 pyramidal cells; microglial reaction was also initiated first in the stratum lucidum of CA3. Whereas CA1 damage was most prominent in the septal half of the hippocampus, hilar and CA3 interneuronal damage had a more extensive dorsoventral distribution. Our results also show a far greater extent of damage in hilar neurons than previously reported. At least four hilar cell types were consistently compromised: mossy cells, spiny fusiform cells, sparsely spiny fusiform cells, and long-spined multipolar cells. A common denominator of the injured neurons in CA3 and the hilus was the presence of spines on their dendrites, which in large part accounted for the far greater number of mossy fiber terminals they receive than their non-spiny neighbors. We suggest that the differential vulnerability of neuronal

  20. From zebrafish heart jogging genes to mouse and human orthologs: using Gene Ontology to investigate mammalian heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodiyar, Varsha K; Howe, Doug; Talmud, Philippa J; Breckenridge, Ross; Lovering, Ruth C

    2013-01-01

    For the majority of organs in developing vertebrate embryos, left-right asymmetry is controlled by a ciliated region; the left-right organizer node in the mouse and human, and the Kuppfer's vesicle in the zebrafish. In the zebrafish, laterality cues from the Kuppfer's vesicle determine asymmetry in the developing heart, the direction of 'heart jogging' and the direction of 'heart looping'.  'Heart jogging' is the term given to the process by which the symmetrical zebrafish heart tube is displaced relative to the dorsal midline, with a leftward 'jog'. Heart jogging is not considered to occur in mammals, although a leftward shift of the developing mouse caudal heart does occur prior to looping, which may be analogous to zebrafish heart jogging. Previous studies have characterized 30 genes involved in zebrafish heart jogging, the majority of which have well defined orthologs in mouse and human and many of these orthologs have been associated with early mammalian heart development.    We undertook manual curation of a specific set of genes associated with heart development and we describe the use of Gene Ontology term enrichment analyses to examine the cellular processes associated with heart jogging.  We found that the human, mouse and zebrafish 'heart jogging orthologs' are involved in similar organ developmental processes across the three species, such as heart, kidney and nervous system development, as well as more specific cellular processes such as cilium development and function. The results of these analyses are consistent with a role for cilia in the determination of left-right asymmetry of many internal organs, in addition to their known role in zebrafish heart jogging.    This study highlights the importance of model organisms in the study of human heart development, and emphasises both the conservation and divergence of developmental processes across vertebrates, as well as the limitations of this approach.

  1. Retinoic acid-independent expression of Meis2 during autopod patterning in the developing bat and mouse limb

    OpenAIRE

    Mason, Mandy K.; Hockman, Dorit; Curry, Lyle; Cunningham, Thomas J.; Duester, Gregg; Logan, Malcolm; Jacobs, David S.; Illing, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background The bat has strikingly divergent forelimbs (long digits supporting wing membranes) and hindlimbs (short, typically free digits) due to the distinct requirements of both aerial and terrestrial locomotion. During embryonic development, the morphology of the bat forelimb deviates dramatically from the mouse and chick, offering an alternative paradigm for identifying genes that play an important role in limb patterning. Results Using transcriptome analysis of developing Natal long-fing...

  2. Retinoic acid-independent expression of Meis2 during autopod patterning in the developing bat and mouse limb

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background The bat has strikingly divergent forelimbs (long digits supporting wing membranes) and hindlimbs (short, typically free digits) due to the distinct requirements of both aerial and terrestrial locomotion. During embryonic development, the morphology of the bat forelimb deviates dramatically from the mouse and chick, offering an alternative paradigm for identifying genes that play an important role in limb patterning. Results Using transcriptome analysis of developing Natal long-fing...

  3. Slingshot-3 dephosphorylates ADF/cofilin but is dispensable for mouse development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousaka, Kazuyoshi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Oshima, Naoko; Nagafuchi, Akira; Shima, Yasuyuki; Chisaka, Osamu; Uemura, Tadashi

    2008-05-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF) and cofilin constitute a family of key regulators of actin filament dynamics. ADF/cofilin is inactivated by phosphorylation at Ser-3 by LIM-kinases and reactivated by dephosphorylation by Slingshot (SSH) family phosphatases. Defects in LIM kinases or ADF/cofilin have been implicated in morbidity in human or mice; however, the roles of mammalian SSH in vivo have not been addressed. In this study, we examined the endogenous expression of each mouse SSH member in various cell lines and tissues, and showed that SSH-3L protein was strongly expressed in epithelial cells. Our structure-function analysis of SSH-3L suggested the possibility that the C-tail unique to SSH-3L negatively regulates the catalytic activity of this phosphatase. Furthermore we made ssh-3 knockout mice to examine its potential in vivo roles. Unexpectedly, ssh-3 was not essential for viability, fertility, or development of epithelial tissues; and ssh-3 did not genetically modify the corneal disorder of the corn1/ADF/destrin mutant.

  4. Regulation of mouse stomach development and Barx1 expression by specific microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong-Moo; Woo, Janghee; Kanellopoulou, Chryssa; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2011-01-01

    Although microRNAs (miRNAs) are postulated to fine-tune many developmental processes, their relationships with specific targets and tissues remain largely undefined. The mesenchymal transcription factor Barx1 controls spleen and stomach morphogenesis and is required to specify stomach-specific epithelium in adjacent endoderm. Barx1 expression is precisely regulated in space and time, with a sharp drop in stomach levels after epithelial specification. We tested the hypothesis that specific miRNAs mediate this marked decline in Barx1 levels. Depletion of the miRNA-processing enzyme Dicer in cultured stomach mesenchyme and conditional Dicer gene deletion in mice significantly increased Barx1 levels, disrupted stomach and intestine development and caused spleen agenesis. Computational and experimental studies identified miR-7a and miR-203 as candidate miRNAs that regulate Barx1 and are expressed in inverse proportion to it in the fetal mouse stomach. Through specific interactions with cognate sequences in the Barx1 3′ untranslated region, miR-7a and miR-203 repress Barx1 expression in stomach mesenchymal cells and its function in inducing gastric epithelium. These results indicate that miRNAs are required for proper digestive tract organogenesis and that miR-7a and miR-203 control expression of the stomach homeotic regulator Barx1. PMID:21307095

  5. Maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, prevents development of hepatocellular carcinoma in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ochoa-Callejero

    Full Text Available Chronic liver disease may result in a sequential progression through fibrosis, cirrhosis and lead, eventually, to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Hepatic stellate cells (HSC seem to be responsible for the fibrogenic response through the activation of an autocrine loop involving the chemokine receptor, CCR5. However, the role of CCR5 in HCC remains poorly understood. Since this receptor is also one of the main ports of entry for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, several CCR5 inhibitors are being used in the clinic to reduce viral load. We used one of these inhibitors, maraviroc (MVC, in a mouse model of diet-induced HCC to investigate whether this intervention would reduce disease progression. Animals treated with MVC on top of a normal control diet did not present any evidence of toxicity or any morphological change when compared with non-treated mice. Animals treated with MVC presented higher survival, less liver fibrosis, lower levels of liver injury markers and chemokines, less apoptosis, lower proliferation index, and lower tumor burden than their counterparts receiving only the hepatotoxic diet. In addition, MVC inhibits HSC activation markers such as phosphorylation of p38 and ERK, and increases hepatocyte survival. This study suggests that MVC, a well tolerated and clinically characterized drug, may be used as a preventative treatment for HCC. Clinical studies are needed to demonstrate the efficacy of this drug, or other CCR5 inhibitors, in patients with high risk of developing HCC.

  6. Development of a squamous cell carcinoma mouse model for immunotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sominski, Devon D; Rafferty, Patricia; Brosnan, Kerry; Volk, Amy; Walker, Mindi; Capaldi, Dorie; Emmell, Eva; Johnson, Kjell; Weinstock, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    An important component of safety assessment of new pharmaceuticals is evaluation of their potential to increase the risk of developing cancer in humans. The traditional 2-year rodent bioassay often is not feasible or scientifically applicable for evaluation of biotherapeutics. Additionally, it has poor predictive value for non-genotoxic immunosuppressive compounds. Thus, there is a need for alternative testing strategies. A novel 3-stage tumor model in syngeneic C3H/HeN mice was evaluated here to study the effects of immunosuppressive drugs on tumor promotion and progression in vivo. The model employed a skin squamous cell carcinoma cell line (SCC VII) due to the increased prevalence of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in humans associated with immunosuppression after transplants. Local invasion, colonization and tumor progression were evaluated. The validation set of immunosuppressive drugs included: Cyclosporin (CSA), cyclophosphamide (CTX), azathioprine, etanercept, abatacept and prednisone. Local invasion was evaluated by histological assessment as well as fluorescence trafficking from Qdot(®)-labeled tumor cells from the site of inoculation to the draining lymph node. Colonization was evaluated by lung colony counts following intravenous inoculation. Tumor progression was assessed by morphometric analysis of lesion area, angiogenesis and growth fraction of established metastatic neoplasia. Immunosuppressive drugs in the validation set yielded mixed results, including decreased progression. The methods and results described herein using an in vivo syngeneic mouse tumor model can provide insight about the assessment of immunosuppressive drugs in carcinogenicity risk assessment.

  7. Analysed cap mesenchyme track data from live imaging of mouse kidney development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, James G; Combes, Alexander N; Little, Melissa H; Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2016-12-01

    This article provides detailed information on manually tracked cap mesenchyme cells from timelapse imaging of multiple ex vivo embryonic mouse kidneys. Cells were imaged for up to 18 h at 15 or 20 min intervals, and multiple cell divisions were tracked. Positional data is supplemented with a range of information including the relative location of the closest ureteric tip and a correction for drift due to bulk movement and tip growth. A subset of tracks were annotated to indicate the presence of processes attached to the ureteric epithelium. The calculations used for drift correction are described, as are the main methods used in the analysis of this data for the purpose of describing cap cell motility. The outcomes of this analysis are discussed in "Cap mesenchyme cell swarming during kidney development is influenced by attraction, repulsion, and adhesion to the ureteric tip" (A.N. Combes, J.G. Lefevre, S. Wilson, N.A. Hamilton, M.H. Little, 2016) [1].

  8. Survival Motor Neuron (SMN) protein is required for normal mouse liver development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szunyogova, Eva; Zhou, Haiyan; Maxwell, Gillian K.; Powis, Rachael A.; Francesco, Muntoni; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Parson, Simon H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is caused by mutation or deletion of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene. Decreased levels of, cell-ubiquitous, SMN protein is associated with a range of systemic pathologies reported in severe patients. Despite high levels of SMN protein in normal liver, there is no comprehensive study of liver pathology in SMA. We describe failed liver development in response to reduced SMN levels, in a mouse model of severe SMA. The SMA liver is dark red, small and has: iron deposition; immature sinusoids congested with blood; persistent erythropoietic elements and increased immature red blood cells; increased and persistent megakaryocytes which release high levels of platelets found as clot-like accumulations in the heart. Myelopoiesis in contrast, was unaffected. Further analysis revealed significant molecular changes in SMA liver, consistent with the morphological findings. Antisense treatment from birth with PMO25, increased lifespan and ameliorated all morphological defects in liver by postnatal day 21. Defects in the liver are evident at birth, prior to motor system pathology, and impair essential liver function in SMA. Liver is a key recipient of SMA therapies, and systemically delivered antisense treatment, completely rescued liver pathology. Liver therefore, represents an important therapeutic target in SMA. PMID:27698380

  9. The impact of development and sensory deprivation on dendritic protrusions in the mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Bajnath, Adesh; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2015-06-01

    Dendritic protrusions (spines and filopodia) are structural indicators of synapses that have been linked to neuronal learning and memory through their morphological alterations induced by development and experienced-dependent activities. Although previous studies have demonstrated that depriving sensory experience leads to structural changes in neocortical organization, the more subtle effects on dendritic protrusions remain unclear, mostly due to focus on only one specific cell type and/or age of manipulation. Here, we show that sensory deprivation induced by whisker trimming influences the dendritic protrusions of basilar dendrites located in thalamocortical recipient lamina (IV and VI) of the mouse barrel cortex in a layer-specific manner. Following 1 month of whisker trimming after birth, the density of dendritic protrusions increased in layer IV, but decreased in layer VI. Whisker regrowth for 1 month returned protrusion densities to comparable level of age-matched controls in layer VI, but not in layer IV. In adults, chronic sensory deprivation led to an increase in protrusion densities in layer IV, but not in layer VI. In addition, chronic pharmacological blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) increased protrusion density in both layers IV and VI, which returned to the control level after 1 month of drug withdrawal. Our data reveal that different cortical layers respond to chronic sensory deprivation in different ways, with more pronounced effects during developmental critical periods than adulthood. We also show that chronically blocking NMDARs activity during developmental critical period also influences the protrusion density and morphology in the cerebral cortex.

  10. A subtype-specific critical period for neurogenesis in the postnatal development of mouse olfactory glomeruli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Kato

    Full Text Available Sensory input is essential for the normal development of sensory centers in the brain, such as the somatosensory, visual, auditory, and olfactory systems. Visual deprivation during a specific developmental stage, called the critical period, results in severe and irreversible functional impairments in the primary visual cortex. Olfactory deprivation in the early postnatal period also causes significant developmental defects in the olfactory bulb, the primary center for olfaction. Olfactory bulb interneurons are continuously generated from neural stem cells in the ventricular-subventricular zone, suggesting that the olfactory system has plasticity even in adulthood. Here, we investigated the effect of transient neonatal olfactory deprivation on the addition of interneurons to the glomerular layer of the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We found that the addition of one subtype of interneurons was persistently inhibited even after reopening the naris. BrdU pulse-chase experiments revealed that the neonatal olfactory deprivation predominantly affected an early phase in the maturation of this neuronal subtype in the olfactory bulb. Subjecting the mice to odor stimulation for 6 weeks after naris reopening resulted in significant recovery from the histological and functional defects caused by the olfactory deprivation. These results suggest that a subtype-specific critical period exists for olfactory bulb neurogenesis, but that this period is less strict and more plastic compared with the critical periods for other systems. This study provides new insights into the mechanisms of postnatal neurogenesis and a biological basis for the therapeutic effect of olfactory training.

  11. Sustained Pax6 Expression Generates Primate-like Basal Radial Glia in Developing Mouse Neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fong Kuan; Fei, Ji-Feng; Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Taverna, Elena; Haffner, Christiane; Fu, Jun; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis; Huttner, Wieland B

    2015-08-01

    The evolutionary expansion of the neocortex in mammals has been linked to enlargement of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and increased proliferative capacity of basal progenitors (BPs), notably basal radial glia (bRG). The transcription factor Pax6 is known to be highly expressed in primate, but not mouse, BPs. Here, we demonstrate that sustaining Pax6 expression selectively in BP-genic apical radial glia (aRG) and their BP progeny of embryonic mouse neocortex suffices to induce primate-like progenitor behaviour. Specifically, we conditionally expressed Pax6 by in utero electroporation using a novel, Tis21-CreERT2 mouse line. This expression altered aRG cleavage plane orientation to promote bRG generation, increased cell-cycle re-entry of BPs, and ultimately increased upper-layer neuron production. Upper-layer neuron production was also increased in double-transgenic mouse embryos with sustained Pax6 expression in the neurogenic lineage. Strikingly, increased BPs existed not only in the SVZ but also in the intermediate zone of the neocortex of these double-transgenic mouse embryos. In mutant mouse embryos lacking functional Pax6, the proportion of bRG among BPs was reduced. Our data identify specific Pax6 effects in BPs and imply that sustaining this Pax6 function in BPs could be a key aspect of SVZ enlargement and, consequently, the evolutionary expansion of the neocortex.

