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Sample records for motor resonance predict

  1. Motor degradation prediction methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor`s duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures.

  2. Motor degradation prediction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, J.R.; Kelly, J.F.; Delzingaro, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Motor Operated Valve (MOV) squirrel cage AC motor rotors are susceptible to degradation under certain conditions. Premature failure can result due to high humidity/temperature environments, high running load conditions, extended periods at locked rotor conditions (i.e. > 15 seconds) or exceeding the motor's duty cycle by frequent starts or multiple valve stroking. Exposure to high heat and moisture due to packing leaks, pressure seal ring leakage or other causes can significantly accelerate the degradation. ComEd and Liberty Technologies have worked together to provide and validate a non-intrusive method using motor power diagnostics to evaluate MOV rotor condition and predict failure. These techniques have provided a quick, low radiation dose method to evaluate inaccessible motors, identify degradation and allow scheduled replacement of motors prior to catastrophic failures

  3. Piezoelectric/magnetostrictive resonant inchworm motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesner, John E.; Teter, Joseph P.

    1994-05-01

    Magnetostrictive and piezoelectric materials were used to create a linear motor operating on the inchworm principle. This motor operates at an electrical resonance, switching power internally between inductive and capacitive components. Magnetic coils surrounding the two Terfenol-D rods which drive the inchworm's center expanding element form the inductive component. Piezoelectric stacks that control the end clamping action are the capacitive components. The normal electrical phase relationship between these components provides natural drive timing for the inchworm. The motor direction can be easily reversed by changing the magnetic bias on the Terfenol. A prototype motor was built that achieved a stall load of 26 lb and no-load speed of 1 inch/sec vs the design of 30 lb and 1.3 inch/sec. A new type of power supply that switches power from a dc source was built for the motor. This power supply uses a small number of components to exactly supply the energy used in each inchworm cycle. It tracks the motor circuit resonance and is not affected by frequency shifts.

  4. Resonant inverter supplied Interior Permanent Magnet (IPM) motor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, rotor position in relation to the resonant frequency component current in the stator winding of DC-voltage link resonant inverter supplied Interior Permanent Magnet (IPM) motor has been developed. Six reference frames are used to relate the rotor position angle to the resonant frequency component current ...

  5. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have been performed on 20 right handed volunteers at 1.5 Tesla using echo planar imaging (EPI) protocol. Index finger tapping invoked localized activation in the primary motor area. Consistent and highly reproducible activation in the primary motor area was observed ...

  6. Electric motor predictive and preventive maintenance guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliver, J.A.

    1992-07-01

    Electric motor performance is vital to the reliable and efficient operation of power plants. The failure of one or more critical motors could cause lost capacity and excessive repair and maintenance cost. However, existing maintenance recommendations proposed by vendors for electric motors have sometimes encouraged many overly conservative maintenance practices. These practices have lead to excessive maintenance activities and costs which have provided no extra margin of operability. EPRI has sponsored RP2814-35 to develop a guide which provides power plants with information and guidance for establishing an effective maintenance program which will aid in preventing unexpected motor failures and assist in planning motor maintenance efforts. The guide includes a technical description which summarizes technical data relative to the four basic types of motors and their components in general use in power plants. The significant causes of motor failures are investigated and described in detail and methods to optimize service life and minimize maintenance cost through appropriate preventive maintenance and conditioning program are presented. This guide provides a foundation for an effective electric motor maintenance program and simplifies the selection of predictive and preventive maintenance tasks. Its use will enable maintenance personnel in nuclear and fossil plants to plan motor repairs during scheduled outages and avoid costly unexpected failures

  7. A variable torque motor compatible with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeck, W W; Ha, S-H; Farmaka, S; Nalcioglu, O

    2009-04-01

    High magnetic fields used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) do not allow the employment of conventional motors due to various incompatibility issues. This paper reports on a new motor that can operate in or near high field magnets used for MRI. The motor was designed to be operational with the MRI equipment and could be used in a rotating imaging gantry inside the magnet designed for dual modality imaging. Furthermore, it could also be used for image guided robotic interventional procedures inside a MRI system if so desired. The prototype motor was developed using magnetic resonance (MR) compatible materials, and its functionality with MR imaging was evaluated experimentally by measuring the performance of the motor and its effect on the MR image quality. Since in our application, namely, single photon emission tomography, the motor has to perform precise stepping of the gantry in small angular steps the most important parameter is the start-up torque. The experimental results showed that the motor has a start-up torque up to 1.37 Nm and rotates at 196 rpm when a constant voltage difference of 12 V is applied at a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The MR image quality was quantified by measuring the signal-to-noise of images acquired under different conditions. The results presented here indicate that the motor is MR compatible and could be used for rotating an imaging gantry or a surgical device inside the magnet.

  8. Constructive role of Brownian motion: Brownian motors and Stochastic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänggi, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Noise is usually thought of as the enemy of order rather as a constructive influence. For the phenomena of Stochastic Resonance [1] and Brownian motors [2], however, stochastic noise can play a beneficial role in enhancing detection and/or facilitating directed transmission of information in absence of biasing forces. Brownian motion assisted Stochastic Resonance finds useful applications in physical, technological, biological and biomedical contexts [1,3]. The basic principles that underpin Stochastic Resonance are elucidated and novel applications for nonlinear classical and quantum systems will be addressed. The presence of non-equilibrium disturbances enables to rectify Brownian motion so that quantum and classical objects can be directed around on a priori designed routes in biological and physical systems (Brownian motors). In doing so, the energy from the haphazard motion of (quantum) Brownian particles is extracted to perform useful work against an external load. This very concept together with first experimental realizations are discussed [2,4,5]. [1] L. Gammaitoni, P. Hä'nggi, P. Jung and F. Marchesoni, Stochastic Resonance, Rev. Mod. Phys. 70, 223 (1998).[2] R. D. Astumian and P. Hä'nggi, Brownian motors, Physics Today 55 (11), 33 (2002).[3] P. Hä'nggi, Stochastic Resonace in Physics and Biology, ChemPhysChem 3, 285 (2002).[4] H. Linke, editor, Special Issue on Brownian Motors, Applied Physics A 75, No. 2 (2002).[5] P. Hä'nggi, F. Marchesoni, F. Nori, Brownian motors, Ann. Physik (Leipzig) 14, xxx (2004); cond-mat/0410033.

  9. Learning from sensory and reward prediction errors during motor adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Jun; Shadmehr, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Voluntary motor commands produce two kinds of consequences. Initially, a sensory consequence is observed in terms of activity in our primary sensory organs (e.g., vision, proprioception). Subsequently, the brain evaluates the sensory feedback and produces a subjective measure of utility or usefulness of the motor commands (e.g., reward). As a result, comparisons between predicted and observed consequences of motor commands produce two forms of prediction error. How do these errors contribute to changes in motor commands? Here, we considered a reach adaptation protocol and found that when high quality sensory feedback was available, adaptation of motor commands was driven almost exclusively by sensory prediction errors. This form of learning had a distinct signature: as motor commands adapted, the subjects altered their predictions regarding sensory consequences of motor commands, and generalized this learning broadly to neighboring motor commands. In contrast, as the quality of the sensory feedback degraded, adaptation of motor commands became more dependent on reward prediction errors. Reward prediction errors produced comparable changes in the motor commands, but produced no change in the predicted sensory consequences of motor commands, and generalized only locally. Because we found that there was a within subject correlation between generalization patterns and sensory remapping, it is plausible that during adaptation an individual's relative reliance on sensory vs. reward prediction errors could be inferred. We suggest that while motor commands change because of sensory and reward prediction errors, only sensory prediction errors produce a change in the neural system that predicts sensory consequences of motor commands.

  10. Musical Sounds, Motor Resonance, and Detectable Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Launay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the paradox that while human music making evolved and spread in an environment where it could only occur in groups, it is now often apparently an enjoyable asocial phenomenon. Here I argue that music is, by definition, sound that we believe has been in some way organized by a human agent, meaning that listening to any musical sounds can be a social experience. There are a number of distinct mechanisms by which we might associate musical sound with agency. While some of these mechanisms involve learning motor associations with that sound, it is also possible to have a more direct relationship from musical sound to agency, and the relative importance of these potentially independent mechanisms should be further explored. Overall, I conclude that the apparent paradox of solipsistic musical engagement is in fact unproblematic, because the way that we perceive and experience musical sounds is inherently social.

  11. [Predictive ocular motor control in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Li; Liu, Zhen-Guo; Chen, Wei; Gan, Jing; Wang, Wen-An

    2008-02-19

    To investigate the changes of predictive ocular motor function in the patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and to discuss its clinical value. Videonystagmography (VNG) was used to examine 24 patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease, 15 males and 9 females, aged 61 +/- 6 (50-69), and 24 sex and age-matched healthy control subjects on random ocular saccade (with the target moving at random intervals to random positions) and predictive ocular saccade (with the 1.25-second light target moving 10 degrees right or left from the center). In the random ocular saccade program, the latency of saccade of the PD patients was 284 ms +/- 58 ms, significantly longer than that of the healthy controls (236 ms +/- 37 ms, P = 0.003). In the predictive ocular saccade pattern, the latency of saccades the PD patients was 150 ms +/- 138 ms, significantly longer than that of the healthy controls (59 ms +/- 102 ms, P = 0.002). The appearance rate of predictive saccades (with the latency of saccade <80 ms) in the PD group was 21%, significantly lower than that in the control group (31%, P = 0.003). There is dysfunction of predictive ocular motor control in the PD patients, and the cognitive function may be impaired at the early stage of PD.

  12. Motor Skill Competence and Perceived Motor Competence: Which Best Predicts Physical Activity among Girls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaverdi, Zeinab; Bahram, Abbas; Khalaji, Hassan; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2013-10-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine which correlate, perceived motor competence or motor skill competence, best predicts girls' physical activity behavior. A sample of 352 girls (mean age=8.7, SD=0.3 yr) participated in this study. To assess motor skill competence and perceived motor competence, each child completed the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 and Physical Ability sub-scale of Marsh's Self-Description Questionnaire. Children's physical activity was assessed by the Physical Activity Questionnaire for Older Children. Multiple linear regression model was used to determine whether perceived motor competence or motor skill competence best predicts moderate-to-vigorous self-report physical activity. Multiple regression analysis indicated that motor skill competence and perceived motor competence predicted 21% variance in physical activity (R(2)=0.21, F=48.9, P=0.001), and motor skill competence (R(2)=0.15, ᵝ=0.33, P= 0.001) resulted in more variance than perceived motor competence (R(2)=0.06, ᵝ=0.25, P=0.001) in physical activity. Results revealed motor skill competence had more influence in comparison with perceived motor competence on physical activity level. We suggest interventional programs based on motor skill competence and perceived motor competence should be administered or implemented to promote physical activity in young girls.

  13. Motor Development and Motor Resonance Difficulties in Autism: Relevance to Early Intervention for Language and Communication Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Mccleery

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Research suggests that a sub-set of children with autism experience notable difficulties and delays in motor skills development, and that a large percentage of children with autism experience deficits in motor resonance. These motor-related deficiencies, which evidence suggests are present from a very early age, are likely to negatively affect social-communicative and language development in this population. Here, we review evidence for delayed, impaired, and atypical motor development in infants and children with autism. We then carefully review and examine the current language and communication-based intervention research that is relevant to motor and motor resonance (i.e., neural mirroring mechanisms activated when we observe the actions of others deficits in children with autism. Finally, we describe research needs and future directions and developments for early interventions aimed at addressing the speech/language and social-communication development difficulties in autism from a motor-related perspective.

  14. Motor development and motor resonance difficulties in autism: relevance to early intervention for language and communication skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleery, Joseph P.; Elliott, Natasha A.; Sampanis, Dimitrios S.; Stefanidou, Chrysi A.

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that a sub-set of children with autism experience notable difficulties and delays in motor skills development, and that a large percentage of children with autism experience deficits in motor resonance. These motor-related deficiencies, which evidence suggests are present from a very early age, are likely to negatively affect social-communicative and language development in this population. Here, we review evidence for delayed, impaired, and atypical motor development in infants and children with autism. We then carefully review and examine the current language and communication-based intervention research that is relevant to motor and motor resonance (i.e., neural “mirroring” mechanisms activated when we observe the actions of others) deficits in children with autism. Finally, we describe research needs and future directions and developments for early interventions aimed at addressing the speech/language and social-communication development difficulties in autism from a motor-related perspective. PMID:23630476

  15. Motor Skill Competence and Perceived Motor Competence: Which Best Predicts Physical Activity among Girls?

    OpenAIRE

    Khodaverdi, Zeinab; Bahram, Abbas; Khalaji, Hassan; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The main purpose of this study was to determine which correlate, perceived motor competence or motor skill competence, best predicts girls? physical activity behavior. Methods A sample of 352 girls (mean age=8.7, SD=0.3 yr) participated in this study. To assess motor skill competence and perceived motor competence, each child completed the Test of Gross Motor Development-2 and Physical Ability sub-scale of Marsh?s Self-Description Questionnaire. Children?s physical activit...

  16. Functional connectivity between somatosensory and motor brain areas predicts individual differences in motor learning by observing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Heather R; Gribble, Paul L

    2017-08-01

    Action observation can facilitate the acquisition of novel motor skills; however, there is considerable individual variability in the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. Here we tested the hypothesis that individual differences in brain function or structure can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Subjects underwent an anatomical MRI scan and resting-state fMRI scans to assess preobservation gray matter volume and preobservation resting-state functional connectivity (FC), respectively. On the following day, subjects observed a video of a tutor adapting her reaches to a novel force field. After observation, subjects performed reaches in a force field as a behavioral assessment of gains in motor learning resulting from observation. We found that individual differences in resting-state FC, but not gray matter volume, predicted postobservation gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state FC between left primary somatosensory cortex and bilateral dorsal premotor cortex, primary motor cortex, and primary somatosensory cortex and left superior parietal lobule was positively correlated with behavioral measures of postobservation motor learning. Sensory-motor resting-state FC can thus predict the extent to which observation will promote subsequent motor learning. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We show that individual differences in preobservation brain function can predict subsequent observation-related gains in motor learning. Preobservation resting-state functional connectivity within a sensory-motor network may be used as a biomarker for the extent to which observation promotes motor learning. This kind of information may be useful if observation is to be used as a way to boost neuroplasticity and sensory-motor recovery for patients undergoing rehabilitation for diseases that impair movement such as stroke. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Using an electron paramagnetic resonance method for testing motor oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krais, S; Tkac, T

    1982-01-01

    Using an ER-9 spectrometer from the Karl Zeiss company, the relative effectiveness is studied of antioxidation additives. Motor oils of the E group, M6AD, 465, M6AD, 466, M6AD 467, 15 W/40, S-3/2 M/4, R-950, which contain the antioxidation additive were tested in Petter AV-1 motors at a temperature of 50 degrees for 120 hours and Petter AVB at a temperature of 90 degrees for 53 hours. To measure the concentration of free radicals of the antioxidation additives one part of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazine (I), which forms stable dimagnetic products with the radicals of the antioxidation additives was introduced into each three parts of the oil. The reduction in the intensity of the signal of I was the measure of the radical concentration. The spectrum was taken for 1 to 2 minutes. The graphs of the dependence of the electron paramagnetic resonance on the test time and the concentration of I are built. The beginning and end of the induction period of oxidation of the oils and the change in the hourly activity of the PP was recorded.

  18. Social interaction enhances motor resonance for observed human actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogeveen, Jeremy; Obhi, Sukhvinder S

    2012-04-25

    Understanding the neural basis of social behavior has become an important goal for cognitive neuroscience and a key aim is to link neural processes observed in the laboratory to more naturalistic social behaviors in real-world contexts. Although it is accepted that mirror mechanisms contribute to the occurrence of motor resonance (MR) and are common to action execution, observation, and imitation, questions remain about mirror (and MR) involvement in real social behavior and in processing nonhuman actions. To determine whether social interaction primes the MR system, groups of participants engaged or did not engage in a social interaction before observing human or robotic actions. During observation, MR was assessed via motor-evoked potentials elicited with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Compared with participants who did not engage in a prior social interaction, participants who engaged in the social interaction showed a significant increase in MR for human actions. In contrast, social interaction did not increase MR for robot actions. Thus, naturalistic social interaction and laboratory action observation tasks appear to involve common MR mechanisms, and recent experience tunes the system to particular agent types.

  19. Infrared thermography application on predictive maintenance for exhaust fan motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I Wayan Widiana; Jakaria; Artadi Heru; Mulyono

    2013-01-01

    To determine the condition of the exhaust fan motor in terms of heat dissipation, predictive maintenance needs to be done. One way is to use infrared thermography. The method used is an infrared thermography with qualitative technique which the analysis focused on the distribution patterns of heat captured by the infrared camera. From measurement results expected to be obtained data of the heat distribution occurs in the motor exhaust fan so it can be given treatment or further improvements recommendations to avoid failure of the operation. Results of measurements on the motor exhaust fan 9 and the motor exhaust fan 10 indicates that there is excessive heat dissipation (over heating). The recommendation given is increasing the motor capacity of 11 kW to 18 kW with a consideration of the addition load on exhaust fan system and age of motor more than 22 years. (author)

  20. Weight dependent modulation of motor resonance induced by weight estimation during observation of partially occluded lifting actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valchev, Nikola; Zijdewind, Inge; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio; Maurits, Natasha M.

    Seeing others performing an action induces the observers' motor cortex to "resonate" with the observed action. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that such motor resonance reflects the encoding of various motor features of the observed action, including the apparent motor

  1. Weight dependent modulation of motor resonance induced by weight estimation during observation of partially occluded lifting actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valchev, N.; Zijdewind, I.; Keysers, C.; Gazzola, V.; Avenanti, A.; Maurits, N.M.

    2015-01-01

    Seeing others performing an action induces the observers' motor cortex to "resonate" with the observed action. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that such motor resonance reflects the encoding of various motor features of the observed action, including the apparent motor

  2. Studies on motor neuron disease with cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Yusaku; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Yagi, Yuji (Kinki Univ., Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-05-01

    The present study was performed to examine the pyramidal tracts of the brain in both 51 normal subjects (21 male and 30 female subjects; mean age of 43.5[+-]16.1 years) and 12 patients with motor neuron disease (6 male and 6 female patients; mean age of 57.4[+-]7.9 years), using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 12 patients with motor neuron disease (MND) comprised 7 suffering from spinal progressive muscular atrophy (SPMA) and 5 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The MRI used in this study was of both short spin echo and long spin echo sequence. Of the 52 normal subjects, 24 of them (47%) had the T2 prolonged small areas (high signal intensity areas) at the posterior limb of internal capsule. These findings were not found in the normal subjects over fifty years old. No similar finding was detected in the pyramidal tracts except the posterior limb of internal capsule. On the other hand, 8 patients with MND (67%) proved to have the high signal intensity areas in the pyramidal tracts. Moreover, these high intensity areas were extended from the crus cerebri to corona radiata in 7 patients (58%). In all patients with ALS, these areas were extended in whole areas of the pyramidal tracts, and the similar findings were also found in two patients with SPMA. These findings were demonstrated to be more extensive than those in the normal subjects. The results thus obtained warrant us to conclude that cranial MRI is useful to detect the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts of MND patients. (author).

  3. Studies on motor neuron disease with cranial magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Nakamura, Yusaku; Kitaguchi, Masataka; Yagi, Yuji

    1992-01-01

    The present study was performed to examine the pyramidal tracts of the brain in both 51 normal subjects (21 male and 30 female subjects; mean age of 43.5±16.1 years) and 12 patients with motor neuron disease (6 male and 6 female patients; mean age of 57.4±7.9 years), using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The 12 patients with motor neuron disease (MND) comprised 7 suffering from spinal progressive muscular atrophy (SPMA) and 5 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The MRI used in this study was of both short spin echo and long spin echo sequence. Of the 52 normal subjects, 24 of them (47%) had the T2 prolonged small areas (high signal intensity areas) at the posterior limb of internal capsule. These findings were not found in the normal subjects over fifty years old. No similar finding was detected in the pyramidal tracts except the posterior limb of internal capsule. On the other hand, 8 patients with MND (67%) proved to have the high signal intensity areas in the pyramidal tracts. Moreover, these high intensity areas were extended from the crus cerebri to corona radiata in 7 patients (58%). In all patients with ALS, these areas were extended in whole areas of the pyramidal tracts, and the similar findings were also found in two patients with SPMA. These findings were demonstrated to be more extensive than those in the normal subjects. The results thus obtained warrant us to conclude that cranial MRI is useful to detect the degeneration of the pyramidal tracts of MND patients. (author)

  4. Prediction and Migration of Surface-related Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen

    2015-08-19

    Surface-related resonant multiples can be migrated to achieve better resolution than migrating primary reflections. We now derive the formula for migrating surface-related resonant multiples, and show its super-resolution characteristics. Moreover, a method is proposed to predict surface-related resonant multiples with zero-offset primary reflections. The prediction can be used to indentify and extract the true resonant multiple from other events. Both synthetic and field data are used to validate this prediction.

  5. Parietal operculum and motor cortex activities predict motor recovery in moderate to severe stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus Fabrice Hannanu

    2017-01-01

    In subacute stroke, fMRI brain activity related to passive movement measured in a sensorimotor network defined by activity during voluntary movement predicted motor recovery better than baseline motor-FMS alone. Furthermore, fMRI sensorimotor network activity measures considered alone allowed excellent clinical recovery prediction and may provide reliable biomarkers for assessing new therapies in clinical trial contexts. Our findings suggest that neural reorganization related to motor recovery from moderate to severe stroke results from balanced changes in ipsilesional MI (BA4a and a set of phylogenetically more archaic sensorimotor regions in the ventral sensorimotor trend, in which OP1 and OP4 processes may complement the ipsilesional dorsal motor cortex in achieving compensatory sensorimotor recovery.

  6. Organization of the human motor system as studied by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI), because of its superior resolution and unlimited repeatability, can be particularly useful in studying functional aspects of the human motor system, especially plasticity, and somatotopic and temporal organization. In this survey, while describing studies that have reliably used BOLD fMRI to examine these aspects of the motor system, we also discuss studies that investigate the neural substrates underlying motor skill acquisition, motor imagery, production of motor sequences; effect of rate and force of movement on brain activation and hemispheric control of motor function. In the clinical realm, in addition to the presurgical evaluation of neurosurgical patients, BOLD fMRI has been used to explore the mechanisms underlying motor abnormalities in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders and the mechanisms underlying reorganization or plasticity of the motor system following a cerebral insult

  7. You'll never crawl alone: Neurophysiological evidence for experience-dependent motor resonance in infancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Elk, Michiel; van Schie, Hein; Hunnius, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Lately, neuroscience is showing a great interest in examining the functional and neural mechanisms which support action observation and understanding. Recent studies have suggested that our motor skills crucially affect the way in which we perceive the actions generated by others, by showing...... stronger motor resonance for observation of actions that are established in one's motor repertoire. In the present study we extend previous findings that were based on expert motor skills in adults to the natural development of actions in infants. To investigate the effect of natural motor experience...... on motor resonance during action observation, 14- to 16-month-old infants' EEG was recorded during observation of action videos. Stronger mu- and betadesynchronizations were found for observation of crawling compared to walking videos and the size of the effect was strongly related to the infant's own...

  8. Somatotopic Semantic Priming and Prediction in the Motor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisoni, Luigi; Dreyer, Felix R.; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of action-related sounds and words activates motor regions, reflecting the semantic grounding of these symbols in action information; in addition, motor cortex exerts causal influences on sound perception and language comprehension. However, proponents of classic symbolic theories still dispute the role of modality-preferential systems such as the motor cortex in the semantic processing of meaningful stimuli. To clarify whether the motor system carries semantic processes, we investigated neurophysiological indexes of semantic relationships between action-related sounds and words. Event-related potentials revealed that action-related words produced significantly larger stimulus-evoked (Mismatch Negativity-like) and predictive brain responses (Readiness Potentials) when presented in body-part-incongruent sound contexts (e.g., “kiss” in footstep sound context; “kick” in whistle context) than in body-part-congruent contexts, a pattern reminiscent of neurophysiological correlates of semantic priming. Cortical generators of the semantic relatedness effect were localized in areas traditionally associated with semantic memory, including left inferior frontal cortex and temporal pole, and, crucially, in motor areas, where body-part congruency of action sound–word relationships was indexed by a somatotopic pattern of activation. As our results show neurophysiological manifestations of action-semantic priming in the motor cortex, they prove semantic processing in the motor system and thus in a modality-preferential system of the human brain. PMID:26908635

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of the primary motor cortex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abbreviations used: BOLD, Blood oxygenation level dependent; CBF, cerebral blood flow; fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging; EPI, eco-planar imaging; FOV, field of view; MRI, Magnetic resonance imaging; MRS, magnetic resonance spectroscopy;. PET, position emission tomography; rCBF, regional cerebral ...

  10. Learning new gait patterns: Exploratory muscle activity during motor learning is not predicted by motor modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Rajiv; Krishnan, Chandramouli; Dhaher, Yasin Y.; Rymer, William Z.

    2018-01-01

    The motor module hypothesis in motor control proposes that the nervous system can simplify the problem of controlling a large number of muscles in human movement by grouping muscles into a smaller number of modules. Here, we tested one prediction of the modular organization hypothesis by examining whether there is preferential exploration along these motor modules during the learning of a new gait pattern. Healthy college-aged participants learned a new gait pattern which required increased hip and knee flexion during the swing phase while walking in a lower-extremity robot (Lokomat). The new gait pattern was displayed as a foot trajectory in the sagittal plane and participants attempted to match their foot trajectory to this template. We recorded EMG from 8 lower-extremity muscles and we extracted motor modules during both baseline walking and target-tracking using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). Results showed increased trajectory variability in the first block of learning, indicating that participants were engaged in exploratory behavior. Critically, when we examined the muscle activity during this exploratory phase, we found that the composition of motor modules changed significantly within the first few strides of attempting the new gait pattern. The lack of persistence of the motor modules under even short time scales suggests that motor modules extracted during locomotion may be more indicative of correlated muscle activity induced by the task constraints of walking, rather than reflecting a modular control strategy. PMID:26916510

  11. A New Class of Resonant Discharge Drive Topology for Switched Reluctance Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Asgar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Switched reluctance motor (SRM drive has a remarkable characteristic, high efficiency, and good controllability, which makes it attractive for high-speed applications. In this paper, the basic control strategy for a switched reluctance motor drive circuit is explained and then three different resonant discharge topologies for SRM drive circuit are proposed. Due to resonantly discharging of excess energy, these topologies provide faster rate of fall for the phase current, which permits the motor to operate at higher speeds. In the new circuits a capacitor is charged resonantly by the use of motor phase windings during the phase turn off periods and then discharged via an inductor and a diode during the next working strokes. Three different drive circuits utilizing this process are proposed. A detailed explanation and demonstration of the converter circuits have been presented.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging applied to motor neuron disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroal, Gonzalo M.; Giavitto, Enrique; Nagel, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Differentiate Motor Neuron Disease by MRI. Material and Methods: 10 patients were studied, 7 patients had a diagnosis of definite ALS by the El Escorial criteria, 2 patients had lower motor neuron signs (LMN) and hyperreflexia and one patient had LMN signs without pain. MRI was performed: slices brain: Sagittal T1-weighted, sagittal and axial FSE T2, axial and coronal FLAIR, diffusion, singlevoxel spectroscopy in protuberances. Functional MRI with motor test; slices in cervical spine: Sagittal T1-weighted, sagittal and axial FSE T2, sagittal FSIR. Results: The 7 patients with definite ALS by El Escorial criteria and 2 patients with LMN signs and hyperreflexia: hyperintensity signal in FSE T2 and FLAIR extending from the motor cortex down to the corona radiate, posterior limb of internal capsules, cerebral peduncles and protuberance base; FSE T2: hypointensity sign in motor cortex; elevation in diffusivity and hyperintensity signal in ADC in posterior limb of internal capsule; reduction of NAA, high levels of Glutamine-Glutamate and of Colina. One of these 9 patients showed disc hernia in C4-5, and other patient in C3-C4, C4-C5 without cord lesion. The patient with LMN signs without pain showed normal brain and disc hernia C5-C6, hypertrophy yellow ligament, anterior-posterior diminution of medullar canal, hyperintensity signal in spine cord in the same level in sagittal FSIR. fMRI: increase signal in contralateral, ipsilateral motor area, and areas involved in initiation and planning movement. Conclusion: MRI allow differentiation between ALS and myelopathy cervical spondylitis and others motor neuron disease. (author) [es

  13. Control strategies for DC motors driving rotor dynamic systems through resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisoi, Alfa; Samantaray, A. K.; Bhattacharyya, Ranjan

    2017-12-01

    Rotor dynamic systems require considerably higher power/torque to accelerate through the structural resonance. However, most sources of mechanical power are non-ideal, i.e., they can only provide a limited amount of power. If there is insufficient power to overcome the resonance then the rotor speed may get caught at resonance and the persistent high vibrations can damage the machine. Various proposed solutions to this problem deal with modifications to the mechanical structure and active/semi-active control of structural parameters. This article proposes modification to the prime mover so that peak available power is delivered exactly at the structural resonance frequency. The limited power/non-ideal prime mover considered in this article is a direct current (DC) motor and the structural resonance happens due to forcing from an eccentric rotor disk and vibrations of a flexible weakly damped foundation. Various control strategies to modify the torque-speed characteristics of permanent magnet, shunt and series wound DC motors to promote escape through resonance are considered. Also, the characteristic curves for rotor/motor speed versus the DC supply voltage are obtained for the considered DC motor types from which the unattainable steady angular speeds and the speed jumps due to Sommerfeld effect are computed. Transient simulations are performed using bond graph models for this multi-energy domain (here, electro-mechanical) system. It is shown that a switched control permitting to switch between shunt and series DC motor configurations gives better regulation over the power delivery at the resonant frequency as well as super-critical operating speeds in the neighborhood of structural resonance.

  14. Motor resonance facilitates movement execution: an ERP and kinematic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde eMénoret

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Action observation, simulation and execution share neural mechanisms that allow for a common motor representation. It is known that when these overlapping mechanisms are simultaneously activated by action observation and execution, motor performance is influenced by observation and vice versa. To understand the neural dynamics underlying this influence and to measure how variations in brain activity impact the precise kinematics of motor behaviour, we coupled kinematics and electrophysiological recordings of participants while they performed and observed congruent or non-congruent actions or during action execution alone. We found that movement velocities and the trajectory deviations of the executed actions increased during the observation of congruent actions compared to the observation of non-congruent actions or action execution alone. This facilitation was also discernible in the motor-related potentials of the participants; the motor-related potentials were transiently more negative in the congruent condition around the onset of the executed movement, which occurred 300 ms after the onset of the observed movement. This facilitation seemed to depend not only on spatial congruency but also on the optimal temporal relationship of the observation and execution events.

  15. Interaction between hippocampal and striatal systems predicts subsequent consolidation of motor sequence memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Albouy

    Full Text Available The development of fast and reproducible motor behavior is a crucial human capacity. The aim of the present study was to address the relationship between the implementation of consistent behavior during initial training on a sequential motor task (the Finger Tapping Task and subsequent sleep-dependent motor sequence memory consolidation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and total sleep deprivation protocol. Our behavioral results indicated significant offline gains in performance speed after sleep whereas performance was only stabilized, but not enhanced, after sleep deprivation. At the cerebral level, we previously showed that responses in the caudate nucleus increase, in parallel to a decrease in its functional connectivity with frontal areas, as performance became more consistent. Here, the strength of the competitive interaction, assessed through functional connectivity analyses, between the caudate nucleus and hippocampo-frontal areas during initial training, predicted delayed gains in performance at retest in sleepers but not in sleep-deprived subjects. Moreover, during retest, responses increased in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex in sleepers whereas in sleep-deprived subjects, responses increased in the putamen and cingulate cortex. Our results suggest that the strength of the competitive interplay between the striatum and the hippocampus, participating in the implementation of consistent motor behavior during initial training, conditions subsequent motor sequence memory consolidation. The latter process appears to be supported by a reorganisation of cerebral activity in hippocampo-neocortical networks after sleep.

  16. Functional imaging of the cerebellum and basal ganglia during predictive motor timing in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husárová, Ivica; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Mareček, Radek; Mikl, Michal; Gescheidt, Tomáš; Krupa, Petr; Bareš, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The basal ganglia and the cerebellum have both emerged as important structures involved in the processing of temporal information. We examined the roles of the cerebellum and striatum in predictive motor timing during a target interception task in healthy individuals (HC group; n = 21) and in patients with early Parkinson's disease (early stage PD group; n = 20) using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Despite having similar hit ratios, the PD failed more often than the HC to postpone their actions until the right moment and to adapt their behavior from one trial to the next. We found more activation in the right cerebellar lobule VI in HC than in early stage PD during successful trials. Successful trial-by-trial adjustments were associated with higher activity in the right putamen and lobule VI of the cerebellum in HC. We conclude that both the cerebellum and striatum are involved in predictive motor timing tasks. The cerebellar activity is associated exclusively with the postponement of action until the right moment, whereas both the cerebellum and striatum are needed for successful adaptation of motor actions from one trial to the next. We found a general ''hypoactivation'' of basal ganglia and cerebellum in early stage PD relative to HC, indicating that even in early stages of the PD there could be functional perturbations in the motor system beyond striatum. Copyright © 2011 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  17. Enhanced pid vs model predictive control applied to bldc motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaya, M. S.; Muhammad, Auwal; Aliyu Abdulkadir, Rabiu; Salim, S. N. S.; Madugu, I. S.; Tijjani, Aminu; Aminu Yusuf, Lukman; Dauda Umar, Ibrahim; Khairi, M. T. M.

    2018-01-01

    BrushLess Direct Current (BLDC) motor is a multivariable and highly complex nonlinear system. Variation of internal parameter values with environment or reference signal increases the difficulty in controlling the BLDC effectively. Advanced control strategies (like model predictive control) often have to be integrated to satisfy the control desires. Enhancing or proper tuning of a conventional algorithm results in achieving the desired performance. This paper presents a performance comparison of Enhanced PID and Model Predictive Control (MPC) applied to brushless direct current motor. The simulation results demonstrated that the PSO-PID is slightly better than the PID and MPC in tracking the trajectory of the reference signal. The proposed scheme could be useful algorithms for the system.

  18. Effective and Robust Generalized Predictive Speed Control of Induction Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patxi Alkorta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents and validates a new proposal for effective speed vector control of induction motors based on linear Generalized Predictive Control (GPC law. The presented GPC-PI cascade configuration simplifies the design with regard to GPC-GPC cascade configuration, maintaining the advantages of the predictive control algorithm. The robust stability of the closed loop system is demonstrated by the poles placement method for several typical cases of uncertainties in induction motors. The controller has been tested using several simulations and experiments and has been compared with Proportional Integral Derivative (PID and Sliding Mode (SM control schemes, obtaining outstanding results in speed tracking even in the presence of parameter uncertainties, unknown load disturbance, and measurement noise in the loop signals, suggesting its use in industrial applications.

  19. Functional magnetic resonance imaging mapping of the motor cortex in patients with cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, W.M.; Zerrin Yetkin, F.; Hammeke, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) to map cerebral functions in patients with frontal or parietal tumors. Methods. Charts and images of patients with cerebral tumors or vascular malformations who underwent FMRI with an echo-planar technique were reviewed. The FMRI maps of motor (11 patients), tactile sensory (12 patients) and language tasks (4 patients) were obtained. The location of the FMRI activation and the positive responses to intraoperative cortical stimulation were compared. The reliability of the paradigms for mapping the rolandic cortex was evaluated. Results. Rolandic cortex was activated by tactile tasks in hall 12 patients and by motor tasks in 10 of 11 patients. Language tasks elicited activation in each of the four patients. Activation was obtained within edematous brain and adjacent to tumors. FMRI in three cases with intraoperative electro-cortical mapping results showed activation for a language, tactile, or motor task within the same gyrus in which stimulation elicited a related motor, sensory, or language function. In patients with >2 cm between the margin of the tumor, as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging, and the activation, no decline in motor function occurred from surgical resection. Conclusions. FMRI of tactile, motor, and language tasks is feasible in patients with cerebral tumors. FMRI shows promise as a means of determining the risk of a postoperative motor deficit from surgical resection of frontal or parietal tumors. (authors)

  20. Development of a novel ultrasonic motor resonator using topology optimization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    M'Boungui, G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available , in which the objective function is to minimize the amount of material with intermediate density, while satisfying a constraint related to the frequency ratio of selected resonant modes. The planar design produced using the optimization procedure was refined...

  1. Absolute analytical prediction of photonic crystal guided mode resonance wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    numerically with methods such as rigorous coupled wave analysis. Here it is demonstrated how the absolute resonance wavelengths of such structures can be predicted by analytically modeling them as slab waveguides in which the propagation constant is determined by a phase matching condition. The model...... is experimentally verified to be capable of predicting the absolute resonance wavelengths to an accuracy of within 0.75 nm, as well as resonance wavelength shifts due to changes in cladding index within an accuracy of 0.45 nm across the visible wavelength regime in the case where material dispersion is taken...

  2. Motor circuit computer model based on studies of functional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Ramo, Karla Batista; Rodriguez Rojas, Rafael; Carballo Barreda, Maylen

    2012-01-01

    The basal ganglia are a complex network of subcortical nuclei involved in motor control, sensorimotor integration, and cognitive processes. Their functioning and interaction with other cerebral structures remains as a subject of debate. The aim of the present work was to simulate the basal ganglia-thalamus-cortex circuitry interaction in motor program selection, supported by functional connectivity pattern obtained by functional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Determination of connections weights between neural populations by functional magnetic resonance imaging, contributed to a more realistic formulation of the model; and consequently to obtain similar results to clinical and experimental data. The network allowed to describe the participation of the basal ganglia in motor program selection and the changes in Parkinson disease. The simulation allowed to demonstrate that dopamine depletion above to 40 % leads to a loss of action selection capability, and to reflect the system adaptation ability to compensate dysfunction in Parkinson disease, coincident with experimental and clinical studies

  3. Physiological basis and image processing in functional magnetic resonance imaging: Neuronal and motor activity in brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rakesh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is recently developing as imaging modality used for mapping hemodynamics of neuronal and motor event related tissue blood oxygen level dependence (BOLD in terms of brain activation. Image processing is performed by segmentation and registration methods. Segmentation algorithms provide brain surface-based analysis, automated anatomical labeling of cortical fields in magnetic resonance data sets based on oxygen metabolic state. Registration algorithms provide geometric features using two or more imaging modalities to assure clinically useful neuronal and motor information of brain activation. This review article summarizes the physiological basis of fMRI signal, its origin, contrast enhancement, physical factors, anatomical labeling by segmentation, registration approaches with examples of visual and motor activity in brain. Latest developments are reviewed for clinical applications of fMRI along with other different neurophysiological and imaging modalities.

  4. Does childhood motor skill proficiency predict adolescent fitness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lisa M; Van Beurden, Eric; Morgan, Philip J; Brooks, Lyndon O; Beard, John R

    2008-12-01

    To determine whether childhood fundamental motor skill proficiency predicts subsequent adolescent cardiorespiratory fitness. In 2000, children's proficiency in a battery of skills was assessed as part of an elementary school-based intervention. Participants were followed up during 2006/2007 as part of the Physical Activity and Skills Study, and cardiorespiratory fitness was measured using the Multistage Fitness Test. Linear regression was used to examine the relationship between childhood fundamental motor skill proficiency and adolescent cardiorespiratory fitness controlling for gender. Composite object control (kick, catch, throw) and locomotor skill (hop, side gallop, vertical jump) were constructed for analysis. A separate linear regression examined the ability of the sprint run to predict cardiorespiratory fitness. Of the 928 original intervention participants, 481 were in 28 schools, 276 (57%) of whom were assessed. Two hundred and forty-four students (88.4%) completed the fitness test. One hundred and twenty-seven were females (52.1%), 60.1% of whom were in grade 10 and 39.0% were in grade 11. As children, almost all 244 completed each motor assessments, except for the sprint run (n = 154, 55.8%). The mean composite skill score in 2000 was 17.7 (SD 5.1). In 2006/2007, the mean number of laps on the Multistage Fitness Test was 50.5 (SD 24.4). Object control proficiency in childhood, adjusting for gender (P = 0.000), was associated with adolescent cardiorespiratory fitness (P = 0.012), accounting for 26% of fitness variation. Children with good object control skills are more likely to become fit adolescents. Fundamental motor skill development in childhood may be an important component of interventions aiming to promote long-term fitness.

  5. Prediction of a required dynamic torque for motor-operated butterfly valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, J. H.; Lee, K. N.; Jeong, W. K.

    2002-01-01

    This study describes the methodology for predicting a required dynamic torque in motor-operated butterfly valves. The results of this methodology have been compared with test data for motor-operated butterfly valves in nuclear power plant. With the close review of test data and torque prediction, it is concluded that the prediction methodology is conservative to predict a required dynamic torque of motor-operated butterfly valves. In addition, the information of correct differential pressure is vital to predict a required dynamic torque of motor-operated butterfly valves

  6. Control of a resonant d.c.-link converter for a.c. motor drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Petterteig

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the control of the resonant d.c.-link converter for a.c. motor drives. This is a low loss converter with higher efficiency than a conventional PWM converter, but it requires complex control. It needs a special control of the resonant d.c.-link voltage in addition to the discrete control of the a.c. side currents. Simulations show how the control of the a.c. currents, the modulation principle, influences the overall performance of the converter.

  7. Validation of an Acoustic Impedance Prediction Model for Skewed Resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howerton, Brian M.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    An impedance prediction model was validated experimentally to determine the composite impedance of a series of high-aspect ratio slot resonators incorporating channel skew and sharp bends. Such structures are useful for packaging acoustic liners into constrained spaces for turbofan noise control applications. A formulation of the Zwikker-Kosten Transmission Line (ZKTL) model, incorporating the Richards correction for rectangular channels, is used to calculate the composite normalized impedance of a series of six multi-slot resonator arrays with constant channel length. Experimentally, acoustic data was acquired in the NASA Langley Normal Incidence Tube over the frequency range of 500 to 3500 Hz at 120 and 140 dB OASPL. Normalized impedance was reduced using the Two-Microphone Method for the various combinations of channel skew and sharp 90o and 180o bends. Results show that the presence of skew and/or sharp bends does not significantly alter the impedance of a slot resonator as compared to a straight resonator of the same total channel length. ZKTL predicts the impedance of such resonators very well over the frequency range of interest. The model can be used to design arrays of slot resonators that can be packaged into complex geometries heretofore unsuitable for effective acoustic treatment.

  8. Early functional MRI activation predicts motor outcome after ischemic stroke: a longitudinal, multimodal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Jingze; Xu, Qiang; Hu, Jianping; Zeng, Fanyong; Lu, Guangming; Liu, Xinfeng

    2018-05-15

    An accurate prediction of long term outcome after stroke is urgently required to provide early individualized neurorehabilitation. This study aimed to examine the added value of early neuroimaging measures and identify the best approaches for predicting motor outcome after stroke. This prospective study involved 34 first-ever ischemic stroke patients (time since stroke: 1-14 days) with upper limb impairment. All patients underwent baseline multimodal assessments that included clinical (age, motor impairment), neurophysiological (motor-evoked potentials, MEP) and neuroimaging (diffusion tensor imaging and motor task-based fMRI) measures, and also underwent reassessment 3 months after stroke. Bivariate analysis and multivariate linear regression models were used to predict the motor scores (Fugl-Meyer assessment, FMA) at 3 months post-stroke. With bivariate analysis, better motor outcome significantly correlated with (1) less initial motor impairment and disability, (2) less corticospinal tract injury, (3) the initial presence of MEPs, (4) stronger baseline motor fMRI activations. In multivariate analysis, incorporating neuroimaging data improved the predictive accuracy relative to only clinical and neurophysiological assessments. Baseline fMRI activation in SMA was an independent predictor of motor outcome after stroke. A multimodal model incorporating fMRI and clinical measures best predicted the motor outcome following stroke. fMRI measures obtained early after stroke provided independent prediction of long-term motor outcome.

  9. Does magnetic resonance imaging predict future low back pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffens, D; Hancock, M J; Maher, C G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has the potential to identify pathology responsible for low back pain (LBP). However, the importance of findings on MRI remains controversial. We aimed to systematically review whether MRI findings of the lumbar spine predict future LBP in different samples...

  10. RESONANT PROCESSES IN STARTING MODES OF SYNCHRONOUS MOTORS WITH CAPACITORS IN THE EXCITATION WINDINGS CIRCUIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Malyar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of a mathematical model that enables to detect resonance modes during asynchronous startup of salient-pole synchronous motors, in which capacitors are switched on to increase the electromagnetic moment in the circuit of the excitation winding. Methodology. The asynchronous mode is described by a system of differential equations of the electric equilibrium of motor circuits written in orthogonal coordinate axes. The basis of the developed algorithm is the mathematical model of the high-level adequacy motor and the projection method for solving the boundary value problem for the equations of the electric equilibrium of the circuits written in orthogonal coordinate axes, taking into account the presence of capacitors in the excitation winding. The coefficients of differential equations are the differential inductances of the motor circuits, which are determined on the basis of the calculation of its magnetic circuit. As a result of the asymmetry of the rotor windings in the asynchronous mode, the current coupling and currents change according to the periodic law. The problem of its definition is solved as a boundary one. Results. A mathematical model for studying the asynchronous characteristics of synchronous motors with capacitors in an excitation winding is developed, by means of which it is possible to investigate the influence of the size of the capacity on the motor's starting properties and the resonance processes which may arise in this case. Scientific novelty. The developed method of mathematical modeling is based on a fundamentally new mathematical basis for the calculation of stationary dynamic modes of nonlinear electromagnetic circuits, which enables to obtain periodic coordinate dependencies, without resorting to the calculation of the transients. The basis of the developed algorithm is based on the approximation of state variables by cubic splines, the projection method of decomposition for the boundary value

  11. Directionality analysis on functional magnetic resonance imaging during motor task using Granger causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, A R; Muthalib, M; Perrey, S; Galka, A; Granert, O; Wolff, S; Deuschl, G; Raethjen, J; Heute, U; Muthuraman, M

    2012-01-01

    Directionality analysis of signals originating from different parts of brain during motor tasks has gained a lot of interest. Since brain activity can be recorded over time, methods of time series analysis can be applied to medical time series as well. Granger Causality is a method to find a causal relationship between time series. Such causality can be referred to as a directional connection and is not necessarily bidirectional. The aim of this study is to differentiate between different motor tasks on the basis of activation maps and also to understand the nature of connections present between different parts of the brain. In this paper, three different motor tasks (finger tapping, simple finger sequencing, and complex finger sequencing) are analyzed. Time series for each task were extracted from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, which have a very good spatial resolution and can look into the sub-cortical regions of the brain. Activation maps based on fMRI images show that, in case of complex finger sequencing, most parts of the brain are active, unlike finger tapping during which only limited regions show activity. Directionality analysis on time series extracted from contralateral motor cortex (CMC), supplementary motor area (SMA), and cerebellum (CER) show bidirectional connections between these parts of the brain. In case of simple finger sequencing and complex finger sequencing, the strongest connections originate from SMA and CMC, while connections originating from CER in either direction are the weakest ones in magnitude during all paradigms.

  12. Absolute analytical prediction of photonic crystal guided mode resonance wavelengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.; Kristensen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    A class of photonic crystal resonant reflectors known as guided mode resonant filters are optical structures that are widely used in the field of refractive index sensing, particularly in biosensing. For the purposes of understanding and design, their behavior has traditionally been modeled numerically with methods such as rigorous coupled wave analysis. Here it is demonstrated how the absolute resonance wavelengths of such structures can be predicted by analytically modeling them as slab waveguides in which the propagation constant is determined by a phase matching condition. The model is experimentally verified to be capable of predicting the absolute resonance wavelengths to an accuracy of within 0.75 nm, as well as resonance wavelength shifts due to changes in cladding index within an accuracy of 0.45 nm across the visible wavelength regime in the case where material dispersion is taken into account. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the model is valid beyond the limit of low grating modulation, for periodically discontinuous waveguide layers, high refractive index contrasts, and highly dispersive media.

