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Sample records for motor sprit fumes

  1. Exposure of Petrol Station Attendants and Auto Mechanics to Premium Motor Sprit Fumes in Calabar, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Udonwa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A population-based-cross-sectional survey was carried out to investigate the potential risk of exposure to premium motor spirit (PMS fumes in Calabar, Nigeria, among Automobile Mechanics (AM, Petrol Station Attendants (PSA and the general population. Structured questionnaire was administered on the randomly chosen subjects to elicit information on their exposure to PMS. Duration of exposure was taken as the length of work in their various occupations. Venous blood was taken for methaemoglobin (MetHb and packed cells volume (PCV. Mean MetHb value was higher in AM (7.3% and PSA (5.8% than in the subjects from the general population (2.7%. PCV was lower in PSA (30.8%, than AM (33.3% and the subjects from the general population (40.8%. MetHb level was directly proportional, and PCV inversely related, to the duration of exposure. The study suggested increased exposure to petrol fumes among AM, PSA, and MetHb as a useful biomarker in determining the level of exposure to benzene in petrol vapour.

  2. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol in rats exposed to premium motor spirit fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aberare, Ogbevire L; Okuonghae, Patrick; Mukoro, Nathaniel; Dirisu, John O; Osazuwa, Favour; Odigie, Elvis; Omoregie, Richard

    2011-06-01

    Deliberate and regular exposure to premium motor spirit fumes is common and could be a risk factor for liver disease in those who are occupationally exposed. A possible association between premium motor spirit fumes and plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol using a rodent model could provide new insights in the pathology of diseases where cellular dysfunction is an established risk factor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effect of premium motor spirit fumes on lipids and lipoproteins in workers occupationally exposed to premium motor spirit fumes using rodent model. Twenty-five Wister albino rats (of both sexes) were used for this study between the 4(th) of August and 7(th) of September, 2010. The rats were divided into five groups of five rats each. Group 1 rats were not exposed to premium motor spirit fumes (control group), group 2 rats were exposed for 1 hour daily, group 3 for 3 hours daily, group 4 for 5 hours daily and group 5 for 7 hours daily. The experiment lasted for a period of 4 weeks. Blood samples obtained from all the groups after 4 weeks of exposure were used for the estimation of plasma levels of triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein- cholesterol and low density lipoprotein- cholesterol. Results showed significant increase in means of plasma total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein levels (P<0.05). The mean triglyceride and total body weight were significantly lower (P<0.05) in the exposed group when compared with the unexposed. The plasma level of high density lipoprotein, the ratio of low density lipoprotein to high density lipoprotein and the ratio of total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein did not differ significantly in exposed subjects when compared with the control group. These results showed that frequent exposure to petrol fumes may be highly deleterious to the liver cells.

  3. Fumed silica. Fumed silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukawa, T.; Shirono, H. (Nippon Aerosil Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-10-18

    The fumed silica is explained in particulate superfineness, high purity, high dispersiveness and other remarkable characteristics, and wide application. The fumed silica, being presently produced, is 7 to 40nm in average primary particulate diameter and 50 to 380m{sup 2}/g in specific surface area. On the surface, there coexist hydrophilic silanol group (Si-OH) and hydrophobic siloxane group (Si-O-Si). There are many characteristics, mutually different between the fumed silica, made hydrophobic by the surface treatment, and untreated hydrophilic silica. The treated silica, if added to the liquid product, serves as agent to heighten the viscosity, prevent the sedimentation and disperse the particles. The highest effect is given to heighten the viscosity in a region of 4 to 9 in pH in water and alcohol. As filling agent to strengthen the elastomer and polymer, and powder product, it gives an effect to prevent the consolidation and improve the fluidity. As for its other applications, utilization is made of particulate superfineness, high purity, thermal insulation properties and adsorption characteristics. 2 to 3 patents are published for it as raw material of quartz glass. 38 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Visibility in sodium fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, G.W.; Anderson, N.R.

    1971-01-01

    The appearance of sodium fume of unknown concentration and the effects of short term exposure on unprotected workers is described. The molecular extinction coefficient of sodium fume is calculated from which light transmission data, and a rapid method for the estimation of the fume concentration is proposed. (author)

  5. Bronchiolitis from nitrous fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darke, C S; Warrack, A J.N.

    1958-01-01

    Gases of low solubility (e.g., NO/sub 2/) may not irritate upper respiratory tract but may act insidiously on lower tract producing edema and bronchiolitis. Cases of bronchiolitis (1 resulting in death) from exposure to brown nitrous fumes are reported. There were no or slight symptoms at first but severe ones after about 1 wk. Pathology appears as acute pulmonary edema with damage and desquamation of alveolar epithelium particularly and that of respiratory bronchioles somewhat. Patchy atelectasis, bronchopneumonia and disruption of fibers in cell walls may also occur. Severe cases have obliteration of lumen (bronchiolitis obliterans) with extreme distress and death.

  6. 222-S LABORATORY FUME HOOD TESTING STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RUELAS, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    The 222-S Laboratory contains 155 active fume hoods that are used to support analytical work with radioactive and/or toxic materials. The performance of a fume hood was brought into question after employees detected odors in the work area while mixing chemicals within the subject fume hood. Following the event, testing of the fume hood was conducted to assess the performance of the fume hood. Based on observations from the testing, it was deemed appropriate to conduct performance evaluations of other fume hoods within the laboratory

  7. The Pozzolanic reaction of silica fume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2012-01-01

    Silica fume is a very important supplementary cementitious binder in High-Performance and Ultra High-Performance Concretes. Through its pozzolanic reaction the silica fume densifies the concrete micro-structure, in particular it strengthens the paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone. In the ......Silica fume is a very important supplementary cementitious binder in High-Performance and Ultra High-Performance Concretes. Through its pozzolanic reaction the silica fume densifies the concrete micro-structure, in particular it strengthens the paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone....... In the present paper different aspects of the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume are investigated. These include chemical shrinkage, isothermal heat development and strength development. Key data for these are given and compared with theoretical calculations, and based on presented measurements the energy...

  8. Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR SULEIMAN

    Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol Attendants in Ibadan, Nigeria. *1A.L. Ogunneye ... inhalation of petrol fumes is associated with adverse effect on the kidney and liver function. ..... neurotoxicity in mice. African ...

  9. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  10. Characterisation of fume from hyperbaric welding operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, John A S; Semple, Sean [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Duffin, Rodger [ELEGI Colt Laboratory, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kelly, Frank [Lung Biology Group, Kings College, University of London (United Kingdom); Seldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea, E-mail: j.a.ross@abdn.ac.u [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    We report preliminary work characterising dust from hyperbaric welding trials carried out at increased pressure in a helium and oxygen atmosphere. Particle size and concentration were measured during welding. Samples for quartz and metal analysis and toxicity assessment were taken from a filter in the local fume extraction system. The residue of dust after metal extraction by nitric acid in hydrogen peroxide predominantly a non-metallic white powder assumed to be dust from welding rod coatings and thermal insulation material. Metallic analysis showed predominantly calcium, from the welding rod coating, and period 4 transition metals such as iron, manganese, magnesium and titanium (inductively coupled mass spectrometry, Agilent 7500c). The presence of zirconium indicated a contribution from grinding. The fume was nanoparticulate in nature with a mean particle diameter of 20-30 nm (MSI Inc WPS 1000XP). It showed an intermediate level of oxidative potential regarding the low-molecular weight respiratory tract lining fluid antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione and caused release of the inflammatory marker IL-8 in a human lung A 549 epithelial cell culture with no indication of cytotoxicity. The study findings have strong implications for the measurement techniques needed to assess fume exposure in hyperbaric welding and the provision of respiratory protection.

  11. Occupational exposure to diesel exhaust fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, A. D.; Sadhra, S.

    2004-01-01

    There is currently no OEL for diesel fumes in the UK. This study reports parallel measurements of airborne levels of diesel fume pollutants in nine distribution depots where diesel powered fork-lift trucks (FLTs) were in use. Correlations between individual pollutants are assessed as well as their spatial distribution. Samples were collected on board FLTs and at background positions at nine distribution depots. Substances measured and the range of exposures by site were: respirable dust (n = 76) GM ≤ 80-179 μg/m 3 ; elemental carbon (n = 79) GM = 7-55 μg/m 3 ; organic carbon (n = 79) GM 11-69 μg/m 3 ; ultrafine particles (n = 17) range = 58-231 x 10 3 particles/cm 3 ; selected particulate phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (n - 14) range = 6-37 ng/m 3 . In addition, a tracer method based on ultrafine particle measurements was used to estimate the spatial distribution of total carbon and PAHs at the sites monitored. The spatial distribution was found to be reasonably uniform. Major diesel fume aerosol components were, in general, well correlated (r = 0.62-0.97). CO 2 measurements were also made and found to be below the HSE guideline of 1000 p.p.m., with most levels below 600 p.p.m. (Author)

  12. Dry fumes purifying system using anhydrous baking soda; Procede chimique d`epuration des fumees au bicarbonate de soude anhydre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1998-04-01

    UNISYSTEMS has developed the industrial implementation of the chemical process using anhydrous backing soda, patented by SOLVAY, for purifying fumes containing inorganic salts and sulphur oxides as polluting agents. The system can be applied to industrial processes releasing this type of polluting agents in the fumes at a temperature over 160 deg C, as it is specially indicated in purifying fumes coming from ceramic firing kilns. (authors)

  13. Study of radon transport through concrete modified with silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, R.P.; Kumar, Amit

    2013-01-01

    The concentration of radon in soil usually varies between a few kBq/m 3 and tens or hundreds of kBq/m 3 depending upon the geographical region. This causes the transport of radon from the soil to indoor environments by diffusion and advection through the pore space of concrete. To reduce indoor radon levels, the use of concrete with low porosity and a low radon diffusion coefficient is recommended. A method of reducing the radon diffusion coefficient through concrete and hence the indoor radon concentration by using silica fume to replace an optimum level of cement was studied. The diffusion coefficient of the concrete was reduced from (1.63 ± 0.3) × 10 −7 to (0.65 ± 0.01) × 10 −8 m 2 /s using 30% substitution of cement with silica fume. The compressive strength of the concrete increased as the silica-fume content increased, while radon exhalation rate and porosity of the concrete decreased. This study suggests a cost-effective method of reducing indoor radon levels. -- Highlights: • Radon diffusion study through silica fume modified concrete was carried out. • Radon diffusion coefficient of concrete decreased with increase of silica fume contents. • Compressive strength increased with increase of silica fume. • Radon exhalation rates and porosity of samples decreased with addition of silica fume. • Radon diffusion coefficient decreased to 2.6% by 30% silica fume substitution

  14. [Analysis on oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, De-Sheng; Kuang, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Xin; Dai, Fei-Hong

    2012-06-01

    By measuring the particulate matter of oil fume which is over 10 microm or below 10 microm separately and using microradiography and Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), it is found out the distributing characteristic of oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission. The result shows that the diameter of the oil fume particles which was sedimentated in the kitchen is between 10-400 microm, the concentration peak value is between 10-100 microm. The diameter of oil fume aerosol is mostly smaller than 1 microm, while the concentration peak value is between 0.063-0.109 microm. In addition, the mass concentration peak value is between 6.560-9.990 microm. Through the analysis to the physical characteristics of oil fume from catering industry cooking emissions, the eigenvalue of the oil fume has been found and the feature matter for monitoring the oil fume has been discovered to provide a reasonable standard for controlling and monitoring the catering industry cooking emission.

  15. When are fume-cupboards necessary in hospital radioisotope laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birks, J L [Singleton Hospital, Swansea (UK)

    1976-06-01

    Suggestions are made for procedures likely to require the provision of efficient fume-cupboards in hospital radioisotope laboratories. All such departments undertaking in vivo radioisotope procedures will require a supply of sterile materials, but only some of these will also require a fume-cupboard, since the use of a relatively inexpensive aseptic cabinet, without air flow and exhaust system, may suffice for such procedures as the labelling of blood cells or plasma. Efficient fume-cupboards may be required in hospital laboratories that are routinely concerned with the elution of generators of isotopes such as /sup 99/Tcsup(m) and /sup 113/Insup(m), the sterilization of radiopharmaceuticals (e.g. technetium-sulphur colloid) requiring the use of a pressure cooker, and the storage and handling of therapeutic quantities of /sup 131/I. Copious general ventilation of isotope rooms may be preferable to the too frequent incorporation of unnecessary fume-cupboards.

  16. Welding fume exposure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, D-H; Kim, J-I; Kim, K-H; Yoo, S-W

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure is estimated to contribute 15% to the burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Welding fumes are suspected to accelerate the decline of lung function and development of COPD. To examine the relationship between welding fume exposure and COPD in Korean shipyard welders. The study involved a group of male welders working at two shipyards who underwent an annual health examination in 2010. Subjects completed a questionnaire about smoking habits and occupational history and a pulmonary function test (PFT) was carried out with strict quality control measures. Welding fume exposure concentrations were estimated using 884 measurements taken between 2002 and 2009 in one of the shipyards. Multiple linear and logistic regression was employed to evaluate the association between cumulative fume exposure and lung function parameters, controlling for age, height and cigarette smoking. Two hundred and forty subjects participated, with a mean age of 48 and mean work duration of 15 years. The mean cumulative fume exposure was 7.7mg/m(3). The prevalence of COPD was 15%. FEV1 and FVC showed non-significant negative correlations with cumulative fume exposure. Odds ratios of COPD were significantly elevated for the middle (3.9; 95% CI 1.4-13.3) and high exposure groups (3.8; 95% CI 1.03-16.2) compared with the low fume exposure group. Our findings support an association between welding fume exposure and increased risk of COPD. Further prospective study is needed to investigate whether this is a causal relationship. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Short term exposure to cooking fumes and pulmonary function

    OpenAIRE

    Qvenild Torgunn; Svendsen Kristin; Svedahl Sindre; Sjaastad Ann; Hilt Bjørn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to cooking fumes may have different deleterious effects on the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to look at possible effects from inhalation of cooking fumes on pulmonary function. Methods Two groups of 12 healthy volunteers (A and B) stayed in a model kitchen for two and four hours respectively, and were monitored with spirometry four times during twenty four hours, on one occasion without any exposure, and on another with exposure to controlled level...

  18. Peripheral neuropathy following intentional inhalation of naphtha fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbein, M; deGroot, W; Rajani, K R

    1984-01-01

    Two adolescent native Canadians who presented with peripheral neuropathy secondary to the abuse of volatile hydrocarbons are described. They were initially thought to have been sniffing leaded gasoline fumes, but public health investigation revealed that they had been sniffing naphtha fumes. Naphtha contains a significant amount of n-hexane, a known inducer of neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of naphtha abuse. These cases emphasize the need to specifically identify the formulation of hydrocarbons being abused. PMID:6093978

  19. Anatomical indications of fume resistance in certain woody plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninova, D.

    1970-01-01

    An attempt is made to describe studies on seven species of fruit and forest trees close to or far from a Bulgarian factory emitting fumes containing S. The most resistant species (Quercus borealis, Gleditsia triacanthos, Morus alba) had the smallest stomata and the greatest number of stomata per unit leaf area. Changes observed in leaf anatomy as a result of exposure to the fumes were: decreased leaf aeration, elongated palisade cells, thicker cuticles, and more stomata.

  20. IMPROVEMENT OF EXPANSIVE SOIL BY USING SILICA FUME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawther Y. AL-Soudany

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Expansive soils are characterized by their considerable volumetric deformations representing a serious challenge for the stability of the engineering structures such as foundations. Consequently, the measurements of swelling properties, involving swelling and swell pressure, become extremely important in spite of their determination needs a lot of time with costly particular equipment. Thus, serious researches attempts have been tried to remedy such soils by means of additives such as cement, lime, steel fibers, stone dust, fly ash and silica fume. In this research the study of silica fume has studied to treatment expansion soil, the clay soil was brought from Al-Nahrawan in Baghdad. The soil selected for the present investigation prepared in laboratory by mixing natural soil with different percentages of bentonite (30, 50 and 70% by soil dry weight. The test program included the effect of bentonite on natural soil then study the effect of silica fume (SF on prepared soil by adding different percentage of silica fume (3, 5, and 7 by weight to the prepared soils and the influence of these admixtures was observed by comparing their results with those of untreated soils (prepared soils. The results show that both liquid limit and plasticity index decreased with the addition of silica fume, while the plastic limit is increase with its addition. As well as, a decrease in the maximum dry unit weight with an increase in the optimum water contents have been obtained with increasing the percentage of addition of the silica fume. It is also observed an improvement in the free swell, swelling pressure by using silica fume. It can be concluded that the silica fume stabilization may be used as a successful way for the treatment of expansive clay.

  1. Danish Investigations on Silica Fume Concretes at Elevated Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    1992-01-01

    Describes fire tests in which the increased risk of explosive spalling of concrete densified by silica fume was first discovered. Further results are discussed from tests to define appropriate limits of silica fume content and to develop a new concrete for slender column units. Observations are m...... are made about circumstances under which superplasticizing additives in concrete gave rise to the development of toxic gases....

  2. Analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cooking oil fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Pan, D; Wang, G

    1994-01-01

    Various samples of cooking oil fumes were analyzed to an effort to study the relationship between the high incidence of pulmonary adenocarcinoma in Chinese women and cooking oil fumes in the kitchen. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in samples of cooking oil fumes were extracted, chromatographed, and measured by fluorescence spectrophotometer. The samples included oil fumes from three commercial cooking oils and fumes from three catering shops. All samples contained benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and dibenzo (a,h)anthracene (DBahA). In addition, the concentration of DBahA was 5.7 to 22.8 times higher than that of BaP in the fume samples. Concentrations of BaP and DBahA were, respectively, 0.463 and 5.736 micrograms/g in refined vegetable oil, 0.341 and 3.725 micrograms/g in soybean oil, and 0.305 and 4.565 micrograms/g in vegetable oil. Investigation of PAH concentrations at three catering shops showed that the level of BaP at a Youtiao (deep-fried twisted dough sticks) shop was 4.18 micrograms/100 m3, 2.28 micrograms/100 m3 at a Seqenma (candied fritters) workshop, and 0.49 micrograms/100 m3 at a kitchen of a restaurant; concentrations of DBahA were 33.80, 14.41, and 3.03 micrograms/100 m3, respectively. The high concentration of carcinogens, such as BaP and DBahA, in cooking oil fumes might help explain why Chinese women, who spend more time exposed to cooking oil fumes than men, have a high incidence of pulmonary adenocarcinoma.

  3. Interlaboratory comparison on 137Cs activity concentration in fume dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, Faidra; Hult, Mikael; Burda, Oleksiy; Arnold, Dirk; Sibbens, Goedele; Caro Marroyo, Belén; Gómez–Mancebo, Maria Belén; Peyrés, Virginia; Moser, Hannah; Ferreux, Laurent; Šolc, Jaroslav; Dryák, Pavel; Fazio, Aldo; Luca, Aurelian; Vodenik, Branko; Reis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was conducted, between 11 European National Metrology Institutes and EC-JRC, on measurement of 137 Cs activity concentration in fume dust. As test material an activity standard produced from real contaminated fume dust was used. The standard material consisted of 13 cylindrical samples of compressed fume dust. The material contained 137 Cs and 60 Co of reference activity concentrations of (9.72±0.10) Bq/g and (0.450±0.018) Bq/g, respectively, for the reference date of 1 June 2013, determined using the comparison results. The organization and results of the intercomparison, as well as the process of obtaining reliable reference values are presented. - Highlights: • A European comparison was conducted on measurement of 137 Cs activity in fume dust. • Participants used high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. • Efficiency calibration included Monte Carlo, numerical and experimental methods. • Reference 137 Cs and 60 Co activity concentrations in the fume dust were determined. • A new traceable activity standard of fume dust matrix is available to end-users.

  4. Decreasing biotoxicity of fume particles produced in welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuei-Min; Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Tseng, Yiider; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Cho, Kuk

    2011-01-30

    Welding fumes contain heavy metals, such as chromium, manganese, and nickel, which cause respiratory diseases and cancer. In this study, a SiO(2) precursor was evaluated as an additive to the shielding gas in an arc welding process to reduce the biotoxicity caused by welding fume particles. Transmission electron micrographic images show that SiO(2) coats on the surface of welding fume particles and promotes particle agglomeration. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy further shows that the relative amount of silicon in these SiO(2)-coated agglomerates is higher than in baseline agglomerates. In addition, Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to different concentrations of pure SiO(2) particles generated from the arc welding process exhibits similar responses, suggesting that SiO(2) does not contribute to welding fume particle toxicity. The trend of E. coli growth in different concentrations of baseline welding fume particle shows the most significant inhibition occurs in higher exposure concentrations. The 50% lethal logarithmic concentrations for E. coli in arc welding particles of baseline, 2%, and 4.2% SiO(2) precursor additives were 823, 1605, and 1800 mg/L, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that using SiO(2) precursors as an additive to arc welding shielding gas can effectively reduce the biotoxicity of welding fume. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of nitrous fumes upon the lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhar, F; Raber, A

    1974-01-01

    After a thorough discussion of the accidental poisoning of 34 workers by large amounts of nitrous fumes in an Austrian chemical plant producing artificial fertilizer and its effects on the lung along with therapeutical measures taken, the chronic effects of long-term exposure to nitrous gases are reviewed. Nitrous gases are a mixture of various oxidation states of nitrogen such as nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, N/sub 2/O/sub 4/, and nitric anhydride plus vapors of nitrous and nitric acid. The individual components of the gas mixture change in dependence on the ambient temperature and the humidity. A different mixture of nitrous gases develops, therefore, at welding operations, blasts, in the chemical industry, in the glass industry, at the production of fertilizer, in the exhausts of combustion engines, and in smoking of cigarettes. The irritations caused by nitrous gases on mucous tissue increase with rising relative humidity. The presence of NO ameliorates the toxic effect of NO/sub 2/. Oil mists protect against the effects of nitrous gases. The addition of sulfur dioxide is supposed to reduce the toxicity of nitrous gases, provided the SO/sub 2/ concentration is considerably higher than the concentration of nitrous gases. Exposure of rats and mice to concentrations of less than 1 ppm nitrous gases caused structural changes in the lung similar to pulmonary edema in humans.

  6. Environmental exposure to cooking oil fumes and cervical intraepithelial neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, M.-T.; Lee, L.-H.; Ho, C.-K.; Wu, S.-C.; Lin, L.-Y.; Cheng, B.-H.; Liu, C.-L.; Yang, C.-Y.; Tsai, H.-T.; Wu, T.-N.

    2004-01-01

    The fumes from cooking oil, similar to cigarette smoke, contain numerous carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aromatic amines, nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, etc. In this study, we examined the association between exposure to cooking oil fumes and the risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm. The study population in this nested case-control study consisted of women above the age of 19 years living in Chia-Yi County, located in the southwestern Taiwan, who had received pap smear screening between October, 1999, and December, 2000 (n=32,466). The potential cases were women having lesions greater than cervical intraepithelium neoplasm II (≥CIN2) reconfirmed by cervical biopsy (n=116). The potential controls (case: control=1:2) were age-matched (±2 years) and residence-matched women who had normal pap smears within 6 months of the cases. In total, 100 cases and 197 controls were completely interviewed by public health nurses about cooking methods, ventilation, and other potential risk factors. Women who cooked at home in a kitchen (n=269) without the presence of a fume extractor at least once a week between the ages of 20 and 40 had a 2.29 times higher risk [95% confidence interval (CI)=1.08-4.87] of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than those who did not cook once a week in such a kitchen during the same age span, after adjusting for other potential confounders. This finding was further strengthened by the finding that women who did not use the fume extractors had a 2.47 times higher risk (95% CI=1.15-5.32) of developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasm than women who cooked in kitchens with fume extractors that were always switched on while cooking. We also found a joint protective effect of fume extractor use among women older than 40 years (n=202) if they used the extractors during both age spans of their lives, ages 20-40 and >40 years. Comparing our findings on women more than 40 years old who used fume extractors during

  7. Short term exposure to cooking fumes and pulmonary function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qvenild Torgunn

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to cooking fumes may have different deleterious effects on the respiratory system. The aim of this study was to look at possible effects from inhalation of cooking fumes on pulmonary function. Methods Two groups of 12 healthy volunteers (A and B stayed in a model kitchen for two and four hours respectively, and were monitored with spirometry four times during twenty four hours, on one occasion without any exposure, and on another with exposure to controlled levels of cooking fumes. Results The change in spirometric values during the day with exposure to cooking fumes, were not statistically significantly different from the changes during the day without exposure, with the exception of forced expiratory time (FET. The change in FET from entering the kitchen until six hours later, was significantly prolonged between the exposed and the unexposed day with a 15.7% increase on the exposed day, compared to a 3.2% decrease during the unexposed day (p-value = 0.03. The same tendency could be seen for FET measurements done immediately after the exposure and on the next morning, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion In our experimental setting, there seems to be minor short term spirometric effects, mainly affecting FET, from short term exposure to cooking fumes.

  8. Comparison of Effect of Metakaolin and silica Fume on Fly Ash Concrete Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Yunfen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica fume is a common mineral admixture used in HSC and HPC, but being its high price and shrinkage in concrete, its usage is under restrictions. As a new mineral admixture, metakaolin gets more and more attention. In order to compare the difference between silica fume and metakaolin, the effects of metakaolin and silica fume on concrete workability, compressive strength, and chloride penetration resistance are studied. It shows that incorporating with fly ash together, silica fume reduces the slump extension, but metakaolin can increases it; silica fume can increases early strength more than metakaolin can, but it isn’t useful for later and long-time strength; metakaolin not only can increase early strength, but also can improve long-time strength. Silica fume and metakaolin can increase the chloride penetration resistance. As a new mineral additive, metakaolin can play a role in concrete which silica fume does, even much better than silica fume.

  9. Silica fume effect on retention characteristics of portland cement for uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Ma Xiaoling; Li Yuxiang

    2005-01-01

    With simulated groundwater as leachant, the retention capabilities of the portland cement, which contains different amount of silica fume, are investigated under 25 degree C and 42 days. The results indicate that silica fume can improve the retention capabilities of portland cement for uranium. When the cement contains 15% silica fume, the diffusion coefficient is 7 x 10 -3 cm 3 · -1 . It is only 5.5% of the cement without containing fume. (authors)

  10. Pulmonary fibrosis and exposure to steel welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, M P

    2015-12-01

    Arc welders who have been exposed to high concentrations of steel welding fume for prolonged periods of time may develop pulmonary fibrosis but the nature of the fibrotic changes has been debated over the last 80 years without any clear international consensus. To characterize the nature of the pulmonary fibrosis that develops in response to steel welding fume exposure and to provide a working hypothesis that would explain the findings of the existing research, to provide a platform for future research and to inform future occupational and clinical management of welders with pulmonary effects from welding fume. Review of the world literature on pulmonary fibrosis and welding of steel in all languages using PubMed, with further secondary search of references in the articles found in the primary search. Google and Reference Manager were used as further confirmatory search tools. Only case series and case reports were found but these provided consistent evidence that the consequence of exposure to steel welding fume at high levels for a prolonged period of time is a type of pulmonary fibrosis similar to, and possibly the same as, respiratory bronchiolitis which eventually develops into desquamative interstitial pneumonia with ongoing exposure. Steel welding fume may cause an occupational respiratory bronchiolitis which may develop into de squamative interstitial pneumonia with ongoing exposure. This concept may explain the difficulties in interpreting the wider literature on welding fume and lung function at lower exposures and may also explain the increased risk of lung cancer in welders. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Evaluation of characterisation techniques for particulate weld fume morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterjovski, Z.; Monaghan, B.J.; Norrish, J.

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of three techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and laser diffraction (LD), was carried out to determine the most suitable technique for the particle-size measurement of particulate-welding fume collected during the robotic gas-metal-arc welding (GMAW) of plain-carbon steel. Particulate fume was deposited onto an Al stub positioned at a horizontal distance of 30 mm and a vertical height of 50 mm from the welding arc, and was then prepared for SEM, TEM and LD sizing. Results are presented for paniculate-welding fume collected for three welding voltages (20, 23 and 26 V) and two metal-transfer modes (dip and dip/globular). TEM imaging was found to be the most effective of the three sizing technique as it was able to resolve both fine nano-particles (5 ran diameter) and coarse nano-particles (>100 mn diameter). The TEM approach showed that results determined were reproducible and that the majority of fume particles produced at the welding voltages investigated were less than 40 nm in diameter. SEM (La B6 filament) images were shown to be inadequate for the quantitative-size analysis of paniculate-welding fume due to the limited resolution of the microscope (-40 nm). However. SEM images did confirm that at a welding voltage of 23 V the majority of particle sizes produced were less than 100 nm in diameter, and thus supported the conclusion that the individual fume particles are predominantly in the nanometre size range. LD gave unexpectedly large mean particle sizes and did not detect particles less than 180 run in diameter. It is concluded that the LD technique measures particle agglomerates and/or simultaneously monitors multiple particles in the beam path.

  12. deFUME: Dynamic exploration of functional metagenomic sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    is time consuming and constitutes a major bottleneck for experimental researchers in the field. Here we present the deFUME web server, an easy-to-use web-based interface for processing, annotation and visualization of functional metagenomics sequencing data, tailored to meet the requirements of non......-bioinformaticians. The web-server integrates multiple analysis steps into one single workflow: read assembly, open reading frame prediction, and annotation with BLAST, InterPro and GO classifiers. Analysis results are visualized in an online dynamic web-interface. The deFUME webserver provides a fast track from raw sequence...

  13. Addition of Silica Fume to Improve Strength of Cement Paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajian; Chen, Hongniao; Li, Gu

    2018-03-01

    This study measured the packing densities of 0 to 30% silica fume (SF) added cementitious materials and strength of the cementitious pastes with various water content. The results revealed that addition of silica fume up to a certain level has great effects on packing density and strength. In-depth analysis illustrated that a lower W/CM ratio would not always result in a higher cube strength, and the range between 0.05 and 0.07 µm would be the amount of water film thickness (WFT) for muximum strength.

  14. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  15. Effect of plasticizer and fumed silica on ionic conductivity behaviour ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    behaviour of proton conducting polymer electrolytes containing different concentrations of hexafluorophosphoric acid (HPF6) in polyethylene oxide ... Polymer electrolytes; ionic conductivity; polyethylene oxide; plasticizer; fumed silica. 1. Introduction ..... is a rapid weight loss which could be due to the degradation of polymer ...

  16. EFFECTS OF FIRE FUMES ON ALMOND SAFETY AND QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ramírez-Gandolfo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A fire originated and burnt two cold chambers; the present study focused on almonds stored in adjacent chambers (4, 5, 6 and 13 and evaluated both their food safety and quality. Testing for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans was carried out in affected facilities, packaging and almonds. Experimental results proved that fire fumes did not reach chambers 4-6, but traces were found in bin packaging of chamber 13; thus, packaging from this chamber were changed. Concentrations of benzo(apyrene were low enough to prove that fire fumes did not get in contact with the stored almonds. Later, only volatile compounds typical of nuts were identified in both raw and toasted almonds. Finally, a trained panel concluded that no sensory signal of fumes reaching almonds was found. This manuscript could be taken as a model protocol to establish whether fire fumes have reached and affected the safety and/or quality of foods. This information will be especially useful for insurance companies.

  17. Effect of Generator (Exhaust) Fumes on the Growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF HORSFALL

    as the distance of the plants from the source of pollution increased, only the 3 m treatment led to significant ... plants were adversely affected by the fume emission especially at the distance of 3 m away from the ..... Principles of Biochemical.

  18. Pemanfaatan Mikrobakteri Terhadap Beton Mutu Tinggi dengan Tambahan Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azwar Annas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Beton mutu tinggi adalah beton yang kuat tekan tinggi sekitar 50 MPa – 100 MPa. Untuk meningkatkan kuat tekan, material pozollan seperti silica fume dan flyash biasanya digunakan untuk mengganti material beton Dalam laporan ini, beton mutu tinggi dengan silica fume sebagai pengganti semen dipelajari. Kadar silica fume yang digunakan adalah 0%, 5%, 7,5% dan 10%. Selain itu pengaruh dari mikrobakteri juga dipelajari. Faktor water per binder yang dipakai adalah 25% dari berat binder, dan untuk membuat workabilitynya bagus maka digunakan superplasticizer. Kadar superplasticizer yang digunakan dicari lewat trial pengujian di laboratorium. Pengujian yang dilakukan pada umur 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 adalah uji tekan pasta, mortar dan beton, selain itu pada benda uji beton umur 28 hari akan dilakukan uji split beton dan uji porositas. Dari hasil penelitian didapatkan kuat tekan beton tertinggi pada umur 28 hari (B7,5M adalah 69,71 MPa, sedangkan variasi silica fume yang paling optimum ada pada kadar 7,5%. Penambahan mikrobakteri tidak berpengaruh pada berat volume beton tetapi berpengaruh pada kuat tekan beton tersebut. Dengan penambahan mikrobakteri maka kuat tekan beton meningkat sebesar ± 30%. Sedangkan porositas total dan porositas tertutup yang terjadi pada beton semakin kecil, ini dibuktikan dengan hasil SEM terlihat bahwa bakteri mengisi area antara aggregat dan matrix beton.

  19. Reaction products of densified silica fume agglomerates in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, Sidney; Sahu, Sadananda; Thaulow, Niels

    2004-01-01

    Most silica fume currently used in concrete is in the dry densified form and consists of agglomerates of sizes between 10 μm and several millimeters. Many of these agglomerates may break down only partially in normal concrete mixing. Examination of various mature silica-fume-bearing concretes using backscatter mode scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis shows that such agglomerates have reacted in situ and given rise to recognizable types of reaction products filling the space within the original outline of the agglomerate. One type is 'quiescent', and usually shows no evidence of volume instability. EDX spectra indicate that the product formed within such grains is C-S-H of very low Ca/Si ratio, with modest alkali contents. Other silica fume agglomerates may undergo a distinct alkali-silica-type reaction (ASR), with the reaction product found within the original outline of the agglomerate having significantly less calcium and usually much higher alkali contents than the quiescent type. Such reacted agglomerates show evidence of local expansion, shrinkage cracking (on drying), and other features common to ASR. Both types may be found within the same concrete, sometimes in close proximity. It further appears that exposure to seawater may convert previously formed reaction products of silica fume agglomerates to magnesium silicate hydrates

  20. Hepatotoxic and Nephrotoxic Effects of Petroleum Fumes on Petrol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects of petroleum fumes on male and female petrol attendants. Investigations had been carried out on thirty (30) adult petrol attendants from different filling stations in Ibadan metropolis of Nigeria with ten (10) healthy adults as control. All the ...

  1. Problem of industrial fumes in the forested valleys of Savoy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossavy, J

    1962-01-01

    A study of injury to forest trees in the Maurienne valley, caused by F in the fumes from aluminum factories was made. Of the local conifers, Pinus sylvestris was the most susceptible, followed by Picea abies and Abies alba; Larch has so far proved resistant, as have broadleaved deciduous species.

  2. Effect of plasticizer and fumed silica on ionic conductivity behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of addition of propylene carbonate (PC) and nano-sized fumed silica on the ionic conductivity behaviour of proton conducting polymer electrolytes containing different concentrations of hexafluorophosphoric acid (HPF6) in polyethylene oxide (PEO) has been studied. The addition of PC results in an increase in ...

  3. Hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity of gasoline fumes in albino rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Folarin O. Owagboriaye

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects of gasoline fumes have been reported, but evidence of its hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity are rare. Therefore, this study assesses hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity of gasoline fumes on forty Albino rats randomly assigned to five experimental treatments (T with eight rats per treatment (T1, T2, T3, T4 and T5. T1(Control was housed in a section of experimental animal house free from gasoline fumes while T2, T3, T4 and T5 were exposed to gasoline fumes in exposure chambers for one, three, five and nine hours daily respectively for twelve weeks. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, alkaline phosphatase (ALP and histopathological examination of the liver tissues were used as diagnostic markers to assess liver dysfunction. Genotoxicity test was conducted on the lung tissues using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting polymerase chain reaction (RAPD PCR technique. Significant increase (p < 0.05 in the level of ALT, AST and ALP for T2, T3, T4 and T5 compared to T1 were recorded. Photomicrograph examination of the liver sections of T1 showed hepatic tissue with normal liver cell architecture while that of T2, T3, T4 and T5 revealed degenerative changes in the ultrastructural integrity of the hepatic cells. Genotoxicity test revealed DNA bands at a reducing intensity from T1 to T5. Dendrogram showed DNA damage in the lungs of T3, T4 and T5 were closely similar and the genotoxic impact was more in T3. Frequent exposure to gasoline fumes was observed to induce hepatoxicity and genotoxicity, hence impairing the normal liver function and gene structure.

  4. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  5. Reduction of fume damage in forests: report on the symposium on fume damage held in Tharandt from 30th September to 2nd October 1965

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daessler, H G; Ranft, H

    1967-01-01

    Summaries are presented of 15 papers, including: extent of variation in fume resistance in Larix and problems of breeding for resistance (Schoenbach); results of research on fume damage on experimental areas in E. Germany (H. Enderlin) (noting differences in resistance to SO/sub 2/ damage of various species of Picea, Pinus, and Abies, varieties of Pseudotsuga taxifolia and provenances of Pinus contorta and Larix spp., effect of fertilizers on resistance, and mass selection of resistant planting stock in practice); resistance of Pinus omorika to fume damage (K.F. Wentzel); chemical and physiological studies on the metabolism of the assimilation organs of conifers affected by SO/sub 2/ (S. Boertitz); basic physiological and phenological studies on the preliminary selection of conifers for SO/sub 2/ resistance (M. Vogl); fertilizer trials in fume-damaged pine stands on Dueben Heath (H. Krauss); insect pests on young pine stands in fume-damaged regions in Poland (Z. Sierpinski); birch and alder pests in industrial regions (Z. Schnaider); management of young fume-damaged spruce stands (E. Pelz); effect of fumes from the potash industry on forest stands in East Germany (E. Ewert); the distribution of injurious substances in leaves (G. Halbwachs); emission of SO/sub 2/ absorbed by spruce needles (J. Materna); and estimating fume damage expected near future power stations (H. Lux).

  6. The development and site investigation of fume diluter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bok Youn; Kang, Chang Hee; Jo, Young Do; Lim, Sang Taek [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    It is third project year on `Application of mobile diesel equipment in underground mines` for providing appropriate measures to improve underground working environment contaminated by the diesel exhaust pollutants. For reducing the exhaust temperature bellow 70 deg. C to prevent production of the governing pollutant (NO{sub 2}), the fume diluter is verified the most effective device through the site investigation. Therefore, the fume diluter is strongly recommended instead of catalytic converter which is employed presently. The performances derived from the tests are as follows; 1) This device increased air flow to 6.7-8.4 times of the original exhaust, 2) Exhaust temperature can be reduced to 66 deg. C from 161 deg. C, 3) All the pollutants can be reduced to bellow than 30 % of exhaust concentration, 4) This device requires less cost and no maintenance. (author). 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  7. A study of the bio-accessibility of welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlinger, Balázs; Ellingsen, Dag G; Náray, Miklós; Záray, Gyula; Thomassen, Yngvar

    2008-12-01

    The respiratory bio-accessibility of a substance is the fraction that is soluble in the respiratory environment and is available for absorption. In the case of respiratory exposure the amount of absorbed substance plays a main role in the biological effects. Extensive bio-accessibility studies have always been an essential requirement for a better understanding of the biological effects of different workplace aerosols, such as welding fumes. Fumes generated using three different welding techniques, manual metal arc (MMA) welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding, and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding were investigated in the present study. Each technique was used for stainless steel welding. Welding fumes were collected on PVC membrane filters in batches of 114 using a multiport air sampler. Three different fluids were applied for the solubility study: deionised water and two kinds of lung fluid simulants: lung epithelial lining fluid simulant (Gamble's solution) and artificial lung lining fluid simulant (Hatch's solution). In order to obtain sufficient data to study the tendencies in solubility change with time, seven different leaching periods were used (0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h), each of them with three replicates. The effect of dissolution temperature was also studied. The total amounts of selected metals in the three different welding fumes were determined after microwave-assisted digestion with the mixture of aqua regia and hydrofluoric acid. The most obvious observation yielded by the results is that the solubility of individual metals varies greatly depending on the welding technique, the composition of the leaching fluid and leaching time. This study shows that the most reasonable choice as a media for the bio-assessment of solubility might be Hatch's solution by a dissolution time of 24 h.

  8. FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYIMIDE/POLYETHERSULFONE-FUMED SILICA MIXED MATRIX MEMBRANE FOR GAS SEPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is performed primarily to investigate the feasibility of fumed silica as inorganic material towards gas separation performance of mixed matrix membrane. In this study, polyimide/polyethersulfone (PES-fumed silica mixed matrix membranes were casted using dry/wet technique. The results from the FESEM, DSC and FTIR analysis confirmed that the structure and physical properties of membrane is influenced by inorganic filler. FESEM’s cross-section view indicated good compatibility between polymer and fumed silica for all of range fumed silica used in this study. The gas separation performance of the mixed matrix membranes with fumed silica were relatively higher compared to that of the neat PI/PES membrane. PI/PES-fumed silica 5 wt% yielded significant selectivity enhancement of 7.21 and 40.47 for O2/N2, and CO2/CH4, respectively.

  9. Effects of densified silica fume on microstructure and compressive strength of blended cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Yajun; Cahyadi, Jong Herman

    2003-01-01

    Some experimental investigations on the microstructure and compressive strength development of silica fume blended cement pastes are presented in this paper. The silica fume replacement varies from 0% to 20% by weight and the water/binder ratio (w/b) is 0.4. The pore structure by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), the micromorphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the compressive strength at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 and 90 days have been studied. The test results indicate that the improvements on both microstructure and mechanical properties of hardened cement pastes by silica fume replacement are not effective due to the agglomeration of silica fume particles. The unreacted silica fume remained in cement pastes, the threshold diameter was not reduced and the increase in compressive strength was insignificant up to 28 days. It is suggested that the proper measures should be taken to disperse silica fume agglomeration to make it more effective on improving the properties of materials

  10. Detailed characterization of welding fumes in personal exposure samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quémerais, B; Mino, James; Amin, M R; Golshahi, H; Izadi, H

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the project was to develop a method allowing for detailed characterization of welding particles including particle number concentration, size distribution, surface chemistry and chemical composition of individual particles, as well as metal concentration of various welding fumes in personal exposure samples using regular sampling equipment. A sample strategy was developed to evaluate the variation of the collection methods on mass concentration. Samples were collected with various samplers and filters at two different locations using our collection system. The first location was using a robotic welding system while the second was manual welding. Collected samples were analysed for mass concentration using gravimetryand metal concentration using ICP/OES. More advanced analysis was performed on selected filters using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to determine surface composition of the particles, and X-Ray Diffraction to determine chemical composition of the fumes. Results showed that the robotic system had a lot of variation in space when the collection system was located close to the weld. Collection efficiency was found to be quite variable depending upon the type of filter. As well, metal concentrations in blank filters were dependent upon the type of filter with MCE presenting with the highest blank values. Results obtained with the XRD and XPS systems showed that it was possible to analyse a small of powdered welding fume sample but results on filters were not conclusive. (paper)

  11. Soluble transition metals cause the pro-inflammatory effects of welding fumes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeilly, Jane D.; Heal, Mathew R.; Beverland, Iain J.; Howe, Alan; Gibson, Mark D.; Hibbs, Leon R.; MacNee, William; Donaldson, Ken

    2004-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently reported a higher incidence of respiratory illnesses such as bronchitis, metal fume fever (MFF), and chronic pneumonitis among welders exposed to high concentrations of metal-enriched welding fumes. Here, we studied the molecular toxicology of three different metal-rich welding fumes: NIMROD 182, NIMROD c276, and COBSTEL 6. Fume toxicity in vitro was determined by exposing human type II alveolar epithelial cell line (A549) to whole welding fume, a soluble extract of fume or the 'washed' particulate. All whole fumes were significantly toxic to A549 cells at doses >63 μg ml -1 (TD 50; 42, 25, and 12 μg ml -1 , respectively). NIMROD c276 and COBSTEL 6 fumes increased levels of IL-8 mRNA and protein at 6 h and protein at 24 h, as did the soluble fraction alone, whereas metal chelation of the soluble fraction using chelex beads attenuated the effect. The soluble fraction of all three fumes caused a rapid depletion in intracellular glutathione following 2-h exposure with a rebound increase by 24 h. In addition, both nickel based fumes, NIMROD 182 and NIMROD c276, induced significant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in A549 cells after 2 h as determined by DCFH fluorescence. ICP analysis confirmed that transition metal concentrations were similar in the whole and soluble fractions of each fume (dominated by Cr), but significantly less in both the washed particles and chelated fractions. These results support the hypothesis that the enhanced pro-inflammatory responses of welding fume particulates are mediated by soluble transition metal components via an oxidative stress mechanism

  12. Determining the Compressive, Flexural and Splitting Tensile Strength of Silica Fume Reinforced Lightweight Foamed Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Mydin M.A.O.; Sani N. Md.; Mohd Yusoff M.A.; Ganesan S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of the properties of foamed concrete in replacing volumes of cement of 10%, 15% and 20% by weight. A control unit of foamed concrete mixture made with ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and 10%, 15% and 20% silica fume was prepared. Three mechanical property parameters were studied such as compressive strength, flexural strength and splitting tensile of foamed concrete with different percentages of silica fume. Silica fume is commonly used to increase the m...

  13. Influence of polyolefin fibers on the engineering properties of cement-based composites containing silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Ta-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An; Huang, Ran; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Experimental study is focus on the engineering properties of cement-based composites. ► Different mixes containing fiber and silica fume proportions have been tested. ► The influence of different mixes on the engineering properties has been discussed. ► The properties are included strength, ductility, permeability and microstructure. -- Abstract: This study evaluated the mechanical properties of cement-based composites produced with added polyolefin fibers and silica fume. Material variables included the water-cementitious ratio, the dosage of silica fume, and the length and dosage of polyolefin fiber. Researchers conducted tests on compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, direct tensile strength, resistivity, rapid chloride penetration, and initial surface absorption, and performed microscopic observation. Test results indicate that the specimens containing silica fume have higher compressive strength than the control and specimen made with fibers. The specimens with polyolefin fiber and silica fume have considerably higher tensile strength and ductility than the control and specimens made with silica fume. The specimens containing silica fume and polyolefin fiber demonstrated better resistance to chloride penetration than composites with polyolefin fiber or silica fume. For a given volume fraction, short polyolefin fiber performs better than its long counterpart in improving the properties of concrete. Specimens containing silica fume demonstrated a significant increase in resistivity and decrease in the total charge passed and absorption. Scanning electron microscopy illustrates that the polyolefin fiber acts to arrest the propagation of internal cracks.

  14. Dispersibility of silica fume in mortar and its effect on properties of mortar. Silica fume no bunsan to mortar no shotokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oga, H; Uomoto, T [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science

    1992-08-01

    Effect of silica fume dispersibility on concrete characteristics was discussed. Properties of mortar mixed with silica fume to exhibit compression strength varied with displacement rates, patterns, and mixing time of silica fume. In submerged curing age of 28 days, the compression strength in a mortar mixed with silica fume at 10% was affected only very little by the mixing time for both pelletizing and non-pelletizing types for up to 180 seconds. The strength increased thereafter with the mixing time. The compression strength at 1020 seconds showed higher value by about 150 kgf/cm [sup 2] than when no silica fume is added, with a difference because of patterns disappearing. In the case of a mixing time of 1020 seconds, neutralization depth receives very little effect from a pattern difference, and decreases with increasing displacement rate. Neutralization coefficient of the mortar mixed with silica fume at 10% decreased with the mixing time, and it was possible to suppress the neutralization coefficient to 25% of the case without silica fume addition in a 1020-second mixing. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. [Emission Characteristics of Water-Soluble Ions in Fumes of Coal Fired Boilers in Beijing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue-qi; Ma, Zhao-hui; Feng, Ya-jun; Wang, Chen; Chen, Yuan-yuan; He, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Selecting coal fired boilers with typical flue gas desulfurization and dust extraction systems in Beijing as the study objects, the issues and characteristics of the water-soluble ions in fumes of coal fired boilers and theirs influence factors were analyzed and evaluated. The maximum mass concentration of total water-soluble ions in fumes of coal fired boilers in Beijing was 51.240 mg x m(-3) in the benchmark fume oxygen content, the minimum was 7.186 mg x m(-3), and the issues of the water-soluble ions were uncorrelated with the fume moisture content. SO4(2-) was the primary characteristic water-soluble ion for desulfurization reaction, and the rate of contribution of SO4(2-) in total water-soluble ions ranged from 63.8% to 81.0%. F- was another characteristic water-soluble ion in fumes of thermal power plant, and the rate of contribution of F- in total water-soluble ions ranged from 22.2% to 32.5%. The fume purification technologies significantly influenced the issues and the emission characteristics of water-soluble ions in fumes of coal fired boilers. Na+ was a characteristic water-soluble ion for the desulfurizer NaOH, NH4+ and NO3+ were characteristic for the desulfurizer NH4HCO3, and Mg2+ was characteristic for the desulfurizer MgO, but the Ca2+ emission was not increased by addition of the desulfurizer CaO or CaCO3 The concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- in fumes of thermal power plant were lower than those in fumes of industrial or heating coal fired boilers. The form of water-soluble ions was significantly correlated with fume temperature. The most water-soluble ions were in superfine state at higher fume temperature and were not easily captured by the filter membrane.

  16. 30 CFR 70.305 - Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or... LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Respiratory Equipment § 70.305 Respiratory equipment; gas, dusts, fumes, or mists. Respiratory equipment approved by...

  17. Increased lung function decline in blue-collar workers exposed to welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaon, Isabelle; Demange, Valérie; Herin, Fabrice; Touranchet, Annie; Paris, Christophe

    2012-07-01

    There is no consensus at the present time about the effect of welding on lung function decline. This study compared lung function decline between blue-collar workers exposed and not exposed to welding fumes in a French longitudinal cohort of 21,238 subjects aged 37 to 52 years at inclusion. Medical data, occupation, sector of activity, and spirometry were recorded twice by occupational physicians in 1990 and 1995. A job-exposure matrix was used to identify 503 male blue-collar workers exposed to welding fumes and 709 control subjects and to define the weekly duration of exposure to welding fumes. Baseline lung function parameters were higher in workers exposed to welding fumes than in control subjects. After a 5-year follow-up, welding-fume exposure was associated with a nonsignificant decline in FVC (P = .06) and FEV(1) (P = .07) after adjustment for age, pack-years, BMI, and baseline value of the parameter. A significant accelerated decline in FEV(1) (P = .046) was also observed in never smokers exposed to welding fumes. An “exposure-response” relationship was observed between FEV(1) decline and weekly duration of exposure to welding fumes in nonsmokers but not in smokers. Blue-collar workers exposed to welding fumes showed accelerated decline in lung function, which, in nonsmokers, was related to weekly duration of exposure.

  18. Influence of silica fume and fly ash on hydration, microstructure and strength of cement based mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weng, Kaimao

    1992-10-01

    The influence of fly ash and silica fume on the hydration, microstructure and strength of cement-based mixtures was investigated. A literature review of the hydration processes, compressive strength development, and microstructure of Portland cement is presented, followed by description of materials and specimens preparation and experimental methodology. It was found that silica fume retards cement hydration at low water/concrete ratios. It reduces calcium hydroxide significantly and increases the amount of hydrates at early ages. Fly ash retards hydration more significantly at high water/concrete ratios than at low ratios. The combination of silica fume and fly ash further retards hydration at one day. Silica fume dominates the reaction with calcium hydroxide. Silica fume significantly increases early strength of mortars and concrete, while fly ash reduces early strength. Silica fume can substantially increase strength of fly ash mortar and concrete after 7 days. Silica fume refines pores in the range 100-500 A, while fly ash mortars exhibit gradual pore refinement as hydration proceeds. Silica fume dominates the pore refinement if used with fly ash. 89 refs., 74 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. Risk of ischemic heart disease following occupational exposure to welding fumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocevic, Emina; Kristiansen, Pernille; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Air pollution has been linked to an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD), but less is known about occupational exposure to welding fumes and the risk of IHD. The objective of this paper was to review the epidemiological evidence on causal links between welding fume exposure...

  20. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiğit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-01-01

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes’ added Silica fume have been investigated

  1. X-ray fluorescence analysis of welding fume particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsey, T.P.

    1982-01-01

    A commercial standard filter set and two laboratory-made standard filter sets are compared via the analysis of generated welding fume samples by X-ray fluorescence. The latter standards are made by (1) hydrophobic-edge membrane filters spiked with prepared metal ion solutions, and (2) filters through which a dispersion of metal oxide powder in isopropanol has been drawn. The results are presented in table form. Precision (Pre) is the relative standard deviation of the six samples. Four main conclusions are enumerated

  2. Compresive Strength for FRC Member using Silica Fume

    OpenAIRE

    R.M.Damgir,; Y.M.Ghugal

    2011-01-01

    The compressive strength of concrete was obtained by conducting tests on standard cubes of size 150X 150X150 mm size with fibers 0 to 5% with an increment of 0.5% and Silica Fume of 5%.The compressivestrength was determined by carrying out compressive test by using UTM. Slump loss increases with increase in Fiber Volume Crack Width reduces as percentage Fiber Volume increases and Crack width varying between 0.75 to 1.30 mm for 28 days concrete strength. Toughness of concrete member increases ...

  3. 42 CFR 84.1141 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mist respirators designed for respiratory protection against fumes of various metals having an air... HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist....1141 Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

  4. Designing, Constructing and Installing a Local Exhaust Ventilation System to Minimize Welders\\' Exposure to Welding Fumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Zare

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Welder’s exposure to welding fumes can cause occupational diseases. The current study sought to examine exposure to welding fumes among welders who work in the repair shop of Sarcheshmeh Copper Complex and design a local exhaust ventilation system to control exposure to welding fumes. Materials & Methods: This applied analytical study was conducted in the summer of 2016 among welders working in the repair shop of Sarcheshmeh Copper Complex. The study comprised three phases; in the first one, welders’ exposure to welding fumes was assessed at the beginning of the study. After that, a local exhaust ventilation system was designed and installed in the aforementioned repair shop. In the final stage, welders’ exposure to welding fumes was assessed again after installation of the ventilation system. The procedure recommended by NIOSH (method number 7300 was used for individual sampling of welders. Results: Based on the obtained findings, before installing the ventilation system, welding technicians were exposed to 0.3 mg/m3 of copper fumes and 0.04 mg/m3 of chromium fumes. Journeyman welders were also exposed to 2.16 mg/m3 of manganese fumes, while stellar welders were exposed to 6.9 mg/m3 of iron fumes. In the light of these measurements, a local exhaust ventilation system was designed and installed. Subsequently, measurement of exposure to welding fumes showed a significant reduction. That is, welding technicians were exposed to 0.17 mg/m3 and 0.015 mg/m3 of copper and chromium fumes respectively. Additionally, journeyman welders were exposed to 0.86 mg/m3 of manganese fumes, whereas stellar welders were exposed to 4.3 mg/m3 of iron fumes. Conclusions: A comparison of standard limits of exposure to welding fumes and the results obtained from measurements in sampling stations before and after the installation of the local exhaust ventilation system reveals that this controlling measure was very effective in the

  5. Genotoxic Effects of Exposure to Gasoline Fumes on Petrol Pump Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Amrin; Barot, Darshana; Chandel, Divya

    2018-04-01

    Petrol pump workers are occupationally exposed to gasoline and its fumes consisting of several mutagenic chemicals. To evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure to gasoline fumes on petrol pump workers. The study groups included 70 petrol pump workers (exposed group) and 70 healthy age-matched individuals with no known exposure (comparison group). Buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt) was performed to check the genotoxicity caused due to inhalation of gasoline fumes. The frequencies of micronucleated cells, nuclear bud, condensed chromatin cells, karyorrhectic cells, pyknotic cells, and karyolytic cells were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to the comparison group. Exposure to gasoline fumes is associated with increased frequency of cell abnormalities. This may lead to various health consequences including cancer in those occupationally exposed to gasoline fumes.