  12. Angiotensin type 1a receptors in the forebrain subfornical organ facilitate leptin-induced weight loss through brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin N; Morgan, Donald A; Butler, Scott D; Rahmouni, Kamal; Gurley, Susan B; Coffman, Thomas M; Mark, Allyn L; Davisson, Robin L

    2015-04-01

    Elevations in brain angiotensin-II cause increased energy expenditure and a lean phenotype. Interestingly, the metabolic effects of increased brain angiotensin-II mimic the actions of leptin, suggesting an interaction between the two systems. Here we demonstrate that angiotensin-type 1a receptors (AT1aR) in the subfornical organ (SFO), a forebrain structure emerging as an integrative metabolic center, play a key role in the body weight-reducing effects of leptin via brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis. Cre/LoxP technology coupled with targeted viral delivery to the SFO in a mouse line bearing a conditional allele of the Agtr1a gene was utilized to determine the interaction between leptin and SFO AT1aR in metabolic regulation. Selective deletion of AT1aR in the SFO attenuated leptin-induced weight loss independent of changes in food intake or locomotor activity. This was associated with diminished leptin-induced increases in core body temperature, blunted upregulation of BAT thermogenic markers, and abolishment of leptin-mediated sympathetic activation to BAT. These data identify a novel interaction between angiotensin-II and leptin in the control of BAT thermogenesis and body weight, and highlight a previously unrecognized role for the forebrain SFO in metabolic regulation.

  13. Cellular composition characterizing postnatal development and maturation of the mouse brain and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, YuHong; Rusznák, Zoltán; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-09-01

    The process of development, maturation, and regression in the central nervous system (CNS) are genetically programmed and influenced by environment. Hitherto, most research efforts have focused on either the early development of the CNS or the late changes associated with aging, whereas an important period corresponding to adolescence has been overlooked. In this study, we searched for age-dependent changes in the number of cells that compose the CNS (divided into isocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, cerebellum, 'rest of the brain', and spinal cord) and the pituitary gland in 4-40-week-old C57BL6 mice, using the isotropic fractionator method in combination with neuronal nuclear protein as a marker for neuronal cells. We found that all CNS structures, except for the isocortex, increased in mass in the period of 4-15 weeks. Over the same period, the absolute number of neurons significantly increased in the olfactory bulb and cerebellum while non-neuronal cell numbers increased in the 'rest of the brain' and isocortex. Along with the gain in body length and weight, the pituitary gland also increased in mass and cell number, the latter correlating well with changes of the brain and spinal cord mass. The majority of the age-dependent alterations (e.g., somatic parameters, relative brain mass, number of pituitary cells, and cellular composition of the cerebellum, isocortex, rest of the brain, and spinal cord) occur rapidly between the 4th and 11th postnatal weeks. This period includes murine adolescence, underscoring the significance of this stage in the postnatal development of the mouse CNS.

  14. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

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    Melissa Gamat

    Full Text Available The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their

  15. Sox7, Sox17, and Sox18 Cooperatively Regulate Vascular Development in the Mouse Retina.

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    Yulian Zhou

    Full Text Available Vascular development and maintenance are controlled by a complex transcriptional program, which integrates both extracellular and intracellular signals in endothelial cells. Here we study the roles of three closely related SoxF family transcription factors-Sox7, Sox17, and Sox18 -in the developing and mature mouse vasculature using targeted gene deletion on a mixed C57/129/CD1 genetic background. In the retinal vasculature, each SoxF gene exhibits a distinctive pattern of expression in different classes of blood vessels. On a mixed genetic background, vascular endothelial-specific deletion of individual SoxF genes has little or no effect on vascular architecture or differentiation, a result that can be explained by overlapping function and by reciprocal regulation of gene expression between Sox7 and Sox17. By contrast, combined deletion of Sox7, Sox17, and Sox18 at the onset of retinal angiogenesis leads to a dense capillary plexus with a nearly complete loss of radial arteries and veins, whereas the presence of a single Sox17 allele largely restores arterial identity, as determined by vascular smooth muscle cell coverage. In the developing retina, expression of all three SoxF genes is reduced in the absence of Norrin/Frizzled4-mediated canonical Wnt signaling, but SoxF gene expression is unaffected by reduced VEGF signaling in response to deletion of Neuropilin1 (Npn1. In adulthood, Sox7, Sox17, and Sox18 act in a largely redundant manner to maintain blood vessel function, as adult onset vascular endothelial-specific deletion of all three SoxF genes leads to massive edema despite nearly normal vascular architecture. These data reveal critical and partially redundant roles for Sox7, Sox17 and Sox18 in vascular growth, differentiation, and maintenance.

  16. Mouse zygotes respond to severe sperm DNA damage by delaying paternal DNA replication and embryonic development.

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    Joanna E Gawecka

    Full Text Available Mouse zygotes do not activate apoptosis in response to DNA damage. We previously reported a unique form of inducible sperm DNA damage termed sperm chromatin fragmentation (SCF. SCF mirrors some aspects of somatic cell apoptosis in that the DNA degradation is mediated by reversible double strand breaks caused by topoisomerase 2B (TOP2B followed by irreversible DNA degradation by a nuclease(s. Here, we created zygotes using spermatozoa induced to undergo SCF (SCF zygotes and tested how they responded to moderate and severe paternal DNA damage during the first cell cycle. We found that the TUNEL assay was not sensitive enough to identify the breaks caused by SCF in zygotes in either case. However, paternal pronuclei in both groups stained positively for γH2AX, a marker for DNA damage, at 5 hrs after fertilization, just before DNA synthesis, while the maternal pronuclei were negative. We also found that both pronuclei in SCF zygotes with moderate DNA damage replicated normally, but paternal pronuclei in the SCF zygotes with severe DNA damage delayed the initiation of DNA replication by up to 12 hrs even though the maternal pronuclei had no discernable delay. Chromosomal analysis of both groups confirmed that the paternal DNA was degraded after S-phase while the maternal pronuclei formed normal chromosomes. The DNA replication delay caused a marked retardation in progression to the 2-cell stage, and a large portion of the embryos arrested at the G2/M border, suggesting that this is an important checkpoint in zygotic development. Those embryos that progressed through the G2/M border died at later stages and none developed to the blastocyst stage. Our data demonstrate that the zygote responds to sperm DNA damage through a non-apoptotic mechanism that acts by slowing paternal DNA replication and ultimately leads to arrest in embryonic development.

  17. Vitrification, in vitro fertilization, and development of Atg7 deficient mouse oocytes.

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    Bang, Soyoung; Lee, Geun-Kyung; Shin, Hyejin; Suh, Chang Suk; Lim, Hyunjung Jade

    2016-03-01

    Autophagy contributes to the clearance and recycling of macromolecules and organelles in response to stress. We previously reported that vitrified mouse oocytes show acute increases in autophagy during warming. Herein, we investigate the potential role of Atg7 in oocyte vitrification by using an oocyte-specific deletion model of the Atg7 gene, a crucial upstream gene in the autophagic pathway. Oocyte-specific Atg7 deficient mice were generated by crossing Atg7 floxed mice and Zp3-Cre transgenic mice. The oocytes were vitrified-warmed and then subjected to in vitro fertilization and development. The rates of survival, fertilization, and development were assessed in the Atg7 deficient oocytes in comparison with the wildtype oocytes. Light chain 3 (LC3) immunofluorescence staining was performed to determine whether this method effectively evaluates the autophagy status of oocytes. The survival rate of vitrified-warmed Atg7(f/f) ;Zp3-Cre (Atg7(d/d) ) metaphase II (MII) oocytes was not significantly different from that of the wildtype (Atg7(f/f) ) oocytes. Fertilization and development in the Atg7(d/d) oocytes were significantly lower than the Atg7(f/f) oocytes, comparable to the Atg5(d/d) oocytes previously described. Notably, the developmental rate improved slightly in vitrified-warmed Atg7(d/d) MII oocytes when compared to fresh Atg7(d/d) oocytes. LC3 immunofluorescence staining showed that this method can be reliably used to assess autophagic activation in oocytes. We confirmed that the LC3-positive signal is nearly absent in Atg7(d/d) oocytes. While autophagy is induced during the warming process after vitrification of MII oocytes, the Atg7 gene is not essential for survival of vitrified-warmed oocytes. Thus, induction of autophagy during warming of vitrified MII oocytes seems to be a natural response to manage cold or other cellular stresses.

  18. Postnatal development, maturation and aging in the mouse cochlea and their effects on hair cell regeneration.

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    Walters, Bradley J; Zuo, Jian

    2013-03-01

    The organ of Corti in the mammalian inner ear is comprised of mechanosensory hair cells (HCs) and nonsensory supporting cells (SCs), both of which are believed to be terminally post-mitotic beyond late embryonic ages. Consequently, regeneration of HCs and SCs does not occur naturally in the adult mammalian cochlea, though recent evidence suggests that these cells may not be completely or irreversibly quiescent at earlier postnatal ages. Furthermore, regenerative processes can be induced by genetic and pharmacological manipulations, but, more and more reports suggest that regenerative potential declines as the organ of Corti continues to age. In numerous mammalian systems, such effects of aging on regenerative potential are well established. However, in the cochlea, the problem of regeneration has not been traditionally viewed as one of aging. This is an important consideration as current models are unable to elicit widespread regeneration or full recovery of function at adult ages yet regenerative therapies will need to be developed specifically for adult populations. Still, the advent of gene targeting and other genetic manipulations has established mice as critically important models for the study of cochlear development and HC regeneration and suggests that auditory HC regeneration in adult mammals may indeed be possible. Thus, this review will focus on the pursuit of regeneration in the postnatal and adult mouse cochlea and highlight processes that occur during postnatal development, maturation, and aging that could contribute to an age-related decline in regenerative potential. Second, we will draw upon the wealth of knowledge pertaining to age related senescence in tissues outside of the ear to synthesize new insights and potentially guide future research aimed at promoting HC regeneration in the adult cochlea.

  19. Nogo-a regulates neural precursor migration in the embryonic mouse cortex.

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    Mathis, Carole; Schröter, Aileen; Thallmair, Michaela; Schwab, Martin E

    2010-10-01

    Although Nogo-A has been intensively studied for its inhibitory effect on axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system, little is known about its function during brain development. In the embryonic mouse cortex, Nogo-A is expressed by radial precursor/glial cells and by tangentially migrating as well as postmigratory neurons. We studied radially migrating neuroblasts in wild-type and Nogo-A knockout (KO) mouse embryos. In vitro analysis showed that Nogo-A and its receptor components NgR, Lingo-1, TROY, and p75 are expressed in cells emigrating from embryonic forebrain-derived neurospheres. Live imaging revealed an increased cell motility when Nogo-A was knocked out or blocked with antibodies. Antibodies blocking NgR or Lingo-1 showed the same motility-enhancing effect supporting a direct role of surface Nogo-A on migration. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling of embryonic day (E)15.5 embryos demonstrated that Nogo-A influences the radial migration of neuronal precursors. At E17.5, the normal transient accumulation of radially migrating precursors within the subventricular zone was not detectable in the Nogo-A KO mouse cortex. At E19, migration to the upper cortical layers was disturbed. These findings suggest that Nogo-A and its receptor complex play a role in the interplay of adhesive and repulsive cell interactions in radial migration during cortical development.

  20. Mouse phenotyping.

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    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. CLoNe is a new method to target single progenitors and study their progeny in mouse and chick.

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    García-Moreno, Fernando; Vasistha, Navneet A; Begbie, Jo; Molnár, Zoltán

    2014-04-01

    Cell lineage analysis enables us to address pivotal questions relating to: the embryonic origin of cells and sibling cell relationships in the adult body; the contribution of progenitors activated after trauma or disease; and the comparison across species in evolutionary biology. To address such fundamental questions, several techniques for clonal labelling have been developed, each with its shortcomings. Here, we report a novel method, CLoNe that is designed to work in all vertebrate species and tissues. CLoNe uses a cocktail of labelling, targeting and transposition vectors that enables targeting of specific subpopulations of progenitor types with a combination of fluorophores resulting in multifluorescence that describes multiple clones per specimen. Furthermore, transposition into the genome ensures the longevity of cell labelling. We demonstrate the robustness of this technique in mouse and chick forebrain development, and show evidence that CLoNe will be broadly applicable to study clonal relationships in different tissues and species.

  2. Depletion of TDP-43 decreases fibril and plaque β-amyloid and exacerbates neurodegeneration in an Alzheimer's mouse model.

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    LaClair, Katherine D; Donde, Aneesh; Ling, Jonathan P; Jeong, Yun Ha; Chhabra, Resham; Martin, Lee J; Wong, Philip C

    2016-12-01

    TDP-43 proteinopathy, initially associated with ALS and FTD, is also found in 30-60% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases and correlates with worsened cognition and neurodegeneration. A major component of this proteinopathy is depletion of this RNA-binding protein from the nucleus, which compromises repression of non-conserved cryptic exons in neurodegenerative diseases. To test whether nuclear depletion of TDP-43 may contribute to the pathogenesis of AD cases with TDP-43 proteinopathy, we examined the impact of depletion of TDP-43 in populations of neurons vulnerable in AD, and on neurodegeneration in an AD-linked context. Here, we show that some populations of pyramidal neurons that are selectively vulnerable in AD are also vulnerable to TDP-43 depletion in mice, while other forebrain neurons appear spared. Moreover, TDP-43 depletion in forebrain neurons of an AD mouse model exacerbates neurodegeneration, and correlates with increased prefibrillar oligomeric Aβ and decreased Aβ plaque burden. These findings support a role for nuclear depletion of TDP-43 in the pathogenesis of AD and provide strong rationale for developing novel therapeutics to alleviate the depletion of TDP-43 and functional antemortem biomarkers associated with its nuclear loss.

  3. Comparative dynamics of 5-methylcytosine reprogramming and TET family expression during preimplantation mammalian development in mouse and sheep.

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    Jafarpour, F; Hosseini, S M; Ostadhosseini, S; Abbasi, H; Dalman, A; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2017-02-01

    Despite previous assumption that paternal active DNA demethylation is an evolutionary conserved phenomenon in mammals, emerging studies in other species, particularly sheep, do not support this issue. Recently, ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes have been suggested as intermediates in genome-wide DNA demethylation through the iterative conversion of five methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC)/5-formylcytosine/5-carboxylcytosine (5caC) derivatives. This study investigated whether TET enzymes and 5mC derivatives are also involved in dynamic reprogramming of early sheep embryos derived by fertilization. Mouse zygotes and developing embryos were considered as control. Obtained results reported substantial differences in dynamics of parent-of-origin-specific patterns of 5mC reprogramming and generation/dilution of 5mC derivatives (5hmC and 5caC) between mouse and sheep early zygotes. Sheep zygotes reported a gradual and insignificant decrease pattern of parental pronucleus 5mC, which was notably replication independent, coincided with gradual generation of 5hmC and 5caC. Although the expression profiles of TET family of enzymes (Tet1, Tet2, and Tet3), with the main exception being Tet2 at later developmental stages, were similar between mouse and sheep developing embryos. In addition, although the expression level of Tet3 was higher than Tet1 and Tet2 in MII oocytes and zygotes in both mouse and sheep, the expression of Tet3 in mouse was higher than sheep in both MII oocytes and zygotes. The contrasting dynamics of 5mC reprogramming between these two species may be associated with the particular evolutionary differences that exist between developmental program of rodents and ruminants, particularly during peri-implantation stages.