  13. Prediction of Parametric Roll Resonance by Multilayer Perceptron Neural Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Míguez González, M; López Peña, F.; Díaz Casás, V.

    2011-01-01

    Parametric roll resonance is a ship stability related phenomenon that generates sudden large amplitude oscillations up to 30-40 degrees of roll. This can cause severe damage, and it can put the crew in serious danger. The need for a parametric rolling real time prediction system has been acknowle......Parametric roll resonance is a ship stability related phenomenon that generates sudden large amplitude oscillations up to 30-40 degrees of roll. This can cause severe damage, and it can put the crew in serious danger. The need for a parametric rolling real time prediction system has been...... acknowledged in the last few years. This work proposes a prediction system based on a multilayer perceptron (MP) neural network. The training and testing of the MP network is accomplished by feeding it with simulated data of a three degrees-of-freedom nonlinear model of a fishing vessel. The neural network...

  14. Predictability, Force and (Anti-)Resonance in Complex Object Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Pauline; Hogan, Neville; Sternad, Dagmar

    2018-04-18

    Manipulation of complex objects as in tool use is ubiquitous and has given humans an evolutionary advantage. This study examined the strategies humans choose when manipulating an object with underactuated internal dynamics, such as a cup of coffee. The object's dynamics renders the temporal evolution complex, possibly even chaotic, and difficult to predict. A cart-and-pendulum model, loosely mimicking coffee sloshing in a cup, was implemented in a virtual environment with a haptic interface. Participants rhythmically manipulated the virtual cup containing a rolling ball; they could choose the oscillation frequency, while the amplitude was prescribed. Three hypotheses were tested: 1) humans decrease interaction forces between hand and object; 2) humans increase the predictability of the object dynamics; 3) humans exploit the resonances of the coupled object-hand system. Analysis revealed that humans chose either a high-frequency strategy with anti-phase cup-and-ball movements or a low-frequency strategy with in-phase cup-and-ball movements. Counter Hypothesis 1, they did not decrease interaction force; instead, they increased the predictability of the interaction dynamics, quantified by mutual information, supporting Hypothesis 2. To address Hypothesis 3, frequency analysis of the coupled hand-object system revealed two resonance frequencies separated by an anti-resonance frequency. The low-frequency strategy exploited one resonance, while the high-frequency strategy afforded more choice, consistent with the frequency response of the coupled system; both strategies avoided the anti-resonance. Hence, humans did not prioritize interaction force, but rather strategies that rendered interactions predictable. These findings highlight that physical interactions with complex objects pose control challenges not present in unconstrained movements.

  15. How Kinesthetic Motor Imagery works: a predictive-processing theory of visualization in sports and motor expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Brass, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Kinesthetic Motor Imagery (KMI) is an important technique to acquire and refine motor skills. KMI is widely used by professional athletes as an effective way to improve motor performance without overt motor output. Despite this obvious relevance, the functional mechanisms and neural circuits involved in KMI in sports are still poorly understood. In the present article, which aims at bridging the sport sciences and cognitive neurophysiology literatures, we give a brief overview of relevant research in the field of KMI. Furthermore, we develop a theoretical account that relates KMI to predictive motor control theories assuming that it is based on internal activation of anticipatory images of action effects. This mechanism allows improving motor performance solely based on internal emulation of action. In accordance with previous literature, we propose that this emulation mechanism is implemented in brain regions that partially overlap with brain areas involved in overt motor performance including the posterior parietal cortex, the cerebellum, the basal ganglia and the premotor cortex. Finally, we outline one way to test the heuristic value of our theoretical framework for KMI; we suggest that experience with motor performance improves the ability to correctly infer the goals of others, in particular in penalty blocking in soccer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Disruption to functional networks in neonates with perinatal brain injury predicts motor skills at 8 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, Annika C; Wild, Conor; Zubiaurre-Elorza, Leire; Herzmann, Charlotte; Duffy, Hester; Han, Victor K; Lee, David S C; Cusack, Rhodri

    2018-01-01

    Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) of neonates with perinatal brain injury could improve prediction of motor impairment before symptoms manifest, and establish how early brain organization relates to subsequent development. This cohort study is the first to describe and quantitatively assess functional brain networks and their relation to later motor skills in neonates with a diverse range of perinatal brain injuries. Infants ( n  = 65, included in final analyses: n  = 53) were recruited from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and were stratified based on their age at birth (premature vs. term), and on whether neuropathology was diagnosed from structural MRI. Functional brain networks and a measure of disruption to functional connectivity were obtained from 14 min of fcMRI acquired during natural sleep at term-equivalent age. Disruption to connectivity of the somatomotor and frontoparietal executive networks predicted motor impairment at 4 and 8 months. This disruption in functional connectivity was not found to be driven by differences between clinical groups, or by any of the specific measures we captured to describe the clinical course. fcMRI was predictive over and above other clinical measures available at discharge from the NICU, including structural MRI. Motor learning was affected by disruption to somatomotor networks, but also frontoparietal executive networks, which supports the functional importance of these networks in early development. Disruption to these two networks might be best addressed by distinct intervention strategies.

  17. Infant and Toddler Oral- and Manual-Motor Skills Predict Later Speech Fluency in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann; Sauer, Eve A.; Geye, Heather M.; Schweigert, Emily K.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2008-01-01

    Background: Spoken and gestural communication proficiency varies greatly among autistic individuals. Three studies examined the role of oral- and manual-motor skill in predicting autistic children's speech development. Methods: Study 1 investigated whether infant and toddler oral- and manual-motor skills predict middle childhood and teenage speech…

  18. When the mask falls: the role of facial motor resonance in memory for emotional language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Jenny-Charlotte; Rumiati, Raffaella Ida; Foroni, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    The recognition and interpretation of emotional information (e.g., about happiness) has been shown to elicit, amongst other bodily reactions, spontaneous facial expressions occurring in accordance to the relevant emotion (e.g. a smile). Theories of embodied cognition act on the assumption that such embodied simulations are not only an accessorial, but a crucial factor in the processing of emotional information. While several studies have confirmed the importance of facial motor resonance during the initial recognition of emotional information, its role at later stages of processing, such as during memory for emotional content, remains unexplored. The present study bridges this gap by exploring the impact of facial motor resonance on the retrieval of emotional stimuli. In a novel approach, the specific effects of embodied simulations were investigated at different stages of emotional memory processing (during encoding and/or retrieval). Eighty participants underwent a memory task involving emotional and neutral words consisting of an encoding and retrieval phase. Depending on the experimental condition, facial muscles were blocked by a hardening facial mask either during encoding, during retrieval, during both encoding and retrieval, or were left free to resonate (control). The results demonstrate that not only initial recognition but also memory of emotional items benefits from embodied simulations occurring during their encoding and retrieval. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Motor phenotype and magnetic resonance measures of basal ganglia iron levels in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzeck, Nico; Singh-Curry, Victoria; Eckart, Cindy; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Perry, Richard J; Bain, Peter G; Düzel, Emrah; Husain, Masud

    2013-12-01

    In Parkinson's disease the degree of motor impairment can be classified with respect to tremor dominant and akinetic rigid features. While tremor dominance and akinetic rigidity might represent two ends of a continuum rather than discrete entities, it would be important to have non-invasive markers of any biological differences between them in vivo, to assess disease trajectories and response to treatment, as well as providing insights into the underlying mechanisms contributing to heterogeneity within the Parkinson's disease population. Here, we used magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether Parkinson's disease patients exhibit structural changes within the basal ganglia that might relate to motor phenotype. Specifically, we examined volumes of basal ganglia regions, as well as transverse relaxation rate (a putative marker of iron load) and magnetization transfer saturation (considered to index structural integrity) within these regions in 40 individuals. We found decreased volume and reduced magnetization transfer within the substantia nigra in Parkinson's disease patients compared to healthy controls. Importantly, there was a positive correlation between tremulous motor phenotype and transverse relaxation rate (reflecting iron load) within the putamen, caudate and thalamus. Our findings suggest that akinetic rigid and tremor dominant symptoms of Parkinson's disease might be differentiated on the basis of the transverse relaxation rate within specific basal ganglia structures. Moreover, they suggest that iron load within the basal ganglia makes an important contribution to motor phenotype, a key prognostic indicator of disease progression in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel magnetic resonance imaging-compatible motor control method for image-guided robotic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takashi; Liao, Hongen; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    For robotic surgery assistance systems that use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for guidance, the problem of electromagnetic interference is common. Image quality is particularly degraded if motors are running during scanning. We propose a novel MRI-compatible method considering the pulse sequence of imaging. Motors are driven for a short time when the MRI system stops signal acquisition (i.e., awaiting relaxation of the proton), so the image does not contain noise from the actuators. The MRI system and motor are synchronized using a radio frequency pulse signal (8.5 MHz) as the trigger, which is acquired via a special antenna mounted near the scanner. This method can be widely applied because it only receives part of the scanning signal and neither hardware nor software of the MRI system needs to be changed. As a feasibility evaluation test, we compared the images and signal-to-noise ratios between the cases with and without this method, under the condition that a piezoelectric motor was driven during scanning as a noise source, which was generally used as a MRI-compatible actuator. The results showed no deterioration in image quality and the benefit of the new method even though the choice of available scanning sequences is limited. (author)

  1. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers of gastrointestinal motor function and fluid distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Asseel; Khalaf; Caroline; L; Hoad; Robin; C; Spiller; Penny; A; Gowland; Gordon; W; Moran; Luca; Marciani

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) is a well established technique that has revolutionized diagnostic radiology. Until recently, the impact that MRI has had in the assessment of gastrointestinal motor function and bowel fluid distribution in health and in disease has been more limited, despite the novel insights that MRI can provide along the entire gastrointestinal tract. MRI biomarkers include intestinal motility indices, small bowel water content and whole gut transit time. The present review discusses new developments and applications of MRI in the upper gastrointestinal tract, the small bowel and the colon reported in the literature in the last 5 years.

  3. NUMERICAL PREDICTION MODELS FOR AIR POLLUTION BY MOTOR VEHICLE EMISSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Scientific work involves: 1 development of 3D numerical models that allow calculating the process of air pollution by motor vehicles emissions; 2 creation of models which would allow predicting the air pollution level in urban areas. Methodology. To solve the problem upon assessing the level of air pollution by motor vehicles emissions fundamental equations of aerodynamics and mass transfer are used. For the solution of differential equations of aerodynamics and mass transfer finite-difference methods are used. For the numerical integration of the equation for the velocity potential the method of conditional approximations is applied. The equation for the velocity potential written in differential form, splits into two equations, where at each step of splitting an unknown value of the velocity potential is determined by an explicit scheme of running computation, while the difference scheme is implicit one. For the numerical integration of the emissions dispersion equation in the atmosphere applies the implicit alternating-triangular difference scheme of splitting. Emissions from the road are modeled by a series of point sources of given intensity. Developed numerical models form is the basis of the created software package. Findings. 3D numerical models were developed; they belong to the class of «diagnostic models». These models take into account main physical factors that influence the process of dispersion of harmful substances in the atmosphere when emissions from vehicles in the city occur. Based on the constructed numerical models the computational experiment was conducted to assess the level of air pollution in the street. Originality. Authors have developed numerical models that allow to calculate the 3D aerodynamics of the wind flow in urban areas and the process of mass transfer emissions from the highway. Calculations to determine the area of contamination, which is formed near the buildings, located along the highway were

  4. Accurate Prediction of Motor Failures by Application of Multi CBM Tools: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Rana; Singh, Veerendra Pratap; Dwivedi, Jai Prakash

    2018-02-01

    Motor failures are very difficult to predict accurately with a single condition-monitoring tool as both electrical and the mechanical systems are closely related. Electrical problem, like phase unbalance, stator winding insulation failures can, at times, lead to vibration problem and at the same time mechanical failures like bearing failure, leads to rotor eccentricity. In this case study of a 550 kW blower motor it has been shown that a rotor bar crack was detected by current signature analysis and vibration monitoring confirmed the same. In later months in a similar motor vibration monitoring predicted bearing failure and current signature analysis confirmed the same. In both the cases, after dismantling the motor, the predictions were found to be accurate. In this paper we will be discussing the accurate predictions of motor failures through use of multi condition monitoring tools with two case studies.

  5. Interpersonal motor resonance in autism spectrum disorder: Evidence against a global ‘mirror system’ deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eEnticott

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The mirror neuron hypothesis of autism is highly controversial, in part because there are conflicting reports as to whether putative indices of mirror system activity are actually deficient in autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Recent evidence suggests that a typical putative mirror system response may be seen in people with an ASD when there is a degree of social relevance to the visual stimuli used to elicit that response. Individuals with ASD (n = 32 and matched neurotypical controls (n = 32 completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS experiment in which the left primary motor cortex was stimulated during the observation of static hands, individual (i.e., one person hand actions, and interactive (i.e., two person hand actions. Motor-evoked potentials (MEP were recorded from the contralateral first dorsal interosseous, and used to generate an index of interpersonal motor resonance (IMR; a putative measure of mirror system activity during action observation. There was no difference between ASD and NT groups in the level of IMR during the observation of these actions. These findings provide evidence against a global mirror system deficit in ASD, and this evidence appears to extend beyond stimuli that have social relevance. Attentional and visual processing influences may be important for understanding the apparent role of IMR in the pathophysiology of ASD.

  6. Interpersonal motor resonance in autism spectrum disorder: evidence against a global "mirror system" deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Peter G; Kennedy, Hayley A; Rinehart, Nicole J; Bradshaw, John L; Tonge, Bruce J; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2013-01-01

    The mirror neuron hypothesis of autism is highly controversial, in part because there are conflicting reports as to whether putative indices of mirror system activity are actually deficient in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Recent evidence suggests that a typical putative mirror system response may be seen in people with an ASD when there is a degree of social relevance to the visual stimuli used to elicit that response. Individuals with ASD (n = 32) and matched neurotypical controls (n = 32) completed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) experiment in which the left primary motor cortex (M1) was stimulated during the observation of static hands, individual (i.e., one person) hand actions, and interactive (i.e., two person) hand actions. Motor-evoked potentials (MEP) were recorded from the contralateral first dorsal interosseous, and used to generate an index of interpersonal motor resonance (IMR; a putative measure of mirror system activity) during action observation. There was no difference between ASD and NT groups in the level of IMR during the observation of these actions. These findings provide evidence against a global mirror system deficit in ASD, and this evidence appears to extend beyond stimuli that have social relevance. Attentional and visual processing influences may be important for understanding the apparent role of IMR in the pathophysiology of ASD.

  7. The motor system resonates to the distal goal of observed actions: testing the inverse pliers paradigm in an ecological setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Luigi; Maule, Francesca; Barchiesi, Guido; Rizzolatti, Giacomo

    2013-11-01

    Does motor mirroring in humans reflect the observed movements or the goal of the observed motor acts? Tools that dissociate the agent/object dynamics from the movements of the body parts used to operate them provide a model for testing resonance to both movements and goals. Here, we describe the temporal relationship of the observer's motor excitability, assessed with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), with the observed goal-directed tool actions, in an ecological setting. Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) to TMS were recorded from the opponens pollicis (OP, thumb flexor) and the extensor indicis proprius (EIP, index extensor) muscles of participants while they observed a person moving several small objects with a pair of normal pliers (closed by finger flexion) or reverse pliers (opened by finger flexion). The MEPs were a significant predictor of the pliers' kinematics that occurred in a variable time interval between -400 and +300 ms from TMS. Whatever pliers' type was being observed, OP MEPs correlated positively and EIP MEPs correlated negatively with the velocity of pliers' tips closure. This datum was confirmed both at individual and at a group level. Motor simulation can be demonstrated in single observers in a "real-life" ecological setting. The relation of motor resonance to the tool type shows that the observer's motor system codes the distal goal of the observed acts (i.e., grasping and releasing objects) in terms of its own motor vocabulary, irrespective of the actual finger movements that were performed by the observed actor.

  8. Evaluation and prediction of the performance of positive displacement motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudor, R.; Ginzburg, L. [Canadian Fracmaster Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Xu, H. [Japan National Oil Corp (Japan); Li, J.; Robello, G.; Grigor, C.

    1998-12-31

    Test results of positive displacement motors (PDMs) collected by using various PDMs from a number of different suppliers have been analyzed. Various correlations have been developed and motor performance pumped with incompressible drilling fluid was evaluated based on test data provided by suppliers in the form of pressure drop versus torque output. Conclusions drawn from the study suggest that when a motor is operated at less than full load, the correlation between mechanical power and hydraulic power across the PDM power section can be described with a simple linear equation (different for each PDM type). Assuming the availability of patented geometric information for each PDM type, the performance of PDMs can be described by both the geometric parameters of the motor and the rheological properties of the circulation fluid. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Hybrid Prediction Model of the Temperature Field of a Motorized Spindle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixiu Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The thermal characteristics of a motorized spindle are the main determinants of its performance, and influence the machining accuracy of computer numerical control machine tools. It is important to accurately predict the thermal field of a motorized spindle during its operation to improve its thermal characteristics. This paper proposes a model to predict the temperature field of a high-speed and high-precision motorized spindle under different working conditions using a finite element model and test data. The finite element model considers the influence of the parameters of the cooling system and the lubrication system, and that of environmental conditions on the coefficient of heat transfer based on test data for the surface temperature of the motorized spindle. A genetic algorithm is used to optimize the coefficient of heat transfer of the spindle, and its temperature field is predicted using a three-dimensional model that employs this optimal coefficient. A prediction model of the 170MD30 temperature field of the motorized spindle is created and simulation data for the temperature field are compared with the test data. The results show that when the speed of the spindle is 10,000 rpm, the relative mean prediction error is 1.5%, and when its speed is 15,000 rpm, the prediction error is 3.6%. Therefore, the proposed prediction model can predict the temperature field of the motorized spindle with high accuracy.

  10. Reflecting on mirror mechanisms: motor resonance effects during action observation only present with low-intensity transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Loporto

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS studies indicate that the observation of other people's actions influences the excitability of the observer's motor system. Motor evoked potential (MEP amplitudes typically increase in muscles which would be active during the execution of the observed action. This 'motor resonance' effect is thought to result from activity in mirror neuron regions, which enhance the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1 via cortico-cortical pathways. The importance of TMS intensity has not yet been recognised in this area of research. Low-intensity TMS predominately activates corticospinal neurons indirectly, whereas high-intensity TMS can directly activate corticospinal axons. This indicates that motor resonance effects should be more prominent when using low-intensity TMS. A related issue is that TMS is typically applied over a single optimal scalp position (OSP to simultaneously elicit MEPs from several muscles. Whether this confounds results, due to differences in the manner that TMS activates spatially separate cortical representations, has not yet been explored. In the current study, MEP amplitudes, resulting from single-pulse TMS applied over M1, were recorded from the first dorsal interosseous (FDI and abductor digiti minimi (ADM muscles during the observation of simple finger abductions. We tested if the TMS intensity (110% vs. 130% resting motor threshold or stimulating position (FDI-OSP vs. ADM-OSP influenced the magnitude of the motor resonance effects. Results showed that the MEP facilitation recorded in the FDI muscle during the observation of index-finger abductions was only detected using low-intensity TMS. In contrast, changes in the OSP had a negligible effect on the presence of motor resonance effects in either the FDI or ADM muscles. These findings support the hypothesis that MN activity enhances M1 excitability via cortico-cortical pathways and highlight a methodological framework by which the

  11. Combined visual and motor evoked potentials predict multiple sclerosis disability after 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaeger, Regina; Schindler, Christian; Grize, Leticia; Dellas, Sophie; Radue, Ernst W; Kappos, Ludwig; Fuhr, Peter

    2014-09-01

    The development of predictors of multiple sclerosis (MS) disability is difficult due to the complex interplay of pathophysiological and adaptive processes. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether combined evoked potential (EP)-measures allow prediction of MS disability after 20 years. We examined 28 patients with clinically definite MS according to Poser's criteria with Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, combined visual and motor EPs at entry (T0), 6 (T1), 12 (T2) and 24 (T3) months, and a cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan at T0 and T2. EDSS testing was repeated at year 14 (T4) and year 20 (T5). Spearman rank correlation was used. We performed a multivariable regression analysis to examine predictive relationships of the sum of z-transformed EP latencies (s-EPT0) and other baseline variables with EDSST5. We found that s-EPT0 correlated with EDSST5 (rho=0.72, pdisability in MS. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Wideband impedance measurements and modeling of DC motors for EMI predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diouf, F.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes; Duval, Fabrice; Bensetti, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    In electromagnetic interference prediction, dc motors are usually modeled as a source and a series impedance. Previous researches only include the impedance of the armature, while neglecting the effect of the motor's rotation. This paper aims at measuring and modeling the wideband impedance of a dc

  13. Motor Testing at 1 Year Improves the Prediction of Motor and Mental Outcome at 2 Years after Perinatal Hypoxic-Ischaemic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Petra Em; Becher, Jules G.; Dallmeijer, Annet J.; Barkhof, Frederik; van Weissenbruch, Mirjam M.; Vermeulen, R. Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the predictive value of motor testing at 1 year for motor and mental outcome at 2 years after perinatal hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (HIE) in term neonates. Method: Motor and mental outcome at 2 years was assessed with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition (BSID-II) in 32 surviving children (20 males, 12…

  14. User's Self-Prediction of Performance in Motor Imagery Brain-Computer Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minkyu; Cho, Hohyun; Ahn, Sangtae; Jun, Sung C

    2018-01-01

    Performance variation is a critical issue in motor imagery brain-computer interface (MI-BCI), and various neurophysiological, psychological, and anatomical correlates have been reported in the literature. Although the main aim of such studies is to predict MI-BCI performance for the prescreening of poor performers, studies which focus on the user's sense of the motor imagery process and directly estimate MI-BCI performance through the user's self-prediction are lacking. In this study, we first test each user's self-prediction idea regarding motor imagery experimental datasets. Fifty-two subjects participated in a classical, two-class motor imagery experiment and were asked to evaluate their easiness with motor imagery and to predict their own MI-BCI performance. During the motor imagery experiment, an electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded; however, no feedback on motor imagery was given to subjects. From EEG recordings, the offline classification accuracy was estimated and compared with several questionnaire scores of subjects, as well as with each subject's self-prediction of MI-BCI performance. The subjects' performance predictions during motor imagery task showed a high positive correlation ( r = 0.64, p performance even without feedback information. This implies that the human brain is an active learning system and, by self-experiencing the endogenous motor imagery process, it can sense and adopt the quality of the process. Thus, it is believed that users may be able to predict MI-BCI performance and results may contribute to a better understanding of low performance and advancing BCI.

  15. Fine Motor Skills Predict Maths Ability Better than They Predict Reading Ability in the Early Primary School Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, Nicola J.; Papini, Chiara; Outhwaite, Laura A.; Gulliford, Anthea

    2016-01-01

    Fine motor skills have long been recognized as an important foundation for development in other domains. However, more precise insights into the role of fine motor skills, and their relationships to other skills in mediating early educational achievements, are needed to support the development of optimal educational interventions. We explored concurrent relationships between two components of fine motor skills, Fine Motor Precision and Fine Motor Integration, and early reading and maths development in two studies with primary school children of low-to-mid socio-economic status in the UK. Two key findings were revealed. First, despite being in the first 2 years of primary school education, significantly better performance was found in reading compared to maths across both studies. This may reflect the protective effects of recent national-level interventions to promote early literacy skills in young children in the UK that have not been similarly promoted for maths. Second, fine motor skills were a better predictor of early maths ability than they were of early reading ability. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that fine motor skills did not significantly predict reading ability when verbal short-term memory was taken into account. In contrast, Fine Motor Integration remained a significant predictor of maths ability, even after the influence of non-verbal IQ had been accounted for. These results suggest that fine motor skills should have a pivotal role in educational interventions designed to support the development of early mathematical skills. PMID:27303342

  16. Fine motor skills predict maths ability better than they predict reading ability in the early primary school years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Pitchford

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Fine motor skills have long been recognised as an important foundation for development in other domains. However, more precise insights into the role of fine motor skills, and their relationships to other skills in mediating early educational achievements, are needed to support the development of optimal educational interventions. We explored concurrent relationships between two components of fine motor skills, Fine Motor Precision and Fine Motor Integration, and early reading and maths development in two studies with primary school children of low-to-mid socio-economic status in the U.K. Two key findings were revealed. First, despite being in the first two years of primary school education, significantly better performance was found in reading compared to maths across both studies. This may reflect the protective effects of recent national-level interventions to promote early literacy skills in young children in the U.K. that have not been similarly promoted for maths. Second, fine motor skills were a better predictor of early maths ability than they were of early reading ability. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that fine motor skills did not significantly predict reading ability when verbal short-term memory was taken into account. In contrast, Fine Motor Integration remained a significant predictor of maths ability, even after the influence of non-verbal IQ had been accounted for. These results suggest that fine motor skills should have a pivotal role in educational interventions designed to support the development of early mathematical skills.

  17. Fine Motor Skills Predict Maths Ability Better than They Predict Reading Ability in the Early Primary School Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchford, Nicola J; Papini, Chiara; Outhwaite, Laura A; Gulliford, Anthea

    2016-01-01

    Fine motor skills have long been recognized as an important foundation for development in other domains. However, more precise insights into the role of fine motor skills, and their relationships to other skills in mediating early educational achievements, are needed to support the development of optimal educational interventions. We explored concurrent relationships between two components of fine motor skills, Fine Motor Precision and Fine Motor Integration, and early reading and maths development in two studies with primary school children of low-to-mid socio-economic status in the UK. Two key findings were revealed. First, despite being in the first 2 years of primary school education, significantly better performance was found in reading compared to maths across both studies. This may reflect the protective effects of recent national-level interventions to promote early literacy skills in young children in the UK that have not been similarly promoted for maths. Second, fine motor skills were a better predictor of early maths ability than they were of early reading ability. Hierarchical multiple regression revealed that fine motor skills did not significantly predict reading ability when verbal short-term memory was taken into account. In contrast, Fine Motor Integration remained a significant predictor of maths ability, even after the influence of non-verbal IQ had been accounted for. These results suggest that fine motor skills should have a pivotal role in educational interventions designed to support the development of early mathematical skills.

  18. Estimation of Mechanical Signals in Induction Motors using the Recursive Prediction Error Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, H.; Knudsen, Morten; Rasmussen, Henrik

    1993-01-01

    Sensor feedback of mechanical quantities for control applications in induction motors is troublesome and relative expensive. In this paper a recursive prediction error (RPE) method has successfully been used to estimate the angular rotor speed ........Sensor feedback of mechanical quantities for control applications in induction motors is troublesome and relative expensive. In this paper a recursive prediction error (RPE) method has successfully been used to estimate the angular rotor speed .....

  19. Bayley-III motor scale and neurological examination at 2 years do not predict motor skills at 4.5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burakevych, Nataliia; Mckinlay, Christopher Joel Dorman; Alsweiler, Jane Marie; Wouldes, Trecia Ann; Harding, Jane Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    To determine whether Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (3rd edition) (Bayley-III) motor scores and neurological examination at 2 years corrected age predict motor difficulties at 4.5 years corrected age. A prospective cohort study of children born at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia in Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New Zealand. Assessment at 2 years was performed using the Bayley-III motor scale and neurological examination, and at 4.5 years using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children (2nd edition) (MABC-2). Of 333 children, 8 (2%) had Bayley-III motor scores below 85, and 50 (15%) had minor deficits on neurological assessment at 2 years; 89 (27%) scored less than or equal to the 15th centile, and 54 (16%) less than or equal to the 5th centile on MABC-2 at 4.5 years. Motor score, fine and gross motor subtest scores, and neurological assessments at 2 years were poorly predictive of motor difficulties at 4.5 years, explaining 0 to 7% of variance in MABC-2 scores. A Bayley-III motor score below 85 predicted MABC-2 scores less than or equal to the 15th centile with a positive predictive value of 30% and a negative predictive value of 74% (7% sensitivity and 94% specificity). Bayley-III motor scale and neurological examination at 2 years were poorly predictive of motor difficulties at 4.5 years. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Comparison of TMS and DTT for predicting motor outcome in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung Ho; Ahn, Sang Ho; Sakong, Joon; Byun, Woo Mok; Choi, Byung Yun; Chang, Chul Hoon; Bai, Daiseg; Son, Su Min

    2010-03-15

    TMS (transcranial magnetic stimulation) and DTT (diffusion tensor tractography) have different advantages in evaluating stroke patients. TMS has good clinical accessibility and economical benefit. On the contrary, DTT has a unique advantage to visualize neural tracts three-dimensionally although it requires an expensive and large MRI machine. Many studies have demonstrated that TMS and DTT have predictive values for motor outcome in stroke patients. However, there has been no study on the comparison of these two evaluation tools. In the current study, we compared the abilities of TMS and DTT to predict upper motor outcome in patients with ICH (intracerebral hemorrhage). Fifty-three consecutive patients with severe motor weakness were evaluated by TMS and DTT at the early stage (7-28 days) of ICH. Modified Brunnstrom classification (MBC) and the motricity index of upper extremity (UMI) were evaluated at onset and 6 months after onset. Patients with the presence of a motor evoked potential (MEP) in TMS or a preserved corticospinal tract (CST) in DTT showed better motor outcomes than those without (p=0.000). TMS showed higher positive predictive value than DTT. In contrast, DTT showed higher negative predictive value than TMS. TMS and DTT had different advantages in predicting motor outcome, and this result could be a reference to predict final neurological deficit at the early stage of ICH.

  1. Weight dependent modulation of motor resonance induced by weight estimation during observation of partially occluded lifting actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valchev, Nikola; Zijdewind, Inge; Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria; Avenanti, Alessio; Maurits, Natasha M

    2015-01-01

    Seeing others performing an action induces the observers' motor cortex to "resonate" with the observed action. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies suggest that such motor resonance reflects the encoding of various motor features of the observed action, including the apparent motor effort. However, it is unclear whether such encoding requires direct observation or whether force requirements can be inferred when the moving body part is partially occluded. To address this issue, we presented participants with videos of a right hand lifting a box of three different weights and asked them to estimate its weight. During each trial we delivered one transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulse over the left primary motor cortex of the observer and recorded the motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from three muscles of the right hand (first dorsal interosseous, FDI, abductor digiti minimi, ADM, and brachioradialis, BR). Importantly, because the hand shown in the videos was hidden behind a screen, only the contractions in the actor's BR muscle under the bare skin were observable during the entire videos, while the contractions in the actor's FDI and ADM muscles were hidden during the grasp and actual lift. The amplitudes of the MEPs recorded from the BR (observable) and FDI (hidden) muscle increased with the weight of the box. These findings indicate that the modulation of motor excitability induced by action observation extends to the cortical representation of muscles with contractions that could not be observed. Thus, motor resonance appears to reflect force requirements of observed lifting actions even when the moving body part is occluded from view. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fine-motor skills testing and prediction of endovascular performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Bo; Lönn, Lars; Schroeder, Torben V

    2013-01-01

    Performing endovascular procedures requires good control of fine-motor digital movements and hand-eye coordination. Objective assessment of such skills is difficult. Trainees acquire control of catheter/wire movements at various paces. However, little is known to what extent talent plays for novice...

  3. A novel L-shaped linear ultrasonic motor operating in a single resonance mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bailiang; Yao, Zhiyuan; Liu, Zhen; Li, Xiaoniu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, a large thrust linear ultrasonic motor using an L-shaped stator is described. The stator is constructed by two mutually perpendicular rectangular plate vibrators, one of which is mounted in parallel with the slider to make the motor structure to be more compact. The symmetric and antisymmetric modes of the stator based on the first order bending vibration of two vibrators are adopted, in which each resonance mode is assigned to drive the slider in one direction. The placement of piezoelectric ceramics in a stator could be determined by finite element analysis, and the influence of slots in the head block on the vibration amplitudes of driving foot was studied as well. Three types of prototypes (non-slotted, dual-slot, and single-slot) were fabricated and experimentally investigated. Experimental results demonstrated that the prototype with one slot exhibited the best mechanical output performance. The maximum loads under the excitation of symmetric mode and antisymmetric mode were 65 and 90 N, respectively.

  4. Whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging of cerebral arteriovenous malformations involving the motor pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozdoba, C.; Remonda, L.; Loevblad, K.O.; Schroth, G.; Nirkko, A.C.

    2002-01-01

    To investigate cortical, basal ganglia and cerebellar activation in patients with arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) involving the motor pathways, we studied ten patients (six male, four female, mean age 30.3 years, range 7.4-44.1) by whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a 1.5-T scanner with the EPI-BOLD-technique. In seven cases multiple fMRI studies were available, acquired in the course of the multi-session endovascular interventional treatment. Self-paced right- and left-handed finger-tapping tasks were used to invoke activation. In six patients a super-selective amytal test (Wada test) was performed during diagnostic pre-interventional angiography studies. Abnormal cortical activation patterns, with activation of the primary sensorimotor area, the supplementary motor area and/or the cerebellum shifted to unphysiological locations, were found in four patients. In all cases, localization of the AVM could account for the changes from the normal. After endovascular procedures, fMRI demonstrated shifts in the activation pattern in three patients. In the six patients that had undergone fMRI studies and the Wada test, both methods yielded comparable results. The fact that AVMs are structural anomalies for which the brain can partly compensate ('plasticity') was underlined by these results. fMRI is a valuable tool in the pre-therapeutic evaluation and post-interventional follow-up of patients with cerebral AVMs in whom an operation or an endovascular procedure is planned. (orig.)

  5. Language for action: Motor resonance during the processing of human and robotic voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cesare, G; Errante, A; Marchi, M; Cuccio, V

    2017-11-01

    In this fMRI study we evaluated whether the auditory processing of action verbs pronounced by a human or a robotic voice in the imperative mood differently modulates the activation of the mirror neuron system (MNs). The study produced three results. First, the activation pattern found during listening to action verbs was very similar in both the robot and human conditions. Second, the processing of action verbs compared to abstract verbs determined the activation of the fronto-parietal circuit classically involved during the action goal understanding. Third, and most importantly, listening to action verbs compared to abstract verbs produced activation of the anterior part of the supramarginal gyrus (aSMG) regardless of the condition (human and robot) and in the absence of any object name. The supramarginal gyrus is a region considered to underpin hand-object interaction and associated to the processing of affordances. These results suggest that listening to action verbs may trigger the recruitment of motor representations characterizing affordances and action execution, coherently with the predictive nature of motor simulation that not only allows us to re-enact motor knowledge to understand others' actions but also prepares us for the actions we might need to carry out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Observation of Point-Light-Walker Locomotion Induces Motor Resonance When Explicitly Represented; An EEG Source Analysis Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Inuggi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human motion, to infer the goal of others' actions, is thought to involve the observer's motor repertoire. One prominent class of actions, the human locomotion, has been object of several studies, all focused on manipulating the shape of degraded human figures like point-light walker (PLW stimuli, represented as walking on the spot. Nevertheless, since the main goal of the locomotor function is to displace the whole body from one position to the other, these stimuli might not fully represent a goal-directed action and thus might not be able to induce the same motor resonance mechanism expected when observing a natural locomotion. To explore this hypothesis, we recorded the event-related potentials (ERP of canonical/scrambled and translating/centered PLWs decoding. We individuated a novel ERP component (N2c over central electrodes, around 435 ms after stimulus onset, for translating compared to centered PLW, only when the canonical shape was preserved. Consistently with our hypothesis, sources analysis associated this component to the activation of trunk and lower legs primary sensory-motor and supplementary motor areas. These results confirm the role of own motor repertoire in processing human action and suggest that ERP can detect the associated motor resonance only when the human figure is explicitly involved in performing a meaningful action.

  7. Predictive Model Based Battery Constraints for Electric Motor Control within EV Powertrains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roşca, B.; Wilkins, S.; Jacob, J.; Hoedemaekers, E.R.G.; Hoek, S.P. van den

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a method of predicting the maximum power capability of a Li-Ion battery, to be used for electric motor control within automotive powertrains. As maximum power is highly dependent on battery state, the method consists of a pack level state observer coupled with a predictive

  8. The Cerebellum Generates Motor-to-Auditory Predictions: ERP Lesion Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolle, Franziska; Schroger, Erich; Baess, Pamela; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2012-01-01

    Forward predictions are crucial in motor action (e.g., catching a ball, or being tickled) but may also apply to sensory or cognitive processes (e.g., listening to distorted speech or to a foreign accent). According to the "internal forward model," the cerebellum generates predictions about somatosensory consequences of movements. These predictions…

  9. Cortical ensemble activity increasingly predicts behaviour outcomes during learning of a motor task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubach, Mark; Wessberg, Johan; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2000-06-01

    When an animal learns to make movements in response to different stimuli, changes in activity in the motor cortex seem to accompany and underlie this learning. The precise nature of modifications in cortical motor areas during the initial stages of motor learning, however, is largely unknown. Here we address this issue by chronically recording from neuronal ensembles located in the rat motor cortex, throughout the period required for rats to learn a reaction-time task. Motor learning was demonstrated by a decrease in the variance of the rats' reaction times and an increase in the time the animals were able to wait for a trigger stimulus. These behavioural changes were correlated with a significant increase in our ability to predict the correct or incorrect outcome of single trials based on three measures of neuronal ensemble activity: average firing rate, temporal patterns of firing, and correlated firing. This increase in prediction indicates that an association between sensory cues and movement emerged in the motor cortex as the task was learned. Such modifications in cortical ensemble activity may be critical for the initial learning of motor tasks.

  10. Predicting octane number using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and artificial neural networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani

    2018-04-17

    Machine learning algorithms are attracting significant interest for predicting complex chemical phenomenon. In this work, a model to predict research octane number (RON) and motor octane number (MON) of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol blends and gasoline-ethanol blends has been developed using artificial neural networks (ANN) and molecular parameters from 1H nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. RON and MON of 128 pure hydrocarbons, 123 hydrocarbon-ethanol blends of known composition and 30 FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) gasoline-ethanol blends were utilized as a dataset to develop the ANN model. The effect of weight % of seven functional groups including paraffinic CH3 groups, paraffinic CH2 groups, paraffinic CH groups, olefinic -CH=CH2 groups, naphthenic CH-CH2 groups, aromatic C-CH groups and ethanolic OH groups on RON and MON was studied. The effect of branching (i.e., methyl substitution), denoted by a parameter termed as branching index (BI), and molecular weight (MW) were included as inputs along with the seven functional groups to predict RON and MON. The topology of the developed ANN models for RON (9-540-314-1) and MON (9-340-603-1) have two hidden layers and a large number of nodes, and was validated against experimentally measured RON and MON of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol and gasoline-ethanol blends; a good correlation (R2=0.99) between the predicted and the experimental data was obtained. The average error of prediction for both RON and MON was found to be 1.2 which is close to the range of experimental uncertainty. This shows that the functional groups in a molecule or fuel can be used to predict its ON, and the complex relationship between them can be captured by tools like ANN.

  11. Predicting octane number using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and artificial neural networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abdul Jameel, Abdul Gani; Oudenhoven, Vincent Van; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Sarathy, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Machine learning algorithms are attracting significant interest for predicting complex chemical phenomenon. In this work, a model to predict research octane number (RON) and motor octane number (MON) of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol blends and gasoline-ethanol blends has been developed using artificial neural networks (ANN) and molecular parameters from 1H nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. RON and MON of 128 pure hydrocarbons, 123 hydrocarbon-ethanol blends of known composition and 30 FACE (fuels for advanced combustion engines) gasoline-ethanol blends were utilized as a dataset to develop the ANN model. The effect of weight % of seven functional groups including paraffinic CH3 groups, paraffinic CH2 groups, paraffinic CH groups, olefinic -CH=CH2 groups, naphthenic CH-CH2 groups, aromatic C-CH groups and ethanolic OH groups on RON and MON was studied. The effect of branching (i.e., methyl substitution), denoted by a parameter termed as branching index (BI), and molecular weight (MW) were included as inputs along with the seven functional groups to predict RON and MON. The topology of the developed ANN models for RON (9-540-314-1) and MON (9-340-603-1) have two hidden layers and a large number of nodes, and was validated against experimentally measured RON and MON of pure hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon-ethanol and gasoline-ethanol blends; a good correlation (R2=0.99) between the predicted and the experimental data was obtained. The average error of prediction for both RON and MON was found to be 1.2 which is close to the range of experimental uncertainty. This shows that the functional groups in a molecule or fuel can be used to predict its ON, and the complex relationship between them can be captured by tools like ANN.

  12. Atrophy of spared grey matter tissue predicts poorer motor recovery and rehabilitation response in chronic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Lynne V.; Taub, Edward; Mark, Victor W.; Barghi, Ameen; Uswatte, Gitendra

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the motor deficit following stroke is clearly due to the structural brain damage that has been sustained, this relationship is attenuated from the acute to chronic phases. We investigated the possibility that motor impairment and response to Constraint-Induced Movement therapy (CI therapy) in chronic stroke patients may relate more strongly to the structural integrity of brain structures remote from the lesion than to measures of overt tissue damage. Methods Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis was performed on MRI scans from 80 chronic stroke patients to investigate whether variations in grey matter density were correlated with extent of residual motor impairment or with CI therapy-induced motor recovery. Results Decreased grey matter density in non-infarcted motor regions was significantly correlated with magnitude of residual motor deficit. In addition, reduced grey matter density in multiple remote brain regions predicted a lesser extent of motor improvement from CI therapy. Conclusions Atrophy in seemingly healthy parts of the brain that are distant from the infarct accounts for at least a portion of the sustained motor deficit in chronic stroke. PMID:22096036

  13. Generating linear regression model to predict motor functions by use of laser range finder during TUG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Daiki; Nishiguchi, Shu; Fukutani, Naoto; Hotta, Takayuki; Tashiro, Yuto; Morino, Saori; Shirooka, Hidehiko; Nozaki, Yuma; Hirata, Hinako; Yamaguchi, Moe; Yorozu, Ayanori; Takahashi, Masaki; Aoyama, Tomoki

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate which spatial and temporal parameters of the Timed Up and Go (TUG) test are associated with motor function in elderly individuals. This study included 99 community-dwelling women aged 72.9 ± 6.3 years. Step length, step width, single support time, variability of the aforementioned parameters, gait velocity, cadence, reaction time from starting signal to first step, and minimum distance between the foot and a marker placed to 3 in front of the chair were measured using our analysis system. The 10-m walk test, five times sit-to-stand (FTSTS) test, and one-leg standing (OLS) test were used to assess motor function. Stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to determine which TUG test parameters were associated with each motor function test. Finally, we calculated a predictive model for each motor function test using each regression coefficient. In stepwise linear regression analysis, step length and cadence were significantly associated with the 10-m walk test, FTSTS and OLS test. Reaction time was associated with the FTSTS test, and step width was associated with the OLS test. Each predictive model showed a strong correlation with the 10-m walk test and OLS test (P motor function test. Moreover, the TUG test time regarded as the lower extremity function and mobility has strong predictive ability in each motor function test. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Revisiting the spectrum of lower motor neuron diseases with snake eyes appearance on magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebouteux, M-V; Franques, J; Guillevin, R; Delmont, E; Lenglet, T; Bede, P; Desnuelle, C; Pouget, J; Pascal-Mousselard, H; Pradat, P-F

    2014-09-01

    The 'snake eyes' sign refers to bilateral hyperintensities of the anterior horns on axial spinal cord imaging. Based on sporadic reports, it has been associated with a range of lower motor neuron (LMN) syndromes, such as spondylotic amyotrophy and Hirayama disease, as well as spinal cord infarction. The objective of our study was to comprehensively characterize the full diagnostic spectrum of LMN syndromes with this radiological clue and discuss potential aetiological factors. A large patient cohort with snake eyes sign and upper limb LMN degeneration was recruited from three French neuromuscular units. Patients underwent detailed electrophysiological, radiological, clinical and anamnestic profiling. Twenty-nine patients were ascertained and followed up for 9.5 ± 8.6 years. The majority of the patients were male (86.2%) with a mean age of 37.3 ± 14.4 years. Symptoms were bilateral in most cases (86.2%). Patients with predominantly proximal and distal deficits were equally represented (44.8% and 55.2%, respectively). A history of preceding trauma or intense physical activity was confirmed in 58.6% of the cases; 27.6% of the patients were given an initial clinical diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and 51.7% were originally suspected to have multifocal motor neuropathy. None of the patients developed ALS on longitudinal follow-up. The snake eyes sign on magnetic resonance imaging is associated with a wide spectrum of neurological conditions and is more common in young men with a history of strenuous activity or antecedent trauma. The recognition of this syndrome is crucial as many of these patients are initially misdiagnosed with ALS. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EAN.

  15. Prediction of movement intention using connectivity within motor-related network: An electrocorticography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Byeong Keun; Kim, June Sic; Ryun, Seokyun; Chung, Chun Kee

    2018-01-01

    Most brain-machine interface (BMI) studies have focused only on the active state of which a BMI user performs specific movement tasks. Therefore, models developed for predicting movements were optimized only for the active state. The models may not be suitable in the idle state during resting. This potential maladaptation could lead to a sudden accident or unintended movement resulting from prediction error. Prediction of movement intention is important to develop a more efficient and reasonable BMI system which could be selectively operated depending on the user's intention. Physical movement is performed through the serial change of brain states: idle, planning, execution, and recovery. The motor networks in the primary motor cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex are involved in these movement states. Neuronal communication differs between the states. Therefore, connectivity may change depending on the states. In this study, we investigated the temporal dynamics of connectivity in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and primary motor cortex to predict movement intention. Movement intention was successfully predicted by connectivity dynamics which may reflect changes in movement states. Furthermore, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is crucial in predicting movement intention to which primary motor cortex contributes. These results suggest that brain connectivity is an excellent approach in predicting movement intention.

  16. Prediction and Migration of Surface-related Resonant Multiples

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Bowen; Schuster, Gerard T.; Huang, Yunsong

    2015-01-01

    Surface-related resonant multiples can be migrated to achieve better resolution than migrating primary reflections. We now derive the formula for migrating surface-related resonant multiples, and show its super-resolution characteristics. Moreover

  17. [Prediction of lateral lymph node metastasis by magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatano, Satoshi; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Ishibashi, Keiichiro; Ishiguro, Toru; Ohsawa, Tomonori; Okada, Norimichi; Nakata, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Masaru; Haga, Norihiro; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2010-11-01

    Considering the advantages and disadvantages of lateral lymph node dissection in patients with advanced lower rectal cancer, it would be ideal to select candidates for lateral lymph node dissection by preoperative imaging study including magnetic resonance imaging(MRI). We have reported that the cut-off value of minimal diameter of lateral lymph node could be set at 6 mm for indication of lateral lymph node dissection. In the present study, we evaluated whether it would be appropriate to apply the cut-off value of minimal diameter of lateral lymph node in MRI. Forty-four patients with advanced lower rectal cancer underwent a curative surgery with lateral lymph node dissection or sampling from 1997 to 2009 in our institute. Among them, 25 patients received MRI preoperatively and analyzed. The images were obtained by a sagittal method that was diagonal along sacro-iliac joint with 5 mm thick sections. Lateral lymph node metastasis was detected in 5 cases, one side in 4 cases and both sides in 1 case. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predict value, and accuracy for predicting metastasis was 50%, 90%, 42.9% and 84.8% respectively, when the cut-off value of the minimal diameter was set at 6 mm in MRI. Our results indicated that a 6 mm set as the cut-off value of minimal diameter of lateral lymph node was suitable for the prediction of lateral lymph node metastasis since the accuracy was relatively high (84.8%), though it was hardly to detect metastatic lymph node less than 6 mm.