  6. Genotoxic Effects of Exposure to Gasoline Fumes on Petrol Pump Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrin Shaikh

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Petrol pump workers are occupationally exposed to gasoline and its fumes consisting of several mutagenic chemicals. Objective: To evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure to gasoline fumes on petrol pump workers. Methods: The study groups included 70 petrol pump workers (exposed group and 70 healthy age-matched individuals with no known exposure (comparison group. Buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt was performed to check the genotoxicity caused due to inhalation of gasoline fumes. Results: The frequencies of micronucleated cells, nuclear bud, condensed chromatin cells, karyorrhectic cells, pyknotic cells, and karyolytic cells were significantly higher in the exposed workers compared to the comparison group. Conclusion: Exposure to gasoline fumes is associated with increased frequency of cell abnormalities. This may lead to various health consequences including cancer in those occupationally exposed to gasoline fumes.

  7. Investigation of durability of silica fume concretes in coastal structures within tidal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganjian, E.; Sadeghi Pouya, H.

    2003-01-01

    In recent decade use of silica fume has been become greater in coastal concrete structures in the persona gulf, to increase durability of those establishments. In this research the durability of cement passers and concrete cubes with use of 7 and 10 percent of silica fume as a cement replacement have been investigated in three curing conditions (fresh water, coast of sea and simulation bonds) by measuring compressive strengths and capillary absorption. Silica fume specimens under wetting and drying condition showed more strength loss after 180 days compare to samples without silica fume or cured in the fresh water. In addition the greater silica fume amount in specimens cured within tidal zone and under wetting and drying simulation, the more water absorption by capillary. According to the results, good correspondence between simulated condition and real site exposure was obtained

  8. Fresh and some mechanical properties of sifcon containing silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salih Shakir

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Slurry infiltrated fiber concrete (SIFCON is one of the recently developed construction material. SIFCON could be considered as a special type of fiber concrete with high fiber content. The matrix of SIFCON consists of flowing cement mortar or cement slurry. SIFCON has a very good potential for application in area where resistance to impact and high ductility are needed especially in designing the seismic retrofit, in the structures under impact and explosive effects and repair of structural reinforced concrete element. The main objective of this paper is to determine the effect of steel fiber content and silica fume (SF cement replacement on the mechanical properties of SIFCON concrete. The percentage of SF replacement was 10% by weight of cement in SIFCON slurry, and three different volume fractions of hooked ended steel fiber (6, 8.5, and 11 % were used. The tested properties of SIFCON were compressive strength and splitting tensile strength which were carried out on standard size of cubes and cylinders respectively at the age of 7and 28 days. It was observed that the mechanical properties of SIFCON were affected in a positive manner by using silica fume as a partial replacement of cement and by adding steel fiber reinforcement in different percentages. The compressive and splitting tensile strength up to 83.7 MPa and 17.3MPa, respectively were obtained at the age of 28 days.

  9. Evaluation of one-step luminescent cyanoacrylate fuming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuu, Alicia; Chadwick, Scott; Spindler, Xanthe; Lam, Rolanda; Moret, Sébastien; Roux, Claude

    2016-06-01

    One-step luminescent cyanoacrylates have recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional cyanoacrylate fuming methods. These new techniques do not require the application of a luminescent post-treatment in order to enhance cyanoacrylate-developed fingermarks. In this study, three one-step polymer cyanoacrylates: CN Yellow Crystals (Aneval Inc.), PolyCyano UV (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) and PECA Multiband (BVDA), and one monomer cyanoacrylate: Lumikit™ (Crime Scene Technology), were evaluated against a conventional two-step cyanoacrylate fuming method (Cyanobloom (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) with rhodamine 6G stain). The manufacturers' recommended conditions or conditions compatible with the MVC™ 1000/D (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) were assessed with fingermarks aged for up to 8 weeks on non-porous and semi-porous substrates. Under white light, Cyanobloom generally gave better development than the one-step treatments across the substrates. Similarly when viewed under the respective luminescent conditions, Cyanobloom with rhodamine 6G stain resulted in improved contrast against the one-step treatments except on polystyrene, where PolyCyano UV and PECA Multiband gave better visualisation. Rhodamine 6G post-treatment of one-step samples did not significantly enhance the contrast of any of the one-step treatments against Cyanobloom/rhodamine 6G-treated samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Calcined clay minerals and Silica fume on the compressive strength of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Soltani

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Pozzolanic materials are well known as potential replacements for cement manufacturing in order to increase compressive strength and improve durability of concrete in different environments and leading to save energy particularly reducing global warming effect. The present study reveals the effect of calcined clay minerals as natural pozzolanic material, separately and in combination with and without silica fume. To achieve this aim, 15 mixed designs with a constant water to cementitious ratio of  0.38 is made. In six mixed designs only metakaolin, zeolite or silica fume  and in eight other designs metakaolin and silica fume or zeolite and silica fume have been combined. Mixes containing metakaolin or zeolite with ratio of 10 or 20 percent and silica fume with 7 or 10 percent show significant increasing in compressive strength and improving durability, being valuable replacement for cement (in percentages. In particular, the best practice is attributed to the age of 28 days for compressive strength the replacement of the composition is 10% zeolite with 7% of silica fume and for electrical resistance the replacement of the composition is 10% zeolite with 7% of silica fume.

  11. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Roberts, Jenny R; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2015-02-03

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m(3); 3h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas-metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m 3 ; 3 h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas–metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks

  13. Effect of Silica Fume on two-stage Concrete Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgader, H. S.; El-Baden, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two-stage concrete (TSC) is an innovative concrete that does not require vibration for placing and compaction. TSC is a simple concept; it is made using the same basic constituents as traditional concrete: cement, coarse aggregate, sand and water as well as mineral and chemical admixtures. As its name suggests, it is produced through a two-stage process. Firstly washed coarse aggregate is placed into the formwork in-situ. Later a specifically designed self compacting grout is introduced into the form from the lowest point under gravity pressure to fill the voids, cementing the aggregate into a monolith. The hardened concrete is dense, homogeneous and has in general improved engineering properties and durability. This paper presents the results from a research work attempt to study the effect of silica fume (SF) and superplasticizers admixtures (SP) on compressive and tensile strength of TSC using various combinations of water to cement ratio (w/c) and cement to sand ratio (c/s). Thirty six concrete mixes with different grout constituents were tested. From each mix twenty four standard cylinder samples of size (150mm×300mm) of concrete containing crushed aggregate were produced. The tested samples were made from combinations of w/c equal to: 0.45, 0.55 and 0.85, and three c/s of values: 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Silica fume was added at a dosage of 6% of weight of cement, while superplasticizer was added at a dosage of 2% of cement weight. Results indicated that both tensile and compressive strength of TSC can be statistically derived as a function of w/c and c/s with good correlation coefficients. The basic principle of traditional concrete, which says that an increase in water/cement ratio will lead to a reduction in compressive strength, was shown to hold true for TSC specimens tested. Using a combination of both silica fume and superplasticisers caused a significant increase in strength relative to control mixes.

  14. PEMANFAATAN LIMBAH SERBUK MARMER PADA BETON SEBAGAI BAHAN PENGGANTI SEBAGIAN SEMEN DENGAN VARIASI PENGGUNAAN SILICA FUME

    OpenAIRE

    Agil Fitri Handayani; Agoes Soehardjono M.D.; Achfas Zacoeb

    2015-01-01

    The Utilization of Marble Powder Waste in Concrete Ma­­­­­­­­terials as a Partial Material Substitution of Cement  with the Variation Use of Silica Fume. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of marble powder and silica fume on the mechanical pro­per­ties of concrete. This study used an experimental design using 16 group of testing materials with variety types of mixtures between marble powder and silica fume 0.00; 5.00; 10.00; and 15.00%. The wa­ter-cement ratio was 0.50 and ...

  15. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazer David

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute

  16. The mechanism of cesium immobilization in densified silica-fume blended cement pastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bar-Nes, G.; Katz, A.; Peled, Y.; Zeiri, Y.

    2008-01-01

    The role of silica-fume agglomerates, found in densified silica-fume (DSF) pastes, in the immobilization mechanism of Cs ions was studied. Samples of cementitious pastes containing two different forms of silica fume - DSF and raw silica fume (RSF) - were prepared. Leaching experiments showed that both additives reduced the leachability of the metal ion, but the effect of the DSF paste was much stronger. Scanning Electron Microscopy, together with Differential Thermal Analysis, proved that no agglomerated particles were present in the RSF pastes and that the extent of pozzolanic reactivity was higher. We therefore believe that unreacted silica within the DSF agglomerates adsorbs Cs ions and consequently increases their immobilization. Furthermore, this work suggests that during the pozzolanic reaction, a hydrated rim develops around the agglomerate that acts as an additional diffusion barrier for the Cs ions, resulting in an increased efficiency of Cs immobilization

  17. Radon exhalation rates of concrete modified with fly ash and silica fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amit Kumar; Chauhan, R.P.; Mehta, Vimal; Kant, K.

    2013-01-01

    The radiological impact of the environmental gas radon to the health of general public is of concern since many decades. Cement used for the construction blended with fly ash and silica fumes is recommended by Government in order to avoid the soil and environmental pollution. But these addition step-up the Indoor radon level in the dwelling due to radioactivity contents. The exhalation of radon from concrete blended with silica fumes and fly ash depends upon addition level, porosity, moisture and radioactivity content. In order to optimize the level of substitution of silica fumes and fly ash, measurements of radon exhalation rates from the concrete blended with different proportions of fly ash and silica fumes was carried out using active scintillation radon monitor. The effect of porosity, moisture, back diffusion and radioactivity content of the concrete on exhalation rates is studied. The measured exhalation rates were extrapolated for indoor radon concentration and effective dose equivalent using ICRP, 1987 recommendations. (author)

  18. Effect of paint fumes on histoarchitecture of the testes of adult male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abdominal incision was performed after which one testis was received from each rats, preserved in 10% formal saline and further processed for histological study using Hematoxylin and eosin technique. Results: The testes of the paint fumes ...

  19. Improvement of RVNRL film properties by adding fumed silica and hydroxy apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adul Thiangchanya

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding fumed silica and hydroxy apatite to Radiation Vulcanized Natural Rubber Latex (RVNRL for improving tear strength, aging properties, degradability and water-soluble protein content of rubber films has been investigated. The addition of fumed silica and hydroxy apatite in RVNRL improves tear strength and aging properties of rubber films, whereas tensile strength and degradability of rubber films were unchanged during storage at room temperature. The water-soluble protein content in rubber films was reduced by immobilization of the fumed silica and hydroxy apatite and enhanced by addition of ZnO. This may reduce allergy problems of natural rubber latex products caused by water-soluble protein. The MST of the RVNRL with fumed silica and hydroxy apatite indicated that the latex must be used within two months after mixing because of its stability.

  20. Minimum acceptable face velocities of laboratory fume hoods and guidelines for their classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, N.E.; Porter, W.E.; Alcorn, S.P.; Everett, W.S.; Hunt, J.B.; Morehead, J.F.; Higdon, H.F.

    1978-06-01

    Data developed to support the requirement of a 100 LFM minimum face velocity requirement for laboratory fume hoods are summarized. Also included is a description of the Y-12 test hood as well as guidelines for a hood classification scheme

  1. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  2. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  3. A comparison between atmospheric/humidity and vacuum cyanoacrylate fuming of latent fingermarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Kevin J; Fraser, Joanna; Friel, Lauren; Adams, Duncan; Attard-Montalto, Nicola; Deacon, Paul

    2015-12-01

    A number of pseudo-operational trials were set up to compare the atmospheric/humidity and vacuum cyanoacrylate fuming processes on plastic carrier bags. The fuming processes were compared using two-step cyanoacrylate fuming with basic yellow 40 (BY40) staining and a one-step fluorescent cyanoacrylate fuming, Lumicyano 4%. Preliminary work using planted fingermarks and split depletions were performed to identify the optimum vacuum fuming conditions. The first pseudo-operational trial compared the different fuming conditions (atmospheric/humidity vs. vacuum) for the two-step process where an additional 50% more marks were detected with the atmospheric/humidity process. None of the marks by the vacuum process could be observed visually; however, a significant number of marks were detected by fluorescence after BY40 staining. The second trial repeated the same work in trial 1 using the one-step cyanoacrylate process, Lumicyano at a concentration of 4%. Trial 2 provided comparable results to trial 1 and all the items were then re-treated with Lumicyano 4% at atmospheric/humidity conditions before dyeing with BY40 to provide the sequences of process A (Lumicyano 4% atmospheric-Lumicyano 4% atmospheric-BY40) and process B (Lumicyano 4% vacuum-Lumicyano 4% atmospheric-BY40). The number of marks (visual and fluorescent) was counted after each treatment with a substantial increase in the number of detected marks in the second and third treatments of the process. The increased detection rate after the double Lumicyano process was unexpected and may have important implications. Trial 3 was performed to investigate whether the amount of cyanoacrylate and/or fuming time had an impact on the results observed in trial 2 whereas trial 4 assessed if the double process using conventional cyanoacrylate, rather than Lumicyano 4%, provided an increased detection rate. Trials 3 and 4 confirmed that doubling the amount of Lumicyano 4% cyanoacrylate and fuming time produced a lower

  4. After-blast fumes from ANFO mixtures - the effect of prill type and mixing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnfield, R.; Wetherelt, A.

    2003-06-01

    Over the last couple of years the Technical Services Department of exchem explosives has received a number of enquiries regarding the nature of after-blast fumes. These enquiries have been driven by two concerns: site-related health and safety and public comment from people living close to blasting operations. The paper examines how these choices can impact the quality and quantity of after-blast fume. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Genotoxic Effects of Exposure to Gasoline Fumes on Petrol Pump Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Amrin Shaikh; Darshana Barot; Divya Chandel

    2018-01-01

    Background: Petrol pump workers are occupationally exposed to gasoline and its fumes consisting of several mutagenic chemicals. Objective: To evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure to gasoline fumes on petrol pump workers. Methods: The study groups included 70 petrol pump workers (exposed group) and 70 healthy age-matched individuals with no known exposure (comparison group). Buccal micronucleus cytome assay (BMCyt) was performed to check the genotoxicity caused due to inhalation ...

  6. Isothermal model investigation of fume extraction systems for the scrap burner at Appleby Frodingham

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D.

    1976-08-01

    Model tests have been made on three suggested schemes for improving the efficiency of fume collection on the scrap burning installation in the Anchor BOS plant at Appleby Frodingham. In particular the usefulness of air curtains as a means of containing the fume has been examined. CO/sub 2/ tracer measurements, and photographs using smoke for visualization have allowed the assessment of the collection efficiencies of the three schemes, and some alterative solutions have been investigated using similar methods. (GRA)

  7. Effect of silica fume on reaction products of uranium (VI) with portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Hongbin; Shaanxi Univ. of Technology, Hanzhong; Li Yuxiang

    2005-01-01

    Simulation of radioactive waste of U(VI) by uranyl nitrate and the effects of different additive quantities (12%, 20%, 30%, 35%, 40%) of silica fume on the products of U(VI) with Portland cement were studied at a hydrothermal condition of 180 degree C for a duration of one week. The X-ray powder diffraction examination results showed that the calcium uranate would be transformed into uranophane when the cement contained 30% silica fume. (authors)

  8. Investigations on the tensile strength of high performance concrete incorporating silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanu Bhanja; Bratish Sengupta

    2005-01-01

    Though the literature is rich in reporting on silica fume concrete the technical data on tensile strength is quite limited. The present paper is directed towards developing a better understanding on the isolated contribution of silica fume on the tensile strengths of High Performance Concrete. Extensive experimentation was carried out over water-binder ratios ranging from 0.26 to 0.42 and silica fume binder ratios from 0.0 to 0.3. For all the mixes compressive, flexural and split tensile strengths were determined at 28 days. The results of the present investigation indicate that silica fume incorporation results in significant improvements in the tensile strengths of concrete. It is also observed that the optimum replacement percentage, which led to maximization of strength, is not a constant one but depends on the water- cementitious material ratio of the mix. Compared to split tensile strengths, flexural strengths have exhibited greater percentage gains in strength. Increase in split tensile strength beyond 15% silica fume replacement is almost insignificant whereas sizeable gains in flexural tensile strength have occurred even up to 25% replacements. For the present investigation transgranular failure of concrete was observed which indicate that silica fume incorporation results in significant improvements in the strength of both paste and transition zone. (authors)

  9. Influence of polyacrylic ester and silica fume on the mechanical properties of mortar for repair application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaohua Jiang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigations on the influence of different amounts of polyacrylic ester and silica fumes on the mechanical properties of mortar such as the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, bonding strength, and abrasion resistance are presented in this article. The results show that the compressive and splitting tensile strength of mortar can be improved with the addition of polyacrylic ester and silica fumes. Results obtained from both the direct tensile bond test and flexural bond test indicate that the addition of polyacrylic ester and silica fumes improves the bond strength significantly, and the enhancement is more obvious with polyacrylic ester paste as interfacial adhesives. Furthermore, mortar incorporation of polyacrylic ester and silica fumes shows superior abrasion resistance compared to the control mortar. Therefore, the correct combination of polyacrylic ester and silica fumes to produce mortars has been shown to have synergistic effects, which results in excellent properties including high bond strength and superior abrasion resistance. Mortars containing polyacrylic ester and silica fumes are ideal for repairing concrete especially for hydraulic concrete structure.

  10. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile.

  11. Determining the Compressive, Flexural and Splitting Tensile Strength of Silica Fume Reinforced Lightweight Foamed Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mydin M.A.O.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the performance of the properties of foamed concrete in replacing volumes of cement of 10%, 15% and 20% by weight. A control unit of foamed concrete mixture made with ordinary Portland cement (OPC and 10%, 15% and 20% silica fume was prepared. Three mechanical property parameters were studied such as compressive strength, flexural strength and splitting tensile of foamed concrete with different percentages of silica fume. Silica fume is commonly used to increase the mechanical properties of concrete materials and it is also chosen due to certain economic reasons. The foamed concrete used in this study was cured at a relative humidity of 70% and a temperature of ±28°C. The improvement of mechanical properties was due to a significant densification in the microstructure of the cement paste matrix in the presence of silica fume hybrid supplementary binder as observed from micrographs obtained in the study. The overall results showed that there is a potential to utilize silica fume in foamed concrete, as there was a noticeable enhancement of thermal and mechanical properties with the addition of silica fume.

  12. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  13. Analysis of heat transfer and contaminant transport in fume hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathanjali, C.; Rahman, M.M.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of three-dimensional flow patterns and the associated heat and mass transfer mechanisms in a fume hood enclosure. The flow enters the hood through the front window opening (positive x-direction) and leaves the cupboard through an opening on the top of the hood (positive z-direction). The flow was assumed to be fully turbulent. The flow pattern for different sash openings were studied. The flow pattern around an object located at the bottom of the hood was studied for different locations of the object. It was found that air entering the hood proceeds directly to the back wall, impinges it and turns upward toward the top wall and exits through the outlet. The flow finds its way around any object forming a recirculating region at its training surface. With an increase in the sash opening, the velocity becomes higher and the fluid traces the path to the outlet more quickly. The volume occupied by recirculating flow decreases with increase in sash opening. Both temperature and concentration were found to be maximum near the source and gradually decreased as the heated air or gaseous contaminant entrained with incoming air. The local concentration decreased with increase in sash opening area. The results will be very useful to design experiments with optimum sash opening providing adequate disposal of contaminants with minimum use of conditioned air inside the room

  14. Profiling mild steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions and costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel G

    2014-05-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g(-1) electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5mg g(-1)) and CMT (~1mg g(-1)). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g(-1) (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g(-1) (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g(-1) (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g(-1) (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  15. Performance of laboratories analysing welding fume on filter samples: results from the WASP proficiency testing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Peter; Butler, Owen

    2008-06-01

    This paper emphasizes the need for occupational hygiene professionals to require evidence of the quality of welding fume data from analytical laboratories. The measurement of metals in welding fume using atomic spectrometric techniques is a complex analysis often requiring specialist digestion procedures. The results from a trial programme testing the proficiency of laboratories in the Workplace Analysis Scheme for Proficiency (WASP) to measure potentially harmful metals in several different types of welding fume showed that most laboratories underestimated the mass of analyte on the filters. The average recovery was 70-80% of the target value and >20% of reported recoveries for some of the more difficult welding fume matrices were welding fume trial filter samples. Consistent rather than erratic error predominated, suggesting that the main analytical factor contributing to the differences between the target values and results was the effectiveness of the sample preparation procedures used by participating laboratories. It is concluded that, with practice and regular participation in WASP, performance can improve over time.

  16. Effects of Exposure to Welding Fume on Lung Function: Results from the German WELDOX Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, M; Hoffmeyer, F; Gawrych, K; Lotz, A; Heinze, E; Berresheim, H; Merget, R; Harth, V; Van Gelder, R; Hahn, J-U; Hartwig, A; Weiß, T; Pesch, B; Brüning, T

    2015-01-01

    The association between exposure to welding fume and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been insufficiently clarified. In this study we assessed the influence of exposure to welding fume on lung function parameters. We investigated forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, and expiratory flow rates in 219 welders. We measured current exposure to respirable particles and estimated a worker's lifetime exposure considering welding techniques, working conditions and protective measures at current and former workplaces. Multiple regression models were applied to estimate the influence of exposure to welding fume, age, and smoking on lung function. We additionally investigated the duration of working as a welder and the predominant welding technique. The findings were that age- and smoking-adjusted lung function parameters showed no decline with increasing duration, current exposure level, and lifetime exposure to welding fume. However, 15% of the welders had FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal, but we could not substantiate the presence of an association with the measures of exposure. Adverse effects of cigarette smoking were confirmed. In conclusion, the study did not support the notion of a possible detrimental effect of exposure to welding fume on lung function in welders.

  17. Highly Efficient Fumed Silica Nanoparticles for Peptide Bond Formation: Converting Alanine to Alanine Anhydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chengchen; Jordan, Jacob S; Yarger, Jeffery L; Holland, Gregory P

    2017-05-24

    In this work, thermal condensation of alanine adsorbed on fumed silica nanoparticles is investigated using thermal analysis and multiple spectroscopic techniques, including infrared (IR), Raman, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies. Thermal analysis shows that adsorbed alanine can undergo thermal condensation, forming peptide bonds within a short time period and at a lower temperature (∼170 °C) on fumed silica nanoparticle surfaces than that in bulk (∼210 °C). Spectroscopic results further show that alanine is converted to alanine anhydride with a yield of 98.8% during thermal condensation. After comparing peptide formation on solution-derived colloidal silica nanoparticles, it is found that fumed silica nanoparticles show much better efficiency and selectivity than solution-derived colloidal silica nanoparticles for synthesizing alanine anhydride. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy provides evidence that the high efficiency for fumed silica nanoparticles is likely related to their unique surface features: the intrinsic high population of strained ring structures present at the surface. This work indicates the great potential of fumed silica nanoparticles in synthesizing peptides with high efficiency and selectivity.

  18. Exposure to Cooking Fumes and Acute Reversible Decrement in Lung Functional Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neghab, Masoud; Delikhoon, Mahdieh; Norouzian Baghani, Abbas; Hassanzadeh, Jafar

    2017-10-01

    Being exposed to cooking fumes, kitchen workers are occupationally at risk of multiple respiratory hazards. No conclusive evidence exists as to whether occupational exposure to these fumes is associated with acute and chronic pulmonary effects and symptoms of respiratory diseases. To quantify the exposure levels and evaluate possible chronic and acute pulmonary effects associated with exposure to cooking fumes. In this cross-sectional study, 60 kitchen workers exposed to cooking fumes and 60 unexposed employees were investigated. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms among these groups was determined through completion of a standard questionnaire. Pulmonary function parameters were also measured before and after participants' work shift. Moreover, air samples were collected and analyzed to quantify their aldehyde, particle, and volatile organic contents. The mean airborne concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein was 0.45 (SD 0.41), 0.13 (0.1), and 1.56 (0.41) mg/m 3 , respectively. The mean atmospheric concentrations of PM 1 , PM 2.5 , PM 7 , PM 10 , and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) was 3.31 (2.6), 12.21 (5.9), 44.16 (16.6), 57 (21.55) μg/m 3 , and 1.31 (1.11) mg/m 3 , respectively. All respiratory symptoms were significantly (pcooking fumes is associated with a significant increase in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms as well as acute reversible decrease in lung functional capacity.

  19. Formulation and characterization of date palm fibers mortar by addition of silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, A.; Kriker, A.; Ouaggad, H.; Merad, N.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents the results of experimental investigations of the formulated and characterization of date palm fibers mortar by addition of silica fume. The use of addition mineral is widely used in the production of cements through the world. The objective of this work is to bring our contribution to the recovery of local resources in the occurrence vegetable fibers of date palm to weak cost and from renewable source and integrate it in the filled of building. Date palm fiber are from Ouargla town in south of Algeria. Different mortar mixtures were prepared in which the cement was substitute by 10% of silica fume. The mechanical characteristics (compressive and flexural strength) of date palm fibers mortar by treatment of the matrix by the adding of silica fume were examined. The results obtained have shown that the mortar workability as well as the compressive and flexural strength decreases with increasing the silica fume replacement. The results showed that the use of silica fume enabled to evaluate the flexural strength. However, another treatment of fibers and matrix will be recommended for Improved the characteristics.

  20. Conversion of Hazardous Motor Vehicle Used Tire and Polystyrene Waste Plastic Mixture into useful Chemical Products

    OpenAIRE

    Moinuddin Sarker; Mohammad Mamunor Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Motor vehicle used tire and polystyrene waste plastic mixture into fuel recovery using thermal degradation process in laboratory batch process. Motor vehicle used tire and polystyrene waste plastic was use 75 gm by weight. Motor vehicle tire was 25 gm and polystyrene waste plastic was 50 gm. In presence of oxygen experiment was performed under laboratory fume hood. Thermal degradation temperature range was 100 - 420 oC and experiment run time was 5 hours. Product fuel density is 0.84 gm/ml an...

  1. 30 CFR 71.700 - Inhalation hazards; threshold limit values for gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors. 71.700 Section 71.700 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... limit values for gases, dust, fumes, mists, and vapors. (a) No operator of an underground coal mine and... limit values adopted by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists in “Threshold...

  2. Thermogravimetric analyses and mineralogical study of polymer modified mortar with silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Etuko Feuzicana de Souza Almeida

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Mineral and organic additions are often used in mortars to improve their properties. Microstructural investigation concerning the effects of styrene acrylic polymer and silica fume on the mineralogical composition of high-early-strength portland cement pastes after 28 days of hydration are presented in this paper. Thermogravimetry and derivative thermogravimetry were used to study the interaction between polymers and cement, as well as the extent of pozzolanic reaction of the mortars with silica fume. Differential scanning calorimetry and X ray diffraction were used to investigate the cement hydration and the effect of the additions. The results showed that the addition of silica fume and polymer reduces the portlandite formation due to delaying of Portland cement hydration and pozzolanic reaction.

  3. Testing Silica Fume-Based Concrete Composites under Chemical and Microbiological Sulfate Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estokova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Current design practices based on descriptive approaches to concrete specification may not be appropriate for the management of aggressive environments. In this study, the durability of cement-based materials with and without the addition of silica fume, subjected to conditions that leach calcium and silicon, were investigated. Chemical corrosion was simulated by employing various H2SO4 and MgSO4 solutions, and biological corrosion was simulated using Acidithiobacillus sp. bacterial inoculation, leading to disrupted and damaged surfaces; the samples’ mass changes were studied following both chemical and biological attacks. Different leaching trends were observed via X-ray fluorescence when comparing chemical with biological leaching. Lower leaching rates were found for concrete samples fortified with silica fume than those without silica fume. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy confirmed a massive sulfate precipitate formation on the concrete surface due to bacterial exposure.

  4. A new method for infrared imaging of air currents in and around critical hazard fume hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulac, W.A.; McCreary, J.R.; Schmalz, H.

    1992-01-01

    A real time method of measuring and recording the efficacy of vapor containment in and around critical hazard fume hoods is being developed. An infrared camera whose response is restricted to a spectral range that overlaps a strong absorption band in a non-toxic gas is used to render real-time video images of the presence and flow of the gas. The gas, nitrous oxide, is ejected in a continuous stream in and around fume hoods that are to be certified capable of containing hazardous fumes. The principle advantage is that various scenarios of air flow displacement in and outside the hood can be easily investigated; the principle limitation is the necessity of high tracer gas concentration to obtain strong visualizations. We hope that this technique can be found to be an effective and safe method to test hoods in locations that were built before present regulations were promulgated

  5. Performance of Portland cement mixes containing silica fume and mixed with lime-water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metwally A.A. Abd Elaty

    2014-12-01

    Test results show that using lime-water in mixing enhances consistency degree compared to the corresponding control mixes. Furthermore, it delays both initial and final setting times compared with traditional water due to the common ion effect principles. Moreover, combined use of lime-water and silica fume enhances the pozzolanic reaction that was identified by the strength development at both early and later ages. The existence of CH crystals for higher percentages of silica fume (up to 30% for further reaction at later ages was observed by XRD results. Moreover, combined use of silica fume and lime-water ensures a high alkaline media around steel bars from the moment of ingredients mixing as long as later ages despite of pozzolanic reaction that was identified from results of chloride attack.

  6. Experimental investigation on high performance RC column with manufactured sand and silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuga Priya, T.

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, the use High Performance Concrete (HPC) has increased in construction industry. The ingredients of HPC depend on the availability and characteristics of suitable alternative materials. Those alternative materials are silica fume and manufactured sand, a by products from ferro silicon and quarry industries respectively. HPC made with silica fume as partial replacement of cement and manufactured sand as replacement of natural sand is considered as sustainable high performance concrete. In this present study the concrete was designed to get target strength of 60 MPa as per guide lines given by ACI 211- 4R (2008). The laboratory study was carried out experimentally to analyse the axial behavior of reinforced cement HPC column of size 100×100×1000mm and square in cross section. 10% of silica fume was preferred over ordinary portland cement. The natural sand was replaced by 0, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100% with Manufactured Sand (M-Sand). In this investigation, totally 6 column specimens were cast for mixes M1 to M6 and were tested in 1000kN loading frame at 28 days. From this, Load-Mid height deflection curves were drawn and compared. Maximum ultimate load carrying capacity and the least deflection is obtained for the mix prepared by partial replacement of cement with 10% silica fume & natural sand by 100% M-Sand. The fine, amorphous and pozzalonic nature of silica fume and fine mineral particles in M- Sand increased the stiffness of HPC column. The test results revealed that HPC can be produced by using M-Sand with silica fume.

  7. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); State Environmental Protection Engineering Center for Pollution Treatment and Control in Textile Industry, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhou, Yasu [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Tyrer, Mark [Mineral Industry Research Organisation, Solihull B37 7HB (United Kingdom); Yu, Yang [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash was investigated. • The addition of silica fume effectively reduced the leaching of Pb and Cd. • The relation of solid phase transformation and leaching behavior of heavy metals was discussed. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ({sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si) techniques. It was found that silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China.

  8. INFLUENCE OF SUBSTITUTION OF ORDINARY PORTLAND CEMENT BY SILICA FUME ON THE HYDRATION OF SLAG-PORTLAND CEMENT PASTES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. El-Alfi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Effect of gradual substitution of ordinary Portland cement by a few percent of silica fume (0.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 wt.% on the hydration properties of slag-Portland cement pastes up to 12 months was investigated. The results show that the composite cement pastes containing silica fume give the higher physico-mechanical properties than that of the slag-Portland cement. Also, the XRD results reveal that the peak of Ca(OH2 shows higher intensity in the sample without silica fume and completely disappears in the sample containing 7.5 wt.% silica fume content. Also, the intensity peaks of C4AH13 sharply increase with silica fume content.

  9. The Relationship of Welding Fume Exposure, Smoking, and Pulmonary Function in Welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Laura L

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between occupational exposure to welding fumes and pulmonary function in an effort to add supportive evidence and clarity to the current body of research. This study utilized a retrospective chart review of pulmonary function testing and pulmonary questionnaires already available in charts from preplacement physicals to the most recent test. When comparing smokers to nonsmokers, utilizing multiple regression and controlling for age and percentage of time using a respirator, years welding was statistically significant at p = .04. Data support that smoking has a synergistic effect when combined with welding fume exposure on pulmonary decline.

  10. Phase analysis of fume during arc weld brazing of steel sheets with protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matusiak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research of the phase identification and of the quantitative phase analysis of fume generated during Cold Metal Transfer (CMT, ColdArc and Metal Inert Gas / Metal Active Gas (MIG / MAG weld brazing. Investigations were conducted for hot - dip coated steel sheets with zinc (Zn and zinc-iron (Zn - Fe alloy coatings. Arc shielding gases applied during the research-related tests were Ar + O2, Ar + CO2, Ar + H2 and Ar + CO2 + H2 gas mixtures. The analysis of the results covers the influence of the chemical composition of shielding gas on the chemical composition of welding fume.

  11. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...... thatsilica fume addition markedly increases the autogenous shrinkage as well as the autogenous relative humidity change....

  12. Dynamic Moisture Sorption and Desorption in Fumed Silica-filled Silicone Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Characterizing dynamic moisture sorption and desorption in fumed silica-filled silicone foam is necessary for determining material compatibilities and life predictions, particularly in sealed environments that may be exposed to a range of environmental conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were performed on S5470 fumed silica-filled silicone foam to determine the weight percent of moisture at saturation. Additionally, TGA was used to determine the time, temperature, and relative humidity levels required for sorption and desorption of physisorbed moisture in S5470.

  13. Corrosion resistance of nickel alloys with chromium and silicon to the red fuming nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurvich, L.Ya.; Zhirnov, A.D.

    1994-01-01

    Corrosion and electrochemical behaviour of binary Ni-Cr, Ni-Si nickel and ternary Ni-Cr-Si alloys in the red fuming nitric acid (RFNA) (8-% of HNO 3 +20% of N 2 O 4 ) is studied. It is shown that nickel alloying with chromium improves its corrosion resistance to the red fuming nitric acid. Nickel alloying with silicon in quantities of up to 5 % reduces, and up to 10%-increases abruptly the corrosion resistance with subsequent decrease of the latter after the further increase of concentration. Ni-15% of Cr alloy alloying with silicon increases monotonously the corrosion resistance. 10 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  15. Green waste from spirit; Gruener Abfall zu Sprit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heida, Lydia

    2013-05-15

    Bio MCN (Almere, The Netherlands) has built the largest factory of the world for the production of bio-methanol. This factory produces 250 million liter methanol annually from natural gas, green gas (from the fermentation of sugar beet residues) and crude glycerol. Crude glycerol arises from the biodiesel production. As part of the Wood Spirit Project, Bio MCN constructs an additional plant that converts 750,000 tons of wood waste to 250 million liters of methanol. The waste wood is chipped and converted to biochar by means of torrefaction. Biochar is pulverized and converted to synthesis gas. This synthesis gas is converted to methanol by means of a chemical catalyst.

  16. Study on properties of mortar using silica fume and ground blast furnace slag. Silica fume oyobi koro slag funmatsu wo mochiita mortar no tokusei ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiiba, H; Honda, S; Araki, A [Fukuoka University, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1992-09-01

    The effect of silica fume and ground blast furnace slag in concrete on the content of superplasticizer, and dynamic properties of hardened mortar with such admixtures were studied experimentally. Although the dependence of a flow value on the superplasticizer was dominated by kinds of superplasticizers, blast furnace slag enhanced the flow value resulting in a high fluidity. Adsorption of superplasticizers onto admixtures was dependent on kinds of superplasticizers, and adsorption onto blast furnace slag was 1.3-2 times that onto normal Portland cement (NPC). The compressive strength of mortar increased by mixing admixtures, while the bending strength was enhanced only by mixing silica fume. Mixing mortar was lower in dynamic elastic modulus than NPC mortar at the same compressive strength, and the velocity of supersonic wave in mortar was scarcely affected by mixing. 11 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Effects of asphalt fume condensate exposure on acute pulmonary responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.Y.C.; Barger, M.W.; Castranova, V. [Health Effects Lab. Div., National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kriech, A.J. [Heritage Research Group, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2000-10-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the effects of in vitro exposure to paving asphalt fume condensate (AFC) on alveolar macrophage (AM) functions and to monitor acute pulmonary responses to in vivo AFC exposure in rats. Methods: For in vitro studies, rat primary AM cultures were incubated with various concentrations of AFC for 24 h at 37 C. AM-conditioned medium was collected and assayed for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as a marker of cytotoxicity. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) production were assayed in AM-conditioned medium to monitor AM function. The effect of AFC on chemiluminescence (CL) generated by resting AM or AM in response to zymosan or PMA stimulation was also determined as a marker of AM activity. For in vivo studies, rats received either (1) a single intratracheal (IT) instillation of saline, or 0.1 mg or 0.5 mg AFC and were killed 1 or 3 days later; or (2) IT instillation of saline, or 0.1, 0.5, or 2 mg AFC for three consecutive days and were killed the following day. Differential counts of cells harvested by bronchoalveolar lavage were measured to monitor inflammation. Acellular LDH and protein content in the first lavage fluid were measured to monitor damage. CL generation, TNF-{alpha} and IL-1 production by AM were assayed to monitor AM function. Results: In vitro AFC exposure at <200 {mu}g/ml did not induce cytotoxicity, oxidant generation, or IL-1 production by AM, but it did cause a small but significant increase in TNF-{alpha} release from AM. In vitro exposure of AM to AFC resulted in a significant decline of CL in response to zymosan or PMA stimulation. The in vivo studies showed that AFC exposure did not induce significant neutrophil infiltration or alter LDH or protein content in acellular lavage samples. Macrophages obtained from AFC-exposed rats did not show significant differences in oxidant production or cytokine secretion at rest or in response to LPS in comparison with control

  18. Effect of Silica fume and superplasticizer on steel-concrete bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, M. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the influence of silica fume and super plasticizer on bond strength. The study included tests of fifty short length pull-out specimens in five series. The effect of silica fume and super plasticizer on bond strength was evaluated separately by tests of specimens made of concretes with similar strengths but different admixtures. Test results showed that the addition of silica fume in the concrete mixture had not a negative effect on bond strength. Also, there was not a considerable decrease in bond strength of specimens made of concrete with super plasticizer. Comparing the measured bond strengths normalized with respect to the square root of the concrete compressive strength, it was seen that the normalized bond strength increased with the concrete strength. this result agrees with the model previously proposed by the author for local bond strength. For the specimens made of high strength concrete including silica fume and super plasticizer, the normalized bond strength did not increase with the concrete strength

  19. Effect of temperature on physical and mechanical properties of concrete containing silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saad, M.; Hanna, G.B.; Abo-El-Enein, S.A.; Kotkata, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Heat-resistant materials are usually used for structural purposes. The need for such building materials is particularly important in the chemical and metallurgical industries and for the thermal shieldings of nuclear power plants. Thus the effect of high temperatures on physical and mechanical properties of concrete was investigated. In this study ordinary Portland cement has been partially replaced by ratios of silica fume. The heat treatment temperature varied from 100 to 600 C by increments of 100 C for three hours without any load. Concrete specimens were treated at each temperature level. The specimens were heated under the same condition for each temperature level. Comparison between physical and mechanical properties during heat treatment were investigated. All specimens were moist-cured for 28 days after casting. Tests were carried out on specimens cooled slowly to room temperature after heating. Results of this investigation indicated that the replacement of ordinary Portland cement by 10% silica fume by weight improved the compressive strength by about 64.6%, but replacement of ordinary Portland cement by silica fume by ratios 20 and 30% improved the compressive strength by only 28% at 600 C. This could be attributed to the additional tobermorite gel (CSH phase) which formed due to the reaction of silica fume with Ca(OH) 2

  20. Effect Of Inhalation Exposure To Kerosene And Petrol-Fumes On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in total body weight, some anaemia-diagnostic indices (haematocrit or packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb) and total serum protein) were determined in rats (Wistar albino strain) after 2 weeks of 4 hours daily inhalation exposure to ungraded concentrations of kerosene and petrol fumes. The results ...

  1. Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Huss, Anke; Kromhout, Hans

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex

  2. Exposure of welders to fumes, Cr, Ni, Cu and gases in Dutch industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, J.F. van der

    1985-01-01

    The exposure of welders in Dutch industries to total particulate, chromium, nickel and copper fume during the welding of unalloyed, stainless and high alloyed steels has been investigated. The exposure to the gases NO2, NO and ozone is also discussed. The results are presented in tables and graphs.

  3. Blunted behavioral and c Fos responses to acidic fumes in the African naked mole-rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVinka, Pamela Colleen; Park, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Acidosis in the skin triggers activation of pain pathways and behaviors indicative of pain in vertebrates. The exception is the naked mole-rat, the only known vertebrate to show physiological and behavioral insensitivity to acid pain in the skin. The goal of the present study was to determine behavioral and physiological responses of this species to airborne acidic fumes, which would be expected to affect the trigeminal pain pathway in other species. Behaviorally, naked mole-rats did not avoid fumes from moderately high concentrations of acetic acid (10 and 20%), and c Fos labeling showed no increase in activity in the trigeminal nuclei and nucleus tractus solitarius. In contrast, these concentrations triggered behavioral aversion and increased Fos activity in other laboratory rodents. For a very high concentration of acetic acid (50%), naked mole-rats showed significant avoidance behavior and increased Fos labeling in the nucleus tractus solitarius caudal region, which receives vagal chemosensory information. However, there was no increase in trigeminal labeling, and in fact, activity significantly decreased. This pattern is opposite of that associated with another irritant, ammonia fumes, which elicited an increase in trigeminal but not nucleus tractus solitarius Fos labeling, and no behavioral avoidance. Behavioral avoidance of acidic fumes, but no increased labeling in the trigeminal pain nucleus is consistent with the notion of adaptations to blunt acid pain, which would be advantageous for naked mole-rats as they normally live under chronically high levels of acidosis-inducing CO(2).

  4. Blunted behavioral and c Fos responses to acidic fumes in the African naked mole-rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Colleen LaVinka

    Full Text Available Acidosis in the skin triggers activation of pain pathways and behaviors indicative of pain in vertebrates. The exception is the naked mole-rat, the only known vertebrate to show physiological and behavioral insensitivity to acid pain in the skin. The goal of the present study was to determine behavioral and physiological responses of this species to airborne acidic fumes, which would be expected to affect the trigeminal pain pathway in other species. Behaviorally, naked mole-rats did not avoid fumes from moderately high concentrations of acetic acid (10 and 20%, and c Fos labeling showed no increase in activity in the trigeminal nuclei and nucleus tractus solitarius. In contrast, these concentrations triggered behavioral aversion and increased Fos activity in other laboratory rodents. For a very high concentration of acetic acid (50%, naked mole-rats showed significant avoidance behavior and increased Fos labeling in the nucleus tractus solitarius caudal region, which receives vagal chemosensory information. However, there was no increase in trigeminal labeling, and in fact, activity significantly decreased. This pattern is opposite of that associated with another irritant, ammonia fumes, which elicited an increase in trigeminal but not nucleus tractus solitarius Fos labeling, and no behavioral avoidance. Behavioral avoidance of acidic fumes, but no increased labeling in the trigeminal pain nucleus is consistent with the notion of adaptations to blunt acid pain, which would be advantageous for naked mole-rats as they normally live under chronically high levels of acidosis-inducing CO(2.

  5. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman; Raashid, M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Effect of silica fume on compressive strength of oil-polluted concrete in different marine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabadi, Hamid; Sayareh, Sina; Sarkardeh, Hamed

    2017-12-01

    In the present research, effect of silica fume as an additive and oil polluted sands as aggregates on compressive strength of concrete were investigated experimentally. The amount of oil in the designed mixtures was assumed to be constant and equal to 2% of the sand weight. Silica fume accounting for 10%, 15% and 20% of the weight is added to the designed mixture. After preparation and curing, concrete specimens were placed into the three different conditions: fresh, brackish and saltwater environments (submerged in fresh water, alternation of exposed in air & submerged in sea water and submerged in sea water). The result of compressive strength tests shows that the compressive strength of the specimens consisting of silica fume increases significantly in comparison with the control specimens in all three environments. The compressive strength of the concrete with 15% silica fume content was about 30% to 50% higher than that of control specimens in all tested environments under the condition of using polluted aggregates in the designed mixture.

  7. Effect of gasoline fumes on reproductive function in male albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owagboriaye, Folarin O; Dedeke, Gabriel A; Ashidi, Joseph S; Aladesida, Adeyinka A; Olooto, Wasiu E

    2018-02-01

    The increase in the frequency of exposure to gasoline fumes and the growing incidence of infertility among humans has been a major concern and subject of discussion over the years in Nigeria. We therefore present the reproductive effect of gasoline fumes on inhalation exposure in 40 male albino rats. The rats were randomized into five experimental treatments (T) with eight rats per treatment. T1 (control) was exposed to distilled water while T2, T3, T4, and T5 were exposed to gasoline fumes in exposure chambers for 1, 3, 5, and 9 h daily respectively for 12 weeks. Serum level of testosterone, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, oxidative stress markers in the testicular tissue, epididymal sperm health assessment, and testicular histopathology of the rats were used as a diagnostic marker of reproductive dysfunction. Significant (p percentage motility in the exposed rats were observed. Significant (p < 0.05) increased in abnormal sperm cells characterized by damaged head, bent tail, damaged tail, and without head were also observed in the exposed rats. Histopathologically, severe degenerative testicular architectural lesions characterized by alterations in all the generations of sperm cells and reduction of interstitial cells were seen in the exposed rats. Gasoline fume is thus said to interfere with spermatogenesis and impair fertility in male gonad.

  8. The use of high expansion foam in the control of sodium and other fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, G.W.

    1971-01-01

    The uses of high expansion air foam for removing sodium fume and airborne radioactivity is discussed. Experiments are described which indicate that a high rate of removal of air contamination can be expected by encapsulation in a high expansion foam of low stability. (author)

  9. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, A.A.; Garwan, M.A.; Maslehuddin, M.; Nagadi, M.M.; Al-Amoudi, O.S.B.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman,; Raashid, M.

    2009-01-01

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  10. PEMANFAATAN LIMBAH SERBUK MARMER PADA BETON SEBAGAI BAHAN PENGGANTI SEBAGIAN SEMEN DENGAN VARIASI PENGGUNAAN SILICA FUME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agil Fitri Handayani

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Utilization of Marble Powder Waste in Concrete Ma­­­­­­­­terials as a Partial Material Substitution of Cement  with the Variation Use of Silica Fume. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of marble powder and silica fume on the mechanical pro­per­ties of concrete. This study used an experimental design using 16 group of testing materials with variety types of mixtures between marble powder and silica fume 0.00; 5.00; 10.00; and 15.00%. The wa­ter-cement ratio was 0.50 and a low dosage of superplasticizer, which was 0.50%. The behavior of fresh concrete were calculated and the mechanical properties of concrete were tested on con­crete age of 28 days. The results showed the marble powder main com­position was Silicon Dioxide (SiO2 17.63% and Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3 2.73%. Mar­ble powder was more appropriate to be used as fillers than to be used as a partial substitution of ce­ment. The optimum mechanical properties of concrete was produced by the mixtures of 5.00% mar­ble powder  and 6.22% silica fume which resulted in compressive strength of 29.04 MPa.   Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh peng­gunaan ser­buk marmer dan silica fume terhadap sifat mekanik beton. Penelitian ini meng­gu­na­kan desain eksperimen dengan 16 kelompok benda uji dengan variasi ser­buk marmer dan silica fume 0,00; 5,00; 10,00; dan 15,00%. Faktor air semen di­gu­nakan 0,50 dan superplasticizer dengan dosis rendah 0,50%. Perilaku beton segar di­perhitungkan dan sifat mekanik beton diuji pada umur beton 28 hari. Hasil analisis me­nunjukkan kom­posisi utama serbuk marmer adalah Silikon Dioksida (SiO2 17,63% dan Kalsium Kar­bonat (CaCO3 2,73%. Serbuk marmer lebih tepat digunakan se­bagai bahan pe­ng­isi atau filler dari pada sebagai pengganti semen. Sifat mekanik be­ton optimum di­ha­sil­kan pada campuran serbuk marmer 5,00% dan silica fume 6,22% dengan kuat tekan be­ton yang dihasilkan  mencapai 29

  11. Welding fumes from stainless steel gas metal arc processes contain multiple manganese chemical species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean

    2010-05-01

    Fumes from a group of gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes used on stainless steel were generated using three different metal transfer modes and four different shield gases. The objective was to identify and measure manganese (Mn) species in the fumes, and identify processes that are minimal generators of Mn species. The robotic welding system was operated in short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO2 and He/Ar), axial spray (AXS) mode (Ar/O2 and Ar/CO2), and pulsed axial-spray (PAXS) mode (Ar/O2). The fumes were analyzed for Mn by a sequential extraction process followed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, and by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total elemental Mn, iron (Fe), chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) were separately measured after aqua regia digestion and ICP-AES analysis. Soluble Mn2+, Fe2+, Fe3+, and Ni2+ in a simple biological buffer (phosphate-buffered saline) were determined at pH 7.2 and 5.0 after 2 h incubation at 37 C by ion chromatography. Results indicate that Mn was present in soluble form, acid-soluble form, and acid-soluble form after reduction by hydroxylamine, which represents soluble Mn0 and Mn2+ compounds, other Mn2+ compounds, and (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds, respectively. The dominant fraction was the acid-soluble Mn2+ fraction, but results varied with the process and shield gas. Soluble Mn mass percent in the fume ranged from 0.2 to 0.9%, acid-soluble Mn2+ compounds ranged from 2.6 to 9.3%, and acid plus reducing agent-soluble (Mn3+ and Mn4+) compounds ranged from 0.6 to 5.1%. Total Mn composition ranged from 7 to 15%. XRD results showed fumes had a crystalline content of 90-99% Fe3O4, and showed evidence of multiple Mn oxides, but overlaps and weak signals limited identification. Small amounts of the Mn2+ in the fume (welding process. Mn generation rates for the fractions were tabulated, and the influence of ozone is discussed. The conclusions are that exposures to welding fumes include multiple Mn species, both

  12. Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of welding fume derived particles generated from real time welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cali; Demokritou, Philip; Shafer, Martin; Christiani, David

    2013-01-01

    Welding fume particles have been well studied in the past; however, most studies have examined welding fumes generated from machine models rather than actual exposures. Furthermore, the link between physicochemical and toxicological properties of welding fume particles has not been well understood. This study aims to investigate the physicochemical properties of particles derived during real time welding processes generated during actual welding processes and to assess the particle size specific toxicological properties. A compact cascade impactor (Harvard CCI) was stationed within the welding booth to sample particles by size. Size fractionated particles were extracted and used for both off-line physicochemical analysis and in vitro cellular toxicological characterization. Each size fraction was analyzed for ions, elemental compositions, and mass concentration. Furthermore, real time optical particle monitors (DustTrak™, TSI Inc., Shoreview, Minn.) were used in the same welding booth to collect real time PM2.5 particle number concentration data. The sampled particles were extracted from the polyurethane foam (PUF) impaction substrates using a previously developed and validated protocol, and used in a cellular assay to assess oxidative stress. By mass, welding aerosols were found to be in coarse (PM 2.5–10), and fine (PM 0.1–2.5) size ranges. Most of the water soluble (WS) metals presented higher concentrations in the coarse size range with some exceptions such as sodium, which presented elevated concentration in the PM 0.1 size range. In vitro data showed size specific dependency, with the fine and ultrafine size ranges having the highest reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity. Additionally, this study suggests a possible correlation between welders' experience, the welding procedure and equipment used and particles generated from welding fumes. Mass concentrations and total metal and water soluble metal concentrations of welding fume particles may be

  13. Alterations in cardiomyocyte function after pulmonary treatment with stainless steel welding fume in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popstojanov, Risto; Antonini, James M; Salmen, Rebecca; Ye, Morgan; Zheng, Wen; Castranova, Vincent; Fekedulegn, Desta B; Kan, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Welding fume is composed of a complex of different metal particulates. Pulmonary exposure to different welding fumes may exert a negative impact on cardiac function, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To explore the effect of welding fumes on cardiac function, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to 2 mg/rat of manual metal arc hard surfacing welding fume (MMA-HS) once per week for 7 wk. Control rats received saline. Cardiomyocytes were isolated enzymatically at d 1 and 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) transients (fluorescence ratio) were measured on the stage of an inverted phase-contrast microscope using a myocyte calcium imaging/cell length system. Phosphorylation levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were determined by Western blot. The levels of nonspecific inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) and proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) in serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Contraction of isolated cardiomyocytes was significantly reduced at d 1 and d 7 postexposure. Intracellular calcium levels were decreased in response to extracellular calcium stimulation at d 7 postexposure. Changes of intracellular calcium levels after isoprenaline hydrochloride (ISO) stimulation were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Phosphorylation levels of cTnI in the left ventricle were significantly lower at d 1 postexposure. The serum levels of CRP were not markedly different between groups at either time point. Serum levels of IL-6 were not detectable in both groups. Cardiomyocyte alterations observed after welding fume treatment were mainly due to alterations in intracellular calcium handling and phosphorylation levels of cTnI.