  4. Histology atlas of the developing mouse heart with emphasis on E11.5 to E18.5.

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    Savolainen, Saija M; Foley, Julie F; Elmore, Susan A

    2009-06-01

    In humans, congenital heart diseases are common. Since the rapid progression of transgenic technologies, the mouse has become the major animal model of defective cardiovascular development. Moreover, genetically modified mice frequently die in utero, commonly due to abnormal cardiovascular development. A variety of publications address specific developmental stages or structures of the mouse heart, but a single reference reviewing and describing the anatomy and histology of cardiac developmental events, stage by stage, has not been available. The aim of this color atlas, which demonstrates embryonic/fetal heart development, is to provide a tool for pathologists and biomedical scientists to use for detailed histological evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E)-stained sections of the developing mouse heart with emphasis on embryonic days (E) 11.5-18.5. The selected images illustrate the main structures and developmental events at each stage and serve as reference material for the confirmation of the chronological age of the embryo/early fetus and assist in the identification of any abnormalities. An extensive review of the literature covering cardiac development pre-E11.5 is summarized in the introduction. Although the focus of this atlas is on the descriptive anatomic and histological development of the normal mouse heart from E11.5 to E18.5, potential embryonic cardiac lesions are discussed with a list of the most common transgenic pre- and perinatal heart defects. Representative images of hearts at E11.5-15.5 and E18.5 are provided in Figures 2-4, 6, 8, and 9. A complete set of labeled images (Figures E11.5-18.5) is available on the CD enclosed in this issue of Toxicologic Pathology. All digital images can be viewed online at https://niehsimages.epl-inc.com with the username "ToxPath" and the password "embryohearts."

  5. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

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    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-Ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 1200 Cailun Road, Shanghai 201203 (China); Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  6. Dynamic Expression of Lgr6 in the Developing and Mature Mouse Cochlea

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    Yanping eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays important roles in mammalian inner ear development. Lgr5, one of the downstream target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, has been reported to be a marker for inner ear hair cell progenitors. Lgr6 shares approximately 50% sequence homology with Lgr5 and has been identified as a stem cell marker in several organs. However, the detailed expression profiles of Lgr6 have not yet been investigated in the mouse inner ear. Here, we first used Lgr6-EGFP-Ires-CreERT2 mice to examine the spatiotemporal expression of Lgr6 protein in the cochlear duct during embryonic and postnatal development. Lgr6-EGFP was first observed in one row of prosensory cells in the middle and basal turn at embryonic day 15.5 (E15.5. From E18.5 to postnatal day 3 (P3, the expression of Lgr6-EGFP was restricted to the inner pillar cells (IPCs. From P7 to P15, the Lgr6-EGFP expression level gradually decreased in the IPCs and gradually increased in the inner border cells (IBCs. At P20, Lgr6-EGFP was only expressed in the IBCs, and by P30 Lgr6-EGFP expression had completely disappeared. Next, we demonstrated that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required to maintain the Lgr6-EGFP expression in vitro. Finally, we demonstrated that the Lgr6-EGFP-positive cells isolated by flow cytometry could differentiate into myosin 7a-positive hair cells after 10 days in-culture, and this suggests that the Lgr6-positive cells might serve as the hair cell progenitor cells in the cochlea.

  7. Development of An ICR Mouse Bioassay for Toxicity Evaluatition in Neurotoxic Poistioning Toxins-Ctiontaminated Shellfish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG Chun Kwan; HUNG Patricia; KAM Kai Man

    2013-01-01

    Objective To develop an ICR (female) mouse bioassay (MBA) for toxicity ctionfirmatition and evaluatition of neurotoxins (brevetoxins)-ctiontaminated shellfish. Methods Brevetoxins (BTX-B) as a causative agent of neurotoxic shellfish poistioning (NSP) under different shellfish matrices were intraperittioneally injected at different doses into mice to study their toxic effects and to differentiate the range of lethal and sublethal dosages. Their sensitivity and specificity were analyzed with 2 competitive ELISA kits for quantitative determinatition of standard BTX-B and dihydroBTX-B under different shellfish matrix-diluent combinatitions. Detectition rates of MBA and two antibody-based assays for BTX-B from field NSP-positive shellfish samples were compared. Results BTX-B could be detected in shellfish tissues at ctioncentratition of 50-400 μg/100 g under shellfish matrix-Tween-saline media, which were appropriate to identify toxic shellfish at or above the regulatory limit (80 μg/100 g shellfish tissues). The LD50 identified was 455 μg/kg for BTX-B under general shellfish matrices (excluding oyster matrices) dissolved in Tween-saline. The presence of shellfish matrices, of oyster matrices in particular, retarded the occurrence of death and toxicity presentatition in mice. Two antibody-based assays, even in the presence of different shellfish matrix-diluent combinatitions, showed acceptable results in quantifying BTX-B and dihydroBTX-B well below the regulatory limit. Ctionclusition The two ELISA analyses agree favorably (correlatition coefficient, r≥0.96;Student's t-tests, P>0.05) with the developed bioassay.

  8. NDR Kinases Are Essential for Somitogenesis and Cardiac Looping during Mouse Embryonic Development.

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    Debora Schmitz-Rohmer

    Full Text Available Studies of mammalian tissue culture cells indicate that the conserved and distinct NDR isoforms, NDR1 and NDR2, play essential cell biological roles. However, mice lacking either Ndr1 or Ndr2 alone develop normally. Here, we studied the physiological consequences of inactivating both NDR1 and NDR2 in mice, showing that the lack of both Ndr1/Ndr2 (called Ndr1/2-double null mutants causes embryonic lethality. In support of compensatory roles for NDR1 and NDR2, total protein and activating phosphorylation levels of the remaining NDR isoform were elevated in mice lacking either Ndr1 or Ndr2. Mice retaining one single wild-type Ndr allele were viable and fertile. Ndr1/2-double null embryos displayed multiple phenotypes causing a developmental delay from embryonic day E8.5 onwards. While NDR kinases are not required for notochord formation, the somites of Ndr1/2-double null embryos were smaller, irregularly shaped and unevenly spaced along the anterior-posterior axis. Genes implicated in somitogenesis were down-regulated and the normally symmetric expression of Lunatic fringe, a component of the Notch pathway, showed a left-right bias in the last forming somite in 50% of all Ndr1/2-double null embryos. In addition, Ndr1/2-double null embryos developed a heart defect that manifests itself as pericardial edemas, obstructed heart tubes and arrest of cardiac looping. The resulting cardiac insufficiency is the likely cause of the lethality of Ndr1/2-double null embryos around E10. Taken together, we show that NDR kinases compensate for each other in vivo in mouse embryos, explaining why mice deficient for either Ndr1 or Ndr2 are viable. Ndr1/2-double null embryos show defects in somitogenesis and cardiac looping, which reveals their essential functions and shows that the NDR kinases are critically required during the early phase of organogenesis.

  9. Development of genetically flexible mouse models of sarcoma using RCAS-TVA mediated gene delivery.

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    Leah Kabaroff

    Full Text Available Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal malignancies and unfortunately there are limited functional genomics platforms to assess the molecular pathways contributing to sarcomagenesis. Thus, novel model systems are needed to validate which genes should be targeted for therapeutic intervention. We hypothesized that delivery of oncogenes into mouse skeletal muscle using a retroviral (RCAS-TVA system would result in sarcomagenesis. We also sought to determine if the cell type transformed (mesenchymal progenitors vs. terminally differentiated tissues would influence sarcoma biology. Cells transduced with RCAS vectors directing the expression of oncoproteins KrasG12D, c-Myc and/or Igf2 were injected into the hindlimbs of mice that expressed the retroviral TVA receptor in neural/mesenchymal progenitors, skeletal/cardiac muscle or ubiquitously (N-tva, AKE and BKE strains respectively. Disrupting the G1 checkpoint CDKN2 (p16/p19-/- resulted in sarcoma in 30% of p16/p19-/- xN-tva mice with a median latency of 23 weeks (range 8-40 weeks. A similar incidence occurred in p16/p19-/- xBKE mice (32%, however, a shorter median latency (10.4 weeks was observed. p16/p19-/- xAKE mice also developed sarcomas (24% incidence; median 9 weeks yet 31% of mice also developed lung sarcomas. Gene-anchored PCR demonstrated retroviral DNA integration in 86% of N-tva, 93% of BKE and 88% of AKE tumors. KrasG12D was the most frequent oncogene isolated. Oncogene delivery by the RCAS-TVA system can generate sarcomas in mice with a defective cell cycle checkpoint. Sarcoma biology differed between the different RCAS models we created, likely due to the cell population being transformed. This genetically flexible system will be a valuable tool for sarcoma research.

  10. Expression of PINK1 in the brain, eye and ear of mouse during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Amora, Marta; Angelini, Cristiano; Marcoli, Manuela; Cervetto, Chiara; Kitada, Tohru; Vallarino, Mauro

    2011-03-01

    PINK1 is a 581 amino acid protein with a serine/threonine kinase domain and an N-terminal mitochondrial targeting motif. The enzyme is expressed in the brain as well as in several tissues such as heart, skeletal muscle, liver, kidney, pancreas and testis. In the present study, we have investigated by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry the presence and distribution of PINK1 in the brain, eye and inner ear of mouse during embryonic development. In the brain we detected two PINK1 molecular isoforms of 55 kDa and 66 kDa. Immunoreactive perikarya first appeared at stage E15 in the diencephalon within the thalamus, the hypothalamus, the periventricular layers of the third ventricle and in the rhombencephalon at level of the pons. Subsequently, new PINK1-positive neurons were found in the midbrain within the floor and the periventricular layers of the ventral wall of the mesencephalic vesicle (stage E17) as well as in the neopallial cortex, the tegmentum of the midbrain and the periventricular region of the caudal part of the rhombencephalon (stage E19). At P0, PINK1-immunoreactive cells appeared in the striatum, the mantle layer and caudal part of the medulla oblongata and the cerebellum. The spatio-temporal expression of PINK1 and its heterogeneous distribution suggest that the enzyme might be involved in neuroregulatory processes during embryogenesis. In the eye, PINK1-immunoreactivity was found in the lens and in the cornea, whereas in the inner ear the enzyme was expressed in the ependymal and subependymal cells of the saccule and in the semicircular canals indicating that PINK1 plays a role in the development of these sensory organs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison and optimization of hiPSC forebrain cortical differentiation protocols.

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    Muratore, Christina R; Srikanth, Priya; Callahan, Dana G; Young-Pearse, Tracy L

    2014-01-01

    Several protocols have been developed for human induced pluripotent stem cell neuronal differentiation. We compare several methods for forebrain cortical neuronal differentiation by assessing cell morphology, immunostaining and gene expression. We evaluate embryoid aggregate vs. monolayer with dual SMAD inhibition differentiation protocols, manual vs. AggreWell aggregate formation, plating substrates, neural progenitor cell (NPC) isolation methods, NPC maintenance and expansion, and astrocyte co-culture. The embryoid aggregate protocol, using a Matrigel substrate, consistently generates a high yield and purity of neurons. NPC isolation by manual selection, enzymatic rosette selection, or FACS all are efficient, but exhibit some differences in resulting cell populations. Expansion of NPCs as neural aggregates yields higher cell purity than expansion in a monolayer. Finally, co-culture of iPSC-derived neurons with astrocytes increases neuronal maturity by day 40. This study directly compares commonly employed methods for neuronal differentiation of iPSCs, and can be used as a resource for choosing between various differentiation protocols.

  12. Comparison and optimization of hiPSC forebrain cortical differentiation protocols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina R Muratore

    Full Text Available Several protocols have been developed for human induced pluripotent stem cell neuronal differentiation. We compare several methods for forebrain cortical neuronal differentiation by assessing cell morphology, immunostaining and gene expression. We evaluate embryoid aggregate vs. monolayer with dual SMAD inhibition differentiation protocols, manual vs. AggreWell aggregate formation, plating substrates, neural progenitor cell (NPC isolation methods, NPC maintenance and expansion, and astrocyte co-culture. The embryoid aggregate protocol, using a Matrigel substrate, consistently generates a high yield and purity of neurons. NPC isolation by manual selection, enzymatic rosette selection, or FACS all are efficient, but exhibit some differences in resulting cell populations. Expansion of NPCs as neural aggregates yields higher cell purity than expansion in a monolayer. Finally, co-culture of iPSC-derived neurons with astrocytes increases neuronal maturity by day 40. This study directly compares commonly employed methods for neuronal differentiation of iPSCs, and can be used as a resource for choosing between various differentiation protocols.

  13. Increased innervation of forebrain targets by midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the absence of FGF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpel, R; Baron, O; Ratzka, A; Schröder, M-L; Hohmann, M; Effenberg, A; Claus, P; Grothe, C

    2016-02-09

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate development and maintenance, and reduce vulnerability of neurons. FGF-2 is essential for survival of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons and is responsible for their dysplasia and disease-related degeneration. We previously reported that FGF-2 is involved in adequate forebrain (FB) target innervation by these neurons in an organotypic co-culture model. It remains unclear, how this ex-vivo phenotype relates to the in vivo situation, and which FGF-related signaling pathway is involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that lack of FGF-2 results in an increased volume of the striatal target area in mice. We further add evidence that the low molecular weight (LMW) FGF-2 isoform is responsible for this phenotype, as this isoform is predominantly expressed in the embryonic ventral midbrain (VM) as well as in postnatal striatum (STR) and known to act via canonical transmembrane FGF receptor (FGFR) activation. Additionally, we confirm that the phenotype with an enlarged FB-target area by DA neurons can be mimicked in an ex-vivo explant model by inhibiting the canonical FGFR signaling, which resulted in decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, while AKT activation remained unchanged.

  14. Specification of Region-Specific Neurons Including Forebrain Glutamatergic Neurons from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Taylor, Kristen; Wang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Zheng; Park, Jung Woo; Zhan, Shuning; Kronenberg, Mark S.; Lichtler, Alexander; Liu, Hui-Xia; Chen, Fang-Ping; Yue, Lixia; Li, Xue-Jun; Xu, Ren-He

    2010-01-01

    Background Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE) cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders. PMID:20686615

  15. Longitudinal measures of cholinergic forebrain atrophy in the transition from healthy aging to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Michel; Heinsen, Helmut; Teipel, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence from cross-sectional in vivo imaging studies suggests that atrophy of the cholinergic basal forebrain (BF) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) can be distinguished from normal age-related degeneration even at predementia stages of the disease. Longitudinal study designs are needed to specify the dynamics of BF degeneration in the transition from normal aging to AD. We applied recently developed techniques for in vivo volumetry of the BF to serial magnetic resonance imaging scans of 82 initially healthy elderly individuals (60-93 years) and 50 patients with very mild AD (Clinical Dementia Rating score = 0.5) that were clinically followed over an average of 3 ± 1.5 years. BF atrophy rates were found to be significantly higher than rates of global brain shrinkage even in cognitively stable healthy elderly individuals. Compared with healthy control subjects, very mild AD patients showed reduced BF volumes at baseline and increased volume loss over time. Atrophy of the BF was more pronounced in progressive patients compared with those that remained stable. The cholinergic BF undergoes disproportionate degeneration in the aging process, which is further increased by the presence of AD.