  18. Prediction of lateral lymph node metastasis by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Satoshi; Kumamoto, Kensuke; Ishibashi, Keiichiro

    2010-01-01

    Considering the advantages and disadvantages of lateral lymph node dissection in patients with advanced lower rectal cancer, it would be ideal to select candidates for lateral lymph node dissection by preoperative imaging study including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have reported that the cut-off value of minimal diameter of lateral lymph node could be set at 6 mm for indication of lateral lymph node dissection. In the present study, we evaluated whether it would be appropriate to apply the cut-off value of minimal diameter of lateral lymph node in MRI. Forty-four patients with advanced lower rectal cancer underwent a curative surgery with lateral lymph node dissection or sampling from 1997 to 2009 in our institute. Among them, 25 patients received MRI preoperatively and analyzed. The images were obtained by a sagittal method that was diagonal along sacro-iliac joint with 5 mm thick sections. Lateral lymph node metastasis was detected in 5 cases, one side in 4 cases and both sides in 1 case. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predict value, and accuracy for predicting metastasis was 50%, 90%, 42.9% and 84.8% respectively, when the cut-off value of the minimal diameter was set at 6 mm in MRI. Our results indicated that a 6 mm set as the cut-off value of minimal diameter of lateral lymph node was suitable for the prediction of lateral lymph node metastasis since the accuracy was relatively high (84.8%), though it was hardly to detect metastatic lymph node less than 6 mm. (author)

  19. D2 receptor genotype and striatal dopamine signaling predict motor cortical activity and behavior in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Leonardo; Blasi, Giuseppe; Taurisano, Paolo; Papazacharias, Apostolos; Romano, Raffaella; Gelao, Barbara; Ursini, Gianluca; Quarto, Tiziana; Lo Bianco, Luciana; Di Giorgio, Annabella; Mancini, Marina; Popolizio, Teresa; Rubini, Giuseppe; Bertolino, Alessandro

    2011-02-14

    Pre-synaptic D2 receptors regulate striatal dopamine release and DAT activity, key factors for modulation of motor pathways. A functional SNP of DRD2 (rs1076560 G>T) is associated with alternative splicing such that the relative expression of D2S (mainly pre-synaptic) vs. D2L (mainly post-synaptic) receptor isoforms is decreased in subjects with the T allele with a putative increase of striatal dopamine levels. To evaluate how DRD2 genotype and striatal dopamine signaling predict motor cortical activity and behavior in humans, we have investigated the association of rs1076560 with BOLD fMRI activity during a motor task. To further evaluate the relationship of this circuitry with dopamine signaling, we also explored the correlation between genotype based differences in motor brain activity and pre-synaptic striatal DAT binding measured with [(123)I] FP-CIT SPECT. Fifty healthy subjects, genotyped for DRD2 rs1076560 were studied with BOLD-fMRI at 3T while performing a visually paced motor task with their right hand; eleven of these subjects also underwent [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT. SPM5 random-effects models were used for statistical analyses. Subjects carrying the T allele had greater BOLD responses in left basal ganglia, thalamus, supplementary motor area, and primary motor cortex, whose activity was also negatively correlated with reaction time at the task. Moreover, left striatal DAT binding and activity of left supplementary motor area were negatively correlated. The present results suggest that DRD2 genetic variation was associated with focusing of responses in the whole motor network, in which activity of predictable nodes was correlated with reaction time and with striatal pre-synaptic dopamine signaling. Our results in humans may help shed light on genetic risk for neurobiological mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of disorders with dysregulation of striatal dopamine like Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A fuzzy expert system for predicting the performance of switched reluctance motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirzaeian, B.; Moallem, M.; Lucas, Caro

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a fuzzy expert system for predicting the performance of a switched reluctance motor has been developed. The design vector consists of design parameters, and output performance variables are efficiency and torque ripple. An accurate analysis program based on Improved Magnetic Equivalent Circuit method has been used to generate the input-output data. These input-output data is used to produce the initial fuzzy rules for predicting the performance of Switched Reluctance Motor. The initial set of fuzzy rules with triangular membership functions has been devised using a table look-up scheme. The initial fuzzy rules have been optimized to a set of fuzzy rules with Gaussian membership functions using gradient descent training scheme. The performance prediction results for a 6/8, 4 kw, Switched Reluctance Motor shows good agreement with the results obtained from Improved Magnetic Equivalent Circuit method or Finite Element analysis. The developed fuzzy expert system can be used for fast prediction of motor performance in the optimal design process or on-line control schemes of Switched Reluctance motor

  1. Fine motor skill predicts expressive language in infant siblings of children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBarton, Eve Sauer; Iverson, Jana M

    2013-11-01

    We investigated whether fine motor and expressive language skills are related in the later-born siblings of children with autism (heightened-risk, HR infants) who are at increased risk for language delays. We observed 34 HR infants longitudinally from 12 to 36 months. We used parent report and standardized observation measures to assess fine motor skill from 12 to 24 months in HR infants (Study 1) and its relation to later expressive vocabulary at 36 months in HR infants (Study 2). In Study 1, we also included 25 infants without a family history of autism to serve as a normative comparison group for a parent-report fine motor measure. We found that HR infants exhibited fine motor delays between 12 and 24 months and expressive vocabulary delays at 36 months. Further, fine motor skill significantly predicted expressive language at 36 months. Fine motor and expressive language skills are related early in development in HR infants, who, as a group, exhibit risk for delays in both. Our findings highlight the importance of considering fine motor skill in children at risk for language impairments and may have implications for early identification of expressive language difficulties. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Perancangan dan Implementasi Pengaturan Kecepatan Motor Brushless DC Menggunakan Metode Model Predictive Control (MPC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fachrul Arifin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Saat ini, penelitian dan pengembangan mobil listrik (electric vehicle sudah menjadi pusat perhatian bagi kalangan industri dan civitas academica. Sudah banyak kendaraan listrik yang sudah diproduksi secara massal di seluruh dunia. Beberapa dari kendaraan listrik tersebut menggunakan motor BLDC sebagai penggerak utamanya. Pada Tugas Akhir kali ini, salah satu kemampuan yang akan diteliti dan dianalisa adalah respon kecepatan motor BLDC pada mobil listrik saat mobil diberi suatu beban. Ketika mendapat pembebanan, respon kecepatan dari motor BLDC akan turun sehingga performa dari motor BLDC tidak sesuai dengan setpoint yang diharapkan. Oleh karena itu, dibutuhkan suatu kontroler yang dapat mengatasi permasalahan diatas dan melakukan pengaturan kerja pada motor BLDC agar bekerja sesuai dengan kebutuhan. Kontroler ini diharapkan mampu untuk mengembalikan respon kecepatan pada motor BLDC kembali kepada setpoint ketika motor BLDC diberi pembebanan. Penulis menggunakan metode kontroler Model Predictive Control (MPC yang dapat memprediksi perilaku sistem pada masa depan yang bergantung pada informasi sistem saat ini dan model state-space dari sistem. Berdasarkan hasil implementasi, kontroler MPC dapat memberikan respon yang sesuai dengan tracking setpoint yang diberikan dengan rata-rata nilai steady-state error sebesar 9,8% untuk semua parameter pembebanan.

  3. Predictive coding of visual-auditory and motor-auditory events: An electrophysiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stekelenburg, Jeroen J; Vroomen, Jean

    2015-11-11

    The amplitude of auditory components of the event-related potential (ERP) is attenuated when sounds are self-generated compared to externally generated sounds. This effect has been ascribed to internal forward modals predicting the sensory consequences of one's own motor actions. Auditory potentials are also attenuated when a sound is accompanied by a video of anticipatory visual motion that reliably predicts the sound. Here, we investigated whether the neural underpinnings of prediction of upcoming auditory stimuli are similar for motor-auditory (MA) and visual-auditory (VA) events using a stimulus omission paradigm. In the MA condition, a finger tap triggered the sound of a handclap whereas in the VA condition the same sound was accompanied by a video showing the handclap. In both conditions, the auditory stimulus was omitted in either 50% or 12% of the trials. These auditory omissions induced early and mid-latency ERP components (oN1 and oN2, presumably reflecting prediction and prediction error), and subsequent higher-order error evaluation processes. The oN1 and oN2 of MA and VA were alike in amplitude, topography, and neural sources despite that the origin of the prediction stems from different brain areas (motor versus visual cortex). This suggests that MA and VA predictions activate a sensory template of the sound in auditory cortex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Developmental differences in childhood motor coordination predict adult alcohol dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzardo, Ann M; Penick, Elizabeth C; Knop, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Danish Longitudinal Study of Alcoholism has identified a number of early biological indicators that predicted alcohol dependence 30 years later. In light of recent evidence linking deficits of the cerebellum to certain neuropsychiatric disorders often comorbid with alcoholism, we...

  5. Early gross motor skills predict the subsequent development of language in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Rachael; Pickles, Andrew; Lord, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    Motor milestones such as the onset of walking are important developmental markers, not only for later motor skills but also for more widespread social-cognitive development. The aim of the current study was to test whether gross motor abilities, specifically the onset of walking, predicted the subsequent rate of language development in a large cohort of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We ran growth curve models for expressive and receptive language measured at 2, 3, 5 and 9 years in 209 autistic children. Measures of gross motor, visual reception and autism symptoms were collected at the 2 year visit. In Model 1, walking onset was included as a predictor of the slope of language development. Model 2 included a measure of non-verbal IQ and autism symptom severity as covariates. The final model, Model 3, additionally covaried for gross motor ability. In the first model, parent-reported age of walking onset significantly predicted the subsequent rate of language development although the relationship became non-significant when gross motor skill, non-verbal ability and autism severity scores were included (Models 2 & 3). Gross motor score, however, did remain a significant predictor of both expressive and receptive language development. Taken together, the model results provide some evidence that early motor abilities in young children with ASD can have longitudinal cross-domain influences, potentially contributing, in part, to the linguistic difficulties that characterise ASD. Autism Res 2016, 9: 993-1001. © 2015 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research. © 2015 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research.

  6. Rehabilitation after stroke: predictive power of Barthel Index versus a cognitive and a motor index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Bentzen, L; Garde, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive power of ratings of Barthel Index at Day 40 post stroke, compared with and/or combined with simultaneous ratings from a mobility scale (EG motor index) and a rather simple cognitive test scale (CT50). The parameter to be individually...

  7. How Kinesthetic Motor Imagery works: A predictive-processing theory of visualization in sports and motor expertise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Brass, M.

    2015-01-01

    Kinesthetic Motor Imagery (KMI) is an important technique to acquire and refine motor skills. KMI is widely used by professional athletes as an effective way to improve motor performance without overt motor output. Despite this obvious relevance, the functional mechanisms and neural circuits

  8. Current error vector based prediction control of the section winding permanent magnet linear synchronous motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong Junjie, E-mail: hongjjie@mail.sysu.edu.cn [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Li Liyi, E-mail: liliyi@hit.edu.cn [Dept. Electrical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150000 (China); Zong Zhijian; Liu Zhongtu [School of Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The structure of the permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (SW-PMLSM) is new. {yields} A new current control method CEVPC is employed in this motor. {yields} The sectional power supply method is different to the others and effective. {yields} The performance gets worse with voltage and current limitations. - Abstract: To include features such as greater thrust density, higher efficiency without reducing the thrust stability, this paper proposes a section winding permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (SW-PMLSM), whose iron core is continuous, whereas winding is divided. The discrete system model of the motor is derived. With the definition of the current error vector and selection of the value function, the theory of the current error vector based prediction control (CEVPC) for the motor currents is explained clearly. According to the winding section feature, the motion region of the mover is divided into five zones, in which the implementation of the current predictive control method is proposed. Finally, the experimental platform is constructed and experiments are carried out. The results show: the current control effect has good dynamic response, and the thrust on the mover remains constant basically.

  9. Nutrition factors predict earlier acquisition of motor and language milestones among young children in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannotti, Lora; Jean Louis Dulience, Sherlie; Wolff, Patricia; Cox, Katherine; Lesorogol, Carolyn; Kohl, Patricia

    2016-09-01

    To examine the nutrition-related factors associated with motor and language development among young children living in a poor urban area of Haiti. Children aged 6-11 months (n = 583) were enrolled and followed monthly for one year. World Health Organization motor developmental milestones and vowel and consonant counts were assessed. Longitudinal regression models were applied to assess the association of anthropometric, dietary intake, infectious disease morbidity and socio-economic and demographic factors on developmental outcomes. At baseline, 9.4% were stunted or length-for-age Z score < -2, and 30.2% were mild-to-moderately stunted or length-for-age Z score < -1. Stunting status was significantly associated with motor and phonetic language acquisition at each time point during infancy. Several nutrition factors significantly predicted earlier achievement of motor and language development outcomes in longitudinal models: child anthropometry; breastfeeding and complementary feeding frequencies; dietary diversity; egg and oil intake; and reduced infectious disease morbidities. Increases in the length-for-age Z score significantly predicted all motor and language outcomes and yielded the best fit models compared to other anthropometric indicators (p < 0.001). Child development interventions may be enhanced by incorporating nutrition strategies such as improved diet quality, breastfeeding promotion and diarrhoeal disease mitigation. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Motorized Activity on Legacy Seismic Lines: A Predictive Modeling Approach to Prioritize Restoration Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornseth, M L; Pigeon, K E; MacNearney, D; Larsen, T A; Stenhouse, G; Cranston, J; Finnegan, L

    2018-05-11

    Natural regeneration of seismic lines, cleared for hydrocarbon exploration, is slow and often hindered by vegetation damage, soil compaction, and motorized human activity. There is an extensive network of seismic lines in western Canada which is known to impact forest ecosystems, and seismic lines have been linked to declines in woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou). Seismic line restoration is costly, but necessary for caribou conservation to reduce cumulative disturbance. Understanding where motorized activity may be impeding regeneration of seismic lines will aid in prioritizing restoration. Our study area in west-central Alberta, encompassed five caribou ranges where restoration is required under federal species at risk recovery strategies, hence prioritizing seismic lines for restoration is of immediate conservation value. To understand patterns of motorized activity on seismic lines, we evaluated five a priori hypotheses using a predictive modeling framework and Geographic Information System variables across three landscapes in the foothills and northern boreal regions of Alberta. In the northern boreal landscape, motorized activity was most common in dry areas with a large industrial footprint. In highly disturbed areas of the foothills, motorized activity on seismic lines increased with low vegetation heights, relatively dry soils, and further from forest cutblocks, while in less disturbed areas of the foothills, motorized activity on seismic lines decreased proportional to seismic line density, slope steepness, and white-tailed deer abundance, and increased proportional with distance to roads. We generated predictive maps of high motorized activity, identifying 21,777 km of seismic lines where active restoration could expedite forest regeneration.

  11. Learning by observing: the effect of multiple sessions of action-observation training on the spontaneous movement tempo and motor resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagravinese, Giovanna; Bisio, Ambra; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco; Avanzino, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The present study was designed to explore the changes in motor performance and motor resonance after multiple sessions of action observation (AO) training. Subjects were exposed to the observation of a video showing finger tapping movements executed at 3Hz, a frequency higher than the spontaneous one (2Hz) for four consecutive days. Motor performance and motor resonance were tested before the AO training on the first day, and on the last day. Results showed that multiple sessions of AO training induced a shift of the speed of execution of finger tapping movements toward the observed one and a change in motor resonance. Before the 3Hz-AO training cortical excitability was highest during the observation of the 2Hz video. This motor resonance effect was lost after one single session of 3Hz-AO training whereas after multiple sessions of 3Hz-AO training cortical excitability was highest during the observation of the 3Hz video. Our study shows for the first time that multiple sessions of AO training are able not only to induce performance gains but also to change the way by which the observer's motor system recognizes a certain movement as belonging to the individual motor repertoire. These results may encourage the development of novel rehabilitative protocols based on multiple sessions of action observation aimed to regain a correct movement when its spontaneous speed is modified by pathologies or to modify the innate temporal properties of certain movements. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Using Brain Oscillations and Corticospinal Excitability to Understand and Predict Post-Stroke Motor Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Thibaut

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available What determines motor recovery in stroke is still unknown and finding markers that could predict and improve stroke recovery is a challenge. In this study, we aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms of motor function recovery after stroke using neurophysiological markers by means of cortical excitability (transcranial magnetic stimulation—TMS and brain oscillations (electroencephalography—EEG. In this cross-sectional study, 55 subjects with chronic stroke (62 ± 14 yo, 17 women, 32 ± 42 months post-stroke were recruited in two sites. We analyzed TMS measures (i.e., motor threshold—MT—of the affected and unaffected sides and EEG variables (i.e., power spectrum in different frequency bands and different brain regions of the affected and unaffected hemispheres and their correlation with motor impairment as measured by Fugl-Meyer. Multiple univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to identify the predictors of good motor function. A significant interaction effect of MT in the affected hemisphere and power in beta bandwidth over the central region for both affected and unaffected hemispheres was found. We identified that motor function positively correlates with beta rhythm over the central region of the unaffected hemisphere, while it negatively correlates with beta rhythm in the affected hemisphere. Our results suggest that cortical activity in the affected and unaffected hemisphere measured by EEG provides new insights on the association between high-frequency rhythms and motor impairment, highlighting the role of an excess of beta in the affected central cortical region in poor motor function in stroke recovery.

  13. Factors predicting the instant effect of motor function after subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xin-Ling; Luo, Xiao-Guang; Lv, Hong; Wang, Jun; Ren, Yan; He, Zhi-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), the predictive effect of levodopa responsiveness on surgical outcomes was confirmed by some studies, however there were different conclusions about that through long- and short-term follow-ups. We aimed to investigate the factors which influence the predictive value of levodopa responsiveness, and discover more predictive factors of surgical outcomes. Twenty-three PD patients underwent bilateral STN-DBS and completed our follow-up. Clinical evaluations were performed 1 week before and 3 months after surgery. STN-DBS significantly improved motor function of PD patients after 3 months; preoperative levodopa responsiveness and disease subtype predicted the effect of DBS on motor function; gender, disease duration and duration of motor fluctuations modified the predictive effect of levodopa responsiveness on motor improvement; the duration of motor fluctuations and severity of preoperative motor symptoms modified the predictive effect of disease subtype on motor improvement. The intensity of levodopa responsiveness served as a predictor of motor improvement more accurately in female patients, patients with shorter disease duration or shorter motor fluctuations; PD patients with dominant axial symptoms benefit less from STN-DBS compared to those with limb-predominant symptoms, especially in their later disease stage.

  14. Nonlinear rocket motor stability prediction: Limit amplitude, triggering, and mean pressure shifta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandro, Gary A.; Fischbach, Sean R.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    High-amplitude pressure oscillations in solid propellant rocket motor combustion chambers display nonlinear effects including: (1) limit cycle behavior in which the fluctuations may dwell for a considerable period of time near their peak amplitude, (2) elevated mean chamber pressure (DC shift), and (3) a triggering amplitude above which pulsing will cause an apparently stable system to transition to violent oscillations. Along with the obvious undesirable vibrations, these features constitute the most damaging impact of combustion instability on system reliability and structural integrity. The physical mechanisms behind these phenomena and their relationship to motor geometry and physical parameters must, therefore, be fully understood if instability is to be avoided in the design process, or if effective corrective measures must be devised during system development. Predictive algorithms now in use have limited ability to characterize the actual time evolution of the oscillations, and they do not supply the motor designer with information regarding peak amplitudes or the associated critical triggering amplitudes. A pivotal missing element is the ability to predict the mean pressure shift; clearly, the designer requires information regarding the maximum chamber pressure that might be experienced during motor operation. In this paper, a comprehensive nonlinear combustion instability model is described that supplies vital information. The central role played by steep-fronted waves is emphasized. The resulting algorithm provides both detailed physical models of nonlinear instability phenomena and the critically needed predictive capability. In particular, the origin of the DC shift is revealed.

  15. Rehabilitation after stroke: predictive power of Barthel Index versus a cognitive and a motor index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, A; Bentzen, L; Garde, B

    1995-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive power of ratings of Barthel Index at Day 40 post stroke, compared with and/or combined with simultaneous ratings from a mobility scale (EG motor index) and a rather simple cognitive test scale (CT50). The parameter to be individually...... predicted was the need for special living facilities and support at discharge from a rehabilitation hospital, as well as six months later; 53 stroke patients with age median 68 years were included in this prospective study. It was shown that a combination of Barthel Index and CT50 had a stronger predictive...

  16. Acoustic resonance of outer-rotor brushless dc motor for air-conditioner fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong-Joo; Chung, Shi-Uk; Hwang, Sang-Moon

    2008-04-01

    Generation of acoustic noise in electric motor is an interacting combination of mechanical and electromagnetic sources. In this paper, a brushless dc motor for air-conditioner fan is analyzed by finite element method to identify noise source, and the analysis results are verified by experiments, and sensitivity analysis is performed by design of experiments.

  17. Experimental Analysis and Full Prediction Model of a 5-DOF Motorized Spindle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiyu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The cost and power consumption of DC power amplifiers are much greater than that of AC power converters. Compared to a motorized spindle supported with DC magnetic bearings, a motorized spindle supported with AC magnetic bearings is inexpensive and more efficient. This paper studies a five-degrees-of-freedom (5-DOF motorized spindle supported with AC hybrid magnetic bearings (HMBs. Most models of suspension forces, except a “switching model”, are quite accurate, but only in a particular operating area and not in regional coverage. If a “switching model” is applied to a 5-DOF motorized spindle, the real-time performance of the control system can be significantly decreased due to the large amount of data processing for both displacement and current. In order to solve this defect, experiments based on the “switching model” are performed, and the resulting data are analyzed. Using the data analysis results, a “full prediction model” based on the operating state is proposed to improve real-time performance and precision. Finally, comparative, verification and stiffness tests are conducted to verify the improvement of the proposed model. Results of the tests indicate that the rotor has excellent characteristics, such as good real-time performance, superior anti-interference performance with load and the accuracy of the model in full zone. The satisfactory experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the “full prediction model” applied to the control system under different operating stages. Therefore, the results of the experimental analysis and the proposed full prediction model can provide a control system of a 5-DOF motorized spindle with the most suitable mathematical models of the suspension force.

  18. Variability in Cadence During Forced Cycling Predicts Motor Improvement in Individuals With Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgel, Angela L.; Abdar, Hassan Mohammadi; Alberts, Jay L.; Discenzo, Fred M.; Loparo, Kenneth A.

    2014-01-01

    Variability in severity and progression of Parkinson’s disease symptoms makes it challenging to design therapy interventions that provide maximal benefit. Previous studies showed that forced cycling, at greater pedaling rates, results in greater improvements in motor function than voluntary cycling. The precise mechanism for differences in function following exercise is unknown. We examined the complexity of biomechanical and physiological features of forced and voluntary cycling and correlated these features to improvements in motor function as measured by the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). Heart rate, cadence, and power were analyzed using entropy signal processing techniques. Pattern variability in heart rate and power were greater in the voluntary group when compared to forced group. In contrast, variability in cadence was higher during forced cycling. UPDRS Motor III scores predicted from the pattern variability data were highly correlated to measured scores in the forced group. This study shows how time series analysis methods of biomechanical and physiological parameters of exercise can be used to predict improvements in motor function. This knowledge will be important in the development of optimal exercise-based rehabilitation programs for Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23144045

  19. Motor-symptom laterality affects acquisition in Parkinson's disease: A cognitive and functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pei; Tan, Yu-Yan; Liu, Dong-Qiang; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Lapidow, Elizabeth; Wang, Ying; Zang, Yu-Feng; Gluck, Mark A; Chen, Sheng-Di

    2017-07-01

    Asymmetric onset of motor symptoms in PD can affect cognitive function. We examined whether motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning and explored its underlying neural mechanism by functional magnetic resonance imaging in PD patients. We recruited 63 early-stage medication-naïve PD patients (29 left-onset medication-naïve patients, 34 right-onset medication-naïve patients) and 38 matched normal controls. Subjects completed an acquired equivalence task (including acquisition, retention, and generalization) and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Learning accuracy and response time in each phase of the task were recorded for behavioral measures. Regional homogeneity was used to analyze resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data, with regional homogeneity lateralization to evaluate hemispheric functional asymmetry in the striatum. Left-onset patients made significantly more errors in acquisition (feedback-based associative learning) than right-onset patients and normal controls, whereas right-onset patients performed as well as normal controls. There was no significant difference among these three groups in the accuracy of either retention or generalization phase. The three groups did not show significant differences in response time. In the left-onset group, there was an inverse relationship between acquisition errors and regional homogeneity in the right dorsal rostral putamen. There were no significant regional homogeneity changes in either the left or the right dorsal rostral putamen in right-onset patients when compared to controls. Motor-symptom laterality could affect feedback-based associative learning in PD, with left-onset medication-naïve patients being selectively impaired. Dysfunction in the right dorsal rostral putamen may underlie the observed deficit in associative learning in patients with left-sided onset.© 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017

  20. Prediction of super-heavy N⁎ and Λ⁎ resonances with hidden beauty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jiajun; Zhao Lu; Zou, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    The meson-baryon coupled channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism is extended to the hidden beauty sector. A few narrow N ⁎ and Λ ⁎ resonances around 11 GeV are predicted as dynamically generated states from the interactions of heavy beauty mesons and baryons. Production cross sections of these predicted resonances in pp and ep collisions are estimated as a guide for the possible experimental search at relevant facilities.

  1. Motor dual-tasking deficits predict falls in Parkinson's disease: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzel, Sebastian; Maechtel, Mirjam; Hasmann, Sandra E; Hobert, Markus A; Heger, Tanja; Berg, Daniela; Maetzler, Walter

    2016-05-01

    Falls severely affect lives of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Cognitive impairment including dual-tasking deficits contribute to fall risk in PD. However, types of dual-tasking deficits preceding falls in PD are still unclear. Walking velocities during box-checking and subtracting serial 7s were assessed twice a year in 40 PD patients over 2.8 ± 1.0 years. Fourteen patients reported a fall within this period (4 excluded fallers already reported falls at baseline). Their dual-task costs (DTC; mean ± standard deviation) 4.2 ± 2.2 months before the first fall were compared with 22 patients never reporting falls. ROC analyses and logistic regressions accounting for DTC, UPDRS-III and disease duration were used for faller classification and prediction. Only walking/box-checking predicted fallers. Fallers showed higher DTC for walking while box-checking, p = 0.029, but not for box-checking while walking, p = 0.178 (combined motor DTC, p = 0.022), than non-fallers. Combined motor DTC classified fallers and non-fallers (area under curve: 0.75; 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.60-0.91) with 71.4% sensitivity (95%CI: 41.9%-91.6%) and 77.3% specificity (54.6%-92.2%), and significantly predicted future fallers (p = 0.023). Here, 20.4%-points higher combined motor DTC (i.e. the mean difference between fallers and non-fallers) was associated with a 2.6 (1.1-6.0) times higher odds to be a future faller. Motor dual-tasking is a potentially valuable predictor of falls in PD, suggesting that avoiding dual task situations as well as specific motor dual-task training might help to prevent falls in PD. These findings and their therapeutic relevance need to be further validated in PD patients without fall history, in early PD stages, and with various motor-motor dual-task challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Predicting vibration-induced displacement for a resonant friction slider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fidlin, A.; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model is set up to quantify vibration-induced motions of a slider, sandwiched between friction layers with different coefficients of friction, and equipped with an imbedded resonator that oscillates at high frequency and small amplitude. This model is highly nonlinear, involving non...

  3. Parallel processing streams for motor output and sensory prediction during action preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Bauer, Markus; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Haggard, Patrick; Dolan, Raymond J

    2015-03-15

    Sensory consequences of one's own actions are perceived as less intense than identical, externally generated stimuli. This is generally taken as evidence for sensory prediction of action consequences. Accordingly, recent theoretical models explain this attenuation by an anticipatory modulation of sensory processing prior to stimulus onset (Roussel et al. 2013) or even action execution (Brown et al. 2013). Experimentally, prestimulus changes that occur in anticipation of self-generated sensations are difficult to disentangle from more general effects of stimulus expectation, attention and task load (performing an action). Here, we show that an established manipulation of subjective agency over a stimulus leads to a predictive modulation in sensory cortex that is independent of these factors. We recorded magnetoencephalography while subjects performed a simple action with either hand and judged the loudness of a tone caused by the action. Effector selection was manipulated by subliminal motor priming. Compatible priming is known to enhance a subjective experience of agency over a consequent stimulus (Chambon and Haggard 2012). In line with this effect on subjective agency, we found stronger sensory attenuation when the action that caused the tone was compatibly primed. This perceptual effect was reflected in a transient phase-locked signal in auditory cortex before stimulus onset and motor execution. Interestingly, this sensory signal emerged at a time when the hemispheric lateralization of motor signals in M1 indicated ongoing effector selection. Our findings confirm theoretical predictions of a sensory modulation prior to self-generated sensations and support the idea that a sensory prediction is generated in parallel to motor output (Walsh and Haggard 2010), before an efference copy becomes available. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  4. Mathematical Modelling and Predictive Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Drives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Belda, Květoslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2013), s. 114-120 ISSN 1805-3386 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0437 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Permanent magnet synchronous motor * mathematical modelling * discrete predictive control * multistep explicit control law * square-root optimization Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2014/AS/belda-0422285.pdf

  5. Providing and optimizing functional MR (Magnetic Resonance) of motor cortex of human brain by MRI ( Magnetic Resonance Imaging) facilities of Imam Khomeinie Hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khosravie, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    Display of human brain cortical activity is accomplished using various techniques, by them different spatial and temporal resolution may be obtained. F MRI technique with proper spatial and temporal resolution due to its noninvasivity is one of the promising techniques for detection of brain activities. This can be used as an important tool by neurologists, since a great development has been achieved for display different brain function. This thesis report the results of simulation effects of thumb motor cortex of normal volunteer by using conventional standard 1.5 T imager and optimized gradient echo techniques. Activating sensory and motor stimulations can be led to, respective cortical area of that stimulation by which oxygenated blood flow is increased in that area (Bold contrast). By designing of a T 2* sensitized gradient echo protocol, thumb's sensory and motor cortex activation is evaluated. A protocol known as F AST i n picker system with the following specifications was used for F MRI: Band Width:24 Hz/Pixel, Tr=101 m Sec , T E=49 m Sec , Flip Angle= 10 deg., N E X=1 ,Slice thickness=5-7 mm F O V=250 mm ,Matrix=128*128 and total scan time= 14 Sec. Stimulation of the motor cortex was performed by periodic movement of dominant thumb in up-down and right-left direction within a Ls hape trajectory of plastic sheet with a frequency about 2 Hz. Then, acquired images in rest and stimulation period were evaluated by S P M 97, S P M 99 b software. During the stimulation, an observable increased signal (%2-%5)in respective sensory-motor cortex was obtained after correcting for partial volume effects, optimizing S/N,and incorporating small vowels. The 2 D F A S T functional image obtained by this method, showed an anatomical association of the increased signal with gray matter of sensory-motor cortex(in T 1 weighted image). The resultant data showed the feasibility of functional magnetic resonance imaging using optimized gradient echo sequences on a standard 1.5 T

  6. Attentional and motor impulsivity interactively predict 'food addiction' in obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meule, Adrian; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multifaceted construct and constitutes a common risk factor for a range of behaviors associated with poor self-control (e.g., substance use or binge eating). The short form of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-15) measures impulsive behaviors related to attentional (inability to focus attention or concentrate), motor (acting without thinking), and non-planning (lack of future orientation or forethought) impulsivity. Eating-related measures appear to be particularly related to attentional and motor impulsivity and recent findings suggest that interactive effects between these two facets may play a role in eating- and weight-regulation. One-hundred thirty-three obese individuals presenting for bariatric surgery (77.4% female) completed the BIS-15 and the Yale Food Addiction Scale (YFAS) 2.0, which measures addiction-like eating based on the eleven symptoms of substance use disorder outlined in the fifth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Sixty-three participants (47.4%) were classified as being 'food addicted'. Scores on attentional and motor impulsivity interactively predicted 'food addiction' status: higher attentional impulsivity was associated with a higher likelihood of receiving a YFAS 2.0 diagnosis only at high (+1 SD), but not at low (-1 SD) levels of motor impulsivity. Results support previous findings showing that non-planning impulsivity does not appear to play a role in eating-related self-regulation. Furthermore, this is the first study that shows interactive effects between different impulsivity facets when predicting 'food addiction' in obese individuals. Self-regulatory failure in eating-regulation (e.g., addiction-like overeating) may particularly emerge when both attentional and motor impulsivity levels are elevated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Theoretical Predictions of Giant Resonances in 94Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Matthew; Bonasera, Giacomo; Shlomo, Shalom

    2016-09-01

    We perform Hartree-Fock based Random Phase Approximation using thirty-three common Skyrme interactions found in the literature for 94Mo. We calculate the strength functions and the Centroid Energies of the Isoscalar Giant Resonances for all multipolarities L0, L1, L2, L3. We compare the calculated Centroid Energies with the experimental value; we also study the Centroid Energy and any correlation it may have with the Nuclear Matter properties of each interaction.

  8. Temporal predictive mechanisms modulate motor reaction time during initiation and inhibition of speech and hand movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Karim; Behroozmand, Roozbeh

    2017-08-01

    Skilled movement is mediated by motor commands executed with extremely fine temporal precision. The question of how the brain incorporates temporal information to perform motor actions has remained unanswered. This study investigated the effect of stimulus temporal predictability on response timing of speech and hand movement. Subjects performed a randomized vowel vocalization or button press task in two counterbalanced blocks in response to temporally-predictable and unpredictable visual cues. Results indicated that speech and hand reaction time was decreased for predictable compared with unpredictable stimuli. This finding suggests that a temporal predictive code is established to capture temporal dynamics of sensory cues in order to produce faster movements in responses to predictable stimuli. In addition, results revealed a main effect of modality, indicating faster hand movement compared with speech. We suggest that this effect is accounted for by the inherent complexity of speech production compared with hand movement. Lastly, we found that movement inhibition was faster than initiation for both hand and speech, suggesting that movement initiation requires a longer processing time to coordinate activities across multiple regions in the brain. These findings provide new insights into the mechanisms of temporal information processing during initiation and inhibition of speech and hand movement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. To transfer or not to transfer? Kinematics and laterality quotient predict interlimb transfer of motor learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefumat, Hannah Z; Vercher, Jean-Louis; Miall, R Chris; Cole, Jonathan; Buloup, Frank; Bringoux, Lionel; Bourdin, Christophe; Sarlegna, Fabrice R

    2015-11-01

    Humans can remarkably adapt their motor behavior to novel environmental conditions, yet it remains unclear which factors enable us to transfer what we have learned with one limb to the other. Here we tested the hypothesis that interlimb transfer of sensorimotor adaptation is determined by environmental conditions but also by individual characteristics. We specifically examined the adaptation of unconstrained reaching movements to a novel Coriolis, velocity-dependent force field. Right-handed subjects sat at the center of a rotating platform and performed forward reaching movements with the upper limb toward flashed visual targets in prerotation, per-rotation (i.e., adaptation), and postrotation tests. Here only the dominant arm was used during adaptation and interlimb transfer was assessed by comparing performance of the nondominant arm before and after dominant-arm adaptation. Vision and no-vision conditions did not significantly influence interlimb transfer of trajectory adaptation, which on average was significant but limited. We uncovered a substantial heterogeneity of interlimb transfer across subjects and found that interlimb transfer can be qualitatively and quantitatively predicted for each healthy young individual. A classifier showed that in our study, interlimb transfer could be predicted based on the subject's task performance, most notably motor variability during learning, and his or her laterality quotient. Positive correlations suggested that variability of motor performance and lateralization of arm movement control facilitate interlimb transfer. We further show that these individual characteristics can predict the presence and the magnitude of interlimb transfer of left-handers. Overall, this study suggests that individual characteristics shape the way the nervous system can generalize motor learning. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Predictability of motor outcome according to the time of diffusion tensor imaging in patients with cerebral infarct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun [Yeungnam College of Science and Technology, Department of Physical Therapy, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Jeoung, Yong Jae [Yeungnam University, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun [Yeungnam University, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Son, Su Min; Jang, Sung Ho [Yeungnam University 317-1, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Saeyoon [Yeungnam University, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulseung [Medical Devices Clinical Trial Center of Yeungnam University Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Predictability of diffusion tensor imaging tractography (DTT) for motor outcome can differ according to the time of DTT. We attempted to compare the predictability for motor outcome according to the time of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by analyzing the corticospinal tract (CST) integrity on DTT in patients with corona radiata (CR) infarct. Seventy-one consecutive hemiparetic patients with CR infarct were recruited. Motor function of the affected extremities was measured twice: at onset and at 6 months from onset. According to the time of DTI, patients were classified into two groups: the early scanning group (ES group) within 14 days since stroke onset; and the late scanning group (LS group) 15-28 days. Motor outcome was compared with the CST integrity on DTT. Motor prognosis was predicted from scan time of DTI and the CST integrity on DTT in the logistic regression model. According to separate regression analysis, the CST integrity of the late group was found to predict MI score (OR = 14.000, 95% CI = 3.194-61.362, p < 0.05), whereas the CST integrity of the early group was not found to predict MI score. In terms of both positive and negative predictabilities, we found that predictability of DTT for motor outcome was better in patients who were scanned later (15-28 days after onset) than in patients who were scanned earlier (1-14 days after onset). (orig.)

  11. Predictability of motor outcome according to the time of diffusion tensor imaging in patients with cerebral infarct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jeoung, Yong Jae; Lee, Jun; Son, Su Min; Jang, Sung Ho; Kim, Saeyoon; Kim, Chulseung

    2012-01-01

    Predictability of diffusion tensor imaging tractography (DTT) for motor outcome can differ according to the time of DTT. We attempted to compare the predictability for motor outcome according to the time of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) by analyzing the corticospinal tract (CST) integrity on DTT in patients with corona radiata (CR) infarct. Seventy-one consecutive hemiparetic patients with CR infarct were recruited. Motor function of the affected extremities was measured twice: at onset and at 6 months from onset. According to the time of DTI, patients were classified into two groups: the early scanning group (ES group) within 14 days since stroke onset; and the late scanning group (LS group) 15-28 days. Motor outcome was compared with the CST integrity on DTT. Motor prognosis was predicted from scan time of DTI and the CST integrity on DTT in the logistic regression model. According to separate regression analysis, the CST integrity of the late group was found to predict MI score (OR = 14.000, 95% CI = 3.194-61.362, p < 0.05), whereas the CST integrity of the early group was not found to predict MI score. In terms of both positive and negative predictabilities, we found that predictability of DTT for motor outcome was better in patients who were scanned later (15-28 days after onset) than in patients who were scanned earlier (1-14 days after onset). (orig.)

  12. Brain magnetic resonance imaging and motor and intellectual functioning in 86 patients born at term with spastic diplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Yurika; Onuma, Akira; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Sato-Shirai, Ikuko; Tanaka, Soichiro; Kobayashi, Satoru; Wakusawa, Keisuke; Inui, Takehiko; Kure, Shigeo; Haginoya, Kazuhiro

    2013-02-01

    To investigate the association between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns and motor function, epileptic episodes, and IQ or developmental quotient in patients born at term with spastic diplegia. Eighty-six patients born at term with cerebral palsy (CP) and spastic diplegia (54 males, 32 females; median age 20 y, range 7-42 y) among 829 patients with CP underwent brain MRI between 1990 and 2008. The MRI and clinical findings were analysed retrospectively. Intellectual disability was classified according to the Enjoji developmental test or the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (3rd edition). The median ages at diagnosis of CP, assignment of Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) level, cognitive assessment, and MRI were 2 years (range 5 mo-8 y), 6 years (2 y 8 mo-19 y), 6 years (1 y 4 mo-19 y), and 7 years (10 mo-30 y) respectively. MRI included normal findings (41.9%), periventricular leukomalacia, hypomyelination, and porencephaly/periventricular venous infarction. The frequency of patients in GMFCS levels III to V and intellectual disability did not differ between those with normal and abnormal MRI findings. Patients with normal MRI findings had significantly fewer epileptic episodes than those with abnormal ones (p=0.001). Varied MRI findings, as well as the presence of severe motor dysfunction and intellectual disability (despite normal MRI), suggest that patients born at term with spastic diplegia had heterogeneous and unidentified pathophysiology. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  13. In-operation inspection technology development-4 ''development of degradation prediction technology for motor-operated valves''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuo, Takeshima; Yuichi, Higashikawa; Masahiro, Koike; Kenji, Matsumoto; Eiji, O'shima

    2001-01-01

    A method for degradation predicting technology has been proposed for motor operated valves in nuclear power plants which is based on the concept of condition monitoring for maintenance. This method (degradation prediction technology) eliminates the unnecessary overhaul of valves and realizes high reliability and economy. The degradation mechanism was clarified by long time heating experiments of gasket and gland packing and the wear test for them and stem nut to research valve parts degradation by stress (pressure, temperature, etc) during plant operation. Effective electric power measurements for motor operated valves were confirmed to be useful discovering valve part failures. The motor operated valve degradation prediction system was developed on the basis of the experiment results and mechanism. The system is able to predict the degradation of valve parts (gasket/gland packing, stem, stem nut, etc) utilizing plant data (pressure, temperature, etc) and effective power of the motor. The life of valve parts can be estimated from the experimental results. (authors)

  14. Temporal prediction abilities are mediated by motor effector and rhythmic expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Fiona C; Harris, Jennifer; Schutz, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Motor synchronization is a critical part of musical performance and listening. Recently, motor control research has described how movements that contain more available degrees of freedom are more accurately timed. Previously, we demonstrated that stick tapping improves perception in a timing detection task, where percussionists greatly outperformed non-percussionists only when tapping along. Since most synchronization studies implement finger tapping to examine simple motor synchronization, here we completed a similar task where percussionists and non-percussionists synchronized using finger tapping; movement with fewer degrees of freedom than stick tapping. Percussionists and non-percussionists listened to an isochronous beat sequence and identified the timing of a probe tone. On half of the trials, they tapped along with their index finger, and on the other half of the trials, they listened without moving prior to making timing judgments. We found that both groups benefited from tapping overall. Interestingly, percussionists performed only marginally better than did non-percussionists when finger tapping and no different when listening alone, differing from past studies reporting highly superior timing abilities in percussionists. Additionally, we found that percussionist finger tapping was less variable and less asynchronous than was non-percussionist tapping. Moreover, in both groups finger tapping was more variable and more asynchronous than stick tapping in our previous study. This study demonstrates that the motor effector implemented in tapping studies affects not only synchronization abilities, but also subsequent prediction abilities. We discuss these findings in light of effector-specific training and degrees of freedom in motor timing, both of which impact timing abilities to different extents.

  15. The useful field of view assessment predicts simulated commercial motor vehicle driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Benjamin; Heaton, Karen; Vance, David E; Stavrinos, Despina

    2016-10-02

    The Useful Field of View (UFOV) assessment, a measure of visual speed of processing, has been shown to be a predictive measure of motor vehicle collision (MVC) involvement in an older adult population, but it remains unknown whether UFOV predicts commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driving safety during secondary task engagement. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the UFOV assessment predicts simulated MVCs in long-haul CMV drivers. Fifty licensed CMV drivers (Mage = 39.80, SD = 8.38, 98% male, 56% Caucasian) were administered the 3-subtest version of the UFOV assessment, where lower scores measured in milliseconds indicated better performance. CMV drivers completed 4 simulated drives, each spanning approximately a 22.50-mile distance. Four secondary tasks were presented to participants in a counterbalanced order during the drives: (a) no secondary task, (b) cell phone conversation, (c) text messaging interaction, and (d) e-mailing interaction with an on-board dispatch device. The selective attention subtest significantly predicted simulated MVCs regardless of secondary task. Each 20 ms slower on subtest 3 was associated with a 25% increase in the risk of an MVC in the simulated drive. The e-mail interaction secondary task significantly predicted simulated MVCs with a 4.14 times greater risk of an MVC compared to the no secondary task condition. Subtest 3, a measure of visual speed of processing, significantly predicted MVCs in the email interaction task. Each 20 ms slower on subtest 3 was associated with a 25% increase in the risk of an MVC during the email interaction task. The UFOV subtest 3 may be a promising measure to identify CMV drivers who may be at risk for MVCs or in need of cognitive training aimed at improving speed of processing. Subtest 3 may also identify CMV drivers who are particularly at risk when engaged in secondary tasks while driving.

  16. Predicting Risk of Motor Vehicle Collisions in Patients with Glaucoma: A Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracitelli, Carolina P B; Tatham, Andrew J; Boer, Erwin R; Abe, Ricardo Y; Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Rosen, Peter N; Medeiros, Felipe A

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of longitudinal Useful Field of View (UFOV) and simulated driving measurements to predict future occurrence of motor vehicle collision (MVC) in drivers with glaucoma. Prospective observational cohort study. 117 drivers with glaucoma followed for an average of 2.1 ± 0.5 years. All subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP), UFOV, driving simulator, and cognitive assessment obtained at baseline and every 6 months during follow-up. The driving simulator evaluated reaction times to high and low contrast peripheral divided attention stimuli presented while negotiating a winding country road, with central driving task performance assessed as "curve coherence". Drivers with MVC during follow-up were identified from Department of Motor Vehicle records. Survival models were used to evaluate the ability of driving simulator and UFOV to predict MVC over time, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Mean age at baseline was 64.5 ± 12.6 years. 11 of 117 (9.4%) drivers had a MVC during follow-up. In the multivariable models, low contrast reaction time was significantly predictive of MVC, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.19 per 1 SD slower reaction time (95% CI, 1.30 to 3.69; P = 0.003). UFOV divided attention was also significantly predictive of MVC with a HR of 1.98 per 1 SD worse (95% CI, 1.10 to 3.57; P = 0.022). Global SAP visual field indices in the better or worse eye were not predictive of MVC. The longitudinal model including driving simulator performance was a better predictor of MVC compared to UFOV (R2 = 0.41 vs R2 = 0.18). Longitudinal divided attention metrics on the UFOV test and during simulated driving were significantly predictive of risk of MVC in glaucoma patients. These findings may help improve the understanding of factors associated with driving impairment related to glaucoma.

  17. Predicting Risk of Motor Vehicle Collisions in Patients with Glaucoma: A Longitudinal Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina P B Gracitelli

    Full Text Available To evaluate the ability of longitudinal Useful Field of View (UFOV and simulated driving measurements to predict future occurrence of motor vehicle collision (MVC in drivers with glaucoma.Prospective observational cohort study.117 drivers with glaucoma followed for an average of 2.1 ± 0.5 years.All subjects had standard automated perimetry (SAP, UFOV, driving simulator, and cognitive assessment obtained at baseline and every 6 months during follow-up. The driving simulator evaluated reaction times to high and low contrast peripheral divided attention stimuli presented while negotiating a winding country road, with central driving task performance assessed as "curve coherence". Drivers with MVC during follow-up were identified from Department of Motor Vehicle records.Survival models were used to evaluate the ability of driving simulator and UFOV to predict MVC over time, adjusting for potential confounding factors.Mean age at baseline was 64.5 ± 12.6 years. 11 of 117 (9.4% drivers had a MVC during follow-up. In the multivariable models, low contrast reaction time was significantly predictive of MVC, with a hazard ratio (HR of 2.19 per 1 SD slower reaction time (95% CI, 1.30 to 3.69; P = 0.003. UFOV divided attention was also significantly predictive of MVC with a HR of 1.98 per 1 SD worse (95% CI, 1.10 to 3.57; P = 0.022. Global SAP visual field indices in the better or worse eye were not predictive of MVC. The longitudinal model including driving simulator performance was a better predictor of MVC compared to UFOV (R2 = 0.41 vs R2 = 0.18.Longitudinal divided attention metrics on the UFOV test and during simulated driving were significantly predictive of risk of MVC in glaucoma patients. These findings may help improve the understanding of factors associated with driving impairment related to glaucoma.

  18. Predictive validity of the Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke Patients (SMES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyller, T B; Sødring, K M; Sveen, U; Ljunggren, A E; Bautz-Holter, E

    1996-12-01

    The Sødring Motor Evaluation of Stroke Patients (SMES) has been developed as an instrument for the evaluation by physiotherapists of motor function and activities in stroke patients. The predictive validity of the instrument was studied in a consecutive sample of 93 acute stroke patients, assessed in the acute phase and after one year. The outcome measures were: survival, residence at home or in institution, the Barthel ADL index (dichotomized at 19/20), and the Frenchay Activities Index (FAI) (dichotomized at 9/10). The SMES, scored in the acute phase, demonstrated a marginally significant predictive power regarding survival, but was a highly significant predictor regarding the other outcomes. The adjusted odds ratio for a good versus a poor outcome for patients in the upper versus the lower tertile of the SMES arm subscore was 5.4 (95% confidence interval 0.9-59) for survival, 11.5 (2.1-88) for living at home, 86.3 (11-infinity) for a high Barthel score, and 31.4 (5.2-288) for a high FAI score. We conclude that SMES has high predictive validity.