  14. Exposure to Cooking Fumes and Acute Reversible Decrement in Lung Functional Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Neghab

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Being exposed to cooking fumes, kitchen workers are occupationally at risk of multiple respiratory hazards. No conclusive evidence exists as to whether occupational exposure to these fumes is associated with acute and chronic pulmonary effects and symptoms of respiratory diseases. Objective: To quantify the exposure levels and evaluate possible chronic and acute pulmonary effects associated with exposure to cooking fumes. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 60 kitchen workers exposed to cooking fumes and 60 unexposed employees were investigated. The prevalence of respiratory symptoms among these groups was determined through completion of a standard questionnaire. Pulmonary function parameters were also measured before and after participants' work shift. Moreover, air samples were collected and analyzed to quantify their aldehyde, particle, and volatile organic contents. Results: The mean airborne concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein was 0.45 (SD 0.41, 0.13 (0.1, and 1.56 (0.41 mg/m3, respectively. The mean atmospheric concentrations of PM1, PM2.5, PM7, PM10, and total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs was 3.31 (2.6, 12.21 (5.9, 44.16 (16.6, 57 (21.55 μg/m3, and 1.31 (1.11 mg/m3, respectively. All respiratory symptoms were significantly (p<0.05 more prevalent in exposed group. No significant difference was noted between the pre-shift mean of spirometry parameters of exposed and unexposed group. However, exposed workers showed cross-shift decrease in most spirometry parameters, significantly lower than the pre-shift values and those of the comparison group. Conclusion: Exposure to cooking fumes is associated with a significant increase in the prevalence of respiratory symptoms as well as acute reversible decrease in lung functional capacity.

  15. Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Su-Jung; Ada, Earl; Isaacs, Jacqueline A.; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Manual handling of nanoparticles is a fundamental task of most nanomaterial research; such handling may expose workers to ultrafine or nanoparticles. Recent studies confirm that exposures to ultrafine or nanoparticles produce adverse inflammatory responses in rodent lungs and such particles may translocate to other areas of the body, including the brain. An important method for protecting workers handling nanoparticles from exposure to airborne nanoparticles is the laboratory fume hood. Such hoods rely on the proper face velocity for optimum performance. In addition, several other hood design and operating factors can affect worker exposure. Handling experiments were performed to measure airborne particle concentration while handling nanoparticles in three fume hoods located in different buildings under a range of operating conditions. Nanoalumina and nanosilver were selected to perform handling experiments in the fume hoods. Air samples were also collected on polycarbonate membrane filters and particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Handling tasks included transferring particles from beaker to beaker by spatula and by pouring. Measurement locations were the room background, the researcher's breathing zone and upstream and downstream from the handling location. Variable factors studied included hood design, transfer method, face velocity/sash location and material types. Airborne particle concentrations measured at breathing zone locations were analyzed to characterize exposure level. Statistics were used to test the correlation between data. The test results found that the handling of dry powders consisting of nano-sized particles inside laboratory fume hoods can result in a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the fume hood into the laboratory environment and the researcher's breathing zone. Many variables were found to affect the extent of particle release including hood design, hood operation (sash height, face velocity

  16. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  17. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm−3, with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training. PMID:26464505

  18. Global metabolomic profiling reveals an association of metal fume exposure and plasma unsaturated fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyue Wei

    Full Text Available Welding-associated air pollutants negatively affect the health of exposed workers; however, their molecular mechanisms in causing disease remain largely unclear. Few studies have systematically investigated the systemic toxic effects of welding fumes on humans.To explore the effects of welding fumes on the plasma metabolome, and to identify biomarkers for risk assessment of welding fume exposure.The two-stage, self-controlled exploratory study included 11 boilermakers from a 2011 discovery panel and 8 boilermakers from a 2012 validation panel. Plasma samples were collected pre- and post-welding fume exposure and analyzed by chromatography/mass spectrometry.Eicosapentaenoic or docosapentaenoic acid metabolic changes post-welding were significantly associated with particulate (PM2.5 exposure (p<0.05. The combined analysis by linear mixed-effects model showed that exposure was associated with a statistically significant decline in metabolite change of eicosapentaenoic acid [β(95% CI = -0.013(-0.022 ≈ -0.004; p = 0.005], docosapentaenoic acid n3 [β(95% CI = -0.010(-0.018 ≈ -0.002; p = 0.017], and docosapentaenoic acid n6 [β(95% CI = -0.007(-0.013 ≈ -0.001; p = 0.021]. Pathway analysis identified an association of the unsaturated fatty acid pathway with exposure (p Study-2011 = 0.025; p Study-2012 = 0.021; p Combined = 0.009. The functional network built by these fatty acids and their interactive genes contained significant enrichment of genes associated with various diseases, including neoplasms, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid metabolism disorders.High-dose exposure of metal welding fumes decreases unsaturated fatty acids with an exposure-response relationship. This alteration in fatty acids is a potential biological mediator and biomarker for exposure-related health disorders.

  19. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, D. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  20. Crosslinkable fumed silica-based nanocomposite electrolytes for rechargeable lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yangxing; Yerian, Jeffrey A.; Khan, Saad A.; Fedkiw, Peter S. [Department of Chemical & amp; Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7905 (United States)

    2006-10-27

    Electrochemical and rheological properties are reported of composite polymer electrolytes (CPEs) consisting of dual-functionalized fumed silica with methacrylate and octyl groups+low-molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether (PEGdm)+lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI, lithium imide)+butyl methacrylate (BMA). The role of butyl methacrylate, which aids in formation of a crosslinked network by tethering adjacent fumed silica particles, on rheology and electrochemistry is examined together with the effects of fumed silica surface group, fumed silica weight percent, salt concentration, and solvent molecular weight. Chemical crosslinking of the fumed silica with 20% BMA shows a substantial increase in the elastic modulus of the system and a transition from a liquid-like/flocculated state to an elastic network. In contrast, no change in lithium transference number and only a modest decrease (factor of 2) on conductivity of the CPE are observed, indicating that a crosslinked silica network has minimal effect on the mechanism of ionic transport. These trends suggest that the chemical crosslinks occur on a microscopic scale, as opposed to a molecular scale, between adjacent silica particles and therefore do not impede the segmental mobility of the PEGdm. The relative proportion of the methacrylate and octyl groups on the silica surface displays a nominal effect on both rheology and conductivity following crosslinking although the pre-cure rheology is a function of the surface groups. Chemical crosslinked nanocomposite polymer electrolytes offer significant higher elastic modulus and yield stress than the physical nanocomposite counterpart with a small/negligible penalty of transport properties. The crosslinked CPEs exhibit good interfacial stability with lithium metal at open circuit, however, they perform poorly in cycling of lithium-lithium cells. (author)

  1. Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Su-Jung, E-mail: candace.umass@gmail.com; Ada, Earl [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States); Isaacs, Jacqueline A. [Northeastern University, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States); Ellenbecker, Michael J. [University of Massachusetts Lowell, NSF Center for High-rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN) (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Manual handling of nanoparticles is a fundamental task of most nanomaterial research; such handling may expose workers to ultrafine or nanoparticles. Recent studies confirm that exposures to ultrafine or nanoparticles produce adverse inflammatory responses in rodent lungs and such particles may translocate to other areas of the body, including the brain. An important method for protecting workers handling nanoparticles from exposure to airborne nanoparticles is the laboratory fume hood. Such hoods rely on the proper face velocity for optimum performance. In addition, several other hood design and operating factors can affect worker exposure. Handling experiments were performed to measure airborne particle concentration while handling nanoparticles in three fume hoods located in different buildings under a range of operating conditions. Nanoalumina and nanosilver were selected to perform handling experiments in the fume hoods. Air samples were also collected on polycarbonate membrane filters and particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Handling tasks included transferring particles from beaker to beaker by spatula and by pouring. Measurement locations were the room background, the researcher's breathing zone and upstream and downstream from the handling location. Variable factors studied included hood design, transfer method, face velocity/sash location and material types. Airborne particle concentrations measured at breathing zone locations were analyzed to characterize exposure level. Statistics were used to test the correlation between data. The test results found that the handling of dry powders consisting of nano-sized particles inside laboratory fume hoods can result in a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the fume hood into the laboratory environment and the researcher's breathing zone. Many variables were found to affect the extent of particle release including hood design, hood operation (sash height, face

  2. The electric motor handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, R.W.; Feltham, P. (eds.)

    2004-05-01

    This handbook outlines the important role that electric motors play in modern society. It covers the field of motor applications from various motor types to their use and repair. It also presents practical applications of electric motors and methods on motor efficiency. More than half of all electricity generated, and 75 per cent of all industrial electricity consumption is consumed by electric motors. Electrical personnel must be aware of all factors involved in electric motors in order to choose and apply the appropriate size of electric motor. These factors include efficiency, sizing and proper application. The efficient use and maximum life expectancy of electric motors depends on proper motor protection, control and maintenance. This handbook includes articles from leading experts on electric motors in modern electrical systems. The content includes: design considerations; proper electric motor sizing techniques; optimal electric motor application; electric motor protection technology; electric motor control principles; electric motor maintenance and troubleshooting; induction electric motors; electric motor bearing currents; electric motor bearing lubrication; electromagnetism; electric motor enclosures; electric motor testing; electric motor repair; DC electric motor; electric motor starters; electric motor brushes; industrial electric motors; electric motor diagrams; AC electric motors; electric motor wiring; electric motor service; electric motor rewinding; electric motor winding; diagram of electric motor wiring; electric motor kit; and, troubleshooting electric motors. A directory of motor manufacturers and suppliers was also included. refs., tabs., figs.

  3. Response of the mouse lung transcriptome to welding fume: effects of stainless and mild steel fumes on lung gene expression in A/J and C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonini James M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debate exists as to whether welding fume is carcinogenic, but epidemiological evidence suggests that welders are an at risk population for the development of lung cancer. Recently, we found that exposure to welding fume caused an acutely greater and prolonged lung inflammatory response in lung tumor susceptible A/J versus resistant C57BL/6J (B6 mice and a trend for increased tumor incidence after stainless steel (SS fume exposure. Here, our objective was to examine potential strain-dependent differences in the regulation and resolution of the lung inflammatory response induced by carcinogenic (Cr and Ni abundant or non-carcinogenic (iron abundant metal-containing welding fumes at the transcriptome level. Methods Mice were exposed four times by pharyngeal aspiration to 5 mg/kg iron abundant gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS, Cr and Ni abundant GMA-SS fume or vehicle and were euthanized 4 and 16 weeks after the last exposure. Whole lung microarray using Illumina Mouse Ref-8 expression beadchips was done. Results Overall, we found that tumor susceptibility was associated with a more marked transcriptional response to both GMA-MS and -SS welding fumes. Also, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that gene regulation and expression in the top molecular networks differed between the strains at both time points post-exposure. Interestingly, a common finding between the strains was that GMA-MS fume exposure altered behavioral gene networks. In contrast, GMA-SS fume exposure chronically upregulated chemotactic and immunomodulatory genes such as CCL3, CCL4, CXCL2, and MMP12 in the A/J strain. In the GMA-SS-exposed B6 mouse, genes that initially downregulated cellular movement, hematological system development/function and immune response were involved at both time points post-exposure. However, at 16 weeks, a transcriptional switch to an upregulation for neutrophil chemotactic genes was found and included genes such as S100A8, S100A9 and

  4. Increase in oxidative stress levels following welding fume inhalation: a controlled human exposure study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Suarez, Guillaume; Wild, Pascal; Danuser, Brigitta; Riediker, Michael

    2016-06-10

    Tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. It has been shown to generate a large majority of particles at the nanoscale and to have low mass emission rates when compared to other types of welding. Despite evidence that TIG fume particles may produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), limited data is available for the time course changes of particle-associated oxidative stress in exposed TIG welders. Twenty non-smoking male welding apprentices were exposed to TIG welding fumes for 60 min under controlled, well-ventilated settings. Exhaled breathe condensate (EBC), blood and urine were collected before exposure, immediately after exposure, 1 h and 3 h post exposure. Volunteers participated in a control day to account for oxidative stress fluctuations due to circadian rhythm. Biological liquids were assessed for total reducing capacity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA), and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) concentrations at each time point. A linear mixed model was used to assess within day and between day differences. Significant increases in the measured biomarkers were found at 3 h post exposure. At 3 h post exposure, we found a 24 % increase in plasma-H2O2 concentrations ([95%CI: 4 % to 46 %], p = 0.01); a 91 % increase in urinary-H2O2 ([2 % to 258 %], p = 0.04); a 14 % increase in plasma-8-OHdG ([0 % to 31 %], p = 0.049); and a 45 % increase in urinary-8-OHdG ([3 % to 105 %], p = 0.03). Doubling particle number concentration (PNC) exposure was associated with a 22 % increase of plasma-8-OHdG at 3 h post exposure (p = 0.01). A 60-min exposure to TIG welding fume in a controlled, well-ventilated setting induced acute oxidative stress at 3 h post exposure in healthy, non-smoking apprentice welders not chronically exposed to welding fumes. As mass concentration of TIG welding fume particles is very low when compared to other types of welding, it is

  5. The Study Of Histopathological Effects Of Welding Fumes On Spermatogenesis In Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab M R

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fumes generated during electric welding are one of air pollutants of working place in industrial companies, which can cause some clinical signs and diseases in worker, including mucosal irritation, changing of semen quality and cancer. Chronic exposure of workers with these fumes can cause reduce sperm motility and forward penetration and decrease in normal sperm count. Although a lot of researches were done in this field up to now, there is little information about histopathological effects of these fumes on germinal epithelium. The aim of this study was to identify structural changes of germinal epithelium in Rat as an experimental model after exposure to fumes of electric welding in exposure chamber. Material and Methods: A total number of 60 Sprague Dawley Rats were chosen and divided into experimental (40 and control (20 groups. Each of groups was subdivided into 2, 4, 6 and 8-week subgroups. The number of Rat in each subgroup of experimental and control group was 10 and 5 respectively. Animals were housed in standard situation. After adaptation experimental group were exposed to fumes of electric welding (AMA 2000 electrode, 100 Ampere, 0.1 cm/s speed of electrode welding for 2 hour/day and 5 day/week. The rate of air turn over in exposure chamber was fixed to 12-15/hour. The amount of O3, CO, CO2, NO + NO2 and particulate matter were measured by Galtec detectors and Cellulose acetate filter respectively. According to time table animals were killed and specimens from testis were taken and fixed in formaline buffer solution and processed routinely. Sections with 5-7 micrometer in thickness were stained by H-E, PAS, PNA and Alcian blue pH=2.5. The thickness of germinal epithelium was measured and data were analyzed by Kruskall Wallis test. Results: The results of this study showed a few quantitative and qualitative changes in germinal epithelium. Vasodilatation of vessels in tunica albuginea and interstitial tissue, decreasing of

  6. Properties of silica fume procured from natural diatomite and its usage in the production of vacuum insulation panels

    OpenAIRE

    V.P. Selyaev; V.A. Neverov; O.G. Mashtaev; A.V. Kolotushkin

    2013-01-01

    The article shows the results of the research of silica fume particles procured from diatomite from Atemar deposit by means of separating silicic acid from colloidal dissolved state into the sediment. The objective of the work was to define thermal-physical and structural characteristics of the silica fume. The research included IR-spectrometry, granulometry, thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray structural analysis, optical microscopy, and small angle X-Ray scattering. As a result of the resea...

  7. High Strength Lightweight Concrete Made with Ternary Mixtures of Cement-Fly Ash-Silica Fume and Scoria as Aggregate

    OpenAIRE

    YAŞAR, Ergül; ATIŞ, Cengiz Duran; KILIÇ, Alaettin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents part of the results of an ongoing laboratory study carried out to design a structural lightweight high strength concrete (SLWHSC) made with and without ternary mixtures of cement-fly ash-silica fume. In the mixtures, lightweight basaltic-pumice (scoria) aggregate was used. A concrete mixture made with lightweight scoria, and another lightweight scoria concrete mixture incorporating 20% fly ash and 10% silica fume as a cement replacement, were prepared. Two normal...

  8. Personal exposure to metal fume, NO2, and O3 among production welders and non-welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonover, Todd; Conroy, Lorraine; Lacey, Steven; Plavka, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize personal exposures to welding-related metals and gases for production welders and non-welders in a large manufacturing facility. Welding fume metals and irritant gases nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) and ozone (O(3)) were sampled for thirty-eight workers. Personal exposure air samples for welding fume metals were collected on 37 mm open face cassettes and nitrogen dioxide and ozone exposure samples were collected with diffusive passive samplers. Samples were analyzed for metals using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) and welding fume metal exposure concentrations were defined as the sum of welding-related metals mass per volume of air sampled. Welding fume metal exposures were highly variable among similar types of welding while NO(2) and O(3) exposure were less variable. Welding fume metal exposures were significantly higher 474 μg/m(3) for welders than non-welders 60 μg/m(3) (p=0.001). Welders were exposed to higher concentrations of NO(2) and O(3) than non-welders but the differences were not statistically significant. Welding fume metal exposure concentrations for welders performing gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) were higher than welders performing gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW). Non-welders experienced exposures similar to GTAW welders despite a curtain wall barrier separating welding and non-welding work areas.

  9. Motor homopolar

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Muñoz, Agustín

    2007-01-01

    Mostramos la construcción de un modelo de motor homopolar, uno de los más antiguos tipos de motores eléctricos. Se caracterizan porque el campo magnético del imán mantiene siempre la misma polaridad (de ahí su nombre, del griego homos, igual), de modo que, cuando una corriente eléctrica atraviesa el campo magnético, aparece una fuerza que hace girar los elementos no fijados mecánicamente. En el sencillísimo motor homopolar colgado (Schlichting y Ucke 2004), el imán puede girar ...

  10. Controversial effects of fumed silica on the curing and thermomechanical properties of epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fumed silica on the curing of a trimethylolpropane epoxy resin was investigated by thermal analysis methods like Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA. The fumed silica used here is a by-product of the silicon and ferrosilicon industry, consisting of micro and nanosized particles. Both the curing reaction and the properties of the obtained composites were affected by the filler content. Different trends were observed for filler contents above and below the 30 wt%. Up to 30 wt%, the behaviour can be explained as a predominantly agglomeration effect. For 30 wt% and higher filler contents, single particles seem to play a more important role.

  11. Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and fetal growth in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie N; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    in their residence during pregnancy. The mothers were also asked about smoking habits and alcohol consumption during pregnancy, pre-pregnancy weight, height, parity and occupation. Information on birth weight and gestational age was obtained from national registers. We found that 45% of the mothers had been exposed......Occupational exposure to organic solvents during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. Though organic solvents in the form of paint fumes are also found in the home environment, no studies have investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. We studied...... associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and fetal growth within the Danish National Birth Cohort which consecutively recruited pregnant women from 1996 to 2002 from all over Denmark. Around the 30th pregnancy week, 19,000 mothers were interviewed about use of paint...

  12. Mass spectrometric investigation of synthetic glycoside of muramyl dipeptide immobilized on fumed silica surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulik, Tetiana V., E-mail: tanyakulyk@gala.net [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 17 Generala Naumova Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Azizova, Liana R., E-mail: liana_azizova@ukr.net [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 17 Generala Naumova Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Palyanytsya, Borys B. [O.O. Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 17 Generala Naumova Str., Kyiv 03164 (Ukraine); Zemlyakov, Alexander E.; Tsikalova, Victoria N. [Vernadsky Tauric National University, pr. Akademika Vernadskogo 4, Simferopol, 95007 (Ukraine)

    2010-05-25

    N-Acetylmuramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine or muramyl dipeptide is a cleavage product of peptidoglycan by lysozyme. This study explored the use of the temperature-programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPDMS) in analysis of glycoside of muramyl dipeptide: O-{l_brace}(4-tert-butylcyclohexyl)-2-acetamido-2, 3-dideoxy-{beta}-D-glucopyranoside-3-yl{r_brace}-D-lactoyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine (MDP) on the surface of fumed silica. Stages of pyrolysis of MDP in condensed state and on the silica surface have been determined. Three stages have been clear identified under pyrolysis of MDP on the silica surface. Kinetic parameters of thermal reactions on the fumed silica surface and in the condensed state have been calculated.

  13. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Titanium Ethanolate as a Possible Cause of Metal Fume Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ahmadimanesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational inhalation exposure to noxious agents is not uncommon. Herein, we present a 26-year-old male student who had accidental acute inhalation exposure to a large quantity of titanium ethanolate and hydrogen chloride in chemistry lab. He was referred to the emergency department of our hospital with low-grade fever, dyspnea, headache, fatigue and myalgia. After 24 hrs of symptomatic treatment (oxygen therapy and acetaminophen, the fever was subsided and the patient discharged home in a good clinical condition. The presented symptoms could be interpreted as a form of metal fume fever. It can therefore be concluded that organo-metallic compound of titanium metal may have the potential to produce metal fume fever in human.

  14. Upgrading offshore pipelines concrete coated by silica fume additive against aggressive mechanical laying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Abdou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies have been carried out to investigate the possibility of utilizing a broad range of micro-silica partial additions with cement in the production of concrete coating. This study investigated the strength properties and permeability of micro-silica concrete to achieve resistance toward concrete cracking and damage during laying. The chemical composition of micro-silica (silica fume was determined, and has been conducted on concrete mixes with additions of 3 up to 25% by weight of cement in concrete. Properties of hardened concrete such as compressive strength, flexural strength, and permeability have been assessed and analyzed. Cubic specimens and beams were produced and cured in a curing tank for 7 and 28 days. Testing results have shown that additions of silica fume to cement between 5% and 7%, which acts as a filler and cementations material, developed high flexural and compressive strength with reduction of permeability.

  15. Chloride accelerated test: influence of silica fume, water/binder ratio and concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pereira

    Full Text Available In developed countries like the UK, France, Italy and Germany, it is estimated that spending on maintenance and repair is practically the same as investment in new constructions. Therefore, this paper aims to study different ways of interfering in the corrosion kinetic using an accelerated corrosion test - CAIM, that simulates the chloride attack. The three variables are: concrete cover thickness, use of silica fume and the water/binder ratio. It was found, by analysis of variance of the weight loss of the steel bars and chloride content in the concrete cover thickness, there is significant influence of the three variables. Also, the results indicate that the addition of silica fume is the path to improve the corrosion protection of low water/binder ratio concretes (like 0.4 and elevation of the concrete cover thickness is the most effective solution to increase protection of high water/binder ratio concrete (above 0.5.

  16. Utilizing waste materials to enhance mechanical and durability characteristics of concrete incorporated with silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction and demolition wastes are increasing significantly due to augmented boom of modern construction. Although the partial cement replacement materials do promote the idea of sustainable construction, the use of construction and demolition waste can also be considered to be viable option to advance the sustainability in modern construction practices. This paper investigates the use of industrial waste materials namely marble dust and crushed bricks as replacement of natural fine aggregates along with the use of silica fume as a partial cement replacement on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. Partial replacement levels of waste materials were 10 and 20 percent by volume while the partial replacement level of silica fume was kept to 20 percent at all concrete samples. The results reported in this paper show that the use of marble dust as a replacement material to the natural fine aggregates resulted in an increase in the mechanical properties of concrete. However, the use of crushed bricks did not substantially contribute in the development of strength. Water permeability of concrete incorporated with both silica fume and waste materials (marble dust and crushed bricks decreased significantly. The decrease in water permeability of concrete was attributed to the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume with calcium hydroxide of cement and the filler effect of the waste materials of marble dust and crushed bricks. The use of waste materials also enhance the freeze and thaw resistance of concrete. Authors strongly suggest that the pozzolanic reaction and the development of the microstructure of the concrete through the use of waste materials are largely responsible from the advances in the durability of concrete.

  17. Performance of soft clay stabilized with sand columns treated by silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samueel Zeena

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In many road construction projects, if weak soil exists, then uncontrollable settlement and critical load carrying capacity are major difficult problems to the safety and serviceability of roads in these areas. Thus ground improvement is essential to achieve the required level of performance. The paper presents results of the tests of four categories. First category was performed on saturated soft bed of clay without any treatment, the second category shed light on the improvement achieved in loading carrying capacity and settlement as a result of reinforcing with conventional sand columns at area replacement ratio = 0.196. The third set investigates the bed reinforced by sand columns stabilized with dry silica fume at different percentages (3, 5 and 7% and the fourth set investigates the behavior of sand columns treated with slurry silica fume at two percentages (10 and 12%. All sand columns models were constructed at (R.D= 60%. Model tests were performed on bed of saturated soil prepared at undrained shear strength between 16-20 kPa for all models. For all cases, the model test was loaded gradually by stress increments up to failure. Stress deformation measurements are recorded and analyzed in terms of bearing improvement ratio and settlement reduction ratio. Optimum results were indicated from soil treated with sand columns stabilized with 7% dry silica fume at medium state reflecting the highest bearing improvement ratio (3.04 and the settlement reduction ratio (0.09 after 7 days curing. While soil treated with sand columns stabilized with 10% slurry silica fume provided higher bearing improvement ratio 3.13 with lower settlement reduction ratio of 0.57 after 7-days curing.

  18. Increased levels of oxidative DNA damage attributable to cooking-oil fumes exposure among cooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yuebin; Cheng, Jinquan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Zhang, Renli; Zhang, Zhunzhen; Shuai, Zhihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2009-07-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that cooks are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from cooking-oil fumes. However, Emission of PAH and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking oil fumes sources have not been investigated among cooks. To investigate the urinary excretion of a marker for oxidative DNA damage, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in different groups of cooks and different exposure groups, and to study the association between 8-OHdG and 1-hydroxypyrene(1-OHP), a biological marker for PAH exposure. Urine samples were collected from different groups of cooks (n = 86) and from unexposed controls (n = 36); all were male with similar age and smoking habits. The health status, occupational history, smoking, and alcohol consumption 24 h prior to sampling was estimated from questionnaires. The urine samples were frozen for later analyses of 8-OHdG and 1-OHP levels by high-performance liquid chromatography. Excretion in urine of 8-OHdG was similar for controls (mean 1.2micromol/mol creatinine, n = 36), and for those who had been in the kitchen with an exhaust-hood operating (mean 1.5micromol/mol creatinine, n = 45). Cooks exposed to cooking-oil fumes without exhaust-hood operation had significantly increased excretion of 8-OHdG (mean 2.3micromol/mol creatinine, n = 18), compared with controls. The urinary levels of ln 1-OHP and ln 8-OHdG were still significantly correlated in a multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that exposure to PAH or possibly other compounds in cooking-oil fumes may cause oxidative DNA damage.

  19. Upgrading offshore pipelines concrete coated by silica fume additive against aggressive mechanical laying

    OpenAIRE

    M.I. Abdou; Hesham Abuseda

    2016-01-01

    Studies have been carried out to investigate the possibility of utilizing a broad range of micro-silica partial additions with cement in the production of concrete coating. This study investigated the strength properties and permeability of micro-silica concrete to achieve resistance toward concrete cracking and damage during laying. The chemical composition of micro-silica (silica fume) was determined, and has been conducted on concrete mixes with additions of 3 up to 25% by weight of cement...

  20. A Review for Characterization of Silica Fume and Its Effects on Concrete Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Panjehpour; Abang Abdullah Abang Ali; Ramazan Demirboga

    2011-01-01

    Mineral additions which are also known as mineral admixtures have been used in Portland cement for many years. There are two types of additions which are commonly mixed into the Portland clinker or blended directly with cement these days. They are crystalline, also known as hydraulically inactive additions and pozzolanic, which are hydraulically active additions. Silica fume is very reactive pozzolan, while it is used in concrete because of its fine particles, large surface area and high SiO2...

  1. Influence of silica fume on mechanical and physical properties of recycled aggregate concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Çakır, Özgür; Sofyanlı, Ömer Özkan

    2015-01-01

    Several studies related to sustainable concrete construction have encouraged development of composite binders, involving Portland cement, industrial by-products, and concrete mixes with partial replacement of natural aggregate with recycled aggregate. In this paper, the effects of incorporating silica fume (SF) in the concrete mix design to improve the quality of recycled aggregates in concrete are presented. Portland cement was replaced with SF at 0%, 5% and 10%. Specimens were manufactured ...

  2. Characteristics of PAHs from deep-frying and frying cooking fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiliang; Li, Jing; Wu, Bobo; Hao, Xuewei; Yin, Yong; Jiang, Xi

    2015-10-01

    Cooking fumes are an important indoor source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Because indoor pollution has a more substantial impact on human health than outdoor pollution, PAHs from cooking fumes have drawn considerable attention. In this study, 16 PAHs emitted through deep-frying and frying methods using rapeseed, soybean, peanut, and olive oil were examined under a laboratory fume hood. Controlled experiments were conducted to collect gas- and particulate-phase PAHs emitted from the cooking oil fumes, and PAH concentrations were quantified via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that deep-frying methods generate more PAHs and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) (1.3 and 10.9 times, respectively) because they consume greater volumes of edible oil and involve higher oil temperatures relative to those of frying methods. In addition, the total B[a]Peq concentration of deep-frying is 2.2-fold larger than that of frying. Regarding the four types of edible oils studied, rapeseed oil produced more PAH emission than the other three oil varieties. For all of the cooking tests, three- and four-ringed PAHs were the main PAH components regardless of the food and oil used. Concerning the PAH partition between gas and particulate phase, the gaseous compounds accounted for 59-96 % of the total. Meanwhile, the particulate fraction was richer of high molecular weight PAHs (five-six rings). Deep-frying and frying were confirmed as important sources of PAH pollution in internal environments. The results of this study provide additional insights into the polluting features of PAHs produced via cooking activities in indoor environments.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Zinc Slag Fuming Process in Top-Submerged Lance Smelting Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey; Reuter, Markus A.; Matusewicz, Robert W.

    2012-02-01

    Slag fuming is a reductive treatment process for molten zinciferous slags for extracting zinc in the form of metal vapor by injecting or adding a reductant source such as pulverized coal or lump coal and natural gas. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to study the zinc slag fuming process from imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag in a top-submerged lance furnace and to investigate the details of fluid flow, reaction kinetics, and heat transfer in the furnace. The model integrates combustion phenomena and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with a number of user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model is based on three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian multiphase flow approach, and it predicts the velocity and temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence, and vortex and plume shape at the lance tip. The model also predicts the mass fractions of slag and gaseous components inside the furnace. The model predicted that the percent of ZnO in the slag bath decreases linearly with time and is consistent broadly with the experimental data. The zinc fuming rate from the slag bath predicted by the model was validated through macrostep validation process against the experimental study of Waladan et al. The model results predicted that the rate of ZnO reduction is controlled by the mass transfer of ZnO from the bulk slag to slag-gas interface and rate of gas-carbon reaction for the specified simulation time studied. Although the model is based on zinc slag fuming, the basic approach could be expanded or applied for the CFD analysis of analogous systems.

  4. In situ polymerization of L-Lactide in the presence of fumed silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prebe, A.; Alcouffe, P.; Cassagnau, Ph.; Gerard, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Chemiorheology, i.e. rheological changes during the polymerization, of a biosourced monomer, i.e. L-Lactide, containing fumed silica have been studied. For that purpose, the reaction was proceeded in situ between the plates of a dynamic rheometer. The polymerization kinetics was followed from the variation of the complex shear modulus versus reaction time. Moreover, at temperatures lower than the crystallization temperature, it was possible to follow the crystallization process while the polymerization takes place. Adding fumed silica particles into the monomer leads to the formation of a physical (percolated) network from particle-particle interactions, i.e. silica, in the L-Lactide probably hydrophilic interactions. The gel-like structure was kept while the polymerization as long as the strain remains low indicating that the silica particle network remains weak. Furthermore, the mechanism of the break down of the gel structure under large deformation as well as the recovery was discussed. It seems that the non-linearity effect of the nanocomposites stems in the silica inter-particle interactions. It was found that silica particles do not have any effect on the temperature of crystallization - molar mass relation but could act as nucleating agent. In situ polymerization of L-Lactide in the presence of 5 wt.% of modified fumed silica was carried out in a reactor. It was found that fumed hydrophilic silica leaded to a microcomposite with highly dense agglomerates in the polymer matrix whereas with a less hydrophilic silica it was possible to decrease the size of the agglomerates increasing the dispersion. The finest dispersion state was achieved with the 'initiating' functionalized silica leading to a 'grafting from' polymerization of the L-Lactide. Such functionalized silica leads to a nanoscale dispersion in a one-step bulk polymerization with only a few small agglomerates.

  5. Characterization of the early pulmonary inflammatory response associated with PTFE fume exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C. J.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Gelein, R.; Baggs, R.; Oberdorster, G.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Heating of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been described to release fumes containing ultrafine particles (approximately 18 nm diam). These fumes can be highly toxic in the respiratory tract inducing extensive pulmonary edema with hemorrhagic inflammation. Fischer-344 rats were exposed to PTFE fumes generated by temperatures ranging from 450 to 460 degrees C for 15 min at an exposure concentration of 5 x 10(5) particles/cm3, equivalent to approximately 50 micrograms/m3. Responses were examined 4 hr post-treatment when these rats demonstrated 60-85% neutrophils (PMNs) in their lung lavage. Increases in abundance for messages encoding the antioxidants manganese superoxide dismutase and metallothionein (MT) increased 15- and 40-fold, respectively. For messages encoding the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 6 (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) increases of 5-, 5-, 10-, 40-, 40-, and 15-fold were present. Vascular endothelial growth factor, which may play a role in the integrity of the endothelial barrier, was decreased to 20% of controls. In situ sections were hybridized with 33P cRNA probes encoding IL-6, MT, surfactant protein C, and TNF alpha. Increased mRNA abundance for MT and IL-6 was expressed around all airways and interstitial regions with MT and IL-6 demonstrating similar spatial distribution. Large numbers of activated PMNs expressed IL-6, MT, and TNF alpha. Additionally, pulmonary macrophages and epithelial cells were actively involved. These observations support the notion that PTFE fumes containing ultrafine particles initiate a severe inflammatory response at low inhaled particle mass concentrations, which is suggestive of an oxidative injury. Furthermore, PMNs may actively regulate the inflammatory process through cytokine and antioxidant expression.

  6. In situ polymerization of L-Lactide in the presence of fumed silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prebe, A. [Universite de Lyon, F-69361, Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR 5223, Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); INSA Lyon, F-69621, Villeurbanne (France); Alcouffe, P. [Universite de Lyon, F-69361, Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR 5223, Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Cassagnau, Ph., E-mail: philippe.cassagnau@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, F-69361, Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR 5223, Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); Gerard, J.F. [Universite de Lyon, F-69361, Lyon (France); CNRS, UMR 5223, Ingenierie des Materiaux Polymeres, F-69622, Villeurbanne (France); INSA Lyon, F-69621, Villeurbanne (France)

    2010-11-01

    Chemiorheology, i.e. rheological changes during the polymerization, of a biosourced monomer, i.e. L-Lactide, containing fumed silica have been studied. For that purpose, the reaction was proceeded in situ between the plates of a dynamic rheometer. The polymerization kinetics was followed from the variation of the complex shear modulus versus reaction time. Moreover, at temperatures lower than the crystallization temperature, it was possible to follow the crystallization process while the polymerization takes place. Adding fumed silica particles into the monomer leads to the formation of a physical (percolated) network from particle-particle interactions, i.e. silica, in the L-Lactide probably hydrophilic interactions. The gel-like structure was kept while the polymerization as long as the strain remains low indicating that the silica particle network remains weak. Furthermore, the mechanism of the break down of the gel structure under large deformation as well as the recovery was discussed. It seems that the non-linearity effect of the nanocomposites stems in the silica inter-particle interactions. It was found that silica particles do not have any effect on the temperature of crystallization - molar mass relation but could act as nucleating agent. In situ polymerization of L-Lactide in the presence of 5 wt.% of modified fumed silica was carried out in a reactor. It was found that fumed hydrophilic silica leaded to a microcomposite with highly dense agglomerates in the polymer matrix whereas with a less hydrophilic silica it was possible to decrease the size of the agglomerates increasing the dispersion. The finest dispersion state was achieved with the 'initiating' functionalized silica leading to a 'grafting from' polymerization of the L-Lactide. Such functionalized silica leads to a nanoscale dispersion in a one-step bulk polymerization with only a few small agglomerates.

  7. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, P.W. [Duke Power Company, Huntersville, NC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Application of stepping motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This book is divided into three parts, which is about practical using of stepping motor. The first part has six chapters. The contents of the first part are about stepping motor, classification of stepping motor, basic theory og stepping motor, characteristic and basic words, types and characteristic of stepping motor in hybrid type and basic control of stepping motor. The second part deals with application of stepping motor with hardware of stepping motor control, stepping motor control by microcomputer and software of stepping motor control. The last part mentions choice of stepping motor system, examples of stepping motor, measurement of stepping motor and practical cases of application of stepping motor.

  9. Risk communication concerning welding fumes for the primary preventive care of welding apprentices in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Vaz, Joana Cezar

    2015-01-19

    This study's aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05) significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049), the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023), and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001). Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2). The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships.

  10. Influence of silica fume on the strength of high strength concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akram, T.; Memon, S.A.; Khan, S.A.

    2007-01-01

    HSC (High Strength Concrete) does not become evident by a sudden change in the behavior of 'ordinary strength' concrete. There is a gradual effect that becomes more noticeable when the strength level exceeds about 40-45 MPa. There cannot be a precise level of strength which defines this change in effect. The effects are on strength and workability, requiring us to take into account in our mix proportioning, the ramifications of fineness of cement on workability and of type of aggregate and aggregate/cement ratio on strength. In fact, the selection of materials becomes more critical as the concrete strength increases and that if very high strength is required (100 MPa and higher), relatively few materials may be suitable. An experimental investigation is carried out to evaluate the feasibility of producing HSC using locally available materials and to study the influence of silica fume on the strength of HSC. The main variables in this research is amount of silica fume. The parameters that are kept constant are the amount of cement equal to 580 kg/m3, dosage of HRWRA (High Range Water Reducing Admictures) equal to 4 % by weight of cementitious materials and the ratio of fine aggregate to coarse aggregate (1:2.3). Test results revealed that it is feasible to produce HSC using locally available materials. The optimum percentage of silica fume was found to be 15 % by weight of cement. (author)

  11. Effects of some anaesthetics on honeybees: nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, ammonium nitrate smoker fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, J

    1954-08-01

    Honeybees were apparently unaffected by atmospheric oxygen concentrations between 7% and 100%, and only became motionless when the oxygen concentration was less than 2%. The effects of nitrous oxide-oxygen mixtures differed little, if at all, from those nitrogen-oxygen mixtures. Bees were not visibly affected by carbon dioxide concentrations up to 10-15% but they became motionless if the concentration exceeded 40-45%. Fumes produced by adding ammonium nitrate to the fuel in a beekeeper's smoker were found to contain hydrogen cyanide or cyanogen. Their effectiveness as an anaesthetic may be due to this or to some unidentified component, but not to nitrous oxide. All three anaesthetics caused foraging bees to stop collecting pollen, and accelerated the retrogression of the pharyngeal glands of young bees. Anaesthesia of a few bees in a colony with nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, or ammonium nitrate smoker fumes did not appear to inhibit their drift back to the original site when their hive was moved, nor was any reduction in drifting observed when a whole colony was moved while anaesthetized with ammonium nitrate smoker fumes. 4 tables.

  12. Work-principle model for predicting toxic fumes of nonideal explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieland, Michael S. [National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh Research Center, P.O. Box 18070, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0070 (United States)

    2004-08-01

    The work-principle from thermodynamics was used to formulate a model for predicting toxic fumes from mining explosives in underground chamber tests, where rapid turbulent combustion within the surrounding air noticeably changes the resulting concentrations. Two model constants were required to help characterize the reaction zone undergoing rapid chemical transformations in conjunction with heat transfer and work output: a stoichiometry mixing fraction and a reaction-quenching temperature. Rudimentary theory with an unsteady uniform concentration gradient was taken to characterize the combustion zone, yielding 75% for the mixing fraction. Four quenching temperature trends were resolved and compared to test results of ammonium nitrate compositions with different fuel-oil percentages (ANFO). The quenching temperature 2345 K was the optimum choice for fitting the two major components of fume toxicity: carbon monoxide (CO) and total nitrogen oxides (NO{sub X}). The resulting two-constant model was used to generate comparisons for test results of ANFO compositions with additives. Though respectable fits were usually found, charge formulations which reacted weakly could not be resolved numerically. The work-principle model yields toxic concentrations for a range of charge formulations, making it a useful tool for investigating the potential hazard of released fumes and reducing the risk of unwanted incidents. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  13. Effect of silica fume on the characterization of the geopolymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Hisham M.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of silica fume (SF) addition on properties of geopolymer materials produced from alkaline activation of alumino-silicates metakaolin and waste concrete produced from demolition works has been studied through the measurement of compressive strength, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Alumino-silicate materials are coarse aggregate included waste concrete and fired kaolin (metakaolin) at 800°C for 3 h, both passing a sieve of 90 μm. Mix specimens containing silica fume were prepared at water/binder ratios in a range of 0.30 under water curing. The used activators are an equal mix of sodium hydroxide and silicate in the ratio of 3:3 wt.%. The control geopolymer mix is composed of metakaolin and waste concrete in an equal mix (50:50, wt.%). Waste concrete was partially replaced by silica fume by 1 to 10 wt.%. The results indicated that compressive strengths of geopolymer mixes incorporating SF increased up to 7% substitution and then decreased up to 10% but still higher than that of the control mix. Results indicated that compressive strengths of geopolymer mixes incorporating SF increases up to 7% substitution and then decreases up to 10% but still higher than the control mix, where 7% SF-digested calcium hydroxide (CH) crystals, decreased the orientation of CH crystals, reduced the crystal size of CH gathered at the interface, and improved the interface more effectively.

  14. [Study on the chemical components of edible oil fume in kitchen and its genotoxity on Drosophila].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Wang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhao, X

    1999-01-30

    To study the chemical components of the condensate of edible oil fume in kitchen and its genotoxicity on Drosophila. Analysis for the chemical components was carried out by gas chromatography and mass spectra (GC/MS) and its genotoxicity was studied by sex linked recessive lethal (SLRL) test in Drosophila. A total of 74 organic compounds were found in samples of condensed oil from the fume in kitchen. It included hydroxylic acids, hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters, aldehydes, ketones, aromatic compounds, and steroids, etc. The total mutagenicity rates in SLRL test induced by the samples at concentrations of 110,320 and 960 mg/L were 0.1732%, 0.4306% and 0.1707% respectively. The sterility rates of the first broods were 2.564%, 2.056% and 2.845% at above 3 concentrations respectively(P < 0.05, as compared with the control). The mutagenicity rate of the second brood at 320 mg/L was 0.530% and that of the third brood at 110 mg/L 0.540%(P < 0.001). Some of the compounds in the condensate of edible oil fume were proved to have high recessive lethal effect and genotoxic effect on the reproductive system of Drosophila.

  15. Comparison of Powder Dusting and Cyanoacrylate Fuming Techniques in Retrieving Latent Fingerprint Exposed to Environment Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayalvanan, Y.; Sri Pawita Albakri Amir Hamzah; Chuan, L.L.; Muhamad Hilmi Baba; Amidon Anan

    2014-01-01

    Latent fingerprints are one of the best evidence to prove the presence of an individuals presence at the crime scene. There are many techniques available for a successful fingerprint lifting. Two of the most common ones are fingerprint powder dusting and cyanoacrylate fuming. This research aims to compare both techniques and determine which has a higher success rate in retrieving fingerprints exposed to local environmental conditions for three days. Fingerprint samples were collected from 18 subjects on glass, perspex and aluminium slides. These samples were then exposed to local environmental conditions for three days. The fingerprints were then developed using the aforementioned techniques. Based on the results, it can be safely said that, fuming results in clearer fingerprints and more minutiae can be found from the retrieved fingerprints even with exposure to less than optimum local conditions. This proves that fuming is a better fingerprint lifting method to resolve latent fingerprint compared to powder dusting. Surface on which the fingerprint is retrieved from influences the quality of clarity of a latent fingerprint. (author)

  16. Effect of silica fume on the fresh and hardened properties of fly ash-based self-compacting geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Fareed Ahmed; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil; Shafiq, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    The effect of silica fume on the fresh and hardened properties of fly ash-based self-compacting geopolymer concrete (SCGC) was investigated in this paper. The work focused on the concrete mixes with a fixed water-to-geopolymer solid (W/Gs) ratio of 0.33 by mass and a constant total binder content of 400 kg/m3. The mass fractions of silica fume that replaced fly ash in this research were 0wt%, 5wt%, 10wt%, and 15wt%. The workability-related fresh properties of SCGC were assessed through slump flow, V-funnel, and L-box test methods. Hardened concrete tests were limited to compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths, all of which were measured at the age of 1, 7, and 28 d after 48-h oven curing. The results indicate that the addition of silica fume as a partial replacement of fly ash results in the loss of workability; nevertheless, the mechanical properties of hardened SCGC are significantly improved by incorporating silica fume, especially up to 10wt%. Applying this percentage of silica fume results in 4.3% reduction in the slump flow; however, it increases the compressive strength by 6.9%, tensile strength by 12.8% and flexural strength by 11.5%.

  17. Enhancing the performance of green solid-state electric double-layer capacitor incorporated with fumed silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Mee Yoke; Numan, Arshid; Liew, Chiam-Wen; Ng, H. M.; Ramesh, K.; Ramesh, S.

    2018-06-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) based on fumed silica nanoparticles as nanofillers, hydroxylethyl cellulose (HEC) as host polymer, magnesium trifluoromethanesulfonate salt and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ionic liquid is prepared by solution casting technique. The ionic conductivity, interactions of adsorbed ions on the host polymer, structural crystallinity and thermal stability are evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. Ionic conductivity studies at room temperature reveals that the SPE with 2 wt. % of fumed silica nanoparticles gives the highest conductivity compared to its counterpart. The XRD and FTIR studies confirm the dissolution of salt, ionic liquid and successful incorporation of fumed silica nanoparticles with host polymer. In order to examine the performance of SPEs, electric double-layer capacitor (EDLC) are fabricated by using activated carbon electrodes. EDLC studies demonstrate that SPE incorporated with 2 wt. % fumed silica nanoparticles gives high specific capacitance (25.0 F/g) at a scan rate of 5 mV/s compared to SPE without fumed silica. Additionally, it is able to withstand 71.3% of capacitance from its initial capacitance value over 1600 cycles at a current density of 0.4 A/g.

  18. Systemic serum amyloid A as a biomarker for exposure to zinc and/or copper-containing metal fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, R; Gube, M; Markert, A; Davatgarbenam, S; Kossack, V; Gerhards, B; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2018-01-01

    Zinc- and copper-containing welding fumes increase systemic C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of the biomarkers serum amyloid A (SAA) and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in this regard. Fifteen male subjects were exposed under controlled conditions to welding fumes containing either zinc, or copper, or copper and zinc for 6 h. Plasma samples were collected before, 6 and 24 h after start of exposure and biomarkers therein were measured by electrochemiluminescent assay. For each exposure, systemic concentrations of systemic SAA, but not VCAM-1, increased significantly at 24 h after exposure start compared with baseline ("copper only": P=0.0005, "zinc only": P=0.027, "copper and zinc": P=0.001). SAA showed a wider range of concentrations than did CRP and its levels increased up to 19-fold after welding fume exposure. The recognition of copper as a potential harmful component in welding fumes, also independent from zinc, deserves further consideration. SAA might represent a new sensitive biomarker for potential subclinical sterile inflammation after inhalation of copper- and/or zinc-containing welding fumes. As elevations of CRP and SAA protein have both been linked to a higher risk for cardiovascular disease, these findings might particularly be important for long-term welders.

  19. Fuels planning: science synthesis and integration; environmental consequences fact sheet 12: Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Fuel Management (FuMe) tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; David Hall

    2005-01-01

    The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) Fuel Management (FuMe) tool was developed to estimate sediment generated by fuel management activities. WEPP FuMe estimates sediment generated for 12 fuel-related conditions from a single input. This fact sheet identifies the intended users and uses, required inputs, what the model does, and tells the user how to obtain the...

  20. Smog chamber study on the evolution of fume from residential coal combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Chunmei; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wei; Chen, Jianhua; Liu, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hongjie

    2012-01-01

    Domestic coal stoves are widely used in countryside and greenbelt residents in China for heating and cooking, and emit considerable pollutants to the atmosphere because of no treatment of their exhaust, which can result in deteriorating local air quality. In this study, a dynamic smog chamber was used to investigate the real-time emissions of gaseous and particulate pollutants during the combustion process and a static smog chamber was used to investigate the fume evolution under simulate light irradiation. The real-time emissions revealed that the total hydrocarbon (THC) and CO increased sharply after ignition, and then quickly decreased, indicating volatilization of hydrocarbons with low molecular weight and incomplete combustion at the beginning stage of combustion made great contribution to these pollutants. There was evident shoulder peak around 10 min combustion for both THC and CO, revealing the emissions from vitrinite combustion. Additionally, another broad emission peak of CO after 30 min was also observed, which was ascribed to the incomplete combustion of the inertinite. Compared with THC and CO, there was only one emission peak for NOx, SO2 and particular matters at the beginning stage of combustion. The fume evolution with static chamber simulation indicated that evident consumption of SO2 and NOx as well as new particle formation were observed. The consumption rates for SO2 and NOx were about 3.44% hr(-1) and 3.68% hr(-1), the new particle formation of nuclei particles grew at a rate of 16.03 nm/hr during the first reaction hour, and the increase of the diameter of accumulation mode particles was evident. The addition of isoprene to the diluted mixture of the fume could promote 03 and secondary particle formation.

  1. Cycling of lithium/metal oxide cells using composite electrolytes containing fumed silicas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jian; Fedkiw, Peter S.

    2003-01-01

    The effect on cycle capacity is reported of cathode material (metal oxide, carbon, and current collector) in lithium/metal oxide cells cycled with fumed silica-based composite electrolytes. Three types of electrolytes are compared: filler-free electrolyte consisting of methyl-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) oligomer (PEGdm, M w =250)+lithium bis(trifluromethylsufonyl)imide (LiTFSI) (Li:O=1:20), and two composite systems of the above baseline liquid electrolyte containing 10-wt% A200 (hydrophilic fumed silica) or R805 (hydrophobic fumed silica with octyl surface group). The composite electrolytes are solid-like gels. Three cathode active materials (LiCoO 2 , V 6 O 13 , and Li x MnO 2 ), four conducting carbons (graphite Timrex [reg] SFG 15, SFG 44, carbon black Vulcan XC72R, and Ketjenblack EC-600JD), and three current collector materials (Al, Ni, and carbon fiber) were studied. Cells with composite electrolytes show higher capacity, reduced capacity fade, and less cell polarization than those with filler-free electrolyte. Among the three active materials studied, V 6 O 13 cathodes deliver the highest capacity and Li x MnO 2 cathodes render the best capacity retention. Discharge capacity of Li/LiCoO 2 cells is affected greatly by cathode carbon type, and the capacity decreases in the order of Ketjenblack>SFG 15>SFG 44>Vulcan. Current collector material also plays a significant role in cell cycling performance. Lithium/vanadium oxide (V 6 O 13 ) cells deliver increased capacity using Ni foil and carbon fiber current collectors in comparison to an Al foil current collector

  2. Assessment of aggregates- cement paste border in concretes containing silica fume and fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sademomtazi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The bond between aggregate and cement paste, called the interfacial transition zone (ITZ is an important parameter that effect on the mechanical properties and durability of concrete. Transition zone microstructure and porosity (pores of cement paste or concrete are affected by the type and properties of materials used which evaluated in this research. On the other hand, the use of efficient, low-cost and reliable method is particularly important for evaluating of concrete performance against the chloride ion penetration and its relationships with transition zone as a suitable index to assess the durability. So far, various methods to approach the electrical Indices are presented. In this research, the effect of pozzolanic materials fly ash (10%, 20% and 30% and silica fume (5% and 10% as substitute of cement by weight in binary and ternary mixtures on the fresh and hardened concrete properties were investigated. To determine mechanical properties, the compressive strength, splitting tensile strength and modulus of elasticity tests were performed. Also, water penetration depth, porosity, water sorptivity, specific electrical resistivity, rapid chloride penetration test (RCPT and rapid chloride migration test (RCMT tests were applied to evaluate concrete durability. To examine the border of aggregate and cement paste morphology of concrete specimens, scanning electron microscope images (SEM was used. The fresh concrete results showed that the presence of silica fume in binary and ternary mixtures reduced workability and air content but fly ash increased them. Adding silica fume to mixtures of containing flay ash while increasing mechanical strength reduced the porosity and pores to 18%. The presence of pozzolanic materials in addition to increasing bond quality and uniformity of aggregate-cement matrix border a considerably positive effect on the transport properties of concrete.

  3. Assessment of the Biological Effects of Welding Fumes Emitted From Metal Active Gas and Manual Metal Arc Welding in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewald, Eva; Gube, Monika; Baumann, Ralf; Bertram, Jens; Kossack, Veronika; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas; Brand, Peter

    2015-08-01

    Emissions from a particular welding process, metal inert gas brazing of zinc-coated steel, induce an increase in C-reactive protein. In this study, it was investigated whether inflammatory effects could also be observed for other welding procedures. Twelve male subjects were separately exposed to (1) manual metal arc welding fumes, (2) filtered air, and (3) metal active gas welding fumes for 6 hours. Inflammatory markers were measured in serum before, and directly, 1 and 7 days after exposure. Although C-reactive protein concentrations remained unchanged, neutrophil concentrations increased directly after exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes, and endothelin-1 concentrations increased directly and 24 hours after exposure. After exposure to metal active gas and filtered air, endothelin-1 concentrations decreased. The increase in the concentrations of neutrophils and endothelin-1 may characterize a subclinical inflammatory reaction, whereas the decrease of endothelin-1 may indicate stress reduction.

  4. Comparative study on strength properties of cement mortar by partial replacement of cement with ceramic powder and silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himabindu, Ch.; Geethasri, Ch.; Hari, N.

    2018-05-01

    Cement mortar is a mixture of cement and sand. Usage of high amount of cement increases the consumption of natural resources and electric power. To overcome this problem we need to replace cement with some other material. Cement is replaced with many other materials like ceramic powder, silica fume, fly ash, granulated blast furnace slag, metakaolin etc.. In this research cement is replaced with ceramic powder and silica fume. Different combinations of ceramic powder and silica fume in cement were replaced. Cement mortar cubes of 1:3 grade were prepared. These cubes were cured under normal water for 7 days, 14days and 28 days. Compressive strength test was conducted for all mixes of cement mortar cubes.

  5. Sugar Dehydration without Sulfuric Acid: No More Choking Fumes in the Classroom!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverstein, Todd P.; Zhang, Yi

    1998-06-01

    Sugar is a common reagent often used in colorful classroom demonstrations. It produces a growing column of black ash when dehydrated by concentrated sulfuric acid, and it produces a brilliant purple flame when combusted with potassium chlorate. Unfortunately, both of these reactions also produce copious quantities of noxious fumes which make them problematic as lecture demonstrations. We have modified and combined these two reactions. Our demonstration uses no sulfuric acid, yields relatively little smoke, and produces an exciting and unpredictable growing column of black carbon.

  6. Fluorine content of plants in air-polluted and fume-free areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daessler, H G

    1969-01-01

    Comparative analysis of plants (including orchard and forest trees) on different soil types in a polluted area, with a known quantitative emission of waste gases from a particular factory, and from a fume-free area, showed the quantitative chemical analysis of plant parts to be a satisfactory method of assessing amounts of F in the atmosphere, and its spatial distribution. The degree of injury, as shown by leaf discoloration and necrosis, was not always directly related to the degree of air pollution, since injury varied with soil type and the nutrient status of the plant. 11 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Strength and Mechanical Properties of High Strength Cement Mortar with Silica Fume

    OpenAIRE

    川上, 英男; 谷, 康博

    1993-01-01

    Two series of tests were carried out to clarify the effects of silica fume on the strength and mechanical properties of cement mortar. The test specimens of cement mortar were prepared within the flow values between 180 mm and 240 mm which qualifies better workability of the concrete. The fiow values were attained by using superplasticizer. The specimens were tested at the age of 4 weeks. Main results of the experiments are as follows. 1. At a given cement water ratio,the larger volume of sil...