  16. Specification of region-specific neurons including forebrain glutamatergic neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Directed differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC into functional, region-specific neural cells is a key step to realizing their therapeutic promise to treat various neural disorders, which awaits detailed elucidation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed neural differentiation from various hiPSC lines generated by others and ourselves. Although heterogeneity in efficiency of neuroepithelial (NE cell differentiation was observed among different hiPSC lines, the NE differentiation process resembles that from human embryonic stem cells (hESC in morphology, timing, transcriptional profile, and requirement for FGF signaling. NE cells differentiated from hiPSC, like those from hESC, can also form rostral phenotypes by default, and form the midbrain or spinal progenitors upon caudalization by morphogens. The rostrocaudal neural progenitors can further mature to develop forebrain glutamatergic projection neurons, midbrain dopaminergic neurons, and spinal motor neurons, respectively. Typical ion channels and action potentials were recorded in the hiPSC-derived neurons. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results demonstrate that hiPSC, regardless of how they were derived, can differentiate into a spectrum of rostrocaudal neurons with functionality, which supports the considerable value of hiPSC for study and treatment of patient-specific neural disorders.

  17. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sarah C; Finney, Brenda A; Lazarou, Maria; Rosser, Anne E; Scherf, Caroline; Adriaensen, Dirk; Kemp, Paul J; Riccardi, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E)11.5-16.5 in mouse) in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult). Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels (VGCC), inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), P/Q type (CaV2.1), N-type (CaV2.2), R-type (CaV2.3), and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3) VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3), demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to match

  18. Fetal calcium regulates branching morphogenesis in the developing human and mouse lung: involvement of voltage-gated calcium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C Brennan

    Full Text Available Airway branching morphogenesis in utero is essential for optimal postnatal lung function. In the fetus, branching morphogenesis occurs during the pseudoglandular stage (weeks 9-17 of human gestation, embryonic days (E11.5-16.5 in mouse in a hypercalcaemic environment (~1.7 in the fetus vs. ~1.1-1.3 mM for an adult. Previously we have shown that fetal hypercalcemia exerts an inhibitory brake on branching morphogenesis via the calcium-sensing receptor. In addition, earlier studies have shown that nifedipine, a selective blocker of L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels (VGCC, inhibits fetal lung growth, suggesting a role for VGCC in lung development. The aim of this work was to investigate the expression of VGCC in the pseudoglandular human and mouse lung, and their role in branching morphogenesis. Expression of L-type (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3, P/Q type (CaV2.1, N-type (CaV2.2, R-type (CaV2.3, and T-type (CaV3.2 and CaV3.3 VGCC was investigated in paraffin sections from week 9 human fetal lungs and E12.5 mouse embryos. Here we show, for the first time, that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are expressed in both the smooth muscle and epithelium of the developing human and mouse lung. Additionally, Cav2.3 was expressed in the lung epithelium of both species. Incubating E12.5 mouse lung rudiments in the presence of nifedipine doubled the amount of branching, an effect which was partly mimicked by the Cav2.3 inhibitor, SNX-482. Direct measurements of changes in epithelial cell membrane potential, using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSBAC2(3, demonstrated that cyclic depolarisations occur within the developing epithelium and coincide with rhythmic occlusions of the lumen, driven by the naturally occurring airway peristalsis. We conclude that VGCC are expressed and functional in the fetal human and mouse lung, where they play a role in branching morphogenesis. Furthermore, rhythmic epithelial depolarisations evoked by airway peristalsis would allow for branching to

  19. Protective Effect of Quercetin on the Development of Preimplantation Mouse Embryos against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin-hua; Yan, Zhi-guang; Liang, Hong-xing; Chai, Wei-ran; Yan, Zheng; Kuang, Yan-ping; Qi, Cong

    2014-01-01

    Quercetin, a plant-derived flavonoid in Chinese herbs, fruits and wine, displays antioxidant properties in many pathological processes associated with oxidative stress. However, the effect of quercetin on the development of preimplantation embryos under oxidative stress is unclear. The present study sought to determine the protective effect and underlying mechanism of action of quercetin against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative injury in mouse zygotes. H2O2 treatment impaired the development of mouse zygotes in vitro, decreasing the rates of blastocyst formation and hatched, and increasing the fragmentation, apoptosis and retardation in blastocysts. Quercetin strongly protected zygotes from H2O2-induced oxidative injury by decreasing the reactive oxygen species level, maintaining mitochondrial function and modulating total antioxidant capability, the activity of the enzymatic antioxidants, including glutathione peroxidase and catalase activity to keep the cellular redox environment. Additionally, quercetin had no effect on the level of glutathione, the main non-enzymatic antioxidant in embryos. PMID:24586844

  20. Development of the vestigial tooth primordia as part of mouse odontogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterková, R; Peterka, M; Viriot, L; Lesot, H

    2002-01-01

    The mouse functional dentition comprises one incisor separated from three molars by a toothless diastema in each dental quadrant. Between the incisor and molars, the embryonic tooth pattern also includes vestigial dental primordia, which undergo regression involving apoptosis in their epithelium. Apoptosis appears to play an important role in achieving the specific tooth pattern in the mouse. We documented similarities in the folding mechanism allowing the formation of the dental lamina in mice as well as in reptiles. While further budding on this dental lamina gives rise to many individual simple tooth primordia in crocodiles and lizards, budding morphogenesis of several simple tooth primordia appears to be integrated in the mouse, giving rise to enamel organs of a complex nature. The differentiation of a mammalian tooth germ during both ontogeny and phylogeny might thus include the concrescence (connation) of more primordia, putatively corresponding to simple teeth in mammalian ancestors.

  1. Age- and Sex-Dependent Changes in Androgen Receptor Expression in the Developing Mouse Cortex and Hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    During the perinatal period, male mice are exposed to higher levels of testosterone (T) than females, which promotes sexual dimorphism in their brain structures and behaviors. In addition to acting via estrogen receptors after being locally converted into estradiol by aromatase, T also acts directly through androgen receptor (AR) in the brain. Therefore, we hypothesized that AR expression in the developing mouse cortex and hippocampus was sexually dimorphic. To test our hypothesis, we measure...

  2. Adiponectin protects against development of metabolic disturbances in a PCOS mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benrick, Anna; Chanclón, Belén; Micallef, Peter; Wu, Yanling; Hadi, Laila; Shelton, John M; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid

    2017-08-22

    Adiponectin, together with adipocyte size, is the strongest factor associated with insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This study investigates the causal relationship between adiponectin levels and metabolic and reproductive functions in PCOS. Prepubertal mice overexpressing adiponectin from adipose tissue (APNtg), adiponectin knockouts (APNko), and their wild-type (WT) littermate mice were continuously exposed to placebo or dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to induce PCOS-like traits. As expected, DHT exposure led to reproductive dysfunction, as judged by continuous anestrus, smaller ovaries with a decreased number of corpus luteum, and an increased number of cystic/atretic follicles. A two-way between-groups analysis showed that there was a significant main effect for DHT exposure, but not for genotype, indicating adiponectin does not influence follicle development. Adiponectin had, however, some protective effects on ovarian function. Similar to in many women with PCOS, DHT exposure led to reduced adiponectin levels, larger adipocyte size, and reduced insulin sensitivity in WTs. APNtg mice remained metabolically healthy despite DHT exposure, while APNko-DHT mice were even more insulin resistant than their DHT-exposed littermate WTs. DHT exposure also reduced the mRNA expression of genes involved in metabolic pathways in gonadal adipose tissue of WT and APNko, but this effect of DHT was not observed in APNtg mice. Moreover, APNtg-DHT mice displayed increased pancreatic mRNA levels of insulin receptors, Pdx1 and Igf1R, suggesting adiponectin stimulates beta cell viability/hyperplasia in the context of PCOS. In conclusion, adiponectin improves metabolic health but has only minor effects on reproductive functions in this PCOS-like mouse model.

  3. HCC development is associated to peripheral insulin resistance in a mouse model of NASH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele De Minicis

    Full Text Available NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide but it is the potential evolution to NASH and eventually to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, even in the absence of cirrhosis, that makes NAFLD of such clinical importance.we aimed to create a mouse model reproducing the pathological spectrum of NAFLD and to investigate the role of possible co-factors in promoting HCC.mice were treated with a choline-deficient L-amino-acid-defined-diet (CDAA or its control (CSAA diet and subjected to a low-dose i.p. injection of CCl4 or vehicle. Insulin resistance was measured by the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp method. Steatosis, fibrosis and HCC were evaluated by histological and molecular analysis.CDAA-treated mice showed peripheral insulin resistance at 1 month. At 1-3 months, extensive steatosis and fibrosis were observed in CDAA and CDAA+CCl4 groups. At 6 months, equal increase in steatosis and fibrosis was observed between the two groups, together with the appearance of tumor. At 9 months of treatment, the 100% of CDAA+CCl4 treated mice revealed tumor versus 40% of CDAA mice. Insulin-like Growth Factor-2 (IGF-2 and Osteopontin (SPP-1 were increased in CDAA mice versus CSAA. Furthermore, Immunostaining for p-AKT, p-c-Myc and Glypican-3 revealed increased positivity in the tumors.the CDAA model promotes the development of HCC from NAFLD-NASH in the presence of insulin resistance but in the absence of cirrhosis. Since this condition is increasingly recognized in humans, our study provides a model that may help understanding mechanisms of carcinogenesis in NAFLD.

  4. Palm is expressed in both developing and adult mouse lens and retina

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    Galileo Deni S

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paralemmin (Palm is a prenyl-palmitoyl anchored membrane protein that can drive membrane and process formation in neurons. Earlier studies have shown brain preferred Palm expression, although this protein is a major water insoluble protein in chicken lens fiber cells and the Palm gene may be regulated by Pax6. Methods The expression profile of Palm protein in the embryonic, newborn and adult mouse eye as well as dissociated retinal neurons was determined by confocal immunofluorescence. The relative mRNA levels of Palm, Palmdelphin (PalmD and paralemmin2 (Palm2 in the lens and retina were determined by real time rt-PCR. Results In the lens, Palm is already expressed at 9.5 dpc in the lens placode, and this expression is maintained in the lens vesicle throughout the formation of the adult lens. Palm is largely absent from the optic vesicle but is detectable at 10.5 dpc in the optic cup. In the developing retina, Palm expression transiently upregulates during the formation of optic nerve as well as in the formation of both the inner and outer plexiform layers. In short term dissociated chick retinal cultures, Palm protein is easily detectable, but the levels appear to reduce sharply as the cultures age. Palm mRNA was found at much higher levels relative to Palm2 or PalmD in both the retina and lens. Conclusion Palm is the major paralemmin family member expressed in the retina and lens and its expression in the retina transiently upregulates during active neurite outgrowth. The expression pattern of Palm in the eye is consistent with it being a Pax6 responsive gene. Since Palm is known to be able to drive membrane formation in brain neurons, it is possible that this molecule is crucial for the increase in membrane formation during lens fiber cell differentiation.

  5. Oxytocin receptor ligand binding in embryonic tissue and postnatal brain development of the C57BL/6J mouse

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    Elizabeth eHammock

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT has drawn increasing attention as a developmentally relevant neuropeptide given its role in the brain regulation of social behavior. It has been suggested that OXT plays an important role in the infant brain during caregiver attachment in nurturing familial contexts, but there is incomplete experimental evidence. Mouse models of OXT system genes have been particularly informative for the role of the OXT system in social behavior, however, the developing brain areas that could respond to ligand activation of the OXT receptor (OXTR have yet to be identified in this species. Here we report new data revealing dynamic ligand-binding distribution of OXTR in the developing mouse brain. Using male and female C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P 0, 7, 14, 21, 35, and 60 we quantified OXTR ligand binding in several brain areas which changed across development. Further, we describe OXTR ligand binding in select tissues of the near-term whole embryo at E18.5. Together, these data aid in the interpretation of findings in mouse models of the OXT system and generate new testable hypotheses for developmental roles for OXT in mammalian systems. We discuss our findings in the context of developmental disorders (including autism, attachment biology, and infant physiological regulation.

  6. Histology Atlas of the Developing Mouse Hepatobiliary Hemolymphatic Vascular System with Emphasis on Embryonic Days 11.5-18.5 and Early Postnatal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartley, Olivia M; Foley, Julie F; Livingston, David P; Cullen, John M; Elmore, Susan A

    2016-07-01

    A critical event in embryo development is the proper formation of the vascular system, of which the hepatobiliary system plays a pivotal role. This has led researchers to use transgenic mice to identify the critical steps involved in developmental disorders associated with the hepatobiliary vascular system. Vascular development is dependent upon normal vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and the transformation of vessels into their adult counterparts. Any alteration in vascular development has the potential to cause deformities or embryonic death. Numerous publications describe specific stages of vascular development relating to various organs, but a single resource detailing the stage-by-stage development of the vasculature pertaining to the hepatobiliary system has not been available. This comprehensive histology atlas provides hematoxylin & eosin and immunohistochemical-stained sections of the developing mouse blood and lymphatic vasculature with emphasis on the hepatobiliary system between embryonic days (E) 11.5-18.5 and the early postnatal period. Additionally, this atlas includes a 3-dimensional video representation of the E18.5 mouse venous vasculature. One of the most noteworthy findings of this atlas is the identification of the portal sinus within the mouse, which has been erroneously misinterpreted as the ductus venosus in previous publications. Although the primary purpose of this atlas is to identify normal hepatobiliary vascular development, potential embryonic abnormalities are also described. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Brain leukocyte infiltration initiated by peripheral inflammation or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis occurs through pathways connected to the CSF-filled compartments of the forebrain and midbrain

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    Schmitt Charlotte

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF has been considered as a preferential pathway of circulation for immune cells during neuroimmune surveillance. In order to evaluate the involvement of CSF-filled spaces in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a model of multiple sclerosis, we performed a time-course analysis of immune cell association with the CSF-containing ventricles, velae, and cisterns in two active models of this disease. Methods Guinea-pig spinal cord homogenate-induced EAE in rat and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein-induced EAE in mouse were used. Leukocyte distribution and phenotypes were investigated by immunohistochemistry in serial sections of brain areas of interest, as well as in CSF withdrawn from rat. Immune cells associated with the choroid plexuses were quantified. Results Freund’s adjuvant-induced peripheral inflammation in the absence of brain antigen led to a subtle but definite increase in the number of myeloid cells in the extraventricular CSF spaces. In both rats and mice, EAE was characterized by a sustained and initial infiltration of lymphocytes and monocytes within forebrain/midbrain fluid-filled compartments such as the velum interpositum and ambient cisterns, and certain basal cisterns. Leukocytes further infiltrated periventricular and pericisternal parenchymal areas, along perivascular spaces or following a downward CSF-to-tissue gradient. Cells quantified in CSF sampled from rats included lymphocytes and neutrophils. The distinctive pattern of cell distribution suggests that both the choroid plexus and the vessels lying in the velae and cisterns are gates for early leukocyte entry in the central nervous system. B-cell infiltration observed in the mouse model was restricted to CSF-filled extraventricular compartments. Conclusion These results identified distinctive velae and cisterns of the forebrain and midbrain as preferential sites of immune cell homing following

  8. A mutagenesis screen in the mouse: Identification of novel gene functions in embryonic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wansleeben, C.