  19. Temperature prediction in high speed bone grinding using motor PWM signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Bruce L; Zhang, Lihui; Wang, Anthony C; Sullivan, Stephen; Wang, Guangjun; Shih, Albert J

    2013-10-01

    This research explores the feasibility of using motor electrical feedback to estimate temperature rise during a surgical bone grinding procedure. High-speed bone grinding is often used during skull base neurosurgery to remove cranial bone and approach skull base tumors through the nasal corridor. Grinding-induced heat could propagate and potentially injure surrounding nerves and arteries, and therefore, predicting the temperature in the grinding region would benefit neurosurgeons during the operation. High-speed electric motors are controlled by pulse-width-modulation (PWM) to alter the current input and thus maintain the rotational speed. Assuming full mechanical to thermal power conversion in the grinding process, PWM can be used as feedback for heat generation and temperature prediction. In this study, the conversion model was established from experiments under a variety of grinding conditions and an inverse heat transfer method to determine heat flux. Given a constant rotational speed, the heat conversion was represented by a linear function, and could predict temperature from the experimental data with less than 20% errors. Such results support the advance of this technology for practical application. Copyright © 2013 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Predicting Motor Skills from Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire Scores, Language Ability, and Other Features of New Zealand Children Entering Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargisson, Rebecca J.; Powell, Cheniel; Stanley, Peter; de Candole, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    The motor and language skills, emotional and behavioural problems of 245 children were measured at school entry. Fine motor scores were significantly predicted by hyperactivity, phonetic awareness, prosocial behaviour, and the presence of medical problems. Gross motor scores were significantly predicted by the presence of medical problems. The…

  1. Dynamic Shaping of the Defensive Peripersonal Space through Predictive Motor Mechanisms: When the "Near" Becomes "Far".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisio, Ambra; Garbarini, Francesca; Biggio, Monica; Fossataro, Carlotta; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco

    2017-03-01

    The hand blink reflex is a subcortical defensive response, known to dramatically increase when the stimulated hand is statically positioned inside the defensive peripersonal space (DPPS) of the face. Here, we tested in a group of healthy human subjects the hand blink reflex in dynamic conditions, investigating whether the direction of the hand movements (up-to/down-from the face) could modulate it. We found that, on equal hand position, the response enhancement was present only when the hand approached to (and not receded from) the DPPS of the face. This means that, when the hand is close to the face but the subject is planning to move the hand down, the predictive motor system can anticipate the consequence of the movement: the "near" becomes "far." We found similar results both in passive movement condition, when only afferent (visual and proprioceptive) information can be used to estimate the final state of the system, and in motor imagery task, when only efferent (intentional) information is available to predict the consequences of the movement. All these findings provide evidence that the DPPS is dynamically shaped by predictive mechanisms run by the motor system and based on the integration of feedforward and sensory feedback signals. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The defensive peripersonal space (DPPS) has a crucial role for survival, and its modulation is fundamental when we interact with the environment, as when we move our arms. Here, we focused on a defensive response, the hand blink reflex, known to increase when a static hand is stimulated inside the DPPS of the face. We tested the hand blink reflex in dynamic conditions (voluntary, passive, and imagined movements) and we found that, on equal hand position, the response enhancement was present only when the hand approached to (and not receded from) the DPPS of the face. This suggests that, through the integration of efferent and afferent signals, the safety boundary around the body is continuously shaped by

  2. Analytical prediction of the electromagnetic torques in single-phase and two-phase ac motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, M.

    2004-07-01

    The single-phase and two-phase versions of AC motors can be modelled by means of the two-axis (d-q) theory with sufficient accuracy when the equivalent circuit parameters are correctly estimated. This work attempts to present a unified approach to the analytical prediction of the electromagnetic torque of these machines. Classical d-q axes formulation requires that the reference frame should be fixed on the frame where the asymmetries arise, i.e. the stator and rotor. The asynchronous torques that characterize the induction motors are modelled in a stationary reference frame, where the d-q axes coincide with the physical magnetic axes of the stator windings. For the permanent magnet motors, that may exhibit asymmetries on both stator and rotor, the proposed solution includes: a series of frame transformations, followed by symmetrical components decomposition. As in single-phase and two-phase systems the homopolar component is zero; each symmetrical component - negative and positive - is further analysed using d-q axes theory. The superposition principle is employed to consider the magnets and rotor cage effects. The developed models account for the most important asymmetries of the motor configuration. These are, from the stator point of view, different distribution, conductors' dimensions and number of effective turns, non-orthogonal magnetic axes windings and from the rotor point of view, asymmetrical rotor cage, variable reluctance, and permanent magnets effect. The time and space harmonics effect is ignored. Test data are compared with the computed data in order to observe how the simplifying assumptions affect the level of accuracy. The analytical prediction methods make possible torque computation according to the nature of the torque being computed, namely, induction, reluctance and excitation (permanent magnet). The results are available for quasi steady-state, steady-state (rated or synchronous speed) and dynamic analyses. All the developed

  3. Fine Motor Skills Predict Maths Ability Better than They Predict Reading Ability in the Early Primary School Years

    OpenAIRE

    Pitchford, Nicola J.; Papini, Chiara; Outhwaite, Laura A.; Gulliford, Anthea

    2016-01-01

    Fine motor skills have long been recognised as an important foundation for development in other domains. However, more precise insights into the role of fine motor skills, and their relationships to other skills in mediating early educational achievements, are needed to support the development of optimal educational interventions. We explored concurrent relationships between two components of fine motor skills, Fine Motor Precision and Fine Motor Integration, and early reading and maths devel...

  4. Corticospinal integrity and motor impairment predict outcomes after excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Jou; Wang, Chih-Pin; Tsai, Po-Yi; Chan, Rai-Chi; Lin, Shan-Hui; Lin, Fu-Gong; Hsieh, Chin-Yi

    2015-01-01

    To identify the effective predictors for therapeutic outcomes based on intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS). A sham-controlled, double-blind parallel study design. A tertiary hospital. People with stroke (N=72) who presented with unilateral hemiplegia. Ten consecutive sessions of real or sham iTBS were implemented with the aim of enhancing hand function. Patients were categorized into 4 groups according to the presence (MEP+) or absence (MEP-) of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) and grip strength according to the Medical Research Council (MRC) scale. Cortical excitability, Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT), finger-tapping task (FT), and simple reaction time were performed before and after the sessions. MEPs and the MRC scale were predictive of iTBS therapeutic outcomes. Group A (MEP+, MRC>1) exhibited the greatest WMFT change (7.6±2.3, P1; 5.2±2.2 score change) and group C (MEP-, MRC=0; 2.3±1.5 score change). These improvements were correlated significantly with baseline motor function and ipsilesional maximum MEP amplitude. The effectiveness of iTBS modulation for poststroke motor enhancement depends on baseline hand grip strength and the presence of MEPs. Our findings indicate that establishing neurostimulation strategies based on the proposed electrophysiological and clinical criteria can allow iTBS to be executed with substantial precision. Effective neuromodulatory strategies can be formulated by using electrophysiological features and clinical presentation information as guidelines. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prediction of windings temperature rise in induction motors supplied with distorted voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnacinski, P. [Gdynia Maritime University, Department of Ship Electrical Power Engineering, Morska Street 83, 81-225 Gdynia (Poland)

    2008-04-15

    One of the features of ship power systems is a different level and intensity of disturbances appearing during routine operation - the rms voltage value and frequency deviation, voltage unbalance and waveform voltage distortion. As a result, marine induction machines are exposed to overheating due to the lowered voltage quality. This paper is devoted to windings temperature rise prediction in marine induction cage machines supplied with distorted voltage, which means real voltage conditions. The proposed method of prediction does not require detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of a machine. Although the method was developed for marine induction motors, it is applicable for industry machines supplied with distorted voltage. It can also be generalized and used for estimation of the steady state windings temperature rise of any electrical machinery in various work conditions. (author)

  6. Prediction of windings temperature rise in induction motors supplied with distorted voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnacinski, P.

    2008-01-01

    One of the features of ship power systems is a different level and intensity of disturbances appearing during routine operation - the rms voltage value and frequency deviation, voltage unbalance and waveform voltage distortion. As a result, marine induction machines are exposed to overheating due to the lowered voltage quality. This paper is devoted to windings temperature rise prediction in marine induction cage machines supplied with distorted voltage, which means real voltage conditions. The proposed method of prediction does not require detailed knowledge of the thermal properties of a machine. Although the method was developed for marine induction motors, it is applicable for industry machines supplied with distorted voltage. It can also be generalized and used for estimation of the steady state windings temperature rise of any electrical machinery in various work conditions

  7. Reduced mu suppression and altered motor resonance in euthymic bipolar disorder: Evidence for a dysfunctional mirror system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sophie C; Enticott, Peter G; Hoy, Kate E; Thomson, Richard H; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Social cognitive difficulties are common in the acute phase of bipolar disorder and, to a lesser extent, during the euthymic stage, and imaging studies of social cognition in euthymic bipolar disorder have implicated mirror system brain regions. This study aimed to use a novel multimodal approach (i.e., including both transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and electroencephalogram (EEG)) to investigate mirror systems in bipolar disorder. Fifteen individuals with euthymic bipolar disorder and 16 healthy controls participated in this study. Single-pulse TMS was applied to the optimal site in the primary motor cortex (M1), which stimulates the muscle of interest during the observation of hand movements (goal-directed or interacting) designed to elicit mirror system activity. Single EEG electrodes (C3, CZ, C4) recorded mu rhythm modulation concurrently. Results revealed that the patient group showed significantly less mu suppression compared to healthy controls. Surprisingly, motor resonance was not significantly different overall between groups; however, bipolar disorder participants showed a pattern of reduced reactivity on some conditions. Although preliminary, this study indicates a potential mirror system deficit in euthymic bipolar disorder, which may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disorder.

  8. Fast monitoring of motor exhaust components by resonant multi-photon ionisation and time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Jochen; Frey, Rüdiger; Nagel, Holger

    1995-03-01

    A new analytical procedure is provided by the combination of two types of spectroscopy. Resonant ionization of selected compounds by multiphoton ionization is based on results of absorption spectroscopy for the compound molecules of interest and time-of-flight mass spectrometry serves for the unambigious detection of these compounds. An interesting application of this method is the fast exhaust gas analysis. In the development of future combustion engines, the management of dynamic motor processes becomes predominant because by more than 90 % of all the dangerous exhaust pollutions are produced in instationary motor phases such as fast speed or load changes. The investigation of dynamic processes however, requires fast analytical procedures with millisecond time resolution together with the capability to measure individual components in a very complex gas mixture The objectives for a development project of such an instrument were set by the Research Association for Combustion Engines (Forschungsvereinigung Verbrennungskraftmaschinen, FVV, Germany): Up to ten substances should be monitored synchroneously with a time resolution of about 10 milliseconds, with concentration limits of 1 part per million and with a precision better than 10 % relative standard deviation. Such a laser mass spectrometer for fast multi-component automotive exhaust analyses has been developed in a joint research project by Bruker-Franzen Analytik GmbH, Dornier GmbH and the Technical University of Munich. The system has been applied at a motor test facility to investigate the emissions of the aromatic hydrocarbons benzene, toluene and xylene, of nitric oxide and acetaldehyde in stationary and dynamic engine operation. These measurements demonstrate that strong emission of these pollutants takes place at instationary engine operation and in particular that these compounds are emitted at different times, giving new information about the processes in the combustion chamber and in the exhaust pipe.

  9. Visual but not motor processes predict simple visuomotor reaction time of badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hülsdünker, Thorben; Strüder, Heiko K; Mierau, Andreas

    2018-03-01

    The athlete's brain exhibits significant functional adaptations that facilitate visuomotor reaction performance. However, it is currently unclear if the same neurophysiological processes that differentiate athletes from non-athletes also determine performance within a homogeneous group of athletes. This information can provide valuable help for athletes and coaches aiming to optimize existing training regimes. Therefore, this study aimed to identify the neurophysiological correlates of visuomotor reaction performance in a group of skilled athletes. In 36 skilled badminton athletes, electroencephalography (EEG) was used to investigate pattern reversal and motion onset visual-evoked potentials (VEPs) as well as visuomotor reaction time (VMRT) during a simple reaction task. Stimulus-locked and response-locked event-related potentials (ERPs) in visual and motor regions as well as the onset of muscle activation (EMG onset) were determined. Correlation and multiple regression analyses identified the neurophysiological parameters predicting EMG onset and VMRT. For pattern reversal stimuli, the P100 latency and age best predicted EMG onset (r = 0.43; p = .003) and VMRT (r = 0.62; p = .001). In the motion onset experiment, EMG onset (r = 0.80; p badminton players while motor-related processes, although differentiating athletes from non-athletes, are not associated simple with visuomotor reaction performance.

  10. Restraint status improves the predictive value of motor vehicle crash criteria for pediatric trauma team activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Andrew P; Dassinger, Melvin S; Recicar, John F; Smith, Samuel D; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna R; Nick, Todd G; Maxson, Robert T

    2012-12-01

    Most trauma centers incorporate mechanistic criteria (MC) into their algorithm for trauma team activation (TTA). We hypothesized that characteristics of the crash are less reliable than restraint status in predicting significant injury and the need for TTA. We identified 271 patients (age, <15 y) admitted with a diagnosis of motor vehicle crash. Mechanistic criteria and restraint status of each patient were recorded. Both MC and MC plus restraint status were evaluated as separate measures for appropriately predicting TTA based on treatment outcomes and injury scores. Improper restraint alone predicted a need for TTA with an odds ratios of 2.69 (P = .002). MC plus improper restraint predicted the need for TTA with an odds ratio of 2.52 (P = .002). In contrast, the odds ratio when using MC alone was 1.65 (P = .16). When the 5 MC were evaluated individually as predictive of TTA, ejection, death of occupant, and intrusion more than 18 inches were statistically significant. Improper restraint is an independent predictor of necessitating TTA in this single-institution study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction of kindergarteners' behavior on Metropolitan Readiness Tests from preschool perceptual and perceptual-motor performances: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belka, D E

    1981-06-01

    Multiple regression equations were generated to predict cognitive achievement for 40 children (ages 57 to 68 mo.) 1 yr. after administration of a battery of 6 perceptual and perceptual-motor tests to determine if previous results from Toledo could be replicated. Regression equations generated from maximum R2 improvement techniques indicated that performance at prekindergarten is useful for prediction of cognitive performance (total score and total score without the copying subtest on the Metropolitan Readiness Tests) 1 yr. later at the end of kindergarten. The optimal battery included scores on auditory perception, fine perceptual-motor, and gross perceptual-motor tasks. The moderate predictive power of the equations obtained was compared with high predictive power generated in the Toledo study.

  12. Regge-plus-resonance predictions for charged-kaon photoproduction from the deuteron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Cauteren T.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a Regge-inspired effective-Lagrangian framework for charged-kaon photoproduction from the deuteron. Quasi-free kaon production is investigated using the Regge-plus-resonance elementary operator within the non-relativistic plane-wave impulse approximation. The Regge-plus-resonance model was developed to describe photoinduced and electroinduced kaon production off protons and can be extended to strangeness production off neutrons. The non-resonant contributions to the amplitude are modelled in terms of K+ (494 and K*+ (892 Regge-trajectory exchange in the t-channel. This amplitude is supplemented with a selection of s-channel resonance-exchange diagrams. We investigate several sources of theoretical uncertainties on the semi-inclusive charged-kaon production cross section. The experimental error bars on the photocoupling helicity amplitudes turn out to put severe limits on the predictive power when considering quasi-free kaon production on a bound neutron.

  13. White matter NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios at MR spectroscopy are predictive of motor outcome in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Giles S; Melbourne, Andrew; Johnson, Samantha; Price, David; Bainbridge, Alan; Gunny, Roxanna; Huertas-Ceballos, Angela; Cady, Ernest B; Ourselin, Sebastian; Marlow, Neil; Robertson, Nicola J

    2014-04-01

    To determine (a) whether diffuse white matter injury of prematurity is associated with an increased choline (Cho)-to-creatine (Cr) ratio and a reduced N-acetylaspartate (NAA)-to-Cho ratio and whether these measures can be used as biomarkers of outcome and (b) if changes in peak area metabolite ratios at magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy are associated with changes in T2 and fractional anisotropy (FA) at MR imaging. The local ethics committee approved this study, and informed parental consent was obtained for each infant. At term-equivalent age, 43 infants born at less than 32 weeks gestation underwent conventional and quantitative diffusion-tensor and T2-weighted MR imaging. Single-voxel point-resolved proton (hydrogen 1) MR spectroscopy was performed from a 2-cm(3) voxel centered in the posterior periventricular white matter. Outcome was evaluated by using Bayley scales at a corrected age of 1 year. Associations were investigated with Pearson product moment or Spearman rank order correlation. Differences in ratios in infants with and infants without impairment were tested by using t tests. NAA/Cho and Cho/Cr ratios correlated with the scaled gross motor score and the composite motor score, independent of gestational age (P NAA/Cho ratio (P NAA/Cho ratio (P NAA/Cho ratio predicted impaired motor outcome at a corrected age of 1 year with a sensitivity of 0.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57, 0.94) and a specificity of 0.80 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.88). The combination of Cho/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios measured in the posterior periventricular white matter at term-equivalent age is predictive of motor outcome at 1 year in infants born at less than 32 weeks gestation. RSNA, 2013

  14. Empathy, autistic traits, and motor resonance in adults with Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Jean-François; Lortie, Mélissa; Deal, Cheri L; Théoret, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a genetic condition resulting from the partial or complete absence of an X-chromosome in phenotypic females. Individuals with Turner syndrome often display social difficulties that are reminiscent of those associated with autistic spectrum disorders (ASD), conditions associated with empathy and mirror-neuron system (MNS) deficits. The goal of the present study was (1) to investigate the extent to which adults with Turner syndrome display autistic and empathic traits, and (2) to probe the integrity of the MNS in this neurogenetic disorder. Sixteen individuals with Turner syndrome and 16 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched controls took part in a neuropsychological assessment where the Weschler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, the Autism Spectrum Quotient and the Empathy Quotient were administered. Functioning of the MNS was assessed by measuring motor cortex activity with transcranial magnetic stimulation during an action-observation task. Results show that individuals with Turner syndrome do not differ significantly from controls regarding autistic or empathic traits, and present normal functioning of the MNS during action observation. Correlational analysis showed a significant positive relationship between scores on the Empathy Quotient and motor facilitation during action observation, bringing further support to the hypothesis that MNS activity is related to sociocognitive competence.

  15. Brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging differentiates between inflammatory neuropathies and does not predict disease course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloed, BA; Bos, Jeroen W; Rutgers, Dirk; van der Pol, WL; van den Berg, Leonard H

    OBJECTIVE: The main objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the distribution of brachial plexus magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities and clinical weakness, and to evaluate the value of brachial plexus MRI in predicting disease course and response to treatment in

  16. Prediction of motor outcomes and activities of daily living function using diffusion tensor tractography in acute hemiparetic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Takeshi; Nagasawa, Yuki; Inagawa, Tetsuji; Imada, Naoki; Izumi, Hiroaki; Emoto, Katsuya; Tani, Itaru; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yuichiro; Oki, Shuichi; Maeda, Tadanori; Araki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The efficacy of diffusion tensor imaging in the prediction of motor outcomes and activities of daily living function remains unclear. We evaluated the most appropriate diffusion tensor parameters and methodology to determine whether the region of interest- or tractography-based method was more useful for predicting motor outcomes and activities of daily living function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Diffusion tensor imaging data within 10 days after stroke onset were collected and analyzed for 25 patients. The corticospinal tract was analyzed. Fractional anisotropy, number of fibers, and apparent diffusion coefficient were used as diffusion tensor parameters. Motor outcomes and activities of daily living function were evaluated on the same day as diffusion tensor imaging and at 1 month post-onset. [Results] The fractional anisotropy value of the affected corticospinal tract significantly correlated with the motor outcome and activities of daily living function within 10 days post-onset and at 1 month post-onset. Tthere were no significant correlations between other diffusion tensor parameters and motor outcomes or activities of daily living function. [Conclusion] The fractional anisotropy value of the affected corticospinal tract obtained using the tractography-based method was useful for predicting motor outcomes and activities of daily living function in stroke patients.

  17. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor deficits in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, F.; Floemer, F.; Kaick, G. van

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the cerebral activation pattern in ten schizophrenic patients and ten healthy volunteers using functional MRI. fMRI was performed using a modified FLASH sequence (TR/TE/α=100/60/40 ) and a conventional 1.5 T MR scanner. Colorcoded statistical parametric maps based on Student's t-test were calculated. Activation strength was quantified using a 5x6 grid overlay. The volunteers showed a higher activation strength during left hand movement compared to right hand movement. This lateralization effect was reversed in patients who showed overall reduced activation strength. Disturbed interhemispheric balance in schizophrenic patients during motor task performance can be demonstrated using fMRI. (orig.) [de

  18. Resonance wood [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]--evaluation and prediction of violin makers' quality-grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksnowitz, Christoph; Teischinger, Alfred; Müller, Ulrich; Pahler, Andreas; Evans, Robert

    2007-04-01

    The definition of quality in the field of resonance wood for musical instrument making has attracted considerable interest over decades but has remained incomplete. The current work compares the traditional knowledge and practical experience of violin makers with a material-science approach to objectively characterize the properties of resonance wood. Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] has earned a very high reputation for the construction of resonance tops of stringed instruments and resonance boards of keyboard instruments, and was therefore chosen as the focus of the investigation. The samples were obtained from numerous renowned resonance wood regions in the European Alps and cover the whole range of available qualities. A set of acoustical, anatomical, mechanical and optical material properties was measured on each sample. These measurements were compared with subjective quality grading by violin makers, who estimated the acoustical, optical and overall suitability for violin making. Multiple linear regression models were applied to evaluate the predictability of the subjective grading using the measured material characteristics as predictors. The results show that luthiers are able to estimate wood quality related to visible features, but predictions of mechanical and acoustical properties proved to be very poor.

  19. The Test of Infant Motor Performance at 3 months predicts language, cognitive, and motor outcomes in infants born preterm at 2 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, Colleen; Schreiber, Michael D; Msall, Michael E

    2018-03-13

    To determine the relationship between the Test of Infant Motor Performance (TIMP) at 3 months and cognitive, language, and motor outcomes on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III) at 2 years of age in high-risk infants born preterm. One hundred and six infants (47 females, 59 males) born at earlier than 31 weeks gestational age were prospectively tested with the TIMP at 10 to 15 weeks after term age and were assessed again with the Bayley-III at 2 years corrected age. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for various cut points of the TIMP z-score and Bayley-III composite scores of no more than 85. The TIMP z-scores at 10 to 15 weeks of age were significantly associated with all three subscales on the Bayley-III at 2 years of age (pcognitive (87%), language (88%), and motor (89%) outcomes, but sensitivity was low (cognitive 41%, language 49%, motor 57%). This study demonstrates that the TIMP is related to cognitive, language, and motor outcomes on the Bayley-III at 2 years of age in high-risk infants born preterm. The Test of Infant Motor Performance (TIMP) predicts Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition outcomes at 2 years of age. The TIMP is relatively good at discriminating between children who will and will not have typical development. © 2018 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Mechanisms of Intentional Binding and Sensory Attenuation: The Role of Temporal Prediction, Temporal Control, Identity Prediction, and Motor Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Gethin; Desantis, Andrea; Waszak, Florian

    2013-01-01

    Sensory processing of action effects has been shown to differ from that of externally triggered stimuli, with respect both to the perceived timing of their occurrence (intentional binding) and to their intensity (sensory attenuation). These phenomena are normally attributed to forward action models, such that when action prediction is consistent…

  1. Design and Implementation of Recursive Model Predictive Control for Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to control the permanent-magnet synchronous motor system (PMSM with different disturbances and nonlinearity, an improved current control algorithm for the PMSM systems using recursive model predictive control (RMPC is developed in this paper. As the conventional MPC has to be computed online, its iterative computational procedure needs long computing time. To enhance computational speed, a recursive method based on recursive Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm (RLMA and iterative learning control (ILC is introduced to solve the learning issue in MPC. RMPC is able to significantly decrease the computation cost of traditional MPC in the PMSM system. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm has been verified by simulation and experimental results.

  2. Resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2014-01-01

    A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice.......A chapter in a book about terminology within the field of medievalism: the chapter discusses the resonance of medieval music and ritual in modern (classical) music culture and liturgical practice....

  3. Diagnostic value of combined magnetic resonance imaging examination of brachial plexus and electrophysiological studies in multifocal motor neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basta Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN is an immune-mediated disorder characterized by slowly progressive asymetrical weakness of limbs without sensory loss. The objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of brachial plexus using combined cervical magnetic stimulation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of plexus brachialis in patients with MMN. We payed special attention to the nerve roots forming nerves inervating weak muscles, but without detectable conduction block (CB using conventional nerve conduction studies. Methods. Nine patients with proven MMN were included in the study. In all of them MRI of the cervical spine and brachial plexus was performed using a Siemens Avanto 1.5 T unit, applying T1 and turbo spinecho T1 sequence, axial turbo spin-echo T2 sequence and a coronal fat-saturated turbo spin-echo T2 sequence. Results. In all the patients severe asymmetric distal weakness of muscles inervated by radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves was observed and the most striking presentation was bilateral wrist and finger drop. Three of them had additional proximal weakness of muscles inervated by axillar and femoral nerves. The majority of the patients had slightly increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF protein content. Six of the patients had positive serum polyclonal IgM anti-GM1 antibodies. Electromyoneurography (EMG showed neurogenic changes, the most severe in distal muscles inervated by radial nerves. All the patients had persistent partial CBs outside the usual sites of nerve compression in radial, ulnar, median and peroneal nerves. In three of the patients cervical magnetic stimulation suggested proximal CBs between cervical root emergence and Erb’s point (prolonged motor root conduction time. In all the patients T2-weighted MRI revealed increased signal intensity in at least one cervical root, truncus or fasciculus of brachial plexus. Conclusion. We found clinical correlation between muscle weakness

  4. Prediction of the limit of detection of an optical resonant reflection biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jongcheol; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Shin, Jae-Heon; Huh, Chul; Sung, Gun Yong

    2007-07-09

    A prediction of the limit of detection of an optical resonant reflection biosensor is presented. An optical resonant reflection biosensor using a guided-mode resonance filter is one of the most promising label-free optical immunosensors due to a sharp reflectance peak and a high sensitivity to the changes of optical path length. We have simulated this type of biosensor using rigorous coupled wave theory to calculate the limit of detection of the thickness of the target protein layer. Theoretically, our biosensor has an estimated ability to detect thickness change approximately the size of typical antigen proteins. We have also investigated the effects of the absorption and divergence of the incident light on the detection ability of the biosensor.

  5. PREDICTION OF AIR POLLUTION FROM MOTOR TRANSPORT ON CITY STREETS AND DISTRICTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Rusakova

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of applied numerical model for prediction of atmospheric pollution rate on streets and districts of a city taking into account chemical transformations of pollutants. Methodology. To solve hydrodynamic task of determining velocity field of wind flow in street the method of discrete vortices was used, in the city district – the method of separation flows vortex of ideal incompressible fluid, for solution equation of pollutant transfer - alternating triangular implicit difference scheme. Findings.An efficient numerical model using the type of «street canyons»for prediction of air quality on city streets and districts with emissions from motor transport considering chemical transformations of pollutants was designed in the work. Originality.The numerical model, which allows taking into account impact of buildings on pollutants dispersion and requiring a small consumption of computer time during practical realization was created. The advantage of the model is the possibility of rapid calculation of emissions dispersion in the street with considering the chemical reactions of pollutants. Practical value. The developed numerical model can be used in practice during the planning of new highways in new urban areas or in the renovation of old ones, for a series of calculations that require search of different variants for arrangement of buildings, highways, under certain weather conditions.

  6. [Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging-guided functional neuronavigation plus intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring for microsurgical resection of lesions involving hand motor area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xing-lu; Chen, Zhi-juan; Yang, Wei-dong; Wang, Zeng-guang; Yu, Qing; Yue, Shu-yuan; Zhang, Jian-ning

    2013-01-15

    To explore the methods and applications of intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI)-guided functional neuronavigation plus intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for microsurgical resection of lesions involving hand motor area. A total of 16 patients with brain lesions adjacent to hand motor area were recruited from January 2011 to April 2012. All of them underwent neuronavigator-assisted microsurgery. Also IONM was conducted to further map hand motor area and epileptogenic focus. High-field iMRI was employed to update the anatomical and functional imaging date and verify the extent of lesion resection. Brain shifting during the functional neuronavigation was corrected by iMRI in 5 patients. Finally, total lesion resection was achieved in 13 cases and subtotal resection in 3 cases. At Months 3-12 post-operation, hand motor function improved (n = 10) or remained unchanged (n = 6). None of them had persistent neurological deficit. The postoperative seizure improvement achieved Enge II level or above in 9 cases of brain lesions complicated with secondary epilepsy. Intraoperative MRI, functional neuronavigation and neurophysiological monitoring technique are complementary in microsurgery of brain lesions involving hand motor area. Combined use of these techniques can obtain precise location of lesions and hand motor functional structures and allow a maximum resection of lesion and minimization of postoperative neurological deficits.

  7. Fine-Motor Skill Deficits in Childhood Predict Adulthood Tic Severity and Global Psychosocial Functioning in Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H.; Sukhodolsky, Denis G.; Leckman, James F.; Schultz, Robert T.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Most children with Tourette's syndrome (TS) experience a significant decline in tic symptoms during adolescence. Currently no clinical measures have been identified that can predict whose tic symptoms will persist into adulthood. Patients with TS have deficits on neuropsychological tests involving fine-motor coordination and…

  8. Preoperative nomograms incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy for prediction of insignificant prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Dave, Amita; Hricak, Hedvig; Akin, Oguz; Yu, Changhong; Zakian, Kristen L.; Udo, Kazuma; Scardino, Peter T.; Eastham, James; Kattan, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives • To validate previously published nomograms for predicting insignificant prostate cancer (PCa) that incorporate clinical data, percentage of biopsy cores positive (%BC+) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or MRI/MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) results. • We also designed new nomogram models incorporating magnetic resonance results and clinical data without detailed biopsy data. • Nomograms for predicting insignificant PCa can help physicians counsel patients with clinically low-risk disease who are choosing between active surveillance and definitive therapy. Patients and methods • In total, 181 low-risk PCa patients (clinical stage T1c–T2a, prostate-specific antigen level < 10 ng/mL, biopsy Gleason score of 6) had MRI/MRSI before surgery. • For MRI and MRI/MRSI, the probability of insignificant PCa was recorded prospectively and independently by two radiologists on a scale from 0 (definitely insignificant) to 3 (definitely significant PCa). • Insignificant PCa was defined on surgical pathology. • There were four models incorporating MRI or MRI/MRSI and clinical data with and without %BC+ that were compared with a base clinical model without %BC and a more comprehensive clinical model with %BC+. • Prediction accuracy was assessed using areas under receiver–operator characteristic curves. Results • At pathology, 27% of patients had insignificant PCa, and the Gleason score was upgraded in 56.4% of patients. • For both readers, all magnetic resonance models performed significantly better than the base clinical model (P ≤ 0.05 for all) and similarly to the more comprehensive clinical model. Conclusions • Existing models incorporating magnetic resonance data, clinical data and %BC+ for predicting the probability of insignificant PCa were validated. • All MR-inclusive models performed significantly better than the base clinical model. PMID:21933336

  9. Lack of motor prediction, rather than perceptual conflict, evokes an odd sensation upon stepping onto a stopped escalator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomi, Hiroaki; Sakurada, Takeshi; Fukui, Takao

    2014-01-01

    When stepping onto a stopped escalator, we often perceive an “odd sensation” that is never felt when stepping onto stairs. The sight of an escalator provides a strong contextual cue that, in expectation of the backward acceleration when stepping on, triggers an anticipatory forward postural adjustment driven by a habitual and implicit motor process. Here we contrast two theories about why this postural change leads to an odd sensation. The first theory links the odd sensation to a lack of sensorimotor prediction from all low-level implicit motor processes. The second theory links the odd sensation to the high-level conflict between the conscious awareness that the escalator is stopped and the implicit perception that evokes an endogenous motor program specific to a moving escalator. We show very similar postural changes can also arise from reflexive responses to visual stimuli, such as contracting/expanding optic flow fields, and that these reflexive responses produce similar odd sensations to the stopped escalator. We conclude that the high-level conflict is not necessary for such sensations. In contrast, the implicitly driven behavioral change itself essentially leads to the odd sensation in motor perception since the unintentional change may be less attributable to self-generated action because of a lack of motor predictions. PMID:24688460

  10. Parkinsonian motor impairment predicts personality domains related to genetic risk and treatment outcomes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Juan L; Calvó, María; Padilla, Eduardo; Balda, Mara; Alemán, Gabriela González; Florenzano, Néstor V; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Kamis, Danielle; Rangeon, Beatriz Molina; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Conesa, Horacio A; Escobar, Javier I; Zwir, Igor; Cloninger, C Robert; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2017-01-01

    Identifying endophenotypes of schizophrenia is of critical importance and has profound implications on clinical practice. Here we propose an innovative approach to clarify the mechanims through which temperament and character deviance relates to risk for schizophrenia and predict long-term treatment outcomes. We recruited 61 antipsychotic naïve subjects with chronic schizophrenia, 99 unaffected relatives, and 68 healthy controls from rural communities in the Central Andes. Diagnosis was ascertained with the Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry; parkinsonian motor impairment was measured with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale; mesencephalic parenchyma was evaluated with transcranial ultrasound; and personality traits were assessed using the Temperament and Character Inventory. Ten-year outcome data was available for ~40% of the index cases. Patients with schizophrenia had higher harm avoidance and self-transcendence (ST), and lower reward dependence (RD), cooperativeness (CO), and self-directedness (SD). Unaffected relatives had higher ST and lower CO and SD. Parkinsonism reliably predicted RD, CO, and SD after correcting for age and sex. The average duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) was over 5 years. Further, SD was anticorrelated with DUP and antipsychotic dosing at follow-up. Baseline DUP was related to antipsychotic dose-years. Further, 'explosive/borderline', 'methodical/obsessive', and 'disorganized/schizotypal' personality profiles were associated with increased risk of schizophrenia. Parkinsonism predicts core personality features and treatment outcomes in schizophrenia. Our study suggests that RD, CO, and SD are endophenotypes of the disease that may, in part, be mediated by dopaminergic function. Further, SD is an important determinant of treatment course and outcome.

  11. Motor and Nonmotor Circuitry Activation Induced by Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in Patients With Parkinson Disease: Intraoperative Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Emily J; Testini, Paola; Min, Hoon-Ki; Gibson, William S; Gorny, Krzysztof R; Favazza, Christopher P; Felmlee, Joel P; Kim, Inyong; Welker, Kirk M; Clayton, Daniel A; Klassen, Bryan T; Chang, Su-youne; Lee, Kendall H

    2015-06-01

    To test the hypothesis suggested by previous studies that subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) in patients with Parkinson disease would affect the activity of motor and nonmotor networks, we applied intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to patients receiving DBS. Ten patients receiving STN DBS for Parkinson disease underwent intraoperative 1.5-T fMRI during high-frequency stimulation delivered via an external pulse generator. The study was conducted between January 1, 2013, and September 30, 2014. We observed blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes (false discovery rate <0.001) in the motor circuitry (including the primary motor, premotor, and supplementary motor cortices; thalamus; pedunculopontine nucleus; and cerebellum) and in the limbic circuitry (including the cingulate and insular cortices). Activation of the motor network was observed also after applying a Bonferroni correction (P<.001) to the data set, suggesting that across patients, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent compared with those occurring in the nonmotor network. These findings support the modulatory role of STN DBS on the activity of motor and nonmotor networks and suggest complex mechanisms as the basis of the efficacy of this treatment modality. Furthermore, these results suggest that across patients, BOLD changes in the motor circuitry are more consistent than those in the nonmotor network. With further studies combining the use of real-time intraoperative fMRI with clinical outcomes in patients treated with DBS, functional imaging techniques have the potential not only to elucidate the mechanisms of DBS functioning but also to guide and assist in the surgical treatment of patients affected by movement and neuropsychiatric disorders. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01809613. Copyright © 2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction of multiple resonance characteristics by an extended resistor-inductor-capacitor circuit model for plasmonic metamaterials absorbers in infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolun; Li, Yongqian; Wang, Binbin; Zhou, Zili

    2015-10-01

    The resonance characteristics of plasmonic metamaterials absorbers (PMAs) are strongly dependent on geometric parameters. A resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit model has been extended to predict the resonance wavelengths and the bandwidths of multiple magnetic polaritons modes in PMAs. For a typical metallic-dielectric-metallic structure absorber working in the infrared region, the developed model describes the correlation between the resonance characteristics and the dimensional sizes. In particular, the RLC model is suitable for not only the fundamental resonance mode, but also for the second- and third-order resonance modes. The prediction of the resonance characteristics agrees fairly well with those calculated by the finite-difference time-domain simulation and the experimental results. The developed RLC model enables the facilitation of designing multi-band PMAs for infrared radiation detectors and thermal emitters.

  13. Usefulness of MR coronal imaging of the ''pyramidal line''. Predictive value in motor function of stroke patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Takayuki; Shimazaki, Mitsunori

    1997-01-01

    A coronal image was obtained along a straight line between the front edge of the medulla and the deepest point of the interpeduncular cistern in the midsagittal plane (the ''pyramidal line''). This coronal image along the pyramidal line revealed the pyramidal tract extending from the internal capsule down to the medulla. Using this technique, we studied 25 patients with motor deficit associated with cerebrovascular disease. We predicted the possibility of their recovery in the subacute stage. We were able to predict the recovery in 23 patients (92%). We conclude that a coronal image along the pyramidal line is useful for the understanding of relation between pyramidal tract and lesion and for predicting motor function. (author)

  14. Usefulness of MR coronal imaging of the ``pyramidal line``. Predictive value in motor function of stroke patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Takayuki; Shimazaki, Mitsunori [Hakodate Red Cross Hospital, Hokkaido (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    A coronal image was obtained along a straight line between the front edge of the medulla and the deepest point of the interpeduncular cistern in the midsagittal plane (the ``pyramidal line``). This coronal image along the pyramidal line revealed the pyramidal tract extending from the internal capsule down to the medulla. Using this technique, we studied 25 patients with motor deficit associated with cerebrovascular disease. We predicted the possibility of their recovery in the subacute stage. We were able to predict the recovery in 23 patients (92%). We conclude that a coronal image along the pyramidal line is useful for the understanding of relation between pyramidal tract and lesion and for predicting motor function. (author)

  15. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  16. Resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    an impetus or drive to that account: change, innovation, rupture, or discontinuity. Resonances: Historical Essays on Continuity and Change explores the historiographical question of the modes of interrelation between these motifs in historical narratives. The essays in the collection attempt to realize...

  17. Stimulation site within the MRI-defined STN predicts postoperative motor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodarg, Fritz; Herzog, Jan; Reese, René; Falk, Daniela; Pinsker, Markus O; Steigerwald, Frank; Jansen, Olav; Deuschl, Günther; Mehdorn, H Maximillian; Volkmann, Jens

    2012-06-01

    High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-HFS) is highly effective in treating motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) and medication side effects as well as in improving quality of life. Despite preoperative screening for patients as eligible candidates for this treatment, electrode position may furthermore influence treatment quality. Here, we investigated the relationship between the anatomical site of stimulation within the MRI-defined STN and the outcome of PD patients after STN-HFS. In 30 PD patients with bilateral STN stimulation, we retrospectively defined the boundaries of the STN within the axial target plane of the stereotactic T2-weighted MRI and determined the position of the active electrode contact in relation to the border of the STN. The position of the active contact within the STN was the only variable to predict the outcome of STN stimulation. In contrast, covariates such as age, disease duration, symptom severity, and response to levodopa had no effect. The lateral position of the stimulation contact within the STN led to significantly better clinical improvement, lower stimulation parameters, and less need for postoperative dopaminergic medication. The outcome of patients with stimulation contacts within the medial region of the STN was significantly worse. Precise targeting of the lateral region of the STN is essential for achieving sufficient stimulation efficacy. Preoperative T2-weighted MRI might be a useful component of the targeting procedure to improve the outcome of PD patients. Copyright © 2012 Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Predictive value of age of walking for later motor performance in children with mental retardation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubun, M; Haishi, K; Okuzumi, H; Hosobuchi, T; Koike, T

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to clarify the predictive value of age of walking for later motor performance in children with mental retardation. While paying due attention to other factors, our investigation focused on the relationship between a subject's age of walking, and his or her subsequent beam-walking performance. The subjects were 85 children with mental retardation with an average age of 13 years and 3 months. Beam-walking performance was measured by a procedure developed by the authors. Five low beams (5 cm) which varied in width (12.5, 10, 7.5, 5 and 2.5 cm) were employed. The performance of subjects was scored from zero to five points according to the width of the beam that they were able to walk without falling off. From the results of multiple regression analysis, three independent variables were found to be significantly related to beam-walking performance. The age of walking was the most basic variable: partial correlation coefficient (PCC) = -45; standardized partial regression coefficient (SPRC) = -0.41. The next variable in importance was walking duration (PCC = 0.38; SPRC = 0.31). The autism variable also contributed significantly (PCC = 0.28; SPRC = 0.22). Therefore, within the age range used in the present study, the age of walking in children with mental retardation was thought to have sufficient predictive value, even when the variables which might have possibly affected their subsequent performance were taken into consideration; the earlier the age of walking, the better the beam-walking performance.

  19. Do motor ability and handwriting kinematic measures predict organizational ability among children with Developmental Coordination Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Children with Developmental Coordination Disorders (DCD) exhibit deficient daily performance concealed in their perception-action mechanism. The aim of this study was to analyze behavior organization of children with DCD, in varied tasks that require generating and monitoring mental representations related to space and time inputs/requirements, for achieving better insight about their perception-action mechanism. Participants included 42 children aged 7-10, half of whom were defined with DCD and half were typically developing (TD). The children were matched for age, gender and school. They were evaluated using the Movement-ABC and performed three handwriting tasks on an electronic tablet that is part of a computerized system (ComPET - Computerized Penmanship Evaluation Tool). In addition, their teachers completed the Questionnaire for Assessing Students' Organizational Abilities-Teachers (QASOA-T) to assess the children's daily organizational ability. Significant group differences (DCD versus controls) were found for all handwriting kinematic measures across the three handwriting tasks and for the children's organizational abilities. Motor ability predicted a considerable percentage of the variance of the kinematic handwriting measures (30-37%), as well as a high percentage of the variance of their organizational abilities (67%). The coefficient of variance of the pen tilt added an additional 3% to the prediction of their organizational abilities. The results of this study exhibited deficient ability among children with DCD in organizing their behavior in varied real-world tasks requiring generation and monitoring representation related to space and time. The significance of the results to understanding the performance mechanism and implication to the clinical field are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-invasive mapping of bilateral motor speech areas using navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Könönen, Mervi; Tamsi, Niko; Säisänen, Laura; Kemppainen, Samuli; Määttä, Sara; Julkunen, Petro; Jutila, Leena; Äikiä, Marja; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Niskanen, Eini; Vanninen, Ritva; Karjalainen, Pasi; Mervaala, Esa

    2015-06-15

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is a modern precise method to activate and study cortical functions noninvasively. We hypothesized that a combination of nTMS and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) could clarify the localization of functional areas involved with motor control and production of speech. Navigated repetitive TMS (rTMS) with short bursts was used to map speech areas on both hemispheres by inducing speech disruption during number recitation tasks in healthy volunteers. Two experienced video reviewers, blinded to the stimulated area, graded each trial offline according to possible speech disruption. The locations of speech disrupting nTMS trials were overlaid with fMRI activations of word generation task. Speech disruptions were produced on both hemispheres by nTMS, though there were more disruptive stimulation sites on the left hemisphere. Grade of the disruptions varied from subjective sensation to mild objectively recognizable disruption up to total speech arrest. The distribution of locations in which speech disruptions could be elicited varied among individuals. On the left hemisphere the locations of disturbing rTMS bursts with reviewers' verification followed the areas of fMRI activation. Similar pattern was not observed on the right hemisphere. The reviewer-verified speech disruptions induced by nTMS provided clinically relevant information, and fMRI might explain further the function of the cortical area. nTMS and fMRI complement each other, and their combination should be advocated when assessing individual localization of speech network. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Growth rates and specific motor abilities as a function to predict the selection of talents taekwondo sport (Egyptian national project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mustafa Bakr

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the contribution ratios of Growth rates and specific motor abilities as a function to predict the selection of talented taekwondo sport. The study was carried out on a sample of (755 individual Clubs and youth centers across the governorates of Egypt, and the average age (11.64 ± 0.48 years, height (144.06 ± 7.04 cm and weight (36.86 ± 7.51 kg. Tests were conducted in the period from 7/11/2011 to 29/12/2011 selected individuals underwent the following tests and measurements (Ability, Hinge flexibility basin, Agility, Kinetics speed in level trunk, Kinetics speed in level face, Endure Performance, Performance , the researcher used the descriptive survey method. The statistical analysis SPSS was used to apply formulas statistical by calculating: average, standard deviation, correlation, stepwise regression. The results showed that the growth rates and special motor abilities contribute to the selection of talented taekwondo. In addition, taekwondo players are characterized by flexibility, Endure performance and motor speed. The study concluded that there are five factors affect the selection of talented junior Taekwondo detailed flexibility contribute (28.8%, endure Performance contribute by (15.1%, ability contribute (7.8%, Growth rates (age, length, weight a contribution rate (5.2%, kinesthetic speed motor (in the level of the trunk - in the face level (1.1%. Predictable talented selection junior taekwondo through the following equation = 49.835 + Age (-0.389 + Length (0.157 + Weight (-0.188 + Flexibility (-0.359 + Ability (0.081 + Agility (-2.261 + Endure Performance (0.608 + Kinetics speed motor in the level of the trunk (0.586 + Kinetics speed motor in the face level (0.260. These results should be taken into account by the taekwondo Federation and trainers for use as an indicator for selecting talented taekwondo sport.

  2. Accurate wavelength prediction of photonic crystal resonant reflection and applications in refractive index measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Vannahme, Christoph; Smith, Cameron L. C.

    2014-01-01

    and superstrate materials. The importance of accounting for material dispersion in order to obtain accurate simulation results is highlighted, and a method for doing so using an iterative approach is demonstrated. Furthermore, an application for the model is demonstrated, in which the material dispersion......In the past decade, photonic crystal resonant reflectors have been increasingly used as the basis for label-free biochemical assays in lab-on-a-chip applications. In both designing and interpreting experimental results, an accurate model describing the optical behavior of such structures...... is essential. Here, an analytical method for precisely predicting the absolute positions of resonantly reflected wavelengths is presented. The model is experimentally verified to be highly accurate using nanoreplicated, polymer-based photonic crystal grating reflectors with varying grating periods...

  3. Numerical prediction of the natural frequency of an Oscillating Water Column operating under resonant conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Torresi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Among the different technologies developed in order to harness wave energy, the Oscillating Water Column devices are the most accredited for an actual diffusion. Recently, Boccotti has patented the REWEC1 (REsonant sea Wave Energy Converter solution 1, a submerged breakwater that performs an active coast protection, embedding an Oscillating Water Column device, which is capable of operating under resonant conditions with that sea state, which gives the highest yearly energy contribution. The REWEC1 dynamic behavior can be approximated by means of a mass-spring-damper system. According to this approximation, a criterion for evaluating the oscillating natural frequency of the REWEC1 has been derived. This criterion has been validated against both experimental results and computational fluid dynamics simulations, performed on a REWEC1 laboratory-scale model. The numerical simulations have shown a good agreement between measurements and predictions.