  8. Urinary β2 Microglobulin in Workers Exposed to Arc Welding Fumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Sadeghniiat-Haghighi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Welding is a process in which two or more metals are attached by the use of heat and, in some cases, pressure. Direct exposure and inhalation of welding fumes causes acute and chronic side effects in humans. Kidney damage is one of these important side effects. β2 microglobulin is an 11.8 kilodalton protein and levels increase in the case of some inflammatory and viral diseases, or kidney malfunction and autoimmune diseases. In this study measurements of β2 microglobulin were used as a criterion for assessing effects on the kidneys of workers exposed to welding fumes. The study population were electric arc welders in an industrial plant in Tehran, Iran. For control we selected workers who did not have any exposure to welding fumes. Both groups were selected on the basis of a questionnaire and the consideration of criteria for inclusion and exclusion. In the end 50 cases and 50 controls were chosen. A urine sample was collected from all participants and urinary pH was set to between 6-8 using NaOH (1M. Sample transportation to the laboratory complied with the related standards. The samples were assessed using the ORG 5BM kit. For quantitative assessment of β2 microglobulin we used the Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA method. The ages of the welders ranged from 21 to 48 years (mean=30.5±5.9 yrs and of controls from 23 to 56 years (mean=31.8±5.9 yrs. Mean employment duration was 7.86±5.01years (range 2 to 27 years for welders. Mean β2 microglobulin level was 0.10±0.096 μg/ml in welders and 0.11±0.06 in controls. This difference was not statistically significant (P=0.381. In conclusion we don't find that exposure to electric arc welding fumes cause a significant change in urinary β2 microglobulin compared to the control group.

  9. Local exhaust ventilation for the control of welding fumes in the construction industry--a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael R; Susi, Pam

    2012-08-01

    Arc welding is a common unit operation in the construction industry, where frequent changes in location and welding position make it more difficult to control fume exposures than in industries where fixed locations are the norm. Welders may be exposed to a variety of toxic airborne contaminants including manganese (Mn) and hexavalent chromium (CrVI). Local exhaust ventilation (LEV) is a well-known engineering control for welding fumes but has not been adopted widely in the construction industry. This literature review presents data on the performance of a variety of LEV systems for welding fume control from the construction (five references), shipyard (five references), and other industries. The studies indicate that LEV can reduce fume exposures to total particulate, Mn, and CrVI to levels below currently relevant standards. Field studies suggest that 40-50% or more reduction in exposure is possible with portable or fixed LEV systems relative to natural ventilation but that correct positioning of the hood and adequate exhaust flow rates are essential. Successful implementation of extraction guns for gas metal arc welding (GMAW) and flux core arc welding has been demonstrated, indicating that a successful balance between extraction airflow and shielding gas requirements is possible. Work practices are an important part of achieving successful control of fume exposures; in particular, positioning the hood close to the arc, checking exhaust flow rates, and avoiding the plume. Further research is needed on hood size effects for controlling welding fume with portable LEV systems and identifying and overcoming barriers to LEV use in construction.

  10. Effectiveness of amorphous silica encapsulation technology on welding fume particles and its impact on mechanical properties of welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Wu, Chang-Yu; Franke, Gene

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel welding shielding gas containing a silica precursor. • Up to 76% of the welding fume particles encapsulated in an amorphous silica layer. • No statistical difference between different types of welds in mechanical tests. • Can potentially reduce the toxicity of welding fume particles. - Abstract: Stainless steel welding generates nano-sized fume particles containing toxic metals which may cause serious health effects upon inhalation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an amorphous silica encapsulation (ASE) technology by evaluating its silica coating efficiency (SCE), particle morphology, and its impact on the weld’s mechanical properties. Tetramethylsilane (TMS) added to the welding shielding gas decomposed at the high-temperature arc zone to enable the silica coating. Collected welding fume particles were digested by two acid mixtures with different degrees of silica solubility, and the measured mass differences in the digests were used to determine the SCE. The SCEs were around 48–64% at the low and medium primary shielding gas flow rates. The highest SCE of 76% occurred at the high shielding gas flow rate (30 Lpm) with a TMS carrier gas flow of 0.64 Lpm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images confirmed the amorphous silica layer on the welding fume particles at most gas flow rates, as well as abundant stand-alone silica particles formed at the high gas flow rate. Metallography showed that welds from the baseline and from the ASE technology were similar except for a tiny crack found in one particular weld made with the ASE technology. Tensile tests showed no statistical difference between the baseline and the ASE welds. All the above test results confirm that welding equipment retrofitted with the ASE technology has the potential to effectively address the toxicity problem of welding fume particles without affecting the mechanical properties of the welds

  11. Microarray-based analysis of the lung recovery process after stainless-steel welding fume exposure in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yang, Mi-jin; Yang, Young-Su; Park, Han-Jin; Heo, Sun Hee; Lee, Eun-Hee; Song, Chang-Woo; Yoon, Seokjoo

    2009-02-01

    Repeated exposure to welding fumes promotes a reversible increase in pulmonary disease risk, but the molecular mechanisms by which welding fumes induce lung injury and how the lung recovers from such insults are unclear. In the present study, pulmonary function and gene-expression profiles in the lung were analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip microarray after 30 days of consecutive exposure to manual metal arc welding combined with stainless-steel (MMA-SS) welding fumes, and again after 30 days of recovery from MMA-SS fume exposure. In total, 577 genes were identified as being either up-regulated or down-regulated (over twofold changes, p process of the lung were up-regulated exclusively in the recovery group. Collectively, these data may help elucidate the molecular mechanism of the recovery process of the lung after welding fume exposure.

  12. Altered ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to chemically distinct metal welding fume particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedan, Jeffrey S., E-mail: jsf2@cdc.gov; Thompson, Janet A.; Meighan, Terence G.; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Antonini, James M.

    2017-07-01

    Welding fume inhalation causes pulmonary toxicity, including susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized that airway epithelial ion transport is a target of fume toxicity, and investigated the effects of fume particulates from manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) on ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) cultured in air-interface. MMA-SS particles, more soluble than GMA-MS particles, contain Cr, Ni, Fe and Mn; GMA-MS particles contain Fe and Mn. MMA-SS or GMA-MS particles (0.0167–166.7 μg/cm{sup 2}) were applied apically to NHBEs. After 18 h transepithelial potential difference (V{sub t}), resistance (R{sub t}), and short circuit current (I{sub sc}) were measured. Particle effects on Na{sup +} and Cl¯ channels and the Na{sup +},K{sup +},2Cl¯-cotransporter were evaluated using amiloride (apical), 5-nitro-2-[(3-phenylpropyl)amino]benzoic acid (NPPB, apical), and bumetanide (basolateral), respectively. MMA-SS (0.0167–16.7 μg/cm{sup 2}) increased basal V{sub t}. Only 16.7 μg/cm{sup 2} GMA-MS increased basal V{sub t} significantly. MMA-SS or GMA-MS exposure potentiated I{sub sc} responses (decreases) to amiloride and bumetanide, while not affecting those to NPPB, GMA-MS to a lesser degree than MMA-SS. Variable effects on R{sub t} were observed in response to amiloride, and bumetanide. Generally, MMA-SS was more potent in altering responses to amiloride and bumetanide than GMA-MS. Hyperpolarization occurred in the absence of LDH release, but decreases in V{sub t}, R{sub t}, and I{sub sc} at higher fume particulate doses accompanied LDH release, to a greater extent for MMA-SS. Thus, Na{sup +} transport and Na{sup +},K{sup +},2Cl¯-cotransport are affected by fume exposure; MMA-MS is more potent than GMA-MS. Enhanced Na{sup +} absorption and decreased airway surface liquid could compromise defenses against infection. - Highlights: • Welding fume particle toxicity was investigated in human bronchial

  13. Jidosha's Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Shirakawa Okuma, Rosely; Calderón Orejuela, Javier

    2016-01-01

    La tesis narra la situación de una empresa concesionaria de vehículos nuevos, Jidosha's Motors, perteneciente a una corporación japonesa que cuenta con una cultura muy arraigada de ética y de cumplimiento. Se plantean respuestas, se identifican problemas y sus alternativas de solución para una toma adecuada de decisiones por parte de los directivos, siguiendo una estructura de análisis de situaciones de negocios (ASN). Tesis

  14. Manganese in exhaled breath condensate: a new marker of exposure to welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulo, Sébastien; Chérot-Kornobis, Nathalie; Howsam, Mike; Crucq, Sébastien; de Broucker, Virginie; Sobaszek, Annie; Edme, Jean-Louis

    2014-04-07

    To evaluate manganese in exhaled breath condensate (Mn-EBC) as an indicator of exposure to fumes from metal inert gas welding process. We collected EBC and urine from 17 welders and 16 unexposed control subjects after 5 days exposure. Concentrations of manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe) and chromium (Cr) were measured in EBC and urine samples and correlated with cumulative exposure indices for the working week (CIW) and for the total welding years (WY), based on duration of welding activity and atmospheric metal measurements. Concentrations of Mn and Ni in EBC were significantly higher among welders than controls whereas this difference was not significant for Mn in urine. Levels of Mn and Ni in EBC were not correlated with their respective levels in urine. The linear regressions found significant positive coefficients between Mn-EBC, Ni-EBC, Ni-U and Cr-U concentrations and the cumulative exposure indices. Taking into account tobacco use, statistical analysis showed the same trends except for the relationship between Mn-U and CIW. This pilot study showed that Mn-EBC, as well as Ni-EBC, can serve as reliable indices of occupational exposure to welding fumes and provide complimentary toxicokinetic information to that provided by urine analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Numerical analysis of the influence of particle charging on the fume formation process in arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashiro, Shinichi; Matsui, Sho; Tanaka, Manabu; Murphy, Anthony B

    2013-01-01

    In order to clarify the influence of electrostatic forces caused by charging of particles on the coagulation process in fume formation in arc welding, a previously developed fume formation model is modified to consider the influence of charging, for both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE conditions. The model takes into account formation of the particles from metal vapour by nucleation, growth of the particles by condensation of metal vapour and coagulation of the particles by collisions to form secondary particles. Results are obtained for both ballistic and Brownian motion of the particles. It is found that the growth of secondary particles is suppressed when the average particle charge becomes significant, because charging of the particle hinders collisions among secondary particles through the strong repulsive electrostatic force. Furthermore, deviations from LTE strongly affect the coagulation process, because the increased electron density at a given gas temperature increases the charging of particles. Brownian motion leads to larger secondary particles, since the average particle speed is increased. The influence of Brownian motion and particle charging cancel each other to a large extent, particularly when deviations from LTE are considered. (paper)

  16. Occupational exposure to solvents, metals and welding fumes and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mark, Marianne; Vermeulen, Roel; Nijssen, Peter C G; Mulleners, Wim M; Sas, Antonetta M G; van Laar, Teus; Huss, Anke; Kromhout, Hans

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between occupational exposure to solvents, metals and/or welding fumes and risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). Data of a hospital based case-control study including 444 PD patients and 876 age and sex matched controls was used. Occupational histories and lifestyle information of cases and controls were collected in a structured telephone interview. Exposures to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents and metals were estimated by linking the ALOHA+ job-exposure matrix to the occupational histories. Exposure to welding fumes was estimated using self-reported information on welding activities. No statistically significant associations with any of the studied metal and solvent exposures were found. However, for self-reported welding activities we observed non-statistically significant reduced risk estimates (third tertile cumulative exposure: OR = 0.51 (95% CI: 0.21-1.24)). The results of our study did not provide support for an increased chance on developing PD after occupational exposure to aromatic solvents, chlorinated solvents or exposure to metals. The results showed reduced risk estimates for welding, which is in line with previous research, but no clear explanation for these findings is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 1-Hydroxypyrene Levels in Blood Samples of Rats After Exposure to Generator Fumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifegwu, Clinton; Igwo-Ezikpe, Miriam N.; Anyakora, Chimezie; Osuntoki, Akinniyi; Oseni, Kafayat A.; Alao, Eragbae O.

    2013-01-01

    Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a major component of fuel generator fumes. Carcinogenicity of these compounds has long been established. In this study, 37 Swiss albino rats were exposed to generator fumes at varied distances for 8 hours per day for a period of 42 days and the level of 1-hydroxypyrene in their blood was evaluated. This study also tried to correlate the level of blood 1-hyroxypyrene with the distance from the source of pollution. Plasma was collected by centrifuging the whole blood sample followed by complete hydrolysis of the conjugated 1-hydroxypyrene glucuronide to yield the analyte of interest, 1-hydroxypyrene, which was achieved using beta glucuronidase. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detector was used to determine the 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in the blood samples. The mobile phase was water:methanol (12:88 v/v) isocratic run at the flow rate of 1.2 mL/min with CI8 stationary phase at 250 nm. After 42 days of exposure, blood concentration level of 1-hydroxypyrene ranged from 34 μg/mL to 26.29 μg/mL depending on the distance from source of exposure. The control group had no 1-hydroxypyrene in their blood. After the period of exposure, percentage of death correlated with the distance from the source of exposure. Percentage of death ranged from 56% to zero depending on the proximity to source of pollution. PMID:24179393

  18. Influence of smelter fumes on the growth of white pine in the Sudbury region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linzon, S N

    1958-01-01

    An additional study was started in 1949 to determine the effects on neighboring white pine forests of sulfur fumes discharged from large smelters operated by two mining companies in the Sudbury district of Ontario. A number of sample timber areas, near to, farther removed, and remote from the sources of the fumes, were placed under observation. Approximately 7000 white pine trees in the vigorous age class of 50 to 90 years had been examined annually by 1954. Foliage on the white pine trees located less than 25 miles northeast of Sudbury showed more extensive injuries every year than foliage on trees located at greater distances from the smelters. Studies of diameter increment showed that there was a gradual decline in the annual growth of white pine in the areas near to the smelters, whereas a constant pattern was maintained in areas located farther from the sources of smoke. Further, in the areas close to the smelters, the volume of white pine lost through excessive tree mortality of all crown class sizes exceeded the volume added by the surviving trees. However, at distances beyond 25 to 30 miles northeast of Sudbury in the direction of the prevailing wind the condition of white pine improved remarkably. It is indicated that the combination of concentration frequency, and duration of atmospheric sulfur dioxide visitations has here declined to a threshold value for the inhibition of growth of white pine. 25 references, 25 figures, 23 tables.

  19. Physico-mechanical properties of high performance concrete using different aggregates in presence of silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah A. Abo-El-Enein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy weight high performance concrete (HPC can be used when particular properties, such as high strength and good radiation shielding are required. Such concrete, using ilmenite and hematite coarse aggregates can significantly have higher specific gravities than those of concrete made with dolomite and air-cooled slag aggregates. Four different concrete mixes with the same cement content and different w/c ratios were designed using normal dolomite aggregate, air-cooled slag by-product and two different types of iron ore aggregates. High performance concrete (grade-M60 can be achieved using superplasticizer to reduce the water/cement ratio; the effect of SF on the performance of concrete was studied by addition of 10% silica fume to the total cement content. The physico-mechanical properties of coarse aggregates and hardened concrete were studied. The results show that, Ilmenite coarse aggregate gives higher physical and mechanical properties than the other aggregates. Also, addition of 10% silica fume developed a stronger and a denser interfacial transition zone (ITZ between concrete particles and the cement matrix. Crushed air-cooled slag can be used to produce a high-strength concrete with better mechanical properties than corresponding concrete made with crushed hematite and ilmenite. Heavy density concrete made with fine aggregates of ilmenite and air-cooled slag are expected to be suitable as shielding materials to attenuate gamma rays.

  20. Effects of boundary-layer separation controllers on a desktop fume hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rong Fung; Chen, Jia-Kun; Hsu, Ching Min; Hung, Shuo-Fu

    2016-10-02

    A desktop fume hood installed with an innovative design of flow boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, work surface, and corners was developed and characterized for its flow and containment leakage characteristics. The geometric features of the developed desktop fume hood included a rearward offset suction slot, two side plates, two side-plate boundary-layer separation controllers on the leading edges of the side plates, a slanted surface on the leading edge of the work surface, and two small triangular plates on the upper left and right corners of the hood face. The flow characteristics were examined using the laser-assisted smoke flow visualization technique. The containment leakages were measured by the tracer gas (sulphur hexafluoride) detection method on the hood face plane with a mannequin installed in front of the hood. The results of flow visualization showed that the smoke dispersions induced by the boundary-layer separations on the leading edges of the side plates and work surface, as well as the three-dimensional complex flows on the upper-left and -right corners of the hood face, were effectively alleviated by the boundary-layer separation controllers. The results of the tracer gas detection method with a mannequin standing in front of the hood showed that the leakage levels were negligibly small (≤0.003 ppm) at low face velocities (≥0.19 m/s).

  1. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  2. The influence of blast furnace slag, fly ash and silica fume on corrosion of reinforced concrete in marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Chloride penetration from sea water may cause corrosion of reinforcement in concrete structures. Adding reactive inorganic materials such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or silica fume to the cement matrix improves the resistance against chloride penetration as compared to Portland cement concrete. A

  3. Lifetime occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes is associated with bronchitis symptoms and higher diffusion capacity in COPD patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez, Esther; Ferrer, Jaume; Zock, Jan Paul|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/095184309; Serra, Ignasi; Antó, Josep M.; De Batlle, Jordi; Kromhout, Hans|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074385224; Vermeulen, Roel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Donaire-González, David; Benet, Marta; Balcells, Eva; Monsó, Eduard; Gayete, Àngel; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Guerra, Stefano; Gea, Joaquim; Orozco-Levi, Mauricio; Vollmer, Ivan; Barberà, Joan Albert; Gómez, Federico P.; Paré, Carles; Roca, Josep; Rodriguez-Roisin, Robert; Agustí, Àlvar; Freixa, Xavier; Rodriguez, Diego A.; Gimeno, Elena; Portillo, Karina; Andreu, Jordi; Pallissa, Esther; Casan, Pere; Güell, Rosa; Giménez, Ana; Marín, Alicia; Morera, Josep; Farrero, Eva; Escarrabill, Joan; Ferrer, Antoni; Sauleda, Jaume; Togores, Bernat; Gáldiz, Juan Bautista; López, Lorena; Belda, José

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to dusts, gases and fumes has been associated with reduced FEV1 and sputum production in COPD patients. The effect of occupational exposure on other characteristics of COPD, especially those reflecting emphysema, has not been studied in these patients.\

  4. 42 CFR 84.1151 - DOP filter test; respirators designed as respiratory protection against dusts, fumes, and mists...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false DOP filter test; respirators designed as... filter test; respirators designed as respiratory protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having an air...) All single air-purifying respirator filter units will be tested in an atmosphere concentration of 100...

  5. Association between cooking oil fume exposure and lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yingbo; Jiang, Ying; Jin, Shan; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has been the main cause of cancer death around the world. Cigarette smoking has been identified as a risk factor for lung cancer in males. However, the etiological factors in nonsmoking women remain elusive. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relationship between cooking oil fume exposure and lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women. Thirteen articles containing three population-based case-control and ten hospital-based case-control studies were included in this meta-analysis. These studies with a total of 3,596 lung cancer women and 6,082 healthy controls were analyzed by RevMan 5.3. Fixed effects model or random effects model was used to obtain pooled estimates of risk ratio. The risk ratios with a 95% CI were 1.74 (95% CI =1.57-1.94) and 2.11 (95% CI =1.54-2.89), respectively. Cooking oil fume exposure as well as not using a kitchen ventilator when cooking was significantly associated with lung cancer among nonsmoking women (Z=10.07, Poil fume exposure, especially lacking a fume extractor, may increase the risk of lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women.

  6. Profiling stainless steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions, hexavalent chromium emissions and operating costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Siert, Arlen; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T

    2016-01-01

    Nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for stainless steel were assessed for fume generation rates, fume generation rates per g of electrode consumed, and emission rates for hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)). Elemental manganese, nickel, chromium, iron emissions per unit length of weld, and labor plus consumables costs were similarly measured. Flux-cored arc welding and shielded metal arc (SMAW) processes were also studied. The objective was to identify the best welding processes for reducing workplace exposures, and estimate costs for all processes. Using a conical chamber, fumes were collected, weighed, recovered, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for metals, and by ion chromatography for Cr(6+). GMAW processes used were Surface Tension Transfer, Regulated Metal Deposition, Cold Metal Transfer, short-circuit, axial spray, and pulsed spray modes. Flux-cored welding used gas shielding; SMAW used E308 rods. Costs were estimated as dollars per m length of a ¼ in (6.3 mm) thick horizontal butt weld; equipment costs were estimated as ratios of new equipment costs to a 250 ampere capacity SMAW welding machine. Results indicate a broad range of fume emission factors for the processes studied. Fume emission rates per g of electrode were lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed-spray mode (0.2 mg/g), and highest for SMAW (8 mg fume/g electrode). Emission rates of Cr(6+) ranged from 50-7800 µg/min, and Cr(6+) generation rates per g electrode ranged from 1-270 µg/g. Elemental Cr generation rates spanned 13-330 µg/g. Manganese emission rates ranged from 50-300 µg/g. Nickel emission rates ranged from 4-140 µg/g. Labor and consumables costs ranged from $3.15 (GMAW pulsed spray) to $7.40 (SMAW) per meter of finished weld, and were measured or estimated for all 11 processes tested. Equipment costs for some processes may be as much as five times the cost of a typical SMAW welding machine. The results show that all of the GMAW processes in this

  7. Inhalation of gas metal arc-stainless steel welding fume promotes lung tumorigenesis in A/J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Lauryn M; Erdely, Aaron; Meighan, Terence G; Battelli, Lori A; Salmen, Rebecca; McKinney, Walter; Stone, Samuel; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Andrews, Ronnee N; Kashon, Michael; Antonini, James M; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C

    2017-08-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest an increased risk of lung cancer with exposure to welding fumes, but controlled animal studies are needed to support this association. Oropharyngeal aspiration of collected "aged" gas metal arc-stainless steel (GMA-SS) welding fume has been shown by our laboratory to promote lung tumor formation in vivo using a two-stage initiation-promotion model. Our objective in this study was to determine whether inhalation of freshly generated GMA-SS welding fume also acts as a lung tumor promoter in lung tumor-susceptible mice. Male A/J mice received intraperitoneal (IP) injections of corn oil or the chemical initiator 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA; 10 µg/g) and 1 week later were exposed by whole-body inhalation to air or GMA-SS welding aerosols for 4 h/d × 4 d/w × 9 w at a target concentration of 40 mg/m 3 . Lung nodules were enumerated at 30 weeks post-initiation. GMA-SS fume significantly promoted lung tumor multiplicity in A/J mice initiated with MCA (16.11 ± 1.18) compared to MCA/air-exposed mice (7.93 ± 0.82). Histopathological analysis found that the increased number of lung nodules in the MCA/GMA-SS group were hyperplasias and adenomas, which was consistent with developing lung tumorigenesis. Metal deposition analysis in the lung revealed a lower deposited dose, approximately fivefold compared to our previous aspiration study, still elicited a significant lung tumorigenic response. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that inhaling GMA-SS welding fume promotes lung tumorigenesis in vivo which is consistent with the epidemiologic studies that show welders may be at an increased risk for lung cancer.

  8. Association between cooking oil fume exposure and lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yingbo Xue, Ying Jiang, Shan Jin, Yong Li Department of Oncology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lung cancer has been the main cause of cancer death around the world. Cigarette smoking has been identified as a risk factor for lung cancer in males. However, the etiological factors in nonsmoking women remain elusive. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the relationship between cooking oil fume exposure and lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women. Thirteen articles containing three population-based case–control and ten hospital-based case–control studies were included in this meta-analysis. These studies with a total of 3,596 lung cancer women and 6,082 healthy controls were analyzed by RevMan 5.3. Fixed effects model or random effects model was used to obtain pooled estimates of risk ratio. The risk ratios with a 95% CI were 1.74 (95% CI =1.57–1.94 and 2.11 (95% CI =1.54–2.89, respectively. Cooking oil fume exposure as well as not using a kitchen ventilator when cooking was significantly associated with lung cancer among nonsmoking women (Z=10.07, P<0.00001; Z=4.65, P<0.00001. Cooking oil fume exposure, especially lacking a fume extractor, may increase the risk of lung cancer among Chinese nonsmoking women. Keywords: cooking oil fume exposure, lung cancer, meta-analysis, nonsmoking women 

  9. Compaction and Collapse Characteristics of Dune Sand Stabilized with Lime-Silica Fume Mix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Y. Fattah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to assess the suitability of dune sands as construction materials. Moreover, such a goal is considered beneficial in determining appropriate methods for soil stabilization or ground improvement and to assessing the suitability of dune sands as subgrade layer for carrying roads and rail foundation. Dune sand samples were collected from a region in Baiji area in Salah-Aldeen governorate, North of Iraq. A grey-colored densified silica fume (SF and lime (L are used. Three percentages are used for lime (3%, 6%, and 9%, and four rates are used for silica fume (3%, 6%, 9% and 12% and the maximum percentage of silica fume is mixed with the proportions of lime. Unsoaked California Bearing Ratio (CBR on compacted dune sands treated dune sands with L-SF by mixing and cured for one day. The increasing in CBR ranged between 443 – 707% at 2.54 mm penetration and 345 – 410% at 5.08 mm penetration.     Resumen El propósito de esta investigación es evaluar el uso de arena de dunas como materiales de construcción. Además, este objetivo permite determinar los métodos apropiados para la estabilización del suelo, el mejoramiento del terreno y la evaluación de pertinencia de la arena de dunas en capas subbase para carreteras y cimientos férreos. Se recolectaron muestras de arena de dunas en el área de Baiji, del comisionado Salah-Aldeen, al norte de Irak. Se utilizó vapor de óxido de silicio (SF, en inglés, grisáceo y densificado, y óxido de calcio (L. Se utilizaron tres porcentajes para el óxido de calcio (3 %, 6 % y 9 %, y cuatro para el óxido de silicio (3 %, 6 %,  9% y 12% y el máximo porcentaje del óxido de silicio se mezcló con las proporciones de óxido de calcio. Se realizó en seco el Ensayo de Relación de Soporte de California (del inglés California Bearing Ratio, CBR en arena de dunas compactada y tratada con la mezcla L-SF curada durante un día. El incremento en el ensayo CBR osciló entre 443

  10. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated biomimicry for optimal cell-material interactions for artificial organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Achala; Ramesh, Bala; Scurr, David J; Alexander, Morgan R; Hamilton, George; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of irreversibly damaged organs due to chronic disease, with suitable tissue engineered implants is now a familiar area of interest to clinicians and multidisciplinary scientists. Ideal tissue engineering approaches require scaffolds to be tailor made to mimic physiological environments of interest with specific surface topographical and biological properties for optimal cell-material interactions. This study demonstrates a single-step procedure for inducing biomimicry in a novel nanocomposite base material scaffold, to re-create the extracellular matrix, which is required for stem cell integration and differentiation to mature cells. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated procedure of scaffold functionalization, can be potentially adapted with multiple bioactive molecules to induce cellular biomimicry, in the development human organs. The proposed nanocomposite materials already in patients for number of implants, including world first synthetic trachea, tear ducts and vascular bypass graft. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cordierite-supported metal oxide for non-methane hydrocarbon oxidation in cooking oil fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yonghai; Yi, Honghong; Tang, Xiaolong; Zhao, Shunzheng; Gao, Fengyu; Wang, Jiangen; Yang, Zhongyu

    2018-05-21

    Cooking emission is an important reason for the air quality deterioration in the metropolitan area in China. Transition metal oxide and different loading of manganese oxide supported on cordierite were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method and were used for non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) oxidation in cooking oil fumes (COFs). The effects of different calcination temperature and different Mn content were also studied. The SEM photographs and CO 2 temperature-programmed desorption revealed 5 wt% Mn/cordierite had the best pore structure and the largest number of the weak and moderate basic sites so it showed the best performance for NMHC oxidation. XRD analysis exhibited 5 wt% Mn/cordierite had the best dispersion of active phase and the active phase was MnO 2 when the calcination temperature was 400℃ which were good for the catalytic oxidation of NMHC.

  12. Properties of cement-fly ash grout admixed with bentonite, silica fume, or organic fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    A detailed laboratory study was conducted to investigate the properties of cement-fly ash grout mixtures as barriers for isolation of hazardous and low-level radioactive wastes. In the grout studied, fly ash was used to replace 30 percent by mass of cement. Three additives including bentonite, silica fume, and polypropylene fiber were used individually in the grout mixes to improve the properties of the grouts in different aspects. The flowability, bleeding, and setting time of freshly mixed grouts were determined; and the unconfined compressive strength, pore size distribution, and water permeability were determined for hardened grouts at various curing durations up to 120 days. Finally, the durability of cement-fly ash grouts was carefully examined in terms of the changes in their physical properties after different levels of exposure to sulfate attack and wet-dry cycles

  13. Possible actions for the minimization of the environmental impact of the iron ore sintering fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Carcedo, F.; Ayala, N.; Isidro, A.; Moro, A.; Cornejo, N.; Ferreira, S.; Hernandez, A.; Cobo, A.; Alaiz, E.; Garcia, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    In sintering plants, gaseous emissions are generated which must comply with increasingly demanding environmental regulations. In the sintering process, about 40 kg of coke and 1,700 Nm''3 of air are used per ton of useful sinter. Sintering fumes have a gaseous phase formed mainly of N 2 , O 2 , CO 2 , H 2 O and CO and the minor components SO . SO 3 , NO and NO 2 . Other minor components include unburned organic products and CLH, and minimal proportions of other high impact compounds such as dioxins and furans are also present. Chlorides and heavy metals are present in the solid fraction. This paper reviews the situation of each emission in relation with the applicable regulations, and the possible means of reducing these emissions. (Author) 12 refs

  14. Carbonation of ternary cementitious concrete systems containing fly ash and silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eehab Ahmed Badreldin Khalil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbonation is quite a complex physical negative effect phenomenon on concrete especially in the ones containing ternary blends of Portland Cement, fly ash, and silica fume. Nine selected concrete mixtures were prepared with various water to cementitious materials’ ratios and various cementitious contents. The concrete mixtures were adapted in such a way to have the same workability and air content. The fresh concrete properties were kept near identical in slump, air content, and unit weight. The variation was in the hardened concrete mechanical properties of compression and tension strength. The carbonation phenomenon was studied for these mixes showing at which mixes of ternary cementitious content heavy carbonation attacks maybe produced. The main components of such mixes that do affect the carbonation process with time were presented.

  15. Fine motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gross (large, general) motor control. An example of gross motor control is waving an arm in greeting. Problems ... out the child's developmental age. Children develop fine motor skills over time, by practicing and being taught. To ...

  16. Exposure to welding fumes and lower airway infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Reetika; Periselneris, Jimstan; Lanone, Sophie; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Melton, Geoffrey; Palmer, Keith T; Andujar, Pascal; Antonini, James M; Cohignac, Vanessa; Erdely, Aaron; Jose, Ricardo J; Mudway, Ian; Brown, Jeremy; Grigg, Jonathan

    2016-02-01

    Welders are at increased risk of pneumococcal pneumonia. The mechanism for this association is not known. The capacity of pneumococci to adhere to and infect lower airway cells is mediated by host-expressed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR). We sought to assess the effect of mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF) on PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection to human airway cells in vitro and on pneumococcal airway infection in a mouse model. The oxidative potential of MS-WF was assessed by their capacity to reduce antioxidants in vitro. Pneumococcal adhesion and infection of A549, BEAS-2B, and primary human bronchial airway cells were assessed by means of quantitative bacterial culture and expressed as colony-forming units (CFU). After intranasal instillation of MS-WF, mice were infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung CFU values were determined. PAFR protein levels were assessed by using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, and PAFR mRNA expression was assessed by using quantitative PCR. PAFR was blocked by CV-3988, and oxidative stress was attenuated by N-acetylcysteine. MS-WF exhibited high oxidative potential. In A549 and BEAS-2B cells MS-WF increased pneumococcal adhesion and infection and PAFR protein expression. Both CV-3988 and N-acetylcysteine reduced MS-WF-stimulated pneumococcal adhesion and infection of airway cells. MS-WF increased mouse lung PAFR mRNA expression and increased BALF and lung pneumococcal CFU values. In MS-WF-exposed mice CV-3988 reduced BALF CFU values. Hypersusceptibility of welders to pneumococcal pneumonia is in part mediated by the capacity of welding fumes to increase PAFR-dependent pneumococcal adhesion and infection of lower airway cells. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of silica fume and metakaolin on glass-fibre reinforced concrete (GRC ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfedaque Díaz, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the mechanical properties of glassfibre reinforced concrete (GRC over time rules out the use of this material in load-bearing structures. While one possible solution to this problem is the addition of pozzolans or metakaolin to the cement mortar, the amounts needed to ensure GRC integrity raise its price to non-competitive levels. Experimental research has been conducted to analyze whether the addition of small amounts of silica fume or metakaolin can prevent or mitigate the ageing issue. Unfortunately, the findings indicate that the addition of small proportions of metakaolin or silica fume to GRC are ineffective in improving its long-term performance.

    Para el uso del mortero de cemento reforzado con fibras de vidrio (GRC en estructuras portantes se han de solucionar los problemas de reducción de las propiedades mecánicas que aparecen con el paso del tiempo. Estos problemas pueden ser solucionados mediante la adición de puzolanas o de metacaolín, a la pasta de mortero de cemento. Sin embargo, la cantidad de metacaolín que ha de ser añadida es elevada y el precio del GRC fabricado está fuera del mercado. Se ha realizado una campaña experimental que analiza si la adición de humo de sílice o de metacaolín en proporciones reducidas consigue evitar o paliar el problema del envejecimiento, que supone un freno al uso del GRC en elementos estructurales. Desgraciadamente, los resultados experimentales muestran que proporciones bajas de metacaolín o de humo de sílice no son efectivas para reducir el problema de pérdida de propiedades mecánicas.

  18. [Association of cooking oil fumes exposure and oxidative DNA damage among occupational exposed populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yue-bin; Xu, Xin-yun; Yuan, Jian-hui; Fang, Shi-song; Liu, Yi-min; Wu, Tang-chun

    2010-08-01

    Previous investigations indicate that cooks are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from cooking oil fumes (COF). However, Emission of PAH and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking oil fumes sources have not been investigated among cooks. To investigate the urinary excretion of a marker for oxidative DNA damage, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in different groups of cooks and different exposure groups, and to study the association between 8-OHdG and 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP), a biological marker for PAH exposure. Urine samples were collected from different groups of cooks (n = 86) and from unexposed controls (n = 36), all are male with similar age and smoking habits. The health status, occupational history, smoking, and alcohol consumption 24 hours prior to sampling was estimated from questionnaires. The urinary samples were frozen for later analyses of 8-OHdG and 1-OHP by high performance liquid chromatography. Excretion in urine of 8-OHdG were similar for controls (mean 1.2 µmol/mol creatinine, n = 36), and for those who had been in the kitchen room with exhaust hood operation (mean 1.5 µmol/mol creatinine, n = 45). COF exposed cooks without exhaust hood operation had increased excretion of 8-OHdG (mean 2.3 µmol/mol creatinine, n = 18). The difference between this group and the unexposed controls was significant. The urinary levels of ln 1-OHP and ln 8-OHdG were still significantly correlated in a multiple regression analysis. Results indicate that exposure to PAH or possibly other compounds in COF may cause oxidative DNA damage.

  19. A Cross-Sectional Study of the Cardiovascular Effects of Welding Fumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiqi Li

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to particulate air pollution has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the risk to welders working today remains unclear. We aimed to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of exposure to welding fumes.In a cross-sectional study, structured interviews and biological sampling were conducted for 101 welders and 127 controls (all non-smoking males from southern Sweden. Personal breathing zone sampling of respirable dust was performed. Blood pressure (BP and endothelial function (using peripheral arterial tonometry were measured. Plasma and serum samples were collected from peripheral blood for measurement of C-reactive protein, low-density lipoprotein, homocysteine, serum amyloid A, and cytokines.Welders were exposed to 10-fold higher levels of particles than controls. Welders had significantly higher BP compared to controls, an average of 5 mm Hg higher systolic and diastolic BP (P ≤ 0.001. IL-8 was 3.4 ng/L higher in welders (P=0.010. Years working as a welder were significantly associated with increased BP (β=0.35, 95%CI 0.13 - 0.58, P=0.0024 for systolic BP; β=0.32, 95%CI 0.16 - 0.48, P<0.001 for diastolic BP, adjusted for BMI but exposure to respirable dust was not associated with BP. No clear associations occurred between welding and endothelial function, or other effect markers.A modest increase in BP was found among welders compared to controls suggesting that low-to-moderate exposure to welding fumes remains a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  20. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  1. The Effect of Aging and Silanization on the Mechanical Properties of Fumed Silica-based Dental Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaje S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Mechanical strength and durability of dental composites are the main topics studied in this field of science today. This study examined fumed silica-based composite as a strong and durable restorative material through flexural and cycling test methods. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization, ageing, cycling and hybridizing on mechanical properties of fumed silica-based resin composite. Materials and Methods: Composites were made of light-cured copolymer based on Bisphenol A glycolmethacrylate (Bis-GMA and Triethylene glycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA at proportion of 50:50 which reinforced by fumed silica filler. For each composite sample, 5 specimen bars were made using Teflon mould (2 x 2 x 25 mm3. The samples with 12 wt% fumed silica (FS were considered as a base line group. The samples were exposed to cyclic cold water (FS-CCW and hot water (FS-CHW. The effect of silanization and adding more filler was studied together with samples containing 12 wt% (FS-S (12, 16 wt% (FS-S (16 and 20 wt% (FS-S (20 fumed silica filler. The filler was silanized with (γ-MPS. The degree of conversion was assessed with Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy. Flexural properties were evaluated with the Three-Point Bending test. Flexural data were analyzed with Excel software. Hardness was measured with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM. Results: The degree of conversion of the resin reached 74% within 24 hrs. Salinization allowed more filler to be wetted by resin. Addition of silanized particles from sample FS-S (12 to sample FS-S (20 improved the mechanical strength. Hybridizing fumed silica with nano-silica (FS-N had no significant effect on the strength, but nano-hardness improved greatly. Ageing and cycling had adverse effects on the strength of the sample FS. The flexural strength of FS-CHW was 72% less than FS sample. Conclusions: Sample FS-N with low diluent and filler percentage complied with the

  2. Exposure to welding fumes increases lung cancer risk among light smokers but not among heavy smokers: evidence from two case–control studies in Montreal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Eric; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Parent, Marie-Élise; Rachet, Bernard; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-01-01

    We investigated relationships between occupational exposure to gas and arc welding fumes and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to these agents throughout the spectrum of industries. Two population-based case–control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979–1986) included 857 cases and 1066 controls, and Study II (1996–2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 controls. Detailed job histories were obtained by interview and evaluated by an expert team of chemist–hygienists to estimate degree of exposure to approximately 300 substances for each job. Gas and arc welding fumes were among the agents evaluated. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer using logistic regression, adjusting for smoking history and other covariates. The two studies provided similar results, so a pooled analysis was conducted. Among all subjects, no significant association was found between lung cancer and gas welding fumes (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.9–1.4) or arc welding fumes (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8–1.2). However, when restricting attention to light smokers, there was an increased risk of lung cancer in relation to gas welding fumes (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.7–4.8) and arc welding fumes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3–3.8), with even higher OR estimates among workers with the highest cumulative exposures. In conclusion, there was no detectable excess risk of lung cancer due to welding fumes among moderate to heavy smokers; but among light smokers we found an excess risk related to both types of welding fumes. PMID:23342253

  3. Exposure to welding fumes increases lung cancer risk among light smokers but not among heavy smokers: evidence from two case-control studies in Montreal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Eric; Pintos, Javier; Lavoué, Jérôme; Parent, Marie-Élise; Rachet, Bernard; Siemiatycki, Jack

    2012-08-01

    We investigated relationships between occupational exposure to gas and arc welding fumes and the risk of lung cancer among workers exposed to these agents throughout the spectrum of industries. Two population-based case-control studies were conducted in Montreal. Study I (1979-1986) included 857 cases and 1066 controls, and Study II (1996-2001) comprised 736 cases and 894 controls. Detailed job histories were obtained by interview and evaluated by an expert team of chemist-hygienists to estimate degree of exposure to approximately 300 substances for each job. Gas and arc welding fumes were among the agents evaluated. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of lung cancer using logistic regression, adjusting for smoking history and other covariates. The two studies provided similar results, so a pooled analysis was conducted. Among all subjects, no significant association was found between lung cancer and gas welding fumes (OR = 1.1; 95% CI = 0.9-1.4) or arc welding fumes (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2). However, when restricting attention to light smokers, there was an increased risk of lung cancer in relation to gas welding fumes (OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.7-4.8) and arc welding fumes (OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.3-3.8), with even higher OR estimates among workers with the highest cumulative exposures. In conclusion, there was no detectable excess risk of lung cancer due to welding fumes among moderate to heavy smokers; but among light smokers we found an excess risk related to both types of welding fumes.

  4. High efficiency motors; Motores de alta eficiencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga Favela, Ivan Jaime [Energia Controlada de Mexico, S. A. de C. V., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    This paper is a technical-financial study of the high efficiency and super-premium motors. As it is widely known, more than 60% of the electrical energy generated in the country is used for the operation of motors, in industry as well as in commerce. Therefore the importance that the motors have in the efficient energy use. [Espanol] El presente trabajo es un estudio tecnico-financiero de los motores de alta eficiencia y los motores super premium. Como es ampliamente conocido, mas del 60% de la energia electrica generada en el pais, es utilizada para accionar motores, dentro de la industria y el comercio. De alli la importancia que los motores tienen en el uso eficiente de la energia.

  5. High efficiency motors; Motores de alta eficiencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga Favela, Ivan Jaime [Energia Controlada de Mexico, S. A. de C. V., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    This paper is a technical-financial study of the high efficiency and super-premium motors. As it is widely known, more than 60% of the electrical energy generated in the country is used for the operation of motors, in industry as well as in commerce. Therefore the importance that the motors have in the efficient energy use. [Espanol] El presente trabajo es un estudio tecnico-financiero de los motores de alta eficiencia y los motores super premium. Como es ampliamente conocido, mas del 60% de la energia electrica generada en el pais, es utilizada para accionar motores, dentro de la industria y el comercio. De alli la importancia que los motores tienen en el uso eficiente de la energia.

  6. Particle release and control of worker exposure during laboratory-scale synthesis, handling and simulated spills of manufactured nanomaterials in fume hoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Ana S.; Kuijpers, Eelco; Kling, Kirsten I.; Levin, Marcus; Koivisto, Antti J.; Nielsen, Signe H.; Fransman, W.; Fedutik, Yijri; Jensen, Keld A.; Koponen, Ismo K.

    2018-02-01

    Fume hoods are one of the most common types of equipment applied to reduce the potential of particle exposure in laboratory environments. A number of previous studies have shown particle release during work with nanomaterials under fume hoods. Here, we assessed laboratory workers' inhalation exposure during synthesis and handling of CuO, TiO2 and ZnO in a fume hood. In addition, we tested the capacity of a fume hood to prevent particle release to laboratory air during simulated spillage of different powders (silica fume, zirconia TZ-3Y and TiO2). Airborne particle concentrations were measured in near field, far field, and in the breathing zone of the worker. Handling CuO nanoparticles increased the concentration of small particles (control during synthesis and handling of nanomaterials. An appropriate fume hood with adequate sash height and face velocity prevents 98.3% of particles release into the surrounding environment. Care should still be made to consider spills and high cleanliness to prevent exposure via resuspension and inadvertent exposure by secondary routes.

  7. Effects of superglue fuming on materials characterization of zip-lock polyethylene bags for route forensic analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koester, C.J.; Grant, P.M.; Blankenship, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Using cyanoacrylate or 'superglue' fuming to develop latent dermatoglyphic prints significantly altered the volatile and semivolatile compounds within the material of polyethylene zip-lock bags. Comparisons of SPME-GC/MS analyses of poly bags obtained before and after application of a glue fuming fingermark-developing technique resulted in markedly different material profiles of the bags. Not only were species added to the chemical composition of a bag, but other compounds that had been initially present were removed. These effects are particularly important for nuclear forensic investigations in the realm of route (pathway) analyses, and may also be of general interest to criminalistics laboratories that examine illicit drugs and their packaging. (author)

  8. The effect of silica fume on early hydration of white Portland cement via fast field cycling-NMR relaxometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Codruţa.; Bede, Andrea; Ardelean, Ioan

    2017-12-01

    Fast Field Cycling (FFC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry is used to monitor the influence introduced on the hydration process by the addition of silica fume in a cement paste mixture, prepared with white Portland cement. The FFC relaxometry technique was implemented due to its sensitivity to a wider range of molecular motions, which gives more information than other relaxometry techniques performed at a fixed frequency. This unique feature of FFC relaxometry allows better separation of the surface and bulk contributions from the global measured relaxation rate. The relaxation process is dominated by the interaction of water protons with the paramagnetic centers located on the surface of cement grains. In the frame of a two-phase exchange model, this allows the monitoring of the influence of an addition of silica fume on the evolution of surface-to-volume ratio during the early hydration stages.

  9. Design and analysis on fume exhaust system of blackbody cavity sensor for continuously measuring molten steel temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohui Mei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fume exhaust system is the main component of the novel blackbody cavity sensor with a single layer tube, which removes the fume by gas flow along the exhaust pipe to keep the light path clean. However, the gas flow may break the conditions of blackbody cavity and results in the poor measurement accuracy. In this paper, we analyzed the influence of the gas flow on the temperature distribution of the measuring cavity, and then calculated the integrated effective emissivity of the non-isothermal cavity based on Monte-Carlo method, accordingly evaluated the sensor measurement accuracy, finally obtained the maximum allowable flow rate for various length of the exhaust pipe to meet the measurement accuracy. These results will help optimize the novel blackbody cavity sensor design and use it better for measuring the temperature of molten steel.

  10. Exposure to welding fumes is associated with hypomethylation of the F2RL3 gene: a cardiovascular disease marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Li, Huiqi; Hedmer, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Albin, Maria; Broberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Welders are at risk for cardiovascular disease. Recent studies linked tobacco smoke exposure to hypomethylation of the F2RL3 (coagulation factor II (thrombin) receptor-like 3) gene, a marker for cardiovascular disease prognosis and mortality. However, whether welding fumes cause hypomethylation of F2RL3 remains unknown. We investigated 101 welders (median span of working as a welder: 7 years) and 127 unexposed controls (non-welders with no obvious exposure to respirable dust at work), age range 23-60 years, all currently non-smoking, in Sweden. The participants were interviewed about their work history, lifestyle factors and diseases. Personal sampling of respirable dust was performed for the welders. DNA methylation of F2RL3 in blood was assessed by pyrosequencing of four CpG sites, CpG_2 (corresponds to cg03636183) to CpG_5, in F2RL3. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between exposure to welding fumes and F2RL3 methylation. Welders had 2.6% lower methylation of CpG_5 than controls (pWelding fumes exposure and previous smoking were associated with F2RL3 hypomethylation. This finding links low-to-moderate exposure to welding fumes to adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, and suggests a potential mechanistic pathway for this link, via epigenetic effects on F2RL3 expression. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Effect of Fly Ash and Silica Fume on the Mechanical Properties of Cement Paste at Different Stages of Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-10

    All materials were placed in a clean, labeled stainless steel mixing bowl and weighed to the nearest ten thousandth of a pound. The cement and fly...on the Mechanical Properties of Cement Paste at Different Stages of Hydration This thesis investigates the effect of fly ash and silica fume on... cement paste hydration. Percentages of each additive will replace the cement by volume to be studied at five ages. These percentages will be compared

  12. Development of UHPC Mixtures Utilizing Natural and Industrial Waste Materials as Partial Replacements of Silica Fume and Sand

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Hakeem, Ibrahim; Maslehuddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    In the exploratory study presented in this paper, an attempt was made to develop different mixtures of ultrahigh performance concrete (UHPC) using various locally available natural and industrial waste materials as partial replacements of silica fume and sand. Materials such as natural pozzolana (NP), fly ash (FA), limestone powder (LSP), cement kiln dust (CKD), and pulverized steel slag (PSS), all of which are abundantly available in Saudi Arabia at little or no cost, were employed in the de...

  13. Influence upon the development of plants of zinc and lead, precipitated from factory fumes into the soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundergardh, H

    1927-01-01

    The investigation reported here deals with soil from a field situated close to a roasting factory for zinc ore. From the fumes of the factory, zinc and lead have precipitated into the soil. From the field, 25 kg of soil were taken from each of 6 places symmetrically distributed over the field and used in pot cultures. The results of experiments show that even though the soil is enriched in lead and zinc, they occur in nearly insoluble combinations, and are physiologically ineffective.

  14. The Use of Wetting Agents/Fume Supressants for Minimizing the Atmospheric Emissions from Hard Chromium Electroplating Baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    Accreditation (A2LA) for compliance with ISO 9001, Quality Systems - Model for Quality Assurance in Design, Development, Production, Installation and Servicing...All samples handling and testing at Patuxent River laboratory is ISO 9001 compliant. Appendix D, Table 1, 2, and 4 outline the test methods...HCF 0.1 4 3 8583 ± 288 8257/8909 8155/9012 1 TEST (N = 44090 CYCLES) TREATED AS AN OUTLIER. EXTRA HARD CHROME WITH FUME SUPPRESSANT HCF -1 4 4

  15. Association between Chinese cooking oil fumes and sleep quality among a middle-aged Chinese population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Fu; Nie, Guanghui; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Liang; Ma, Yifei; Peng, Suwan; Ou, Songfeng; Qin, Jian; Zhang, Li'e; Li, Shu; Zou, Ruosi; Zeng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zou, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    Poor sleep quality is an important symptom of many medical or psychiatric disorders. However, the impact of cooking oil fumes (COFs) on sleep quality has not been studied. This population-based cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the association between COFs of Chinese household cooking and sleep quality. Individual sleep quality assessment was completed in 2197 participants with an average age of 37.52 years, through Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Information about their cooking practice were also collected by self-reported questionnaire. As an internal biomarker of COFs, urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HOP) (n = 562) was further measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Binary logistic regression models were performed to evaluate the association between exposure to COFs and individual sleep quality. We found that, subjective poor kitchen ventilation, preheating oil to smoking, and cooking for over 30 minutes were positively associated with overall poor sleep quality (global PSQI score >5) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.43–2.16; 1.25, (1.03–1.52); 1.42, (1.15–1.76), respectively]. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjective poor kitchen ventilation still tend to increase the risk of long sleep latency, sleep disturbances, and daytime dysfunction [OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.09–1.73; 1.91, (1.39–2.61); 1.54, (1.23–1.93), respectively]. Similar results were observed in participants who preheated oil to smoking [OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.08–1.72; 1.55, (1.14–2.14); 1.25, (1.02–1.55), respectively] and cooked for over 30 minutes [OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.05–1.72; 1.46, (1.03–2.06); 1.36, (1.08–1.72), respectively]. Furthermore, high urinary 1-HOP level was also positively associated with overall poor sleep quality (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.31–4.05). The results indicated that exposure to COFs from Chinese household cooking may be a risk factor for poor sleep quality among

  16. Refreshing the Aged Latent Fingerprints with Ionizing Radiation Prior to the Cyanoacrylate Fuming Procedure: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristova, Mimoza M; Radiceska, Pavlina; Bozinov, Igorco; Barandovski, Lambe

    2016-05-01

    One of the crucial factors determining the cyanoacrylate deposit quality over latent fingerprints appeared to be the extent of the humidity. This work focuses on the enhancement/refreshment of age-degraded latent fingerprints by irradiating the samples with UV, X-ray, or thermal neutrons prior to the cyanoacrylate (CA) fuming. Age degradation of latent fingerprints deposited on glass surfaces was examined through the decrease in the number of characteristic minutiae counts over time. A term "critical day" was introduced for the time at which the average number of identifiable minutiae definitions drops to one-half. Fingerprints older than their "critical day" were exposed to either UV, X-ray, or thermal neutrons. Identical reference samples were kept unexposed. All samples, both reference and irradiated, were developed during a single CA fuming procedure. Comparative latent fingerprint analysis showed that exposure to ionizing radiation enhances the CA fuming, yielding a 20-30% increase in average minutiae count. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Parental Occupational Exposure to Heavy Metals and Welding Fumes and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors in Offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togawa, Kayo; Le Cornet, Charlotte; Feychting, Maria

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data are scarce on the association between prenatal/preconception environmental exposure and testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) in offspring. We examined parental occupational exposures to heavy metals and welding fumes in relation to TGCT in offspring in a registry-based case-control ......BACKGROUND: Data are scarce on the association between prenatal/preconception environmental exposure and testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) in offspring. We examined parental occupational exposures to heavy metals and welding fumes in relation to TGCT in offspring in a registry-based case......-control study (NORD-TEST Study). METHODS: We identified TGCT cases diagnosed at ages 14-49 years in Finland (1988-2012), Norway (1978-2010), and Sweden (1979-2011) through nationwide cancer registries. These cases were individually matched by country and year of birth to controls selected from population...... registries. Information on parental occupations was retrieved from censuses. From this, we estimated prenatal/preconception exposures of chromium, iron, nickel, lead, and welding fumes (all three countries), and cadmium (Finland only) for each parent using job-exposure matrices specifying prevalence (P...

  18. Development of UHPC mixtures utilizing natural and industrial waste materials as partial replacements of silica fume and sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shamsad; Hakeem, Ibrahim; Maslehuddin, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    In the exploratory study presented in this paper, an attempt was made to develop different mixtures of ultrahigh performance concrete (UHPC) using various locally available natural and industrial waste materials as partial replacements of silica fume and sand. Materials such as natural pozzolana (NP), fly ash (FA), limestone powder (LSP), cement kiln dust (CKD), and pulverized steel slag (PSS), all of which are abundantly available in Saudi Arabia at little or no cost, were employed in the development of the UHPC mixtures. A base mixture of UHPC without replacement of silica fume or sand was selected and a total of 24 trial mixtures of UHPC were prepared using different percentages of NP, FA, LSP, CKD, and PSS, partially replacing the silica fume and sand. Flow and 28-d compressive strength of each UHPC mixture were determined to finally select those mixtures, which satisfied the minimum flow and strength criteria of UHPC. The test results showed that the utilization of NP, FA, LSP, CKD, and PSS in production of UHPC is possible with acceptable flow and strength. A total of 10 UHPC mixtures were identified with flow and strength equal to or more than the minimum required.