    2010-01-01

    Developmental genetics has been a field of interest for over a hundred years. We have set out to perform an ENU mutagenesis screen in the mouse at E10.5. In the first chapter the pathways and developmental processes described in this thesis are introduced. In the second chapter we describe the ENU-m

  9. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for chicken interleukin 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which are specific for chicken interleukin 18 (chIL18) were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and neutralization assays. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chIL18 identified a ...

  10. New Mouse Model May Aid in Developing Effective Therapies for Ovarian Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A new genetically engineered mouse model appears promising as an effective tool for preclinical testing of novel therapies for ovarian cancer, which tends to be diagnosed in late stage. There are few effective treatments for the disease.

  11. Development of a mouse monoclonal antibody cocktail for post-exposure rabies prophylaxis in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Müller

    Full Text Available As the demand for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP treatments has increased exponentially in recent years, the limited supply of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG and ERIG has failed to provide the required passive immune component in PEP in countries where canine rabies is endemic. Replacement of HRIG and ERIG with a potentially cheaper and efficacious alternative biological for treatment of rabies in humans, therefore, remains a high priority. In this study, we set out to assess a mouse monoclonal antibody (MoMAb cocktail with the ultimate goal to develop a product at the lowest possible cost that can be used in developing countries as a replacement for RIG in PEP. Five MoMAbs, E559.9.14, 1112-1, 62-71-3, M727-5-1, and M777-16-3, were selected from available panels based on stringent criteria, such as biological activity, neutralizing potency, binding specificity, spectrum of neutralization of lyssaviruses, and history of each hybridoma. Four of these MoMAbs recognize epitopes in antigenic site II and one recognizes an epitope in antigenic site III on the rabies virus (RABV glycoprotein, as determined by nucleotide sequence analysis of the glycoprotein gene of unique MoMAb neutralization-escape mutants. The MoMAbs were produced under Good Laboratory Practice (GLP conditions. Unique combinations (cocktails were prepared, using different concentrations of the MoMAbs that were capable of targeting non-overlapping epitopes of antigenic sites II and III. Blind in vitro efficacy studies showed the MoMab cocktails neutralized a broad spectrum of lyssaviruses except for lyssaviruses belonging to phylogroups II and III. In vivo, MoMAb cocktails resulted in protection as a component of PEP that was comparable to HRIG. In conclusion, all three novel combinations of MoMAbs were shown to have equal efficacy to HRIG and therefore could be considered a potentially less expensive alternative biological agent for use in PEP and prevention of

  12. Distribution of ELOVL4 in the Developing and Adult Mouse Brain

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    David M. Sherry

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available ELOngation of Very Long chain fatty acids (ELOVL-4 is essential for the synthesis of very long chain-fatty acids (fatty acids with chain lengths ≥ 28 carbons. The functions of ELOVL4 and its very long-chain fatty acid products are poorly understood at present. However, mutations in ELOVL4 cause neurodevelopmental or neurodegenerative diseases that vary according to the mutation and inheritance pattern. Heterozygous inheritance of different ELOVL4 mutations causes Stargardt-like Macular Dystrophy or Spinocerebellar Ataxia type 34. Homozygous inheritance of ELOVL4 mutations causes more severe disease characterized by seizures, intellectual disability, ichthyosis, and premature death. To better understand ELOVL4 and very long chain fatty acid function in the brain, we examined ELOVL4 expression in the mouse brain between embryonic day 18 and postnatal day 60 by immunolabeling using ELOVL4 and other marker antibodies. ELOVL4 was widely expressed in a region- and cell type-specific manner, and was restricted to cell bodies, consistent with its known localization to endoplasmic reticulum. ELOVL4 labeling was most prominent in gray matter, although labeling also was present in some cells located in white matter. ELOVL4 was widely expressed in the developing brain by embryonic day 18 and was especially pronounced in regions underlying the lateral ventricles and other neurogenic regions. The basal ganglia in particular showed intense ELOVL4 labeling at this stage. In the postnatal brain, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, thalamus, hypothalamus, midbrain, pons, and medulla all showed prominent ELOVL4 labeling, although ELOVL4 distribution was not uniform across all cells or subnuclei within these regions. In contrast, the basal ganglia showed little ELOVL4 labeling in the postnatal brain. Double labeling studies showed that ELOVL4 was primarily expressed by neurons, although presumptive oligodendrocytes located in white matter tracts also showed

  13. Design and development of a high resolution animal SPECT scanner dedicated for rat and mouse imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajedi, Salar; Zeraatkar, Navid [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moji, Vahideh; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sarkar, Saeed [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabi, Hossein [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Teymoorian, Behnoosh [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parto Negar Persia Co, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghafarian, Pardis [Chronic Respiratory Disease Research Center, NRITLD, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); PET/CT and Cyclotron Center, Masih Daneshvari Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahmim, Arman [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Reza Ay, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammadreza_ay@sina.tums.ac.ir [Research Center for Molecular and Cellular Imaging, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-21

    A dedicated small-animal SPECT system, HiReSPECT, was designed and developed to provide a high resolution molecular imaging modality in response to growing research demands. HiReSPECT is a dual-head system mounted on a rotating gantry. The detection system is based on pixelated CsI(Na) scintillator crystals coupled to two Hamamatsu H8500 Position Sensitive Photomultiplier Tubes in each head. Also, a high resolution parallel-hole collimator is applied to every head. The dimensions of each head are 50 mm×100 mm, enabling sufficient transaxial and axial fields-of-view (TFOV and AFOV), respectively, for coverage of the entire mouse in single-bed position imaging. However, a 50 mm TFOV is not sufficient for transaxial coverage of rats. To address this, each head can be rotated by 90 degrees in order to align the larger dimension of the heads with the short body axis, allowing tomographic data acquisition for rats. An innovative non-linear recursive filter was used for signal processing/detection. Resolution recovery was also embedded in the modified Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) image reconstruction code to compensate for Collimator-Detector Response (CDR). Moreover, an innovative interpolation algorithm was developed to speed up the reconstruction code. The planar spatial resolution at the head surface and the image spatial resolutions were 1.7 mm and 1.2–1.6 mm, respectively. The measurements followed by post-processing showed that the observed count rate at 20% count loss is about 42 kcps. The system sensitivity at the collimator surface for heads 1 and 2 were 1.32 cps/µCi and 1.25 cps/µCi, respectively. The corresponding values were 1.18 cps/µCi and 1.02 cps/µCi at 8 cm distance from the collimator surfaces. In addition, whole-body scans of mice demonstrated appropriate imaging capability of the HiReSPECT.

  14. Impact of Prostate Inflammation on Lesion Development in the POET3+Pten+/− Mouse Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, Grant N.; Cresswell, Gregory M.; Snyder, Paul W.; Chen, Long; Liu, Xiaoqi; Crist, Scott A.; Henry, Michael D.; Ratliff, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence linking prostatitis and prostate cancer development is contradictory. To study this link, the POET3 mouse, an inducible model of prostatitis, was crossed with a Pten-loss model of prostate cancer (Pten+/−) containing the ROSA26 luciferase allele to monitor prostate size. Prostatitis was induced, and prostate bioluminescence was tracked over 12 months, with lesion development, inflammation, and cytokine expression analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 months and compared with mice without induction of prostatitis. Acute prostatitis led to more proliferative epithelium and enhanced bioluminescence. However, 4 months after initiation of prostatitis, mice with induced inflammation had lower grade pre-neoplastic lesions. A trend existed toward greater development of carcinoma 12 months after induction of inflammation, including one of two mice with carcinoma developing perineural invasion. Two of 18 mice at the later time points developed lesions with similarities to proliferative inflammatory atrophy, including one mouse with associated carcinoma. Pten+/− mice developed spontaneous inflammation, and prostatitis was similar among groups of mice at 8 and 12 months. Analyzed as one cohort, lesion number and grade were positively correlated with prostatitis. Specifically, amounts of CD11b+Gr1+ cells were correlated with lesion development. These results support the hypothesis that myeloid-based inflammation is associated with lesion development in the murine prostate, and previous bouts of CD8-driven prostatitis may promote invasion in the Pten+/− model of cancer. PMID:25455686

  15. Mouse Y-Encoded Transcription Factor Zfy2 Is Essential for Sperm Head Remodelling and Sperm Tail Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadege Vernet

    Full Text Available A previous study indicated that genetic information encoded on the mouse Y chromosome short arm (Yp is required for efficient completion of the second meiotic division (that generates haploid round spermatids, restructuring of the sperm head, and development of the sperm tail. Using mouse models lacking a Y chromosome but with varying Yp gene complements provided by Yp chromosomal derivatives or transgenes, we recently identified the Y-encoded zinc finger transcription factors Zfy1 and Zfy2 as the Yp genes promoting the second meiotic division. Using the same mouse models we here show that Zfy2 (but not Zfy1 contributes to the restructuring of the sperm head and is required for the development of the sperm tail. The preferential involvement of Zfy2 is consistent with the presence of an additional strong spermatid-specific promotor that has been acquired by this gene. This is further supported by the fact that promotion of sperm morphogenesis is also seen in one of the two markedly Yp gene deficient models in which a Yp deletion has created a Zfy2/1 fusion gene that is driven by the strong Zfy2 spermatid-specific promotor, but encodes a protein almost identical to that encoded by Zfy1. Our results point to there being further genetic information on Yp that also has a role in restructuring the sperm head.

  16. Inactivation of STAT3 Signaling Impairs Hair Cell Differentiation in the Developing Mouse Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although STAT3 signaling is demonstrated to regulate sensory cell differentiation and regeneration in the zebrafish, its exact role is still unclear in mammalian cochleae. Here, we report that STAT3 and its activated form are specifically expressed in hair cells during mouse cochlear development. Importantly, conditional cochlear deletion of Stat3 leads to an inhibition on hair cell differentiation in mice in vivo and in vitro. By cell fate analysis, inactivation of STAT3 signaling shifts the cell division modes from asymmetric to symmetric divisions from supporting cells. Moreover, inhibition of Notch signaling stimulates STAT3 phosphorylation, and inactivation of STAT3 signaling attenuates production of supernumerary hair cells induced by a Notch pathway inhibitor. Our findings highlight an important role of the STAT3 signaling during mouse cochlear hair cell differentiation and may have clinical implications for the recovery of hair cell loss-induced hearing impairment.

  17. Fusion of blastomeres in mouse embryos under the action of femtosecond laser radiation. Efficiency of blastocyst formation and embryo development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osychenko, A A; Zalesskii, A D; Krivokharchenko, A S; Zhakhbazyan, A K; Nadtochenko, V A [N N Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ryabova, A V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-31

    Using the method of femtosecond laser surgery we study the fusion of two-cell mouse embryos under the action of tightly focused femtosecond laser radiation with the fusion efficiency reaching 60%. The detailed statistical analysis of the efficiency of blastomere fusion and development of the embryo up to the blastocyst stage after exposure of the embryos from different mice to a femtosecond pulse is presented. It is shown that the efficiency of blastocyst formation essentially depends on the biological characteristics of the embryo, namely, the strain and age of the donor mouse. The possibility of obtaining hexaploid embryonal cells using the methods of femtosecond laser surgery is demonstrated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  18. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) expression and possible function in mouse tooth germ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kana; Wada, Hiroko; Nagata, Kengo; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Wada, Naohisa; Someya, Hirotaka; Mikami, Yurie; Sakai, Hidetaka; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal expression of Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) region gene 1 (FRG1) is involved in the pathogenesis of FSHD. FRG1 is also important for the normal muscular and vascular development. Our previous study showed that FRG1 is one of the highly expressed genes in the mandible on embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) than on E12.0. In this study, we investigated the temporospatial expression pattern of FRG1 mRNA and protein during the development of the mouse lower first molar, and also evaluated the subcellular localization of the FRG1 protein in mouse dental epithelial (mDE6) cells. The FRG1 expression was identified in the dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells at the initiation and bud stages. It was detected in the inner enamel epithelium at the cap and early bell stages. At the late bell and root formation stages, these signals were detected in ameloblasts and odontoblasts during the formation of enamel and dentin matrices, respectively. The FRG1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm in the mouse tooth germ in vivo, while FRG1 was detected predominantly in the nucleus and faintly in the cytoplasm in mDE6 cells in vitro. In mDE6 cells treated with bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4), the protein expression of FRG1 increased in cytoplasm, suggesting that FRG1 may translocate to the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that FRG1 is involved in the morphogenesis of the tooth germ, as well as in the formation of enamel and dentin matrices and that FRG1 may play a role in the odontogenesis in the mouse following BMP4 stimulation.

  19. Altered mitochondrial respiration in selectively vulnerable brain subregions following transient forebrain ischemia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, N R; Pulsinelli, W A

    1987-11-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory function, assessed from the rate of oxygen uptake by homogenates of rat brain subregions, was examined after 30 min of forebrain ischemia and at recirculation periods of up to 48 h. Ischemia-sensitive regions which develop extensive neuronal loss during the recirculation period (dorsal-lateral striatum, CA1 hippocampus) were compared with ischemia-resistant areas (paramedian neocortex, CA3 plus CA4 hippocampus). All areas showed reductions (to 53-69% of control) during ischemia for oxygen uptake rates determined in the presence of ADP or an uncoupling agent, which then recovered within 1 h of cerebral recirculation. In the ischemia-resistant regions, oxygen uptake rates remained similar to control values for at least 48 h of recirculation. After 3 h of recirculation, a significant decrease in respiratory activity (measured in the presence of ADP or uncoupling agent) was observed in the dorsal-lateral striatum which progressed to reductions of greater than 65% of the initial activity by 24 h. In the CA1 hippocampus, oxygen uptake rates were unchanged for 24 h, but were significantly reduced (by 30% in the presence of uncoupling agent) at 48 h. These alterations parallel the development of histological evidence of ischemic cell change determined previously and apparently precede the appearance of differential changes between sensitive and resistant regions in the content of high-energy phosphate compounds. These results suggest that alterations of mitochondrial activity are a relatively early change in the development of ischemic cell death and provide a sensitive biochemical marker for this process.