  4. Predicting Motor Vehicle Collisions in a Driving Simulator in Young Adults Using the Useful Field of View Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Benjamin; Cox, Molly K; Vance, David E; Stavrinos, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Being involved in motor vehicle collisions is the leading cause of death in 1- to 34-year-olds, and risk is particularly high in young adults. The Useful Field of View (UFOV) task, a cognitive measure of processing speed, divided attention, and selective attention, has been shown to be predictive of motor vehicle collisions in older adults, but its use as a predictor of driving performance in a young adult population has not been investigated. The present study examined whether UFOV was a predictive measure of motor vehicle collisions in a driving simulator in a young adult population. The 3-subtest version of UFOV (lower scores measured in milliseconds indicate better performance) was administered to 60 college students. Participants also completed an 11-mile simulated drive to provide driving performance metrics. Findings suggested that subtests 1 and 2 suffered from a ceiling effect. UFOV subtest 3 significantly predicted collisions in the simulated drive. Each 30 ms slower on the subtest was associated with nearly a 10% increase in the risk of a simulated collision. Post hoc analyses revealed a small partially mediating effect of subtest 3 on the relationship between driving experience and collisions. The selective attention component of UFOV subtest 3 may be a predictive measure of crash involvement in a young adult population. Improvements in selective attention may be the underlying mechanism in how driving experience improves driving performance.

  5. Simple motor tasks independently predict extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutchak, Fernanda Machado; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello; Victorino, Josué Almeida; Meneguzzi, Carla; Poersch, Karla; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of simple motor tasks such as hand grasping and tongue protrusion as predictors of extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients. This was a prospective cohort study conducted in the neurological ICU of a tertiary care hospital in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil. Adult patients who had been intubated for neurological reasons and were eligible for weaning were included in the study. The ability of patients to perform simple motor tasks such as hand grasping and tongue protrusion was evaluated as a predictor of extubation failure. Data regarding duration of mechanical ventilation, length of ICU stay, length of hospital stay, mortality, and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia were collected. A total of 132 intubated patients who had been receiving mechanical ventilation for at least 24 h and who passed a spontaneous breathing trial were included in the analysis. Logistic regression showed that patient inability to grasp the hand of the examiner (relative risk = 1.57; 95% CI: 1.01-2.44; p commands is predictive of extubation failure in critically ill neurological patients. Hand grasping and tongue protrusion on command might be quick and easy bedside tests to identify neurocritical care patients who are candidates for extubation. Avaliar a utilidade de tarefas motoras simples, tais como preensão de mão e protrusão da língua, para predizer extubação malsucedida em pacientes neurológicos críticos. Estudo prospectivo de coorte realizado na UTI neurológica de um hospital terciário em Porto Alegre (RS). Pacientes adultos que haviam sido intubados por motivos neurológicos e que eram candidatos ao desmame foram incluídos no estudo. O estudo avaliou se a capacidade dos pacientes de realizar tarefas motoras simples como apertar as mãos do examinador e pôr a língua para fora seria um preditor de extubação malsucedida. Foram coletados dados referentes ao tempo de ventilação mecânica, tempo de internação na

  6. A prediction model for the grade of liver fibrosis using magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuka, Yusuke; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Abe, Hayato; Matsumoto, Naoki; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Haradome, Hiroki; Sugitani, Masahiko; Tsuji, Shingo; Takayama, Tadatoshi

    2017-11-28

    Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) has recently become available for assessment of liver fibrosis. We aimed to develop a prediction model for liver fibrosis using clinical variables, including LSM. We performed a prospective study to compare liver fibrosis grade with fibrosis score. LSM was measured using magnetic resonance elastography in 184 patients that underwent liver resection, and liver fibrosis grade was diagnosed histologically after surgery. Using the prediction model established in the training group, we validated the classification accuracy in the independent test group. First, we determined a cut-off value for stratifying fibrosis grade using LSM in 122 patients in the training group, and correctly diagnosed fibrosis grades of 62 patients in the test group with a total accuracy of 69.3%. Next, on least absolute shrinkage and selection operator analysis in the training group, LSM (r = 0.687, P prediction model. This prediction model applied to the test group correctly diagnosed 32 of 36 (88.8%) Grade I (F0 and F1) patients, 13 of 18 (72.2%) Grade II (F2 and F3) patients, and 7 of 8 (87.5%) Grade III (F4) patients in the test group, with a total accuracy of 83.8%. The prediction model based on LSM, ICGR15, and platelet count can accurately and reproducibly predict liver fibrosis grade.

  7. Multiparametric analysis of magnetic resonance images for glioma grading and patient survival time prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, Benjamin; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Mouridsen, Kim; Nedregaard, Baard; Due-Toennessen, Paulina; Nome, Terje; Hald, John K.; Bjoernerud, Atle; Haaberg, Asta K.; Kvinnsland, Yngve

    2011-01-01

    Background. A systematic comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) options for glioma diagnosis is lacking. Purpose. To investigate multiple MR-derived image features with respect to diagnostic accuracy in tumor grading and survival prediction in glioma patients. Material and Methods. T1 pre- and post-contrast, T2 and dynamic susceptibility contrast scans of 74 glioma patients with histologically confirmed grade were acquired. For each patient, a set of statistical features was obtained from the parametric maps derived from the original images, in a region-of-interest encompassing the tumor volume. A forward stepwise selection procedure was used to find the best combinations of features for grade prediction with a cross-validated logistic model and survival time prediction with a cox proportional-hazards regression. Results. Presence/absence of enhancement paired with kurtosis of the FM (first moment of the first-pass curve) was the feature combination that best predicted tumor grade (grade II vs. grade III-IV; median AUC 0.96), with the main contribution being due to the first of the features. A lower predictive value (median AUC = 0.82) was obtained when grade IV tumors were excluded. Presence/absence of enhancement alone was the best predictor for survival time, and the regression was significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Presence/absence of enhancement, reflecting transendothelial leakage, was the feature with highest predictive value for grade and survival time in glioma patients

  8. Multiparametric analysis of magnetic resonance images for glioma grading and patient survival time prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, Benjamin (Dept. of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)), email: benjamin.garzon@ntnu.no; Emblem, Kyrre E. (The Interventional Center, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Dept. of Radiology, MGH-HST AA Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States)); Mouridsen, Kim (Center of Functionally Integrative Neuroscience, Aarhus Univ., Aarhus (Denmark)); Nedregaard, Baard; Due-Toennessen, Paulina; Nome, Terje; Hald, John K. (Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Bjoernerud, Atle (The Interventional Center, Rikshospitalet, Oslo Univ. Hospital, Oslo (Norway)); Haaberg, Asta K. (Dept. of Circulation and Medical Imaging, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Dept. of Medical Imaging, St Olav' s Hospital, Trondheim (Norway)); Kvinnsland, Yngve (NordicImagingLab, Bergen (Norway))

    2011-11-15

    Background. A systematic comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) options for glioma diagnosis is lacking. Purpose. To investigate multiple MR-derived image features with respect to diagnostic accuracy in tumor grading and survival prediction in glioma patients. Material and Methods. T1 pre- and post-contrast, T2 and dynamic susceptibility contrast scans of 74 glioma patients with histologically confirmed grade were acquired. For each patient, a set of statistical features was obtained from the parametric maps derived from the original images, in a region-of-interest encompassing the tumor volume. A forward stepwise selection procedure was used to find the best combinations of features for grade prediction with a cross-validated logistic model and survival time prediction with a cox proportional-hazards regression. Results. Presence/absence of enhancement paired with kurtosis of the FM (first moment of the first-pass curve) was the feature combination that best predicted tumor grade (grade II vs. grade III-IV; median AUC 0.96), with the main contribution being due to the first of the features. A lower predictive value (median AUC = 0.82) was obtained when grade IV tumors were excluded. Presence/absence of enhancement alone was the best predictor for survival time, and the regression was significant (P < 0.0001). Conclusion. Presence/absence of enhancement, reflecting transendothelial leakage, was the feature with highest predictive value for grade and survival time in glioma patients

  9. Similar circuits but different connectivity patterns between the cerebellum, basal ganglia, and supplementary motor area in early Parkinson's disease patients and controls during predictive motor timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husárová, Ivica; Mikl, Michal; Lungu, Ovidiu V; Mareček, Radek; Vaníček, Jiří; Bareš, Martin

    2013-10-01

    The cerebellum, basal ganglia (BG), and other cortical regions, such as supplementary motor area (SMA) have emerged as important structures dealing with various aspects of timing, yet the modulation of functional connectivity between them during motor timing tasks remains unexplored. We used dynamic causal modeling to investigate the differences in effective connectivity (EC) between these regions and its modulation by behavioral outcome during a motor timing prediction task in a group of 16 patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD) and 17 healthy controls. Behavioral events (hits and errors) constituted the driving input connected to the cerebellum, and the modulation in connectivity was assessed relative to the hit condition (successful interception of target). The driving input elicited response in the target area, while modulatory input changed the specific connection strength. The neuroimaging data revealed similar structure of intrinsic connectivity in both groups with unidirectional connections from cerebellum to both sides of the BG, from BG to the SMA, and then from SMA to the cerebellum. However, the type of intrinsic connection was different between two groups. In the PD group, the connection between the SMA and cerebellum was inhibitory in comparison to the HC group, where the connection was activated. Furthermore, the modulation of connectivity by the performance in the task was different between the two groups, with decreased connectivity between the cerebellum and left BG and SMA and a more pronounced symmetry of these connections in controls. In the same time, there was an increased EC between the cerebellum and both sides of BG with more pronounced asymmetry (stronger connection with left BG) in patients. In addition, in the PD group the modulatory input strengthened inhibitory connectivity between the SMA and the cerebellum, while in the HC group the excitatory connection was slightly strengthened. Our findings indicate that although early PD

  10. Multimachine subsynchronous resonance: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahoud, M.A.; Harley, R.G.; Levy, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes a theoretical investigation into the subsynchronous resonance (SSR) behaviour of a power system containing synchronous generators, induction motors and series capacitors. By applying eigenvalue techniques, attention is paid to the effect of replacing the induction motor by an equivalent fixed resistor-inductor (R-L) load. Nonlinear transient simulations and their Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT's) are also used to investigate the effects of the complexity of the mechanical model of the generator on the SSR predictions. The results show that the model used for the induction motor has a significant effect on the SSR behaviour of a multimachine system

  11. A New Concept of Two-Stage Multi-Element Resonant-/Cyclo-Converter for Two-Phase IM/SM Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmud Ali Rzig Abdalmula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new concept of power electronic two-phase system with two-stage DC/AC/AC converter and two-phase IM/PMSM motor. The proposed system consisting of two-stage converter comprises: input resonant boost converter with AC output, two-phase half-bridge cyclo-converter commutated by HF AC input voltage, and induction or synchronous motor. Such a system with AC interlink, as a whole unit, has better properties as a 3-phase reference VSI inverter: higher efficiency due to soft switching of both converter stages, higher switching frequency, smaller dimensions and weight with lesser number of power semiconductor switches and better price. In comparison with currently used conventional system configurations the proposed system features a good efficiency of electronic converters and also has a good torque overloading of two-phase AC induction or synchronous motors. Design of two-stage multi-element resonant converter and results of simulation experiments are presented in the paper.

  12. Detecting bilateral motor associated areas with resting state functional magnetic resonance: the effect of different seed points selection on the results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Huiming; Yang Mingming; Meng Liangliang; Zhang Jing

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of different seed points selection on localizing bilateral hand motor associated areas in resting state functional magnetic resonance. Methods: Thirty -one subjects were recruited (male 15, female 16), all of them underwent both block-designed fMRI scan during performing bilateral hand motor task and resting-state fMRI scan. DPARSA V2.0 and SPM8 were used to process the data. The peak voxels in the activity map of the task scan were selected as seeds to compute functional connectivity map of the resting-state scan. Spatial correlation analysis was performed to compare the activity map of the task scan and the connectivity map of the resting- state scan. Results: Fifteen isolated clusters were picked to generate the peak voxels, which were selected as seeds to compute functional connectivity maps. Among all the functional connectivity maps, those generated by motor area (SMA) presented the most consistent spatial distribution with task associated activity map, and the functional connectivity maps generated by primary motor cortex (M1) and dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) consisted of bilateral Ml and SMA. the functional connectivity maps generated by putamen (Pu), thalamus (Th), cerebellum anterior lobe (CbAL) and cerebellum posterior lobe (CbPL) consisted of the areas around the seeds and the mirror areas in the contralateral cortex. Conclusion: Using SMA as seed to compute resting-state functional connectivity map may produce the best spatial coherence with the activity map generated by bilateral hand motor task, and selecting M1 and PMd as seeds may present the best primary motor cortex in the connectivity map. (authors)

  13. Local-learning-based neuron selection for grasping gesture prediction in motor brain machine interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Wang, Yiwen; Wang, Yueming; Wang, Fang; Hao, Yaoyao; Zhang, Shaomin; Zhang, Qiaosheng; Chen, Weidong; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The high-dimensional neural recordings bring computational challenges to movement decoding in motor brain machine interfaces (mBMI), especially for portable applications. However, not all recorded neural activities relate to the execution of a certain movement task. This paper proposes to use a local-learning-based method to perform neuron selection for the gesture prediction in a reaching and grasping task. Approach. Nonlinear neural activities are decomposed into a set of linear ones in a weighted feature space. A margin is defined to measure the distance between inter-class and intra-class neural patterns. The weights, reflecting the importance of neurons, are obtained by minimizing a margin-based exponential error function. To find the most dominant neurons in the task, 1-norm regularization is introduced to the objective function for sparse weights, where near-zero weights indicate irrelevant neurons. Main results. The signals of only 10 neurons out of 70 selected by the proposed method could achieve over 95% of the full recording's decoding accuracy of gesture predictions, no matter which different decoding methods are used (support vector machine and K-nearest neighbor). The temporal activities of the selected neurons show visually distinguishable patterns associated with various hand states. Compared with other algorithms, the proposed method can better eliminate the irrelevant neurons with near-zero weights and provides the important neuron subset with the best decoding performance in statistics. The weights of important neurons converge usually within 10-20 iterations. In addition, we study the temporal and spatial variation of neuron importance along a period of one and a half months in the same task. A high decoding performance can be maintained by updating the neuron subset. Significance. The proposed algorithm effectively ascertains the neuronal importance without assuming any coding model and provides a high performance with different

  14. Can magnetic resonance imaging predict the success of parturition in oxytocin-induced pregnant women?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabir, N.; Akkemik, B.; Dicle, O.; Yurdakul, B.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging could predict the outcome of attempted vaginal delivery in a group of pregnant women whose parturition had to be induced by oxytocin. The signal intensity and morphology alterations in the cervix of 21 full-term pregnant women were analyzed before the induction of parturition. T2-weighted gradient echo sequences were utilized and signal intensity in the cervix was measured from the anterior and posterior lips of the cervix. An index indicating the brightness range of the cervix was formulated to overcome the effects of the individual intensity changes. Imaging features including the signal intensity and the evidence of effacement were correlated with the actual type of delivery performed. Images were also assessed visually by two independent radiologists. Statistical analysis of brightness indexes that were considered to have a predictive value as an indicator for possible delivery was not significant. However, visually assessed signal intensity of the cervix correlated strongly with the type of delivery. Effacement itself was the most reliable parameter in predicting the progress of the delivery. In conclusion, MR imaging seems to be useful for predicting normal parturition in full-term pregnant women who need oxytocin induction. However, the presence of effacement seems to be a more reliable and practical parameter that will be preferred in that prediction. (orig.)

  15. Visuo-motor coordination ability predicts performance with brain-computer interfaces controlled by modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Hammer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of sensorimotor rhythms (SMR was suggested as a control signal for brain-computer interfaces (BCI. Yet, there is a population of users estimated between 10 to 50% not able to achieve reliable control and only about 20% of users achieve high (80-100% performance. Predicting performance prior to BCI use would facilitate selection of the most feasible system for an individual, thus constitute a practical benefit for the user, and increase our knowledge about the correlates of BCI control. In a recent study, we predicted SMR-BCI performance from psychological variables that were assessed prior to the BCI sessions and BCI control was supported with machine-learning techniques. We described two significant psychological predictors, namely the visuo-motor coordination ability and the ability to concentrate on the task. The purpose of the current study was to replicate these results thereby validating these predictors within a neurofeedback based SMR-BCI that involved no machine learning. Thirty-three healthy BCI novices participated in a calibration session and three further neurofeedback training sessions. Two variables were related with mean SMR-BCI performance: (1 A measure for the accuracy of fine motor skills, i.e. a trade for a person’s visuo-motor control ability and (2 subject’s attentional impulsivity. In a linear regression they accounted for almost 20% in variance of SMR-BCI performance, but predictor (1 failed significance. Nevertheless, on the basis of our prior regression model for sensorimotor control ability we could predict current SMR-BCI performance with an average prediction error of M = 12.07%. In more than 50% of the participants, the prediction error was smaller than 10%. Hence, psychological variables played a moderate role in predicting SMR-BCI performance in a neurofeedback approach that involved no machine learning. Future studies are needed to further consolidate (or reject the present predictors.

  16. Higher Levels of Psychopathy Predict Poorer Motor Control: Implications for Understanding the Psychopathy Construct

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Michael D.; Bresin, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    A review of the literature suggests that higher levels of psychopathy may be linked to less effective behavioral control. However, several commentators have urged caution in making statements of this type in the absence of direct evidence. In two studies (total N = 142), moment-to-moment accuracy in a motor control task was examined as a function of dimensional variations in psychopathy in an undergraduate population. As hypothesized, motor control was distinctively worse at higher levels of ...

  17. Predicting Collateral Status With Magnetic Resonance Perfusion Parameters: Probabilistic Approach With a Tmax-Derived Prediction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi Ji; Son, Jeong Pyo; Kim, Suk Jae; Ryoo, Sookyung; Woo, Sook-Young; Cha, Jihoon; Kim, Gyeong-Moon; Chung, Chin-Sang; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bang, Oh Young

    2015-10-01

    Good collateral flow is an important predictor for favorable responses to recanalization therapy and successful outcomes after acute ischemic stroke. Magnetic resonance perfusion-weighted imaging (MRP) is widely used in patients with stroke. However, it is unclear whether the perfusion parameters and thresholds would predict collateral status. The present study evaluated the relationship between hypoperfusion severity and collateral status to develop a predictive model for good collaterals using MRP parameters. Patients who were eligible for recanalization therapy that underwent both serial diffusion-weighted imaging and serial MRP were enrolled into the study. A collateral flow map derived from MRP source data was generated through automatic postprocessing. Hypoperfusion severity, presented as proportions of every 2-s Tmax strata to the entire hypoperfusion volume (Tmax≥2 s), was compared between patients with good and poor collaterals. Prediction models for good collaterals were developed with each Tmax strata proportion and cerebral blood volumes. Among 66 patients, 53 showed good collaterals based on MRP-based collateral grading. Although no difference was noted in delays within 16 s, more severe Tmax delays (Tmax16-18 s, Tmax18-22 s, Tmax22-24 s, and Tmax>24 s) were associated with poor collaterals. The probability equation model using Tmax strata proportion demonstrated high predictive power in a receiver operating characteristic analysis (area under the curve=0.9303; 95% confidence interval, 0.8682-0.9924). The probability score was negatively correlated with the volume of infarct growth (P=0.030). Collateral status is associated with more severe Tmax delays than previously defined. The present Tmax severity-weighted model can determine good collaterals and subsequent infarct growth. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Corticospinal tract damage in patients with severe diffuse axonal injury in a chronic stage on diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and motor evoked potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasokawa, Yu-to; Nakayama, Noriyuki; Iwama, Toru; Okumura, Ayumi; Shinoda, Jun; Miwa, Kazuhiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the disturbed motor function of the corticospinal tract (CST) of diffuse axonal injury (DAI) using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging and motor evoked potential (MEP) examination, and to analyze these comparatively. Forty-three patients (86 sides of the CST) with severe DAI in a chronic stage underwent DTMR imaging and MEP examination using transcranial magnetic stimulation. Fractional anisotrophy (FA) values of 6 regions of interests (ROIs) in the CST were measured on FA map obtained from DTMR imaging. The lowest FA value among the FA values of the 6 ROIs in each of the CSTs was defined as the minimum FA value. And the lowest magnetic stimulation strength that could derive MEP was defined as the minimum threshold of MEP. The mean minimum FA value of the CSTs in which MEP could not be obtained even by the maximum strength of magnetic stimulation (the MEP (-) group) was significantly lower than that of the CSTs in which MEP could be obtained (the MEP (+) group). In the MEP (+) group, the minimum FA value decreased with the increase of the minimum threshold of MEP with a significant correlation. These results demonstrate that physiological motor dysfunction disclosed on MEP is significantly correlated with morphological damage of the CST observed on DTMR imaging in patients with DAI in a chronic stage. DTMR imaging is strongly suggested to be helpful to evaluate disturbed motor function and to infer its severity in DAI. (author)

  19. Cognitive mechanisms of visuomotor transformation in movement imitation: examining predictions based on models of apraxia and motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravenhorst, Robynne M; Walter, Charles B

    2009-11-01

    When we observe a movement and then reproduce it, how is this visual input transformed into motor output? Studies on stroke patients with apraxia suggest that there may be two distinct routes used for gesture imitation; an indirect route that recruits stored movement memories (motor programs) and a direct route that bypasses them. The present study examined 30 healthy adults ages 18-80 (mean age=44.0 years, SD=19.5) to learn how motor programs are recruited or bypassed in movement imitation depending upon task conditions (whether familiar letters or novel shapes are imitated) and perceptual factors (whether shapes or letters are perceived). Subjects were asked to imitate the movements of a model who formed shapes and letters on a sheer mesh screen, and to report whether they perceived the task as a shape or a letter. Movements were recorded using a Vicon motion analysis system, and subsequently analyzed to determine the degree of difference between the demonstrated and produced movements. As predicted, letter perception on the letter tasks resulted in increased temporal error when the demonstrated stroke order conflicted with subjects' habitual pattern of letter formation. No such interference effects were observed when the letter tasks were perceived as shapes. These findings are discussed in the context of current theories on imitation, and implications for rehabilitation and motor re-learning are presented.

  20. The modulation of the motor resonance triggered by reach-to-grasp movements: No role of human physical similarity as conveyed by age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Barbara F M; Ricciardelli, Paola

    2017-07-01

    The activation of the mirror-neuron circuit during the observation of motor acts is thought to be the basis of human capacity to read the intentions behind the behavior of others. Growing empirical evidence shows a different activation of the mirror-neuron resonance mechanism depending on how much the observer and the observed agent share their motor repertoires. Here, the possible modulatory effect of physical similarity between the observer and the agent was investigated in three studies. We used a visuo-motor priming task in which participants were asked to categorize manipulable and non-manipulable objects into natural or man-made kinds after having watched precision and power reach-to-grasp movements. Physical similarity was manipulated by presenting reach-to-grasp movements performed by the hands of actors of three different age ranges that are adults of the same age as the participants, children, and elderly. Faster responses were observed in trials where power grip movements were performed by the adults and precision grip movements were performed by the elderly (Main Study). This finding is not in keeping with the idea that physical similarity shapes the mirror-neuron resonance. Instead, it suggests an effect of the kinematic organization of the reach-to-grasp movements, which systematically changed with the actor age as revealed by a kinematic analysis. The differential effect played by adult and elderly actor primes was lost when static grasping hands (Control Study 1) and reach-to-grasp movements with uniform kinematic profiles (Control Study 2) were used. Therefore, we found preliminary evidence that mirror-neuron resonance is not shaped by physical similarity but by the kinematics of the observed action. This finding is novel as it suggests that human ability to read the intentions behind the behavior of others may benefit from a mere visual processing of spatiotemporal patterns.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging at primary diagnosis cannot predict subsequent contralateral slip in slipped capital femoral epiphysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wensaas, Anders [Akershus University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Loerenskog (Norway); Wiig, Ola; Terjesen, Terje [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rikshospitalet (Norway); Castberg Hellund, Johan; Khoshnewiszadeh, Behzad [Oslo University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Ullevaal (Norway)

    2017-12-15

    Prophylactic fixation of the contralateral hip in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is controversial, and no reliable method has been established to predict subsequent contralateral slip. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate if magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at primary diagnosis could predict future contralateral slip. Twenty-two patients with unilateral SCFE were included, all had MRI of both hips taken before operative fixation. Six different parameters were measured on the MRI: the MRI slip angle, the greatest focal widening of the physis, the global widening of the physis measured at three locations (the midpoint of the physis and 1 cm lateral and medial to the midpoint), periphyseal (epiphyseal and metaphyseal) bone marrow edema, the presence of pathological joint effusion, and the amount of joint effusion measured from the lateral edge of the greater trochanter. Mean follow-up was 33 months (range, 16-63 months). Six patients were treated for contralateral slip during the follow-up time and a comparison of the MRI parameters of the contralateral hip in these six patients and in the 16 patients that remained unilateral was done to see if subsequent contralateral slip was possible to predict at primary diagnosis. All MRI parameters were significantly altered in hips with established SCFE compared with the contralateral hips. However, none of the MRI parameters showed any significant difference between patients who had a subsequent contralateral slip and those that remained unilateral. MRI taken at primary diagnosis could not predict future contralateral slip. (orig.)

  2. Predictive Direct Torque Control Application-Specific Integrated Circuit of an Induction Motor Drive with a Fuzzy Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Ming Sung

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a modified predictive direct torque control (PDTC application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC of a motor drive with a fuzzy controller for eliminating sampling and calculating delay times in hysteresis controllers. These delay times degrade the control quality and increase both torque and flux ripples in a motor drive. The proposed fuzzy PDTC ASIC calculates the stator’s magnetic flux and torque by detecting the three-phase current, three-phase voltage, and rotor speed, and eliminates the ripples in the torque and flux by using a fuzzy controller and predictive scheme. The Verilog hardware description language was used to implement the hardware architecture, and the ASIC was fabricated by the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company through a 0.18-μm 1P6M CMOS process that involved a cell-based design method. The measurements revealed that the proposed fuzzy PDTC ASIC of the three-phase induction motor yielded a test coverage of 96.03%, fault coverage of 95.06%, chip area of 1.81 × 1.81 mm2, and power consumption of 296 mW, at an operating frequency of 50 MHz and a supply voltage of 1.8 V.

  3. In-operation inspection technology development-4 ''development of degradation prediction technology for motor-operated valves''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuo, Takeshima; Yuichi, Higashikawa [Hitachi Engineering and Production Div., Nuclear Systems Div., Hitachi, Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan); Masahiro, Koike [Power and Industrial Systems R and D Lab., Hitachi, Ltd., (Japan); Kenji, Matsumoto [Tokyo Research and Development Center, Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp. (Japan); Eiji, O' shima [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A method for degradation predicting technology has been proposed for motor operated valves in nuclear power plants which is based on the concept of condition monitoring for maintenance. This method (degradation prediction technology) eliminates the unnecessary overhaul of valves and realizes high reliability and economy. The degradation mechanism was clarified by long time heating experiments of gasket and gland packing and the wear test for them and stem nut to research valve parts degradation by stress (pressure, temperature, etc) during plant operation. Effective electric power measurements for motor operated valves were confirmed to be useful discovering valve part failures. The motor operated valve degradation prediction system was developed on the basis of the experiment results and mechanism. The system is able to predict the degradation of valve parts (gasket/gland packing, stem, stem nut, etc) utilizing plant data (pressure, temperature, etc) and effective power of the motor. The life of valve parts can be estimated from the experimental results. (authors)

  4. Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Hestbaek, Lise

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health...... a child first sits or walks without support does not influence the likelihood that they will experience spinal pain in later childhood. Level of Evidence Etiology 2b. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 15 Sep 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7484....

  5. Test of Axel-Brink predictions by a discrete approach to resonance-averaged (n,γ) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Shahal, O.; Slaughter, G.G.

    1981-01-01

    The limitations imposed by Porter-Thomas fluctuations in the study of primary γ rays following neutron capture have been partly overcome by obtaining individual γ-ray spectra from 48 resonances in the 173 Yb(n,γ) reaction and summing them after appropriate normalizations. The resulting average radiation widths (and hence the γ-ray strength function) are in good agreement with the Axel-Brink predictions based on a giant dipole resonance model

  6. Early-postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in glial tumors: prediction of tumor regrowth and recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekinci, Gazanfer; Akpinar, Ihsan N. E-mail: i.akpinar@mailcity.com; Baltacioglu, Feyyaz; Erzen, Canan; Kilic, Tuerker; Elmaci, Ilhan; Pamir, Necmettin

    2003-02-01

    Objective: This study investigated the value of early-postoperative magnetic resonance (EPMR) imaging in the detection of residual glial tumor and investigated the role of EPMR for the prediction of tumor regrowth and recurrence. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed pre- and post-operative magnetic resonance imaging results from 50 adult patients who underwent surgical treatment for supratentorial glial tumor. There were glioblastoma multiforme in 25 patients, astrocytoma (grades II and III) in 11 patients, oligodendroglioma (grades II and III) in 9 patients, and oligoastrocytoma (grades II and III) in 5 patients. EPMR imaging was performed within 24 h after surgery. EPMR findings were compared with the neurosurgeon's intraoperative estimation of gross tumor removal. Patterns of contrast enhancement at the resection site, in residual and developing tumor tissue and blood at the resection site were evaluated on EPMR and in follow-up studies. 'Residual tumor' was defined as contrast enhancing mass at the operative site on EPMR. 'Regrowth' was defined as contrast enhancing mass detected on follow-up in the same location as the primary tumor. 'Recurrence' was defined as appearance of a mass lesion in the brain parenchyma distant from the resection bed during follow-up. Results: Nineteen patients showed no evidence of residual tumor, regrowth, or recurrence on EPMR or any of the later follow-up radiological examinations. EPMR identified 20 cases of residual tumor. Follow-up showed tumor regrowth in 10 patients, and tumor recurrence in 1 case. EPMR showed contrast enhancement of the resection bed in 45 of the 50 patients. Four of the 20 residual tumors showed a thick linear enhancement pattern, and the other 16 cases exhibited thick linear-nodular enhancement. No thin linear enhancement was observed in the residual tumor group. Nine of the 10-regrowth tumors showed a thick linear-nodular enhancement pattern, and one

  7. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolite profiles predict survival in paediatric brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Martin; Cummins, Carole L; Macpherson, Lesley; Sun, Yu; Natarajan, Kal; Grundy, Richard G; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Kauppinen, Risto A; Peet, Andrew C

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumours cause the highest mortality and morbidity rate of all childhood tumour groups and new methods are required to improve clinical management. (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) allows non-invasive concentration measurements of small molecules present in tumour tissue, providing clinically useful imaging biomarkers. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether MRS detectable molecules can predict the survival of paediatric brain tumour patients. Short echo time (30ms) single voxel (1)H MRS was performed on children attending Birmingham Children's Hospital with a suspected brain tumour and 115 patients were included in the survival analysis. Patients were followed-up for a median period of 35 months and Cox-Regression was used to establish the prognostic value of individual MRS detectable molecules. A multivariate model of survival was also investigated to improve prognostic power. Lipids and scyllo-inositol predicted poor survival whilst glutamine and N-acetyl aspartate predicted improved survival (pmodel of survival based on three MRS biomarkers predicted survival with a similar accuracy to histologic grading (p5e-5). A negative correlation between lipids and glutamine was found, suggesting a functional link between these molecules. MRS detectable biomolecules have been identified that predict survival of paediatric brain tumour patients across a range of tumour types. The evaluation of these biomarkers in large prospective studies of specific tumour types should be undertaken. The correlation between lipids and glutamine provides new insight into paediatric brain tumour metabolism that may present novel targets for therapy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Voxel-wise prostate cell density prediction using multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yu; Reynolds, Hayley M; Wraith, Darren; Williams, Scott; Finnegan, Mary E; Mitchell, Catherine; Murphy, Declan; Haworth, Annette

    2018-04-26

    There are currently no methods to estimate cell density in the prostate. This study aimed to develop predictive models to estimate prostate cell density from multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) data at a voxel level using machine learning techniques. In vivo mpMRI data were collected from 30 patients before radical prostatectomy. Sequences included T2-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Ground truth cell density maps were computed from histology and co-registered with mpMRI. Feature extraction and selection were performed on mpMRI data. Final models were fitted using three regression algorithms including multivariate adaptive regression spline (MARS), polynomial regression (PR) and generalised additive model (GAM). Model parameters were optimised using leave-one-out cross-validation on the training data and model performance was evaluated on test data using root mean square error (RMSE) measurements. Predictive models to estimate voxel-wise prostate cell density were successfully trained and tested using the three algorithms. The best model (GAM) achieved a RMSE of 1.06 (± 0.06) × 10 3 cells/mm 2 and a relative deviation of 13.3 ± 0.8%. Prostate cell density can be quantitatively estimated non-invasively from mpMRI data using high-quality co-registered data at a voxel level. These cell density predictions could be used for tissue classification, treatment response evaluation and personalised radiotherapy.

  9. Multispectral code excited linear prediction coding and its application in magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J H; Wang, Y; Cahill, P T

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports a multispectral code excited linear prediction (MCELP) method for the compression of multispectral images. Different linear prediction models and adaptation schemes have been compared. The method that uses a forward adaptive autoregressive (AR) model has been proven to achieve a good compromise between performance, complexity, and robustness. This approach is referred to as the MFCELP method. Given a set of multispectral images, the linear predictive coefficients are updated over nonoverlapping three-dimensional (3-D) macroblocks. Each macroblock is further divided into several 3-D micro-blocks, and the best excitation signal for each microblock is determined through an analysis-by-synthesis procedure. The MFCELP method has been applied to multispectral magnetic resonance (MR) images. To satisfy the high quality requirement for medical images, the error between the original image set and the synthesized one is further specified using a vector quantizer. This method has been applied to images from 26 clinical MR neuro studies (20 slices/study, three spectral bands/slice, 256x256 pixels/band, 12 b/pixel). The MFCELP method provides a significant visual improvement over the discrete cosine transform (DCT) based Joint Photographers Expert Group (JPEG) method, the wavelet transform based embedded zero-tree wavelet (EZW) coding method, and the vector tree (VT) coding method, as well as the multispectral segmented autoregressive moving average (MSARMA) method we developed previously.

  10. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Shin, Mihye; Hinshaw, Waldo; Bennett, N Robert; Pelc, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2013-02-01

    Using hybrid x-ray∕MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also evaluated to determine

  11. Novel motor design for rotating anode x-ray tubes operating in the fringe field of a magnetic resonance imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lillaney, Prasheel; Pelc, Norbert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Shin Mihye [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Hinshaw, Waldo; Fahrig, Rebecca [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Bennett, N. Robert [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Qualcomm MEMS Technologies, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Using hybrid x-ray/MR (XMR) systems for image guidance during interventional procedures could enhance the diagnosis and treatment of neurologic, oncologic, cardiovascular, and other disorders. The authors propose a close proximity hybrid system design in which a C-arm fluoroscopy unit is placed immediately adjacent to the solenoid magnet of a MR system with a minimum distance of 1.2 m between the x-ray and MR imaging fields of view. Existing rotating anode x-ray tube designs fail within MR fringe field environments because the magnetic fields alter the electron trajectories in the x-ray tube and act as a brake on the induction motor, reducing the rotation speed of the anode. In this study the authors propose a novel motor design that avoids the anode rotation speed reduction. Methods: The proposed design replaces the permanent magnet stator found in brushed dc motors with the radial component of the MR fringe field. The x-ray tube is oriented such that the radial component of the MR fringe field is orthogonal to the cathode-anode axis. Using a feedback position sensor and the support bearings as electrical slip rings, the authors use electrical commutation to eliminate the need for mechanical brushes and commutators. A vacuum compatible prototype of the proposed motor design was assembled, and its performance was evaluated at various operating conditions. The prototype consisted of a 3.1 in. diameter anode rated at 300 kHU with a ceramic rotor that was 5.6 in. in length and had a 2.9 in. diameter. The material chosen for all ceramic components was MACOR, a machineable glass ceramic developed by Corning Inc. The approximate weight of the entire assembly was 1750 g. The maximum rotation speed, angular acceleration, and acceleration time of the motor design were investigated, as well as the dependence of these parameters on rotor angular offset, magnetic field strength, and field orientation. The resonance properties of the authors' assembly were also

  12. Three-dimensional visualization of functional brain tissue and functional magnetic resonance imaging-integrated neuronavigation in the resection of brain tumor adjacent to motor cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Tong; Cui Shimin; Tong Xiaoguang; Liu Li; Xue Kai; Liu Meili; Liang Siquan; Zhang Yunting; Zhi Dashi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the value of three -dimensional visualization of functional brain tissue and the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-integrated neuronavigation in the resection of brain tumor adjacent to motor cortex. Method: Sixty patients with tumor located in the central sulcus were enrolled. Thirty patients were randomly assigned to function group and 30 to control group. Patients in function group underwent fMRI to localize the functional brain tissues. Then the function information was transferred to the neurosurgical navigator. The patients in control group underwent surgery with navigation without function information. The therapeutic effect, excision rate. improvement of motor function, and survival quality during follow-up were analyzed. Result: All patients in function group were accomplished visualization of functional brain tissues and fMRI-integrated neuronavigation. The locations of tumors, central sulcus and motor cortex were marked during the operation. The fMRI -integrated information played a great role in both pre- and post-operation. Pre-operation: designing the location of the skin flap and window bone, determining the relationship between the tumor and motor cortex, and designing the pathway for the resection. Post- operation: real-time navigation of relationship between the tumor and motor cortex, assisting to localize the motor cortex using interoperation ultra-sound for correcting the displacement by the CSF outflow and collapsing tumor. The patients in the function group had better results than the patients in the control group in therapeutic effect (u=2.646, P=0.008), excision rate (χ = 7.200, P<0.01), improvement of motor function (u=2.231, P=0.026), and survival quality (KPS u c = 2.664, P=0.008; Zubrod -ECOG -WHO u c =2.135, P=0.033). Conclusions: Using preoperative three -dimensional visualization of cerebral function tissue and the fMRI-integrated neuronavigation technology, combining intraoperative accurate

  13. Do Nimble Hands Make for Nimble Lexicons? Fine Motor Skills Predict Knowledge of Embodied Vocabulary Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggate, Sebastian P.; Stoeger, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Theories and research in embodied cognition postulate that cognition grounded in action enjoys a processing advantage. Extending this theory to the study of how fine motor skills (FMS) link to vocabulary development in preschool children, the authors investigated FMS and vocabulary in 76 preschoolers. Building on previous research, they…

  14. Fine Motor Skill Predicts Expressive Language in Infant Siblings of Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBarton, Eve Sauer; Iverson, Jana M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether fine motor and expressive language skills are related in the later-born siblings of children with autism (heightened-risk, HR infants) who are at increased risk for language delays. We observed 34 HR infants longitudinally from 12 to 36 months. We used parent report and standardized observation measures to assess fine motor…

  15. Cognitive ability predicts motor learning on a virtual reality game in patients with TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Rochelle L; Skeel, Reid L; Ustinova, Ksenia I

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality games and simulations have been utilized successfully for motor rehabilitation of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Little is known, however, how TBI-related cognitive decline affects learning of motor tasks in virtual environments. To fill this gap, we examined learning within a virtual reality game involving various reaching motions in 14 patients with TBI and 15 healthy individuals with different cognitive abilities. All participants practiced ten 90-second gaming trials to assess various aspects of motor learning. Cognitive abilities were assessed with a battery of tests including measures of memory, executive functioning, and visuospatial ability. Overall, participants with TBI showed both reduced performance and a slower learning rate in the virtual reality game compared to healthy individuals. Numerous correlations between overall performance and several of the cognitive ability domains were revealed for both the patient and control groups, with the best predictor being overall cognitive ability. The results may provide a starting point for rehabilitation programs regarding which cognitive domains interact with motor learning.

  16. Working memory and fine motor skills predict early numeracy performance of children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rooijen, Maaike; Verhoeven, Ludo; Steenbergen, Bert

    2016-01-01

    Early numeracy is an important precursor for arithmetic performance, academic proficiency, and work success. Besides their apparent motor difficulties, children with cerebral palsy (CP) often show additional cognitive disturbances. In this study, we examine whether working memory, non-verbal intelligence, linguistic skills, counting and fine motor skills are positively related to the early numeracy performance of 6-year-old children with CP. A total of 56 children (M = 6.0, SD = 0.61, 37 boys) from Dutch special education schools participated in this cross-sectional study. Of the total group, 81% of the children have the spastic type of CP (33% unilateral and 66% bilateral), 9% have been diagnosed as having diskinetic CP, 8% have been diagnosed as having spastic and diskinetic CP and 2% have been diagnosed as having a combination of diskinetic and atactic CP. The children completed standardized tests assessing early numeracy performance, working memory, non-verbal intelligence, sentence understanding and fine motor skills. In addition, an experimental task was administered to examine their basic counting performance. Structural equation modeling showed that working memory and fine motor skills were significantly related to the early numeracy performance of the children (β = .79 and p working memory and early numeracy (β = .57, p working memory for early numeracy performance in children with CP and they warrant further research into the efficacy of intervention programs aimed at working memory training.

  17. Environmental Light and Its Relationship with Electromagnetic Resonances of Biomolecular Interactions, as Predicted by the Resonant Recognition Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Cosic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The meaning and influence of light to biomolecular interactions, and consequently to health, has been analyzed using the Resonant Recognition Model (RRM. The RRM proposes that biological processes/interactions are based on electromagnetic resonances between interacting biomolecules at specific electromagnetic frequencies within the infra-red, visible and ultra-violet frequency ranges, where each interaction can be identified by the certain frequency critical for resonant activation of specific biological activities of proteins and DNA. We found that: (1 the various biological interactions could be grouped according to their resonant frequency into super families of these functions, enabling simpler analyses of these interactions and consequently analyses of influence of electromagnetic frequencies to health; (2 the RRM spectrum of all analyzed biological functions/interactions is the same as the spectrum of the sun light on the Earth, which is in accordance with fact that life is sustained by the sun light; (3 the water is transparent to RRM frequencies, enabling proteins and DNA to interact without loss of energy; (4 the spectrum of some artificial sources of light, as opposed to the sun light, do not cover the whole RRM spectrum, causing concerns for disturbance to some biological functions and consequently we speculate that it can influence health.

  18. Attentional bias toward high-calorie food-cues and trait motor impulsivity interactively predict weight gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Meule

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Strong bottom-up impulses and weak top-down control may interactively lead to overeating and, consequently, weight gain. In the present study, female university freshmen were tested at the start of the first semester and again at the start of the second semester. Attentional bias toward high- or low-calorie food-cues was assessed using a dot-probe paradigm and participants completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale . Attentional bias and motor impulsivity interactively predicted change in body mass index: motor impulsivity positively predicted weight gain only when participants showed an attentional bias toward high-calorie food-cues. Attentional and non-planning impulsivity were unrelated to weight change. Results support findings showing that weight gain is prospectively predicted by a combination of weak top-down control (i.e. high impulsivity and strong bottom-up impulses (i.e. high automatic motivational drive toward high-calorie food stimuli. They also highlight the fact that only specific aspects of impulsivity are relevant in eating and weight regulation.

  19. Prediction of Individual Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy via Machine Learning on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Bürger, Christian; Münker, Sandra; Mühlmann, Lisa; Wahl, Patricia; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Alferink, Judith; Zwanzger, Peter; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Dannlowski, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, biomarkers that accurately predict a response to ECT remain unidentified. To investigate whether certain factors identified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are able to predict ECT response. In this nonrandomized prospective study, gray matter structure was assessed twice at approximately 6 weeks apart using 3-T MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Patients were recruited through the inpatient service of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, from March 11, 2010, to March 27, 2015. Two patient groups with acute major depressive disorder were included. One group received an ECT series in addition to antidepressants (n = 24); a comparison sample was treated solely with antidepressants (n = 23). Both groups were compared with a sample of healthy control participants (n = 21). Binary pattern classification was used to predict ECT response by structural MRI that was performed before treatment. In addition, univariate analysis was conducted to predict reduction of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by pretreatment gray matter volumes and to investigate ECT-related structural changes. One participant in the ECT sample was excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 participants (27 men and 40 women; mean [SD] age, 43.7 [10.6] years). The binary pattern classification yielded a successful prediction of ECT response, with accuracy rates of 78.3% (18 of 23 patients in the ECT sample) and sensitivity rates of 100% (13 of 13 who responded to ECT). Furthermore, a support vector regression yielded a significant prediction of relative reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. The principal findings of the univariate model indicated a positive association between pretreatment subgenual cingulate volume and individual ECT response (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI] coordinates x = 8, y = 21, z = -18

  20. A study on the activation of supplementary motor area in functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Gong Yong; Chung, Gyung Ho; Park, Hark Hoon; Oh, Hee Sul; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Jin Young

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the activated zone of the supplementary motor area through motor and sensory stimulation of both hands by fMRI. Twenty-four healthy volunteers, ranging in age from 20 to 30 years, served as subjects. They were divided into four groups and performed one of the four activation tasks : complex movement, fine movement, touch sensation, heat sensation. Complex movement consisted of a finger task in which subjects flexed and extended all fingers repeatedly in union, without the fingers touching each other(group I). Fine movement involved a thumb task in which subjects flexed and extended the thumb repeatedly without touching the other fingers(group II). Touch sensation consisted of a palm task in which another person repeatedly drew a circle on the subject's palm (group III), and heat sensation involved of a palm task in which subject's palm was touched by another person with a 40 deg C water-bag (group IV). F-MRI was conducted on a commercial 1.5-T scanner equipped with echo-planar imaging. After overlapping images were obtained using a Z-s-core, and the mean/curve in the MR devices was evaluated, the activated zone of the supplementary motor area was also evalvated. Thirty-two of 48 images(20 of the 24 men) revealed activated zones in the supplementary motor area. In group I, activation was observed in five subjects, in three of whom it was bilateral (contralateral activation). In group II, activation was observed in five subjects, in one of whom it was bilateral. In group III, activation occurred in five subjects(bilateral in four, and contralateral in three), and In group IV, activation was also observed in five;in three of these it was bilateral. Using fMRI, and in association with motor and sensory tasks, the supplementary motor area was activated in 66.7% of healthy volunteers (32/48)

  1. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7-11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Irene R; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Faber, Niels R; Oosterveld, Frits G J; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players' potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player's future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7-11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items 'aiming at target', 'throwing a ball', and 'eye-hand coordination' in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment's outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be included in a talent

  2. Does Motor Development in Infancy Predict Spinal Pain in Later Childhood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Steven J; Williams, Christopher M; Hestbaek, Lise

    2017-01-01

    first sat, and first walked without support. Predictors were measured by parent-report when the children were aged 6, and 18 months, along with a comprehensive list of covariates, including; child sex, birthweight and cognitive development, socioeconomic indicators, and parental health variables......Study Design Longitudinal cohort study. Background Spinal pain is responsible for a huge personal and societal burden but the aetiology remains unclear. Deficits in motor control have been implicated with spinal pain in adults, and delayed motor development is associated with a range of health...... problems and risks in children. Objectives To assess whether there is an independent relationship between the age at which infants first sit and walk without support, and spinal pain at age 11 years. Methods Data from the Danish National Birth Cohort were analysed. Predictors were age at which the child...