  19. Development of UHPC Mixtures Utilizing Natural and Industrial Waste Materials as Partial Replacements of Silica Fume and Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsad Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the exploratory study presented in this paper, an attempt was made to develop different mixtures of ultrahigh performance concrete (UHPC using various locally available natural and industrial waste materials as partial replacements of silica fume and sand. Materials such as natural pozzolana (NP, fly ash (FA, limestone powder (LSP, cement kiln dust (CKD, and pulverized steel slag (PSS, all of which are abundantly available in Saudi Arabia at little or no cost, were employed in the development of the UHPC mixtures. A base mixture of UHPC without replacement of silica fume or sand was selected and a total of 24 trial mixtures of UHPC were prepared using different percentages of NP, FA, LSP, CKD, and PSS, partially replacing the silica fume and sand. Flow and 28-d compressive strength of each UHPC mixture were determined to finally select those mixtures, which satisfied the minimum flow and strength criteria of UHPC. The test results showed that the utilization of NP, FA, LSP, CKD, and PSS in production of UHPC is possible with acceptable flow and strength. A total of 10 UHPC mixtures were identified with flow and strength equal to or more than the minimum required.

  20. An Accelerated Test Method of Simultaneous Carbonation and Chloride Ion Ingress: Durability of Silica Fume Concrete in Severe Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ghahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack on mechanical characteristics and durability of concrete containing silica fume have been investigated through an accelerated test method. Specimens containing different amounts of silica fume were maintained in an apparatus in which carbon dioxide pressure and concentration and relative humidity were kept constant, and wetting and drying cycles in saline water were applied. Surface resistivity, sorptivity, CO2 consumption, and carbonation and chloride ion ingress depths measurements were taken. Phase change due to carbonation and chloride ion attack was monitored by XRD analysis, and microstructures and interfacial transition zones were studied by implementing SEM as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry. It was expected to have a synergistic effect in the tidal zone where simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack happen. However, the observed reduced surface resistivity, compared to specimens maintained in CO2 gas, could be due to the moisture that is available near the surface, hindering CO2 from penetrating into the pores of the specimens. Moreover, the porosity analysis of the specimens showed that the sample containing silica fume cured in the tidal zone had 50.1% less total porosity than the plain cement paste cured in the same condition.

  1. Effects of curing type, silica fume fineness, and fiber length on the mechanical properties and impact resistance of UHPFRC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Şahan Arel

    Full Text Available The effects of silica fume fineness and fiber aspect ratio on the compressive strength and impact resistance of ultra high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC are investigated experimentally. To this end, UHPFRC mixtures are manufactured by combining silica fumes with different fineness (specific surface areas: 17,200, 20,000, and 27,600 m2/kg and hooked-end steel fibers with various aspect ratios (lengths: 8, 13, and 16 mm. The samples are subjected to standard curing, steam curing, and hot-water curing. Compressive strength tests are conducted after 7-, 28-, 56-, and 90-day curing periods, and an impact resistance experiment is performed after the 90th day. A steam-cured mixture of silica fumes with a specific surface area of 27,600 m2/kg and 16-mm-long fibers produce better results than the other mixtures in terms of mechanical properties. Moreover, impact resistance increases with the fiber aspect ratio. Keywords: Curing, Fineness, UHPFRC, Mechanical properties, Fiber

  2. Exposure to diesel exhaust fumes in the context of exposure to ultrafine particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Bujak-Pietrek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Diesel exhaust fumes emission is a significant source of ultrafine particles, the size of which is expressed in nanometers. People occupationally exposed to diesel exhaust particles include mainly workers servicing vehicles with engines of this type. This article presents the analysis of measurements of ultrafine particle concentrations occurring in the bus depot premises during the work connected with everyday technical servicing of buses. Material and Methods: The measurements were carried out in the everyday servicing (ES room of the bus depot before, during and after the work connected with bus servicing. Determinations included: particle concentrations in terms of particle number and particle surface area, and mass concentrations of aerosol. Results: Mean value of number concentration of 10- to 1000-nm particles increased almost 20-fold, from 7600 particles/cm3 before starting bus servicing procedures to 130 000 particles/cm3 during the bus servicing procedures in the room. During the procedures, the mean surface area concentration of particles potentially deposited in the alveolar (A region was almost 3 times higher than that of the particles depositing in the tracheo-bronchial (TB region: 356.46 μm2/cm3 vs. 95.97 μm2/cm3, respectively. The mass concentration of the fraction of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter 0.02–1 μm (PM1 increased 5-fold during the analyzed procedures and was 0.042 mg/m3 before, and 0.298 mg/m3 while the procedures continued. Conclusions: At the time when bus servicing procedures continued in the ES room, a very high increase in all parameters of the analyzed particles was observed. The diesel exhaust particles exhibit a very high degree of fragmentation and, while their number is very high and their surface area is very large, their mass concentration is relatively low. The above findings confirm that ultrafine particles found in diesel exhaust fumes may be harmful to the health of the

  3. Altered ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelial cells following exposure to chemically distinct metal welding fume particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedan, Jeffrey S; Thompson, Janet A; Meighan, Terence G; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Antonini, James M

    2017-07-01

    Welding fume inhalation causes pulmonary toxicity, including susceptibility to infection. We hypothesized that airway epithelial ion transport is a target of fume toxicity, and investigated the effects of fume particulates from manual metal arc-stainless steel (MMA-SS) and gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS) on ion transport in normal human bronchial epithelium (NHBE) cultured in air-interface. MMA-SS particles, more soluble than GMA-MS particles, contain Cr, Ni, Fe and Mn; GMA-MS particles contain Fe and Mn. MMA-SS or GMA-MS particles (0.0167-166.7μg/cm 2 ) were applied apically to NHBEs. After 18h transepithelial potential difference (V t ), resistance (R t ), and short circuit current (I sc ) were measured. Particle effects on Na + and Cl¯ channels and the Na + ,K + ,2Cl¯-cotransporter were evaluated using amiloride (apical), 5-nitro-2-[(3-phenylpropyl)amino]benzoic acid (NPPB, apical), and bumetanide (basolateral), respectively. MMA-SS (0.0167-16.7μg/cm 2 ) increased basal V t . Only 16.7μg/cm 2 GMA-MS increased basal V t significantly. MMA-SS or GMA-MS exposure potentiated I sc responses (decreases) to amiloride and bumetanide, while not affecting those to NPPB, GMA-MS to a lesser degree than MMA-SS. Variable effects on R t were observed in response to amiloride, and bumetanide. Generally, MMA-SS was more potent in altering responses to amiloride and bumetanide than GMA-MS. Hyperpolarization occurred in the absence of LDH release, but decreases in V t , R t , and I sc at higher fume particulate doses accompanied LDH release, to a greater extent for MMA-SS. Thus, Na + transport and Na + ,K + ,2Cl¯-cotransport are affected by fume exposure; MMA-MS is more potent than GMA-MS. Enhanced Na + absorption and decreased airway surface liquid could compromise defenses against infection. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Hexavalent chromium content in stainless steel welding fumes is dependent on the welding process and shield gas type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean; Slaven, James; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Antonini, James

    2009-02-01

    Occupational exposure to welding fumes is a known health hazard. To isolate elements in stainless steel welding fumes with high potential for adverse health outcomes, fumes were generated using a robotic gas metal arc system, using four shield gases of varying oxygen content. The objective was to measure Cr(VI) concentrations in a broad spectrum of gas metal arc welding processes, and identify processes of exceptionally high or low Cr(VI) content. The gases used were 95% Ar/5% O(2), 98% Ar/2% O(2), 95% Ar/5%CO(2), and 75% He/25% Ar. The welder was operated in axial spray mode (Ar/O(2), Ar/CO(2)), short-circuit (SC) mode (Ar/CO(2) low voltage and He/Ar), and pulsed axial-spray mode (98% Ar/2% O(2)). Results indicate large differences in Cr(VI) in the fumes, with Ar/O(2) (Pulsed)>Ar/O(2)>Ar/CO(2)>Ar/CO(2) (SC)>He/Ar; values were 3000+/-300, 2800+/-85, 2600+/-120, 1400+/-190, and 320+/-290 ppm respectively (means +/- standard errors for 2 runs and 3 replicates per run). Respective rates of Cr(VI) generation were 1.5, 3.2, 4.4, 1.3, and 0.46 microg/min; generation rates were also calculated in terms of microg Cr(VI) per metre of wire used. The generation rates of Cr(VI) increased with increasing O(3) concentrations. Particle size measurements indicated similar distributions, but somewhat higher >0.6 microm fractions for the short-circuit mode samples. Fumes were also sampled into 2 selected size ranges, a microspatter fraction (>or=0.6 microm) and a fine (welding type and shield gas type, and this presents an opportunity to tailor welding practices to lessen Cr(VI) exposures in workplaces by selecting low Cr(VI)-generating processes. Short-circuit processes generated less Cr(VI) than axial-spray methods, and inert gas shielding gave lower Cr(VI) content than shielding with active gases. A short circuit He/Ar shielded process and a pulsed axial spray Ar/O(2) process were both identified as having substantially lower Cr(VI) generation rates per unit of wire used relative

  5. Number size distribution of fine and ultrafine fume particles from various welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Peter; Lenz, Klaus; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Studies in the field of environmental epidemiology indicate that for the adverse effect of inhaled particles not only particle mass is crucial but also particle size is. Ultrafine particles with diameters below 100 nm are of special interest since these particles have high surface area to mass ratio and have properties which differ from those of larger particles. In this paper, particle size distributions of various welding and joining techniques were measured close to the welding process using a fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). It turned out that welding processes with high mass emission rates (manual metal arc welding, metal active gas welding, metal inert gas welding, metal inert gas soldering, and laser welding) show mainly agglomerated particles with diameters above 100 nm and only few particles in the size range below 50 nm (10 to 15%). Welding processes with low mass emission rates (tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding) emit predominantly ultrafine particles with diameters well below 100 nm. This finding can be explained by considerably faster agglomeration processes in welding processes with high mass emission rates. Although mass emission is low for tungsten inert gas welding and resistance spot welding, due to the low particle size of the fume, these processes cannot be labeled as toxicologically irrelevant and should be further investigated.

  6. Flow injection determination of lead and cadmium in hair samples from workers exposed to welding fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cespon-Romero, R.M.; Yebra-Biurrun, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    A flow injection procedure involving continuous acid leaching for lead and cadmium determination in hair samples of persons in permanent contact with a polluted workplace environment by flame atomic absorption spectrometry is proposed. Variables such as sonication time, nature and concentration of the acid solution used as leaching solution, leaching temperature, flow-rate of the continuous manifold, leaching solution volume and hair particle size were simultaneously studied by applying a Plackett-Burman design approach. Results showed that nitric acid concentration (leaching solution), leaching temperature and sonication time were statistically significant variables (confidence interval of 95%). These last two variables were finally optimised by using a central composite design. The proposed procedure allowed the determination of cadmium and lead with limits of detection 0.1 and 1.0 μg g -1 , respectively. The accuracy of the developed procedure was evaluated by the analysis of a certified reference material (CRM 397, human hair, from the BCR). The proposed method was applied with satisfactory results to the determination of Cd and Pb in human hair samples of workers exposed to welding fumes

  7. Mechanism of alkalinity lowering and chemical equilibrium model of high fly ash silica fume cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Seiichi; Honda, Akira; Negishi, Kumi

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of alkalinity lowering of a High Fly ash Silica fume Cement (HFSC) under liquid/solid ratio conditions where the pH is largely controlled by the soluble alkali components (Region I) has been studied. This mechanism was incorporated in the chemical equilibrium model of HFSC. As a result, it is suggested that the dissolution and precipitation behavior of SO 4 2- partially contributes to alkalinity lowering of HFSC in Region I. A chemical equilibrium model of HFSC incorporating alkali (Na, K) adsorption, which was presumed as another contributing factor of the alkalinity lowering effect, was also developed, and an HFSC immersion experiment was analyzed using the model. The results of the developed model showed good agreement with the experiment results. From the above results, it was concluded that the alkalinity lowering of HFSC in Region I was attributed to both the dissolution and precipitation behavior of SO 4 2- and alkali adsorption, in addition to the absence of Ca(OH) 2 . A chemical equilibrium model of HFSC incorporating alkali and SO 4 2- adsorption was also proposed. (author)

  8. Influence of shielding gas on fume formation rate and particle size distribution for optimised GMAW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, K.R.; Monaghan, B.J.; Nicholson, A.; Cuiuri, D.; Norrish, J.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of shielding gas on fume formation rate (FFR) and particle size distribution has been investigated by using a technique developed for automatic control of the welding voltage in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). The results for automatic control are compared with the use of a fixed voltage. Significant reductions in FFR and a general decrease in average particle size were observed using the automatic control technique. This reduction in FFR was attributed to improved metal transfer stability, via a reduction in the occurrence of repelled globular transfer, by promoting the 'drop-spray' transfer condition, together with a reduction in the arc length. FFR and particle size were strongly related to the C O2 content of the shielding gas, where FFR increased as percent C 02 increased, due mainly to the dominant influence of C O2 on weld transfer and arc characteristics. The results indicate that FFR for GMAW in the spray regime should be determined by using optimised welding conditions for each shielding gas composition.

  9. Toxicological Investigation of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Four Occupants of a Fuming Sport Utility Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Nnoli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This toxicological investigation involves a report on the death of four occupants of a sport utility vehicle on one of the major busy Federal roads of Nigeria where they were held for up to three hours in a traffic jam while the car was steaming. Methods: Autopsy was executed using the standard procedure and toxicological analysis was done using simple spectrophotometric method to establish the level of carboxyhaemoglobin (HbCO in peripheral blood in the four occupants. Results: The autopsy report indicated generalized cyanosis, sub-conjuctival hemorrhages, marked laryngo-trachea edema with severe hyperemia with frothy fluid discharges characteristic of carbon monoxide poisoning. Toxicological report of the level of HbCO in part per million (ppm in the peripheral blood of the four occupants was A= 650 ppm; B= 500 ppm; C= 480 ppm, and D= 495 ppm against the maximum permissible level of 50 ppm. Conclusion: The sudden death of the four occupants was due to excessive inhalation of the carbon monoxide gas from the exhaust fumes leaking into the cabin of the car. The poor road network, numerous potholes, and traffic jam in most of roads in Nigeria could have exacerbated a leaky exhaust of the smoky second hand SUV car leading to the acute carbon monoxide poisoning.

  10. University of Missouri research reactor exhaust ventilation/laboratory fume hood upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, C.B. Jr.; McKibben, J.C.; McCracken, C.B.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Missouri research reactor (MURR) facility is located in Research Park, 1 mile south of the Columbia campus. The reactor is a 10-MW pressurized loop, in-pool-type, light-water-moderated, beryllium-and-graphite-reflected core, serviced by six radial beam tubes for research, and has sample irradiation facilities in both a flux trap and in the graphite region. The reactor operates at full power 150 h/week, 52 week/yr, making it one of the best operating schedules and the most extensively used of any university research reactor. This extensive utilization includes many programs, such as radioisotope applications, neutron activation analysis, etc., that depend heavily on fume hoods, glove boxes, and hot cells that put a tremendous demand on the exhaust system. The exhaust system is required to be operable whenever the reactor is operating and must have the capability of being operated from an emergency electrical generator on loss of site electrical power. The originally installed exhaust ventilation system was below needed capacity and, with increased program requirements and system age, the necessity to upgrade the system was paramount. The challenge was to complete the upgrade construction while continuing to operate the reactor and maintain all the other ongoing programs, rather than take the easy way of an extended shutdown. This paper discusses how MURR met this challenge and solved these problems, problems that are similarly experienced by almost all research reactors to some degree when major work is required on critical systems

  11. Enhancing the quality of aged latent fingerprints developed by superglue fuming: loss and replenishment of initiator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargacki, Stephen P; Lewis, Linda A; Dadmun, Mark D

    2008-09-01

    The recovery and identification of latent fingerprints from a crime scene are crucial to many investigations. The cyanoacrylate (superglue) fuming method (CFM), which develops fingerprints by growing a polymer coating over the print residue, is a powerful method but encounters severe limitations when prints are aged or exposed to harsh environmental conditions. We examine the aging process and how the changes that occur to a fingerprint residue over time influence the growth of polymer during development. We identify loss of initiator by erosion and degradation that, when coupled with a loss of water from the print residue, result in a decreased ability to polymerize ethylcyanoacrylate. Then, we present a methodology by which the ability of aged latent fingerprints to polymerize ethylcyanoacrylate is recovered. Two print enhancement agents, acetic acid and ammonia, are demonstrated to improve the growth of polymer from the print ridges by over an order of magnitude, while retaining the integrity of the print structure. Comparison between the two enhancement agents indicate that the enhancement occurs due to ridge coating by the ammonia or acetic acid and pH control of the latent print.

  12. Investigation of Fumed Silica/Aqueous NaCl Superdielectric Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Jenkins

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A constant current charge/discharge protocol which showed fumed silica filled to the point of incipient wetness with aqueous NaCl solution to have dielectric constants >108 over the full range of dielectric thicknesses of 0.38–3.9 mm and discharge times of 0.25–>100 s was studied, making this material another example of a superdielectric. The dielectric constant was impacted by both frequency and thickness. For time to discharge greater than 10 s the dielectric constant for all thicknesses needed to be fairly constant, always >109, although trending higher with increasing thickness. At shorter discharge times the dielectric constant consistently decreased, with decreasing time to discharge. Hence, it is reasonable to suggest that for time to discharge >10 s the dielectric constant at all thicknesses will be greater than 109. This in turn implies an energy density for a 5 micron thick dielectric layer in the order of 350 J/cm3 for discharge times greater than 10 s.

  13. Investigation of Fumed Silica/Aqueous NaCl Superdielectric Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Natalie; Petty, Clayton; Phillips, Jonathan

    2016-02-20

    A constant current charge/discharge protocol which showed fumed silica filled to the point of incipient wetness with aqueous NaCl solution to have dielectric constants >10⁸ over the full range of dielectric thicknesses of 0.38-3.9 mm and discharge times of 0.25->100 s was studied, making this material another example of a superdielectric. The dielectric constant was impacted by both frequency and thickness. For time to discharge greater than 10 s the dielectric constant for all thicknesses needed to be fairly constant, always >10⁸, although trending higher with increasing thickness. At shorter discharge times the dielectric constant consistently decreased, with decreasing time to discharge. Hence, it is reasonable to suggest that for time to discharge >10 s the dielectric constant at all thicknesses will be greater than 10⁸. This in turn implies an energy density for a 5 micron thick dielectric layer in the order of 350 J/cm³ for discharge times greater than 10 s.

  14. The analysis of lightweight brick strength pressure with mixture of glass powder and silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursyamsi; Liang, William

    2018-03-01

    Little by little the engineers research how the development of concrete that can utilize waste. In the utilization of the waste, it can be functioned as mixing material which the chemical or the physical traits of the used goods contain similarity to the mixture of concrete in general, one of them is glass powder as the substitute of cement. The glass powder that utilizes is the one that is sifted through sieve No. 200 as much as 10% of the weight of the cement. The testing specimen of the concrete brick is make of the mixture with the ratio of 1:7, then is added with the foaming agent (1:30) and silica fume (10% of the weight of the cement). Furthermore, visual examination, absorption, net weight and testing specimen compressive strength. The data analysis uses the reference of SNI 03 – 0349 – 1989 regarding Concrete Brick for the Match for the Wall. Foaming Agent is make by using modified hand drill and brace. The testing specimen uses the brick mold with the size of 40 cm x 20cm x 10 cm. Based on this research, it shows that the quality that results from brick is still qualified based on SNI 03 – 0349 – 1989.

  15. Fume emissions from a low-cost 3-D printer with various filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Evan L; Wang, Jun; Regens, James L

    2017-07-01

    3-D printing is an additive manufacturing process involving the injection of melted thermoplastic polymers, which are then laid down in layers to achieve a pre-designed shape. The heated deposition process raises concerns of potential aerosol and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emission and exposure. The decreasing cost of desktop 3-D printers has made the use of 3-D printers more acceptable in non-industrial workplaces lacking sufficient ventilation. Meanwhile, little is known about the characteristics of 3-D printing fume emission. The objective of this study was to characterize aerosols and VOC emissions generated from various filaments used with a low-cost 3-D printer in an environmental testing chamber. A pre-designed object was printed in 1.25 hours using eight types of filaments. A scanning mobility particle sizer and an aerodynamic particle sizer were employed to measure the particle size distribution in sub-half-micron fraction (printers due to high respirablity, especially if used in settings without proper guidance and engineering control.

  16. Reduction of cooking oil fume exposure following an engineering intervention in Chinese restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Shih, Tung-Sheng; Chen, Chiou-Jong; Hsu, Jin-Huei; Wang, Shun-Chih; Huang, Chien-Ping; Kuo, Ching-Tang; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Hu, Howard; Chan, Chang-Chuan

    2011-01-01

    A new engineering intervention measure, an embracing air curtain device (EACD), was used to increase the capture efficiency of cooker hoods and reduce cooking oil fume (COF) exposure in Chinese restaurants. An EACD was installed in six Chinese restaurants where the cooks complained of COF exposure. Before- and after-installation measurements were taken to compare changes in particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in kitchen air, and changes in levels of urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and malondialdehyde (MDA). The association between PM and PAHs in air and 8-OHdG and MDA in urine was evaluated by linear mixed-effects regression analysis. Results showed that geometric mean kitchen air levels of PM(10), PM(2.5), PM(1.0) and total particulate PAHs were significantly reduced after the EACDs were introduced. Urinary levels of 8-OHdG and MDA in cooks were also significantly lower after EACD instalment. PM(2.5), PM(1.0) and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) levels were positively associated with urinary 8-OHdG levels after adjusting for key personal covariates. Urinary MDA levels in cooks were also positively associated with BaP levels after adjusting for key personal covariates. This study demonstrates that the EACD is effective for reducing COF and oxidative stress levels in cooks working in Chinese kitchens.

  17. Effects of cooking method, cooking oil, and food type on aldehyde emissions in cooking oil fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-Yu; Lan, Cheng-Hang; Lin, Pei-Chen; Kuo, Yi-Chun

    2017-02-15

    Cooking oil fumes (COFs) contain a mixture of chemicals. Of all chemicals, aldehydes draw a great attention since several of them are considered carcinogenic and formation of long-chain aldehydes is related to fatty acids in cooking oils. The objectives of this research were to compare aldehyde compositions and concentrations in COFs produced by different cooking oils, cooking methods, and food types and to suggest better cooking practices. This study compared aldehydes in COFs produced using four cooking oils (palm oil, rapeseed oil, sunflower oil, and soybean oil), three cooking methods (stir frying, pan frying, and deep frying), and two foods (potato and pork loin) in a typical kitchen. Results showed the highest total aldehyde emissions in cooking methods were produced by deep frying, followed by pan frying then by stir frying. Sunflower oil had the highest emissions of total aldehydes, regardless of cooking method and food type whereas rapeseed oil and palm oil had relatively lower emissions. This study suggests that using gentle cooking methods (e.g., stir frying) and using oils low in unsaturated fatty acids (e.g., palm oil or rapeseed oil) can reduce the production of aldehydes in COFs, especially long-chain aldehydes such as hexanal and t,t-2,4-DDE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fumed and Precipitated Hydrophilic Silica Suspension Gels in Mineral Oil: Stability and Rheological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiki Sugino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrophilic fumed silica (FS and precipitated silica (PS powders were suspended in mineral oil; increasing the silica volume fraction (φ in the suspension led to the formation of sol, pre-gel, and gel states. Gelation took place at lower φ values in the FS than the PS suspension because of the lower silanol density on the FS surface. The shear stresses and dynamic moduli of the FS and PS suspensions were measured as a function of φ. Plots of the apparent shear viscosity against shear rate depended on φ and the silica powder. The FS suspensions in the gel state exhibited shear thinning, followed by a weak shear thickening or by constant viscosity with an increasing shear rate. In contrast, the PS suspensions in the gel state showed shear thinning, irrespective of φ. The dynamic moduli of the pre-gel and gel states were dependent on the surface silanol density: at a fixed φ, the storage modulus G′ in the linear viscoelasticity region was larger for the FS than for the PS suspension. Beyond the linear region, the G′ of the PS suspensions showed strain hardening and the loss modulus G″ of the FS and PS suspensions exhibited weak strain overshoot.

  19. Electric motor handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, B J

    2013-01-01

    Electric Motor Handbook aims to give practical knowledge in a wide range of capacities such as plant design, equipment specification, commissioning, operation and maintenance. The book covers topics such as the modeling of steady-state motor performance; polyphase induction, synchronous, and a.c. commutator motors; ambient conditions, enclosures, cooling and loss dissipation; and electrical supply systems and motor drives. Also covered are topics such as variable-speed drives and motor control; materials and motor components; insulation types, systems, and techniques; and the installation, sit

  20. Handbook on linear motor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This book guides the application for Linear motor. It lists classification and speciality of Linear Motor, terms of linear-induction motor, principle of the Motor, types on one-side linear-induction motor, bilateral linear-induction motor, linear-DC Motor on basic of the motor, linear-DC Motor for moving-coil type, linear-DC motor for permanent-magnet moving type, linear-DC motor for electricity non-utility type, linear-pulse motor for variable motor, linear-pulse motor for permanent magneto type, linear-vibration actuator, linear-vibration actuator for moving-coil type, linear synchronous motor, linear electromagnetic motor, linear electromagnetic solenoid, technical organization and magnetic levitation and linear motor and sensor.

  1. Interacting adiabatic quantum motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruch, Anton; Kusminskiy, Silvia Viola; Refael, Gil; von Oppen, Felix

    2018-05-01

    We present a field-theoretic treatment of an adiabatic quantum motor. We explicitly discuss a motor called the Thouless motor which is based on a Thouless pump operating in reverse. When a sliding periodic potential is considered to be the motor degree of freedom, a bias voltage applied to the electron channel sets the motor in motion. We investigate a Thouless motor whose electron channel is modeled as a Luttinger liquid. Interactions increase the gap opened by the periodic potential. For an infinite Luttinger liquid the coupling-induced friction is enhanced by electron-electron interactions. When the Luttinger liquid is ultimately coupled to Fermi liquid reservoirs, the dissipation reduces to its value for a noninteracting electron system for a constant motor velocity. Our results can also be applied to a motor based on a nanomagnet coupled to a quantum spin Hall edge.

  2. Chronic motor tic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic vocal tic disorder; Tic - chronic motor tic disorder ... Chronic motor tic disorder is more common than Tourette syndrome . Chronic tics may be forms of Tourette syndrome. Tics usually start ...

  3. Evaluation of the Pulmonary Toxicity of a Fume Generated from a Nickel-, Copper-Based Electrode to be Used as a Substitute in Stainless Steel Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Badding, Melissa A; Meighan, Terence G; Keane, Michael; Leonard, Stephen S; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiology has indicated a possible increase in lung cancer among stainless steel welders. Chromium (Cr) is a primary component of stainless steel welding fume. There is an initiative to develop alternative welding consumables [nickel (Ni)- and copper (Cu)-based alloys] that do not contain Cr. No study has been performed to evaluate the toxicity of fumes generated from Ni- and Cu-based consumables. Dose–response and time-course effects on lung toxicity of a Ni- and Cu-based welding fume (Ni–Cu WF) were examined using an in vivo and in vitro bioassay, and compared with two other well-characterized welding fumes. Even though only trace amounts of Cr were present, a persistent increase in lung injury and inflammation was observed for the Ni–Cu WF compared to the other fumes. The difference in response appears to be due to a direct cytotoxic effect by the Ni–Cu WF sample on lung macrophages as opposed to an elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). PMID:25392698

  4. Size-separated particle fractions of stainless steel welding fume particles - A multi-analytical characterization focusing on surface oxide speciation and release of hexavalent chromium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, N; Belleville, L; Cha, Y; Olofsson, U; Odnevall Wallinder, I; Persson, K-A; Hedberg, Y S

    2018-01-15

    Welding fume of stainless steels is potentially health hazardous. The aim of this study was to investigate the manganese (Mn) and chromium (Cr) speciation of welding fume particles and their extent of metal release relevant for an inhalation scenario, as a function of particle size, welding method (manual metal arc welding, metal arc welding using an active shielding gas), different electrodes (solid wires and flux-cored wires) and shielding gases, and base alloy (austenitic AISI 304L and duplex stainless steel LDX2101). Metal release investigations were performed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.3, 37°, 24h. The particles were characterized by means of microscopic, spectroscopic, and electroanalytical methods. Cr was predominantly released from particles of the welding fume when exposed in PBS [3-96% of the total amount of Cr, of which up to 70% as Cr(VI)], followed by Mn, nickel, and iron. Duplex stainless steel welded with a flux-cored wire generated a welding fume that released most Cr(VI). Nano-sized particles released a significantly higher amount of nickel compared with micron-sized particle fractions. The welding fume did not contain any solitary known chromate compounds, but multi-elemental highly oxidized oxide(s) (iron, Cr, and Mn, possibly bismuth and silicon). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Piezoelectric Motors, an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Spanner; Burhanettin Koc

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric motors are used in many industrial and commercial applications. Various piezoelectric motors are available in the market. All of the piezoelectric motors use the inverse piezoelectric effect, where microscopically small oscillatory motions are converted into continuous or stepping rotary or linear motions. Methods of obtaining long moving distance have various drive and functional principles that make these motors categorized into three groups: resonance-drive (piezoelectric ult...

  6. Electric Motor Thermal Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennion, Kevin S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Thermal management enables more efficient and cost-effective motors. This Annual Merit Review presentation describes the technical accomplishments and progress in electric motor thermal management R&D over the last year. This project supports a broad industry demand for data, analysis methods, and experimental techniques to improve and better understand motor thermal management.

  7. Programmable dc motor controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, J. E.

    1982-11-01

    A portable programmable dc motor controller, with features not available on commercial instruments was developed for controlling fixtures during welding processes. The controller can be used to drive any dc motor having tachometer feedback and motor requirements not exceeding 30 volts, 3 amperes. Among the controller's features are delayed start time, upslope time, speed, and downslope time.

  8. The Far Ultraviolet M-dwarf Evolution Survey (FUMES): Overview and Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, J. Sebastian; France, Kevin; Youngblood, Allison

    2018-01-01

    M-dwarf stars are prime targets for exoplanet searches because of their close proximity and favorable properties for both planet detection and characterization, with current searches around these targets having already discovered several Earth-sized planets within their star’s habitable zones. However, the atmospheric characterization and potential habitability of these exoplanetary systems depends critically on the high-energy stellar radiation environment from X-rays to NUV. Strong radiation at these energies can lead to atmospheric mass loss and is a strong driver of photochemistry in planetary atmospheres. Recently, the MUSCLES Treasury Survey provided the first comprehensive assessment of the high-energy radiation field around old, planet hosting M-dwarfs. However, the habitability and potential for such exoplanetary atmospheres to develop life also depends on the evolution of the atmosphere and hence the evolution of the incident radiation field. The strong high-energy spectrum of young M-dwarfs can have devastating consequences for the potential habitability of a given system. We, thus, introduce the Far Ultraviolet M-dwarf Evolution Survey (FUMES), a new HST-STIS observing campaign targeting 10 early-mid M dwarfs with known rotation periods, including 6 targets with known ages, to assess the evolution of the FUV radiation, including Lyα, of M-dwarf stars with stellar rotation period. We present the initial results of our survey characterizing the FUV emission features of our targets and the implications of our measurements for the evolution of the entire high-energy radiation environment around M-dwarfs from youth to old age.

  9. Influence of silica fume on mechanical and physical properties of recycled aggregate concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür Çakır

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Several studies related to sustainable concrete construction have encouraged development of composite binders, involving Portland cement, industrial by-products, and concrete mixes with partial replacement of natural aggregate with recycled aggregate. In this paper, the effects of incorporating silica fume (SF in the concrete mix design to improve the quality of recycled aggregates in concrete are presented. Portland cement was replaced with SF at 0%, 5% and 10%. Specimens were manufactured by replacing natural aggregates with recycled aggregates. Two size fractions (4/12 mm and 8/22 mm as recycled aggregates were used and four series of concrete mixtures were produced. In all concrete mixtures, a constant water/binder ratio at 0.50 was used and concrete mixtures with a target initial slump of S4 class (16–21 cm were prepared. Concrete properties were evaluated by means of compressive strength, tensile splitting strength, water absorption and ultrasonic pulse velocity and it was found that, using 10% SF as a cement replacement for recycled aggregate concretes enhanced the mechanical and physical properties of concrete. At all the test ages the tensile splitting strength gain of the natural aggregate concrete mixture (NA with and without SF was higher than that of the recycled concrete mixtures. Continuous and significant improvement in the tensile splitting strength of recycled aggregate concretes incorporating SF was observed. Similar to compressive strength test results, concrete incorporating 10% SF and containing 4/12 mm fraction recycled aggregates showed better performance among recycled aggregate concretes.

  10. Nature and morphology of fumed oxides and features of interfacial phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gun’ko, V.M.; Zarko, V.I.; Goncharuk, O.V.; Matkovsky, A.K.; Remez, O.S.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Wojcik, G.; Walusiak, B.; Blitz, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Effects of oxide surface structure on interfacial behavior of nonpolar and polar adsorbates. • Confined space effects on freezing and melting temperatures of bound adsorbates. • Equilibrium adsorption and evaporation rate vs. structure of nanooxide adsorbents. - Abstract: Individual and complex fumed nanooxides were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, adsorption, desorption (evaporation), and quantum chemical methods. For mixed nanooxides in contrast to simple and small nanoparticles of individual silica or titania, complex core–shell nanoparticles (50–200 nm in size) with titania or alumina cores and silica or alumina shells can be destroyed under high-pressure cryogelation (HPCG), mechnochemical activation (MCA) that also affect the structure of aggregates of nanoparticles and agglomerates of aggregates becoming more compacted. This is accompanied by changes in color from white to beige of different tints and changes in the UV–vis spectra in the 300–600 nm range, as well as changes in crystalline structure of alumina. Any treatment of ‘soft’ nanooxides affects the interfacial behavior of polar and nonpolar adsorbates. For some of them, the hysteresis loops become strongly open. Rearrangement of secondary particles affects the freezing-melting point depression. Clusterization of adsorbates bound in pores causes diminution of heat effects during phase transition (freezing, fusion). Freezing point depression and increasing melting point cause significant hysteresis freezing-melting effects for adsorbates bound to oxide nanoparticles. The study shows that complex nanooxides can be more sensitive to external actions than simple nanooxides such as silica.

  11. On the effectiveness of incorporating shear thickening fluid with fumed silica particles in hip protectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, A.; Goh, B. W. Y.; Tay, T. E.; Lee, H. P.; Rammohan, A. V.; Tan, V. B. C.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a smart hip protector by incorporating shear thickening fluid (STF) into conventional foam hip protectors. The shear thickening properties of fumed silica particles dispersed in liquid polyethylene glycol (PEG) were determined from rheological tests. Dynamic drop tests, using a 4 kg drop platen at 0.5 m drop height, were conducted to study how STF improves energy absorption as compared to unfilled foam and PEG filled foam. The results show that PEG filled foam reduces the mean peak force transmitted by a further 55% and mean peak displacement by 32.5% as compared to the unfilled foam; the STF filled foam further reduces mean peak force and displacement by 15% and 41% respectively when compared to the PEG filled foam. At a displacement of 22 mm, the STF filled foam absorbs 7.4 times more energy than the PEG filled foam. The results of varying the drop mass and drop height show that the energy absorbed per unit displacement for STF filled foam is always higher than that of PEG filled foam. Finally, the effectiveness of a prototype of hip protector made from 15 mm thick STF filled foam in preventing hip fractures was studied under two different loading conditions: distributed load (plate drop test) and concentrated load (ball drop test). The results of the plate and ball drop tests show that among all hip protectors tested in this study, only the prototype can reduce the mean peak impact force to be lower than the force required to fracture a hip bone (3.1 kN) regardless of the type of loading. Moreover, the peak force of the prototype is about half of this value, suggesting thinner prototype could have been used instead. These findings show that STF is effective in improving the performance of hip protectors.

  12. Effect of silica fume addition on the PGNAA measurement of chlorine in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, A.A.; Maslehuddin, M.; Garwan, M.A.; Nagadi, M.M.; Al-Amoudi, O.S.B.; Raashid, M.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman

    2010-01-01

    Pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), and blast furnace slag (BFS) are added to Portland cement in concrete to prevent reinforcement steel corrosion in concrete. Further preventive measure against reinforcement steel corrosion require monitoring of chloride salts concentration in concrete using non-destructive techniques, such as the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. Due to interferences between gamma-rays from chlorine and calcium in PGNAA technique, detection limit of chlorine in concrete strongly depends upon calcium concentration in concrete. SF mainly contains silica and its addition to cement concrete reduces overall concentration of calcium in concrete. This may result in an improvement in detection limit of chlorine in SF-based concrete in PGNAA studies. Particularly for chlorine detection using 6.11 and 6.62 MeV prompt gamma-rays that strongly interfere with 6.42 MeV prompt gamma-rays from calcium. In this study, SF was added to Portland cement to prevent concrete reinforcement steel from corrosion. The chlorine concentration in SF cement concrete specimens containing 0.2-3.0 wt% chlorine was measured through yield of 1.16, 1.95, 6.11, 6.62, 7.41, 7.79, and 8.58 MeV chlorine gamma-rays using PGNAA technique. An excellent agreement was noted between the experimental yield of the prompt gamma-rays and the gamma-ray yield calculated through the Monte Carlo simulations. Further the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in SF cement concrete was calculated and compared with the MDC values of chlorine in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement. The MDC of chlorine in SF-based concrete through 6.11 MeV, and 6.62 MeV chlorine gamma-rays was found to be improved as compared to those in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement.

  13. Nature and morphology of fumed oxides and features of interfacial phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gun’ko, V.M., E-mail: vlad_gunko@ukr.net [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Zarko, V.I.; Goncharuk, O.V.; Matkovsky, A.K.; Remez, O.S. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Wojcik, G. [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Walusiak, B.; Blitz, J.P. [Eastern Illinois University, Department of Chemistry, Charleston, IL 61920 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Effects of oxide surface structure on interfacial behavior of nonpolar and polar adsorbates. • Confined space effects on freezing and melting temperatures of bound adsorbates. • Equilibrium adsorption and evaporation rate vs. structure of nanooxide adsorbents. - Abstract: Individual and complex fumed nanooxides were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, adsorption, desorption (evaporation), and quantum chemical methods. For mixed nanooxides in contrast to simple and small nanoparticles of individual silica or titania, complex core–shell nanoparticles (50–200 nm in size) with titania or alumina cores and silica or alumina shells can be destroyed under high-pressure cryogelation (HPCG), mechnochemical activation (MCA) that also affect the structure of aggregates of nanoparticles and agglomerates of aggregates becoming more compacted. This is accompanied by changes in color from white to beige of different tints and changes in the UV–vis spectra in the 300–600 nm range, as well as changes in crystalline structure of alumina. Any treatment of ‘soft’ nanooxides affects the interfacial behavior of polar and nonpolar adsorbates. For some of them, the hysteresis loops become strongly open. Rearrangement of secondary particles affects the freezing-melting point depression. Clusterization of adsorbates bound in pores causes diminution of heat effects during phase transition (freezing, fusion). Freezing point depression and increasing melting point cause significant hysteresis freezing-melting effects for adsorbates bound to oxide nanoparticles. The study shows that complex nanooxides can be more sensitive to external actions than simple nanooxides such as silica.

  14. Effect of silica fume addition on the PGNAA measurement of chlorine in concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Center for Engineering Research, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Raashid, M.; Khateeb-ur-Rehman [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-03-15

    Pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash (FA), silica fume (SF), and blast furnace slag (BFS) are added to Portland cement in concrete to prevent reinforcement steel corrosion in concrete. Further preventive measure against reinforcement steel corrosion require monitoring of chloride salts concentration in concrete using non-destructive techniques, such as the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) technique. Due to interferences between gamma-rays from chlorine and calcium in PGNAA technique, detection limit of chlorine in concrete strongly depends upon calcium concentration in concrete. SF mainly contains silica and its addition to cement concrete reduces overall concentration of calcium in concrete. This may result in an improvement in detection limit of chlorine in SF-based concrete in PGNAA studies. Particularly for chlorine detection using 6.11 and 6.62 MeV prompt gamma-rays that strongly interfere with 6.42 MeV prompt gamma-rays from calcium. In this study, SF was added to Portland cement to prevent concrete reinforcement steel from corrosion. The chlorine concentration in SF cement concrete specimens containing 0.2-3.0 wt% chlorine was measured through yield of 1.16, 1.95, 6.11, 6.62, 7.41, 7.79, and 8.58 MeV chlorine gamma-rays using PGNAA technique. An excellent agreement was noted between the experimental yield of the prompt gamma-rays and the gamma-ray yield calculated through the Monte Carlo simulations. Further the minimum detectable concentration (MDC) of chlorine in SF cement concrete was calculated and compared with the MDC values of chlorine in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement. The MDC of chlorine in SF-based concrete through 6.11 MeV, and 6.62 MeV chlorine gamma-rays was found to be improved as compared to those in plain concrete and concrete mixed with fly ash cement.

  15. Frankincense and myrrh essential oils and burn incense fume against micro-inhabitants of sacral ambients. Wisdom of the ancients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljaljević Grbić, Milica; Unković, Nikola; Dimkić, Ivica; Janaćković, Peđa; Gavrilović, Milan; Stanojević, Olja; Stupar, Miloš; Vujisić, Ljubodrag; Jelikić, Aleksa; Stanković, Slaviša; Vukojević, Jelena

    2018-03-09

    Essential oils obtained from resins of Boswellia carteri Birdw. and Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl., commonly known as frankincense and true myrrh respectively, have been used extensively since 2800 BCE for the treatment of skin sores, wounds, teeth, inflammation, and urinary tract diseases in traditional medicine; for preparation of mummification balms and unguents; and also as incense and perfumes. Since ancient times, burning of frankincense and myrrh in places of worship for spiritual purposes and contemplation (a ubiquitous practice across various religions) had hygienic functions, to refine the smell and reduce contagion by purifying the indoor air. The general purpose of the study was to assess the in vitro antimicrobial potential of the liquid and vapour phases of B. carteri and C. myrrha essential oils and burn incense, as well as to test the effectiveness of their in situ application to cleanse microbially-contaminated air within the ambient of an investigated 17th-century church. The chemical composition of B. carteri and C. myrrha essential oils, obtained by hydrodistillation of frankincense and true myrrh oleo gum resins was determined using GC/MS, and antimicrobial properties of their liquid and vapour phases were assessed by the broth microdilution and microatmosphere diffusion methods. Chemical analysis of burn incense fume obtained using bottle gas washing with dichloromethane as a solvent was performed by GC/MS, while its antimicrobial activity was evaluated using a modified microatmosphere diffusion method to evaluate germination inhibition for fungi and CFU count reduction for bacteria. The in situ antimicrobial activity of B. carteri burn incense and essential oil vapour phase was assessed in the sealed nave and diaconicon of the church, respectively. The dominant compounds of B. carteri EO were α-pinene (38.41%) and myrcene (15.21%), while C. myrrha EO was characterized by high content of furanoeudesma-1,3-diene (17.65%), followed by curzerene

  16. Motor/generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickam, Christopher Dale [Glasford, IL

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  17. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Ching CHENG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed that concrete with higher compressive strength in Los Angeles abrasion tests also had better abrasion resistance. The inclusion of steel fibers into test concrete with a water-binder ratio of 0.35 resulted in a significant increase in compressive strength. This concrete also displayed better abrasion resistance and splitting tensile strength than reference concrete; in the test sample with a water-binder ratio of 0.55, the added steel fibers was unable to effectively produce cementation with the concrete. The inclusion of silica fume improved the abrasion resistance of concretes. In water abrasion testing, the abrasion resistance of concrete containing steel fiber was worse than that of concrete without steel fibers. In the water abrasion testing, the surface of steel fiber reinforced concrete was eroded by water and steel balls, and the impact caused the steel fibers to separate from the concrete and led to higher wear loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6460

  18. Piezoelectric Motors, an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Spanner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric motors are used in many industrial and commercial applications. Various piezoelectric motors are available in the market. All of the piezoelectric motors use the inverse piezoelectric effect, where microscopically small oscillatory motions are converted into continuous or stepping rotary or linear motions. Methods of obtaining long moving distance have various drive and functional principles that make these motors categorized into three groups: resonance-drive (piezoelectric ultrasonic motors, inertia-drive, and piezo-walk-drive. In this review, a comprehensive summary of piezoelectric motors, with their classification from initial idea to recent progress, is presented. This review also includes some of the industrial and commercial applications of piezoelectric motors that are presently available in the market as actuators.

  19. Motor degradation prediction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  20. Neuroplasticity & Motor Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Lundbye

    Practice of a new motor task is usually associated with an improvement in performance. Indeed, if we stop practicing and return the next day to the same task, we find that our performance has been maintained and may even be better than it was at the start of the first day. This improvement...... is a measure of our ability to form and store a motor memory of the task. However, the initial memory of the task is labile and may be subject to interference. During and following motor learning plastic changes occur within the central nervous system. On one hand these changes are driven by motor practice......, on the other hand the changes underlie the formation of motor memory and the retention of improved motor performance. During motor learning changes may occur at many different levels within the central nervous system dependent on the type of task and training. Here, we demonstrate different studies from our...

  1. Irritative effects of fumes and aerosols of bitumen on the airways: results of a cross-shift study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Pesch, Beate; Kappler, Martin; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Rihs, Hans Peter; Merget, Rolf; Bruening, Thomas [Institut der Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Berufsgenossenschaftliches Forschungsinstitut fuer Arbeitsmedizin (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Schott, Klaus [Berufsgenossenschaft der Bauwirtschaft (BG BAU), Munich (Germany); Preuss, Ralf; Angerer, Juergen [Universitaet Erlangen, Institut und Poliklinik fuer Arbeits-, Sozial- und Umweltmedizin (IPASUM), Erlangen (Germany); Hahn, Jens Uwe [Berufsgenossenschaftliches Institut fuer Arbeitsschutz (BGIA), Sankt Augustin (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    Possible health hazards of fumes and aerosols of bitumen are in discussion, and data on their adverse effects on human airways under current exposure conditions are limited. To assess the irritative effects of exposure to fumes and aerosols of bitumen on the airways, a cross-sectional cross-shift study was conducted including external and internal exposure measurements, spirometry and especially non-invasive methods like nasal lavage collection and induction of sputum in order to identify and evaluate more precisely inflammatory process in the upper and lower airways. The cross-shift study comprised 74 mastic asphalt workers who were exposed to fumes and aerosols of bitumen and 49 construction workers without this exposure as reference group. Questionnaire, spirometry, ambient monitoring and urinary analysis were performed. Humoral and cellular parameters were measured in nasal lavage fluid (NALF) and induced sputum. For data analysis, a mixed linear model was performed on the different outcomes with exposure group, time of measurement (pre-, post-shift), current smoking, German nationality and age as fixed factors and subjects as random factor. Based on personal exposure measurements during shift, mastic asphalt workers were classified into a low ({<=}10 mg/m{sup 3}; n = 46) and a high (>10 mg/m{sup 3}; n = 28) exposure group. High exposure was accompanied by significant higher urinary post-shift concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene and the sum of hydroxyphenanthrenes. Acute respiratory symptoms were reported more frequently in the high exposure group after shift. Significant cross-shift declines in lung function parameters (forced expiratory volume in 1 s [FEV{sub 1} (% predicted)] and forced vital capacity [FVC (% predicted)]) were measured in mastic asphalt workers. Pre-shift FEV{sub 1} (% predicted) and FVC (% predicted) were higher in the low exposure group. In pre- and post-shift NALF samples, interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-, IL-8- and total protein concentrations

  2. The Use of Wetting Agents/Fume Suppressants for Minimizing the Atmospheric Emissions from Hard Chromium Electroplating Baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-01

    PFOA), perfluorooctane sulphonic acid (PFOSA) and clofibric acid . Biochim Biophys Acta 1128: 65-72 Kannan K, Koistinen J, Beckmen K, Evans T...mg/dscm (6.6 x 10-6 gr/dscf) Decorative Chromium Plating Baths Using Chromic Acid All new and existing baths 0.01 mg/dscm (4.4 x 10-6 gr/dscf...surface of the baths, causing the production of chromic acid mist. “Surface active” fume suppressants (also called surfactants) are added directly

  3. Exposure to rubber fume and rubber process dust in the general rubber goods, tyre manufacturing and retread industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dost, A A; Redman, D; Cox, G

    2000-08-01

    This study assesses the current patterns and levels of exposure to rubber fume and rubber process dust in the British rubber industry and compares and contrasts the data obtained from the general rubber goods (GRG), retread tire (RT) and new tire (NT) sectors. A total of 179 rubber companies were visited and data were obtained from 52 general rubber goods, 29 retread tire and 7 new tire manufacturers. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire and included a walk-through inspection of the workplace to assess the extent of use of control measures and the nature of work practices being employed. The most recent (predominantly 1995-97) exposure monitoring data for rubber fume and rubber process dust were obtained from these companies; no additional sampling was conducted for the purpose of this study. In addition to the assessment of exposure data, evaluation of occupational hygiene reports for the quality of information and advice was also carried out.A comparison of the median exposures for processes showed that the order of exposure to rubber fume (E, in mg m(-3)) is: E(moulding) (0.40) approximately E(extrusion) (0.33)>E(milling) (0.18) for GRG; E(press) (0. 32)>E(extrusion) (0.19)>E(autoclave) (0.10) for RT; and E(press) (0. 22) approximately E(all other) (0.22) for NT. The order of exposure to rubber fume between sectors was E(GRG) (0.40)>E(RT) (0.32)>E(NT) (0.22). Median exposures to rubber process dust in the GRG was E(weighing) (4.2)>E(mixing) (1.2) approximately E(milling) (0.8) approximately E(extrusion) (0.8) and no significant difference (P=0. 31) between GRG and NT sectors. The findings compare well with the study carried out in the Netherlands [Kromhout et al. (1994), Annals of Occupational Hygiene 38(1), 3-22], and it is suggested that the factors governing the significant differences noted between the three sectors relate principally to the production and task functions and also to the extent of controls employed. Evaluation of occupational

  4. The effects of silica fume and hydrated lime on the strength development and durability characteristics of concrete under hot water curing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is considered to be highly important for preserving continued industrial growth and human development. Concrete, being the world’s largest manufacturing material comprises cement as an essential binding component for strength development. However, excessive production of cement due to high degree of construction practices around the world frames cement as a leading pollutant of releasing significant amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere. To overcome this environmental degradation, silica fume and hydrated lime are used as partial replacements to cement. This paper begins with the examination of the partial replacement levels of hydrated lime and silica fume in concrete and their influence on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. The effect of hot water curing on concrete incorporated with both silica fume and hydrated lime is also investigated in this paper. The results reported in this paper show that the use of silica fume as a partial replacement material improved both the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete due to the formation of calcium silica hydrate crystals through the pozzolanic reaction. Although the hydrated lime did not significantly contribute in the development of strength, its presence enhanced the durability of concrete especially at long-term. The results also showed that hot water curing enhanced the strength development of concrete incorporated with silica fume due to the accelerated rate of both the hydration and pozzolanic reaction that takes place between silica fume and calcium hydroxide of the cement matrix particularly at early times. The results reported in this paper have significant contribution in the development of sustainable concrete. The paper does not only address the use of alternative binders as a partial replacement material in concrete but also suggest proper curing conditions for the proposed replacement materials. These practices

  5. 发烟硫酸浓度互换公式的推导%Derivation about Concentrations Exchanging Formula of Fuming Sulphuric Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭靖辉; 唐淑贞

    2011-01-01

    指出发烟硫酸是游离态SO3的H2SO4溶液,运用质量守恒定律对发烟硫酸浓度互换公式进行了推导,阐述了使用该公式的注意事项。%Fuming sulphuric acid was regarded as SO3 of free state in sulfuric acid solution,concentrations exchanging formula of fuming sulphuric acid was deduced by mass conservation law,attentions of formula were expounded.

  6. Influence of organic solvents on interfacial water at surfaces of silica gel and partially silylated fumed silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turov, V.V.; Gun'ko, V.M.; Tsapko, M.D.; Bogatyrev, V.M.; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J.; Leboda, R.; Ryczkowski, J.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of organic solvents (dimethylsulfoxide-d 6 (DMSO-d 6 ), chloroform-d, acetone-d 6 , and acetonitrile-d 3 ) on the properties of interfacial water at surfaces of silica gel Si-40 and partially silylated fumed silica A-380 were studied by means of the 1 H NMR spectroscopy with freezing-out of adsorbed water at 180 1 H NMR investigations were also analysed on the basis of the structural characteristics of silicas and quantum chemical calculations of the chemical shifts δ H and solvent effects. DMSO-d 6 and acetonitrile-d 3 are poorly miscible with water in silica gel pores in contrast to the bulk liquids. DMSO-d 6 and chloroform-d affect the structure of the interfacial water weaker than acetone-d 6 and acetonitrile-d 3 at amounts of liquids greater than the pore volume. Acetone-d 6 and acetonitrile-d 3 can displace water from pores under this condition. The chemical shift of protons in water adsorbed on silica gel is 3.5-6.5 ppm, which corresponds to the formation of two to four hydrogen bonds per molecule. Water adsorbed on partially silylated fumed silica has two 1 H NMR signals at 5 and 1.1-1.7 ppm related to different structures (droplets and small clusters) of the interfacial water

  7. Mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol modified cement mortar with silica fume used as matrix including radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dakroury, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discussed the mechanical and chemical properties of polyvinyl alcohol - modified cement mortar with silica fume to assess the safety for disposal of radioactive waste. The modified cement mortars containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) in the presence of 10 % silica fume (SF) .The chemical reaction between polymer and cement - hydrated product were investigated by the Infrared Spectral Technology, Differential Thermal Analysis and X-ray diffraction. The leaching of 137Cs from a waste composite into a surrounding fluid has been studied .The results shown that PVA increases the strength and decreases the porosity. The increase in strength duo to the interaction of PVA with cement , may be forming some new compound that fill the pores or improve the bond between the cement . The pozzolanic reaction of the SF increases the calcium silicate hydrates in the hardening matrix composites. There is distinct change in the refinement of the pore structure in cement composites giving fewer capillary pores and more of the finer gel pores

  8. Synthesis and comparison of mechanical behavior of fly ash-epoxy and silica fumes-epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangamesh; Ravishankar, K. S.; Kulkarni, S. M.

    2017-08-01

    Present day innovation requires materials with a typical combination of properties that are not possible by conventional metal, alloys, ceramics and polymeric materials. Particulate reinforcements for polymers are selected with the dual objective of improving composite properties and save on the total cost of the system. The point of this study is to utilize and compare the mechanical properties of filler (fly ash and silica fumes) reinforced epoxy composites. The composites of different proportions by percentage of matrix (100%), fillers (5%, 10% and 15%) volume are developed using hand lay-up process are tested for tensile and compression, according to ASTM Standards. From these mechanical properties, the flexural analysis of these composites is simulated. And which are characterized by Scanning electron microscopy for the fracture surface study, which reveals the brittle fracture, this also conforms from the Finite element analysis (FEA). And the overall mechanical properties of the fly ash reinforced polymer composites were found to have better than silica fumes reinforced composites.