  20. Protogenin, a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is implicated in the development of the mouse lower first molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada Hiroko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protogenin (Prtg has been identified as a gene which is highly expressed in the mouse mandible at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5 by a cDNA subtraction method between mandibles at E10.5 and E12.0. Prtg is a new member of the deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC family, which is composed of DCC, Neogenin, Punc and Nope. Although these members play an important role in the development of the embryonic central nervous system, recent research has also shed on the non-neuronal organization. However, very little is known regarding the fetal requirement of the non-neuronal organization for Prtg and how this may be associated with the tooth germ development. This study examined the functional implications of Prtg in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. Results Ptrg is preferentially expressed in the early stage of organogenesis. Prtg mRNA and protein were widely expressed in the mesenchymal cells in the mandible at E10.5. The oral epithelial cells were also positive for Prtg. The expression intensity of Prtg after E12.0 was markedly reduced in the mesenchymal cells of the mandible, and was restricted to the area where the tooth bud was likely to be formed. Signals were also observed in the epithelial cells of the tooth germ. Weak signals were observed in the inner enamel epithelial cells at E16.0 and E18.0. An inhibition assay using a hemagglutinating virus of Japan-liposome containing Prtg antisense-phosphorothioated-oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-S-ODN in cultured mandibles at E10.5 showed a significant growth inhibition in the tooth germ. The relationship between Prtg and the odontogenesis-related genes was examined in mouse E10.5 mandible, and we verified that the Bmp-4 expression had significantly been decreased in the mouse E10.5 mandible 24 hr after treatment with Prtg AS-S-ODN. Conclusion These results indicated that the Prtg might be related to the initial morphogenesis of the tooth germ leading to the

  1. Protogenin, a new member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is implicated in the development of the mouse lower first molar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Protogenin (Prtg) has been identified as a gene which is highly expressed in the mouse mandible at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) by a cDNA subtraction method between mandibles at E10.5 and E12.0. Prtg is a new member of the deleted in colorectal carcinoma (DCC) family, which is composed of DCC, Neogenin, Punc and Nope. Although these members play an important role in the development of the embryonic central nervous system, recent research has also shed on the non-neuronal organization. However, very little is known regarding the fetal requirement of the non-neuronal organization for Prtg and how this may be associated with the tooth germ development. This study examined the functional implications of Prtg in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. Results Ptrg is preferentially expressed in the early stage of organogenesis. Prtg mRNA and protein were widely expressed in the mesenchymal cells in the mandible at E10.5. The oral epithelial cells were also positive for Prtg. The expression intensity of Prtg after E12.0 was markedly reduced in the mesenchymal cells of the mandible, and was restricted to the area where the tooth bud was likely to be formed. Signals were also observed in the epithelial cells of the tooth germ. Weak signals were observed in the inner enamel epithelial cells at E16.0 and E18.0. An inhibition assay using a hemagglutinating virus of Japan-liposome containing Prtg antisense-phosphorothioated-oligodeoxynucleotide (AS-S-ODN) in cultured mandibles at E10.5 showed a significant growth inhibition in the tooth germ. The relationship between Prtg and the odontogenesis-related genes was examined in mouse E10.5 mandible, and we verified that the Bmp-4 expression had significantly been decreased in the mouse E10.5 mandible 24 hr after treatment with Prtg AS-S-ODN. Conclusion These results indicated that the Prtg might be related to the initial morphogenesis of the tooth germ leading to the differentiation of the inner enamel

  2. Aging-induced Seizure-related Changes to the Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Pathway in Forebrain Specific BDNF Overexpressing Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Kate L; Goodman, Jeffrey H; Chadman, Kathryn K; McCloskey, Daniel P

    2011-08-01

    Aging confers an increased risk for developing seizure activity, especially within brain regions that mediate learning and synaptic plasticity. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family that has an important role in regulating growth and development of the nervous system. BDNF is upregulated after pharmacological seizure induction and this upregulation contributes to enhanced excitability of the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 pathway, which is accompanied by neuropeptide Y (NPY) upregulation. Mice overexpressing a BDNF transgene in forebrain neurons provide an avenue for understanding the role of neurotrophic support in the aged hippocampus. In this study BDNF transgenic (TG) mice were utilized to determine whether increased BDNF expression through genetic manipulation resulted in age-related changes in hippocampal excitability and NPY expression. Spontaneous behavioral seizures were observed in TG mice, but not WT mice, past 5 months of age and the severity of behavioral seizures increased with age. Electrophysiological investigation of hippocampal CA3 activity indicated that slices from aged TG mice (86%), but not age-matched WT mice, or young TG mice, showed epileptiform activity in response to either repeated paired pulse or high frequency (tetanic) stimulation. Electrophysiological results were supported by the observation of robust ectopic NPY immunoreactivity in hippocampal mossy fibers of most aged TG mice (57%), which was absent in age-matched WT mice and young TG mice. The results from this study indicate that forebrain restricted BDNF overexpression produces age-related changes in hyperexcitability and NPY immunoreactivity in mossy fiber-CA3 pathway. Together, these data suggest that the capability for BDNF to promote epileptogenesis is maintained, and may be enhanced, in the aging hippocampus.

  3. In vivo labeling of rabbit cholinergic basal forebrain neurons with fluorochromated antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartig, W; Varga, C; Kacza, J; Grosche, J; Seeger, J; Luiten, PGM; Brauer, K; Harkany, T; Härtig, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    Cholinergic basal forebrain neurons (CBFN) expressing the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)) were previously selectively labeled in vivo with carbocyanine 3 (Cy3)-tagged anti-p75(NTR), but the applied 192IgG-conjugates recognized p75(NTR) only in rat The antibody ME 20.4 raised agains

  4. Effects of heavy ions on rabbit tissues: damage to the forebrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, A.B.; Keng, P.C.; Lee, A.C.; Lett, J.T. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins (USA). Dept. of Radiology and Radiation Biology)

    1982-10-01

    As part of a study of progressive radiation effects in normal tissues, the forebrains of New Zealand white rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) (about 6 weeks old) were irradiated locally with single acute doses of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-photons (LETsub(infinity)=0.3 keV/..mu..m), Ne ions (LETsub(infinity)=35+-3 keV/..mu..m) or Ar ions (LETsub(infinity)=90+-5 keV/..mu..m). Other rabbits received fractionated doses of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-photons according to a standard radiotherapeutic protocol. Irradiated rabbits and appropriately aged controls were sacrificed at selected intervals, and whole sagittal sections of their brains were examined for pathological changes. Forebrain damage was scored with subjective indices based on histological differences between the anterior (irradiated) and posterior (unirradiated) regions of the brain. Those indices ranged from zero (no apparent damage) to five (severe infarctions, etc.). At intermediate levels of forebrain damage, the relative biological effectiveness (r.b.e.) of each heavy ion was similar to that found for alopecia and cataractogenesis, and the early expression of the damage was also accelerated as the LETsub(infinity) increased. Late deterioration of the forebrain appeared also to be accelerated by increasing LETsub(infinity), although its accurate quantification was not possible because other priorities in the overall experimental design limited systematic sacrifice of the animals.

  5. A Critical Analysis of Atoh7 (Math5) mRNA Splicing in the Developing Mouse Retina

    OpenAIRE

    Lev Prasov; Brown, Nadean L.; Tom Glaser

    2010-01-01

    The Math5 (Atoh7) gene is transiently expressed during retinogenesis by progenitors exiting mitosis, and is essential for ganglion cell (RGC) development. Math5 contains a single exon, and its 1.7 kb mRNA encodes a 149-aa polypeptide. Mouse Math5 mutants have essentially no RGCs or optic nerves. Given the importance of this gene in retinal development, we thoroughly investigated the possibility of Math5 mRNA splicing by Northern blot, 3'RACE, RNase protection assays, and RT-PCR, using RNAs ex...

  6. Effect of Different High CO2 Concentrations on the Development of 2-cell Mouse Embryos in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-hua LU; Wei-jie ZHU

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate effects of different high CO2 concentrations on the development of 2-cell mouse embryos in vitroMethods At levels of 5% CO2 (control group), 5.7% CO2, 6.0% CO2 and 15% CO2, embryos were incubated in drops with CZB medium, respectively, and the drops were covered by paraffin oil which was treated with three-distilled water. In addition, at the level of 15% CO2, there were another two groups, in which paraffin oil was treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution or the drops were uncovered. The development of embryos in all stages was noted.Results The developmental rates of blastocysts in five experimental groups were significantly lower than that of the control group (P0.05). At the level of 15% CO2, 15% embryos developed in the 4-cell stage with irregular blastomere and degenerated quickly in the group which paraffin oil was treated with distilled water; 2.2% embryos developed in the 4-cell stage in the group which paraffin oil was treated with PBS and the rest stagnated in the 2-cell stage. Conclusions High CO2 concentrations had toxic effect on the in vitro development of 2-cell mouse embryos, and was responsible for the inhibition of the embryos. It is important for the development of embryos in vitro to detect strictly CO2 concentration.

  7. Evidence for the involvement of two areas of the zebra finch forebrain in sexual imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollenhagen, A; Bischof, H J

    2000-03-01

    Sexual imprinting in male zebra finches is a two-step process, including an acquisition period early in life and a stabilization process normally occuring during the first courtship attempts of the male. During the acquisition period, a young male learns about its social environment. During stabilization, which can be delayed experimentally until day 100, it develops a preference for the appropriate object for courtship behavior on the basis of its previous and acute experience. Thereafter, this preference cannot be altered again. Exploring the physiological basis for imprinting, we have previously shown that the neurons of two forebrain areas (ANC and HAD) increase their spine density in the course of the stabilization process, while in two other areas (MNH and LNH) a decrease of spine density can be observed. With the present experiments, we tested the idea that the spine density decrease in MNH and LNH is the anatomical manifestation of the imprinting process. Previous behavioral experiments have shown that exposure to a nestbox after 100 days of age stabilizes the sexual preference of a zebra finch male as well as does exposure to a female. The present study shows that nestbox exposure also reduces the spine density in MNH and LNH, but has no effect on ANC and HAD. It has also been shown previously that treating males with an antiandrogen between days 40 and 100 affects the final preference of a male. The present experiment indicates that the same treatment affects spine growth during development in MNH and LNH and prevents the increase of spine density within HAD and ANC normally induced by exposure to a female. The results are interpreted as strong evidence for the involvement of MNH and LNH in sexual imprinting. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Developing a Mouse Model of Sensory and Cognitive Deficits for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    intestinal vasodilation . • Avertin–chloral hydrate has low impact on mouse health in the post-anesthetic period. a r t i c l e i n...general appearance, organ color and size relative to one another, signs of inflammation, vasodilation and the presence or absence of ascites. Eight mice...Neuroscience Methods 219 (2013) 61– 69 67 Fig. 6. Mild acute vasodilation in 2,2,2-tribromoethanol–chloral hydrate injected abdomens. Saline injected (A and B

  9. TDP-43 pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cykowski, Matthew D; Takei, Hidehiro; Schulz, Paul E; Appel, Stanley H; Powell, Suzanne Z

    2014-12-24

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disease characterized clinically by motor symptoms including limb weakness, dysarthria, dysphagia, and respiratory compromise, and pathologically by inclusions of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43). Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis also may demonstrate non-motor symptoms and signs of autonomic and energy dysfunction as hypermetabolism and weight loss that suggest the possibility of pathology in the forebrain, including hypothalamus. However, this region has received little investigation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this study, the frequency, topography, and clinical associations of TDP-43 inclusion pathology in the basal forebrain and hypothalamus were examined in 33 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: 25 men and 8 women; mean age at death of 62.7 years, median disease duration of 3.1 years (range of 1.3 to 9.8 years). TDP-43 pathology was present in 11 patients (33.3%), including components in both basal forebrain (n=10) and hypothalamus (n=7). This pathology was associated with non-motor system TDP-43 pathology (Χ2=17.5, p=0.00003) and bulbar symptoms at onset (Χ2=4.04, p=0.044), but not age or disease duration. Furthermore, TDP-43 pathology in the lateral hypothalamic area was associated with reduced body mass index (W=11, p=0.023). This is the first systematic demonstration of pathologic involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Furthermore, the findings suggest that involvement of the basal forebrain and hypothalamus has significant phenotypic associations in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, including site of symptom onset, as well as deficits in energy metabolism with loss of body mass index.

  10. Comparative evaluation of a newly developed 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chulmin; Kwon, Eun-Young; Choi, Su-Mi; Cho, Sung-Yeon; Byun, Ji-Hyun; Park, Jung Yeon; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kang, Jin Han; Shin, Jinhwan; Kim, Hun

    2016-12-14

    Animal models facilitate evaluation of vaccine efficacy at relatively low cost. This study was a comparative evaluation of the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a new 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) with a control vaccine in a mouse model. After vaccination, anti-capsular antibody levels were evaluated by pneumococcal polysaccharide (PnP) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and opsonophagocytic killing assay (OPA). Also, mice were challenged intraperitoneally with 100-fold of the 50% lethal dose of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The anti-capsular IgG levels against serotypes 1, 4, 7F, 14, 18C, 19A, and 19F were high (quartile 2 >1,600), while those against the other serotypes were low (Q2 ≤ 800). Also, the OPA titres were similar to those determined by PnP ELISA. Comparative analysis between new PCV13 and control vaccination group in a mouse model exhibited significant differences in serological immunity of a few serotypes and the range of anti-capsular IgG in the population. Challenge of wild-type or neutropenic mice with serotypes 3, 5, 6A, 6B, and 9V showed protective immunity despite of induced relatively low levels of anti-capsular antibodies. With comparison analysis, a mouse model should be adequate for evaluating serological efficacy and difference in the population level as preclinical trial.

  11. Regulation of X-linked gene expression during early mouse development by Rlim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Shin, JongDae; Shea, Jeremy M; Yu, Jun; Bošković, Ana; Byron, Meg; Zhu, Xiaochun; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Lawrence, Jeanne B; Torres, Eduardo M; Zhu, Lihua J; Rando, Oliver J; Bach, Ingolf

    2016-09-19

    Mammalian X-linked gene expression is highly regulated as female cells contain two and male one X chromosome (X). To adjust the X gene dosage between genders, female mouse preimplantation embryos undergo an imprinted form of X chromosome inactivation (iXCI) that requires both Rlim (also known as Rnf12) and the long non-coding RNA Xist. Moreover, it is thought that gene expression from the single active X is upregulated to correct for bi-allelic autosomal (A) gene expression. We have combined mouse genetics with RNA-seq on single mouse embryos to investigate functions of Rlim on the temporal regulation of iXCI and Xist. Our results reveal crucial roles of Rlim for the maintenance of high Xist RNA levels, Xist clouds and X-silencing in female embryos at blastocyst stages, while initial Xist expression appears Rlim-independent. We find further that X/A upregulation is initiated in early male and female preimplantation embryos.

  12. In vivo cell tracking of mouse embryonic myoblasts and fast fibers during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Lucia; Villar, Pedro; Martínez, Lidia; Badia-Careaga, Claudio; Arredondo, Juan J; Cervera, Margarita

    2014-09-01

    Fast and slow TnI are co-expressed in E11.5 embryos, and fast TnI is present from the very beginning of myogenesis. A novel green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter mouse lines (FastTnI/GFP lines) that carry the primary and secondary enhancer elements of the mouse fast troponin I (fast TnI), in which reporter expression correlates precisely with distribution of the endogenous fTnI protein was generated. Using the FastTnI/GFP mouse model, we characterized the early myogenic events in mice, analyzing the migration of GFP+ myoblasts, and the formation of primary and secondary myotubes in transgenic embryos. Interestingly, we found that the two contractile fast and slow isoforms of TnI are expressed during the migration of myoblasts from the somites to the limbs and body wall, suggesting that both participate in these events. Since no sarcomeres are present in myoblasts, we speculate that the function of fast TnI in early myogenesis is, like Myosin and Tropomyosin, to participate in cell movement during the initial myogenic stages. genesis © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. FGF/FGFR2 signaling regulates the generation and correct positioning of Bergmann glia cells in the developing mouse cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Meier

    Full Text Available The normal cellular organization and layering of the vertebrate cerebellum is established during embryonic and early postnatal development by the interplay of a complex array of genetic and signaling pathways. Disruption of these processes and of the proper layering of the cerebellum usually leads to ataxic behaviors. Here, we analyzed the relative contribution of Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2-mediated signaling to cerebellar development in conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice. We show that during embryonic mouse development, Fgfr2 expression is higher in the anterior cerebellar primordium and excluded from the proliferative ventricular neuroepithelium. Consistent with this finding, conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice display the most prominent defects in the anterior lobules of the adult cerebellum. In this context, FGFR2-mediated signaling is required for the proper generation of Bergmann glia cells and the correct positioning of these cells within the Purkinje cell layer, and for cell survival in the developing cerebellar primordium. Using cerebellar microexplant cultures treated with an FGFR agonist (FGF9 or antagonist (SU5402, we also show that FGF9/FGFR-mediated signaling inhibits the outward migration of radial glia and Bergmann glia precursors and cells, and might thus act as a positioning cue for these cells. Altogether, our findings reveal the specific functions of the FGFR2-mediated signaling pathway in the generation and positioning of Bergmann glia cells during cerebellar development in the mouse.