  3. Evaluation of acoustic resonance at branch section in main steam line. Part 2. Proposal of method for predicting resonance frequency in steam flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Yuta; Morita, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    Flow-induced acoustic resonances of piping system containing closed side-branches are sometimes encountered in power plants. Acoustic standing waves with large amplitude pressure fluctuation in closed side-branches are excited by the unstable shear layer which separates the mean flow in the main piping from the stagnant fluid in the branch. In U.S. NPP, the steam dryer had been damaged by high cycle fatigue due to acoustic-induced vibration under a power uprating condition. Our previous research developed the method for evaluating the acoustic resonance at the branch sections in actual power plants by using CFD. In the method, sound speed in wet steam is evaluated by its theory on the assumption of homogeneous flow, although it may be different from practical sound speed in wet steam. So, it is necessary to consider and introduce the most suitable model of practical sound speed in wet steam. In addition, we tried to develop simplified prediction method of the amplitude and frequency of pressure fluctuation in wet steam flow. Our previous experimental research clarified that resonance amplitude of fluctuating pressure at the top of the branch in wet steam. However, the resonance frequency in steam condition could not be estimated by using theoretical equation as the end correction in steam condition and sound speed in wet steam is not clarified as same reason as CFD. Therefore, in this study, we tried to evaluate the end correction in each dry and wet steam and sound speed of wet steam from experimental results. As a result, method for predicting resonance frequency by using theoretical equation in each wet and dry steam condition was proposed. (author)

  4. Development of Erosive Burning Models for CFD Predictions of Solid Rocket Motor Internal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qun-Zhen

    2003-01-01

    Four erosive burning models, equations (11) to (14). are developed in this work by using a power law relationship to correlate (1) the erosive burning ratio and the local velocity gradient at propellant surfaces; (2) the erosive burning ratio and the velocity gradient divided by centerline velocity; (3) the erosive burning difference and the local velocity gradient at propellant surfaces; and (4) the erosive burning difference and the velocity gradient divided by centerline velocity. These models depend on the local velocity gradient at the propellant surface (or the velocity gradient divided by centerline velocity) only and, unlike other empirical models, are independent of the motor size. It was argued that, since the erosive burning is a local phenomenon occurring near the surface of the solid propellant, the erosive burning ratio should be independent of the bore diameter if it is correlated with some local flow parameters such as the velocity gradient at the propellant surface. This seems to be true considering the good results obtained by applying these models, which are developed from the small size 5 inch CP tandem motor testing, to CFD simulations of much bigger motors.

  5. Can a virtual reality assessment of fine motor skill predict successful central line insertion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadipanah, Hossein; Parthiban, Chembian; Nathwani, Jay; Rutherford, Drew; DiMarco, Shannon; Pugh, Carla

    2016-10-01

    Due to the increased use of peripherally inserted central catheter lines, central lines are not performed as frequently. The aim of this study is to evaluate whether a virtual reality (VR)-based assessment of fine motor skills can be used as a valid and objective assessment of central line skills. Surgical residents (N = 43) from 7 general surgery programs performed a subclavian central line in a simulated setting. Then, they participated in a force discrimination task in a VR environment. Hand movements from the subclavian central line simulation were tracked by electromagnetic sensors. Gross movements as monitored by the electromagnetic sensors were compared with the fine motor metrics calculated from the force discrimination tasks in the VR environment. Long periods of inactivity (idle time) during needle insertion and lack of smooth movements, as detected by the electromagnetic sensors, showed a significant correlation with poor force discrimination in the VR environment. Also, long periods of needle insertion time correlated to the poor performance in force discrimination in the VR environment. This study shows that force discrimination in a defined VR environment correlates to needle insertion time, idle time, and hand smoothness when performing subclavian central line placement. Fine motor force discrimination may serve as a valid and objective assessment of the skills required for successful needle insertion when placing central lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of injuries to the ankle joint: can it predict clinical outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, M; De Simoni, C; Wetz, H H; Zollinger, H; Hodler, J

    1997-02-01

    To predict clinical outcome after ankle sprains on the basis of magnetic resonance (MR) findings. Twenty-nine consecutive patients (mean age 32.9 years, range 13-60 years) were examined clinically and with MR imaging both after trauma and following standardized conservative therapy. Various MR abnormalities were related to a clinical outcome score. There was a tendency for a better clinical outcome in partial, rather than complete, tears of the anterior talofibular ligament and when there was no fluid within the peroneal tendon sheath at the initial MR examination (P = 0.092 for either abnormality). A number of other MR features did not significantly influence clinical outcome, including the presence of a calcaneofibular ligament lesion and a bone bruise of the talar dome. Clinical outcome after ankle sprain cannot consistently be predicted by MR imaging, although MR imaging may be more accurate when the anterior talofibular ligament is only partially torn and there are no signs of injury to the peroneal tendon sheath.

  7. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict the Recurrence of Chronic Subdural Hematoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    GOTO, Haruo; ISHIKAWA, Osamu; NOMURA, Masashi; TANAKA, Kentaro; NOMURA, Seiji; MAEDA, Keiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The exact predictive factors for postoperative recurrence of chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) are still unknown. Based on the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), low recurrence rate of T1-hyperintensity hematoma was previously reported. We investigated the other types of radiological findings which are related to the recurrence rate of CSDH in large number of patients analyzed by multivariate logistic regression model. Preoperative MRI and postoperative computed tomography (CT) were performed and the influence of the preoperative use of antiplatelet or anticoagulant drugs was also studied. The overall recurrence rate was 9.3% (47 of 505 hematomas). The MRI T1-iso/hypointensity group showed a significantly higher recurrence rate (18.2%, 29 of 159) compared to the other groups (5.2%, 18 of 346; p hematoma, antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug usage, residual hematoma on postoperative CT, and MRI classification (p hematoma and antiplatelet or anticoagulant drug usage did not increase the recurrence risk. The preoperative MRI findings, especially T1WI findings, have predictive value for postoperative recurrence of CSDH and the T1-iso/hypointensity group can be assumed to be a high recurrence risk group. PMID:25746312

  8. Central Motor Conduction Studies and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Children with Severe Primary and Secondary Dystonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Verity; Mills, Kerry; Siddiqui, Ata; Selway, Richard; Lin, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Dystonia in childhood has many causes. Imaging may suggest corticospinal tract dysfunction with or without coexistent basal ganglia damage. There are very few published neurophysiological studies on children with dystonia; one previous study has focused on primary dystonia. We investigated central motor conduction in 62 children (34 males, 28…

  9. Application of 3DAC (3D anisotropy contrast) imaging to predict motor function outcome of patients with cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igase, Keiji; Matsubara, Ichiro; Arai, Masamori; Goishi, Jyunji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-01-01

    ThreeDAC (3D anisotropy contrast) image can depict neuronal fibers in 3 dimensions and the way those anatomical structures exist. However, despite its sophistication, quantitative analysis of 3DAC image has been performed poorly, probably, due to difficulties collecting numerical factors, thus we have tried to evaluate a feasible quantitative 3DAC image technique to predict motor function outcome in patients with cerebral infarction. Twenty-five patients with a acute cerebral infarctions, who underwent 3DAC procedure with 3 tesla MRI within 1 week after the onset, were enrolled in this study. To assess motor function, we applied manual muscle testing (MMT) score, which was modified by designating from 1 to 13 points corresponding to MMT, during both the onset and 3 months later. 3DAC image was created through the procedure assigning each direction to red, green and blue (RGB) colors after obtaining rare 3DAC images. On the slice showing the maximally injured region, Injured Fiber Ratio (IFR), defined as the ratio of injured area on horizontal fibers shown as blue area to the area of whole horizontal fibers in a healthy side, was calculated and compared with MMT score. Although MMT score at the onset did not correlate significantly with IFR, each MMT score of the arm and leg 3 months later revealed a significant correlation with IFR(R 2 =0.47 and R 2 =0.67, respectively). Given these results, by exploiting the IFR obtained from 3DAC image a motor function outcome in patients with cerebral infarction might be predicted even in a very acute stage and 3DAC image could be a feasible modality for analyzing a neuronal injury in cerebral infarction patients. (author)

  10. Can magnetic resonance imaging accurately predict concordant pain provocation during provocative disc injection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Chang Ho; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Chung, Kyoo Byung; Sung, Deuk Jae; Lee, Sang-Heon; Derby, Richard

    2009-01-01

    To correlate magnetic resonance (MR) image findings with pain response by provocation discography in patients with discogenic low back pain, with an emphasis on the combination analysis of a high intensity zone (HIZ) and disc contour abnormalities. Sixty-two patients (aged 17-68 years) with axial low back pain that was likely to be disc related underwent lumbar discography (178 discs tested). The MR images were evaluated for disc degeneration, disc contour abnormalities, HIZ, and endplate abnormalities. Based on the combination of an HIZ and disc contour abnormalities, four classes were determined: (1) normal or bulging disc without HIZ; (2) normal or bulging disc with HIZ; (3) disc protrusion without HIZ; (4) disc protrusion with HIZ. These MR image findings and a new combined MR classification were analyzed in the base of concordant pain determined by discography. Disc protrusion with HIZ [sensitivity 45.5%; specificity 97.8%; positive predictive value (PPV), 87.0%] correlated significantly with concordant pain provocation (P < 0.01). A normal or bulging disc with HIZ was not associated with reproduction of pain. Disc degeneration (sensitivity 95.4%; specificity 38.8%; PPV 33.9%), disc protrusion (sensitivity 68.2%; specificity 80.6%; PPV 53.6%), and HIZ (sensitivity 56.8%; specificity 83.6%; PPV 53.2%) were not helpful in the identification of a disc with concordant pain. The proposed MR classification is useful to predict a disc with concordant pain. Disc protrusion with HIZ on MR imaging predicted positive discography in patients with discogenic low back pain. (orig.)

  11. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  12. Spinal cord multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging for survival prediction in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querin, G; El Mendili, M M; Lenglet, T; Delphine, S; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Benali, H; Pradat, P-F

    2017-08-01

    Assessing survival is a critical issue in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Neuroimaging seems to be promising in the assessment of disease severity and several studies also suggest a strong relationship between spinal cord (SC) atrophy described by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and disease progression. The aim of the study was to determine the predictive added value of multimodal SC MRI on survival. Forty-nine ALS patients were recruited and clinical data were collected. Patients were scored on the Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale and manual muscle testing. They were followed longitudinally to assess survival. The cervical SC was imaged using the 3 T MRI system. Cord volume and cross-sectional area (CSA) at each vertebral level were computed. Diffusion tensor imaging metrics were measured. Imaging metrics and clinical variables were used as inputs for a multivariate Cox regression survival model. On building a multivariate Cox regression model with clinical and MRI parameters, fractional anisotropy, magnetization transfer ratio and CSA at C2-C3, C4-C5, C5-C6 and C6-C7 vertebral levels were significant. Moreover, the hazard ratio calculated for CSA at the C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels indicated an increased risk for patients with SC atrophy (respectively 0.66 and 0.68). In our cohort, MRI parameters seem to be more predictive than clinical variables, which had a hazard ratio very close to 1. It is suggested that multimodal SC MRI could be a useful tool in survival prediction especially if used at the beginning of the disease and when combined with clinical variables. To validate it as a biomarker, confirmation of the results in bigger independent cohorts of patients is warranted. © 2017 EAN.

  13. Prediction of quantum interference in molecular junctions using a parabolic diagram: Understanding the origin of Fano and anti-resonances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Sevincli, Haldun

    2013-01-01

    Recently the interest in quantum interference (QI) phenomena in molecular devices (molecular junctions) has been growing due to the unique features observed in the transmission spectra. In order to design single molecular devices exploiting QI effects as desired, it is necessary to provide simple...... rules for predicting the appearance of QI effects such as anti-resonances or Fano line shapes and for controlling them. In this study, we derive a transmission function of a generic molecular junction with a side group (T-shaped molecular junction) using a minimal toy model. We developed a simple method...... to predict the appearance of quantum interference, Fano resonances or anti- resonances, and its position in the conductance spectrum by introducing a simple graphical representation (parabolic model). Using it we can easily visualize the relation between the key electronic parameters and the positions...

  14. Can Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predict the Reparability of Massive Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Youn; Park, Ji Seon; Rhee, Yong Girl

    2017-06-01

    Numerous studies have shown preoperative fatty infiltration of rotator cuff muscles to be strongly negatively correlated with the successful repair of massive rotator cuff tears (RCTs). To assess the association between factors identified on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), especially infraspinatus fatty infiltration, and the reparability of massive RCTs. Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. We analyzed a total of 105 patients with massive RCTs for whom MRI was performed ≤6 months before arthroscopic procedures. The mean age of the patients was 62.7 years (range, 46-83 years), and 46 were men. Among them, complete repair was possible in 50 patients (48%) and not possible in 55 patients (52%). The tangent sign, fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff, and Patte classification were evaluated as predictors of reparability. Using the receiver operating characteristic curve and the area under the curve (AUC), the prediction accuracy of each variable and combinations of variables were measured. Reparability was associated with fatty infiltration of the supraspinatus ( P = .0045) and infraspinatus ( P 3 and grade >2, respectively. The examination of single variables revealed that infraspinatus fatty infiltration showed the highest AUC value (0.812; sensitivity: 0.86; specificity: 0.76), while the tangent sign showed the lowest AUC value (0.626; sensitivity: 0.38; specificity: 0.87). Among 2-variable combinations, the combination of infraspinatus fatty infiltration and the Patte classification showed the highest AUC value (0.874; sensitivity: 0.54; specificity: 0.96). The combination of 4 variables, that is, infraspinatus and supraspinatus fatty infiltration, the tangent sign, and the Patte classification, had an AUC of 0.866 (sensitivity: 0.28; specificity: 0.98), which was lower than the highest AUC value (0.874; sensitivity: 0.54; specificity: 0.96) among the 2-variable combinations. The tangent sign or Patte classification alone was not a predictive

  15. Piezoelectric Motors, an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Karl Spanner; Burhanettin Koc

    2016-01-01

    Piezoelectric motors are used in many industrial and commercial applications. Various piezoelectric motors are available in the market. All of the piezoelectric motors use the inverse piezoelectric effect, where microscopically small oscillatory motions are converted into continuous or stepping rotary or linear motions. Methods of obtaining long moving distance have various drive and functional principles that make these motors categorized into three groups: resonance-drive (piezoelectric ult...

  16. Resonant Cholinergic Dynamics in Cognitive and Motor Decision-Making: Attention, Category Learning, and Choice in Neocortex, Superior Colliculus, and Optic Tectum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, Stephen; Palma, Jesse; Versace, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Freely behaving organisms need to rapidly calibrate their perceptual, cognitive, and motor decisions based on continuously changing environmental conditions. These plastic changes include sharpening or broadening of cognitive and motor attention and learning to match the behavioral demands that are imposed by changing environmental statistics. This article proposes that a shared circuit design for such flexible decision-making is used in specific cognitive and motor circuits, and that both types of circuits use acetylcholine to modulate choice selectivity. Such task-sensitive control is proposed to control thalamocortical choice of the critical features that are cognitively attended and that are incorporated through learning into prototypes of visual recognition categories. A cholinergically-modulated process of vigilance control determines if a recognition category and its attended features are abstract (low vigilance) or concrete (high vigilance). Homologous neural mechanisms of cholinergic modulation are proposed to focus attention and learn a multimodal map within the deeper layers of superior colliculus. This map enables visual, auditory, and planned movement commands to compete for attention, leading to selection of a winning position that controls where the next saccadic eye movement will go. Such map learning may be viewed as a kind of attentive motor category learning. The article hereby explicates a link between attention, learning, and cholinergic modulation during decision making within both cognitive and motor systems. Homologs between the mammalian superior colliculus and the avian optic tectum lead to predictions about how multimodal map learning may occur in the mammalian and avian brain and how such learning may be modulated by acetycholine.

  17. Resonant cholinergic dynamics in cognitive and motor decision-making:Attention, category learning, and choice in neocortex, superior colliculus, and optic tectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eGrossberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Freely behaving organisms need to rapidly calibrate their perceptual, cognitive, and motor decisions based on continuously changing environmental conditions. These plastic changes include sharpening or broadening of cognitive and motor attention and learning to match the behavioral demands that are imposed by changing environmental statistics. This article proposes that a shared circuit design for such flexible decision-making is used in specific cognitive and motor circuits, and that both types of circuits use acetylcholine to modulate choice selectivity. Such task-sensitive control is proposed to control thalamocortical choice of the critical features that are cognitively attended and that are incorporated through learning into prototypes of visual recognition categories. A cholinergically-modulated process of vigilance control determines if a recognition category and its attended features are abstract (low vigilance or concrete (high vigilance. Homologous neural mechanisms of cholinergic modulation are proposed to focus attention and learn a multimodal map within the deeper layers of superior colliculus. This map enables visual, auditory, and planned movement commands to compete for attention, leading to selection of a winning position that controls where the next saccadic eye movement will go. Such map learning may be viewed as a kind of attentive motor category learning. The article hereby explicates a link between attention, learning, and cholinergic modulation during decision making within both cognitive and motor systems. Homologs between the mammalian superior colliculus and the avian optic tectum lead to predictions about how multimodal map learning may occur in the avian brain and how such learning may be modulated by acetycholine.

  18. Evaluation of an Automated Analysis Tool for Prostate Cancer Prediction Using Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias C Roethke

    Full Text Available To evaluate the diagnostic performance of an automated analysis tool for the assessment of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI of the prostate.A fully automated analysis tool was used for a retrospective analysis of mpMRI sets (T2-weighted, T1-weighted dynamic contrast-enhanced, and diffusion-weighted sequences. The software provided a malignancy prediction value for each image pixel, defined as Malignancy Attention Index (MAI that can be depicted as a colour map overlay on the original images. The malignancy maps were compared to histopathology derived from a combination of MRI-targeted and systematic transperineal MRI/TRUS-fusion biopsies.In total, mpMRI data of 45 patients were evaluated. With a sensitivity of 85.7% (with 95% CI of 65.4-95.0, a specificity of 87.5% (with 95% CI of 69.0-95.7 and a diagnostic accuracy of 86.7% (with 95% CI of 73.8-93.8 for detection of prostate cancer, the automated analysis results corresponded well with the reported diagnostic accuracies by human readers based on the PI-RADS system in the current literature.The study revealed comparable diagnostic accuracies for the detection of prostate cancer of a user-independent MAI-based automated analysis tool and PI-RADS-scoring-based human reader analysis of mpMRI. Thus, the analysis tool could serve as a detection support system for less experienced readers. The results of the study also suggest the potential of MAI-based analysis for advanced lesion assessments, such as cancer extent and staging prediction.

  19. Predicting Basal Metabolic Rate in Men with Motor Complete Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, Tom E; Gorgey, Ashraf S

    2018-01-08

    To assess the accuracy of existing basal metabolic rate (BMR) prediction equations in men with chronic (>1 year) spinal cord injury (SCI). The primary aim is to develop new SCI population-specific BMR prediction models, based on anthropometric, body composition and/or demographic variables that are strongly associated with BMR. Thirty men with chronic SCI (Paraplegic; n = 21, Tetraplegic; n = 9), aged 35 ± 11 years (mean ± SD) participated in this cross-sectional study. Criterion BMR values were measured by indirect calorimetry. Body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry; DXA) and anthropometric measurements (circumferences and diameters) were also taken. Multiple linear regression analysis was performed to develop new SCI-specific BMR prediction models. Criterion BMR values were compared to values estimated from six existing and four developed prediction equations RESULTS: Existing equations that use information on stature, weight and/or age, significantly (P BMR by a mean of 14-17% (187-234 kcal/day). Equations that utilised fat-free mass (FFM) accurately predicted BMR. The development of new SCI-specific prediction models demonstrated that the addition of anthropometric variables (weight, height and calf circumference) to FFM (Model 3; r = 0.77), explained 8% more of the variance in BMR than FFM alone (Model 1; r = 0.69). Using anthropometric variables, without FFM, explained less of the variance in BMR (Model 4; r = 0.57). However, all the developed prediction models demonstrated acceptable mean absolute error ≤ 6%. BMR can be more accurately estimated when DXA derived FFM is incorporated into prediction equations. Utilising anthropometric measurements provides a promising alternative to improve the prediction of BMR, beyond that achieved by existing equations in persons with SCI.

  20. A parallel solution-adaptive scheme for predicting multi-phase core flows in solid propellant rocket motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachdev, J.S.; Groth, C.P.T.; Gottlieb, J.J.

    2003-01-01

    The development of a parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) scheme is described for solving the governing equations for multi-phase (gas-particle) core flows in solid propellant rocket motors (SRM). An Eulerian formulation is used to described the coupled motion between the gas and particle phases. A cell-centred upwind finite-volume discretization and the use of limited solution reconstruction, Riemann solver based flux functions for the gas and particle phases, and explicit multi-stage time-stepping allows for high solution accuracy and computational robustness. A Riemann problem is formulated for prescribing boundary data at the burning surface. Efficient and scalable parallel implementations are achieved with domain decomposition on distributed memory multiprocessor architectures. Numerical results are described to demonstrate the capabilities of the approach for predicting SRM core flows. (author)

  1. Action prediction in younger versus older adults: neural correlates of motor familiarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Diersch

    Full Text Available Generating predictions during action observation is essential for efficient navigation through our social environment. With age, the sensitivity in action prediction declines. In younger adults, the action observation network (AON, consisting of premotor, parietal and occipitotemporal cortices, has been implicated in transforming executed and observed actions into a common code. Much less is known about age-related changes in the neural representation of observed actions. Using fMRI, the present study measured brain activity in younger and older adults during the prediction of temporarily occluded actions (figure skating elements and simple movement exercises. All participants were highly familiar with the movement exercises whereas only some participants were experienced figure skaters. With respect to the AON, the results confirm that this network was preferentially engaged for the more familiar movement exercises. Compared to younger adults, older adults recruited visual regions to perform the task and, additionally, the hippocampus and caudate when the observed actions were familiar to them. Thus, instead of effectively exploiting the sensorimotor matching properties of the AON, older adults seemed to rely predominantly on the visual dynamics of the observed actions to perform the task. Our data further suggest that the caudate played an important role during the prediction of the less familiar figure skating elements in better-performing groups. Together, these findings show that action prediction engages a distributed network in the brain, which is modulated by the content of the observed actions and the age and experience of the observer.

  2. Motor cognitive processing speed estimation among the primary schoolchildren by deriving prediction formula: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vencita Priyanka Aranha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Motor cognitive processing speed (MCPS is often reported in terms of reaction time. In spite of being a significant indicator of function, behavior, and performance, MCPS is rarely used in clinics and schools to identify kids with slowed motor cognitive processing. The reason behind this is the lack of availability of convenient formula to estimate MCPS. Thereby, the aim of this study is to estimate the MCPS in the primary schoolchildren. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and four primary schoolchildren, aged 6–12 years, were recruited by the cluster sampling method for this cross-sectional study. MCPS was estimated by the ruler drop method (RDM. By this method, a metallic stainless steel ruler was suspended vertically such that 5 cm graduation of the lower was aligned between the web space of the child's hand, and the child was asked to catch the moving ruler as quickly as possible, once released from the examiner's hand. Distance the ruler traveled was recorded and converted into time, which is the MCPS. Multiple regression analysis of variables was performed to determine the influence of independent variables on MCPS. Results: Mean MCPS of the entire sample of 204 primary schoolchildren is 230.01 ms ± 26.5 standard deviation (95% confidence interval; 226.4–233.7 ms that ranged from 162.9 to 321.6 ms. By stepwise regression analysis, we derived the regression equation, MCPS (ms = 279.625–5.495 × age, with 41.3% (R = 0.413 predictability and 17.1% (R2 = 0.171 and adjusted R2 = 0.166 variability. Conclusion: MCPS prediction formula through RDM in the primary schoolchildren has been established.

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light concentration in motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia predicts survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skillbäck, Tobias; Mattsson, Niklas; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2017-08-01

    To aid diagnostics, patient stratification and studies seeking to find treatments for the related diseases motor neuron disease (MND) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), there is a need to establish a way to assess disease severity and the amount of ongoing neurodegeneration. Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) may serve this purpose. We cross-referenced the Swedish mortality registry with the laboratory database at Sahlgrenska University Hospital to produce a dataset of CSF NFL concentrations and mortality information for 715 MND patients, 87 FTD patients, and 107 healthy controls. Biomarker concentrations were analysed in relation to recorded cause of death and time of death. MND patients had significantly higher CSF NFL concentrations than FTD patients. Both groups had significantly higher concentrations than the healthy controls (mean 709% increase in MND and 307% increase in FTD). Higher concentrations of CSF NFL were associated with shorter survival in both MND and FTD. The results of this study strengthen the notion of CSF NFL as a useful tool for determining disease intensity in MND and FTD patients. Further studies in patient cohorts with clinically subtyped and genetically classified diagnoses are needed.

  4. Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which

  5. What roles do errors serve in motor skill learning? An examination of two theoretical predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanli, Elizabeth A; Lee, Timothy D

    2014-01-01

    Easy-to-difficult and difficult-to-easy progressions of task difficulty during skill acquisition were examined in 2 experiments that assessed retention, dual-task, and transfer tests of learning. Findings of the first experiment suggest that an easy-to difficult progression did not consistently induce implicit learning processes and was not consistently beneficial to performance under a secondary-task load. The findings of experiment two did not support the predictions made based on schema theory and only partially supported predictions based on reinvestment theory. The authors interpret these findings to suggest that the timing of error in relation to the difficulty of the task (functional task difficulty) plays a role in the transfer of learning to novel versions of a task.

  6. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7-11 years Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene R Faber

    Full Text Available Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players' potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player's future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7-11 years. Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05. Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items 'aiming at target', 'throwing a ball', and 'eye-hand coordination' in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%. Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment's outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%. This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be

  7. Can Perceptuo-Motor Skills Assessment Outcomes in Young Table Tennis Players (7–11 years) Predict Future Competition Participation and Performance? An Observational Prospective Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Forecasting future performance in youth table tennis players based on current performance is complex due to, among other things, differences between youth players in growth, development, maturity, context and table tennis experience. Talent development programmes might benefit from an assessment of underlying perceptuo-motor skills for table tennis, which is hypothesized to determine the players’ potential concerning the perceptuo-motor domain. The Dutch perceptuo-motor skills assessment intends to measure the perceptuo-motor potential for table tennis in youth players by assessing the underlying skills crucial for developing technical and tactical qualities. Untrained perceptuo-motor tasks are used as these are suggested to represent a player’s future potential better than specific sport skills themselves as the latter depend on exposure to the sport itself. This study evaluated the value of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment for a talent developmental programme by evaluating its predictive validity for competition participation and performance in 48 young table tennis players (7–11 years). Players were tested on their perceptuo-motor skills once during a regional talent day, and the subsequent competition results were recorded half-yearly over a period of 2.5 years. Logistic regression analysis showed that test scores did not predict future competition participation (p >0.05). Yet, the Generalized Estimating Equations analysis, including the test items ‘aiming at target’, ‘throwing a ball’, and ‘eye-hand coordination’ in the best fitting model, revealed that the outcomes of the perceptuo-motor skills assessment were significant predictors for future competition results (R2 = 51%). Since the test age influences the perceptuo-motor skills assessment’s outcome, another multivariable model was proposed including test age as a covariate (R2 = 53%). This evaluation demonstrates promising prospects for the perceptuo-motor skills assessment to be

  8. Poor fine-motor and visuospatial skills predict persistence of pediatric-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder into adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Michael H; Sukhodolsky, Denis G; Dombrowski, Philip A; Panza, Kaitlyn E; Craiglow, Brittany G; Landeros-Weisenberger, Angeli; Leckman, James F; Peterson, Bradley S; Schultz, Robert T

    2011-09-01

    Half of pediatric-onset OCD cases remit by adulthood. Studies have demonstrated that initial response to pharmacotherapy, age of onset, prominent hoarding symptoms, and the presence of comorbid tic disorders are associated with long-term outcome. Our goal was to examine the association between childhood performance on neuropsychological testing and persistence of OCD into adulthood. Twenty-four children with OCD were followed for an average of 7.5 years into early adulthood. Neuropsychological performance in childhood (childhood performance on the Purdue pegboard task and the block design subscale of WISC-III was associated with persistence of OCD symptoms into adulthood. IQ, VMI, and nonverbal memory performance did not predict significantly the persistence of OCD. These results suggest that visuospatial and fine-motor skill deficits are predictive of poor long-term outcome in pediatric-onset OCD. Future longitudinal studies are needed to chart the course of these deficits relative to the course of symptoms in OCD and to determine whether the association of these neuropsychiatric deficits with long-term outcome is specific to pediatric-onset OCD or generalizes to other psychiatric disorders. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry © 2011 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  9. Parkinson’s Disease Severity at 3 Years Can Be Predicted from Non-Motor Symptoms at Baseline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Ayala

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of this study is to present a predictive model of Parkinson’s disease (PD global severity, measured with the Clinical Impression of Severity Index for Parkinson’s Disease (CISI-PD.MethodsThis is an observational, longitudinal study with annual follow-up assessments over 3 years (four time points. A multilevel analysis and multiple imputation techniques were performed to generate a predictive model that estimates changes in the CISI-PD at 1, 2, and 3 years.ResultsThe clinical state of patients (CISI-PD significantly worsened in the 3-year follow-up. However, this change was of small magnitude (effect size: 0.44. The following baseline variables were significant predictors of the global severity change: baseline global severity of disease, levodopa equivalent dose, depression and anxiety symptoms, autonomic dysfunction, and cognitive state. The goodness-of-fit of the model was adequate, and the sensitive analysis showed that the data imputation method applied was suitable.ConclusionDisease progression depends more on the individual’s baseline characteristics than on the 3-year time period. Results may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution of PD including the non-motor manifestations of the disease.

  10. Prediction models and development of an easy to use open-access tool for measuring lung function of individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, Gabi; de Groot, Sonja; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Perret, Claudio; Michel, Franz; Hopman, Maria T. E.

    Objective: To develop statistical models to predict lung function and respiratory muscle strength from personal and lesion characteristics of individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury. Design: Cross-sectional, multi-centre cohort study. Subjects: A total of 440 individuals with traumatic,

  11. Model predictive control-based dynamic coordinate strategy for hydraulic hub-motor auxiliary system of a heavy commercial vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaohua; Li, Guanghan; Yin, Guodong; Song, Dafeng; Li, Sheng; Yang, Nannan

    2018-02-01

    Equipping a hydraulic hub-motor auxiliary system (HHMAS), which mainly consists of a hydraulic variable pump, a hydraulic hub-motor, a hydraulic valve block and hydraulic accumulators, with part-time all-wheel-drive functions improves the power performance and fuel economy of heavy commercial vehicles. The coordinated control problem that occurs when HHMAS operates in the auxiliary drive mode is addressed in this paper; the solution to this problem is the key to the maximization of HHMAS. To achieve a reasonable distribution of the engine power between mechanical and hydraulic paths, a nonlinear control scheme based on model predictive control (MPC) is investigated. First, a nonlinear model of HHMAS with vehicle dynamics and tire slip characteristics is built, and a controller-design-oriented model is simplified. Then, a steady-state feedforward + dynamic MPC feedback controller (FMPC) is designed to calculate the control input sequence of engine torque and hydraulic variable pump displacement. Finally, the controller is tested in the MATLAB/Simulink and AMESim co-simulation platform and the hardware-in-the-loop experiment platform, and its performance is compared with that of the existing proportional-integral-derivative controller and the feedforward controller under the same conditions. Simulation results show that the designed FMPC has the best performance, and control performance can be guaranteed in a real-time environment. Compared with the tracking control error of the feedforward controller, that of the designed FMPC is decreased by 85% and the traction efficiency performance is improved by 23% under a low-friction-surface condition. Moreover, under common road conditions for heavy commercial vehicles, the traction force can increase up to 13.4-15.6%.

  12. Effect of DA-9701 on Gastric Motor Function Assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yang Won; Min, Byung-Hoon; Kim, Seonwoo; Choi, Dongil; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-01-01

    Improving gastric accommodation and gastric emptying is an attractive physiological treatment target in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD). We evaluated the effect of DA-9701, a new drug for FD, on gastric motor function after a meal in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Forty healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive either DA-9701 or placebo. After 5 days of treatment, subjects underwent gastric MRI (60 min before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after a liquid test meal). Gastric volume was measured through 3-dimensional reconstruction from MRI data. We analyzed 4 outcome variables including changes in total gastric volume (TGV), proximal TGV, and proximal to distal TGV ratio after a meal and gastric emptying rates after adjusting values at the pre-test meal. Changes in TGV and proximal TGV after a meal did not differ between the DA-9701 and placebo groups (difference between groups -25.9 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] -54.0 to 2.3 mL, P = 0.070 and -2.9 mL, 95% CI -30.3 to 24.5 mL, P = 0.832, respectively). However, pre-treatment with DA-9701 increased postprandial proximal to distal TGV ratio more than placebo (difference between groups 0.93, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.79, P = 0.034). In addition, pre-treatment with DA-9701 significantly increased gastric emptying as compared with placebo (mean difference between groups 3.41%, 95% CI 0.54% to 6.29%, P = 0.021, by mixed model for repeated measures). Our results suggested that DA-9701 enhances gastric emptying and does not significantly affect gastric accommodation in healthy volunteers. Further studies to confirm whether DA-9701 enhances these gastric motor functions in patients with FD are warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02091635.

  13. Effect of DA-9701 on Gastric Motor Function Assessed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Healthy Volunteers: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Won Min

    Full Text Available Improving gastric accommodation and gastric emptying is an attractive physiological treatment target in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD. We evaluated the effect of DA-9701, a new drug for FD, on gastric motor function after a meal in healthy volunteers using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Forty healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to receive either DA-9701 or placebo. After 5 days of treatment, subjects underwent gastric MRI (60 min before and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after a liquid test meal. Gastric volume was measured through 3-dimensional reconstruction from MRI data. We analyzed 4 outcome variables including changes in total gastric volume (TGV, proximal TGV, and proximal to distal TGV ratio after a meal and gastric emptying rates after adjusting values at the pre-test meal.Changes in TGV and proximal TGV after a meal did not differ between the DA-9701 and placebo groups (difference between groups -25.9 mL, 95% confidence interval [CI] -54.0 to 2.3 mL, P = 0.070 and -2.9 mL, 95% CI -30.3 to 24.5 mL, P = 0.832, respectively. However, pre-treatment with DA-9701 increased postprandial proximal to distal TGV ratio more than placebo (difference between groups 0.93, 95% CI 0.08 to 1.79, P = 0.034. In addition, pre-treatment with DA-9701 significantly increased gastric emptying as compared with placebo (mean difference between groups 3.41%, 95% CI 0.54% to 6.29%, P = 0.021, by mixed model for repeated measures.Our results suggested that DA-9701 enhances gastric emptying and does not significantly affect gastric accommodation in healthy volunteers. Further studies to confirm whether DA-9701 enhances these gastric motor functions in patients with FD are warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02091635.

  14. The Movement-Image Compatibility Effect: Embodiment Theory Interpretations of Motor Resonance With Digitized Photographs, Drawings, and Paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark-Oliver Casper

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available To evoke the impression of movement in the “immobile” image is one of the central motivations of the visual art, and the activating effect of images has been discussed in art psychology already some 100 years ago. However, this topic has up to now been largely neglected by the researchers in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. This study investigates – from an interdisciplinary perspective – the formation of lateralized instances of motion when an observer perceives movement in an image. A first step was to identify images that evoke a perception of movement in a certain direction and to give this a rating. Reaction times leading to the engagement of a joystick following the presentation of images are used to evidence the postulated movement occasioned by the perception of movement in an image. Where the required direction of joystick moves matched the expected perception of movement direction in the image, significantly shorter reaction times were recorded. The experiment was able to prove a “movement-image compatibility effect” in observers of images. Based on this, the paper revisits and brings up to date the theses on motor sensory response to images which were developed in art psychology at the beginning of the 20th century. It furthermore contributes an embodiment theory interpretation to the prevalent representational explanation of compatibility effects.

  15. Fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant finite control set-model predictive control of a multiphase voltage-source inverter supplying BLDC motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehifar, Mehdi; Moreno-Equilaz, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Due to its fault tolerance, a multiphase brushless direct current (BLDC) motor can meet high reliability demand for application in electric vehicles. The voltage-source inverter (VSI) supplying the motor is subjected to open circuit faults. Therefore, it is necessary to design a fault-tolerant (FT) control algorithm with an embedded fault diagnosis (FD) block. In this paper, finite control set-model predictive control (FCS-MPC) is developed to implement the fault-tolerant control algorithm of a five-phase BLDC motor. The developed control method is fast, simple, and flexible. A FD method based on available information from the control block is proposed; this method is simple, robust to common transients in motor and able to localize multiple open circuit faults. The proposed FD and FT control algorithm are embedded in a five-phase BLDC motor drive. In order to validate the theory presented, simulation and experimental results are conducted on a five-phase two-level VSI supplying a five-phase BLDC motor. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Defining probabilities of bowel resection in deep endometriosis of the rectum: Prediction with preoperative magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perandini, Alessio; Perandini, Simone; Montemezzi, Stefania; Bonin, Cecilia; Bellini, Gaia; Bergamini, Valentino

    2018-02-01

    Deep endometriosis of the rectum is a highly challenging disease, and a surgical approach is often needed to restore anatomy and function. Two kinds of surgeries may be performed: radical with segmental bowel resection or conservative without resection. Most patients undergo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgery, but there is currently no method to predict if conservative surgery is feasible or whether bowel resection is required. The aim of this study was to create an algorithm that could predict bowel resection using MRI images, that was easy to apply and could be useful in a clinical setting, in order to adequately discuss informed consent with the patient and plan the an appropriate and efficient surgical session. We collected medical records from 2010 to 2016 and reviewed the MRI results of 52 patients to detect any parameters that could predict bowel resection. Parameters that were reproducible and with a significant correlation to radical surgery were investigated by statistical regression and combined in an algorithm to give the best prediction of resection. The calculation of two parameters in MRI, impact angle and lesion size, and their use in a mathematical algorithm permit us to predict bowel resection with a positive predictive value of 87% and a negative predictive value of 83%. MRI could be of value in predicting the need for bowel resection in deep endometriosis of the rectum. Further research is required to assess the possibility of a wider application of this algorithm outside our single-center study. © 2017 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Multiphoton resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shore, B.W.

    1977-01-01

    The long-time average of level populations in a coherently-excited anharmonic sequence of energy levels (e.g., an anharmonic oscillator) exhibits sharp resonances as a function of laser frequency. For simple linearly-increasing anharmonicity, each resonance is a superposition of various multiphoton resonances (e.g., a superposition of 3, 5, 7, . . . photon resonances), each having its own characteristic width predictable from perturbation theory

  18. A resonance shift prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle for cylindrical cavities with a rigid sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Arturo O; Cutanda-Henríquez, Vicente

    2008-11-01

    An investigation on the resonance frequency shift for a plane-wave mode in a cylindrical cavity produced by a rigid sphere is reported in this paper. This change of the resonance frequency has been previously considered as a cause of oscillational instabilities in single-mode acoustic levitation devices. It is shown that the use of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance allows the derivation of an expression for the resonance frequency shift in a simpler and more direct way than a method based on a Green's function reported in literature. The position of the sphere can be any point along the axis of the cavity. Obtained predictions of the resonance frequency shift with the deduced equation agree quite well with numerical simulations based on the boundary element method. The results are also confirmed by experiments. The equation derived from the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle appears to be more general, and for large spheres, it gives a better approximation than the equation previously reported.

  19. Lumbo-pelvic joint protection against antigravity forces: motor control and segmental stiffness assessed with magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, C A; Hides, J A; Wilson, S; Stanton, W; Snijders, C J

    2004-07-01

    The antigravity muscles of the lumbo-pelvic region, especially transversus abdominis (TrA), are important for the protection and support of the weightbearing joints. Measures of TrA function (the response to the postural cue of drawing in the abdominal wall) have been developed and quantified using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cross-sections through the trunk allowed muscle contraction as well as the large fascial attachments of the TrA to be visualized. The cross sectional area (CSA) of the deep musculo-fascial system was measured at rest and in the contracted state, using static images as well as a cine sequence. In this developmental study, MRI measures were undertaken on a small sample of low back pain (LBP) and non LBP subjects. Results demonstrated that, in non LBP subjects, the draw in action produced a symmetrical deep musculo-fascial "corset" which encircles the abdomen. This study demonstrated a difference in this "corset" measure between subjects with and without LBP. These measures may also prove useful to quantify the effect of unloading in bedrest and microgravity exposure.

  20. The predictive value of endorectal 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension in patients with low, intermediate and high risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somford, D M; Hamoen, E H; Fütterer, J J; van Basten, J P; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C A; Vreuls, W; van Oort, I M; Vergunst, H; Kiemeney, L A; Barentsz, J O; Witjes, J A

    2013-11-01

    We determined the positive and negative predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy for different prostate cancer risk groups. We evaluated a cohort of 183 patients who underwent 3 Tesla multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, including T2-weighted, diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic contrast enhanced sequences, with an endorectal coil before radical prostatectomy. Pathological stage at radical prostatectomy was used as standard reference for extraprostatic extension. The cohort was classified into low, intermediate and high risk groups according to the D'Amico criteria. We recorded prevalence of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy and determined sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension in each group. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy. The overall prevalence of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy was 49.7% ranging from 24.7% to 77.1% between low and high risk categories. Overall staging accuracy of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension was 73.8%, with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 58.2%, 89.1%, 84.1% and 68.3%, respectively. Positive predictive value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension was best in the high risk cohort with 88.8%. Negative predictive value was highest in the low risk cohort with 87.7%. With an odds ratio of 10.3 multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging is by far the best preoperative predictor of extraprostatic extension at radical prostatectomy. For adequate patient counseling, knowledge of predictive values of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for extraprostatic extension is

  1. Predictive values of Bi-Rads categories 3, 4 and 5 in non-palpable breast masses evaluated by mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roveda Junior, Decio; Fleury, Eduardo de Castro Faria; Piato, Sebastiao; Oliveira, Vilmar Marques de; Rinaldi, Jose Francisco; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the predictive value of BI-RADS TM categories 3, 4 and 5 in non-palpable breast masses assessed by mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Materials And Methods: Twenty-nine patients with BI-RADS categories 3, 4 and 5 non-palpable breast masses identified by mammograms were submitted to complementary ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging studies, besides excisional biopsy. In total, 30 biopsies were performed. The lesions as well as their respective BI-RADS classification into 3, 4 and 5 were correlated with the histopathological results. The predictive values calculation was made by means of specific mathematical equations. Results: Negative predictive values for category 3 were: mammography, 69.23%; ultrasound, 70.58%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 100%. Positive predictive values for category 4 were: mammography, 63.63%; ultrasound, 50%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 30.76%. For category 5, positive predictive values were: mammography and ultrasound, 100%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 92.85%. Conclusion: For category 3, the negative predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging was high, and for categories 4 and 5, the positive predictive values of the three modalities were moderate. (author)

  2. 1H Magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the internal capsule in human brain: a feasibility study to detect lactate following contralateral motor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostert, Jop P.; Keyser, Jacques De; Sijens, Paul E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-01-01

    Animal experiments suggest that astrocytic glycogen may act as an energy source for axons especially during heightened activity. In this model astrocytic glycogen breaks down to lactate that is shuttled to axons where it is metabolized oxidatively to generate ATP. The aim of this study was to investigate whether 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy could be used to detect a rise in lactate levels in human white matter during enhanced axonal activation. Six healthy volunteers (four women and two men; age range 21-38 years) participated in the study. We were unable to detect any significant MR spectral change, i.e. neither in the peak areas of inositol, choline, creatine, glutamate and N-acetylaspartate nor in the lactate level, in the contralateral posterior limb of the internal capsule during intense motor activation of the hand (four successive episodes of squeezing a soft ball for 7 min followed by 7 min rest). Possible explanations are that the technique is not sensitive enough to detect a small rise in lactate, or lactate turnover is too fast to be detected, or that another monocarboxylate different from lactate may be involved in axonal energy metabolism. (orig.)

  3. Motor Synchronization in Patients With Schizophrenia: Preserved Time Representation With Abnormalities in Predictive Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Wilquin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Basic temporal dysfunctions have been described in patients with schizophrenia, which may impact their ability to connect and synchronize with the outer world. The present study was conducted with the aim to distinguish between interval timing and synchronization difficulties and more generally the spatial-temporal organization disturbances for voluntary actions. A new sensorimotor synchronization task was developed to test these abilities.Method: Twenty-four chronic schizophrenia patients matched with 27 controls performed a spatial-tapping task in which finger taps were to be produced in synchrony with a regular metronome to six visual targets presented around a virtual circle on a tactile screen. Isochronous (time intervals of 500 ms and non-isochronous auditory sequences (alternated time intervals of 300/600 ms were presented. The capacity to produce time intervals accurately versus the ability to synchronize own actions (tap with external events (tone were measured.Results: Patients with schizophrenia were able to produce the tapping patterns of both isochronous and non-isochronous auditory sequences as accurately as controls producing inter-response intervals close to the expected interval of 500 and 900 ms, respectively. However, the synchronization performances revealed significantly more positive asynchrony means (but similar variances in the patient group than in the control group for both types of auditory sequences.Conclusion: The patterns of results suggest that patients with schizophrenia are able to perceive and produce both simple and complex sequences of time intervals but are impaired in the ability to synchronize their actions with external events. These findings suggest a specific deficit in predictive timing, which may be at the core of early symptoms previously described in schizophrenia.

  4. An Improved Continuous-Time Model Predictive Control of Permanent Magnetic Synchronous Motors for a Wide-Speed Range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Su

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an improved continuous-time model predictive control (CTMPC of permanent magnetic synchronous motors (PMSMs for a wide-speed range, including the constant torque region and the flux-weakening (FW region. In the constant torque region, the mathematic models of PMSMs in dq-axes are decoupled without the limitation of DC-link voltage. However, in the FW region, the mathematic models of PMSMs in dq-axes are cross-coupled together with the limitation of DC-link voltage. A nonlinear PMSMs mathematic model in the FW region is presented based on the voltage angle. The solving of the nonlinear mathematic model of PMSMs in FW region will lead to heavy computation load for digital signal processing (DSP. To overcome such a problem, a linearization method of the voltage angle is also proposed to reduce the computation load. The selection of transiting points between the constant torque region and FW regions is researched to improve the performance of the driven system. Compared with the proportional integral (PI controller, the proposed CTMPC has obvious advantages in dealing with systems’ nonlinear constraints and improving system performance by restraining overshoot current under step torque changing. Both simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method in achieving good steady-state performance and smooth switching between the constant torque and FW regions.

  5. Emotions predictably modify response times in the initiation of human motor actions: A meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Garrett F; Cranley, Nicole M; Carnaby, Giselle; Janelle, Christopher M

    2016-03-01

    Emotions motivate individuals to attain appetitive goals and avoid aversive consequences. Empirical investigations have detailed how broad approach and avoidance orientations are reflected in fundamental movement attributes such as the speed, accuracy, and variability of motor actions. Several theoretical perspectives propose explanations for how emotional states influence the speed with which goal directed movements are initiated. These perspectives include biological predisposition, muscle activation, distance regulation, cognitive evaluation, and evaluative response coding accounts. A comprehensive review of literature and meta-analysis were undertaken to quantify empirical support for these theoretical perspectives. The systematic review yielded 34 studies that contained 53 independent experiments producing 128 effect sizes used to evaluate the predictions of existing theories. The central tenets of the biological predisposition (Hedges' g = -0.356), distance regulation (g = -0.293; g = 0.243), and cognitive evaluation (g = -0.249; g = -0.405; g = -0.174) accounts were supported. Partial support was also identified for the evaluative response coding (g = -0.255) framework. Our findings provide quantitative evidence that substantiate existing theoretical perspectives, and provide potential direction for conceptual integration of these independent perspectives. Recommendations for future empirical work in this area are discussed. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Predictive factors for pelvic magnetic resonance in response to arterial embolization of a uterine leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Zlotnik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Minimally invasive methods are used as alternatives to treat leiomyomas and include uterine artery embolization, which has emerged as a safe, effective method. This study aims to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging predictors for a reduction in leiomyoma volume in patients undergoing uterine artery embolization. METHODS: This prospective longitudinal study was performed at a university hospital. We followed 50 symptomatic premenopausal women with uterine leiomyomas who underwent uterine artery embolization. We examined 179 leiomyomas among these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed one month before and six months after uterine artery embolization. Two radiologists who specialized in abdominal imaging independently interpreted the images. Main Outcome Measures: The magnetic resonance imaging parameters were the uterus and leiomyomas volumes, their localizations, contrast perfusion pattern and node-to-muscle ratio. RESULTS: Six months after treatment, the average uterine volume reduction was 38.91%, and the leiomyomas were reduced by 55.23%. When the leiomyomas were submucosal and/or had a higher node-to-muscle ratio in the T2 images, the volume reduction was even greater (greater than 50%. Other parameters showed no association. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that symptomatic uterine leiomyomas in patients undergoing uterine artery embolization exhibit volume reductions greater than 50% by magnetic resonance imaging when the leiomyomas are submucosal and/or had a high node-to-muscle ratio in the T2 images.