  9. In vitro dentin permeability after application of Gluma® desensitizer as aqueous solution or aqueous fumed silica dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Ishihata

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess and to compare the effects of Gluma® Desensitizer (GDL with an experimental glutaraldehyde and HEMA containing fumed silica dispersion (GDG on dentin permeability using a chemiluminous tracer penetration test. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty disc-shaped dentin specimens were dissected from extracted human third molars. The dentin specimens were mounted in a split chamber device for determination of permeability under liquid pressure using a photochemical method. Ten specimens were randomly selected and allocated to the evaluation groups Gluma® Desensitizer as aqueous solution and glutaraldehyde/HEMA as fumed silica dispersion, respectively. Dentin disc permeability was determined at two pressure levels after removal of smear with EDTA, after albumin soaking, and after application of the desensitizing agents. Two desensitizer-treated and rinsed specimens of each group were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM for surface remnants. RESULTS: Comparatively large standard deviations of the mean EDTA reference and albumin soaked samples permeability values refected the differences of the dentin substrates. The mean chemiluminescence values of specimen treated with GDL and GDG, respectively, were signifcantly reduced after topical application of the desensitizing agents on albumin-soaked dentin. The effects of GDL and GDG on permeability were not signifcantly different. Treated specimens showed no surface remnants after rinsing. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental desensitizer gel formulation reduced dentin permeability as effectively as the original Gluma® Desensitizer solution.

  10. Peak expiratory flow rate in asymptomatic male workers exposed to chemical fumes, in various industries of Hyderabad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padaki Samata K, Dambal Amrut , Kokiwar Prashant

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Context: The prevalence of occupational health hazards and mortality has been reported to be unusually high among people of India. Although developed countries are very much careful about the health in occupations it is quite neglected in the developing countries like India. Aims: To record PEFR in asymptomatic male workers exposed to chemical fumes for more than 2 years and compare the results with age matched unexposed, healthy male controls. Methods and Material: This was a comparative study between 50 asymptomatic male workers exposed to chemical fumes for more than 2 years in various industries located at Jeedimetla Industrial Area and 50 unexposed healthy male individuals from general population. The sampling was done by simple random sampling (lottery method. The data was collected in the Research Laboratory of Physiology. Anthropometry like weight, height, was measured and the PEFR test was performed in the standing position by taking a deep inspiration and then blowing out as hard and as quickly as possible with their nose closed. Data was analyzed by using SPSS package and was expressed in terms of mean ± SD. Results: It was observed that mean PEFR was statistically highly significant in cases (p = 0.0001, and PEFR decreased with increase in duration of exposure. Conclusions: Thus, it can be concluded that apparently healthy individuals may also have abnormal PEFR findings. Hence, a regular check on these parameters will help them in reducing the chances of its manifestation at a future date.

  11. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. Graham; Warner, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Graham Jones, J., and Warner, C. G. (1972).Brit. J. industr. Med.,29, 169-177. Chronic exposure to iron oxide, chromium oxide, and nickel oxide fumes of metal dressers in a steelworks. Occupational and medical histories, smoking habits, respiratory symptoms, chest radiographs, and ventilatory capacities were studied in 14 steelworkers employed as deseamers of steel ingots for periods of up to 16 years. The men were exposed for approximately five hours of each working shift to fume concentrations ranging from 1·3 to 294·1 mg/m3 made up mainly of iron oxide with varying proportions of chromium oxide and nickel oxide. Four of the men, with 14 to 16 years' exposure, showed radiological evidence of pneumoconiosis classified as ILO categories 2 or 3. Of these, two had pulmonary function within the normal range and two had measurable loss of function, moderate in one case and mild in the other. Many observers would diagnose these cases as siderosis but the authors consider that this term should be reserved for cases exposed to pure iron compounds. The correct diagnosis is mixed-dust pneumoconiosis and the loss of pulmonary function is caused by the effects of the mixture of metallic oxides. It is probable that inhalation of pure iron oxide does not cause fibrotic pulmonary changes, whereas the inhalation of iron oxide plus certain other substances obviously does. Images PMID:5021996

  12. Motor degradation prediction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor's duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures

  13. Pulmonary function abnormalities and airway irritation symptoms of metal fumes exposure on automobile spot welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiin-Chyuan John; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Shen, Wu-Shiun

    2006-06-01

    Spot or resistance welding has been considered less hazardous than other types of welding. Automobile manufacturing is a major industry in Taiwan. Spot and arc welding are common processes in this industry. The respiratory effects on automobile spot welders exposed to metal fumes are investigated. The cohort consisted of 41 male auto-body spot welders, 76 male arc welders, 71 male office workers, and 59 assemblers without welding exposure. Inductivity Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrophotometer (ICP-MS) was applied to detect metals' (zinc, copper, nickel) levels in the post-shift urine samples. Demographic data, work history, smoking status, and respiratory tract irritation symptoms were gathered by a standard self-administered questionnaire. Pulmonary function tests were also performed. There were significantly higher values for average urine metals' (zinc, copper, nickel) levels in spot welders and arc welders than in the non-welding controls. There were 4 out of 23 (17.4%) abnormal forced vital capacity (FVC) among the high-exposed spot welders, 2 out of 18 (11.1%) among the low-exposed spot welders, and 6 out of 130 (4.6%) non-welding-exposed workers. There was a significant linear trend between spot welding exposure and the prevalence of restrictive airway abnormalities (P = 0.036) after adjusting for other factors. There were 9 out of 23 (39.1%) abnormal peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) among high-exposed spot welders, 5 out of 18 (27.8%) among the low-exposed spot welders, and 28 out of 130 (21.5%) non-welding-exposed workers. There was a borderline significant linear trend between spot welding exposure and the prevalence of obstructive lung function abnormalities (P = 0.084) after adjusting for other factors. There was also a significant dose-response relationship of airway irritation symptoms (cough, phlegm, chronic bronchitis) among the spot welders. Arc welders with high exposure status also had a significant risk of obstructive lung abnormalities (PEFR

  14. Association between Chinese cooking oil fumes and sleep quality among a middle-aged Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Fu; Nie, Guanghui; Zhou, Bo; Wang, Liang; Ma, Yifei; Peng, Suwan; Ou, Songfeng; Qin, Jian; Zhang, Li'e; Li, Shu; Zou, Ruosi; Zeng, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zou, Yunfeng

    2017-08-01

    Poor sleep quality is an important symptom of many medical or psychiatric disorders. However, the impact of cooking oil fumes (COFs) on sleep quality has not been studied. This population-based cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the association between COFs of Chinese household cooking and sleep quality. Individual sleep quality assessment was completed in 2197 participants with an average age of 37.52 years, through Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Information about their cooking practice were also collected by self-reported questionnaire. As an internal biomarker of COFs, urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HOP) (n = 562) was further measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Binary logistic regression models were performed to evaluate the association between exposure to COFs and individual sleep quality. We found that, subjective poor kitchen ventilation, preheating oil to smoking, and cooking for over 30 minutes were positively associated with overall poor sleep quality (global PSQI score >5) [odds ratio (OR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.43-2.16; 1.25, (1.03-1.52); 1.42, (1.15-1.76), respectively]. After adjusting for potential confounders, subjective poor kitchen ventilation still tend to increase the risk of long sleep latency, sleep disturbances, and daytime dysfunction [OR = 1.37, 95% CI = 1.09-1.73; 1.91, (1.39-2.61); 1.54, (1.23-1.93), respectively]. Similar results were observed in participants who preheated oil to smoking [OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.08-1.72; 1.55, (1.14-2.14); 1.25, (1.02-1.55), respectively] and cooked for over 30 minutes [OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.05-1.72; 1.46, (1.03-2.06); 1.36, (1.08-1.72), respectively]. Furthermore, high urinary 1-HOP level was also positively associated with overall poor sleep quality (OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.31-4.05). The results indicated that exposure to COFs from Chinese household cooking may be a risk factor for poor sleep quality among middle-aged Chinese

  15. Cryogenic Electric Motor Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gerald V.

    2004-01-01

    Technology for pollution-free "electric flight" is being evaluated in a number of NASA Glenn Research Center programs. One approach is to drive propulsive fans or propellers with electric motors powered by fuel cells running on hydrogen. For large transport aircraft, conventional electric motors are far too heavy to be feasible. However, since hydrogen fuel would almost surely be carried as liquid, a propulsive electric motor could be cooled to near liquid hydrogen temperature (-423 F) by using the fuel for cooling before it goes to the fuel cells. Motor windings could be either superconducting or high purity normal copper or aluminum. The electrical resistance of pure metals can drop to 1/100th or less of their room-temperature resistance at liquid hydrogen temperature. In either case, super or normal, much higher current density is possible in motor windings. This leads to more compact motors that are projected to produce 20 hp/lb or more in large sizes, in comparison to on the order of 2 hp/lb for large conventional motors. High power density is the major goal. To support cryogenic motor development, we have designed and built in-house a small motor (7-in. outside diameter) for operation in liquid nitrogen.

  16. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  17. Fumed Silica Nanoparticles Incorporated in Quaternized Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Nanocomposite Membrane for Enhanced Power Densities in Direct Alcohol Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Rajesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A nanocomposite polymer membrane based on quaternized poly(vinyl alcohol/fumed silica (QPVA/FS was prepared via a quaternization process and solution casting method. The physico-chemical properties of the QPVA/FS membrane were investigated. Its high ionic conductivity was found to depend greatly on the concentration of fumed silica in the QPVA matrix. A maximum conductivity of 3.50 × 10−2 S/cm was obtained for QPVA/5%FS at 60 °C when it was doped with 6 M KOH. The permeabilities of methanol and ethanol were reduced with increasing fumed silica content. Cell voltage and peak power density were analyzed as functions of fumed silica concentration, temperature, methanol and ethanol concentrations. A maximum power density of 96.8 mW/cm2 was achieved with QPVA/5%FS electrolyte using 2 M methanol + 6 M KOH as fuel at 80 °C. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was obtained using the QPVA/5%FS electrolyte with 3 M ethanol + 5 M KOH as fuel. The resulting peak power densities are higher than the majority of published reports. The results confirm that QPVA/FS exhibits promise as a future polymeric electrolyte for use in direct alkaline alcoholic fuel cells.

  18. A model for prediction of fume formation rate in gas metal arc welding (GMAW), globular and spray modes, DC electrode positive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, J H; Hewitt, P J; Redding, C A; Workman, A D

    2001-03-01

    Prediction of fume formation rate during metal arc welding and the composition of the fume are of interest to occupational hygienists concerned with risk assessment and to manufacturers of welding consumables. A model for GMAW (DC electrode positive) is described based on the welder determined process parameters (current, wire feed rate and wire composition), on the surface area of molten metal in the arc and on the partial vapour pressures of the component metals of the alloy wire. The model is applicable to globular and spray welding transfer modes but not to dip mode. Metal evaporation from a droplet is evaluated for short time increments and total evaporation obtained by summation over the life of the droplet. The contribution of fume derived from the weld pool and spatter (particles of metal ejected from the arc) is discussed, as are limitations of the model. Calculated droplet temperatures are similar to values determined by other workers. A degree of relationship between predicted and measured fume formation rates is demonstrated but the model does not at this stage provide a reliable predictive tool.

  19. Modeling Induction Motor Imbalances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armah, Kabenla; Jouffroy, Jerome; Duggen, Lars

    2016-01-01

    This paper gives a study into the development of a generalized model for a three-phase induction motor that offers flexibility of simulating balanced and unbalanced parameter scenarios. By analyzing the interaction of forces within the motor, we achieve our main objective of deriving the system d...

  20. Artificial molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kassem, Salma; van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S.; Wilson, Miriam R.; Feringa, Ben L.; Leigh, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Motor proteins are nature's solution for directing movement at the molecular level. The field of artificial molecular motors takes inspiration from these tiny but powerful machines. Although directional motion on the nanoscale performed by synthetic molecular machines is a relatively new

  1. To What Extent Can Motor Imagery Replace Motor Execution While Learning a Fine Motor Skill?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Szarkiewicz, Sylwia; Prekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna; Jaskowski, Wojciech; van der Lubbe, Robert Henricus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Motor imagery is generally thought to share common mechanisms with motor execution. In the present study, we examined to what extent learning a fine motor skill by motor imagery may substitute physical practice. Learning effects were assessed by manipulating the proportion of motor execution and

  2. Higher Efficiency HVAC Motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, Charles Joseph [QM Power, Inc., Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2018-02-13

    The objective of this project was to design and build a cost competitive, more efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) motor than what is currently available on the market. Though different potential motor architectures among QMP’s primary technology platforms were investigated and evaluated, including through the building of numerous prototypes, the project ultimately focused on scaling up QM Power, Inc.’s (QMP) Q-Sync permanent magnet synchronous motors from available sub-fractional horsepower (HP) sizes for commercial refrigeration fan applications to larger fractional horsepower sizes appropriate for HVAC applications, and to add multi-speed functionality. The more specific goal became the research, design, development, and testing of a prototype 1/2 HP Q-Sync motor that has at least two operating speeds and 87% peak efficiency compared to incumbent electronically commutated motors (EC or ECM, also known as brushless direct current (DC) motors), the heretofore highest efficiency HVACR fan motor solution, at approximately 82% peak efficiency. The resulting motor prototype built achieved these goals, hitting 90% efficiency and .95 power factor at full load and speed, and 80% efficiency and .7 power factor at half speed. Q-Sync, developed in part through a DOE SBIR grant (Award # DE-SC0006311), is a novel, patented motor technology that improves on electronically commutated permanent magnet motors through an advanced electronic circuit technology. It allows a motor to “sync” with the alternating current (AC) power flow. It does so by eliminating the constant, wasteful power conversions from AC to DC and back to AC through the synthetic creation of a new AC wave on the primary circuit board (PCB) by a process called pulse width modulation (PWM; aka electronic commutation) that is incessantly required to sustain motor operation in an EC permanent magnet motor. The Q-Sync circuit improves the power factor of the motor by removing all

  3. Flying without fuel. Minimalism in aircraft construction; Fliegen ohne Sprit. Minimalisten im Flugzeugbau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, W.

    1997-05-01

    The article describes the solar aircraft `Icare`` which was constucted in a joint project by engineers and scientists of Stuttgart university. The aircraft requires slightly more than one kW for staying up. The theoretical fundamentals are presented in the dissertation of Peer Frank, ``Aircraft design for minimum fuel consumption` (Institute of Aircraft Engineering, Stuttgart, 1992). (orig.) [Deutsch] Allein mit Sonnenkraft kann das Flugzeug `Icare` fliegen. Es entstand in Gemeinschaftsarbeit von Ingenieuren und Wissenschaftlern der Stuttgarter Universitaet. Das Solarflugzeug Icare benoetigt etwas ueber ein Kilowatt, um oben zu bleiben. In seiner Doktorarbeit `Die Auslegung von Flugzeugen mit geringstem Antriebsleistungsbedarf` (Institut fuer Flugzeugbau, Stuttgart, 1992) hat der Duesseldorfer Peer Frank die theoretischen Grundlagen dazu behandelt. (orig.)

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation of Submerged Combustion Behavior in a Tuyere Blown Slag-fuming Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, G. A.; Reuter, M. A.; Matusewicz, R. W.

    2012-10-01

    A thin-slice computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a conventional tuyere blown slag-fuming furnace has been developed in Eulerian multiphase flow approach by employing a three-dimensional (3-D) hybrid unstructured orthographic grid system. The model considers a thin slice of the conventional tuyere blown slag-fuming furnace to investigate details of fluid flow, submerged coal combustion dynamics, coal use behavior, jet penetration behavior, bath interaction conditions, and generation of turbulence in the bath. The model was developed by coupling the CFD with the kinetics equations developed by Richards et al. for a zinc-fuming furnace. The model integrates submerged coal combustion at the tuyere tip and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with several user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model predicted the velocity, temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence and vortex, and coal use behavior from the slag bath. The tuyere jet penetration length ( l P) was compared with the equation provided by Hoefele and Brimacombe from isothermal experimental work ( {{l_{{P}} }/{d_{o }} = 10.7( {N^' }_{Fr} } )^{0.46} ( {ρ_{{g}} /ρl } )^{0.35} } ) and found 2.26 times higher, which can be attributed to coal combustion and gas expansion at a high temperature. The jet expansion angle measured for the slag system studied is 85 deg for the specific inlet conditions during the simulation time studied. The highest coal penetration distance was found to be l/L = 0.2, where l is the distance from the tuyere tip along the center line and L is the total length (2.44 m) of the modeled furnace. The model also predicted that 10 pct of the injected coal bypasses the tuyere gas stream uncombusted and carried to the free surface by the tuyere gas stream, which

  5. Linear motor coil assembly and linear motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2009-01-01

    An ironless linear motor (5) comprising a magnet track (53) and a coil assembly (50) operating in cooperation with said magnet track (53) and having a plurality of concentrated multi-turn coils (31 a-f, 41 a-d, 51 a-k), wherein the end windings (31E) of the coils (31 a-f, 41 a-e) are substantially

  6. Spinal cord: motor neuron diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Kourosh; Roos, Raymond P

    2013-02-01

    Spinal cord motor neuron diseases affect lower motor neurons in the ventral horn. This article focuses on the most common spinal cord motor neuron disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which also affects upper motor neurons. Also discussed are other motor neuron diseases that only affect the lower motor neurons. Despite the identification of several genes associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the pathogenesis of this complex disease remains elusive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Biomonitoring for iron, manganese, chromium, aluminum, nickel and cadmium in workers exposed to welding fume: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The control of exposure to welding fumes is increasing importance in promoting a healthy, safe and productive work environment. This study is a case-control design, random study was conducted among welder (56 subjects and non welder (39 subjects with more than 1 years experience in the same job task in an automotive parts manufactory within the industrial area at Cikarang in 2013. All subjects were completed physical examination, informed consent and questionnaire. Blood heavy metals were determined by Inductively-Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS. Whole blood iron, manganese, chromium and lead in welder were higher than non-welder, but not different for aluminum, nickel and cadmium. In welder, chromium and manganese correlated with smoking status, cadmium correlated with age and smoking status. In multivariate analysis, wholeblood cadmium correlates with age and smoking status.

  8. Temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of silica fume cement pastes with a very low water–binder ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, I., E-mail: ippei@dali.nuac.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, ES Building, No. 539, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Teramoto, A. [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Faculty of Engineering, ES Building, No. 546, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-08-15

    Ultra-high-strength concrete with a large unit cement content undergoes considerable temperature increase inside members due to hydration heat, leading to a higher risk of internal cracking. Hence, the temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes made with silica fume premixed cement with a water–binder ratio of 0.15 was studied extensively. Development of autogenous shrinkage showed different behaviors before and after the inflection point, and dependence on the temperature after mixing and subsequent temperature histories. The difference in autogenous shrinkage behavior poses problems for winter construction because autogenous shrinkage may increase with decrease in temperature after mixing before the inflection point and with increase in temperature inside concrete members with large cross sections.

  9. Temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of silica fume cement pastes with a very low water–binder ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, I.; Teramoto, A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-high-strength concrete with a large unit cement content undergoes considerable temperature increase inside members due to hydration heat, leading to a higher risk of internal cracking. Hence, the temperature dependence of autogenous shrinkage of cement pastes made with silica fume premixed cement with a water–binder ratio of 0.15 was studied extensively. Development of autogenous shrinkage showed different behaviors before and after the inflection point, and dependence on the temperature after mixing and subsequent temperature histories. The difference in autogenous shrinkage behavior poses problems for winter construction because autogenous shrinkage may increase with decrease in temperature after mixing before the inflection point and with increase in temperature inside concrete members with large cross sections

  10. [Children and motor competence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmundsson, H; Haga, M

    2000-10-20

    Recently, the topic of motor competence has figured prominently in the media. The claims made are many, but the research that support the statements is seldom cited. The aim of this review article is to address that deficiency by documenting what is really known about the motor competence of children. Motor competence not only allows children to carry out everyday practical tasks, but it is also an important determinant of their level of self-esteem and of their popularity and status in their peer group. While many studies have shown a significant correlation between motor problems and other problems in the social sphere, it has been difficult to establish causal relationships with any degree of confidence, as there appear to be several interactions which need to be taken into account. Research has shown that 6-10% of Norwegian children in the 7 to 10 year age group have a motor competence well below the norm. It is unusual for motor problems to simply disappear over time. In the absence of intervention the syndrome is likely to continue to manifest itself. More recent research points to some of the circularity in this causal network, children with motor problems having been shown to be less physically active than their peers. In a larger health perspective this in itself can have very serious consequences for the child.

  11. Oxidative stress, telomere shortening, and DNA methylation in relation to low-to-moderate occupational exposure to welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiqi; Hedmer, Maria; Wojdacz, Tomasz; Hossain, Mohammad Bakhtiar; Lindh, Christian H; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Albin, Maria; Broberg, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to welding fumes is a risk factor for lung cancer. We examined relationships between low-to-moderate occupational exposure to particles from welding fumes and cancer-related biomarkers for oxidative stress, changes in telomere length, and alterations in DNA methylation. We enrolled 101 welders and 127 controls (all currently nonsmoking men) from southern Sweden. We performed personal sampling of respirable dust and measured 8-oxodG concentrations in urine using a simplified liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. Telomere length in peripheral blood was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Methylation status of 10 tumor suppressor genes was determined by methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis. All analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, previous smoking, passive smoking, current residence, and wood burning stove/boiler at home. Welders were exposed to respirable dust at 1.2 mg/m(3) (standard deviation, 3.3 mg/m(3); range, 0.1-19.3), whereas control exposures did not exceed 0.1 mg/m(3) (P < 0.001). Welders and controls did not differ in 8-oxodG levels (β = 1.2, P = 0.17) or relative telomere length (β = -0.053, P = 0.083) in adjusted models. Welders showed higher probability of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) methylation in the unadjusted model (odds ratio = 14, P = 0.014), but this was not significant in the fully adjusted model (P = 0.052). Every working year as a welder was associated with 0.0066 units shorter telomeres (95% confidence interval -0.013 to -0.00053, P = 0.033). Although there were no clear associations between concentrations of respirable dust and the biomarkers, there were modest signs of associations between oxidative stress, telomere alterations, DNA methylation, and occupational exposure to low-to-moderate levels of particles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Assessment of occupational exposure to manganese and other metals in welding fumes by portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Cavallari, Jennifer M; Fang, Shona C; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C; Weisskopf, Marc G

    2010-08-01

    Elemental analysis of welding fume samples can be done using several laboratory-based techniques. However, portable measurement techniques could offer several advantages. In this study, we sought to determine whether the portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) is suitable for analysis of five metals (manganese, iron, zinc, copper, and chromium) on 37-mm polytetrafluoroethylene filters. Using this filter fitted on a cyclone in line with a personal pump, gravimetric samples were collected from a group of boilermakers exposed to welding fumes. We assessed the assumption of uniform deposition of these metals on the filters, and the relationships between measurement results of each metal obtained from traditional laboratory-based XRF and the portable XRF. For all five metals of interest, repeated measurements with the portable XRF at the same filter area showed good consistency (reliability ratios are equal or close to 1.0 for almost all metals). The portable XRF readings taken from three different areas of each filter were not significantly different (p-values = 0.77 to 0.98). This suggested that the metal rich PM(2.5) deposits uniformly on the samples collected using this gravimetric method. For comparison of the two XRFs, the results from the portable XRF were well correlated and highly predictive of those from the laboratory XRF. The Spearman correlation coefficients were from 0.325 for chromium, to 0.995 for manganese and 0.998 for iron. The mean differences as a percent of the mean laboratory XRF readings were also small (metals were moderately to strongly correlated with the total fine particle fraction on filters (Spearman rho = 0.41 for zinc to 0.97 for iron). Such strong correlations and comparable results suggested that the portable XRF could be used as an effective and reliable tool for exposure assessment in many studies.

  13. Influence of organic solvents on interfacial water at surfaces of silica gel and partially silylated fumed silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turov, V.V.; Gun' ko, V.M.; Tsapko, M.D.; Bogatyrev, V.M.; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J.; Leboda, R.; Ryczkowski, J

    2004-05-15

    The effects of organic solvents (dimethylsulfoxide-d{sub 6} (DMSO-d{sub 6}), chloroform-d, acetone-d{sub 6}, and acetonitrile-d{sub 3}) on the properties of interfacial water at surfaces of silica gel Si-40 and partially silylated fumed silica A-380 were studied by means of the {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy with freezing-out of adsorbed water at 180fumed silica has two {sup 1}H NMR signals at 5 and 1.1-1.7 ppm related to different structures (droplets and small clusters) of the interfacial water.

  14. Stabilization / solidification of polluted marine dredged sediment of port en Bessin France, using hydraulic binders and silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silitonga, Ernesto

    2017-09-01

    A large amount of sediment is dredged in France every year. Due to the increase of the amount of marine dredged sediments, environmentally reuse of dredged sediment is urgently needed in France. The first objective of this study is to find an application for reuse of marine dredged sediments materials, as new material for road construction. Hence, serial tests need to be realized to identify if marine dredged sediment could be utilized for road construction. The second goal is to enhance the physical, mechanical and chemical characteristics of the mix, by incorporating binders and sediments, and revealed the identification of the mechanical characteristics measured on the mixes is compatible with their use as a base course material. The results show that the treatment by hydraulics binders could satisfy the needed mechanical characteristics. The present of Silica Fume is aimed to reduce the pollution level, especially the heavy metal content. However, the proportion of hydraulics binders and silica fume needed to meet prescribed specification is important, so the reuse of the marine dredged sediments of Port-en-Bessin, France in road construction, as an alternative material could be achieved. After the geotechnical study in laboratory results shown as expected than the study to identify the chemical characteristic realized. To evaluate the environmental impacts of the used material, leaching test is performed. The leaching test was performed to verify the predicted release of pollutants based on total dissolution. And for the final part, the test results show that the polluted marine dredged sediments could be safely used (in term of environmental impact) as a new material in road construction.

  15. Field comparison of three inhalable samplers (IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 and Button) for welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti, Agurtzane; Montes, Natividad; Rojo, José M; Quintana, M José

    2012-02-01

    Inhalable sampler efficiency depends on the aerodynamic size of the airborne particles to be sampled and the wind speed. The aim of this study was to compare the behaviour of three personal inhalable samplers for welding fumes generated by Manual Metal Arc (MMA) and Metal Active Gas (MAG) processes. The selected samplers were the ones available in Spain when the study began: IOM, PGP-GSP 3.5 (GSP) and Button. Sampling was carried out in a welding training center that provided a homogeneous workplace environment. The static sampling assembly used allowed the placement of 12 samplers and 2 cascade impactors simultaneously. 183 samples were collected throughout 2009 and 2010. The range of welding fumes' mass concentrations was from 2 mg m(-3) to 5 mg m(-3). The pooled variation coefficients for the three inhalable samplers were less than or equal to 3.0%. Welding particle size distribution was characterized by a bimodal log-normal distribution, with MMADs of 0.7 μm and 8.2 μm. For these welding aerosols, the Button and the GSP samplers showed a similar performance (P = 0.598). The mean mass concentration ratio was 1.00 ± 0.01. The IOM sampler showed a different performance (P IOM and 0.92 ± 0.02 for GSP/IOM. This information is useful to consider the measurements accomplished by the IOM, GSP or Button samplers together, in order to assess the exposure at workplaces over time or to study exposure levels in a specific industrial activity, as welding operations.

  16. A study of mortars prepared with fly ash and silica fume for use in structures exposed to marine enviroments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate different mortar mixtures containing 5, 10 and 1 5% P/P silica fume and 5, 10, 12.5, 15 and 17.5% P/P fly ash to be used for repairing/constructing reinforced concrete structures exposed to marine environments. These were evaluated from the following standpoints: physical-chemical (capillary absorption and effective porosity; mechanical (compressive strength; electrochemical (lineal polarization, cyclic polarización and rapid chloride permeation; morphological (scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that 15 % silica fume mixture with no fly ash gave the best performance from both the physical-mechanical as well as the economic standpoint.

    El presente trabajo tiene como finalidad evaluar diferentes mezclas de mortero con contenidos de 5, 10 y 15 % P/P de microsílica y contenidos de 5, 10, 12,5, 15 y 17,5 % P/P de ceniza volante para ser utilizadas en la reparación/construcción de estructuras de concreto armado expuestas a ambientes marinos. Se evaluaron desde el punto de vista físico-químico (absorción capilar y porosidad efectiva, mecánico (resistencia a la compresión, electroquímico (polarización lineal, polarización cíclica y permeabilidad rápida de cloruros y su morfología por medio de microscopía electrónica de barrido. Los resultados permitieron seleccionar la mezcla conteniendo 15 % de microsílica sin ceniza volante, tanto desde el punto de vista físico-mecánico y electroquímico como económico.

  17. Pozzolanic Reactivity of Silica Fume and Ground Rice Husk Ash as Reactive Silica in a Cementitious System: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiting Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study comparably assessed the pozzolanic effect of silica fume (SF and ground rice husk ash (RHA as supplementary cementing materials on the properties of blended cement pastes and concretes. A commonly commercial silica fume (SF and locally-produced rice husk ash (RHA samples with two finenesses (one with larger size than cement and the other with smaller size than cement were used in this study. Material properties of SF and RHA were experimentally characterized. Hydration and mechanical properties of cement pastes incorporating SF and RHA were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and compressive strength tests, respectively. Properties of concretes regarding workability, mechanical property, durability, and microstructure were evaluated. Results showed that, although the finely ground RHA used in this study possessed lower SiO2 content and higher particle size compared to SF, it exhibited comparable pozzolanic reactivity with SF due to the nano-scale pores on its each single particle, leading to a higher specific surface area. The optimal replacement levels of SF and RHA were 10% by weight of cement in pastes and concretes. Although addition of SF and RHA led to a significant reduction in slump for the fresh mixtures, inclusion of up to 30% of SF or 15% of ground RHA did not adversely affect the strength of concretes. At the same mix, incorporation of finely-ground RHA in cement composites provided comparable mechanical properties, hydration degree, and durability with SF blended cement composites, owing to the porous structure and high specific surface area of RHA particles. Microstructure morphology analysis of concretes explored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM further validated the strength and the durability test results.

  18. Feasibility of mobile health game "Fume" in supporting tobacco-related health literacy among early adolescents: A three-armed cluster randomized design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisod, Heidi; Pakarinen, Anni; Axelin, Anna; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Smed, Jouni; Salanterä, Sanna

    2018-05-01

    New interventions supporting health literacy and a tobacco-free lifestyle in adolescence are needed to narrow the widening gap in existing health inequalities. Health games offer potential and could be utilized for example in school healthcare, but more research is needed to increase the understanding of the effects of game elements in health interventions. The aim of this feasibility study is to determine the short-term effectiveness of the tobacco-related mobile health game Fume and a non-gamified website in comparison with a no-intervention control group, regarding tobacco-related health literacy among 10-13-year-old early adolescents. In addition, we compare the demand for and acceptability of Fume to that of the website. In total, 151 early adolescents participated in this single-blinded, three-armed cluster randomized trial. The participants from three municipalities in southwest Finland were randomly allocated between a group with access to the health game Fume (n = 61), a group with access to the website (n = 47), and a group with no intervention (n = 43). The intervention groups first participated in a 20-min training session with Fume/the website, and then had two weeks to use Fume/the website based on their own interest. Short-term effectiveness was measured by primary (anti-smoking self-efficacy) and secondary (smoking outcome expectations, attitudes towards tobacco use, tobacco-use motives, motivation to decline tobacco use in the future, and knowledge about tobacco) outcomes derived from the theory-based determinants of tobacco-related health literacy and evaluated with self-assessment questionnaires at baseline and post-intervention (after a two-week follow-up). For evaluating the demand, the actual use of Fume/the website was tracked during the two-week period. Regarding acceptability, the raised interest towards Fume/the website and opinions about the interventions were evaluated post-intervention. Differences were tested with the Mc

  19. Motor Vehicle Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these crashes is one part of motor vehicle safety. Here are some things you can do to ... speed or drive aggressively Don't drive impaired Safety also involves being aware of others. Share the ...

  20. Motor Carrier Crash Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Contains data on large trucks and buses involved in Federally reportable crashes as per Title 49 U.S.C. Part 390.5 (crashes involving a commercial motor vehicle, and...

  1. High Power Density Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    With the growing concerns of global warming, the need for pollution-free vehicles is ever increasing. Pollution-free flight is one of NASA's goals for the 21" Century. , One method of approaching that goal is hydrogen-fueled aircraft that use fuel cells or turbo- generators to develop electric power that can drive electric motors that turn the aircraft's propulsive fans or propellers. Hydrogen fuel would likely be carried as a liquid, stored in tanks at its boiling point of 20.5 K (-422.5 F). Conventional electric motors, however, are far too heavy (for a given horsepower) to use on aircraft. Fortunately the liquid hydrogen fuel can provide essentially free refrigeration that can be used to cool the windings of motors before the hydrogen is used for fuel. Either High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or high purity metals such as copper or aluminum may be used in the motor windings. Superconductors have essentially zero electrical resistance to steady current. The electrical resistance of high purity aluminum or copper near liquid hydrogen temperature can be l/lOO* or less of the room temperature resistance. These conductors could provide higher motor efficiency than normal room-temperature motors achieve. But much more importantly, these conductors can carry ten to a hundred times more current than copper conductors do in normal motors operating at room temperature. This is a consequence of the low electrical resistance and of good heat transfer coefficients in boiling LH2. Thus the conductors can produce higher magnetic field strengths and consequently higher motor torque and power. Designs, analysis and actual cryogenic motor tests show that such cryogenic motors could produce three or more times as much power per unit weight as turbine engines can, whereas conventional motors produce only 1/5 as much power per weight as turbine engines. This summer work has been done with Litz wire to maximize the current density. The current is limited by the amount of heat it

  2. Split-phase motor running as capacitor starts motor and as capacitor run motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahaya Asizehi ENESI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the input parameters of a single phase split-phase induction motor is taken to investigate and to study the output performance characteristics of capacitor start and capacitor run induction motor. The value of these input parameters are used in the design characteristics of capacitor run and capacitor start motor with each motor connected to rated or standard capacitor in series with auxiliary winding or starting winding respectively for the normal operational condition. The magnitude of capacitor that will develop maximum torque in capacitor start motor and capacitor run motor are investigated and determined by simulation. Each of these capacitors is connected to the auxiliary winding of split-phase motor thereby transforming it into capacitor start or capacitor run motor. The starting current and starting torque of the split-phase motor (SPM, capacitor run motor (CRM and capacitor star motor (CSM are compared for their suitability in their operational performance and applications.

  3. Determination of Informal Sector as Urban Pollution Source : Fume Characterization of Small-scale Manual Metal Arc Welding using Factor Analysis in Bandung City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nastiti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries, the informal sector, particularly small-scale welding activities, are considered to be an important contributor to urban air pollution although studies in this sector are limited. This study aims to identify the composition of small-scale welding fume in order to further investigate the effects and set control strategies and urban pollution abatement policies. Breathing zone air samples were collected from 30 mild steel manual metal arc welders and 17 non-welders in Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. The respirable particulates in air samples were analyzed using gravimetric method, and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA was employed to identify characteristic of welding fume. It was found that respirable particulates concentration in welders (range : 315.6 and 3,735.93 µgm-3; average 1,545.436 µgm-3 were significantly higher than in non-welders (range : 41.84 and 1,688.03 µgm-3; average : 375.783 µgm-3. Welders’ breathing zones contain Fe>Na>K>Mn>Al >Cr>Ti>Cl>Br>I>Zn>Sb>V>Co>Sc; while non-welders’ breathing zones contain Cr>F>Al>Ti>Na>Br>I>Mn>Cl>Co>Zn>Sc. Inter-species correlation analysis conducted using Statgraphic Ver. 4.0 shows that Fe (range : n.d. – 775.19 µgm-3; average: 0.1674 µgm-3, Co (range : n.d. – 0.51 µgm-3; average: 0.000082 µgm-3, Mn (range : 0.39 – 148.37 µgm-3; average: 0.0374 µgm-3, Na (range: 0.17 and 623.85 µgm-3; average: 0.0973 µgm-3 and K (range : n.d. – 301.15 µgm-3; average: 0.0535 µgm-3 were emitted from welding activity, and thus are considered as components of welding fume which contribute to urban air pollution. Although welding fume and the identified species in welding fume were still below permissible limit, small-scale welding activities have great potential in emitting higher fume concentration due to due to high variability of welding activities, such as welding frequency, materials being welded, and varied environmental conditions

  4. Human biomonitoring of chromium and nickel from an experimental exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes of low and high alloyed steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The uptake and elimination of metals from welding fumes is currently not fully understood. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL) it is possible to investigate the impact of welding fumes on human subjects under controlled exposure conditions. In this study, the uptake and elimination of chromium or chromium (VI) respectively as well as nickel was studied in subjects after exposure to the emissions of a manual metal arc welding process using low or high alloyed steel. In this present study 12 healthy male non-smokers, who never worked as welders before, were exposed for 6h to welding fumes of a manual metal arc welding process. In a three-fold crossover study design, subjects were exposed in randomized order to either clean air, emissions from welding low alloyed steel, and emissions from welding high alloyed steel. Particle mass concentration of the exposure aerosol was 2.5mg m(-3). The content of chromium and nickel in the air was determined by analysing air filter samples on a high emission scenario. Urine analysis for chromium and nickel was performed before and after exposure using methods of human biomonitoring. There were significantly elevated chromium levels after exposure to welding fumes from high alloyed steel compared to urinary chromium levels before exposure to high alloyed welding fumes, as well as compared to the other exposure scenarios. The mean values increased from 0.27 µg l(-1) to 18.62 µg l(-1). The results were in good agreement with already existing correlations between external and internal exposure (German exposure equivalent for carcinogenic working materials EKA). The variability of urinary chromium levels was high. For urinary nickel no significant changes could be detected at all. Six-hour exposure to 2.5mg m(-3) high alloyed manual metal arc welding fumes lead to elevated urinary chromium levels far higher (7.11-34.16 µg l(-1)) than the German biological exposure reference value (BAR) of 0.6 µg l(-1) directly after

  5. Determination of Informal Sector as Urban Pollution Source : Fume Characterization of Small-scale Manual Metal Arc Welding using Factor Analysis in Bandung City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nastiti, A.; Pramudyastuti, D.Y.; Oginawati, K.; Santoso, M.

    2012-01-01

    In developing countries, the informal sector, particularly small-scale welding activities, are considered to be an important contributor to urban air pollution although studies in this sector are limited. This study aims to identify the composition of small-scale welding fume in order to further investigate the effects and set control strategies and urban pollution abatement policies. Breathing zone air samples were collected from 30 mild steel manual metal arc welders and 17 non-welders in Bandung City, West Java, Indonesia. The respirable particulates in air samples were analyzed using gravimetric method, and Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was employed to identify characteristic of welding fume. It was found that respirable particulates concentration in welders (range : 315.6 and 3,735.93 µgm -3 ; average 1,545.436 µgm -3 ) were significantly higher than in non-welders (range : 41.84 and 1,688.03 µgm -3 ; average : 375.783 µgm -3 ). Welders' breathing zones contain Fe>Na>K>Mn>Al >Cr>Ti>Cl>Br>I>Zn>Sb>V>Co>Sc; while non-welders' breathing zones contain Cr>F>Al>Ti>Na>Br>I>Mn>Cl>Co>Zn>Sc. Inter-species correlation analysis conducted using Statgraphic Ver. 4.0 shows that Fe (range : n.d. - 775.19 µgm -3 ; average: 0.1674µgm -3 ), Co (range : n.d. - 0.51 µgm -3 ; average: 0.000082 µgm -3 ), Mn (range : 0.39 - 148.37 µgm -3 ; average: 0.0374 µgm -3 ), Na (range: 0.17 and 623.85 µgm -3 ; average: 0.0973 µgm -3 ) and K (range : n.d. - 301.15 µgm -3 ; average: 0.0535 µgm -3 ) were emitted from welding activity, and thus are considered as components of welding fume which contribute to urban air pollution. Although welding fume and the identified species in welding fume were still below permissible limit, small-scale welding activities have great potential in emitting higher fume concentration due to due to high variability of welding activities, such as welding frequency, materials being welded, and varied environmental conditions. (author)

  6. Electrodynamic linear motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munehiro, H

    1980-05-29

    When driving the carriage of a printer through a rotating motor, there are problems regarding the limited accuracy of the carriage position due to rotation or contraction and ageing of the cable. In order to solve the problem, a direct drive system was proposed, in which the printer carriage is driven by a linear motor. If one wants to keep the motor circuit of such a motor compact, then the magnetic flux density in the air gap must be reduced or the motor travel must be reduced. It is the purpose of this invention to create an electrodynamic linear motor, which on the one hand is compact and light and on the other hand has a relatively high constant force over a large travel. The invention is characterised by the fact that magnetic fields of alternating polarity are generated at equal intervals in the magnetic field, and that the coil arrangement has 2 adjacent coils, whose size corresponds to half the length of each magnetic pole. A logic circuit is provided to select one of the two coils and to determine the direction of the current depending on the signals of a magnetic field sensor on the coil arrangement.

  7. Markov process of muscle motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratiev, Yu; Pechersky, E; Pirogov, S

    2008-01-01

    We study a Markov random process describing muscle molecular motor behaviour. Every motor is either bound up with a thin filament or unbound. In the bound state the motor creates a force proportional to its displacement from the neutral position. In both states the motor spends an exponential time depending on the state. The thin filament moves at a velocity proportional to the average of all displacements of all motors. We assume that the time which a motor stays in the bound state does not depend on its displacement. Then one can find an exact solution of a nonlinear equation appearing in the limit of an infinite number of motors

  8. Electric vehicle motors and controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secunde, R. R.

    1981-01-01

    Improved and advanced components being developed include electronically commutated permanent magnet motors of both drum and disk configuration, an unconventional brush commutated motor, and ac induction motors and various controllers. Test results on developmental motors, controllers, and combinations thereof indicate that efficiencies of 90% and higher for individual components, and 80% to 90% for motor/controller combinations can be obtained at rated power. The simplicity of the developmental motors and the potential for ultimately low cost electronics indicate that one or more of these approaches to electric vehicle propulsion may eventually displace presently used controllers and brush commutated dc motors.

  9. Effects of using silica fume and polycarboxylate-type superplasticizer on physical properties of cementitious grout mixtures for semiflexible pavement surfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koting, Suhana; Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S; Ibrahim, Mohd Rasdan; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout.

  10. Effects of Using Silica Fume and Polycarboxylate-Type Superplasticizer on Physical Properties of Cementitious Grout Mixtures for Semiflexible Pavement Surfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhana Koting

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout.

  11. Assessment of the biological effects of welding fumes emitted from metal inert gas welding processes of aluminium and zinc-plated materials in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, L; Bauer, M; Bertram, J; Gube, M; Lenz, K; Reisgen, U; Schettgen, T; Kraus, T; Brand, P

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate biological effects and potential health risks due to two different metal-inert-gas (MIG) welding fumes (MIG welding of aluminium and MIG soldering of zinc coated steel) in healthy humans. In a threefold cross-over design study 12 male subjects were exposed to three different exposure scenarios. Exposures were performed under controlled conditions in the Aachener Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL). On three different days the subjects were either exposed to filtered ambient air, to welding fumes from MIG welding of aluminium, or to fumes from MIG soldering of zinc coated materials. Exposure was performed for 6 h and the average fume concentration was 2.5 mg m(-3). Before, directly after, 1 day after, and 7 days after exposure spirometric and impulse oscillometric measurements were performed, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) was collected and blood samples were taken and analyzed for inflammatory markers. During MIG welding of aluminium high ozone concentrations (up to 250 μg m(-3)) were observed, whereas ozone was negligible for MIG soldering. For MIG soldering, concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) and factor VIII were significantly increased but remained mostly within the normal range. The concentration of neutrophils increased in tendency. For MIG welding of aluminium, the lung function showed significant decreases in Peak Expiratory Flow (PEF) and Mean Expiratory Flow at 75% vital capacity (MEF 75) 7 days after exposure. The concentration of ristocetin cofactor was increased. The observed increase of hsCRP during MIG-soldering can be understood as an indicator for asymptomatic systemic inflammation probably due to zinc (zinc concentration 1.5 mg m(-3)). The change in lung function observed after MIG welding of aluminium may be attributed to ozone inhalation, although the late response (7 days after exposure) is surprising. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. A versatile stepping motor controller for systems with many motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, S.K.; Siddons, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    A versatile system for controlling beamlines or complex experimental setups is described. The system as currently configured can control up to 32 motors, with all motors capable of full speed operation concurrently. There are 2 limit switch inputs for each motor, and a further input to accept a reference position marker. The motors can be controlled via a front panel keyboard with display, or by a host computer over an IEEE-488 interface. Both methods can be used together if required. There is an ''emergency stop'' key on the front panel keyboard to stop the motion of all motors without losing track of the motors' position. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of form-stable dodecane/hydrophobic fumed silica composite phase change materials for cold energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jiajie; Ling, Ziye; Fang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Form-stable dodecane/fumed silica composite for cold storage is prepared. • A suggesting hypothesis that explains infiltration mechanism is proposed. • The performance of the composite phase change material is investigated. • Numerical simulation of system is carried out and results fit well. - Abstract: A kind of form-stable composite phase change materials used for cold thermal energy storage is prepared by absorbing dodecane into the hydrophobic fumed silica. With relatively suitable pore diameter and hydrophobic groups, hydrophobic fumed silica is beneficial to the penetration and infiltration of dodecane and the leakage problem solving. Scanned by electron micrographs and Fourier transformation infrared, the composite phase change material is characterized to be just physical penetration. Besides, the differential scanning calorimeter and thermo gravimetric analysis reveals the high enthalpy, good thermal stability and cycling performance of this composite phase change material. What’s more, Hot-Disk thermal constants analyzer demonstrates that the composite phase change material has low thermal conductivity which is desired in cold storage application. In the experiment, a cold energy storage system is set up and the results from the experiment show that the system has excellent performance of cold storage by incorporating composite phase change material. Apart from that, the experimental data is found to have a great agreement with the numerical simulation which is carried out by using the commercial computational fluid dynamics software FLUENT.

  14. Improvement in ionic conductivity of self-supported P(MMA-AN-VAc) gel electrolyte by fumed silica for lithium ion batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Youhao; Rao Mumin; Li Weishan; Tan Chunlin; Yi Jin; Chen Lang

    2009-01-01

    Fumed silica was used as a dopant in the preparation of poly(methyl methacrylate-acrylonitrile-vinyl acetate) (P(MMA-AN-VAc)) to improve the ionic conductivity of the P(MMA-AN-VAc)-based gel polymer electrolyte (GPE). The performance of the P(MMA-AN-VAc) membrane and its GPE for lithium ion battery use were studied by XRD, SEM, TGA, LSV, CA, EIS, and charge/discharge test. It is found that the doping of fumed silica in the P(MMA-AN-VAc) changes the membrane from semi-crystal to amorphous state and the pore structure of the membrane. By the doping of 10 wt.% fumed silica in the membrane, the porosity of the membrane increases with the pore dispersed more uniformly and interconnected and having higher electrolyte uptake, resulting in the improvement in ionic conductivity of the GPE from 3.48 x 10 -3 to 5.13 x 10 -3 S cm -1 at ambient temperature. On the other hand, the thermal stability of the membrane, the electrochemical stability of the GPE, and the cyclic performance of the battery are also improved.

  15. Influence of Silica Fume Addition in the Long-Term Performance of Sustainable Cement Grouts for Micropiles Exposed to a Sulphate Aggressive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Ortega

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available At present, sustainability is of major importance in the cement industry, and the use of additions such as silica fume as clinker replacement contributes towards that goal. Special foundations, and particularly micropiles, are one of the most suitable areas for the use of sustainable cements. The aim of this research is to analyse the effects in the very long-term (for 600 days produced by sulphate attack in the microstructure of grouts for micropiles in which OPC (ordinary Portland cement has been replaced by 5% and 10% silica fume. This line of study is building on a previous work, where these effects were studied in slag and fly ash grouts. Grouts made using a commercial sulphate-resisting Portland cement were also studied. The non-destructive impedance spectroscopy technique, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and Wenner resistivity testing were used. Mass variation and the compressive strength have also been analysed. Apparently, impedance spectroscopy is the most suitable technique for studying sulphate attack development. According to the results obtained, grouts for micropiles with a content of silica fume up to 10% and exposed to an aggressive sulphate medium, have a similar or even better behaviour in the very long-term, compared to grouts prepared using sulphate-resisting Portland cement.

  16. Effects of cyanoacrylate fuming, time after recovery, and location of biological material on the recovery and analysis of DNA from post-blast pipe bomb fragments*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, Todd W; Cromartie, Carter; Farr, Matthew

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of time, cyanoacrylate fuming, and location of the biological material on DNA analysis of post-blast pipe bomb fragments. Multiple aliquots of a cell suspension (prepared by soaking buccal swabs in water) were deposited on components of the devices prior to assembly. The pipe bombs were then deflagrated and the fragments recovered. Fragments from half of the devices were cyanoacrylate fumed. The cell spots on the fragments were swabbed and polymerase chain reaction/short tandem repeat analysis was performed 1 week and 3 months after deflagration. A significant decrease in the amount of DNA recovered was observed between samples collected and analyzed within 1 week compared with the samples collected and analyzed 3 months after deflagration. Cyanoacrylate fuming did not have a measurable effect on the success of the DNA analysis at either time point. Greater quantities of DNA were recovered from the pipe nipples than the end caps. Undeflagrated controls showed that the majority (>95%) of the DNA deposited on the devices was not recovered at a week or 3 months.

  17. Influence of microstructure on the diffusive transport in pastes, mortars and concretes made with cement Portland and silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajja, Zineb

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to its high mechanical strength and its potential containment capacity conferred by a compact microstructure, concrete is considered as the most suitable material to compose the engineered barrier of some radioactive waste storage structure. Knowledge of diffusion properties and microstructure of these cementitious materials is then essential to study their long-term durability. In a more specific context of low and intermediate waste management, the use of formulations containing silica fume (SF) appears of great importance. The experimental approach consists in selecting many formulations of pastes and mortars to test by the HTO through-out diffusion test. Their initial compositions (water to binder ratio, SF content, sand content and particle size) were varied in order to browse different microstructures and diffusion properties, and to see the influence of each parameter (water, SF, content and grain size of sand) on the evolution of diffusivity within these materials. The microstructure was investigated to interpret the obtained values of diffusion coefficients. Different complementary techniques have been used to characterize the porous structure (water and mercury intrusion porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption), to verify SF reactivity (TGA, SEM associated to EDS) or to determine the profile porosity at ITZ (SEM combined with image analysis).The relationship between microstructure and diffusion coefficients (DeHTO) was then discussed. The ultimate goal was to find a link between microstructure properties and transport parameters to estimate from a simple characterization, the DeHTO of concrete, difficult to get from HTO diffusion cells test. Other attempts have also been made to try to assess the concrete diffusion coefficient, such as the multi-scale modeling approach (the scale of hydrates 3D model), or the diffusion of other elements ( like oxygen or nitrogen). This study shows that silica fume agglomerates (slurry) observed in cement paste and mortar

  18. Flood-proof motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Marcus [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Even before the Fukushima event occurred some German nuclear power plants (NPP) have considered flooding scenarios. As a result of one of these studies, AREVA performed an upgrade project in NPP Isar 1 with flood-proof motors as a replacement of existing air-cooled low-voltage and high-voltage motors of the emergency cooling chain. After the Fukushima event, in which the cooling chains failed, the topic flood-proof equipment gets more and more into focus. This compact will introduce different kinds of flood-proof electrical motors which are currently installed or planned for installation into NPPs over the world. Moreover the process of qualification, as it was performed during the project in NPP Isar 1, will be shown. (orig.)

  19. Advanced AC Motor Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmierkowski, M.P. [Institute of Control and Industrial Electronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warszawa (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper a review of control methods for high performance PWM inverter-fed induction motor drives is presented. Starting from the description of an induction motor by the help of the space vectors, three basic control strategic are discussed. As first, the most popular Field Oriented Control (FOC) is described. Secondly, the Direct Torque and Flux vector Control (DTFC) method, which - in contrast to FOC - depart from idea of coordinate transformation and analogy with DC motor, is briefly characterized. The last group is based on Feedback Linearization Control (FLC) and can be easy combined with sliding mode control. The simulation and experimental oscillograms that illustrate the performance of the discussed control strategies are shown. (orig.) 35 refs.

  20. Flood-proof motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Even before the Fukushima event occurred some German nuclear power plants (NPP) have considered flooding scenarios. As a result of one of these studies, AREVA performed an upgrade project in NPP Isar 1 with flood-proof motors as a replacement of existing air-cooled low-voltage and high-voltage motors of the emergency cooling chain. After the Fukushima event, in which the cooling chains failed, the topic flood-proof equipment gets more and more into focus. This compact will introduce different kinds of flood-proof electrical motors which are currently installed or planned for installation into NPPs over the world. Moreover the process of qualification, as it was performed during the project in NPP Isar 1, will be shown. (orig.)

  1. Mechanical design of electric motors

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Rapid increases in energy consumption and emphasis on environmental protection have posed challenges for the motor industry, as has the design and manufacture of highly efficient, reliable, cost-effective, energy-saving, quiet, precisely controlled, and long-lasting electric motors.Suitable for motor designers, engineers, and manufacturers, as well as maintenance personnel, undergraduate and graduate students, and academic researchers, Mechanical Design of Electric Motors provides in-depth knowledge of state-of-the-art design methods and developments of electric motors. From motor classificati

  2. Transformers and motors

    CERN Document Server

    Shultz, George

    1991-01-01

    Transformers and Motors is an in-depth technical reference which was originally written for the National Joint Apprenticeship Training Committee to train apprentice and journeymen electricians. This book provides detailed information for equipment installation and covers equipment maintenance and repair. The book also includes troubleshooting and replacement guidelines, and it contains a minimum of theory and math.In this easy-to-understand, practical sourcebook, you'll discover:* Explanations of the fundamental concepts of transformers and motors* Transformer connections and d

  3. Linear induction motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkman, W.E.; Adams, W.Q.; Berrier, B.R.

    1978-01-01

    A linear induction motor has been operated on a test bed with a feedback pulse resolution of 5 nm (0.2 μin). Slewing tests with this slide drive have shown positioning errors less than or equal to 33 nm (1.3 μin) at feedrates between 0 and 25.4 mm/min (0-1 ipm). A 0.86-m (34-in)-stroke linear motor is being investigated, using the SPACO machine as a test bed. Initial results were encouraging, and work is continuing to optimize the servosystem compensation

  4. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    Human studies in the past three decades have provided us with an emerging understanding of how cortical and spinal networks collaborate to ensure the vast repertoire of human behaviors. We differ from other animals in having direct cortical connections to spinal motoneurons, which bypass spinal...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  5. Electrodynamic ratchet motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jiufu; Sader, John E; Mulvaney, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Brownian ratchets produce directed motion through rectification of thermal fluctuations and have been used for separation processes and colloidal transport. We propose a flashing ratchet motor that enables the transduction of electrical energy into rotary micromechanical work. This is achieved through torque generation provided by boundary shaping of equipotential surfaces. The present device contrasts to previous implementations that focus on translational motion. Stochastic simulations elucidate the performance characteristics of this device as a function of its geometry. Miniaturization to nanoscale dimensions yields rotational speeds in excess of 1 kHz, which is comparable to biomolecular motors of similar size.