  14. Stepwise renal lineage differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells tracing in vivo development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, Masaki, E-mail: masakiwestriver@gmail.com [Medical and Research Services, Greater Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Healthcare System at Sepulveda, North Hills, CA (United States); University of California at Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 91343 (United States); Yanagawa, Naomi [Medical and Research Services, Greater Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Healthcare System at Sepulveda, North Hills, CA (United States); University of California at Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 91343 (United States); Kojima, Nobuhiko [Institute of Industrial Science (IIS), University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Yuri, Shunsuke; Hauser, Peter V.; Jo, Oak D.; Yanagawa, Norimoto [Medical and Research Services, Greater Los Angeles Veterans Affairs Healthcare System at Sepulveda, North Hills, CA (United States); University of California at Los Angeles, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA 91343 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced renal lineages from mESCs by following the in vivo developmental cues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced nephrogenic intermediate mesoderm by stepwise addition of factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We induced two types of renal progenitor cells by reciprocal conditioned media. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose the potential role of CD24 for the enrichment of renal lineage cells. -- Abstract: The in vitro derivation of renal lineage progenitor cells is essential for renal cell therapy and regeneration. Despite extensive studies in the past, a protocol for renal lineage induction from embryonic stem cells remains unestablished. In this study, we aimed to induce renal lineages from mouse embryonic stem cells (mESC) by following in vivo developmental stages, i.e., the induction of mesoderm (Stage I), intermediate mesoderm (Stage II) and renal lineages (Stage III). For stage I induction, in accordance with known signaling pathways involved in mesoderm development in vivo, i.e., Nodal, bone morphogenic proteins (BMPs) and Wnt, we found that the sequential addition of three factors, i.e., Activin-A (A), a surrogate for Nodal signaling, during days 0-2, A plus BMP-4 (4) during days 2-4, and A4 plus lithium (L), a surrogate for Wnt signaling, during days 4-6, was most effective to induce the mesodermal marker, Brachyury. For stage II induction, the addition of retinoic acid (R) in the continuous presence of A4L during days 6-8 was most effective to induce nephrogenic intermediate mesodermal markers, such as Pax2 and Lim1. Under this condition, more than 30% of cells were stained positive for Pax2, and there was a concomitant decrease in the expression of non-mesodermal markers. For stage III induction, in resemblance to the reciprocal induction between ureteric bud (UB) and metanephric mesenchyme (MM) during kidney development, we found that the exposure to conditioned media derived from UB and MM cells was

  15. Of mice, birds, and men: the mouse ultrasonic song system has some features similar to humans and song-learning birds.

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    Gustavo Arriaga

    Full Text Available Humans and song-learning birds communicate acoustically using learned vocalizations. The characteristic features of this social communication behavior include vocal control by forebrain motor areas, a direct cortical projection to brainstem vocal motor neurons, and dependence on auditory feedback to develop and maintain learned vocalizations. These features have so far not been found in closely related primate and avian species that do not learn vocalizations. Male mice produce courtship ultrasonic vocalizations with acoustic features similar to songs of song-learning birds. However, it is assumed that mice lack a forebrain system for vocal modification and that their ultrasonic vocalizations are innate. Here we investigated the mouse song system and discovered that it includes a motor cortex region active during singing, that projects directly to brainstem vocal motor neurons and is necessary for keeping song more stereotyped and on pitch. We also discovered that male mice depend on auditory feedback to maintain some ultrasonic song features, and that sub-strains with differences in their songs can match each other's pitch when cross-housed under competitive social conditions. We conclude that male mice have some limited vocal modification abilities with at least some neuroanatomical features thought to be unique to humans and song-learning birds. To explain our findings, we propose a continuum hypothesis of vocal learning.

  16. Reduced Cholinergic Basal Forebrain Integrity Links Neonatal Complications and Adult Cognitive Deficits After Premature Birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grothe, Michel J; Scheef, Lukas; Bäuml, Josef; Meng, Chun; Daamen, Marcel; Baumann, Nicole; Zimmer, Claus; Teipel, Stefan; Bartmann, Peter; Boecker, Henning; Wolke, Dieter; Wohlschläger, Afra; Sorg, Christian

    2017-07-15

    Prematurely born individuals have an increased risk for long-term neurocognitive impairments. In animal models, development of the cholinergic basal forebrain (cBF) is selectively vulnerable to adverse effects of perinatal stressors, and impaired cBF integrity results in lasting cognitive deficits. We hypothesized that cBF integrity is impaired in prematurely born individuals and mediates adult cognitive impairments associated with prematurity. We used magnetic resonance imaging-based volumetric assessments of a cytoarchitectonically defined cBF region of interest to determine differences in cBF integrity between 99 adults who were born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight and 106 term-born control subjects from the same birth cohort. Magnetic resonance imaging-derived cBF volumes were studied in relation to neonatal clinical complications after delivery and intelligence measures (IQ) in adulthood. In adults who were born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight, cBF volumes were significantly reduced compared with term-born adults (-4.5% [F1,202 = 11.82, p = .001]). Lower cBF volume in adults who were born very preterm and/or with very low birth weight was specifically associated with both neonatal complications (rpart,92 = -.35, p premature birth and links neonatal complications with long-term cognitive outcome. Data suggest that cholinergic system abnormalities may play a relevant role for long-term neurocognitive impairments associated with premature delivery. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mechanisms underlying the basal forebrain enhancement of top-down and bottom-up attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Michael C; Dutt, Nikil; Krichmar, Jeffrey L

    2014-03-01

    Both attentional signals from frontal cortex and neuromodulatory signals from basal forebrain (BF) have been shown to influence information processing in the primary visual cortex (V1). These two systems exert complementary effects on their targets, including increasing firing rates and decreasing interneuronal correlations. Interestingly, experimental research suggests that the cholinergic system is important for increasing V1's sensitivity to both sensory and attentional information. To see how the BF and top-down attention act together to modulate sensory input, we developed a spiking neural network model of V1 and thalamus that incorporated cholinergic neuromodulation and top-down attention. In our model, activation of the BF had a broad effect that decreases the efficacy of top-down projections and increased the reliance of bottom-up sensory input. In contrast, we demonstrated how local release of acetylcholine in the visual cortex, which was triggered through top-down gluatmatergic projections, could enhance top-down attention with high spatial specificity. Our model matched experimental data showing that the BF and top-down attention decrease interneuronal correlations and increase between-trial reliability. We found that decreases in correlations were primarily between excitatory-inhibitory pairs rather than excitatory-excitatory pairs and suggest that excitatory-inhibitory decorrelation is necessary for maintaining low levels of excitatory-excitatory correlations. Increased inhibitory drive via release of acetylcholine in V1 may then act as a buffer, absorbing increases in excitatory-excitatory correlations that occur with attention and BF stimulation. These findings will lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms underyling the BF's interactions with attention signals and influences on correlations.

  18. Temperature manipulation of neuronal dynamics in a forebrain motor control nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindlin, Gabriel B.

    2017-01-01

    Different neuronal types within brain motor areas contribute to the generation of complex motor behaviors. A widely studied songbird forebrain nucleus (HVC) has been recognized as fundamental in shaping the precise timing characteristics of birdsong. This is based, among other evidence, on the stretching and the “breaking” of song structure when HVC is cooled. However, little is known about the temperature effects that take place in its neurons. To address this, we investigated the dynamics of HVC both experimentally and computationally. We developed a technique where simultaneous electrophysiological recordings were performed during temperature manipulation of HVC. We recorded spontaneous activity and found three effects: widening of the spike shape, decrease of the firing rate and change in the interspike interval distribution. All these effects could be explained with a detailed conductance based model of all the neurons present in HVC. Temperature dependence of the ionic channel time constants explained the first effect, while the second was based in the changes of the maximal conductance using single synaptic excitatory inputs. The last phenomenon, only emerged after introducing a more realistic synaptic input to the inhibitory interneurons. Two timescales were present in the interspike distributions. The behavior of one timescale was reproduced with different input balances received form the excitatory neurons, whereas the other, which disappears with cooling, could not be found assuming poissonian synaptic inputs. Furthermore, the computational model shows that the bursting of the excitatory neurons arises naturally at normal brain temperature and that they have an intrinsic delay at low temperatures. The same effect occurs at single synapses, which may explain song stretching. These findings shed light on the temperature dependence of neuronal dynamics and present a comprehensive framework to study neuronal connectivity. This study, which is based on

  19. The medial forebrain bundle as a target for deep brain stimulation for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, Volker A; Schlaepfer, Thomas E; Goll, Peter; Reinacher, Peter C; Voderholzer, Ulrich; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Urbach, Horst; Freyer, Tobias

    2017-06-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising putative modality for the treatment of refractory psychiatric disorders such as major depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Several targets have been posited; however, a clear consensus on differential efficacy and possible modes of action remain unclear. DBS to the supero-lateral branch of the medial forebrain bundle (slMFB) has recently been introduced for major depression (MD). Due to our experience with slMFB stimulation for MD, and because OCD might be related to similar dysfunctions of the reward system, treatment with slMFB DBS seams meaningful. Here we describe our first 2 cases together with a hypothetical mode of action. We describe diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) fiber tractographically (FT)-assisted implantation of the bilateral DBS systems in 2 male patients. In a selected literature overview, we discuss the possible mode of action. Both patients were successfully implanted and stimulated. The follow-up time was 12 months. One patient showed a significant response (Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale [YBOCS] reduction by 35%); the other patient reached remission criteria 3 months after surgery (YBOCS<14) and showed mild OCD just above the remission criterion at 12 months follow-up. While the hypermetabolism theory for OCD involves the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) network, we think that there is clinical evidence that the reward system plays a crucial role. Our findings suggest an important role of this network in mechanisms of disease development and recovery. In this uncontrolled case series, continuous bilateral DBS to the slMFB led to clinically significant improvements of ratings of OCD severity. Ongoing research focuses on the role of the reward system in OCD, and its yet-underestimated role in this underlying neurobiology of the disease.

  20. The selective vitamin D receptor agonist, elocalcitol, reduces endometriosis development in a mouse model by inhibiting peritoneal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Margherita; Viganò, Paola; Gentilini, Davide; Camisa, Barbara; Caporizzo, Elvira; Di Lucia, Pietro; Monno, Antonella; Candiani, Massimo; Somigliana, Edgardo; Panina-Bordignon, Paola

    2012-07-01

    Endometriosis, which is characterized by the growth of endometrial tissue at ectopic locations as well as vascular development and inflammation, is still an unmet clinical need since an optimal drug that allows for both pain and infertility management does not exist. Since both the eutopic and the ectopic endometrium express the vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR agonists are endowed with anti-proliferative and anti-inflammatory properties, we evaluated the effect of elocalcitol, a VDR agonist with low calcaemic liability, in a mouse model of experimentally induced endometriosis. Endometriosis was induced by injection of syngeneic endometrial tissue fragments into adult Balb/c female mice. After having confirmed by immunohistochemistry that endometriotic lesions developing in mice expressed VDR, the mice were administered with elocalcitol (100 μg/kg) or vehicle orally, once a day, for various durations of time. In this model, elocalcitol was able to reduce total lesion weight up to 70% upon treatment for 1 week before and 2 weeks after disease induction. Interestingly, a therapeutic effect was also observed on already established lesions. Elocalcitol was shown to reduce the capacity of mouse endometrial cells to adhere to collagen. In addition in treated mice, a decreased state of peritoneal inflammation was demonstrated by the inhibition of macrophage recruitment and inflammatory cytokine secretion. The VDR agonist elocalcitol inhibits lesion development in a validated mouse model of endometriosis, and exerts a protective effect on both the implantation and organization of transferred endometrial tissue. These preliminary data in mice provide a sound rationale for further testing in primate models and eventually in humans.

  1. Effects of magnetic resonance imaging on eye development in the C57BL/6J mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyndall, D.A.; Sulik, K.K. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1991-03-01

    An investigation was undertaken to ascertain the potential teratogenicity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) fields. The C57BL/6J mouse was chosen as the experimental model with eye malformations (microphthalmia and morphologic anomalies) designated as the biological end point. This mouse strain is genetically predisposed to this type of malformation as a 10% spontaneous incidence occurs. Dams in groups of 15 were subjected to MRI imaging conditions on gestational day (Gd) 7 for 36 minutes to a spin-echo T-2-weighted scan by using a 1.5 Tesla magnetic field and a radiofrequency (RF) field of 64 MHz. One group was exposed at the magnetic isocenter while another was exposed at the entrance to the magnet lumen. There was also a sham control group. The dams were sacrificed at Gd 14. Assessment of eye abnormality was determined by, (1) a veterinary ophthalmologist, (2) a computer-based method comparing eye areas, and (3) a methodology combining both the above subjective and quantitative methods. MRI fields were found to produce malformation rates (15-37%) higher than controls (2-19% P less than or equal to .05, Kruskal-Wallis Test) for both isocenter and lumen entrance groups. The malformation rates and degree of statistical significance varied somewhat with analytical methodology and the unit of measure (right eye, left eye, or fetus). The results suggest for the first time the potential of MRI fields to produce developmental malformations in an animal model utilizing clinically realistic exposure conditions. (However, the reader is remained that the mouse strain utilized in this investigation was genetically prone to malformations).

  2. MrgX Is Not Essential for Cell Growth and Development in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    MRGX is one of the members of MORF4/MRG family of transcriptional regulators, which are involved in cell growth regulation and cellular senescence. We have shown that MRGX and MRG15 associate with Rb in nucleoprotein complexes and regulate B-myb promoter activity. To elucidate the functions of MRGX and to explore its potential role in modulating cell growth in vivo, we have generated MrgX-deficient mice. Characterization of the expression pattern of mouse MrgX demonstrated it was ubiquitously...

  3. Gpr177/mouse Wntless is essential for Wnt-mediated craniofacial and brain development

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Jiang; Yu, Hsiao-Man Ivy; Maruyama, Takamitsu; Mirando, Anthony J.; Hsu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Gpr177, the mouse orthologue of Drosophila Wls/Evi/Srt, is required for establishment of the anterior-posterior axis. The Gpr177 null phenotype is highly reminiscent to the loss of Wnt3, the earliest abnormality among all Wnt knockouts in mice. The expression of Gpr177 in various cell types and tissues lead us to hypothesize that reciprocal regulation of Wnt and Gpr177 is essential for the Wnt-dependent developmental and pathogenic processes. Here we creat...