  7. A General Mathematical Algorithm for Predicting the Course of Unfused Tetanic Contractions of Motor Units in Rat Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rositsa Raikova

    Full Text Available An unfused tetanus of a motor unit (MU evoked by a train of pulses at variable interpulse intervals is the sum of non-equal twitch-like responses to these stimuli. A tool for a precise prediction of these successive contractions for MUs of different physiological types with different contractile properties is crucial for modeling the whole muscle behavior during various types of activity. The aim of this paper is to develop such a general mathematical algorithm for the MUs of the medial gastrocnemius muscle of rats. For this purpose, tetanic curves recorded for 30 MUs (10 slow, 10 fast fatigue-resistant and 10 fast fatigable were mathematically decomposed into twitch-like contractions. Each contraction was modeled by the previously proposed 6-parameter analytical function, and the analysis of these six parameters allowed us to develop a prediction algorithm based on the following input data: parameters of the initial twitch, the maximum force of a MU and the series of pulses. Linear relationship was found between the normalized amplitudes of the successive contractions and the remainder between the actual force levels at which the contraction started and the maximum tetanic force. The normalization was made according to the amplitude of the first decomposed twitch. However, the respective approximation lines had different specific angles with respect to the ordinate. These angles had different and non-overlapping ranges for slow and fast MUs. A sensitivity analysis concerning this slope was performed and the dependence between the angles and the maximal fused tetanic force normalized to the amplitude of the first contraction was approximated by a power function. The normalized MU contraction and half-relaxation times were approximated by linear functions depending on the normalized actual force levels at which each contraction starts. The normalization was made according to the contraction time of the first contraction. The actual force levels

  8. Piezoelectric Motors, an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Spanner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric motors are used in many industrial and commercial applications. Various piezoelectric motors are available in the market. All of the piezoelectric motors use the inverse piezoelectric effect, where microscopically small oscillatory motions are converted into continuous or stepping rotary or linear motions. Methods of obtaining long moving distance have various drive and functional principles that make these motors categorized into three groups: resonance-drive (piezoelectric ultrasonic motors, inertia-drive, and piezo-walk-drive. In this review, a comprehensive summary of piezoelectric motors, with their classification from initial idea to recent progress, is presented. This review also includes some of the industrial and commercial applications of piezoelectric motors that are presently available in the market as actuators.

  9. The benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography for predicting vascular access surgery outcome: a computer model perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten A G Merkx

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Vascular access (VA surgery, a prerequisite for hemodialysis treatment of end-stage renal-disease (ESRD patients, is hampered by complication rates, which are frequently related to flow enhancement. To assist in VA surgery planning, a patient-specific computer model for postoperative flow enhancement was developed. The purpose of this study is to assess the benefit of non contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (NCE-MRA data as patient-specific geometrical input for the model-based prediction of surgery outcome. METHODS: 25 ESRD patients were included in this study. All patients received a NCE-MRA examination of the upper extremity blood vessels in addition to routine ultrasound (US. Local arterial radii were assessed from NCE-MRA and converted to model input using a linear fit per artery. Venous radii were determined with US. The effect of radius measurement uncertainty on model predictions was accounted for by performing Monte-Carlo simulations. The resulting flow prediction interval of the computer model was compared with the postoperative flow obtained from US. Patients with no overlap between model-based prediction and postoperative measurement were further analyzed to determine whether an increase in geometrical detail improved computer model prediction. RESULTS: Overlap between postoperative flows and model-based predictions was obtained for 71% of patients. Detailed inspection of non-overlapping cases revealed that the geometrical details that could be assessed from NCE-MRA explained most of the differences, and moreover, upon addition of these details in the computer model the flow predictions improved. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate clearly that NCE-MRA does provide valuable geometrical information for VA surgery planning. Therefore, it is recommended to use this modality, at least for patients at risk for local or global narrowing of the blood vessels as well as for patients for whom an US-based model

  10. Stabilization of dendritic spine clusters and hyperactive Ras-MAPK signaling predict enhanced motor learning in an autistic savant mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Thomas Ash

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available That both prominent behavioral inflexibility and exceptional learning abilities are seen occasionally in autistic patients is a mystery. We hypothesize that these altered patterns of learning and memory can arise from a pathological imbalance between the stability and plasticity of internal neural representations. We evaluated this hypothesis in the mouse model of MECP2 duplication syndrome, which demonstrates enhanced motor learning, stereotyped behaviors, and social avoidance. Learning-associated structural plasticity was measured in the motor cortex of MECP2 duplication mice by 2-photon imaging (Fig. 1A. An increased stabilization rate of learning-associated dendritic spines was observed in mutants, and this correlated with rotarod performance. Analysis of the spatial distribution of stabilized spines revealed that the mutant’s increased spine stabilization was due to a specific increase in the stability of spines jointly formed in ~9-micron clusters. Clustered spine stabilization but not isolated spine stabilization predicted enhanced motor performance in MECP2 duplication mice (Fig. 1B. Biochemical assays of Ras-MAPK and mTOR pathway activation demonstrated profound hyperphosphorylation of MAPK in the motor cortex of MECP2 duplication mice with motor training (Fig. 1C. Taken together these data suggest that a pathological bias towards hyperstability of learning-associated dendritic spine clusters driven by hyperactive Ras-MAPK signaling could contribute to neurobehavioral phenotypes in this form of syndromic autism.

  11. Quantitative characterization of myocardial infarction by cardiovascular magnetic resonance predicts future cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauly John M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR can provide quantitative data of the myocardial tissue utilizing high spatial and temporal resolution along with exquisite tissue contrast. Previous studies have correlated myocardial scar tissue with the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmia. This study was conducted to evaluate whether characterization of myocardial infarction by CMR can predict cardiovascular events in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM. Results We consecutively studied 86 patients with ICM (LVEF Conclusion Quantification of the scar volume and scar percentage by CMR is superior to LVEDV, LVESV, and LVEF in prognosticating the future likelihood of the development of cardiovascular events in patients with ICM.

  12. Structural Gray Matter Changes in the Hippocampus and the Primary Motor Cortex on An-Hour-to-One- Day Scale Can Predict Arm-Reaching Performance Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midori Kodama

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have revealed rapid (e.g., hours to days training-induced cortical structural changes using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Currently, there is great interest in studying how such a rapid brain structural change affects behavioral improvement. Structural reorganization contributes to memory or enhanced information processing in the brain and may increase its capability of skill learning. If the gray matter (GM is capable of such rapid structural reorganization upon training, the extent of volume increase may characterize the learning process. To shed light on this issue, we conducted a case series study of 5-day visuomotor learning using neuroanatomical imaging, and analyzed the effect of rapid brain structural change on motor performance improvement via regression analysis. Participants performed an upper-arm reaching task under left-right mirror-reversal for five consecutive days; T1-weighted MR imaging was performed before training, after the first and fifth days, and 1 week and 1 month after training. We detected increase in GM volume on the first day (i.e., a few hours after the first training session in the primary motor cortex (M1, primary sensory cortex (S1, and in the hippocampal areas. Notably, regression analysis revealed that individual differences in such short-term increases were associated with the learning levels after 5 days of training. These results suggest that GM structural changes are not simply a footprint of previous motor learning but have some relationship with future motor learning. In conclusion, the present study provides new insight into the role of structural changes in causing functional changes during motor learning.

  13. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormuth II, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction–diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction–diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error 0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction–diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions. (paper)

  14. Editorial Commentary: Single-Image Slice Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessments Do Not Predict 3-Dimensional Muscle Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-01-01

    No single-image magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) assessment-Goutallier classification, Fuchs classification, or cross-sectional area-is predictive of whole-muscle volume or fatty atrophy of the supraspinatus or infraspinatus. Rather, 3-dimensional MRI measurement of whole-muscle volume and fat-free muscle volume is required and is associated with shoulder strength, which is clinically relevant. Three-dimensional MRI may represent a new gold standard for assessment of the rotator cuff musculature using imaging and may help to predict the feasibility of repair of a rotator cuff tear as well as the postoperative outcome. Unfortunately, 3-dimensional MRI assessment of muscle volume is labor intensive and is not widely available for clinical use. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Nonvisible tumors on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging does not predict low-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Hwan Lee

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: Even though cancer foci were not visualized by postbiopsy MRI, the pathological tumor volumes and extent of GS upgrading were relatively high. Therefore, nonvisible tumors by multiparametric MRI do not appear to be predictive of low-risk PCA.

  16. Maternal Education Level Predicts Cognitive, Language, and Motor Outcome in Preterm Infants in the Second Year of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Kousiki; Greene, Michelle M; Patel, Aloka L; Meier, Paula

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate the relative impact of maternal education level (MEL) on cognitive, language, and motor outcomes at 20 months' corrected age (CA) in preterm infants. Study Design A total of 177 preterm infants born between 2008 and 2010 were tested at 20 months' CA using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III. Multiple regression analyses were done to determine the relative impact of MEL on cognitive, language, and motor scores. Results Infants born to mothers with high school MEL were 3.74 times more likely to have a subnormal motor index, while those born to mothers with some college and graduate school MEL had reduced odds (0.36 and 0.12, respectively) of having subnormal language index at 20 months. In linear regression, MEL was the strongest predictor of cognitive, language, and motor scores, and graduate school MEL was associated with increases in cognitive, motor, and language scores of 8.49, 8.23, and 15.74 points, respectively. Conclusions MEL is the most significant predictor of cognitive, language, and motor outcome at 20 months' CA in preterm infants. Further research is needed to evaluate if targeted interventions that focus on early childhood learning and parenting practices can ameliorate the impact of low MEL. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Usefulness of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging to predict the need for intervention in patients with coarctation of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzarelli, Stefano; Meadows, Alison Knauth; Ordovas, Karen Gomes; Higgins, Charles Bernard; Meadows, Jeffery Joshua

    2012-03-15

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging can predict hemodynamically significant coarctation of the aorta (CoA) with a high degree of discrimination. However, the ability of CMR to predict important clinical outcomes in this patient population is unknown. Therefore, we sought to define the ability of CMR to predict the need for surgical or transcatheter intervention in patients with CoA. We retrospectively reviewed the data from 133 consecutive patients who had undergone CMR for the evaluation of known or suspected CoA. The characteristics of the CMR-derived variables predicting the need for surgical or transcatheter intervention for CoA within 1 year were determined through logistic regression analysis. Therapeutic aortic intervention was performed in 41 (31%) of the 133 patients during the study period. The indexed minimum aortic cross-sectional area was the strongest predictor of subsequent intervention (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.975) followed by heart rate-corrected deceleration time in the descending aorta (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.951), and the percentage of flow increase (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.867). The combination of the indexed minimum aortic cross-sectional area and rate-corrected deceleration time in the descending aorta provided the best predictive model (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve 0.986). In conclusion, CMR findings can predict the need for subsequent intervention in CoA. These findings reinforce the "gate-keeper role" of CMR to cardiac catheterization by providing valuable diagnostic and powerful prognostic information and could guide additional treatment of patients with CoA with the final intent of reducing the number of diagnostic catheterizations in such patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Predictive Utility of the Total Glasgow Coma Scale Versus the Motor Component of the Glasgow Coma Scale for Identification of Patients With Serious Traumatic Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Roger; Totten, Annette M; Carney, Nancy; Dandy, Spencer; Fu, Rongwei; Grusing, Sara; Pappas, Miranda; Wasson, Ngoc; Newgard, Craig D

    2017-08-01

    The motor component of the Glasgow Coma Scale (mGCS) has been proposed as an easier-to-use alternative to the total GCS (tGCS) for field assessment of trauma patients by emergency medical services. We perform a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the predictive utility of the tGCS versus the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale in field triage of trauma for identifying patients with adverse outcomes (inhospital mortality or severe brain injury) or who underwent procedures (neurosurgical intervention or emergency intubation) indicating need for high-level trauma care. Ovid MEDLINE, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments, and the Cochrane databases were searched through June 2016 for English-language cohort studies. We included studies that compared the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of the tGCS versus the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale assessed in the field or shortly after arrival in the emergency department for predicting the outcomes described above. Meta-analyses were performed with a random-effects model, and subgroup and sensitivity analyses were conducted. We included 18 head-to-head studies of predictive utility (n=1,703,388). For inhospital mortality, the tGCS was associated with slightly greater discrimination than the mGCS (pooled mean difference in [AUROC] 0.015; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.009 to 0.022; I 2 =85%; 12 studies) or the Simplified Motor Scale (pooled mean difference in AUROC 0.030; 95% CI 0.024 to 0.036; I 2 =0%; 5 studies). The tGCS was also associated with greater discrimination than the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale for nonmortality outcomes (differences in AUROC from 0.03 to 0.05). Findings were robust in subgroup and sensitivity analyses. The tGCS is associated with slightly greater discrimination than the mGCS or Simplified Motor Scale for identifying severe trauma. The small differences in discrimination are likely to be

  19. Radioanalytical prediction of radiative capture in 99Mo production via transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing by cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Khorshidi, Abdollah; Pazirandeh, Ali; Tenreiro, Claudio; Kadi, Yacine

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the transmutation adiabatic resonance crossing (TARC) concept was estimated in Mo-99 radioisotope production via radiative capture reaction in two designs. The TARC method was composed of moderating neutrons in lead or a composition of lead and water. Additionally, the target was surrounded by a moderator assembly and a graphite reflector district. Produced neutrons were investigated by (p,xn) interactions with 30 MeV and 300 mu A proton beam on tungsten, beryllium, and tantalum targets. The Mo-99 production yield was related to the moderator property, cross section, and sample positioning inside the distinct region of neutron storage as must be proper to achieve gains. Gathered thermal flux of neutrons can contribute to molybdenum isotope production. Moreover, the sample positioning to gain higher production yield was dependent on a greater flux in the length of thermal neutrons and region materials inside the moderator or reflector. When the sample radial distance from Be was 38 cm inside the...

  20. Scoring of late gadolinium enhancement in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging can predict cardiac events in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nojiri, Ayumi; Hongo, Kenichi; Kawai, Makoto; Komukai, Kimiaki; Sakuma, Toru; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yoshimura, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) represents myocardial fibrosis and may be related to the clinical outcome of various heart diseases. This study evaluated the relationship between LGE and cardiac events in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) using a new scoring method. This study retrospectively followed 46 HCM patients without heart failure symptoms for 3.8±1.8 years. Gadolinium-enhanced cardiac MRI was performed in all patients. Cardiac events including newly developed heart failure or ventricular tachyarrhythmia were evaluated during the follow-up period. We evaluated the predictive factors to identify the patients with cardiac events. None of the risk factors reported to be related to poor outcome or the existence of LGE alone could predict cardiac events, which might be due to the small number of subjects investigated in this study. A new scoring method for LGE-positive areas (LGE score) was applied and higher LGE score can predict cardiac events in this study population. The proposed LGE score for cardiac MRI is considered to be a potentially valid method for assessing cardiac events in HCM patients. (author)

  1. Development of a deep convolutional neural network to predict grading of canine meningiomas from magnetic resonance images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzato, T; Cherubini, G B; Atzori, M; Zotti, A

    2018-05-01

    An established deep neural network (DNN) based on transfer learning and a newly designed DNN were tested to predict the grade of meningiomas from magnetic resonance (MR) images in dogs and to determine the accuracy of classification of using pre- and post-contrast T1-weighted (T1W), and T2-weighted (T2W) MR images. The images were randomly assigned to a training set, a validation set and a test set, comprising 60%, 10% and 30% of images, respectively. The combination of DNN and MR sequence displaying the highest discriminating accuracy was used to develop an image classifier to predict the grading of new cases. The algorithm based on transfer learning using the established DNN did not provide satisfactory results, whereas the newly designed DNN had high classification accuracy. On the basis of classification accuracy, an image classifier built on the newly designed DNN using post-contrast T1W images was developed. This image classifier correctly predicted the grading of 8 out of 10 images not included in the data set. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of Ship Resonant Rolling - Related Dangerous Zones with Regard to the Equivalent Metacentric Height Governing Natural Frequency of Roll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemyslaw Krata

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Potentially dangerous zones corresponding to dynamical stability phenomena, possibly encountered by ships sailing in rough sea, are estimated nowadays with the use of the method recommended by IMO in the guidance coded MSC.1/Circ.1228. In this IMO method the parameter governing the natural period of roll is the initial metacentric height. Some earlier studies revealed that the initial metacentric height which is commonly in use on-board ships for the purpose of performing the MSC.1/Circ.1228-recommended calculations, may significantly vary from the so called equivalent metacentric height obtained for large amplitudes of ship’s roll. In the light of such ascertainment, the paper deals with resultant resonance roll zones locations with regard to the equivalent metacentric height concept remaining appropriate for large amplitudes of roll. The noteworthy transfer of the resonance zones location is disclosed which reflects the distinct configurations of potentially dangerous ship’s course and speed configurations than could be predicted on the basis the initial metacentric height.

  3. Effectiveness of late gadolinium enhancement to improve outcomes prediction in patients referred for cardiovascular magnetic resonance after echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Echocardiography (echo) is a first line test to assess cardiac structure and function. It is not known if cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) with late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) ordered during routine clinical practice in selected patients can add additional prognostic information after routine echo. We assessed whether CMR improves outcomes prediction after contemporaneous echo, which may have implications for efforts to optimize processes of care, assess effectiveness, and allocate limited health care resources. Methods and results We prospectively enrolled 1044 consecutive patients referred for CMR. There were 38 deaths and 3 cardiac transplants over a median follow-up of 1.0 years (IQR 0.4-1.5). We first reproduced previous survival curve strata (presence of LGE and ejection fraction (EF) echocardiography, CMR with LGE further improves risk stratification of individuals at risk for death or death/cardiac transplant. PMID:23324403

  4. Prediction of cognitive and motor development in preterm children using exhaustive feature selection and cross-validation of near-term white matter microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadl, Kornél; Vassar, Rachel; Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Yeom, Kristin W; Stevenson, David K; Rose, Jessica

    2018-01-01

    Advanced neuroimaging and computational methods offer opportunities for more accurate prognosis. We hypothesized that near-term regional white matter (WM) microstructure, assessed on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), using exhaustive feature selection with cross-validation would predict neurodevelopment in preterm children. Near-term MRI and DTI obtained at 36.6 ± 1.8 weeks postmenstrual age in 66 very-low-birth-weight preterm neonates were assessed. 60/66 had follow-up neurodevelopmental evaluation with Bayley Scales of Infant-Toddler Development, 3rd-edition (BSID-III) at 18-22 months. Linear models with exhaustive feature selection and leave-one-out cross-validation computed based on DTI identified sets of three brain regions most predictive of cognitive and motor function; logistic regression models were computed to classify high-risk infants scoring one standard deviation below mean. Cognitive impairment was predicted (100% sensitivity, 100% specificity; AUC = 1) by near-term right middle-temporal gyrus MD, right cingulate-cingulum MD, left caudate MD. Motor impairment was predicted (90% sensitivity, 86% specificity; AUC = 0.912) by left precuneus FA, right superior occipital gyrus MD, right hippocampus FA. Cognitive score variance was explained (29.6%, cross-validated Rˆ2 = 0.296) by left posterior-limb-of-internal-capsule MD, Genu RD, right fusiform gyrus AD. Motor score variance was explained (31.7%, cross-validated Rˆ2 = 0.317) by left posterior-limb-of-internal-capsule MD, right parahippocampal gyrus AD, right middle-temporal gyrus AD. Search in large DTI feature space more accurately identified neonatal neuroimaging correlates of neurodevelopment.

  5. Dielectric function and its predicted effect on localized plasmon resonances of equiatomic Au–Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva, K S B; Gentle, A; Arnold, M; Cortie, M B; Keast, V J

    2015-01-01

    Equiatomic (Au,Cu) solid solution orders below 658 K to form a tetragonal AuCu (I) phase with significant changes in physical properties and the crystal structure. The effect of ordering on the dielectric function of the material is controversial however, with inconsistent results reported in the literature. Since the nature of any localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the nanostructures is very sensitive to the dielectric function, this uncertainty hinders the use of AuCu in plasmonic devices or structures. Therefore, we re-examine the question using a combination of measurements and computations. We find that no significant change in the dielectric function occurs when this material becomes ordered, at least over the range of photon energies relevant to LSPRs. The likely properties of LSPRs in plasmonic devices made of AuCu are analyzed. Use of the alloy offers some advantages over pure Cu, however pure Au would still be the superior option in most situations. (paper)

  6. Hybrid method to predict the resonant frequencies and to characterise dual band proximity coupled microstrip antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Ruchi; Ghosh, Jayanta

    2018-06-01

    A new hybrid technique, which is a combination of neural network (NN) and support vector machine, is proposed for designing of different slotted dual band proximity coupled microstrip antennas. Slots on the patch are employed to produce the second resonance along with size reduction. The proposed hybrid model provides flexibility to design the dual band antennas in the frequency range from 1 to 6 GHz. This includes DCS (1.71-1.88 GHz), PCS (1.88-1.99 GHz), UMTS (1.92-2.17 GHz), LTE2300 (2.3-2.4 GHz), Bluetooth (2.4-2.485 GHz), WiMAX (3.3-3.7 GHz), and WLAN (5.15-5.35 GHz, 5.725-5.825 GHz) bands applications. Also, the comparative study of this proposed technique is done with the existing methods like knowledge based NN and support vector machine. The proposed method is found to be more accurate in terms of % error and root mean square % error and the results are in good accord with the measured values.

  7. Ability of preoperative 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging to predict the absence of side-specific extracapsular extension of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Tomohiko; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Nakagawa, Tohru; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Kawahara, Takashi; Manabe, Tomoko; Miyake, Mototaka; Arai, Eri; Kanai, Yae; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have shown an improvement in prostate cancer diagnosis with the use of 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. We retrospectively assessed the ability of this imaging technique to predict side-specific extracapsular extension of prostate cancer. From October 2007 to August 2011, prostatectomy was carried out in 396 patients after preoperative 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. Among these, 132 (primary sample) and 134 patients (validation sample) underwent 12-core prostate biopsy at the National Cancer Center Hospital of Tokyo, Japan, and at other institutions, respectively. In the primary dataset, univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to predict side-specific extracapsular extension using variables determined preoperatively, including 3.0-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging findings (T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging). A prediction model was then constructed and applied to the validation study sample. Multivariate analysis identified four significant independent predictors (P Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging findings, ≥2 positive biopsy cores on each side and a maximum percentage of positive cores ≥31% on each side. The negative predictive value was 93.9% in the combination model with these four predictors, meanwhile the positive predictive value was 33.8%. Good reproducibility of these four significant predictors and the combination model was observed in the validation study sample. The side-specific extracapsular extension prediction by the biopsy Gleason score and factors associated with tumor location, including a positive 3.0-Tesla diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging finding, have a high negative predictive value, but a low positive predictive value. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging to predict vesicoureteral reflux in children with urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Yang Shin; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Radiology, Korea University Guro Hospital, 80 Guro-dong, Guro-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kee Hwan [Korea University College of Medicine, Departments of Pediatrics, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Bo-Kyung [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kiefer, Berthold [Oncology Application Development, Siemens Healthcare, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    To compare the diffusion parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) between the ''reflux'' and the ''non-reflux'' kidneys, and to evaluate the feasibility of using IVIM DWI to predict vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children with a urinary tract infection (UTI). Eighty-three kidneys from 57 pediatric patients with a UTI were classified into ''reflux'' and ''non-reflux'' groups according to voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) results. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (PF) were measured and compared in the renal pelvis of both groups. Four indices (D*/ADC, PF/ADC, D*/D, and PF/D) were calculated and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. VURs were detected on VCUG in 21 kidneys. PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' group than in the ''non-reflux'' group. The indices were all significantly higher. The PF/D index showed the best diagnostic performance in predicting VUR in children with UTI (A{sub z} = 0.864). PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' kidney than in the ''non-reflux'' kidney. Our new index (PF/D) could prove useful for predicting VUR. (orig.)

  9. Magnetic Resonance Colonography May Predict the Need for Bowel Resection in Colorectal Endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldo Scardapane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To define if MRI findings in patients with deep pelvic endometriosis (DPE may be predictive for the need of bowel resection. Material and Methods. A retrospective survey of 196 pelvic MRIs of women who received laparoscopic procedures for DPE was carried out. A pelvic MRI was performed in all patients: it consisted in T2w-TSE sequences in axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and T1w and THRIVE sequences in the axial plane; the exam was completed by MR-Colonography. Intestinal lesions were measured in short and long axis and the degree of stenosis was established. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the predictors of intestinal resection. Results. 57/196 patients received an intestinal resection. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a predictive value of short axis (Odds-Ratio = 2.29, p=0.011 and stenosis (Odds-Ratio = 1.20, p=0.003. ROC analysis showed that a cut-off value of 11 mm for the short axis and 30% for the stenosis may correctly classify, respectively, 96,94% (sensitivity 92,9% and specificity 98,56% and 97,96% (sensitivity 94,74% and specificity 99,3% of the cases. Conclusion. The presence of an endometriotic rectal nodule > 11 mm in short axis causing a stenosis > 30% in pelvic MRI reliably predicts the need of a rectal resection.

  10. Intravoxel incoherent motion magnetic resonance imaging to predict vesicoureteral reflux in children with urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeong Woo; Lee, Chang Hee; Park, Yang Shin; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Park, Cheol Min; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Je, Bo-Kyung; Kiefer, Berthold

    2016-01-01

    To compare the diffusion parameters of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) between the ''reflux'' and the ''non-reflux'' kidneys, and to evaluate the feasibility of using IVIM DWI to predict vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) in children with a urinary tract infection (UTI). Eighty-three kidneys from 57 pediatric patients with a UTI were classified into ''reflux'' and ''non-reflux'' groups according to voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) results. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo-diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (PF) were measured and compared in the renal pelvis of both groups. Four indices (D*/ADC, PF/ADC, D*/D, and PF/D) were calculated and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses were performed. VURs were detected on VCUG in 21 kidneys. PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' group than in the ''non-reflux'' group. The indices were all significantly higher. The PF/D index showed the best diagnostic performance in predicting VUR in children with UTI (A z = 0.864). PF and D* were significantly higher in the ''reflux'' kidney than in the ''non-reflux'' kidney. Our new index (PF/D) could prove useful for predicting VUR. (orig.)

  11. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich [Department of Radio-Oncology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Piringer, Gudrun, E-mail: gudrun.piringer@hotmail.com [Department of Oncology, Wels-Grieskirchen Medical Hospital, Wels (Austria); Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Saely, Christoph Hubert [Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Lukas, Peter [Department of Radio-Oncology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Öfner, Dietmar [Department of Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  12. Predicting variation in subject thermal response during transcranial magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound surgery: Comparison in seventeen subject datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyas, Urvi, E-mail: urvi.vyas@gmail.com; Ghanouni, Pejman; Halpern, Casey H.; Pauly, Kim Butts [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Elias, Jeff [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Purpose: In transcranial magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound (tcMRgFUS) treatments, the acoustic and spatial heterogeneity of the skull cause reflection, absorption, and scattering of the acoustic beams. These effects depend on skull-specific parameters and can lead to patient-specific thermal responses to the same transducer power. In this work, the authors develop a simulation tool to help predict these different experimental responses using 3D heterogeneous tissue models based on the subject CT images. The authors then validate and compare the predicted skull efficiencies to an experimental metric based on the subject thermal responses during tcMRgFUS treatments in a dataset of seventeen human subjects. Methods: Seventeen human head CT scans were used to create tissue acoustic models, simulating the effects of reflection, absorption, and scattering of the acoustic beam as it propagates through a heterogeneous skull. The hybrid angular spectrum technique was used to model the acoustic beam propagation of the InSightec ExAblate 4000 head transducer for each subject, yielding maps of the specific absorption rate (SAR). The simulation assumed the transducer was geometrically focused to the thalamus of each subject, and the focal SAR at the target was used as a measure of the simulated skull efficiency. Experimental skull efficiency for each subject was calculated using the thermal temperature maps from the tcMRgFUS treatments. Axial temperature images (with no artifacts) were reconstructed with a single baseline, corrected using a referenceless algorithm. The experimental skull efficiency was calculated by dividing the reconstructed temperature rise 8.8 s after sonication by the applied acoustic power. Results: The simulated skull efficiency using individual-specific heterogeneous models predicts well (R{sup 2} = 0.84) the experimental energy efficiency. Conclusions: This paper presents a simulation model to predict the variation in thermal responses

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics for prediction of gastric damage induced by indomethacin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Seon Hwa; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMR based metabolomics – gastric damage by indomethacin. ► Pattern recognition analysis was performed to biomarkers of gastric damage. ► 2-Oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate were selected as putative biomarkers. ► The gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical step of drug. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have side effects including gastric erosions, ulceration and bleeding. In this study, pattern recognition analysis of the 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of urine was performed to develop surrogate biomarkers related to the gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by indomethacin in rats. Urine was collected for 5 h after oral administration of indomethacin (25 mg kg −1 ) or co-administration with cimetidine (100 mg kg −1 ), which protects against GI damage. The 1 H-NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04 ppm) for global profiling, and 36 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. The level of gastric damage in each animal was also determined. Indomethacin caused severe gastric damage; however, indomethacin administered with cimetidine did not. Simultaneously, the patterns of changes in their endogenous metabolites were different. Multivariate data analyses were carried out to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to indomethacin using partial least square-discrimination analysis. In targeted profiling, a few endogenous metabolites, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate, were selected as putative biomarkers for the gastric damage induced by indomethacin. These metabolites changed depending on the degree of GI damage, although the same dose of indomethacin (10 mg kg −1 ) was administered to rats. The results of global and targeted profiling suggest that the gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical stage of drug development using a NMR based metabolomics approach.

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics for prediction of gastric damage induced by indomethacin in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, So Young [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Hyun [Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myeon Woo [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu-Bong [College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Dandae-ro, Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Hwa [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Dandae-ro, Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ki Hwan, E-mail: hyokwa11@korea.kr [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hwa Jeong, E-mail: hwalee@ewha.ac.kr [Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR based metabolomics - gastric damage by indomethacin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pattern recognition analysis was performed to biomarkers of gastric damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-Oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate were selected as putative biomarkers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical step of drug. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have side effects including gastric erosions, ulceration and bleeding. In this study, pattern recognition analysis of the {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of urine was performed to develop surrogate biomarkers related to the gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by indomethacin in rats. Urine was collected for 5 h after oral administration of indomethacin (25 mg kg{sup -1}) or co-administration with cimetidine (100 mg kg{sup -1}), which protects against GI damage. The {sup 1}H-NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04 ppm) for global profiling, and 36 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. The level of gastric damage in each animal was also determined. Indomethacin caused severe gastric damage; however, indomethacin administered with cimetidine did not. Simultaneously, the patterns of changes in their endogenous metabolites were different. Multivariate data analyses were carried out to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to indomethacin using partial least square-discrimination analysis. In targeted profiling, a few endogenous metabolites, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate, were selected as putative biomarkers for the gastric damage induced by indomethacin. These metabolites changed depending on the degree of GI damage, although the same dose of indomethacin (10 mg kg{sup -1}) was administered to rats. The results of global and targeted profiling suggest that the gastric damage induced by

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Prediction of the Relationship between Whiplash Injury and Temporomandibular Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Auh, Q-Schick; Hong, Jyung-Pyo

    2017-01-01

    Whiplash injury can cause internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and lead to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Our aim was to evaluate whether the initial clinical findings in TMD patients with whiplash injury are correlated with their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics. This case-control study involved 219 patients (135 women, 84 men; mean age: 37.84 years) who visited our orofacial pain clinic with TMD; TMD was diagnosed using the diagnostic criteria for TMD Axis I. Patients were categorized into three groups based on the presence and type of macrotrauma: in the "wTMD" group, patients had suffered whiplash injury; patients in the "pTMD" group had post-traumatic TMD; the "iTMD" group comprised patients who had presented with TMD symptoms and had sustained no macrotrauma. We investigated the presence of disk displacement, effusion, disk deformity, and condylar degeneration, and changes in the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM). To evaluate the severity of TMD pain and objectively analyze symptoms, we used a visual analog scale (VAS), palpation index (PI), neck PI, dysfunction index, and craniomandibular index (CMI). The VAS scores, and the severity indexes of the TMD including PI, neck PI, and CMI were highest in the wTMD patients. Atrophy of the LPM was most commonly seen in the wTMD group, as was disk deformity. In wTMD patients only, VAS score was significantly correlated with stress; it was correlated with headache in wTMD and iTMD patients. The clinical symptoms of TMD were not correlated with MRI findings in the wTMD group. However, alterations in the LPM were strongly correlated with disk displacement. If clinicians recognize alterations in the LPM and disk displacement in the TMJ, they will better understand the clinical symptoms and pathophysiology of TMD with whiplash injury. Whiplash injury may lead to TMD via different mechanisms from other macrotraumas.

  16. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Studies of Rat Behavior: Transient Motor Deficit in Skilled Reaching, Rears, and Activity in Rats After a Single Dose of MnCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Alaverdashvili

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI has been suggested to be a useful tool to visualize and map behavior-relevant neural populations at large scale in freely behaving rodents. A primary concern in MEMRI applications is Mn 2+ toxicity. Although a few studies have specifically examined toxicity on gross motor behavior, Mn 2+ toxicity on skilled motor behavior was not explored. Thus, the objective of this study was to combine manganese as a functional contrast agent with comprehensive behavior evaluation. We evaluated Mn 2+ effect on skilled reach-to-eat action, locomotion, and balance using a single pellet reaching task, activity cage, and cylinder test, respectively. The tests used are sensitive to the pathophysiology of many neurological and neurodegenerative disorders of the motor system. The behavioral testing was done in combination with a moderate dose of manganese. Behavior was studied before and after a single, intravenous infusion of MnCl 2 (48 mg/kg. The rats were imaged at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 14 days following infusion. The results show that MnCl 2 infusion resulted in detectable abnormalities in skilled reaching, locomotion, and balance that recovered within 3 days compared with the infusion of saline. Because some tests and behavioral measures could not detect motor abnormalities of skilled movements, comprehensive evaluation of motor behavior is critical in assessing the effects of MnCl 2 . The relaxation mapping results suggest that the transport of Mn 2+ into the brain is through the choroid plexus-cerebrospinal fluid system with the primary entry point and highest relaxation rates found in the pituitary gland. Relaxation rates in the pituitary gland correlated with measures of motor skill, suggesting that altered motor ability is related to the level of Mn circulating in the brain. Thus, combined MEMRI and behavioral studies that both achieve adequate image enhancement and are also free of motor skills deficits are

  17. PREDICTIVE CONTRIBUTION OF MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS AND MOTOR ABILITIES ON THE RESULT OF RUNNING THE 60m HURDLES IN BOYS AGED 12 - 13 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zana Bujak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is to determine predictive contributions of morphological characteristics and motor abilities on the 60m hurdles, with an aim to form a group of easily applicable field tests so as to identify boys who are talented in hurdl e racing . The subject sample of this study was comprised of 60 boys aged 12 - 13. The variable sample consisted of a 60m hurdles criterion variable and a set of 13 p re dictor variables comprising of morphological characteristics, speed - strength abilities and the subjects' coordina tion qualities . Applying the regression analysis , the predictive contribution of a complete variable s et of morpholog ical characteristics and motor abilities was determined as an above average statistical significance, influencing 60m hurdle outcome. The greatest individual statistically significant predictive contribution was achieved by the variables of speed - strength quality assessment: 20m flying start r ace result with a standing long jump; and only one variable from the field of morphological characteristics: the shin length. The results support the following conclusion: the two specific variables of speed - strength quality, and 20m flying start race results along with standing long jump , can be relevant predictors of successful outcome in hurdle races .

  18. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Prediction of the Relationship between Whiplash Injury and Temporomandibular Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon-Hee Lee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available PurposeWhiplash injury can cause internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ and lead to temporomandibular disorders (TMDs. Our aim was to evaluate whether the initial clinical findings in TMD patients with whiplash injury are correlated with their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI characteristics.Materials and methodsThis case–control study involved 219 patients (135 women, 84 men; mean age: 37.84 years who visited our orofacial pain clinic with TMD; TMD was diagnosed using the diagnostic criteria for TMD Axis I. Patients were categorized into three groups based on the presence and type of macrotrauma: in the “wTMD” group, patients had suffered whiplash injury; patients in the “pTMD” group had post-traumatic TMD; the “iTMD” group comprised patients who had presented with TMD symptoms and had sustained no macrotrauma. We investigated the presence of disk displacement, effusion, disk deformity, and condylar degeneration, and changes in the lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM. To evaluate the severity of TMD pain and objectively analyze symptoms, we used a visual analog scale (VAS, palpation index (PI, neck PI, dysfunction index, and craniomandibular index (CMI.ResultsThe VAS scores, and the severity indexes of the TMD including PI, neck PI, and CMI were highest in the wTMD patients. Atrophy of the LPM was most commonly seen in the wTMD group, as was disk deformity. In wTMD patients only, VAS score was significantly correlated with stress; it was correlated with headache in wTMD and iTMD patients. The clinical symptoms of TMD were not correlated with MRI findings in the wTMD group. However, alterations in the LPM were strongly correlated with disk displacement.ConclusionIf clinicians recognize alterations in the LPM and disk displacement in the TMJ, they will better understand the clinical symptoms and pathophysiology of TMD with whiplash injury. Whiplash injury may lead to TMD via different mechanisms from other macrotraumas.

  19. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for prediction of insignificant prostate cancer in potential candidates for active surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Heon; Jeong, Jae Yong; Lee, Sin Woo; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Jeon, Seong Soo; Kim, Chan Kyo; Park, Byung Kwan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) from diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) could help improve the prediction of insignificant prostate cancer in candidates for active surveillance (AS). Enrolled in this retrospective study were 287 AS candidates who underwent DW-MRI before radical prostatectomy. Patients were stratified into two groups; Group A consisted of patients with no visible tumour or a suspected tumour ADC value > 0.830 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec and Group B consisted of patients with a suspected tumour ADC value < 0.830 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec. We compared pathological outcomes in each group. Group A had 243 (84.7 %) patients and Group B had 44 (15.3 %) patients. The proportion of organ-confined Gleason ≤ 6 disease and insignificant prostate cancer was significantly higher in Group A than Group B (61.3 % vs. 38.6 %, p = 0.005 and 47.7 % vs. 25.0 %, p = 0.005, respectively). On multivariate analysis, a high ADC value was the independent predictor of organ-confined Gleason ≤ 6 disease and insignificant prostate cancer (odds ratio = 2.43, p = 0.011 and odds ratio = 2.74, p = 0.009, respectively). Tumour ADC values may be a useful marker for predicting insignificant prostate cancer in candidates for AS. (orig.)

  20. Coronary artery calcification score by multislice computed tomography predicts the outcome of dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, Caroline H.C.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Overbosch, Jelle; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Dijkman, Paul R.M. van; Zijlstra, Felix

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of less than 11 can reliably rule out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients suspected of having myocardial ischemia. In 114 of 136 consecutive patients clinically suspected of myocardial ischemia with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, dobutamine CMR was performed and the CAC score was determined. The CAC score was obtained by 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and was calculated according to the method of Agatston. The CAC score and the results of the dobutamine CMR were correlated and the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of the CAC score for dobutamine CMR were calculated. A total of 114 (87%) of the patients were eligible for this study. There was a significant correlation between the CAC score and dobutamine CMR (p<0.001). Patients with a CAC score of less than 11 showed no signs of inducible ischemia during dobutamine CMR. For a CAC score of less than 101, the NPV and the PPV of the CAC score for the outcome of dobutamine CMR were, respectively, 0.96 and 0.29. In patients with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia a MDCT CAC score of less than 11 reliably rules out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine CMR. (orig.)

  1. Coronary artery calcification score by multislice computed tomography predicts the outcome of dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Caroline H C; Kuijpers, Dirkjan; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Overbosch, Jelle; van Dijkman, Paul R M; Zijlstra, Felix; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of less than 11 can reliably rule out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients suspected of having myocardial ischemia. In 114 of 136 consecutive patients clinically suspected of myocardial ischemia with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, dobutamine CMR was performed and the CAC score was determined. The CAC score was obtained by 16-row multidetector compued tomography (MDCT) and was calculated according to the method of Agatston. The CAC score and the results of the dobutamine CMR were correlated and the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of the CAC score for dobutamine CMR were calculated. A total of 114 (87%) of the patients were eligible for this study. There was a significant correlation between the CAC score and dobutamine CMR (p<0.001). Patients with a CAC score of less than 11 showed no signs of inducible ischemia during dobutamine CMR. For a CAC score of less than 101, the NPV and the PPV of the CAC score for the outcome of dobutamine CMR were, respectively, 0.96 and 0.29. In patients with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia a MDCT CAC score of less than 11 reliably rules out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine CMR.

  2. Coronary artery calcification score by multislice computed tomography predicts the outcome of dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, Caroline H.C.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Overbosch, Jelle; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Dirkjan [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands); Bronovo Hospital, Department of Radiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Dijkman, Paul R.M. van [Bronovo Hospital, Department of Cardiology, The Hague (Netherlands); Zijlstra, Felix [University Hospital Groningen, Department of Cardiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether a coronary artery calcium (CAC) score of less than 11 can reliably rule out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients suspected of having myocardial ischemia. In 114 of 136 consecutive patients clinically suspected of myocardial ischemia with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, dobutamine CMR was performed and the CAC score was determined. The CAC score was obtained by 16-row multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and was calculated according to the method of Agatston. The CAC score and the results of the dobutamine CMR were correlated and the positive predictive value (PPV) and the negative predictive value (NPV) of the CAC score for dobutamine CMR were calculated. A total of 114 (87%) of the patients were eligible for this study. There was a significant correlation between the CAC score and dobutamine CMR (p<0.001). Patients with a CAC score of less than 11 showed no signs of inducible ischemia during dobutamine CMR. For a CAC score of less than 101, the NPV and the PPV of the CAC score for the outcome of dobutamine CMR were, respectively, 0.96 and 0.29. In patients with an inconclusive diagnosis of myocardial ischemia a MDCT CAC score of less than 11 reliably rules out myocardial ischemia detected by dobutamine CMR. (orig.)

  3. Predicting athletic performance with self-confidence and somatic and cognitive anxiety as a function of motor and physiological requirements in six sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of the present study is to examine the ability of certain psychological attributes to predict performance in six National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate sports. Eighty-four athletes from the varsity sports teams of cross country running, alpine and nordic skiing, tennis, basketball, and track and field at the University of Colorado completed a questionnaire adapted from Martens (1977; Martens et al., 1983) that measured their trait levels of self-confidence (Bandura, 1977), somatic anxiety, and cognitive anxiety (Martens, 1977; Martens et al., 1983). In addition, at three to six competitions during the season, the members of the cross country running and tennis teams filled out a state measure (Martens et al., 1983) of the three attributes from one to two hours prior to the competition. Following each competition, subjective and objective ratings of performance were obtained, and, for all sports, coaches' ratings of performance and an overall seasonal team ranking were determined as seasonal performance measures. The sports were dichotomized along motor and physiological dimensions. Results indicate that all three psychological attributes were significant predictors of performance in both fine motor, anaerobic sports and gross motor, aerobic sports. Further, clear differences in these relationships emerged as a function of the dichotomization. In addition, unexpected sex differences emerged. The findings are discussed relative to prior research and their implications for future research.

  4. Method and timing of tumor volume measurement for outcome prediction in cervical cancer using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayr, Nina A.; Taoka, Toshiaki; Yuh, William T.C.; Denning, Leah M.; Zhen, Weining K.; Paulino, Arnold C.; Gaston, Robert C.; Sorosky, Joel I.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Walker, Joan L.; Mannel, Robert S.; Buatti, John M.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, imaging-based tumor volume before, during, and after radiation therapy (RT) has been shown to predict tumor response in cervical cancer. However, the effectiveness of different methods and timing of imaging-based tumor size assessment have not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to compare the predictive value for treatment outcome derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid tumor volume measurement using orthogonal diameters (with ellipsoid computation) with that derived from more complex contour tracing/region-of-interest (ROI) analysis 3D tumor volumetry. Methods and Materials: Serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations were prospectively performed in 60 patients with advanced cervical cancer (Stages IB 2 -IVB/recurrent) at the start of RT, during early RT (20-25 Gy), mid-RT (45-50 Gy), and at follow-up (1-2 months after RT completion). ROI-based volumetry was derived by tracing the entire tumor region in each MR slice on the computer work station. For the diameter-based surrogate ''ellipsoid volume,'' the three orthogonal diameters (d 1 , d 2 , d 3 ) were measured on film hard copies to calculate volume as an ellipsoid (d 1 x d 2 x d 3 x π/6). Serial tumor volumes and regression rates determined by each method were correlated with local control, disease-free and overall survival, and the results were compared between the two measuring methods. Median post-therapy follow-up was 4.9 years (range, 2.0-8.2 years). Results: The best method and time point of tumor size measurement for the prediction of outcome was the tumor regression rate in the mid-therapy MRI examination (at 45-50 Gy) using 3D ROI volumetry. For the pre-RT measurement both the diameter-based method and ROI volumetry provided similar predictive accuracy, particularly for patients with small ( 3 ) and large (≥100 cm 3 ) pre-RT tumor size. However, the pre-RT tumor size measured by either method had much less predictive value for the intermediate-size (40

  5. Evaluation of 3D tensor tractography of pyramidal tract depicted by 3T MRI in patients with lacunar infarcts. For prediction of motor function outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igase, Keiji; Arai, Masamori; Matsubara, Ichiro; Goishi, Jyunji; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Nagato, Shigeyuki; Seno, Toshimoto; Ohnishi, Takanori

    2007-01-01

    3D tensor tractography (DTT) has been applied to central nervous system (CNS) diseases to depict neuronal fibers. In this study with 3 tesla MRI, we have evaluated DTT to predict outcome of motor function in patients with lacunar infarcts. Fifteen patients with New lacunar infarcts, underwent DTTs with at least one in the acute (mean 1.4 days) and another in the subacute phase (mean 18.7 days). Patients were separated to 2 groups, recovery and non-recovery. Patients in former group had almost complete recovery in motor function 3 month later, while those to latter had a residual hemiparesis. Motor function was assessed with MMT score, which was uniquely stratefied into 12 levels by a modified MMT (manual muscle testing) protocol. DTT was implemented with 3 tesla MRI (Signa Excite; GE) and analyzed with dTV. IISR which was produced by the Department of Radiology, Tokyo University. The pyramidal tract was delineated by setting each region of interest (ROI), with the cerebral peduncle as the seed point and the motor cortex as the target point. The number of pyramidal fibers was identified as drawn lines obtained from a result display. The ratio of the number of fibers (RF) was calculated based on the number of fibers in the injured side relative to the number of fibers in the intact side x 100. In acute phase mean RFs the recovery (70.8±21.6%) and non-recovery (63.5±23.4%) groups were not significantly different. RF of recovery group in subacute phase was 100.5±28.3%, which was significantly higher with that in acute phase, meanwhile there was no significance difference between RFs of non-recovery group in two phases. In addition there was a significant correlation (R 2 =0.89) between MMT score 3 month later and RF in subacute phase in all patients group. There seems to be a correlation between long-term recovery of motor function and increased numbers in pyramidal fibers defected by DTT. Therefore, DTT may have a potential use in predicting the outcome of patients

  6. How the credit assignment problems in motor control could be solved after the cerebellum predicts increases in error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verduzco-Flores, Sergio O; O'Reilly, Randall C

    2015-01-01

    We present a cerebellar architecture with two main characteristics. The first one is that complex spikes respond to increases in sensory errors. The second one is that cerebellar modules associate particular contexts where errors have increased in the past with corrective commands that stop the increase in error. We analyze our architecture formally and computationally for the case of reaching in a 3D environment. In the case of motor control, we show that there are synergies of this architecture with the Equilibrium-Point hypothesis, leading to novel ways to solve the motor error and distal learning problems. In particular, the presence of desired equilibrium lengths for muscles provides a way to know when the error is increasing, and which corrections to apply. In the context of Threshold Control Theory and Perceptual Control Theory we show how to extend our model so it implements anticipative corrections in cascade control systems that span from muscle contractions to cognitive operations.