  6. The effect of induction motor shaft diameter on motor performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asım Gökhan Yetgin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Induction motors are used in many areas from the past to the present and in different fields with the development of technology has continued to be used. It is obvious that induction motors as an improvement to the efficiency in terms of energy saving would cause great benefit. In that context, induction motor manufacturers and designers are constantly trying out new methods to improve motor performance and efficiency. In this study, what would be the optimum diameter of the shaft in order to increase the efficiency of the induction motor were investigated. In the study, 5.5 kW, 7.5 kW and 11 kW motors analyzes were also performed. Obtained shaft diameter values were compared with the manufacturer values. In addition, critical points such as the magnetic flux values, weight values and performances of the motors were examined and optimal shaft diameter values for each motor have been determined.

  7. HTSL massive motor. Project: Motor field calculation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutt, H.J.; Gruener, A.

    2003-01-01

    HTS motors up to 300 kW were to be developed and optimized. For this, specific calculation methods were enhanced to include superconducting rotor types (hysteresis, reluctance and permanent magnet HTS rotors). The experiments were carried out in a SHM70-45 hysteresis motor. It was shown how static and dynamic trapped field magnetisation of the rotor with YBCO rings will increase flux in the air gap motor, increasing the motor capacity to twice its original level. (orig.) [de

  8. Stepping Motor - Hydraulic Motor Servo Drives for an NC Milling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the retrofit design of the control system of an NC milling machine with a stepping motor and stepping motor - actuated hydraulic motor servo mechanism on the machines X-axis is described. The servo designed in the course of this study was tested practically and shown to be linear - the velocity following errors ...

  9. Biomarkers of exposure to stainless steel tungsten inert gas welding fumes and the effect of exposure on exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccelli, Maria Grazia; Goldoni, Matteo; Andreoli, Roberta; Mozzoni, Paola; Pinelli, Silvana; Alinovi, Rossella; Selis, Luisella; Mutti, Antonio; Corradi, Massimo

    2018-08-01

    The respiratory tract is the main target organ of the inhaled hexavalent chromium (Cr-VI) and nickel (Ni) contained in stainless steel (SS) welding fumes (WFs). The aim of this study was to investigate the Cr and Ni content of the exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of SS tungsten inert gas (TIG) welders, and relate their concentrations with oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers. EBC and urine from 100 SS TIG welders were collected pre-(T 0 ) and post-shift (T 1 ) on a Friday, and pre-shift (T 2 ) on the following Monday morning. Both EBC and urinary Cr concentrations were higher at T 1 (0.08 μg/L and 0.71 μg/g creatinine) and T 0 (0.06 μg/L and 0.74 μg/g creatinine) than at T 2 (below the limit of detection [LOD] and 0.59 μg/g creatinine), and EBC Ni concentrations generally remained welding also play a role in generating lung oxidative stress. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of nanoclay dispersed phenol formaldehyde/fumed silica nanocomposites on physico-mechanical and thermal properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Josephine Chang Hui; Rahman, Md. Rezaur; Hamdan, Sinin

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of phenol formaldehyde/fumed silica/nanoclay (PF/FS/clay) nanocomposites were investigated. PF/FS/clay nanocomposites were prepared via condensation polymerization method and the effect of different clays as compatibilizers were subsequently investigated. The properties of nanocomposites were characterized through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and tensile test. FT-IR results confirmed the condensation polymerization and the formation of nanocomposites. SEM result revealed that the surface-modified clay (1.34TCN) had better compatibility with PF/FS matrix compared to surface-modified clay (1.28E), clay (1.30E) and clay (1.31PS). Besides, clay (1.34TCN)-loaded nanocomposites showed better surface morphology among all the nanocomposites. Furthermore, PF/FS/clay (1.34TCN) nanocomposite exhibited better tensile strength and modulus up to 68% due to the strong interfacial bonding between the polymer matrix and fillers. Thermal stability of PF/FS/clay (1.34TCN) nanocomposite showed the highest weight percent loss at the final degradation stage with higher activation energy. Overall, this study proved that clay (1.34TCN) was the most suitable to be introduced in PF/FS matrix.

  11. Integration of chemical scrubber with sodium hypochlorite and surfactant for removal of hydrocarbons in cooking oil fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Hsin-Han; Hsieh, Chu-Chin

    2010-01-01

    There are many types of technologies to control cooking oil fumes (COFs), but current typical technologies, such as electrostatic precipitator, conventional scrubber, catalyst, or condenser, are unable to efficiently remove the odorous materials present in COFs which are the primary cause of odor-complaint cases. There is also a lack of information about using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and surfactants to remove contaminants in COFs, and previous studies lack on-site investigations in restaurants. This study presents a chemical scrubber integrated with an automatic control system (ACS) to treat hydrocarbons (HCs) in COFs, and to monitor non-methane HCs (NMHC) and odor as indicators for its efficiency evaluation. The chemical scrubber effectively treats hydrophobic substances in COFs by combining surfactant and NaOCl under optimal operational conditions with NHMC removal efficiency as high as 85%. The mass transfer coefficient (K L a) of NMHC was enhanced by 50% under the NaOCl and surfactant conditions, as compared to typical wet scrubber. Further, this study establishes the fuzzy equations of the ACS, including the relationship between the removal efficiency and K L a, liquid/gas ratio, pH and C NaOCl .

  12. Integration of chemical scrubber with sodium hypochlorite and surfactant for removal of hydrocarbons in cooking oil fume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsin-Han [Graduate School of Engineering Science and Technology, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Touliu, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Chu-Chin, E-mail: hsiehcc@yuntech.edu.tw [Department of Environmental and Safety Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Touliu, Yunlin, Taiwan (China)

    2010-10-15

    There are many types of technologies to control cooking oil fumes (COFs), but current typical technologies, such as electrostatic precipitator, conventional scrubber, catalyst, or condenser, are unable to efficiently remove the odorous materials present in COFs which are the primary cause of odor-complaint cases. There is also a lack of information about using sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and surfactants to remove contaminants in COFs, and previous studies lack on-site investigations in restaurants. This study presents a chemical scrubber integrated with an automatic control system (ACS) to treat hydrocarbons (HCs) in COFs, and to monitor non-methane HCs (NMHC) and odor as indicators for its efficiency evaluation. The chemical scrubber effectively treats hydrophobic substances in COFs by combining surfactant and NaOCl under optimal operational conditions with NHMC removal efficiency as high as 85%. The mass transfer coefficient (K{sub L}a) of NMHC was enhanced by 50% under the NaOCl and surfactant conditions, as compared to typical wet scrubber. Further, this study establishes the fuzzy equations of the ACS, including the relationship between the removal efficiency and K{sub L}a, liquid/gas ratio, pH and C{sub NaOCl}.

  13. Effects on Chinese restaurant workers of exposure to cooking oil fumes: a cautionary note on urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Chih-Hong; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Wu, Kuen-Yuh

    2008-12-01

    This study evaluates oxidative DNA damage in workers who are exposed to cooking oil fumes (COFs) in Chinese restaurants. The study participants were 387 nonsmoking Chinese restaurant workers, 202 kitchen staff, and 185 service staff at 23 Chinese restaurants in Taiwan. Airborne particulate matter and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon levels were monitored in kitchens and dining areas. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) was used as an internal dose of exposure to COFs, and urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was used as an oxidative DNA damage marker. The relationship between workers' 8-OHdG and 1-OHP levels was estimated using linear mixed-effects models. Airborne particulate matter and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons levels in kitchens significantly exceeded those in dining areas. The kitchen staff's geometric mean levels of urinary 8-OHdG (7.9 microg/g creatinine) and 1-OHP (4.5 microg/g creatinine) were significantly higher than those of the service staff, which were 5.4 and 2.7 microg/g creatinine, respectively. Urinary 1-OHP level, work in kitchens, gender, and work hours per day were four significant predictors of urinary 8-OHdG levels after adjustments are made for covariates. Oxidative DNA damage was associated with exposure of Chinese restaurant workers to COFs. Female restaurant workers had a greater oxidative stress response to COFs than male restaurant workers, providing additional evidence of the link between lung cancer in Chinese women and exposure to COFs.

  14. Effect of addition of different nano-clays on the fumed silica-polyethylene glycol based shear-thickening fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mansi; Mehta, Rajeev; Verma, Sanjeev K.; Biswas, Ipsita

    2018-01-01

    A comparative study of the rheology of shear thickening suspensions of 20% fumed silica in polyethylene glycol (PEG200) with different nano clays as additives has been done. The nano-clays used are montmorillonite (MMT), Closite15A, Kaolin and Halloysite clay. The objective was to study the effect of relatively cost-effective clays as a partial substitute of silica. Specifically, the effect of type, concentration, temperature and frequency were considered. The results indicate that the shear thickening properties of Closite15A as additive in temperature ranges of 25 °C-45 °C performs the best and Halloysite performs best at higher (55 °C) and lower temperatures (5, 15 °C). The elasticity effects in dynamic experiments were markedly enhanced by Halloysite clay addition. Addition of MMT, however, led to insignificant enhancement in critical viscosity in steady-state as well as dynamic state-rheology. Interestingly, shear thickening fluid (STF) with all clay except MMT was stable after storing for more than a month. These findings indicate that the introduction of nano-clay as additives is a promising and cost effective method for enhancing the STF behavior which can be utilized in high impact resistant (about 3000% strain and 300 rad s-1 frequency) applications.

  15. Running on empty, fuming to Ottawa : prepared for the 6. annual gas tax honesty day campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents recommendations by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) regarding gasoline taxes and motoring revenues. From the period of May 2003 to April 2004, the average cost of a litre of gasoline in Canada was 73.3 cents. In 2004, gasoline taxes accounted for 42 per cent of the pump price paid by Canadian motorists. The paper criticizes the fact that the federal government collected $5.3 billion in federal gasoline and diesel taxes in 2003-2004, but provided only minimal support for roadway spending. The Department of Transport returned only 2.5 per cent of that revenue ($135 million) to the provinces for roadway and highway spending. In comparison, the US federal government returned 84 per cent of the US gasoline tax revenues back into road and highway development. The mayors of the major cities in Canada point to the need for a real commitment to municipal roadway spending. The CTF recommends that the federal government transfer and dedicate 5 cents of federal gasoline tax revenues to municipalities for roadway development using the CTF Municipal Roadway Trust model. It also recommends that the remaining half be returned to motorists and taxpayers in the form of lower gasoline taxes, beginning with the elimination of the 1.5 cent per litre gasoline tax introduced in 1995 to bring down the deficit. Other recommendations include the elimination of the harmonized sales tax and the goods and service tax charged on the tax component of the pump price. The main principles of these recommendations are to dedicate gasoline tax revenues to highway and roadway construction and maintenance and to reduce the tax rates to levels in keeping with road and highway funding. tabs., figs

  16. Running on empty, fuming to Ottawa : prepared for the 6. annual gas tax honesty day campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents recommendations by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) regarding gasoline taxes and motoring revenues. From the period of May 2003 to April 2004, the average cost of a litre of gasoline in Canada was 73.3 cents. In 2004, gasoline taxes accounted for 42 per cent of the pump price paid by Canadian motorists. The paper criticizes the fact that the federal government collected $5.3 billion in federal gasoline and diesel taxes in 2003-2004, but provided only minimal support for roadway spending. The Department of Transport returned only 2.5 per cent of that revenue ($135 million) to the provinces for roadway and highway spending. In comparison, the US federal government returned 84 per cent of the US gasoline tax revenues back into road and highway development. The mayors of the major cities in Canada point to the need for a real commitment to municipal roadway spending. The CTF recommends that the federal government transfer and dedicate 5 cents of federal gasoline tax revenues to municipalities for roadway development using the CTF Municipal Roadway Trust model. It also recommends that the remaining half be returned to motorists and taxpayers in the form of lower gasoline taxes, beginning with the elimination of the 1.5 cent per litre gasoline tax introduced in 1995 to bring down the deficit. Other recommendations include the elimination of the harmonized sales tax and the goods and service tax charged on the tax component of the pump price. The main principles of these recommendations are to dedicate gasoline tax revenues to highway and roadway construction and maintenance and to reduce the tax rates to levels in keeping with road and highway funding. tabs., figs.

  17. Thiokol Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on thiokol solid rocket motors. The topics include: 1) Communications; 2) Military and government intelligence; 3) Positioning satellites; 4) Remote sensing; 5) Space burial; 6) Science; 7) Space manufacturing; 8) Advertising; 9) Space rescue space debris management; 10) Space tourism; 11) Space settlements; 12) Hazardous waste disposal; 13) Extraterrestrial resources; 14) Fast package delivery; and 15) Space utilities.

  18. Reciprocating Linear Electric Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldowsky, M. P.

    1984-01-01

    Features include structural simplicity and good force/displacement characteristics. Reciprocating motor has simple, rugged construction, relatively low reciprocating weight, improved power delivery, and improved force control. Wear reduced by use of magnetic bearings. Intended to provide drivers for long-lived Stirling-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, concept has less exotic applications, such as fuel pumps.

  19. Switched reluctance motor drives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Davis RM, Ray WF, Blake RJ 1981 Inverter drive for switched reluctance: circuits and component ratings. Inst. Elec. Eng. Proc. B128: 126-136. Ehsani M. 1991 Position Sensor elimination technique for the switched reluctance motor drive. US Patent No. 5,072,166. Ehsani M, Ramani K R 1993 Direct control strategies based ...

  20. Motor Incoordination in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between motor performance, attention deficit, impulsiveness, and hyperactivity in 42 school-aged children with ADHD (36 males, 6 females; mean age 8 years 2 months; range 6-11 years was studied at National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.

  1. Deafness and motor abilities level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Zwierzchowska

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The audition injury hinders some motor motions and the organised coordination at the higher level and may be a cause of disturbances and disorder in some motor abilities adoption. It was assumed that deafness including its aetiology and injury mechanism may significantly influence the motor development of human being. The study aimed in checking if the deafness, as a result of various unfavourable factors, determines the motor development of children and youngsters. Consequently the dependency between qualitative features i.e.: signed motor level and aetiology, audition injury mechanism and the deafness degree was examined. The mechanism and aetiology of hearing correlated with the motor abilities displayed statistically significant dependencies in few motor trials only. Revealed correlations regarded mostly the coordination trials excluding the flexibility one. Statistically significant dependencies between the audition diminution and the motor abilities level were not found.

  2. Possibilities of using plants to alleviate the effects of the motor vehicle and of detecting 'latent' injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, T

    1978-01-01

    This paper deals with plants in the roadside environment in relation to noise abatement, gaseous pollutants, particulate pollutants, and 'latent' injury. The use of trees and shrubs particularly in combination with solid barriers may diminish noise in residential areas. Plants may help to some modest extent to improve the noise situation for man near arteries of motor traffic. Plants may absorb some pollutants and serve as 'sinks'. Shrubs and trees along highways may help to increase the dilution of exhaust fumes by turbulence. Woody vegetation absorbs particulates effectively. The filtering action of woody vegetation is very beneficial, and not restricted to lead. 'Latent' injury is the first warning signal that the biological situation there may also be adverse for man, changes in plants near highways indicate that the environment in that vicinity of heavily travelled motorways is under a stress. 10 references, 2 figures.

  3. MOTORIC STIMULATION RELATED TO FINE MOTORIC DEVELOPMENT ON CHILD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Triharini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Motor developmental stimulation is an activity undertaken to stimulate the children basic skills and so they can grow and develop optimally. Children who obtain a direct stimulus will grow faster than who get less stimulus. Mother’s behavior of stimulation is very important for children, it is considering as the basic needs of children and it must be fulfilled. Providing good stimulation could optimize fine motor development in children. The purpose of this study was to analyze mother’s behavior about motor stimulation with fine motor development in toddler age 4-5 years old. Method: Design have been  used in this study was cross sectional. Population were mothers and their toddler in Group A of Dharma Wanita Persatuan Driyorejo Gresik Preschool. Sample were 51 respondents recruited by using purposive sampling technique according to inclusion and exclusion criteria. The independent variable was mother’s behavior about motor stimulation whereas dependent variable was fine motor development in toddler. The data were collected using questionnaire and conducting observation on fine motor development based on Denver Development Screening Test (DDST. Data then analyzed using Spearman Rho (r test to find relation between mother’s behaviors about stimulation motor on their toddler fine motor development. Result: Results  of this study showed that there were correlations between mother’s knowledge and fine motor development in toddler (p=0.000, between mother’s attitude and fine motor development in toddler (p=0.000, and between mother’s actions and fine motor development in toddler (p=0.000. Analysis: In sort study found that there were relation between fine motor development and mother’s behavior. Discussion: Therefore mother’s behavior needed to be improved. Further research about stimulation motor and fine motor development aspects in toddler is required.

  4. Microprocessor controller for stepping motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, B.G.; Thuot, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for digital computer control of multiple stepping motors which operate in a severe electromagnetic pulse environment is presented. The motors position mirrors in the beam-alignment system of a 100-kJ CO 2 laser. An asynchronous communications channel of a computer is used to send coded messages, containing the motor address and stepping-command information, to the stepping-motor controller in a bit serial format over a fiber-optics communications link. The addressed controller responds by transmitting to the computer its address and other motor information, thus confirming the received message. Each controller is capable of controlling three stepping motors. The controller contains the fiber-optics interface, a microprocessor, and the stepping-motor driven circuits. The microprocessor program, which resides in an EPROM, decodes the received messages, transmits responses, performs the stepping-motor sequence logic, maintains motor-position information, and monitors the motor's reference switch. For multiple stepping-motor application, the controllers are connected in a daisy chain providing control of many motors from one asynchronous communications channel of the computer

  5. Multiple stage miniature stepping motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niven, W.A.; Shikany, S.D.; Shira, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    A stepping motor comprising a plurality of stages which may be selectively activated to effect stepping movement of the motor, and which are mounted along a common rotor shaft to achieve considerable reduction in motor size and minimum diameter, whereby sequential activation of the stages results in successive rotor steps with direction being determined by the particular activating sequence followed

  6. Experiments with a DC Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the…

  7. Fundamental Principles underlying Motor Reflexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Zhou (Kuikui)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe cerebellum has been suggested to be involved in motor control ever since the early 19th century. The motor control ranges from timing and strength of simple reflexes to multiple joint/limb coordination and complex motor sequence acquisition. The current thesis discusses the

  8. Motor Vehicle Theft. Special Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Caroline Wolf

    Thirteen years of data from the National Crime Survey were analyzed to examine the characteristics of motor vehicle theft, to identify trends during the past 13 years, and to determine who are most likely to be victims of motor vehicle theft. All motor vehicle thefts reported to the National Crime Survey from 1973 through 1985 were examined.…

  9. Segmented motor drive - with multi-phase induction motor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Flemming Buus

    of the induction motor is set up. The model is able to calculate dynamical electric, magnetic and mechanic state variables, but initially it is used to calculate static characteristics in motors with different number of phases and different voltage supply shapes. This analysis show i.e. that the efficiency....... The multi-phase motor is selected for further analysis. The project is limited to examine if increasing the number of phases can improve the characteristics for induction motor drives. In the literature it is demonstrated that torque production in a six-phase motor can be increased, if a 3rd harmonic......This PhD project commences in modulation of motor drives, i.e. having the advantage of reducing the number of variants and improves the system reliability at error situations. Four different motor drive topologies with modular construction as common denominator are compared on a general level...

  10. Variation in motor output and motor performance in a centrally generated motor pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Brian J.; Doloc-Mihu, Anca; Calabrese, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) produce motor patterns that ultimately drive motor outputs. We studied how functional motor performance is achieved, specifically, whether the variation seen in motor patterns is reflected in motor performance and whether fictive motor patterns differ from those in vivo. We used the leech heartbeat system in which a bilaterally symmetrical CPG coordinates segmental heart motor neurons and two segmented heart tubes into two mutually exclusive coordination modes: rear-to-front peristaltic on one side and nearly synchronous on the other, with regular side-to-side switches. We assessed individual variability of the motor pattern and the beat pattern in vivo. To quantify the beat pattern we imaged intact adults. To quantify the phase relations between motor neurons and heart constrictions we recorded extracellularly from two heart motor neurons and movement from the corresponding heart segments in minimally dissected leeches. Variation in the motor pattern was reflected in motor performance only in the peristaltic mode, where larger intersegmental phase differences in the motor neurons resulted in larger phase differences between heart constrictions. Fictive motor patterns differed from those in vivo only in the synchronous mode, where intersegmental phase differences in vivo had a larger front-to-rear bias and were more constrained. Additionally, load-influenced constriction timing might explain the amplification of the phase differences between heart segments in the peristaltic mode and the higher variability in motor output due to body shape assumed in this soft-bodied animal. The motor pattern determines the beat pattern, peristaltic or synchronous, but heart mechanics influence the phase relations achieved. PMID:24717348

  11. Split-phase motor running as capacitor starts motor and as capacitor run motor

    OpenAIRE

    Yahaya Asizehi ENESI; Jacob TSADO; Mark NWOHU; Usman Abraham USMAN; Odu Ayo IMORU

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the input parameters of a single phase split-phase induction motor is taken to investigate and to study the output performance characteristics of capacitor start and capacitor run induction motor. The value of these input parameters are used in the design characteristics of capacitor run and capacitor start motor with each motor connected to rated or standard capacitor in series with auxiliary winding or starting winding respectively for the normal operational condition. The ma...

  12. Study of the degradation mechanisms of amines used for the capture of CO{sub 2} in industrial fumes; Etude des mecanismes de degradation des amines utilisees pour le captage du CO{sub 2} dans les fumees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepaumier, H

    2008-10-15

    Global warming leads to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Post combustion CO{sub 2} capture with solvent is the most advanced technology to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions in industrial fumes. A major problem associated with chemical absorption of CO{sub 2} using the benchmark ethanolamine (MEA) is solvent degradation through irreversible side reactions with CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} which leads to numerous harmful impacts to the process: corrosion, solvent loss, foaming, fouling, and viscosity increase. So, developing new amines with higher chemical stability is essential. This work is based on the chemical stability study of 17 different molecules. Their structures have been chosen in order to establish structure-property relationships: alkanolamines, known for gas treatment application (MEA, DEA, MDEA, AMP...), di-amines, and tri-amines without alcohol function. Impact of temperature, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} on degradation has been studied. Strong experimental conditions have been used to observe significant degradation after a 15 days experiment. Separation, identification and quantification of degradation products have been performed by using different testing instructions such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, ionic chromatography and NMR. Different mechanisms are proposed to explain most of degradation compounds. Radical reactions (dealkylation, alkylation, ring-closure reactions and piperazinones formation) are involved under O{sub 2} pressure whereas CO{sub 2} induces ionic reactions (dealkylation, alkylation, addition, ring-closure reactions and oxazolidinones or imidazolidinones formation). Large discrepancies of stability are noticed among the different amines. Knowledge of degradation products and reaction mechanisms has thus permitted to establish some relationships between structure and chemical stability: for example, role of the amine function (primary, secondary, tertiary), impact of alkyl chain length between the two amino groups and steric

  13. Acute exercise improves motor memory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Kasper Christen; Roig, Marc; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that a single bout of acute cardiovascular exercise improves motor skill learning through an optimization of long-term motor memory. Here we expand this previous finding, to explore potential exercise-related biomarkers and their association with measures of motor memory...... practice whereas lactate correlated with better retention 1 hour as well as 24 hours and 7 days after practice. Thus, improvements in motor skill acquisition and retention induced by acute cardiovascular exercise are associated with increased concentrations of biomarkers involved in memory and learning...... processes. More mechanistic studies are required to elucidate the specific role of each biomarker in the formation of motor memory....

  14. Dynamically Timed Electric Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Ann M. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A brushless DC motor including a housing having an end cap secured thereto. The housing encloses a rotor. a stator and a rotationally displaceable commutation board having sensors secured thereon and spaced around the periphery of the rotor. An external rotational force is applied to the commutation board for displacement of the sensors to various positions whereby varying feedback signals are generated by the positioning of the sensors relative to the rotating rotor. The commutation board is secured in a fixed position in response to feedback signals indicative of optimum sensor position being determined. The rotation of the commutation board and the securing of the sensors in the desired fixed position is accomplished without requiring the removal of the end cap and with the DC motor operating.

  15. TFTR Motor Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Bronner, G.; Horton, M.

    1977-01-01

    A general description is given of 475 MVA pulsed motor generators for TFTR at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Two identical generators operating in parallel are capable of supplying 950 MVA for an equivalent square pulse of 6.77 seconds and 4,500 MJ at 0.7 power factor to provide the energy for the pulsed electrical coils and heating system for TFTR. The description includes the operational features of the 15,000 HP wound rotor motors driving each generator with its starting equipment and cycloconverter for controlling speed, power factor, and regulating line voltage during load pulsing where the generator speed changes from 87.5 to 60 Hz frequency variation to provide the 4,500 MJ or energy. The special design characteristics such as fatigue stress calculations for 10 6 cycles of operation, forcing factor on exciter to provide regulation, and low generator impedance are reviewed

  16. Libert-E Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieloff, Susan F.; Kinnunen, Raymond; Chevarley, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Kei Yun Wong has big dreams. She has been entrusted with the United States launch of Libert-E Motor, a new line of Chinese-manufactured electric scooters. With only $750,000 of her original budget of $3 million left, she needs to make sure that the launch succeeds, as it represents the initial step in her desire to create the first Chinese global…

  17. 350 KVA motor generators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    Each logic circuit in the central computers consumes only a fraction of a watt: however, the final load constituted by many such circuits plus peripheral equipment is nearly half a million watts. Shown here are two 350 KVA motor generators used to convert 50 Hz mains to 60 Hz (US standard). Flywheels on the M.G. shafts remove power dropouts of up to 0.5 s.

  18. Motor Fuel Excise Taxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-09-01

    A new report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) explores the role of alternative fuels and energy efficient vehicles in motor fuel taxes. Throughout the United States, it is common practice for federal, state, and local governments to tax motor fuels on a per gallon basis to fund construction and maintenance of our transportation infrastructure. In recent years, however, expenses have outpaced revenues creating substantial funding shortfalls that have required supplemental funding sources. While rising infrastructure costs and the decreasing purchasing power of the gas tax are significant factors contributing to the shortfall, the increased use of alternative fuels and more stringent fuel economy standards are also exacerbating revenue shortfalls. The current dynamic places vehicle efficiency and petroleum use reduction polices at direct odds with policies promoting robust transportation infrastructure. Understanding the energy, transportation, and environmental tradeoffs of motor fuel tax policies can be complicated, but recent experiences at the state level are helping policymakers align their energy and environmental priorities with highway funding requirements.

  19. Motor car driving; Kraftfahrzeugfuehrung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juergensohn, T. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). ISS-Fahrzeugtechnik; Timpe, K.P. (eds.) [Technische Univ. Berlin (DE). Zentrum Mensch-Maschine-Systeme (ZMMS)

    2001-07-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on motor car driving, i.e. all aspects of motor car technology that cannot be looked at separately from the needs, characteristics and limitations of the human driver. This includes ergonomics as well as the design of the driver interface in consideration of the findings of cognitive science, problems of driving simulation in the context of simulation of technical systems, problems relating to optimal car automation up to traffic psychology. The book is in honour of Prof. Dr. Willumeit who died in summer 2000. Prof. Willumeit was one of the few scientists in Germany who had been an expert on all aspects of motor car driving for many years. [German] Erstmalig wird das Thema der Fahrzeugfuehrung geschlossen dargestellt. Die Thematik der 'Kraftfahrzeugfuehrung' umfasst in diesem Zusammenhang alle Aspekte der Kraftfahrzeugtechnik, die nicht isoliert von den Erfordernissen, Eigenschaften und Grenzen des menschlichen Fahrers betrachtet werden koennen. Dies beinhaltet u.a. Probleme der Ergonomie, aber auch Fragen nach einer kognitionswissenschaftlich unterstuetzten Schnittstellengestaltung, Fragen der Simulation des Fahrverhalten im Kontext der Simulation technischer Systeme oder Fragen einer optimalen Fahrzeugautomatisierung bis hin zu verkehrspsychologischen Aspekten. Das Buch ist als Gedenkband fuer Prof. Dr. Willumeit konzipiert, der im Sommer 2000 verstarb. Prof. Willumeit war einer der wenigen Wissenschaftler in Deutschland, der ueber viele Jahre diese Thematik der Kraftfahrzeugfuehrung in ihrer vollen Breite verfolgte. (orig.)

  20. Gel/Space Ratio Evolution in Ternary Composite System Consisting of Portland Cement, Silica Fume, and Fly Ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mengxue; Li, Chen; Yao, Wu

    2017-01-11

    In cement-based pastes, the relationship between the complex phase assemblage and mechanical properties is usually described by the "gel/space ratio" descriptor. The gel/space ratio is defined as the volume ratio of the gel to the available space in the composite system, and it has been widely studied in the cement unary system. This work determines the gel/space ratio in the cement-silica fume-fly ash ternary system (C-SF-FA system) by measuring the reaction degrees of the cement, SF, and FA. The effects that the supplementary cementitious material (SCM) replacements exert on the evolution of the gel/space ratio are discussed both theoretically and practically. The relationship between the gel/space ratio and compressive strength is then explored, and the relationship disparities for different mix proportions are analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that the SCM replacements promote the gel/space ratio evolution only when the SCM reaction degree is higher than a certain value, which is calculated and defined as the critical reaction degree (CRD). The effects of the SCM replacements can be predicted based on the CRD, and the theological predictions agree with the test results quite well. At low gel/space ratios, disparities in the relationship between the gel/space ratio and the compressive strength are caused by porosity, which has also been studied in cement unary systems. The ratio of cement-produced gel to SCM-produced gel ( G C to G S C M ratio) is introduced for use in analyzing high gel/space ratios, in which it plays a major role in creating relationship disparities.

  1. Study of the degradation mechanisms of amines used for the capture of CO2 in industrial fumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepaumier, H.

    2008-10-01

    Global warming leads to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Post combustion CO 2 capture with solvent is the most advanced technology to reduce CO 2 emissions in industrial fumes. A major problem associated with chemical absorption of CO 2 using the benchmark ethanolamine (MEA) is solvent degradation through irreversible side reactions with CO 2 and O 2 which leads to numerous harmful impacts to the process: corrosion, solvent loss, foaming, fouling, and viscosity increase. So, developing new amines with higher chemical stability is essential. This work is based on the chemical stability study of 17 different molecules. Their structures have been chosen in order to establish structure-property relationships: alkanolamines, known for gas treatment application (MEA, DEA, MDEA, AMP...), di-amines, and tri-amines without alcohol function. Impact of temperature, CO 2 , and O 2 on degradation has been studied. Strong experimental conditions have been used to observe significant degradation after a 15 days experiment. Separation, identification and quantification of degradation products have been performed by using different testing instructions such as gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, ionic chromatography and NMR. Different mechanisms are proposed to explain most of degradation compounds. Radical reactions (dealkylation, alkylation, ring-closure reactions and piperazinones formation) are involved under O 2 pressure whereas CO 2 induces ionic reactions (dealkylation, alkylation, addition, ring-closure reactions and oxazolidinones or imidazolidinones formation). Large discrepancies of stability are noticed among the different amines. Knowledge of degradation products and reaction mechanisms has thus permitted to establish some relationships between structure and chemical stability: for example, role of the amine function (primary, secondary, tertiary), impact of alkyl chain length between the two amino groups and steric hindrance. (author)

  2. Gel/Space Ratio Evolution in Ternary Composite System Consisting of Portland Cement, Silica Fume, and Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxue Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In cement-based pastes, the relationship between the complex phase assemblage and mechanical properties is usually described by the “gel/space ratio” descriptor. The gel/space ratio is defined as the volume ratio of the gel to the available space in the composite system, and it has been widely studied in the cement unary system. This work determines the gel/space ratio in the cement-silica fume-fly ash ternary system (C-SF-FA system by measuring the reaction degrees of the cement, SF, and FA. The effects that the supplementary cementitious material (SCM replacements exert on the evolution of the gel/space ratio are discussed both theoretically and practically. The relationship between the gel/space ratio and compressive strength is then explored, and the relationship disparities for different mix proportions are analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that the SCM replacements promote the gel/space ratio evolution only when the SCM reaction degree is higher than a certain value, which is calculated and defined as the critical reaction degree (CRD. The effects of the SCM replacements can be predicted based on the CRD, and the theological predictions agree with the test results quite well. At low gel/space ratios, disparities in the relationship between the gel/space ratio and the compressive strength are caused by porosity, which has also been studied in cement unary systems. The ratio of cement-produced gel to SCM-produced gel ( G C to G S C M ratio is introduced for use in analyzing high gel/space ratios, in which it plays a major role in creating relationship disparities.

  3. In situ formation of sintered cordierite–mullite nano–micro composites by utilizing of waste silica fume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, R.M.; EL-Rafei, A.M.; Zawrah, M.F.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We succeeded to obtain in situ formed sintered cordierite–mullite nano–macro composites from waste and pure materials at 1400 °C. ► Their sinterability was greatly dependent on both firing temperature and composition. ► XRD patterns showed that the optimum temperature required for formation of sintered cordierite–mullite nano–macro composites was achieved at 1400 °C. ► The batch containing 70 wt.% cordierite and 30 wt.% mullite exhibited the best properties. ► Microstructures of the densified composites were composed of nano–macro cordierite–mullite structures. -- Abstract: This study aims at in situ formation of sintered cordierite–mullite nano–macro composites having high technological properties using waste silica fume, calcined ball clay, calcined alumina, and magnesia as starting materials. The starting materials were mixed in different ratios to obtain different cordierite–mullite composite batches in which the cordierite contents ranged from 50 to 100 wt.%. The batches were uni-axially pressed at 100 MPa and sintered at 1350, 1400 and 1450 °C to select the optimum temperature required for cordierite–mullite nano–macro composites formation. The formed phases were identified by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. The sintering parameters in terms of bulk density (BD) and apparent porosity (AP) were determined. The microstructure of composites has been investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Cold crushing strength (CCS) of the sintered batches was evaluated. The result revealed that the cordierite–mullite nano–macro composites were in-situ formed at 1400 °C. The batch containing 70 wt.% cordierite showed good physical and mechanical properties.

  4. Solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR characterization of hydrates formed in calcium aluminate-silica fume mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Rivas Mercury, J.M.; Aza, A.H. de; Turrillas, X.; Sobrados, I.; Sanz, J.

    2008-01-01

    Partially deuterated Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) y (OH) 12-4y -Al(OH) 3 mixtures, prepared by hydration of Ca 3 Al 2 O 6 (C 3 A), Ca 12 Al 14 O 33 (C 12 A 7 ) and CaAl 2 O 4 (CA) phases in the presence of silica fume, have been characterized by 29 Si and 27 Al magic-angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopies. NMR spectroscopy was used to characterize anhydrous and fully hydrated samples. In hydrated compounds, Ca 3 Al 2 (OH) 12 and Al(OH) 3 phases were detected. From the quantitative analysis of 27 Al NMR signals, the Al(OH) 3 /Ca 3 Al 2 (OH) 12 ratio was deduced. The incorporation of Si into the katoite structure, Ca 3 Al 2 (SiO 4 ) 3-x (OH) 4x , was followed by 27 Al and 29 Si NMR spectroscopies. Si/OH ratios were determined from the quantitative analysis of 27 Al MAS-NMR components associated with Al(OH) 6 and Al(OSi)(OH) 5 environments. The 29 Si NMR spectroscopy was also used to quantify the unreacted silica and amorphous calcium aluminosilicate hydrates formed, C-S-H and C-A-S-H for short. From 29 Si NMR spectra, the amount of Si incorporated into different phases was estimated. Si and Al concentrations, deduced by NMR, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrometry, and Rietveld analysis of both X-ray and neutron data, indicate that only a part of available Si is incorporated in katoite structures. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron micrograph of CaAl 2 O 4 -microsilica mixture hydrated at 90 deg. C for 31 days showing a cubic Ca 3 Al 2.0±0.2 (SiO 4 ) 0.9±0.2 (OH) 1.8 crystal surrounded by unreacted amorphous silica spheres

  5. 76 FR 647 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 3... Motors and Small Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of... motors and small electric motors, clarify the scope of energy conservation standards for electric motors...

  6. 46 CFR 111.70-3 - Motor controllers and motor-control centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Motor controllers and motor-control centers. 111.70-3... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Motor Circuits, Controllers, and Protection § 111.70-3 Motor controllers and motor-control centers. (a) General. The enclosure for each motor controller or motor-control...

  7. Lifetime occupational exposure to metals and welding fumes, and risk of glioma: a 7-country population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Marie-Elise; Turner, Michelle C; Lavoué, Jérôme; Richard, Hugues; Figuerola, Jordi; Kincl, Laurel; Richardson, Lesley; Benke, Geza; Blettner, Maria; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, David; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Schüz, Joachim; Siemiatycki, Jack; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-08-25

    Brain tumor etiology is poorly understood. Based on their ability to pass through the blood-brain barrier, it has been hypothesized that exposure to metals may increase the risk of brain cancer. Results from the few epidemiological studies on this issue are limited and inconsistent. We investigated the relationship between glioma risk and occupational exposure to five metals - lead, cadmium, nickel, chromium and iron- as well as to welding fumes, using data from the seven-country INTEROCC study. A total of 1800 incident glioma cases and 5160 controls aged 30-69 years were included in the analysis. Lifetime occupational exposure to the agents was assessed using the INTEROCC JEM, a modified version of the Finnish job exposure matrix FINJEM. In general, cases had a slightly higher prevalence of exposure to the various metals and welding fumes than did controls, with the prevalence among ever exposed ranging between 1.7 and 2.2% for cadmium to 10.2 and 13.6% for iron among controls and cases, respectively. However, in multivariable logistic regression analyses, there was no association between ever exposure to any of the agents and risk of glioma with odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) ranging from 0.8 (0.7-1.0) for lead to 1.1 (0.7-1.6) for cadmium. Results were consistent across models considering cumulative exposure or duration, as well as in all sensitivity analyses conducted. Findings from this large-scale international study provide no evidence for an association between occupational exposure to any of the metals under scrutiny or welding fumes, and risk of glioma.

  8. Performance Comparison between a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor and an Induction Motor as a Traction Motor for High Speed Train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Minoru; Kawamura, Junya; Terauchi, Nobuo

    Performance tests are carried out to demonstrate the superiority of a permanent magnet synchronous motor to an induction motor as a traction motor for high-speed train. A prototype motor was manufactured by replacing the rotor of a conventional induction motor. The test results show that the permanent magnet motor is lighter, efficient and more silent than the induction motor because of the different rotor structure.

  9. Neurons other than motor neurons in motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffoli, Riccardo; Biagioni, Francesca; Busceti, Carla L; Gaglione, Anderson; Ryskalin, Larisa; Gambardella, Stefano; Frati, Alessandro; Fornai, Francesco

    2017-11-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is typically defined by a loss of motor neurons in the central nervous system. Accordingly, morphological analysis for decades considered motor neurons (in the cortex, brainstem and spinal cord) as the neuronal population selectively involved in ALS. Similarly, this was considered the pathological marker to score disease severity ex vivo both in patients and experimental models. However, the concept of non-autonomous motor neuron death was used recently to indicate the need for additional cell types to produce motor neuron death in ALS. This means that motor neuron loss occurs only when they are connected with other cell types. This concept originally emphasized the need for resident glia as well as non-resident inflammatory cells. Nowadays, the additional role of neurons other than motor neurons emerged in the scenario to induce non-autonomous motor neuron death. In fact, in ALS neurons diverse from motor neurons are involved. These cells play multiple roles in ALS: (i) they participate in the chain of events to produce motor neuron loss; (ii) they may even degenerate more than and before motor neurons. In the present manuscript evidence about multi-neuronal involvement in ALS patients and experimental models is discussed. Specific sub-classes of neurons in the whole spinal cord are reported either to degenerate or to trigger neuronal degeneration, thus portraying ALS as a whole spinal cord disorder rather than a disease affecting motor neurons solely. This is associated with a novel concept in motor neuron disease which recruits abnormal mechanisms of cell to cell communication.

  10. Comparison of capabilities of reluctance synchronous motor and induction motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stumberger, Gorazd; Hadziselimovic, Miralem; Stumberger, Bojan; Miljavec, Damijan; Dolinar, Drago; Zagradisnik, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the capabilities of a reluctance synchronous motor (RSM) with those of an induction motor (IM). An RSM and IM were designed and made, with the same rated power and speed. They differ only in the rotor portion while their stators, housings and cooling systems are identical. The capabilities of both motors in a variable speed drive are evaluated by comparison of the results obtained by magnetically nonlinear models and by measurements

  11. A comparison of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress from welding fumes generated with a new nickel-, copper-based consumable versus mild and stainless steel-based welding in RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badding, Melissa A; Fix, Natalie R; Antonini, James M; Leonard, Stephen S

    2014-01-01

    Welding processes that generate fumes containing toxic metals, such as hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), manganese (Mn), and nickel (Ni), have been implicated in lung injury, inflammation, and lung tumor promotion in animal models. While federal regulations have reduced permissible worker exposure limits to Cr(VI), this is not always practical considering that welders may work in confined spaces and exhaust ventilation may be ineffective. Thus, there has been a recent initiative to minimize the potentially hazardous components in welding materials by developing new consumables containing much less Cr(VI) and Mn. A new nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu)-based material (Ni-Cu WF) is being suggested as a safer alternative to stainless steel consumables; however, its adverse cellular effects have not been studied. This study compared the cytotoxic effects of the newly developed Ni-Cu WF with two well-characterized welding fumes, collected from gas metal arc welding using mild steel (GMA-MS) or stainless steel (GMA-SS) electrodes. RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages were exposed to the three welding fumes at two doses (50 µg/ml and 250 µg/ml) for up to 24 hours. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, phagocytic function, and cytokine production were examined. The GMA-MS and GMA-SS samples were found to be more reactive in terms of ROS production compared to the Ni-Cu WF. However, the fumes from this new material were more cytotoxic, inducing cell death and mitochondrial dysfunction at a lower dose. Additionally, pre-treatment with Ni-Cu WF particles impaired the ability of cells to phagocytize E. coli, suggesting macrophage dysfunction. Thus, the toxic cellular responses to welding fumes are largely due to the metal composition. The results also suggest that reducing Cr(VI) and Mn in the generated fume by increasing the concentration of other metals (e.g., Ni, Cu) may not necessarily improve welder safety.

  12. Control of synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous motors are indubitably the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. Their control law is thus critical for combining at the same time high productivity to reduced energy consummation. As far as possible, the control algorithms must exploit the properties of these actuators. Therefore, this work draws on well adapted models resulting from the Park's transformation, for both the most traditional machines with sinusoidal field distribution and for machines with non-sinusoidal field distribution which are more and more used in

  13. Electric Motors for Vehicle Propulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Larsson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This work is intended to contribute with knowledge to the area of electic motorsfor propulsion in the vehicle industry. This is done by first studying the differentelectric motors available, the motors suitable for vehicle propulsion are then dividedinto four different types to be studied separately. These four types are thedirect current, induction, permanent magnet and switched reluctance motors. Thedesign and construction are then studied to understand how the different typesdiffer from ea...

  14. High efficiency motor selection handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Gilbert A.; Litman, Todd; Douglass, John G.

    1990-10-01

    Substantial reductions in energy and operational costs can be achieved through the use of energy-efficient electric motors. A handbook was compiled to help industry identify opportunities for cost-effective application of these motors. It covers the economic and operational factors to be considered when motor purchase decisions are being made. Its audience includes plant managers, plant engineers, and others interested in energy management or preventative maintenance programs.

  15. Motor development of blind toddler

    OpenAIRE

    Likar, Petra

    2013-01-01

    For blind toddlers, development of motor skills enables possibilities for learning and exploring the environment. The purpose of this graduation thesis is to systematically mark the milestones in development of motor skills in blind toddlers, to establish different factors which affect this development, and to discover different ways for teachers for visually impaired and parents to encourage development of motor skills. It is typical of blind toddlers that they do not experience a wide varie...

  16. Motor fuel prices in Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdogdu, Erkan

    2014-01-01

    The world's most expensive motor fuel (gasoline, diesel and LPG) is sold most likely in the Republic of Turkey. This paper investigates the key issues related to the motor fuel prices in Turkey. First of all, the paper analyses the main reason behind high prices, namely motor fuel taxes in Turkey. Then, it estimates the elasticity of motor fuel demand in Turkey using an econometric analysis. The findings indicate that motor fuel demand in Turkey is quite inelastic and, therefore, not responsive to price increases caused by an increase in either pre-tax prices or taxes. Therefore, fuel market in Turkey is open to opportunistic behavior by firms (through excessive profits) and the government (through excessive taxes). Besides, the paper focuses on the impact of high motor fuel prices on road transport associated activities, including the pattern of passenger transportation, motorization rate, fuel use, total kilometers traveled and CO 2 emissions from road transportation. The impact of motor fuel prices on income distribution in Turkey and Turkish public opinion about high motor fuel prices are also among the subjects investigated in the course of the study. - Highlights: • The key issues (e.g. taxes) related to motor fuel prices in Turkey are explored. • Their impact on transport activities and income distribution is also investigated. • An econometric analysis is performed to estimate motor fuel demand in Turkey. • Motor fuel demand in Turkey is found to be quite inelastic. • Turkish fuel market is open to opportunistic behavior by firms and the government

  17. Motor of the future - superconducting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moen, Odd

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature superconductors count as the most innovative and future-oriented technology for electric motors. When these materials are used, the engine rating can be doubled and at the same time the losses halved while retaining the same size of construction. Siemens have recently developed a synchronous motor based on a high-temperature superconducting excitation winding. The rated power of the motor is 380 kW. The high-temperature superconductor that is used in this motor requires considerably less cooling outfit than low-temperature superconductors

  18. Overview of Bearingless Induction Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bearingless induction motors combining functions of both torque generation and noncontact magnetic suspension together have attracted more and more attention in the past decades due to their definite advantages of compactness, simple structure, less maintenance, no wear particles, high rotational speed, and so forth. This paper overviews the key technologies of the bearingless induction motors, with emphasis on motor topologies, mathematical models, and control strategies. Particularly, in the control issues, the vector control, independent control, direct torque control, nonlinear decoupling control, sensorless control, and so forth are investigated. In addition, several possible development trends of the bearingless induction motors are also discussed.

  19. Gap junctions and motor behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole; Tresch, Matthew C.

    2002-01-01

    The production of any motor behavior requires coordinated activity in motor neurons and premotor networks. In vertebrates, this coordination is often assumed to take place through chemical synapses. Here we review recent data suggesting that electrical gap-junction coupling plays an important role...... in coordinating and generating motor outputs in embryonic and early postnatal life. Considering the recent demonstration of a prevalent expression of gap-junction proteins and gap-junction structures in the adult mammalian spinal cord, we suggest that neuronal gap-junction coupling might also contribute...... to the production of motor behavior in adult mammals....

  20. Design of an HTS motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Y; Pei, R; Hong, Z; Jiang, Q; Coombs, T A [Cambridge University engineering Department, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: yj222@cam.ac.uk

    2008-02-01

    This paper gives a detailed description of the design of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) motor. The stator of the motor consists of six air cored HTS racetrack windings, together with an iron shield. The rotor is made of 80 superconducting YBCO pucks, which can be magnetized and equates to a four-pole permanent magnet. The whole HTS motor is cooled by liquid nitrogen to 77K, and acts as a permanent magnet synchronous motor with the power rate of 15.7 kW.

  1. Experiments with a dc motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2010-01-01

    Experiments with an electric motor provide good opportunity to demonstrate some basic laws of electricity and magnetism. The aim of the experiments with a low-power dc motor is to show how the motor approaches its steady rotation and how its torque, mechanical power and efficiency depend on the rotation velocity. The tight relationship between the mechanical and electrical parameters of the motor is clearly seen. The measurements are carried out with the ScienceWorkshop data-acquisition system and the DataStudio software from PASCO scientific. The experiments are well related to university courses of electricity and magnetism and can be used in undergraduate laboratories or for lecture demonstrations.

  2. Harmonic modeling of induction motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedra, J.; Sainz, L.; Corcoles, F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, ETSEIB-UPC, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2006-07-15

    The paper proposes an induction motor model for the study of harmonic load flow in balanced and unbalanced conditions. The parameters of this model are obtained from motor manufacturer data and the positive- and negative-sequence equivalent circuits of the single- and double-cage models. An approximate harmonic model based on motor manufacturer data only is also proposed. In addition, the paper includes manufacturer data and the calculated parameters of 36 induction motors of different rated powers. This database is used to analyze the proposed models. (author)

  3. Motor carrier evaluation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portsmouth, James

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), Transportation Management Program (TMP) has the overall responsibility to provide a well-managed transportation program for the safe, efficient, and economical transportation of DOE-owned materials. The DOE-TMP has established an excellent safety record in the transportation of hazardous materials including radioactive materials and radioactive wastes. This safety record can be maintained only through continued diligence and sustained effort on the part of the DOE-TMP, its field offices, and the contractors' organizations. Key elements in the DOE'S effective hazardous and radioactive materials shipping program are (1) integrity of packages, (2) strict adherence to regulations and procedures, (3) trained personnel, (4) complete management support, and (5) use of the best commercial carriers. The DOE Motor Carrier Evaluation Program was developed to better define the criteria and methodology needed to identify motor carriers for use in the transportation of Highway Route Controlled Quantities (HRCQ), Truck Load (TL) quantities of radioactive materials, hazardous materials and waste. (author)

  4. Zenn Motor Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, I. [Zenn Motor Company, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Zenn Motor company is a leader in the electric vehicle space and builds and markets a low speed vehicle known as the zero emission, no noise (ZENN). This presentation provided background information on the Zenn Motor Company as well as on EEStor, a company that develops four-wheeled vehicles and that is seeking partners to fund the development for a modified barium titanate-based ultracapacitor. In 2004, ZENN entered into a technology agreement with EEStor that secured certain exclusive and non-exclusive rights to purchase and deploy EEStor's EESU technology as part of its ZENNergy solutions in several markets, including exclusive rights for new four-passenger vehicles with a curb weight of up to 1,400 kilograms; exclusive rights for the neighbourhood electric vehicles (NEV) and golf carts market; exclusive rights for utility vehicles; and exclusive rights for the aftermarket conversion to ZENNergy of any four-wheeled vehicles. The presentation also addressed ZENNergy and the art of integrating high energy drive solutions. Lessons learned and EEStor's technology attributes were discussed. A hypothetical case study was also offered. The presentation concluded with a discussion of EEStor technology status and opportunity horizons. It was concluded that a better battery is needed to enable the mass adoption of electric vehicles. tabs.

  5. Adjustable rheology of fumed silica dispersion in urethane prepolymers: Composition-dependent sol and gel behaviors and energy-mediated shear responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhong, E-mail: 11329038@zju.edu.cn; Song, Yihu, E-mail: s-yh0411@zju.edu.cn; Wang, Xiang, E-mail: 11229036@zju.edu.cn; Zheng, Qiang, E-mail: zhengqiang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Variation of colloidal and interfacial interactions leads to a microstructural diversity in fumed silica dispersions exhibiting absolutely different sol- or gel-like rheological responses. In this study, fumed silicas with different surface areas (200–400 m{sup 2}/g) and surface characteristics (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) are dispersed into moisture-cured polyurethane. The microstructures investigated using transmission electron microscope are associated perfectly with three different rheological behaviors: (i) Sols with well-dispersed silica aggregates, (ii) weak gels with agglomerate-linked networks, and (iii) strong gels with concentrated networks of large agglomerates. Though sols and gels are well distinguished by shear thickening or sustained thinning response through steady shear flow test, it is interesting that the sols and weak gels exhibit a uniform modulus plateau-softening-hardening-softening response with increasing dynamic strain at frequency 10 rad s{sup −1} while the strong gels show a sustained softening beyond the linear regime. Furthermore, the onset of softening and hardening can be normalized: The two softening are isoenergetic at mechanical energies of 0.3 J m{sup −3} and 10 kJ m{sup −3}. On the other hand, the hardening is initiated by a critical strain of 60%. The mechanisms involved in the generation of the sol- and the gel-like dispersions and their structural evolutions during shear are thoroughly clarified in relation to the polyols, the characteristic and content of silica and the curing catalysts.

  6. Motor-operated valve (MOV) actuator motor and gearbox testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1997-07-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory tested the performance of electric motors and actuator gearboxes typical of the equipment installed on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plants. Using a test stand that simulates valve closure loads against flow and pressure, the authors tested five electric motors (four ac and one dc) and three gearboxes at conditions a motor might experience in a power plant, including such off-normal conditions as operation at high temperature and reduced voltage. They also monitored the efficiency of the actuator gearbox. All five motors operated at or above their rated starting torque during tests at normal voltages and temperatures. For all five motors, actual torque losses due to voltage degradation were greater than the losses calculated by methods typically used for predicting motor torque at degraded voltage conditions. For the dc motor the actual torque losses due to elevated operating temperatures were greater than the losses calculated by the typical predictive method. The actual efficiencies of the actuator gearboxes were generally lower than the running efficiencies published by the manufacturer and were generally nearer the published pull-out efficiencies. Operation of the gearbox at elevated temperature did not affect the operating efficiency

  7. Performance at high temperature of alkali-activated slag pastes produced with silica fume and rice husk ash based activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the mechanical properties, and structural changes induced by high temperature exposure, of alkali-silicate activated slag cements produced with sodium silicates derived from silica fume (SF and rice husk ash (RHA. Similar reaction products were identified, independent of the type of silicate used, but with subtle differences in the composition of the C-S-H gels, leading to different strength losses after elevated temperature exposure. Cements produced with the alternative activators developed higher compressive strengths than those produced with commercial silicate. All samples retained strengths of more than 50 MPa after exposure to 600 °C, however, after exposure to 800 °C only the specimens produced with the RHA-based activator retained measurable strength. This study elucidated that silicate-activated slag binders, either activated with commercial silicate solutions or with sodium silicates based on SF or RHA, are stable up to 600 °C.Este estudio evaluó las propiedades mecánicas, y cambios estructurales inducidos por exposición a temperaturas elevadas, de cementos de escoria activada alcalinamente producidos con silicatos sódicos derivados de humo de sílice (SF y ceniza de cascarilla de arroz (RHA. Se identificaron productos de reacción similares, independiente del tipo de silicato utilizado, pero con diferencias menores en la composición de las geles C-S-H, lo cual indujo diferentes pérdidas de resistencia posterior a exposición a temperaturas elevadas. Los cementantes producidos con los activadores alternativos desarrollaron resistencias a la compresión más altas que aquellos producidos con silicato comercial. Todas las muestras retuvieron resistencias de más de 50 MPa posterior a la exposición a 600 °C, sin embargo, posterior a la exposición a 800 °C únicamente muestras producidas con activadores de RHA retuvieron resistencias medibles. Este estudio elucidó que cementantes de escoria activada con

  8. Torque control for electric motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, C. A.

    1980-01-01

    Method for adjusting electric-motor torque output to accomodate various loads utilizes phase-lock loop to control relay connected to starting circuit. As load is imposed, motor slows down, and phase lock is lost. Phase-lock signal triggers relay to power starting coil and generate additional torque. Once phase lock is recoverd, relay restores starting circuit to its normal operating mode.