  4. Mouse Genetic Models Reveal Surprising Functions of IκB Kinase Alpha in Skin Development and Skin Carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Xiaojun [The Methodist Hospital Research Institute, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Park, Eunmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Fischer, Susan M. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78967 (United States); Hu, Yinling, E-mail: huy2@mail.nih.gov [Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Gene knockout studies unexpectedly reveal a pivotal role for IκB kinase alpha (IKKα) in mouse embryonic skin development. Skin carcinogenesis experiments show that Ikkα heterozygous mice are highly susceptible to chemical carcinogen or ultraviolet B light (UVB) induced benign and malignant skin tumors in comparison to wild-type mice. IKKα deletion mediated by keratin 5 (K5).Cre or K15.Cre in keratinocytes induces epidermal hyperplasia and spontaneous skin squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) in Ikkα floxed mice. On the other hand, transgenic mice overexpressing IKKα in the epidermis, under the control of a truncated loricrin promoter or K5 promoter, develop normal skin and show no defects in the formation of the epidermis and other epithelial organs, and the transgenic IKKα represses chemical carcinogen or UVB induced skin carcinogenesis. Moreover, IKKα deletion mediated by a mutation, which generates a stop codon in the Ikkα gene, has been reported in a human autosomal recessive lethal syndrome. Downregulated IKKα and Ikkα mutations and deletions are found in human skin SCCs. The collective evidence not only highlights the importance of IKKα in skin development, maintaining skin homeostasis, and preventing skin carcinogenesis, but also demonstrates that mouse models are extremely valuable tools for revealing the mechanisms underlying these biological events, leading our studies from bench side to bedside.

  5. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  6. Effect of an Improved Mechanical Method for Assisted Hatching on the in vitro Development of Mouse Embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-jun ZHANG; Yun FENG; Xiao-yan HUANG; Lan XIA; Yi-juan SUN; Yan LI

    2006-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficiency of an improved shape of opening for mechanical assisted hatching (AH) on the in virto development of mouse embryos.Methods A total of 622 KM BAI mouse embryos in 2-cell-4-cell stage were randomly divided into group A, group B and control group. A new mechanical AH method by improving the shape of opening in the ZP was used in group A, and a "-/ "-shaped opening was created. A "+" -shaped opening was made in group B, while no opening was made in control group. Comparisons have been made among the three groups with regard to the duration of AH, the blastocyst formation and complete hatching rate, etc.Results The duration of AH in group A (43.25 ± 3.46 s) was significantly shorter than that in group B (52.81 ±4.32 s, P <0.05). The blastocyst formation rate on d 5was not significantly different among the three groups (92.27%, 93.66% and 94.92%respectively, P >0.05). The complete hatching rate of blastocysts on d 6 between group A and group B was no statistical difference (94.09% vs 92.71%, P >0.05), but significantly higher than that in control group (43.32%, P <0.001). No significant difference in the percentage of grade 1 blastocysts was found among the three groups on d 5 (85.22%, 82.81% and 86.63% respectively, P >0.05).Conclusion It could enhance the process of embryo hatching and facilitate the hatching rate of blastocysts by using the improved mechanical AH method, which is of safety and efficiency to mouse embryo in the in vitro development.

  7. Tumor development, growth characteristics and spectrum of genetic aberrations in the TH-MYCN mouse model of neuroblastoma.

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    Agnes Rasmuson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The TH-MYCN transgenic neuroblastoma model, with targeted MYCN expression to the developing neural crest, has been used to study neuroblastoma development and evaluate novel targeted tumor therapies. METHODS: We followed tumor development in 395 TH-MYCN (129X1/SvJ mice (125 negative, 206 hemizygous and 64 homozygous mice by abdominal palpations up to 40 weeks of age. DNA sequencing of MYCN in the original plasmid construct and mouse genomic DNA was done to verify the accuracy. Copy number analysis with Affymetrix® Mouse Diversity Genotyping Arrays was used to characterize acquired genetic aberrations. RESULTS: DNA sequencing confirmed presence of human MYCN cDNA in genomic TH-MYCN DNA corresponding to the original plasmid construct. Tumor incidence and growth correlated significantly to transgene status with event-free survival for hemizygous mice at 50%, and 0% for homozygous mice. Hemizygous mice developed tumors at 5.6-19 weeks (median 9.1 and homozygous mice at 4.0-6.9 weeks (5.4. The mean treatment window, time from palpable tumor to sacrifice, for hemizygous and homozygous mice was 15 and 5.2 days, respectively. Hemizygous mice developing tumors as early as homozygous mice had a longer treatment window. Age at tumor development did not influence treatment window for hemizygous mice, whereas treatment window in homozygous mice decreased significantly with increasing age. Seven out of 10 analysed tumors had a flat DNA profile with neither segmental nor numerical chromosomal aberrations. Only three tumors from hemizygous mice showed acquired genetic features with one or more numerical aberrations. Of these, one event corresponded to gain on the mouse equivalent of human chromosome 17. CONCLUSION: Hemizygous and homozygous TH-MYCN mice have significantly different neuroblastoma incidence, tumor growth characteristics and treatment windows but overlap in age at tumor development making correct early genotyping essential to evaluate

  8. Post-Transcriptional Control of Gene Expression in Mouse Early Embryo Development: A View from the Tip of the Iceberg

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    Claudio Sette

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization is a very complex biological process that requires the perfect cooperation between two highly specialized cells: the male and female gametes. The oocyte provides the physical space where this process takes place, most of the energetic need, and half of the genetic contribution. The spermatozoon mostly contributes the other half of the chromosomes and it is specialized to reach and to penetrate the oocyte. Notably, the mouse oocyte and early embryo are transcriptionally inactive. Hence, they fully depend on the maternal mRNAs and proteins stored during oocyte maturation to drive the onset of development. The new embryo develops autonomously around the four-cell stage, when maternal supplies are exhausted and the zygotic genome is activated in mice. This oocyte-to-embryo transition needs an efficient and tightly regulated translation of the maternally-inherited mRNAs, which likely contributes to embryonic genome activation. Full understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in early embryos is crucial to understand the reprogramming of the embryonic genome, it might help driving reprogramming of stem cells in vitro and will likely improve in vitro culturing of mammalian embryos for assisted reproduction. Nevertheless, the knowledge of the mechanism(s underlying this fundamental step in embryogenesis is still scarce, especially if compared to other model organisms. We will review here the current knowledge on the post-transcriptional control of gene expression in mouse early embryos and discuss some of the unanswered questions concerning this fascinating field of biology.

  9. Paternal Benzo[a]pyrene Exposure Modulates MicroRNA Expression Patterns in the Developing Mouse Embryo

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    Asgeir Brevik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Little attention has been given to how microRNA expression is affected by environmental contaminants exposure. We investigate the effects of paternal exposure to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P on miRNA expression in the developing mouse embryo. Male mice were exposed to B[a]P (150 mg/kg i.p., and their sperm was used four days later in in-vitro fertilization experiments. Twenty embryos each from 2-, 8-cell and the blastocyst stage were used for genome-wide miRNA expression profiling. Paternal exposure to B[a]P affected the expression of several miRNAs, and the target genes for some of the dysregulated miRNAs were enriched in many different pathways that are likely to be relevant for the developing mouse embryo. By linking the miRNA target genes to publicly available databases, we identified some miRNA target genes that may serve as global markers of B[a]P-mediated genotoxic stress. The dysregulated miRNAs may provide valuable knowledge about potential transgenerational effects of sublethal exposure to chemicals.

  10. Identification of reliable reference genes for qRT-PCR studies of the developing mouse mammary gland

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Moosdijk, Anoeska Agatha Alida; van Amerongen, Renée

    2016-01-01

    Cell growth and differentiation are often driven by subtle changes in gene expression. Many challenges still exist in detecting these changes, particularly in the context of a complex, developing tissue. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) allows relatively high-throughput evaluation of multiple genes and developmental time points. Proper quantification of gene expression levels by qRT-PCR requires normalization to one or more reference genes. Traditionally, these genes have been selected based on their presumed “housekeeping” function, with the implicit assumption that they are stably expressed over the entire experimental set. However, this is rarely tested empirically. Here we describe the identification of novel reference genes for the mouse mammary gland based on their stable expression in published microarray datasets. We compared eight novel candidate reference genes (Arpc3, Clock, Ctbp1, Phf7, Prdx1, Sugp2, Taf11 and Usp7) to eight traditional ones (18S, Actb, Gapdh, Hmbs, Hprt, Rpl13a, Sdha and Tbp) and analysed all genes for stable expression in the mouse mammary gland from pre-puberty to adulthood using four different algorithms (GeNorm, DeltaCt, BestKeeper and NormFinder). Prdx1, Phf7 and Ctbp1 were validated as novel and reliable, tissue-specific reference genes that outperform traditional reference genes in qRT-PCR studies of postnatal mammary gland development. PMID:27752147

  11. DNA methylation profiling of the fibrinogen gene landscape in human cells and during mouse and zebrafish development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorjohann, Silja; Pitetti, Jean-Luc; Nef, Serge; Gonelle-Gispert, Carmen; Buhler, Leo; Fish, Richard J; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2013-01-01

    The fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG show coordinated expression in hepatocytes. Understanding the underlying transcriptional regulation may elucidate how their tissue-specific expression is maintained and explain the high variability in fibrinogen blood levels. DNA methylation of CpG-poor gene promoters is dynamic with low methylation correlating with tissue-specific gene expression but its direct effect on gene regulation as well as implications of non-promoter CpG methylation are not clear. Here we compared methylation of CpG sites throughout the fibrinogen gene cluster in human cells and mouse and zebrafish tissues. We observed low DNA methylation of the CpG-poor fibrinogen promoters and of additional regulatory elements (the liver enhancers CNC12 and PFE2) in fibrinogen-expressing samples. In a gene reporter assay, CpG-methylation in the FGA promoter reduced promoter activity, suggesting a repressive function for DNA methylation in the fibrinogen locus. In mouse and zebrafish livers we measured reductions in DNA methylation around fibrinogen genes during development that were preceded by increased fibrinogen expression and tri-methylation of Histone3 lysine4 (H3K4me3) in fibrinogen promoters. Our data support a model where changes in hepatic transcription factor expression and histone modification provide the switch for increased fibrinogen gene expression in the developing liver which is followed by reduction of CpG methylation.

  12. DNA methylation profiling of the fibrinogen gene landscape in human cells and during mouse and zebrafish development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silja Vorjohann

    Full Text Available The fibrinogen genes FGA, FGB and FGG show coordinated expression in hepatocytes. Understanding the underlying transcriptional regulation may elucidate how their tissue-specific expression is maintained and explain the high variability in fibrinogen blood levels. DNA methylation of CpG-poor gene promoters is dynamic with low methylation correlating with tissue-specific gene expression but its direct effect on gene regulation as well as implications of non-promoter CpG methylation are not clear. Here we compared methylation of CpG sites throughout the fibrinogen gene cluster in human cells and mouse and zebrafish tissues. We observed low DNA methylation of the CpG-poor fibrinogen promoters and of additional regulatory elements (the liver enhancers CNC12 and PFE2 in fibrinogen-expressing samples. In a gene reporter assay, CpG-methylation in the FGA promoter reduced promoter activity, suggesting a repressive function for DNA methylation in the fibrinogen locus. In mouse and zebrafish livers we measured reductions in DNA methylation around fibrinogen genes during development that were preceded by increased fibrinogen expression and tri-methylation of Histone3 lysine4 (H3K4me3 in fibrinogen promoters. Our data support a model where changes in hepatic transcription factor expression and histone modification provide the switch for increased fibrinogen gene expression in the developing liver which is followed by reduction of CpG methylation.

  13. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  14. Inducible forebrain-specific ablation of the transcription factor Creb during adulthood induces anxiety but no spatial/contextual learning deficits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Annika Vogt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP (cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB is an activity-dependent transcription factor playing a role in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, and emotional behavior. However, the impact of Creb ablation on rodent behavior is vague as e.g. memory performance of different Creb mutant mice depends on the specific type of mutation per se but additionally on the background and learning protocol differences. Here we present the first targeted ablation of CREB induced during adulthood selectively in principal forebrain neurons in a pure background strain of C57BL/6 mice. All hippocampal principal neurons exhibited lack of CREB expression. Mutant mice showed a severe anxiety phenotype in the openfield and novel object exploration test as well as in the Dark-Light Box Test, but unaltered hippocampus-dependent long-term memory in the Morris water maze and in context dependent fear conditioning. On the molecular level, CREB ablation led to CREM up regulation in the hippocampus and frontal cortex which may at least in part compensate for the loss of CREB. BDNF, a postulated CREB target gene, was down regulated in the frontal lobe but not in the hippocampus; neurogenesis remained unaltered. Our data indicate that in the adult mouse forebrain the late onset of CREB ablation can, in case of memory functionality, be compensated for and is not essential for memory consolidation and retrieval during adulthood. In contrast, the presence of CREB protein during adulthood seems to be pivotal for the regulation of emotional behavior.

  15. Rabbit Forebrain cholinergic system: Morphological characterization of nuclei and distribution of cholinergic terminals in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    C. Varga; Hartig, W.; Grosche, J.; Luiten, PGM; Seeger, J.; K. Brauer; Harkany, T.; Härtig, Wolfgang; Keijser, Jan N.

    2003-01-01

    Although the rabbit brain, in particular the basal forebrain cholinergic system, has become a common model for neuropathological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease, detailed neuroanatomical studies on the morphological organization of basal forebrain cholinergic nuclei and on their output pathways are still awaited. Therefore, we performed quantitative choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunocytochemistry to localize major cholinergic nuclei and to determine the number of respective c...

  16. Is pancreas development abnormal in the non-obese diabetic mouse, a spontaneous model of type I diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Homo-Delarche

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite extensive genetic and immunological research, the complex etiology and pathogenesis of type I diabetes remains unresolved. During the last few years, our attention has been focused on factors such as abnormalities of islet function and/or microenvironment, that could interact with immune partners in the spontaneous model of the disease, the non-obese diabetic (NOD mouse. Intriguingly, the first anomalies that we noted in NOD mice, compared to control strains, are already present at birth and consist of 1 higher numbers of paradoxically hyperactive ß cells, assessed by in situ preproinsulin II expression; 2 high percentages of immature islets, representing islet neogenesis related to neonatal ß-cell hyperactivity and suggestive of in utero ß-cell stimulation; 3 elevated levels of some types of antigen-presenting cells and FasL+ cells, and 4 abnormalities of extracellular matrix (ECM protein expression. However, the colocalization in all control mouse strains studied of fibroblast-like cells (anti-TR-7 labeling, some ECM proteins (particularly, fibronectin and collagen I, antigen-presenting cells and a few FasL+ cells at the periphery of islets undergoing neogenesis suggests that remodeling phenomena that normally take place during postnatal pancreas development could be disturbed in NOD mice. These data show that from birth onwards there is an intricate relationship between endocrine and immune events in the NOD mouse. They also suggest that tissue-specific autoimmune reactions could arise from developmental phenomena taking place during fetal life in which ECM-immune cell interaction(s may play a key role.

  17. Distribution of Kv3.3 potassium channel subunits in distinct neuronal populations of mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su Ying; Zagha, Edward; Kwon, Elaine S; Ozaita, Andres; Bobik, Marketta; Martone, Maryann E; Ellisman, Mark H; Heintz, Nathaniel; Rudy, Bernardo

    2007-06-20

    Kv3.3 proteins are pore-forming subunits of voltage-dependent potassium channels, and mutations in the gene encoding for Kv3.3 have recently been linked to human disease, spinocerebellar ataxia 13, with cerebellar and extracerebellar symptoms. To understand better the functions of Kv3.3 subunits in brain, we developed highly specific antibodies to Kv3.3 and analyzed immunoreactivity throughout mouse brain. We found that Kv3.3 subunits are widely expressed, present in important forebrain structures but particularly prominent in brainstem and cerebellum. In forebrain and midbrain, Kv3.3 expression was often found colocalized with parvalbumin and other Kv3 subunits in inhibitory neurons. In brainstem, Kv3.3 was strong