  9. Open-Ended Electric Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Mauri

    1975-01-01

    Presents complete instructions for assembling an electric motor which does not require large amounts of power to operate and which is inexpensive as well as reliable. Several open-ended experiments with the motor are included as well as information for obtaining a kit of parts and instructions. (BR)

  10. Genetic heterogeneity of motor neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansagi, Boglarka; Griffin, Helen; Whittaker, Roger G; Antoniadi, Thalia; Evangelista, Teresinha; Miller, James; Greenslade, Mark; Forester, Natalie; Duff, Jennifer; Bradshaw, Anna; Kleinle, Stephanie; Boczonadi, Veronika; Steele, Hannah; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Franko, Edit; Pyle, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F; Horvath, Rita

    2017-03-28

    To study the prevalence, molecular cause, and clinical presentation of hereditary motor neuropathies in a large cohort of patients from the North of England. Detailed neurologic and electrophysiologic assessments and next-generation panel testing or whole exome sequencing were performed in 105 patients with clinical symptoms of distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN, 64 patients), axonal motor neuropathy (motor Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease [CMT2], 16 patients), or complex neurologic disease predominantly affecting the motor nerves (hereditary motor neuropathy plus, 25 patients). The prevalence of dHMN is 2.14 affected individuals per 100,000 inhabitants (95% confidence interval 1.62-2.66) in the North of England. Causative mutations were identified in 26 out of 73 index patients (35.6%). The diagnostic rate in the dHMN subgroup was 32.5%, which is higher than previously reported (20%). We detected a significant defect of neuromuscular transmission in 7 cases and identified potentially causative mutations in 4 patients with multifocal demyelinating motor neuropathy. Many of the genes were shared between dHMN and motor CMT2, indicating identical disease mechanisms; therefore, we suggest changing the classification and including dHMN also as a subcategory of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Abnormal neuromuscular transmission in some genetic forms provides a treatable target to develop therapies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. on behalf of the American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Energy-saving motor; Energiesparmotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindegger, M.

    2002-07-01

    This report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) describes the development and testing of an advanced electrical motor using a permanent-magnet rotor. The aims of the project - to study the technical feasibility and market potential of the Eco-Motor - are discussed and the three phases of the project described. These include the calculation and realisation of a 250-watt prototype operating at 230 V, the measurement of the motor's characteristics as well as those of a comparable asynchronous motor on the test bed at the University of Applied Science in Lucerne, Switzerland, and a market study to establish if the Eco-Motor and its controller can compete against normal asynchronous motors. Also, the results of an analysis of the energy-savings potential is made, should such Eco-Motors be used. Detailed results of the three phases of the project are presented and the prospects of producing such motors in Switzerland for home use as well as for export are examined.

  12. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. RECENT

  13. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    Purpose of review Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. Recent

  14. 77 FR 26607 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-04

    ... Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors; Final Rules #0;#0;Federal... Procedures for Electric Motors and Small Electric Motors AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable... electric motors and small electric motors. That supplemental proposal, along with an earlier proposal from...

  15. Piezoelectric wave motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerganian, Simon Scott

    2001-07-17

    A piezoelectric motor having a stator in which piezoelectric elements are contained in slots formed in the stator transverse to the desired wave motion. When an electric field is imposed on the elements, deformation of the elements imposes a force perpendicular to the sides of the slot, deforming the stator. Appropriate frequency and phase shifting of the electric field will produce a wave in the stator and motion in a rotor. In a preferred aspect, the piezoelectric elements are configured so that deformation of the elements in direction of an imposed electric field, generally referred to as the d.sub.33 direction, is utilized to produce wave motion in the stator. In a further aspect, the elements are compressed into the slots so as to minimize tensile stresses on the elements in use.

  16. Reciprocating linear motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldowsky, Michael P. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A reciprocating linear motor is formed with a pair of ring-shaped permanent magnets having opposite radial polarizations, held axially apart by a nonmagnetic yoke, which serves as an axially displaceable armature assembly. A pair of annularly wound coils having axial lengths which differ from the axial lengths of the permanent magnets are serially coupled together in mutual opposition and positioned with an outer cylindrical core in axial symmetry about the armature assembly. One embodiment includes a second pair of annularly wound coils serially coupled together in mutual opposition and an inner cylindrical core positioned in axial symmetry inside the armature radially opposite to the first pair of coils. Application of a potential difference across a serial connection of the two pairs of coils creates a current flow perpendicular to the magnetic field created by the armature magnets, thereby causing limited linear displacement of the magnets relative to the coils.

  17. Economical motor transport operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, P

    1979-09-01

    Motor transport is one area in a company where energy conservation is a function primarily of operative education and motivation rather than mechanical or technical control and monitoring. Unless the driver wants to save energy by proper operation of the vehicle, there is nothing the company can do to force him, whatever equipment it fits to the vehicles, or incentives it offers. This article gives an overview of the use of energy in road transport and examines a number of actions that can be taken to conserve energy. It discusses the question of the cost-effectiveness of transport energy conservation in the light of the complex issues involved. The problems and opportunities of implementing energy-saving programs are examined. (MCW)

  18. Stabilizing motor fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1935-07-12

    Motor fuel is stabilized by adding less than 2% of a tar fraction from peat, coal, torbanite or shale, said fraction containing sufficient constituents boiling between 200 and 325/sup 0/C, to inhibit gum formation. Low-temperature coal-tar fractions are specified. The preferred boiling ranges are from 225 or 250/sup 0/ to 275/sup 0/C. In examples, the quantity added was 0.01%. The fuel may be a cracked distillate of gasoline boiling-point range or containing gasoline, and may contain relatively large proportions of di- and tri-olefines. The material added to the fuel may be (1) the tar fraction itself; (2) its alkali-soluble constituents; (3) its acid-soluble constituents; (4) a mixture of (2) and (3); (5) a blend of (2), (3) or (4) with a normal tar fraction; (6) the residue after extraction with alkali; (7) the residue after extraction with acid and alkali.

  19. Sucker rod motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzalov, N N; Radzhabov, N A

    1983-01-01

    The motor consists of rollers mounted on the wellmouth and connected by a flexible rink. Reciprocating mechanism is in the form of a horizontal non-mobile single-side operation cylinder, inside which a plunger and rod are mounted. The working housing of the hydrocylinder is connected to a gas-hydr aulic batter, and when running is connected via plunger to the high pressure source; running in reverse it is connected with a safety valve and automatic control unit. The unit is equipped with a reducer and a mechanical transformer consisting of screw and nut, and which is shutoff with a single-side lining. The plunger rod consists of an auger-like unit. The high pressure source is provided by the injection line of the sucker rod that has been equipped with a reverse valve.

  20. Motor-operated gearbox efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1996-12-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, the authors compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators they tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer.

  1. Motor-operated gearbox efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.; Weidenhamer, G.H.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, the authors compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators they tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer

  2. Motor-operator gearbox efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1996-01-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory recently conducted tests investigating the operating efficiency of the power train (gearbox) in motor-operators typically used in nuclear power plants to power motor-operated valves. Actual efficiency ratios were determined from in-line measurements of electric motor torque (input to the operator gearbox) and valve stem torque (output from the gearbox) while the operators were subjected to gradually increasing loads until the electric motor stalled. The testing included parametric studies under reduced voltage and elevated temperature conditions. As part of the analysis of the results, we compared efficiency values determined from testing to the values published by the operator manufacturer and typically used by the industry in calculations for estimating motor-operator capabilities. The operators we tested under load ran at efficiencies lower than the running efficiency (typically 50%) published by the operator manufacturer

  3. Electric motors for use in radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, T.U.D.; Mahmood, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    Requirements of electric motors for a nuclear plant and the effect of nuclear radiations on different parts of the motors are discussed. Feasibility of using locally-fabricated motors is also considered. (author)

  4. VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    1984-09-01

    Sep 1, 1984 ... VERY SLOW SPEED AXIAL MOTION RELUCTANCE MOTOR by. L. A. Agu ... order as that of the screw-thread motor can be obtained. LIST OF .... The n stator have equal non- magnetic spacers .... induction motor. An.

  5. Actions to promote energy efficient electric motors. Motors study group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, A.T. de [Coimbra Univ. (PT). Inst. of Systems and Robotics (ISR)

    1996-10-01

    Motor electricity consumption is influenced by many factors including: motor efficiency, motor speed controls, power supply quality, harmonics, systems oversizing, distribution network, mechanical transmission system, maintenance practices, load management and cycling, and the efficiency of the end-use device (e.g. fan, pump, etc.). Due to their importance, an overview of these factors is presented in this report. This study also describes the electricity use in the industrial and tertiary sectors and the electricity consumption associated with the different types of electric motors systems in the Member States of the European Union, as well as estimated future evolution until 2010. The studies for individual countries were carried out by the different partners of the motors study group at a previous stage. The study has found that there is a lack of accurate information about the motor electricity consumption, installed motor capacity and the motor market in almost all the European Union countries and only some general statistical sources are available. There is little field data, which is mainly available in Denmark, France, Italy and the Netherlands. Due to this lack of primary information, some common assumptions were made, based on the experience of the members of the study group. This lack of end-use characterisation data shows the need for improvement from the point of view of current knowledge. It is therefore recommended that further research is undertaken to arrive at more accurate figures. These could be the basis for a better understanding for motor use in practice and - as a consequence - for a more precise appraisal of potentials and barriers to energy efficiency. (orig.)

  6. Submersible canned motor mixer pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    A mixer pump is described used in a waste tank for mobilizing high-level radioactive liquid waste having a column assembly containing power cables, a motor housing with electric motor means which includes a stator can of a stator assembly and a rotor can of a rotor assembly, and an impeller assembly with an impeller connected to a shaft of the rotor assembly. The column assembly locates the motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to lubricate radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the impeller and electric motor means act to grind down large particles in the liquid waste flow. These larger particles are received in slots in the static bearing members of the radial bearing assemblies. Only solid waste particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the mixer pump. 10 figs

  7. Pathogenesis of motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyze the factors and theories related to the attack of motor neuron disease, and comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.DATA SOURCES: A search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about motor neuron disease published in English from January 1994 to June 2006 by using the keywords of "neurodegenerative diseases". Other literatures were collected by retrieving specific journals and articles.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, articles related to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease were involved, and those obviously irrelated to the articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 54 articles were collected, 30 of them were involved, and the other 24 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: The pathogenesis of motor neuron disease has multiple factors, and the present related theories included free radical oxidation, excitotoxicity, genetic and immune factors, lack of neurotrophic factor,injury of neurofilament, etc. The studies mainly come from transgenic animal models, cell culture in vitro and patients with familial motor neuron disease, but there are still many restrictions and disadvantages.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to try to find whether there is internal association among different mechanisms,comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron diseases, in order to provide reliable evidence for the clinical treatment.

  8. Re-use of incinerated agro-industrial waste as pozzolanic addition. Comparison with spanish silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado, A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to determine the viability of using incinerated agro-industrial waste, ashes C1 and C2, as possible artificial pozzolanic additions in traditional and highperformance concretes and mortars, mainly, and for this reason, a comparative study was likewise conducted with Spanish silica fume (HS. The conclusion drawn from the findings was that the two ashes used could be regarded to be centainly, silicic artificial pozzolanic additions but only C2, which had a higher SiO2 content, could be regarded to be a “microsilica”, however, because its loss on ignition, L.O.I., fell within the acceptable range of variability. In contrast, C1 could not be so regarded because its L.O.I. was too high, despite its higher reactive silica SiO2r- content. For this reason, ash C1 had to be ruled out for any of the proposed uses, even though in terms of chemical and sulfatic characterization it was closer to HS than C2. By contrast, the mechanical strength values of C2 and HS were comparable, making the former initially acceptable for any of such uses. Finally, it has also been justified that, adoption of any method of trial to determine potential resistance to the sulfates of the Portland cements with calcareous filler lacks of sense.Este trabajo ha tenido por objetivo determinar la viabilidad de uso de dos residuos agroindustriales incinerados, cenizas C1 y C2, como posibles adiciones puzolánicas artificiales, para fabricar cementos y/o de sus productos derivados, hormigones y morteros tradicionales y especiales, principalmente; de aquí su estudio comparativo con el humo de sílice español, HS. Y la conclusión que se obtuvo fue que las dos cenizas pueden ser consideradas como adiciones puzolánicas artificiales con carácter químico silícico cierto, pero sólo una, la C2, podría llegar a ser considerada como “microsílice”, porque su pérdida por calcinación se encuentra dentro de su límite permitido. En cambio la C1, no, porque

  9. Opening of the first CO{sub 2} capture installation on the fumes of a coal power plant - european project Castor, Denmark; Inauguration de la premiere installation de captage du CO{sub 2} sur les fumees d'une centrale electrique au charbon - Projet europeen Castor, Danemark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-03-15

    The 15 March 2006, was launched the first industrial pilot of CO{sub 2} capture of the Castor project, coordinated by the IFP and financed by the european commission, on the site of the Esbjerg (Denmark) power plant. It is the first world installation allowing the CO{sub 2} capture on the fumes of a coal power plant. This document presents the pilot installation, discusses the european project Castor, the advantages of the CO{sub 2} capture and storage for a better use of the fossil energies, where and how capturing the CO{sub 2} and the Denmark energy context. (A.L.B.)

  10. Hereditary motor neuropathies and motor neuron diseases: which is which.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanemann, Clemens O; Ludolph, Albert C

    2002-12-01

    When Charcot first defined amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) he used the clinical and neuropathological pattern of vulnerability as a guideline. Similarly other motor neuron diseases such as the spinal muscular atrophies (SMA) and the motor neuropathies (MN) were grouped following clinical criteria. However, ever since the etiology of these diseases has started to be disclosed by genetics, we have learnt that the limits of the syndromes are not as well defined as our forefathers thought. A mutation leading to ALS can also be associated with the clinical picture of spinal muscular atrophy; even more unexpected is the overlap of the so-called motor neuropathies with the clinical syndrome of slowly progressive ALS or that primary lateral sclerosis (PLS) can be caused by the same gene as that responsible for some cases of ALS. In this review we summarise recent work showing that there is a considerable overlap between CMT, MN, SMA, ALS and PLS. Insights into these phenotypes should lead to study of the variants of motor neuron disease and possibly to a reclassification. This comprehensive review should help to improve understanding of the pathogenesis of motor neuron degeneration and finally may aid the research for urgently needed new treatment strategies, perhaps with validity for the entire group of motor neuron diseases.

  11. The change in perceived motor competence and motor task values during elementary school : Gender and motor performance differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordstar, J.J.; van der Net, J.; Jak, S.; Helders, P.J.M.; Jongmans, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Participation in motor activities is essential for social interaction and life satisfaction in children. Self-perceptions and task values have a central position in why children do or do not participate in (motor) activities. Investigating developmental changes in motor self-perceptions and motor

  12. 'Motor control center obsolescence'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    A significant and growing problem within the global nuclear industry is the aging of motor control center (MCC) components. MCC's have a very important role in the safety and critical to generation requirements of a nuclear power plant. Although many OEM's MCC's such as ITE/Telemechanique, GE, Westinghouse, Cutler Hammer, Klockner Moeller, etc. have been used throughout the global nuclear industry, they all have one common aspect obsolescence. Obsolescence of various components within the MCC's such as molded case circuit breakers, starters, relays, heaters, contactors, etc. are impacting the reliability of the MCC to serve its intended function. The paper will discuss the options which the nuclear industry is faced with to increase the reliability of the MCC's while maintaining design control, qualification and meeting budget constraints. The options as listed below shall be discussed in detail with examples to enhance the readers understanding of the situation: 1) Component by component replacement: The hurdles associated with trying to find equivalent components to replace the obsolete components while still worki (mechanically and electrically) in the original cubicle will be presented. 2) Complete MCC cubicle with new internal components replacement: The process of supplying a replacement cubicle, with all new internal components and new door to replace the original cubicle will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of the advantages and dis-advantages of the two methods to bring the MCC to an as new condition with the overall goal of increasing reliability. (author)

  13. Aberrant supplementary motor complex and limbic activity during motor preparation in motor conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Brezing, Christina; Gallea, Cecile; Hallett, Mark

    2011-11-01

    Conversion disorder (CD) is characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms presumed related to psychological issues. The main hypotheses to explain conversion paralysis, characterized by a lack of movement, include impairments in either motor intention or disruption of motor execution, and further, that hyperactive self-monitoring, limbic processing or top-down regulation from higher order frontal regions may interfere with motor execution. We have recently shown that CD with positive abnormal or excessive motor symptoms was associated with greater amygdala activity to arousing stimuli along with greater functional connectivity between the amygdala and supplementary motor area. Here we studied patients with such symptoms focusing on motor initiation. Subjects performed either an internally or externally generated 2-button action selection task in a functional MRI study. Eleven CD patients without major depression and 11 age- and gender-matched normal volunteers were assessed. During both internally and externally generated movement, conversion disorder patients relative to normal volunteers had lower left supplementary motor area (SMA) (implicated in motor initiation) and higher right amygdala, left anterior insula, and bilateral posterior cingulate activity (implicated in assigning emotional salience). These findings were confirmed in a subgroup analysis of patients with tremor symptoms. During internally versus externally generated action in CD patients, the left SMA had lower functional connectivity with bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. We propose a theory in which previously mapped conversion motor representations may in an arousing context hijack the voluntary action selection system, which is both hypoactive and functionally disconnected from prefrontal top-down regulation. Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

  14. Aberrant supplementary motor complex and limbic activity during motor preparation in motor conversion disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, V; Brezing, C; Gallea, C; Hallett, M

    2014-01-01

    Background Conversion disorder is characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms presumed related to psychological issues. The main hypotheses to explain conversion paralysis, characterized by a lack of movement, include impairments in either motor intention or disruption of motor execution, and further, that hyperactive self-monitoring, limbic processing or top-down regulation from higher order frontal regions may interfere with motor execution. We have recently shown that conversion disorder with positive abnormal or excessive motor symptoms was associated with greater amygdala activity to arousing stimuli along with greater functional connectivity between the amgydala and supplementary motor area. Here we studied patients with such symptoms focusing on motor initiation. Methods Subjects performed either an internally or externally generated two-button action selection task in a functional MRI study. Results Eleven conversion disorder patients without major depression and 11 age- and gender-matched normal volunteers were assessed. During both internally and externally generated movement, conversion disorder patients relative to normal volunteers had lower left supplementary motor area (SMA) (implicated in motor initiation) and higher right amygdala, left anterior insula and bilateral posterior cingulate activity (implicated in assigning emotional salience). These findings were confirmed in a subgroup analysis of patients with tremor symptoms. During internally versus externally generated action in CD patients, the left SMA had lower functional connectivity with bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortices. Conclusion We propose a theory in which previously mapped conversion motor representations may in an arousing context hijack the voluntary action selection system which is both hypoactive and functionally disconnected from prefrontal top-down regulation. PMID:21935985

  15. Honda Motor Company's CVCC Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    From 1968 to 1972, Honda Motor Co. of Japan designed, tested, and massproduced a stratified charge engine, the CVCC, which was lower in carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, and nitrogen oxide emissions and higher in fuel economy than contemporary convention...

  16. Fault diagnosis of induction motors

    CERN Document Server

    Faiz, Jawad; Joksimović, Gojko

    2017-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive, structural approach to fault diagnosis strategy. The different fault types, signal processing techniques, and loss characterisation are addressed in the book. This is essential reading for work with induction motors for transportation and energy.

  17. 78 FR 66801 - Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration [Docket No. FMCSA-2006-26367] Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee; Charter Renewal AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety... and recommendations on motor carrier safety programs and motor carrier safety regulations through a...

  18. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, L G; Chisholm, W P; Keane, M J; Chen, B T

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8-199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10-51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40-105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5-1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm.

  19. Application of UV and X-Ray radiation for refreshing of old latent fingerprints in the cyanoacrylate fuming technique - preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiceska, Pavlina; Ristova, Mimoza

    2013-01-01

    The work described below focuses on enhancement/refreshment of older latent fingerprints onto a non porous (glass) surface. The aging of the fingerprints is a major problem of the forensic science, because of the compound’s degradation under the influence of a variety of atmospheric parameters, in addition to the time factor. The humidification extent on the latent fingerprints appeared to be one of the critical factors for the deposition of the cyanoacrylate on the finger-marks, since the unsaturated bonds from lipid content from the latent fingerprints serve as active water condensation centers. In the present work we show results from the enhancement of aged latent fingerprint details by activation of the humidity condensation centers with exposition to UV or X-ray radiation prior to their developing into the cyanoacrylate fuming chamber. The aging of the latent fingerprints on glass surfaces with the time for given conditions was established. A term “critical day” was introduced as the day when the detectable details from the latent fingerprints dropped to one half of the initial number of details, recovered from identical fresh latent fingerprint. As the fingerprints were aged to the “critical day”, one third of the samples were exposed to a UV for 15 minutes, another third to 15 minutes of X-ray radiation and the last third was kept unexposed. All the samples were developed into a single cyanoacrylate fuming process. The results showed that in both UV and X-ray cases, a considerable enhancement/refreshment, in approximately 50% of the aged latent fingerprints, has been achieved with only a short term irradiation (15 minutes). (Author)

  20. Electrical stimulation and motor recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Wise

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several investigators have successfully regenerated axons in animal spinal cords without locomotor recovery. One explanation is that the animals were not trained to use the regenerated connections. Intensive locomotor training improves walking recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in people, and >90% of people with incomplete SCI recover walking with training. Although the optimal timing, duration, intensity, and type of locomotor training are still controversial, many investigators have reported beneficial effects of training on locomotor function. The mechanisms by which training improves recovery are not clear, but an attractive theory is available. In 1949, Donald Hebb proposed a famous rule that has been paraphrased as "neurons that fire together, wire together." This rule provided a theoretical basis for a widely accepted theory that homosynaptic and heterosynaptic activity facilitate synaptic formation and consolidation. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord has a locomotor center, called the central pattern generator (CPG), which can be activated nonspecifically with electrical stimulation or neurotransmitters to produce walking. The CPG is an obvious target to reconnect after SCI. Stimulating motor cortex, spinal cord, or peripheral nerves can modulate lumbar spinal cord excitability. Motor cortex stimulation causes long-term changes in spinal reflexes and synapses, increases sprouting of the corticospinal tract, and restores skilled forelimb function in rats. Long used to treat chronic pain, motor cortex stimuli modify lumbar spinal network excitability and improve lower extremity motor scores in humans. Similarly, epidural spinal cord stimulation has long been used to treat pain and spasticity. Subthreshold epidural stimulation reduces the threshold for locomotor activity. In 2011, Harkema et al. reported lumbosacral epidural stimulation restores motor control in chronic motor complete patients. Peripheral nerve or functional electrical

  1. Mathematical modeling of molecular motors

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Amongst the many complex processes taking place in living cells, transport of cargoes across the cytosceleton is fundamental to cell viability and activity. To move cargoes between the different cell parts, cells employ Molecular Motors. The motors operate by transporting cargoes along the so-called cellular micro-tubules, namely rope-like structures that connect, for instance, the cell-nucleus and outer membrane. We introduce a new Markov Chain, the killed Quasi-Random-Walk, for such transpo...

  2. Segmented rail linear induction motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jr., Maynard; Marder, Barry M.

    1996-01-01

    A segmented rail linear induction motor has a segmented rail consisting of a plurality of nonferrous electrically conductive segments aligned along a guideway. The motor further includes a carriage including at least one pair of opposed coils fastened to the carriage for moving the carriage. A power source applies an electric current to the coils to induce currents in the conductive surfaces to repel the coils from adjacent edges of the conductive surfaces.

  3. Motor performance of preschool children

    OpenAIRE

    Karina Słonka; Manuela Dyas; Tadeusz Słonka; Tomasz Szurmik

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pre‑school age is a period of intensive development when children shape their posture, habits and motor memory. Movement is child's physiological need.  Motive activity supports not only physical development, but also psychical, intellectual and social.   Aim: The aim of the study is to assess motor ability in preschool children from the city of Opole and District Dobrzeń Wielki. Materials and methods: The research involved 228 children, aged 5 and 6. The method used in...

  4. Paliperidone-associated motor tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Han; Chiu, Nan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Paliperidone-associated motor tics. Case report. We report a 30-year-old man with schizophrenia who developed motor tics (eye blinking) after treatment of paliperidone up to 15 mg daily. Tic-like symptoms, from simple eye blinking to complex Tourette-like syndrome, may occur during paliperidone treatment, especially with high dose. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. High-speed AC motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokinen, T.; Arkkio, A. [Helsinki University of Technology Laboratory of Electromechanics, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    The paper deals with various types of highspeed electric motors, and their limiting powers. Standard machines with laminated rotors can be utilised if the speed is moderate. The solid rotor construction makes it possible to reach higher power and speed levels than those of laminated rotors. The development work on high-speed motors done at Helsinki University of Technology is presented, too. (orig.) 12 refs.

  6. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2015-07-07

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for advancing a borehole. High power laser drilling system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam through the electrical motor.

  7. Electric motor for laser-mechanical drilling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Daryl L.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.

    2017-10-10

    A high power laser drilling system utilizing an electric motor laser bottom hole assembly. A high power laser beam travels within the electric motor for performing a laser operation. A system includes a down hole electrical motor having a hollow rotor for conveying a high power laser beam having a wavelength less than 1060 nm through the electrical motor.

  8. Control of non-conventional synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Classical synchronous motors are the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. However, numerous applications require efficient controls in non-conventional situations. Firstly, this is the case with synchronous motors supplied by thyristor line-commutated inverters, or with synchronous motors with faults on one or several phases. Secondly, many drive systems use non-conventional motors such as polyphase (more than three phases) synchronous motors, synchronous motors with double excitation, permanent magnet linear synchronous motors,

  9. Movement Sonification: Audiovisual benefits on motor learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Andreas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Processes of motor control and learning in sports as well as in motor rehabilitation are based on perceptual functions and emergent motor representations. Here a new method of movement sonification is described which is designed to tune in more comprehensively the auditory system into motor perception to enhance motor learning. Usually silent features of the cyclic movement pattern "indoor rowing" are sonified in real time to make them additionally available to the auditory system when executing the movement. Via real time sonification movement perception can be enhanced in terms of temporal precision and multi-channel integration. But beside the contribution of a single perceptual channel to motor perception and motor representation also mechanisms of multisensory integration can be addressed, if movement sonification is configured adequately: Multimodal motor representations consisting of at least visual, auditory and proprioceptive components - can be shaped subtly resulting in more precise motor control and enhanced motor learning.

  10. 41 CFR 102-34.85 - What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What motor vehicles require motor vehicle identification? 102-34.85 Section 102-34.85 Public Contracts and Property Management... 34-MOTOR VEHICLE MANAGEMENT Identifying and Registering Motor Vehicles Motor Vehicle Identification...

  11. Applications of superconductors to electric motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, B.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews previous experience in applying superconductors to electric motors and examines the difficulties encountered. While motors and generators have a common basis, several significant differences exist. The application of high temperature superconductors to the major electric motor types is discussed and expected difficulties are presented. The limitations imposed by various motor designs are reflected in a statement of the desired material properties for high temperature superconductor electric motor applications

  12. Space shuttle booster separation motor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. W.; Chase, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    The separation characteristics of the space shuttle solid rocket boosters (SRBs) are introduced along with the system level requirements for the booster separation motors (BSMs). These system requirements are then translated into specific motor requirements that control the design of the BSM. Each motor component is discussed including its geometry, material selection, and fabrication process. Also discussed is the propellant selection, grain design, and performance capabilities of the motor. The upcoming test program to develop and qualify the motor is outlined.

  13. Motor demand-dependent activation of ipsilateral motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetefisch, Cathrin M; Revill, Kate Pirog; Shuster, Linda; Hines, Benjamin; Parsons, Michael

    2014-08-15

    The role of ipsilateral primary motor cortex (M1) in hand motor control during complex task performance remains controversial. Bilateral M1 activation is inconsistently observed in functional (f)MRI studies of unilateral hand performance. Two factors limit the interpretation of these data. As the motor tasks differ qualitatively in these studies, it is conceivable that M1 contributions differ with the demand on skillfulness. Second, most studies lack the verification of a strictly unilateral execution of the motor task during the acquisition of imaging data. Here, we use fMRI to determine whether ipsilateral M1 activity depends on the demand for precision in a pointing task where precision varied quantitatively while movement trajectories remained equal. Thirteen healthy participants used an MRI-compatible joystick to point to targets of four different sizes in a block design. A clustered acquisition technique allowed simultaneous fMRI/EMG data collection and confirmed that movements were strictly unilateral. Accuracy of performance increased with target size. Overall, the pointing task revealed activation in contralateral and ipsilateral M1, extending into contralateral somatosensory and parietal areas. Target size-dependent activation differences were found in ipsilateral M1 extending into the temporal/parietal junction, where activation increased with increasing demand on accuracy. The results suggest that ipsilateral M1 is active during the execution of a unilateral motor task and that its activity is modulated by the demand on precision. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Changes of motor-cortical oscillations associated with motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollok, B; Latz, D; Krause, V; Butz, M; Schnitzler, A

    2014-09-05

    Motor learning results from practice but also between practice sessions. After skill acquisition early consolidation results in less interference with other motor tasks and even improved performance of the newly learned skill. A specific significance of the primary motor cortex (M1) for early consolidation has been suggested. Since synchronized oscillatory activity is assumed to facilitate neuronal plasticity, we here investigate alterations of motor-cortical oscillations by means of event-related desynchronization (ERD) at alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) frequencies in healthy humans. Neuromagnetic activity was recorded using a 306-channel whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) system. ERD was investigated in 15 subjects during training on a serial reaction time task and 10 min after initial training. The data were compared with performance during a randomly varying sequence serving as control condition. The data reveal a stepwise decline of alpha-band ERD associated with faster reaction times replicating previous findings. The amount of beta-band suppression was significantly correlated with reduction of reaction times. While changes of alpha power have been related to lower cognitive control after initial skill acquisition, the present data suggest that the amount of beta suppression represents a neurophysiological marker of early cortical reorganization associated with motor learning. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs

  16. 77 FR 65765 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-30

    ... the vehicle. The antenna module translates the radio frequency signal received from the key into a... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General Motors Corporation AGENCY...

  17. 77 FR 25534 - Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... response back to the vehicle. The antenna module translates the radio frequency signal received from the... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Federal Motor Vehicle Motor Theft Prevention Standard; General Motors Corporation AGENCY...

  18. 75 FR 22317 - Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Small Business Impacts of Motor Vehicle Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... 1300 [Docket No. NHTSA-2010-0054] Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards; Small Business Impacts of Motor Vehicle Safety AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Department of..., multipurpose passenger vehicles, trucks, buses, trailers, incomplete vehicles, motorcycles, and motor vehicle...

  19. Comparison of Linear Induction Motor Theories for the LIMRV and TLRV Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The Oberretl, Yamamura, and Mosebach theories of the linear induction motor are described and also applied to predict performance characteristics of the TLRV & LIMRV linear induction motors. The effect of finite motor width and length on performance ...

  20. 46 CFR 169.684 - Overcurrent protection for motors and motor branch circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations Operating at... motor that is responsive to motor current or to both motor current and temperature may be used. (b) The...

  1. On line protection systems for induction motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colak, I.; Celik, H.; Sefa, I.; Demirbas, S.

    2005-01-01

    Protection of induction motors is very important since they are widely used in industry for many applications due to their high robustness, reliability, low cost and maintenance, high efficiency and long service life. So, protecting these motors is crucial for operations. This paper presents a combined protection approach for induction motors. To achieve this, the electrical values of the induction motor were measured with sensitivity ±1% through a data acquisition card and processed with software developed in Visual C++. An on line protection system for induction motors was achieved easily and effectively. The experimental results have shown that the induction motor was protected against the possible problems faced during the operation. The software developed for this protection provides flexible and reliable media for operators and their motors. It is expected that the motor protection achieved in this study might be faster than the classical techniques and also may be applied to larger motors easily after small modifications of the software

  2. Mirror neurons and motor intentionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolatti, Giacomo; Sinigaglia, Corrado

    2007-01-01

    Our social life rests to a large extent on our ability to understand the intentions of others. What are the bases of this ability? A very influential view is that we understand the intentions of others because we are able to represent them as having mental states. Without this meta-representational (mind-reading) ability their behavior would be meaningless to us. Over the past few years this view has been challenged by neurophysiological findings and, in particular, by the discovery of mirror neurons. The functional properties of these neurons indicate that intentional understanding is based primarily on a mechanism that directly matches the sensory representation of the observed actions with one's own motor representation of those same actions. These findings reveal how deeply motor and intentional components of action are intertwined, suggesting that both can be fully comprehended only starting from a motor approach to intentionality.

  3. Induction Motors by Electric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej M. Trzynadlowski

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives an overview of the issues and means of detection of mechanical abnormalities in induction motors by electric measurements. If undetected and untreated, the worn or damaged bearings, rotor imbalance and eccentricity, broken bars of the rotor cage, and torsional and lateral vibration lead to roughly a half of all failures of induction motor drives. The detection of abnormalities is based on the fact that they cause periodic disturbance of motor variables, such as the speed, torque, current, and magnetic flux. Thus, spectral analysis of those or related quantities may yield a warning about an incipient failure of the drive system. Although the traditional non-invasive diagnostics has mostly been based on the signature analysis of the stator current, other media can also be employed. In particular, the partial instantaneous input power is shown, theoretically and experimentally, to offer distinct advantages under noisy operating conditions. Use of torque and flux estimates is also discussed.

  4. Linear Synchronous Motor Repeatability Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    A cart system using linear synchronous motors was being considered for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP). One of the applications in the PIP was the movement of a stack of furnace trays, filled with the waste form (pucks) from a stacking/unstacking station to several bottom loaded furnaces. A system was ordered to perform this function in the PIP Ceramic Prototype Test Facility (CPTF). This system was installed and started up in SRTC prior to being installed in the CPTF. The PIP was suspended and then canceled after the linear synchronous motor system was started up. This system was used to determine repeatability of a linear synchronous motor cart system for the Modern Pit Facility

  5. Conceptual design of stepper motor replacing servo motor for control rod controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Dzul Aiman Aslan; Mohd Idris Taib; Izhar Abu Hussin; Mohd Khairulezwan Abdul Manan; Mohd Sabri Minhat

    2010-01-01

    In PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor, current control rod controller are using servo motor to control the movement. Control rod is a very important safety element and measure in every nuclear reactor. So, precision is very important in measurement of security in the nuclear reactor. In this case, there are a few disadvantages when using the servo motor is measurement of the motor is not precise. One solution to overcome this is by shifting servo motor with stepper motor. A stepper motor (or step motor) is a brush less, synchronous electric motor that can divide a full rotation into a large number of steps. (author)

  6. Superconducting DC homopolar motors for ship propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiberger, M.; Reed, M.R.; Creedon, W.P.; O' Hea, B.J. [General Atomic (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Superconducting DC homopolar motors have undergone recent advances in technology, warranting serious consideration of their use for ship propulsion. Homopolar motor propulsion is now practical because of two key technology developments: cryogen-free superconducting refrigeration and high performance motor fiber brushes. These compact motors are ideal for podded applications, where reduced drag and fuel consumption are predicted. In addition, the simple DC motor controller is more efficient and reliable compared with AC motor controllers. Military ships also benefit from increased stealth implicit in homopolar DC excitation, which also allows the option for direct hull or pod mounting. (authors)

  7. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, J.S.

    1998-12-01

    A homopolar motor has a field rotor mounted on a frame for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor mounted for rotation on said frame within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor. The two rotors are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism, so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed. 7 figs.

  8. Homopolar motor with dual rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A homopolar motor (10) has a field rotor (15) mounted on a frame (11) for rotation in a first rotational direction and for producing an electromagnetic field, and an armature rotor (17) mounted for rotation on said frame (11) within said electromagnetic field and in a second rotational direction counter to said first rotational direction of said field rotor (15). The two rotors (15, 17) are coupled through a 1:1 gearing mechanism (19), so as to travel at the same speed but in opposite directions. This doubles the output voltage and output power, as compared to a motor in which only the armature is rotated. Several embodiments are disclosed.

  9. The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Royce E.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Solid Rocket Motor will utilize improved design features and automated manufacturing methods to produce an inherently safer propulsive system for the Space Shuttle and future launch systems. This second-generation motor will also provide an additional 12,000 pounds of payload to orbit, enhancing the utility and efficiency of the Shuttle system. The new plant will feature strip-wound, asbestos-free insulation; propellant continuous mixing and casting; and extensive robotic systems. Following a series of static tests at the Stennis Space Center, MS flights are targeted to begin in early 1997.

  10. Interference in ballistic motor learning - is motor interference really sensory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass; Rothwell, John C

    Skill gained after a short period of practice in one motor task can be abolished if a second task is learned shortly afterwards. We hypothesised that interference requires the same circuits to be engaged in the two tasks and provoke competing processes of synaptic plasticity. To test this, subjects...

  11. To what extent does motor imagery resemble motor preparation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lubbe, Rob; Sobierajewicz, Jagna; Jongsma, Marijtje; Przekoracka-Krawczyk, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Motor imagery may be defined as the generation of an image of the acting self that lacks the final execution of a movement. This image is thought to be a simulation of the intended action from a first-person perspective. Recent studies with a Go/NoGo version of the discrete sequence production

  12. Motor learning as a criterion for evaluating coordination motor abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boraczynski Tomasz

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the ability of motor learning based on objective, metric criteria, in terms of pedagogical process aimed at improving the accuracy of hits a golf ball to the target. A group of 77 students of physical education participated in the study. Within 8 months there were performed 11 measurement sessions. In each session, subjects performed 10 hits a golf ball to the target from a distance of 9 m. Accuracy of hits was recorded. Effect of motor learning has been demonstrated in the progress of 10 consecutive hits a golf ball to the target in each session (operational control; in the dynamics of performance improvement between sessions (current control; as well as in the total result of eight-month experiment (stage control. There were developed norms for quantitative and qualitative assessment of accuracy of hits a golf ball to the target. Developed quantitative and qualitative criteria for assessing the speed of motor learning in various conditions of the educational process creates the possibility of organization the operational, current and stage control of the level of human coordination motor abilities, as required by leading process.

  13. Coupling with concentric contact around motor shaft for line start synchronous motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melfi, Michael J.; Burdeshaw, Galen E.

    2017-10-03

    A method comprises providing a line-start synchronous motor. The motor has a stator, a rotor core disposed within the stator, and a motor shaft. In accordance with a step of the method, a coupling for coupling a load to the motor is provided. The coupling has a motor shaft attachment portion configured to provide substantially concentric contact around the shaft at the end of the motor shaft. The coupling has a load attachment portion configured to operatively connect to a load. In accordance with a step of the method, a load is coupled to the motor with the coupling, and driven from start to at least near synchronous speed during steady state operation of the motor with a load coupled thereto. The motor shaft attachment portion may comprise a bushing assembly with matching and opposed tapered surfaces that cooperate to secure the motor shaft attachment portion around the motor shaft.

  14. Motor cortex is required for learning but not for executing a motor skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Risa; Markman, Timothy; Poddar, Rajesh; Ko, Raymond; Fantana, Antoniu L; Dhawale, Ashesh K; Kampff, Adam R; Ölveczky, Bence P

    2015-05-06

    Motor cortex is widely believed to underlie the acquisition and execution of motor skills, but its contributions to these processes are not fully understood. One reason is that studies on motor skills often conflate motor cortex's established role in dexterous control with roles in learning and producing task-specific motor sequences. To dissociate these aspects, we developed a motor task for rats that trains spatiotemporally precise movement patterns without requirements for dexterity. Remarkably, motor cortex lesions had no discernible effect on the acquired skills, which were expressed in their distinct pre-lesion forms on the very first day of post-lesion training. Motor cortex lesions prior to training, however, rendered rats unable to acquire the stereotyped motor sequences required for the task. These results suggest a remarkable capacity of subcortical motor circuits to execute learned skills and a previously unappreciated role for motor cortex in "tutoring" these circuits during learning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Motor cortex is required for learning but not executing a motor skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Risa; Markman, Timothy; Poddar, Rajesh; Ko, Raymond; Fantana, Antoniu; Dhawale, Ashesh; Kampff, Adam R.; Ölveczky, Bence P.

    2018-01-01

    Motor cortex is widely believed to underlie the acquisition and execution of motor skills, yet its contributions to these processes are not fully understood. One reason is that studies on motor skills often conflate motor cortex’s established role in dexterous control with roles in learning and producing task-specific motor sequences. To dissociate these aspects, we developed a motor task for rats that trains spatiotemporally precise movement patterns without requirements for dexterity. Remarkably, motor cortex lesions had no discernible effect on the acquired skills, which were expressed in their distinct pre-lesion forms on the very first day of post-lesion training. Motor cortex lesions prior to training, however, rendered rats unable to acquire the stereotyped motor sequences required for the task. These results suggest a remarkable capacity of subcortical motor circuits to execute learned skills and a previously unappreciated role for motor cortex in ‘tutoring’ these circuits during learning. PMID:25892304

  16. Aversive stimuli exacerbate defensive motor behaviour in motor conversion disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Rebekah L; Sinanaj, Indrit; Galli, Silvio; Aybek, Selma; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2016-12-01

    Conversion disorder or functional neurological symptom disorder (FND) can affect the voluntary motor system, without an organic cause. Functional symptoms are thought to be generated unconsciously, arising from underlying psychological stressors. However, attempts to demonstrate a direct relationship between the limbic system and disrupted motor function in FND are lacking. We tested whether negative affect would exacerbate alterations of motor control and corresponding brain activations in individuals with FND. Ten patients and ten healthy controls produced an isometric precision-grip contraction at 10% of maximum force while either viewing visual feedback of their force output, or unpleasant or pleasant emotional images (without feedback). Force magnitude was continuously recorded together with change in brain activity using fMRI. For controls, force output decayed from the target level while viewing pleasant and unpleasant images. Patients however, maintained force at the target level without decay while viewing unpleasant images, indicating a pronounced effect of negative affect on force output in FND. This emotional modulation of force control was associated with different brain activation patterns between groups. Contrasting the unpleasant with the pleasant condition, controls showed increased activity in the inferior frontal cortex and pre-supplementary motor area, whereas patients had greater activity in the cerebellum (vermis), posterior cingulate cortex, and hippocampus. Engagement of a cerebellar-limbic network in patients is consistent with heightened processing of emotional salience, and supports the role of the cerebellum in freezing responses in the presence of aversive events. These data highlight a possible neural circuit through which psychological stressors elicit defensive behaviour and modulate motor function in FND. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. ELECTRIC MOTORS FOR FARM USE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Urbana. Coll. of Agriculture.

    BETWEEN 2 AND 8 HOURS ARE REQUIRED FOR USE OF THIS TEXTUAL OR REFERENCE MATERIAL ON ELECTRIC MOTORS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY AN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION-AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING SPECIALIST ON THE BASIS OF CONFERENCES WITH SUBJECT MATTER SPECIALISTS, TEACHER EDUCATORS, SUPERVISORS, AND TEACHERS. THE OBJECTIVES AND SUBJECT MATTER CENTER AROUND THE…

  18. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  19. Linear Motor With Air Slide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bruce G.; Gerver, Michael J.; Hawkey, Timothy J.; Fenn, Ralph C.

    1993-01-01

    Improved linear actuator comprises air slide and linear electric motor. Unit exhibits low friction, low backlash, and more nearly even acceleration. Used in machinery in which positions, velocities, and accelerations must be carefully controlled and/or vibrations must be suppressed.

  20. Technology and Motor Ability Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Lang, Yong; Luo, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    As a new member joining the technology family, active video games have been developed to promote physical exercise. This working-in-progress paper shares an ongoing project on examining the basic motor abilities that are enhanced through participating in commercially available active video games. [For the full proceedings see ED557181.

  1. Motor Skill Learning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbard, Carl P.

    The purpose of this article is to briefly describe schema theory and indicate its relevance to early childhood development, with specific reference to children's acquisition of motor skills. Schema theory proposes an explanation of how individuals learn and perform a seemingly endless variety of movements. According to Schmidt (1975), goal…

  2. Shape memory alloy based motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1989a,b) that SMA spring or strip generates force as a non-linear function of its deformed length. ... magnetic property, smooth, jerk free operation and insensitivity to space radiations namely, electrons, protons ..... will be 1 Amp DC. The motor ...

  3. Treatment of functional motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelauff, Jeannette M.; Dreissen, Yasmine E. M.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.; Stone, Jon

    OPINION STATEMENT: For the treatment of functional motor disorder, we recommend a three-stage approach. Firstly, patients must be assessed and given an unambiguous diagnosis, with an explanation that helps them understand that they have a genuine disorder, with the potential for reversibility. A key

  4. Motor Action and Emotional Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casasanto, Daniel; Dijkstra, Katinka

    2010-01-01

    Can simple motor actions affect how efficiently people retrieve emotional memories, and influence what they choose to remember? In Experiment 1, participants were prompted to retell autobiographical memories with either positive or negative valence, while moving marbles either upward or downward. They retrieved memories faster when the direction…

  5. Magnetic Signature of Brushless Electric Motors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clarke, David

    2006-01-01

    Brushless electric motors are used in a number of underwater vehicles. When these underwater vehicles are used for mine clearance operations the magnetic signature of the brushless motors is important...

  6. Improving commercial motor vehicle safety in Oregon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This study addressed the primary functions of the Oregon Department of Transportations (ODOTs) Motor Carrier Safety Assistance Program (MCSAP), which is administered by the Motor Carrier Transportation Division (MCTD). The study first documente...

  7. Energy Optimal Control of Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Flemming

    This thesis deals with energy optimal control of small and medium-size variable speed induction motor drives for especially Heating, Ventilation and Air-Condition (HVAC) applications. Optimized efficiency is achieved by adapting the magnetization level in the motor to the load, and the basic...... demonstrated that energy optimal control will sometimes improve and sometimes deteriorate the stability. Comparison of small and medium-size induction motor drives with permanent magnet motor drives indicated why, and in which applications, PM motors are especially good. Calculations of economical aspects...... improvement by energy optimal control for any standard induction motor drive between 2.2 kW and 90 kW. A simple method to evaluate the robustness against load disturbances was developed and used to compare the robustness of different motor types and sizes. Calculation of the oscillatory behavior of a motor...

  8. Experimental thermodynamics of single molecular motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyabe, Shoichi; Muneyuki, Eiro

    2013-01-01

    Molecular motor is a nano-sized chemical engine that converts chemical free energy to mechanical motions. Hence, the energetics is as important as kinetics in order to understand its operation principle. We review experiments to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of a rotational F1-ATPase motor (F1-motor) at a single-molecule level. We show that the F1-motor achieves 100% thermo dynamic efficiency at the stalled state. Furthermore, the motor reduces the internal irreversible heat inside the motor to almost zero and achieves a highly-efficient free energy transduction close to 100% during rotations far from quasistatic process. We discuss the mechanism of how the F1-motor achieves such a high efficiency, which highlights the remarkable property of the nano-sized engine F1-motor.

  9. Motor Vehicle Crash Injuries PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement is based on the October 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Motor vehicle crashes are costly and preventable. Learn what can be done to help prevent motor vehicle injuries.

  10. Optimization analysis of propulsion motor control efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAI Qingnan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] This paper aims to strengthen the control effect of propulsion motors and decrease the energy used during actual control procedures.[Methods] Based on the traditional propulsion motor equivalence circuit, we increase the iron loss current component, introduce the definition of power matching ratio, calculate the highest efficiency of a motor at a given speed and discuss the flux corresponding to the power matching ratio with the highest efficiency. In the original motor vector efficiency optimization control module, an efficiency optimization control module is added so as to achieve motor efficiency optimization and energy conservation.[Results] MATLAB/Simulink simulation data shows that the efficiency optimization control method is suitable for most conditions. The operation efficiency of the improved motor model is significantly higher than that of the original motor model, and its dynamic performance is good.[Conclusions] Our motor efficiency optimization control method can be applied in engineering to achieve energy conservation.

  11. How to make spinal motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi N; Williams, Luis A; Klim, Joseph R; Eggan, Kevin

    2014-02-01

    All muscle movements, including breathing, walking, and fine motor skills rely on the function of the spinal motor neuron to transmit signals from the brain to individual muscle groups. Loss of spinal motor neuron function underlies several neurological disorders for which treatment has been hampered by the inability to obtain sufficient quantities of primary motor neurons to perform mechanistic studies or drug screens. Progress towards overcoming this challenge has been achieved through the synthesis of developmental biology paradigms and advances in stem cell and reprogramming technology, which allow the production of motor neurons in vitro. In this Primer, we discuss how the logic of spinal motor neuron development has been applied to allow generation of motor neurons either from pluripotent stem cells by directed differentiation and transcriptional programming, or from somatic cells by direct lineage conversion. Finally, we discuss methods to evaluate the molecular and functional properties of motor neurons generated through each of these techniques.

  12. Ultrasonic Linear Motor with Two Independent Vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneishi, Takeshi; Tomikawa, Yoshiro

    2004-09-01

    We propose a new structure of an ultrasonic linear motor in order to solve the problems of high-power ultrasonic linear motors that drive the XY-stage for electron beam equipment and to expand the application fields of the motor. We pay special attention to the following three points: (1) the vibration in two directions of the ultrasonic linear motor should not influence mutually each other, (2) the vibration in two directions should be divided into the stage traveling direction and the pressing direction of the ultrasonic linear motor, and (3) the rigidity of the stage traveling direction of the ultrasonic linear motor should be increased. As a result, the supporting method of ultrasonic linear motors is simplified. The efficiency of the motor is improved and temperature rise is reduced. The stage position drift is also improved.

  13. Ventajas de los motores de flujo axial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto M Basanta Otero

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Es importante conocer sobre una familia de motores que a diferencia de los convencionales o tradicionales no presentanun flujo rotatorio radial, denominados motores de flujo axial. Dichos motores presentan altos valores de par motriz abajas velocidades, una alta eficiencia y alta densidad de potencia. Este trabajo constituye un breve análisis dealgunos motores de la referencia bibliográfica.  Is important to know about a family of motors that at difference whit the traditional, don't have a rotator radial flux,called, axial flux motors. These motors have high torque for low speed, high efficiency and high power density. Thiswork is a brief analysis of several motors of the bibliographic references.

  14. The micro-step motor controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Myung Kook; Choi, Bung Hun; Choi, Young Hyun; Cheon, Jong Gu

    2004-11-01

    The developed micro-step motor controller can handle 4 axes stepping motor drivers simultaneously and provide high power bipolar driving mechanism with constant current mode. It can be easily controlled by manual key functions and the motor driving status is displayed by the front panel VFD. Due to the development of several kinds of communication and driving protocol, PC can operate even several micro-step motor controllers at once by multi-drop connection

  15. High-Tc superconducting electric motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiferl, R.; Stein, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the advantages and limitations of using superconductors in motors are discussed. A synchronous motor with a high temperature superconducting field winding for pump and fan drive applications is described and some of its unique design features are identified. A 10,000 horsepower superconducting motor design is presented. The critical field and current density requirements for high temperature superconducting wire in motors is discussed. Finally, recent progress in superconducting wire performance is presented

  16. Frequency modulation drive for a piezoelectric motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittas, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    A piezoelectric motor has peak performance at a specific frequency f.sub.1 that may vary over a range of frequencies. A drive system is disclosed for operating such a motor at peak performance without feedback. The drive system consists of the motor and an ac source connected to power the motor, the ac source repeatedly generating a frequency over a range from f.sub.1 -.DELTA.x to f.sub.1 +.DELTA.y.

  17. Some simple demonstration experiments involving homopolar motors

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Seán M.

    2007-01-01

    The ready availability of very strong permanent magnets in the form of rare-earth magnetic alloys such as neodymium-iron-boron has lead to renewed interest in one of the oldest types of electric motors - the homopolar motor. The ease with which a demonstration homopolar motor can now be built and operated when neodymium magnets are used is quite remarkable. In this paper some simple homopolar motors employing neodymium magnets suitable for demonstrational purposes are described and discussed....

  18. Some simple demonstration experiments involving homopolar motors

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart,Seán M.

    2007-01-01

    The ready availability of very strong permanent magnets in the form of rare-earth magnetic alloys such as neodymium-iron-boron has lead to renewed interest in one of the oldest types of electric motors - the homopolar motor. The ease with which a demonstration homopolar motor can now be built and operated when neodymium magnets are used is quite remarkable. In this paper some simple homopolar motors employing neodymium magnets suitable for demonstrational purposes are described and discussed.

  19. Physical mechanisms of biological molecular motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John H. Jr. [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Ste. 617 SR1 Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)], E-mail: jhmiller@uh.edu; Vajrala, Vijayanand; Infante, Hans L. [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Ste. 617 SR1 Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Claycomb, James R. [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Ste. 617 SR1 Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States); Department of Mathematics and Physics, Houston Baptist University, 7502 Fondren Road, Houston, TX 77074-3298 (United States); Palanisami, Akilan; Fang Jie; Mercier, George T. [Department of Physics and Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Road, Ste. 617 SR1 Houston, TX 77204-5005 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    Biological motors generally fall into two categories: (1) those that convert chemical into mechanical energy via hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate, usually adenosine triphosphate, regarded as life's chemical currency of energy and (2) membrane bound motors driven directly by an ion gradient and/or membrane potential. Here we argue that electrostatic interactions play a vital role for both types of motors and, therefore, the tools of physics can greatly contribute to understanding biological motors.

  20. Physical mechanisms of biological molecular motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, John H. Jr.; Vajrala, Vijayanand; Infante, Hans L.; Claycomb, James R.; Palanisami, Akilan; Fang Jie; Mercier, George T.

    2009-01-01

    Biological motors generally fall into two categories: (1) those that convert chemical into mechanical energy via hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate, usually adenosine triphosphate, regarded as life's chemical currency of energy and (2) membrane bound motors driven directly by an ion gradient and/or membrane potential. Here we argue that electrostatic interactions play a vital role for both types of motors and, therefore, the tools of physics can greatly contribute to understanding biological motors