  7. How the credit assignment problems in motor control could be solved after the cerebellum predicts increases in error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Oscar Verduzco-Flores

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a cerebellar architecture with two main characteristics. The first one is that complex spikes respond to increases in sensory errors. The second one is that cerebellar modules associate particular contexts where errors have increased in the past with corrective commands that stop the increase in error. We analyze our architecture formally and computationally for the case of reaching in a 3D environment. In the case of motor control, we show that there are synergies of this architecture with the Equilibrium-Point hypothesis, leading to novel ways to solve the motor error and distal learning problems. In particular, the presence of desired equilibrium lengths for muscles provides a way to know when the error is increasing, and which corrections to apply. In the context of Threshold Control Theory and Perceptual Control Theory we show how to extend our model so it implements anticipative corrections in cascade control systems that span from muscle contractions to cognitive operations.

  8. EEG Theta Dynamics within Frontal and Parietal Cortices for Error Processing during Reaching Movements in a Prism Adaptation Study Altering Visuo-Motor Predictive Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Pieranna; Bonfiglio, Luca; Minichilli, Fabrizio; Cantore, Nicoletta; Carboncini, Maria Chiara; Piccotti, Emily; Rossi, Bruno; Andre, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of frontal midline theta (fmθ) is observed during error commission, but little is known about the role of theta oscillations in correcting motor behaviours. We investigate EEG activity of healthy partipants executing a reaching task under variable degrees of prism-induced visuo-motor distortion and visual occlusion of the initial arm trajectory. This task introduces directional errors of different magnitudes. The discrepancy between predicted and actual movement directions (i.e. the error), at the time when visual feedback (hand appearance) became available, elicits a signal that triggers on-line movement correction. Analysis were performed on 25 EEG channels. For each participant, the median value of the angular error of all reaching trials was used to partition the EEG epochs into high- and low-error conditions. We computed event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP) time-locked either to visual feedback or to the onset of movement correction. ERSP time-locked to the onset of visual feedback showed that fmθ increased in the high- but not in the low-error condition with an approximate time lag of 200 ms. Moreover, when single epochs were sorted by the degree of motor error, fmθ started to increase when a certain level of error was exceeded and, then, scaled with error magnitude. When ERSP were time-locked to the onset of movement correction, the fmθ increase anticipated this event with an approximate time lead of 50 ms. During successive trials, an error reduction was observed which was associated with indices of adaptations (i.e., aftereffects) suggesting the need to explore if theta oscillations may facilitate learning. To our knowledge this is the first study where the EEG signal recorded during reaching movements was time-locked to the onset of the error visual feedback. This allowed us to conclude that theta oscillations putatively generated by anterior cingulate cortex activation are implicated in error processing in semi-naturalistic motor

  9. Predicting surgical outcome in cases of cervical myelopathy with magnetic resonance imaging. Critical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akiyama, Takashi

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the author attempted to correlate clinical factors significant in cases of cervical myelopathy with postoperative recovery. It is hoped that the results will aid in the preoperative prediction of surgical outcomes. The factors considered were the transverse area of the spinal cord, the cord compression rate, the presence of a high intensity area in T2-weighted MRI, the duration of symptoms before surgery, and age at surgery. Because there are variations in the transverse area of the spinal cord, 100 normal individuals were selected and the standard transverse area was calculated. The transverse area of the spinal cord and the cord constriction rate in the myelopathy cases was then measured and compared to the standard. The data indicated that the constriction rate was most relevant to recovery rate. Clinical thresholds found to correlate with a better than average rate of recovery in cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) were: a cord constriction rate; under 28.7%, cord compression rate; over 0.38, duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 9.2 months, and age at surgery; under 59.2 yrs. In patients with ossification of the longitudinal ligament (OPLL), cord constriction rate; under 36.2%, cord compression rate; over 0.30, duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 14.2 months, and age at surgery; under 57.6 yrs., all correlated with superior recovery, as did cord constriction rate; under 22.3%, and duration of symptoms before surgery; less than 3.7 months with patients suffering from cervical disc herniation (CDH). Furthermore, the absence of a T2-weighted high intensity area in CSM and OPLL patients also correlated with improved recovery. These results suggest that a favorable postoperative recovery rate can be expected in cases of cervical myelopathy that conform to the above criteria. (author)

  10. Comparison of Linear Induction Motor Theories for the LIMRV and TLRV Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The Oberretl, Yamamura, and Mosebach theories of the linear induction motor are described and also applied to predict performance characteristics of the TLRV & LIMRV linear induction motors. The effect of finite motor width and length on performance ...

  11. Prediction of BRAF mutation status of craniopharyngioma using magnetic resonance imaging features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Qi; Yu, Yang; Shi, Zhifeng; Wang, Yongfei; Zhu, Wei; Du, Zunguo; Yao, Zhenwei; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2017-10-06

    .91. The area under the ROC curve for the sum of all 5 diagnostic criteria was 0.989 (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS The BRAF mutation status of craniopharyngiomas might be predicted using certain MRI features with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, thus offering potential guidance for the preoperative administration of BRAF mutation inhibitors.

  12. Causal Role of Motor Simulation in Turn-Taking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, Lauren V; Novembre, Giacomo; Keller, Peter E; Pickering, Martin J

    2015-12-16

    Overlap between sensory and motor representations has been documented for a range of human actions, from grasping (Rizzolatti et al., 1996b) to playing a musical instrument (Novembre and Keller, 2014). Such overlap suggests that individuals use motor simulation to predict the outcome of observed actions (Wolpert, 1997). Here we investigate motor simulation as a basis of human communication. Using a musical turn-taking task, we show that pianists call on motor representations of their partner's part to predict when to come in for their own turn. Pianists played alternating solos with a videoed partner, and double-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied around the turn-switch to temporarily disrupt processing in two cortical regions implicated previously in different forms of motor simulation: (1) the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC), associated with automatic motor resonance during passive observation of hand actions, especially when the actions are familiar (Lahav et al., 2007); and (2) the supplementary motor area (SMA), involved in active motor imagery, especially when the actions are familiar (Baumann et al., 2007). Stimulation of the right dPMC decreased the temporal accuracy of pianists' (right-hand) entries relative to sham when the partner's (left-hand) part had been rehearsed previously. This effect did not occur for dPMC stimulation without rehearsal or for SMA stimulation. These findings support the role of the dPMC in predicting the time course of observed actions via resonance-based motor simulation during turn-taking. Because turn-taking spans multiple modes of human interaction, we suggest that simulation is a foundational mechanism underlying the temporal dynamics of joint action. Even during passive observation, seeing or hearing somebody execute an action from within our repertoire activates motor cortices of our brain. But what is the functional relevance of such "motor simulation"? By combining a musical duet task with a real

  13. Motor Neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2017-01-01

    Motor neurons translate synaptic input from widely distributed premotor networks into patterns of action potentials that orchestrate motor unit force and motor behavior. Intercalated between the CNS and muscles, motor neurons add to and adjust the final motor command. The identity and functional...... in in vitro preparations is far from complete. Nevertheless, a foundation has been provided for pursuing functional significance of intrinsic response properties in motoneurons in vivo during motor behavior at levels from molecules to systems....

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected tumor response for locally advanced rectal cancer predicts survival outcomes: MERCURY experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Uday B; Taylor, Fiona; Blomqvist, Lennart; George, Christopher; Evans, Hywel; Tekkis, Paris; Quirke, Philip; Sebag-Montefiore, David; Moran, Brendan; Heald, Richard; Guthrie, Ashley; Bees, Nicola; Swift, Ian; Pennert, Kjell; Brown, Gina

    2011-10-01

    To assess magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and pathologic staging after neoadjuvant therapy for rectal cancer in a prospectively enrolled, multicenter study. In a prospective cohort study, 111 patients who had rectal cancer treated by neoadjuvant therapy were assessed for response by MRI and pathology staging by T, N and circumferential resection margin (CRM) status. Tumor regression grade (TRG) was also assessed by MRI. Overall survival (OS) was estimated by using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to determine associations between staging of good and poor responders on MRI or pathology and survival outcomes after controlling for patient characteristics. On multivariate analysis, the MRI-assessed TRG (mrTRG) hazard ratios (HRs) were independently significant for survival (HR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.65 to 11.7) and disease-free survival (DFS; HR, 3.28; 95% CI, 1.22 to 8.80). Five-year survival for poor mrTRG was 27% versus 72% (P = .001), and DFS for poor mrTRG was 31% versus 64% (P = .007). Preoperative MRI-predicted CRM independently predicted local recurrence (LR; HR, 4.25; 95% CI, 1.45 to 12.51). Five-year survival for poor post-treatment pathologic T stage (ypT) was 39% versus 76% (P = .001); DFS for the same was 38% versus 84% (P = .001); and LR for the same was 27% versus 6% (P = .018). The 5-year survival for involved pCRM was 30% versus 59% (P = .001); DFS, 28 versus 62% (P = .02); and LR, 56% versus 10% (P = .001). Pathology node status did not predict outcomes. MRI assessment of TRG and CRM are imaging markers that predict survival outcomes for good and poor responders and provide an opportunity for the multidisciplinary team to offer additional treatment options before planning definitive surgery. Postoperative histopathology assessment of ypT and CRM but not post-treatment N status were important postsurgical predictors of outcome.

  15. Predictive value of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived myocardial strain for poor outcomes in patients with acute myocarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji Won; Jeong, Yeon Joo; Lee, Gee Won; Lee, Nam Kyung; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Jin You [Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Bum Sung; Choo, Ki Seok [Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the utility of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR)-derived myocardial strain measurement for the prediction of poor outcomes in patients with acute myocarditis We retrospectively analyzed data from 37 patients with acute myocarditis who underwent CMR. Left ventricular (LV) size, LV mass index, ejection fraction and presence of myocardial late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) were analyzed. LV circumferential strain (EccSAX), radial strain (ErrSAX) from mid-ventricular level short-axis cine views and LV longitudinal strain (EllLV), radial strain (ErrLax) measurements from 2-chamber long-axis views were obtained. In total, 31 of 37 patients (83.8%) underwent follow-up echocardiography. The primary outcome was major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE). Incomplete LV functional recovery was a secondary outcome. During an average follow-up of 41 months, 11 of 37 patients (29.7%) experienced MACE. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, which included LV mass index, LV ejection fraction, the presence of LGE, EccSAX, ErrSAX, EllLV, and ErrLax values, indicated that the presence of LGE (hazard ratio, 42.88; p = 0.014), together with ErrLax (hazard ratio, 0.77 per 1%, p = 0.004), was a significant predictor of MACE. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated worse outcomes in patient with LGE and an ErrLax value ≤ 9.48%. Multivariable backward regression analysis revealed that ErrLax values were the only significant predictors of LV functional recovery (hazard ratio, 0.54 per 1%; p = 0.042). CMR-derived ErrLax values can predict poor outcomes, both MACE and incomplete LV functional recovery, in patients with acute myocarditis, while LGE is only a predictor of MACE.

  16. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can play a role in predicting flare in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nusman, Charlotte M., E-mail: c.m.nusman@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rossum, Marion A.J. van [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Doctor Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatrics, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dolman, Koert M. [Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Reade Institute location Jan van Breemen, Doctor Jan van Breemenstraat 2, 1056 AB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Pediatrics, Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Jan Tooropstraat 164, 1061 AE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berg, J. Merlijn van den [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kuijpers, Taco W. [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Immunology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Emma Children’s Hospital, Academic Medical Center Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Subclinical synovitis is present in 40% of the inactive JIA patients. • One third of the inactive JIA patients flared during 2-year clinical follow-up. • DCE-MRI can play a role in predicting clinical flare in JIA patients. - Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to determine whether conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters of a previously affected target joint in patients with clinically inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have prognostic meaning for a flare of joint inflammation during follow-up. Material and methods: Thirty-two JIA patients with clinically inactive disease at the time of MRI of the knee were prospectively included. DCE-MRI provided both descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shapes, representing functional properties of the synovium. Conventional MRI outcome measures included validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow edema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. During a 2-year period the patients were monitored by their pediatric rheumatologist and clinical flares were registered. Results: MRI analysis revealed synovial hypertrophy in 13 (39.4%) of the clinically inactive patients. Twelve patients (37.5%) had at least one flare during 2-year clinical follow-up. Persistently inactive and flaring patients differed significantly in the maximum enhancement of the synovium on the DCE-MRI (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found between these two groups in any of the baseline scores of conventional MRI. Conclusions: Our prospective clinical follow-up study indicates that the assessment of ‘maximum enhancement’ upon DCE-MRI may be able to predict a clinical flare within 2 years in inactive JIA patients.

  17. Magnetic resonance metabolic profiling of breast cancer tissue obtained with core needle biopsy for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Soo Choi

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether metabolic profiling of core needle biopsy (CNB samples using high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS could be used for predicting pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. After institutional review board approval and informed consent were obtained, CNB tissue samples were collected from 37 malignant lesions in 37 patients before NAC treatment. The metabolic profiling of CNB samples were performed by HR-MAS MRS. Metabolic profiles were compared according to pathologic response to NAC using the Mann-Whitney test. Multivariate analysis was performed with orthogonal projections to latent structure-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA. Various metabolites including choline-containing compounds were identified and quantified by HR-MAS MRS in all 37 breast cancer tissue samples obtained by CNB. In univariate analysis, the metabolite concentrations and metabolic ratios of CNB samples obtained with HR-MAS MRS were not significantly different between different pathologic response groups. However, there was a trend of lower levels of phosphocholine/creatine ratio and choline-containing metabolite concentrations in the pathologic complete response group compared to the non-pathologic complete response group. In multivariate analysis, the OPLS-DA models built with HR-MAS MR metabolic profiles showed visible discrimination between the pathologic response groups. This study showed OPLS-DA multivariate analysis using metabolic profiles of pretreatment CNB samples assessed by HR- MAS MRS may be used to predict pathologic response before NAC, although we did not identify the metabolite showing statistical significance in univariate analysis. Therefore, our preliminary results raise the necessity of further study on HR-MAS MR metabolic profiling of CNB samples for a large number of cancers.

  18. Individual differences in decision making and reward processing predict changes in cannabis use: a prospective functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousijn, Janna; Wiers, Reinout W; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; Porrino, Linda J; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2013-11-01

    Decision-making deficits are thought to play an important role in the development and persistence of substance use disorders. Individual differences in decision-making abilities and their underlying neurocircuitry may, therefore, constitute an important predictor for the course of substance use and the development of substance use disorders. Here, we investigate the predictive value of decision making and neural mechanisms underlying decision making for future cannabis use and problem severity in a sample of heavy cannabis users. Brain activity during a monetary decision-making task (Iowa gambling task) was compared between 32 heavy cannabis users and 41 matched non-using controls using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, within the group of heavy cannabis users, associations were examined between task-related brain activations, cannabis use and cannabis use-related problems at baseline, and change in cannabis use and problem severity after a 6-month follow-up. Despite normal task performance, heavy cannabis users compared with controls showed higher activation during wins in core areas associated with decision making. Moreover, within the group of heavy cannabis users, win-related activity and activity anticipating loss outcomes in areas generally involved in executive functions predicted change in cannabis use after 6 months. These findings are consistent with previous studies and point to abnormal processing of motivational information in heavy cannabis users. A new finding is that individuals who are biased toward immediate rewards have a higher probability of increasing drug use, highlighting the importance of the relative balance between motivational processes and regulatory executive processes in the development of substance use disorders. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction Biology © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can play a role in predicting flare in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nusman, Charlotte M.; Hemke, Robert; Lavini, Cristina; Schonenberg-Meinema, Dieneke; Rossum, Marion A.J. van; Dolman, Koert M.; Berg, J. Merlijn van den; Maas, Mario; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Subclinical synovitis is present in 40% of the inactive JIA patients. • One third of the inactive JIA patients flared during 2-year clinical follow-up. • DCE-MRI can play a role in predicting clinical flare in JIA patients. - Abstract: Purpose: The study was performed to determine whether conventional and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters of a previously affected target joint in patients with clinically inactive juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) have prognostic meaning for a flare of joint inflammation during follow-up. Material and methods: Thirty-two JIA patients with clinically inactive disease at the time of MRI of the knee were prospectively included. DCE-MRI provided both descriptive measures and time-intensity-curve shapes, representing functional properties of the synovium. Conventional MRI outcome measures included validated scores for synovial hypertrophy, bone marrow edema, cartilage lesions and bone erosions. During a 2-year period the patients were monitored by their pediatric rheumatologist and clinical flares were registered. Results: MRI analysis revealed synovial hypertrophy in 13 (39.4%) of the clinically inactive patients. Twelve patients (37.5%) had at least one flare during 2-year clinical follow-up. Persistently inactive and flaring patients differed significantly in the maximum enhancement of the synovium on the DCE-MRI (p < 0.05), whereas no difference was found between these two groups in any of the baseline scores of conventional MRI. Conclusions: Our prospective clinical follow-up study indicates that the assessment of ‘maximum enhancement’ upon DCE-MRI may be able to predict a clinical flare within 2 years in inactive JIA patients.

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance findings predicting mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggen, Vivan J.M.; Leiner, Tim; Habets, Jesse; Post, Marco C.; Dijk, Arie P. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W.; Boersma, Eric

    2016-01-01

    To provide a comprehensive overview of all reported cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings that predict clinical deterioration in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were systematically searched for longitudinal studies published by April 2015 that reported associations between CMR findings and adverse clinical outcome in PAH. Studies were appraised using previously developed criteria for prognostic studies. Meta-analysis using random effect models was performed for CMR findings investigated by three or more studies. Eight papers (539 patients) investigating 21 different CMR findings were included. Meta-analysis showed that right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction was the strongest predictor of mortality in PAH (pooled HR 1.23 [95 % CI 1.07-1.41], p = 0.003) per 5 % decrease. In addition, RV end-diastolic volume index (pooled HR 1.06 [95 % CI 1.00-1.12], p = 0.049), RV end-systolic volume index (pooled HR 1.05 [95 % CI 1.01-1.09], p = 0.013) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (pooled HR 1.16 [95 % CI 1.00-1.34], p = 0.045) were of prognostic importance. RV and LV mass did not provide prognostic information (p = 0.852 and p = 0.983, respectively). This meta-analysis substantiates the clinical yield of specific CMR findings in the prognostication of PAH patients. Decreased RV ejection is the strongest and most well established predictor of mortality. (orig.)

  1. Wall enhancement on high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Peng; Zhang, Hong-Qi [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Yang, Qi [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Dan-Dan [Capital Medical University, Department of Clinical Pathology, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China); Guan, Shao-Chen [Capital Medical University, Department of Evidence-Based Medicine, Xuanwu Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2016-10-15

    The aneurysm wall has been reported to play a critical role in the formation, development, and even rupture of an aneurysm. We used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) to investigate the aneurysm wall in an effort to identify evidence of inflammation invasion and define its relationship with aneurysm behavior. Patients with intracranial aneurysms who were prospectively evaluated using HRMRI between July 2013 and June 2014 were enrolled in this study. The aneurysm's wall enhancement and evidence of inflammation invasion were determined. In addition, the relationship between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size and symptoms, including ruptured aneurysms, giant unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs) presenting as mass effect, progressively growing aneurysms, and aneurysms associated with neurological symptoms, was statistically analyzed. Twenty-five patients with 30 aneurysms were available for the current study. Fourteen aneurysms showed wall enhancement, including 6 ruptured and 8 unruptured aneurysms. Evidence of inflammation was identified directly through histological studies and indirectly through intraoperative investigations and clinical courses. The statistical analysis indicated no significant correlation between aneurysm wall enhancement and aneurysm size. However, there was a strong correlation between wall enhancement and aneurysm symptoms, with a kappa value of 0.86 (95 % CI 0.68-1). Aneurysm wall enhancement on HRMRI might be a sign of inflammatory change. Symptomatic aneurysms exhibited wall enhancement on HRMRI. Wall enhancement had a high consistent correlation of symptomatic aneurysms. Therefore, wall enhancement on HRMRI might predict an unsteady state of an intracranial saccular aneurysm. (orig.)

  2. Predicting Pathological Features at Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Prostate Cancer Eligible for Active Surveillance by Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottavio de Cobelli

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic performance of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI and Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PIRADS score in predicting pathologic features in a cohort of patients eligible for active surveillance who underwent radical prostatectomy.A total of 223 patients who fulfilled the criteria for "Prostate Cancer Research International: Active Surveillance", were included. Mp-1.5 Tesla MRI examination staging with endorectal coil was performed at least 6-8 weeks after TRUS-guided biopsy. In all patients, the likelihood of the presence of cancer was assigned using PIRADS score between 1 and 5. Outcomes of interest were: Gleason score upgrading, extra capsular extension (ECE, unfavorable prognosis (occurrence of both upgrading and ECE, large tumor volume (≥ 0.5 ml, and seminal vesicle invasion (SVI. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves and Decision Curve Analyses (DCA were performed for models with and without inclusion of PIRADS score.Multivariate analysis demonstrated the association of PIRADS score with upgrading (P < 0.0001, ECE (P < 0.0001, unfavorable prognosis (P < 0.0001, and large tumor volume (P = 0.002. ROC curves and DCA showed that models including PIRADS score resulted in greater net benefit for almost all the outcomes of interest, with the only exception of SVI.mpMRI and PIRADS scoring are feasible tools in clinical setting and could be used as decision-support systems for a more accurate selection of patients eligible for AS.

  3. Cardiac magnetic resonance findings predicting mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggen, Vivan J.M. [AHMaZON Centre for Adult Congenital Heart Disease, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen and St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Leiner, Tim; Habets, Jesse [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Post, Marco C.; Dijk, Arie P. van; Sieswerda, Gertjan T. [AHMaZON Centre for Adult Congenital Heart Disease, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen and St. Antonius Hospital Nieuwegein, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Roos-Hesselink, Jolien W. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Boersma, Eric [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Cardiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-11-15

    To provide a comprehensive overview of all reported cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) findings that predict clinical deterioration in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). MEDLINE and EMBASE electronic databases were systematically searched for longitudinal studies published by April 2015 that reported associations between CMR findings and adverse clinical outcome in PAH. Studies were appraised using previously developed criteria for prognostic studies. Meta-analysis using random effect models was performed for CMR findings investigated by three or more studies. Eight papers (539 patients) investigating 21 different CMR findings were included. Meta-analysis showed that right ventricular (RV) ejection fraction was the strongest predictor of mortality in PAH (pooled HR 1.23 [95 % CI 1.07-1.41], p = 0.003) per 5 % decrease. In addition, RV end-diastolic volume index (pooled HR 1.06 [95 % CI 1.00-1.12], p = 0.049), RV end-systolic volume index (pooled HR 1.05 [95 % CI 1.01-1.09], p = 0.013) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (pooled HR 1.16 [95 % CI 1.00-1.34], p = 0.045) were of prognostic importance. RV and LV mass did not provide prognostic information (p = 0.852 and p = 0.983, respectively). This meta-analysis substantiates the clinical yield of specific CMR findings in the prognostication of PAH patients. Decreased RV ejection is the strongest and most well established predictor of mortality. (orig.)

  4. Factors predicting the feasibility of monitoring lower-limb muscle motor evoked potentials in patients undergoing excision of spinal cord tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Velayutham, Parthiban; Joseph, Mathew; Babu, K Srinivasa

    2011-06-01

    This prospective study on intraoperative muscle motor evoked potentials (MMEPs) from lower-limb muscles in patients undergoing surgery for spinal cord tumors was performed to: 1) determine preoperative clinical features that could predict successful recording of lower-limb MMEPs; 2) determine the muscle in the lower limb from which MMEPs could be most consistently obtained; 3) assess the need to monitor more than 1 muscle per limb; and 4) determine the effect of a successful baseline MMEP recording on early postoperative motor outcome. Of 115 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for spinal cord tumors, 110 were included in this study (44 intramedullary and 66 intradural extramedullary tumors). Muscle MEPs were generated using transcranial electrical stimulation under controlled anesthesia and were recorded from the tibialis anterior, quadriceps, soleus, and external anal sphincter muscles bilaterally. The effect of age (≤ 20 or > 20 years old), location of the tumor (intramedullary or extramedullary), segmental location of the tumor (cervical, thoracic, or lumbar), duration of symptoms (≤ 12 or > 12 months), preoperative functional grade (Nurick Grades 0-3 or 4-5), and muscle power (Medical Research Council Grades 0/5-3/5 or 4/5-5/5) on the success rate of obtaining MMEPs was studied using multiple regression analysis. The effect of the ability to monitor MMEPs on motor outcome at discharge from the hospital was also analyzed. The overall success rate for obtaining baseline lower-limb MMEPs was 68.2% (75 of 110 patients). Eighty-nine percent of patients with Nurick Grades 0-3 had successful MMEP recordings. Muscle MEPs could not be obtained in any patient in whom muscle power was 2/5 or less, but were obtained from 91.4% of patients with muscle power of 4/5 or more. Analysis showed that only preoperative Nurick grade (p ≤ 0.0001) and muscle power (p < 0.0001) were significant predictors of the likelihood of obtaining MMEPs. Responses were most consistently

  5. Intermittently-visual Tracking Experiments Reveal the Roles of Error-correction and Predictive Mechanisms in the Human Visual-motor Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yoshikatsu; Tamura, Yurie; Sase, Kazuya; Sugawara, Ken; Sawada, Yasuji

    Prediction mechanism is necessary for human visual motion to compensate a delay of sensory-motor system. In a previous study, “proactive control” was discussed as one example of predictive function of human beings, in which motion of hands preceded the virtual moving target in visual tracking experiments. To study the roles of the positional-error correction mechanism and the prediction mechanism, we carried out an intermittently-visual tracking experiment where a circular orbit is segmented into the target-visible regions and the target-invisible regions. Main results found in this research were following. A rhythmic component appeared in the tracer velocity when the target velocity was relatively high. The period of the rhythm in the brain obtained from environmental stimuli is shortened more than 10%. The shortening of the period of rhythm in the brain accelerates the hand motion as soon as the visual information is cut-off, and causes the precedence of hand motion to the target motion. Although the precedence of the hand in the blind region is reset by the environmental information when the target enters the visible region, the hand motion precedes the target in average when the predictive mechanism dominates the error-corrective mechanism.

  6. Baryon Resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oset, E.; Sarkar, S.; Sun Baoxi; Vicente Vacas, M.J.; Ramos, A.; Gonzalez, P.; Vijande, J.; Martinez Torres, A.; Khemchandani, K.

    2010-01-01

    In this talk I show recent results on how many excited baryon resonances appear as systems of one meson and one baryon, or two mesons and one baryon, with the mesons being either pseudoscalar or vectors. Connection with experiment is made including a discussion on old predictions and recent results for the photoproduction of the Λ(1405) resonance, as well as the prediction of one 1/2 + baryon state around 1920 MeV which might have been seen in the γp→K + Λ reaction.

  7. Can Diffusion-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predict Survival in Patients with Cervical Cancer? A Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu-Ting, E-mail: wangyuting_330@163.com; Li, Ying-Chun, E-mail: anicespringspring@163.com; Yin, Long-Lin, E-mail: yinlonglin@163.com; Pu, Hong, E-mail: ph196797@163.com

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • DWI may serve as a prognostic factor in patients with cervical cancer. • Unfavorable DWI results (mostly low ADC) were associated with higher risks of tumor recurrence. • A quantified ADC was shown to be a suitable candidate indicator. - Abstract: Objective: Although diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) has been widely used in the diagnosis of cervical cancer, whether it can predict disease recurrence or survival remains inconclusive. This study aimed to systematically evaluate whether DWI can serve as a reliable prognostic predictor in patients with cervical cancer. Methods: PubMed, the MEDLINE database and the Cochrane Library were searched for DWI studies with >12 months of prognostic data in patients with cervical cancer. Endpoints included tumor recurrence and death. Methodological quality was assessed using the Quality in Prognostic Studies (QUIPS) tool. Combined estimates of hazard ratios (HRs) were derived. Results: Nine studies involving a total of 796 patients (mean/median age from 45.0 years to 62.9 years) met the inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was relatively high. Eight of the nine studies employed apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) as an indicator of DWI results. Using disease-free survival (DFS) as an outcome measure, nine studies yielded a combined HR of 1.55 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.23–1.95), and seven studies that employed pretreatment DWI yielded a combined HR of 1.50 (95% CI: 1.03–2.19), which indicated that unfavorable DWI results were associated with an approximately 1.50–1.55-fold higher risk of tumor recurrence. The two studies investigating the impact of DWI results on overall survival (OS) reported HRs of 7.20 and 2.17, respectively. Conclusion: DWI may serve as a predictor of tumor recurrence in patients with cervical cancer as showed by meta-analysis, and the quantified ADC as a suitable candidate indicator.

  8. EEG Theta Dynamics within Frontal and Parietal Cortices for Error Processing during Reaching Movements in a Prism Adaptation Study Altering Visuo-Motor Predictive Planning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieranna Arrighi

    Full Text Available Modulation of frontal midline theta (fmθ is observed during error commission, but little is known about the role of theta oscillations in correcting motor behaviours. We investigate EEG activity of healthy partipants executing a reaching task under variable degrees of prism-induced visuo-motor distortion and visual occlusion of the initial arm trajectory. This task introduces directional errors of different magnitudes. The discrepancy between predicted and actual movement directions (i.e. the error, at the time when visual feedback (hand appearance became available, elicits a signal that triggers on-line movement correction. Analysis were performed on 25 EEG channels. For each participant, the median value of the angular error of all reaching trials was used to partition the EEG epochs into high- and low-error conditions. We computed event-related spectral perturbations (ERSP time-locked either to visual feedback or to the onset of movement correction. ERSP time-locked to the onset of visual feedback showed that fmθ increased in the high- but not in the low-error condition with an approximate time lag of 200 ms. Moreover, when single epochs were sorted by the degree of motor error, fmθ started to increase when a certain level of error was exceeded and, then, scaled with error magnitude. When ERSP were time-locked to the onset of movement correction, the fmθ increase anticipated this event with an approximate time lead of 50 ms. During successive trials, an error reduction was observed which was associated with indices of adaptations (i.e., aftereffects suggesting the need to explore if theta oscillations may facilitate learning. To our knowledge this is the first study where the EEG signal recorded during reaching movements was time-locked to the onset of the error visual feedback. This allowed us to conclude that theta oscillations putatively generated by anterior cingulate cortex activation are implicated in error processing in semi

  9. Prediction of Tungsten CMP Pad Life Using Blanket Removal Rate Data and Endpoint Data Obtained from Process Temperature and Carrier Motor Current Measurments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetherington, Dale L.; Stein, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Several techniques to predict pad failure during tungsten CMP were investigated for a specific consumable set. These techniques include blanket polish rate measurements and metrics derived from two endpoint detection schemes. Blanket polish rate decreased significantly near pad failure. Metrics from the thermal endpoint technique included change in peak temperature, change in the time to reach peak temperature, and the change in the slope of the temperature trace just prior to peak temperature all as a function of pad life. Average carrier motor current before endpoint was also investigated. Changes in these metrics were observed however these changes, excluding time to peak process temperature, were either not consistent between pads or too noisy to be reliable predictors of pad failure

  10. Human brain mapping of language-related function on 1.5T magnetic resonance system: focused on motor language function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hee Young; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Shin, Taemin; Piao, Xiang Hao; Kim, Jae Soo; Lee, Gyung Kyu; Park, Il Soon; Park, Ji Hoon; Kang, Su Jin; You, Jin Jong; Chung, Sung Hoon

    1998-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of functional MR imaging of motor language function and its usefulness in the determination of hemispheric language dominance. In order to activate the motor center of language, six subjects ( 5 right-handed, 1 left-handed: 3 males: 3 females) generated words. They were requested to do this silently, without physical articulation, in response to English letters presented visually. Gradient-echo images (TR/TE/flip angle, 80/60/40 deg; 64 x 128 matrix; 10 mm thickness) were obtained in three axial planes including the inferior frontal gyrus. Functional maps were created by the postprocessing of gradient-echo images, including subtraction and statistics. Areas of activation were topographically analyzed and numbers of activated pixels in each region were compared between right and left sides. The reproducibility of functional maps was tested by repetition of functional imaging in the same subjects. Our results suggest that functional MR imaging can depict the activation of motor language function in the brain and can be used a useful non-invasive method for determining the hemispheric dominance of language. (author). 26 refs., 3 figs

  11. The predictability of frequency-altered auditory feedback changes the weighting of feedback and feedforward input for speech motor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerer, Nichole E; Jones, Jeffery A

    2014-12-01

    Speech production requires the combined effort of a feedback control system driven by sensory feedback, and a feedforward control system driven by internal models. However, the factors that dictate the relative weighting of these feedback and feedforward control systems are unclear. In this event-related potential (ERP) study, participants produced vocalisations while being exposed to blocks of frequency-altered feedback (FAF) perturbations that were either predictable in magnitude (consistently either 50 or 100 cents) or unpredictable in magnitude (50- and 100-cent perturbations varying randomly within each vocalisation). Vocal and P1-N1-P2 ERP responses revealed decreases in the magnitude and trial-to-trial variability of vocal responses, smaller N1 amplitudes, and shorter vocal, P1 and N1 response latencies following predictable FAF perturbation magnitudes. In addition, vocal response magnitudes correlated with N1 amplitudes, vocal response latencies, and P2 latencies. This pattern of results suggests that after repeated exposure to predictable FAF perturbations, the contribution of the feedforward control system increases. Examination of the presentation order of the FAF perturbations revealed smaller compensatory responses, smaller P1 and P2 amplitudes, and shorter N1 latencies when the block of predictable 100-cent perturbations occurred prior to the block of predictable 50-cent perturbations. These results suggest that exposure to large perturbations modulates responses to subsequent perturbations of equal or smaller size. Similarly, exposure to a 100-cent perturbation prior to a 50-cent perturbation within a vocalisation decreased the magnitude of vocal and N1 responses, but increased P1 and P2 latencies. Thus, exposure to a single perturbation can affect responses to subsequent perturbations. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Echocardiographic indexes help predict the need for nuclear magnetic resonance evaluation of patients with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreiro, Myriam; Toro, Lida; Andia, Marcelo; Zelada, Pamela; Alcantara, Alex; Castillo, Maria Elisa; Lagos, Rosa; Bareno, Sandra; Uribe, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary insufficiency (PI) frequently appears long-term after repair of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOFr). Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) plays a fundamental role in the indication of pulmonary valve replacement, in order to avoid complications of PI. However, CMR is a scarce and expensive resource in our reality, which is why its indication must be optimized. Aim: The objective of this work is to find echocardiographic indices to identify patients with TOFr with dilated RV and reduced ejection fraction (EF) Method: Images from echocardiograms (ECHO) and CMR in 20 patients (9 women, 8-25 years of age, average 15,8 years old) with TOFr were retrospectively reviewed. From ECHO images we obtained measurements for tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tissular s wave, isovolumetric acceleration (IVA), and severity of PI (mild, moderate, or severe). From CMR images, we measured EF, end diastolic volume (EDV) of the RV, and regurgitant fraction (RF) of the pulmonary artery. We performed a multivariate statistical analysis to explore the relation between ECHO parameters and CMR findings Results: No correlation was found between individual ECHO parameters and EDV or RV EF. However, we did find a model based on the TAPSE and PI that was able to predict the EDV of the RV with an r2 = 0.6. (FDV-RV = 8.60*TAPSE + 36.19*PI - 77.213). After comparing the PI with RF, we found that that echocardiography could correctly distinguish cases with mild PI from those with severe PI (p<0.001), or moderate from severe (p=0.004), but not mild from moderate PI Conclusion: In this preliminary study, we found a statistical model based on the TAPSE and PI which could be useful in the selection of patients with TOFr that are referred to CMR. While this study needs to be validated on a greater number of patients, it indicates the relevance of some echocardiographic parameters, which should always be included in the evaluation of patients with TOFr

  13. Usefulness of magnetic resonance volumetric evaluation in predicting response to preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients with resectable rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Chang, Hee Jin; Jeong, Seung-yong; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Ahn, Joong Bae; Kim, Dae Hyun; Lim, Seok-Byung; Lee, Jong Seok; Park, Jae-Gahb

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We performed magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry before and after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for evaluating response to therapy in T3 and T4 rectal cancer. To investigate the utility of MR volumetry for predicting the response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation, we compared results from MR volumetry before chemoradiation with those after chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: A total 112 patients with T3 or T4 rectal cancer who successfully underwent MR volumetry and completed neoadjuvant chemoradiation followed by radical resection for cure were identified. MR volumetries were performed before and after chemoradiation. We compared pre- and postchemoradiation tumor volume and % volume reduction rates of patients whose tumors were down-staged with those of patients that were not down-staged. The same analyses were also performed between those patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease in the operative specimen. We assessed the difference of % volume reduction rate according to Dworak's rectal cancer regression grades. Results: Fifty-seven patients (50.9%) demonstrated a tumor down-staging after chemoradiation therapy. Both pre- and posttreatment MR tumor volumes were significantly less in patients whose tumors were down-staged than in patients that were not down-staged (p = 0.04, 0.031), and % volume reduction rates were significantly higher in patients whose tumors were down-staged (p = 0.024). Sixteen patients (14.3%) showed pathologically complete tumor regression. The differences of MR tumor volumes before and after chemoradiation and % volume reduction rates were not significantly different between patients having a complete histologic regression and those with residual disease (p = 0.688, 0.451, and 0.480). The differences of % volume reduction rates according to Dworak's grades were statistically significant (p = 0.03). Conclusion: The MR volumetric examinations before and after chemoradiation demonstrated the

  14. Identification and validation of a logistic regression model for predicting serious injuries associated with motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononen, Douglas W; Flannagan, Carol A C; Wang, Stewart C

    2011-01-01

    A multivariate logistic regression model, based upon National Automotive Sampling System Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) data for calendar years 1999-2008, was developed to predict the probability that a crash-involved vehicle will contain one or more occupants with serious or incapacitating injuries. These vehicles were defined as containing at least one occupant coded with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of greater than or equal to 15, in planar, non-rollover crash events involving Model Year 2000 and newer cars, light trucks, and vans. The target injury outcome measure was developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-led National Expert Panel on Field Triage in their recent revision of the Field Triage Decision Scheme (American College of Surgeons, 2006). The parameters to be used for crash injury prediction were subsequently specified by the National Expert Panel. Model input parameters included: crash direction (front, left, right, and rear), change in velocity (delta-V), multiple vs. single impacts, belt use, presence of at least one older occupant (≥ 55 years old), presence of at least one female in the vehicle, and vehicle type (car, pickup truck, van, and sport utility). The model was developed using predictor variables that may be readily available, post-crash, from OnStar-like telematics systems. Model sensitivity and specificity were 40% and 98%, respectively, using a probability cutpoint of 0.20. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve for the final model was 0.84. Delta-V (mph), seat belt use and crash direction were the most important predictors of serious injury. Due to the complexity of factors associated with rollover-related injuries, a separate screening algorithm is needed to model injuries associated with this crash mode. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Tractography of the corticospinal tracts in infants with focal perinatal injury: comparison with normal controls and to motor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roze, Elise; Harris, Polly A.; Ball, Gareth; Braga, Rodrigo M.; Allsop, Joanna M.; Counsell, Serena J.; Elorza, Leire Zubiaurre; Merchant, Nazakat; Arichi, Tomoki; Edwards, A.D.; Cowan, Frances M.; Porter, Emma; Rutherford, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    Our aims were to (1) assess the corticospinal tracts (CSTs) in infants with focal injury and healthy term controls using probabilistic tractography and (2) to correlate the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tractography findings in infants with focal injury with their later motor function. We studied 20 infants with focal lesions and 23 controls using MRI and diffusion tensor imaging. Tract volume, fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values, axial diffusivity and radial diffusivity (RD) of the CSTs were determined. Asymmetry indices (AIs) were calculated by comparing ipsilateral to contralateral CSTs. Motor outcome was assessed using a standardized neurological examination. Conventional MRI was able to predict normal motor development (n = 9) or hemiplegia (n = 6). In children who developed a mild motor asymmetry (n = 5), conventional MRI predicted a hemiplegia in two and normal motor development in three infants. The AIs for tract volume, FA, ADC and RD showed a significant difference between controls and infants who developed a hemiplegia, and RD also showed a significant difference in AI between controls and infants who developed a mild asymmetry. Conventional MRI was able to predict subsequent normal motor development or hemiplegia following focal injury in newborn infants. Measures of RD obtained from diffusion tractography may offer additional information for predicting a subsequent asymmetry in motor function. (orig.)

  16. A resonance shift prediction based on the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle for cylindrical cavities with a rigid sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orozco Santillan, Arturo; Cutanda Henríquez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    devices. It is shown that the use of the Boltzmann-Ehrenfest principle of adiabatic invariance allows the derivation of an expression for the resonance frequency shift in a simpler and more direct way than a method based on a Green’s function reported in the literature. The position of the sphere can...

  17. Multiquark Resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, A.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-01-01

    Multiquark resonances are undoubtedly experimentally observed. The number of states and the amount of details on their properties has been growing over the years. It is very recent the discovery of two pentaquarks and the confirmation of four tetraquarks, two of which had not been observed before. We mainly review the theoretical understanding of this sector of particle physics phenomenology and present some considerations attempting a coherent description of the so called X and Z resonances. The prominent problems plaguing theoretical models, like the absence of selection rules limiting the number of states predicted, motivate new directions in model building. Data are reviewed going through all of the observed resonances with particular attention to their common features and the purpose of providing a starting point to further research.

  18. Evaluation of the Predictive Value of Intraoperative Changes in Motor-Evoked Potentials of Caudal Cranial Nerves for the Postoperative Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Marcel; Tatagiba, Marcos; Liebsch, Marina; Feigl, Guenther C

    2016-11-01

    The predictive value of changes in intraoperatively acquired motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of the lower cranial nerves (LCN) IX-X (glossopharyngeal-vagus nerve) and CN XII (hypoglossal nerve) on operative outcomes was investigated. MEPs of CN IX-X and CN XII were recorded intraoperatively in 63 patients undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. We correlated the changes of the MEPs with postoperative nerve function. For CN IX-X, we found a correlation between the amplitude of the MEP ratio and uvula deviation (P = 0.028) and the amplitude duration of the MEP and gag reflex function (P = 0.027). Patients with an MEP ratio of the glossopharyngeal-vagus amplitude ≤1.47 μV had a 3.4 times increased risk of developing a uvula deviation. Patients with a final MEP duration of the CN IX-X ≤11.6 milliseconds had a 3.6 times increased risk for their gag reflex to become extinct. Our study greatly contributes to the current knowledge of intraoperative MEPs as a predictor for postoperative cranial nerve function. We were able to extent previous findings on MEP values of the facial nerve on postoperative nerve function to 3 additional cranial nerves. Finding reliable predictors for postoperative nerve function is of great importance to the overall quality of life for a patient undergoing surgery of the posterior cranial fossa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. PREDICTION OF ATMOSPHERIC AIR POLLUTION BY EMISSIONS OF MOTOR TRANSPORT TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATION OF HARMFUL SUBSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of 3D numerical models, which allow us to calculate air pollution process from road transport emissions based on chemical transformation of pollutants. Creating numerical models, which would give the opportunity to predict the level of air pollution in urban areas. Methodology. To address the evaluation of the air pollution problem of emissions of vehicles the equations of aerodynamics and mass transfer were used. In order to solve differential equations of aerodynamics and mass transfer the finite difference methods are used. For the numerical integration of the equation for the velocity potential the method of conditional approximation was applied. The equation for the velocity potential written in difference form, is being split into two equations, and at each step of splitting the unknown value of the potential speed is determined by the explicit scheme of running account and the difference scheme itself is implicit. For the numerical integration of the equation of dispersion of emissions in the atmosphere is used implicit alternating-triangular difference splitting scheme. Emissions from the road are simulated by a series of point sources of a given intensity. The developed numerical models are the basis of established software package.Findings. There were developed 3D numerical models, which belong to the class «diagnostic models». These models take into account the main physical factors affecting the process of dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere when emissions from road transport taking into account the chemical transformation of pollutants. On the basis of the constructed numerical models a computational experiment to assess the level of air pollution in the street was carried out. Originality. Numerical models that allow you to calculate the 3D aerodynamic of wind flow in urban areas and the process of mass transfer of emissions from the road were developed. The models make it possible to account the

  20. Added value of multiple versus single sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in predicting motor cortex stimulation efficacy for refractory neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommier, Benjamin; Quesada, Charles; Fauchon, Camille; Nuti, Christophe; Vassal, François; Peyron, Roland

    2018-05-18

    OBJECTIVE Selection criteria for offering patients motor cortex stimulation (MCS) for refractory neuropathic pain are a critical topic of research. A single session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been advocated for selecting MCS candidates, but it has a low negative predictive value. Here the authors investigated whether multiple rTMS sessions would more accurately predict MCS efficacy. METHODS Patients included in this longitudinal study could access MCS after at least four rTMS sessions performed 3-4 weeks apart. The positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of the four rTMS sessions and the correlation between the analgesic effects of the two treatments were assessed. RESULTS Twelve MCS patients underwent an average of 15.9 rTMS sessions prior to surgery; nine of the patients were rTMS responders. Postoperative follow-up was 57.8 ± 15.6 months (mean ± standard deviation). Mean percentage of pain relief (%R) was 21% and 40% after the first and fourth rTMS sessions, respectively. The corresponding mean durations of pain relief were respectively 2.4 and 12.9 days. A cumulative effect of the rTMS sessions was observed on both %R and duration of pain relief (p < 0.01). The %R value obtained with MCS was 35% after 6 months and 43% at the last follow-up. Both the PPV and NPV of rTMS were 100% after the fourth rTMS session (p = 0.0045). A significant correlation was found between %R or duration of pain relief after the fourth rTMS session and %R at the last MCS follow-up (R 2 = 0.83, p = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS Four rTMS sessions predicted MCS efficacy better than a single session in neuropathic pain patients. Taking into account the cumulative effects of rTMS, the authors found a high-level correlation between the analgesic effects of rTMS and MCS.

  1. The role of magnetic resonance imaging in the prediction of the neurodevelopmental outcome of acute bilirubin encephalopathy in newborns

    OpenAIRE

    TATLI, Mustafa Mansur

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is widely used in the diagnosis of acute bilirubin encephalopathy, but the relationship between MRI findings and neurodevelopmental outcome in newborns with acute bilirubin encephalopathy remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between acute bilirubin encephalopathy, MRI findings, and neurodevelopmental outcome. Materials and Methods: The study included 13 infants with acute bilirubin encephalopathy. MRI was performed ...

  2. Prediction of Neurocognitive Deficits by Parkinsonian Motor Impairment in Schizophrenia: A Study in Neuroleptic-Naïve Subjects, Unaffected First-Degree Relatives and Healthy Controls From an Indigenous Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Juan L; González Alemán, Gabriela; Florenzano, Néstor; Padilla, Eduardo; Calvó, María; Guerrero, Gonzalo; Kamis, Danielle; Stratton, Lee; Toranzo, Juan; Molina Rangeon, Beatriz; Hernández Cuervo, Helena; Bourdieu, Mercedes; Sedó, Manuel; Strejilevich, Sergio; Cloninger, Claude Robert; Escobar, Javier I; de Erausquin, Gabriel A

    2016-11-01

    Neurocognitive deficits are among the most debilitating and pervasive symptoms of schizophrenia, and are present also in unaffected first-degree relatives. Also, multiple reports reveal parkisonian motor deficits in untreated subjects with schizophrenia and in first-degree relatives of affected subjects. Yet, the relation between motor and cognitive impairment and its value as a classifier of endophenotypes has not been studied. To test the efficacy of midbrain hyperechogenicity (MHE) and parkinsonian motor impairment (PKM) as predictors of neurocognitive impairment in subjects with or at risk for schizophrenia, that could be used to segregate them from first-degree relatives and healthy controls. Seventy-six subjects with chronic schizophrenia never exposed to antipsychotic medication, 106 unaffected first-degree relatives, and 62 healthy controls were blindly assessed for cognitive and motor function, and transcranial ultrasound. Executive function, fluid intelligence, motor planning, and hand coordination showed group differences. PKM and MHE were significantly higher in untreated schizophrenia and unaffected relatives. Unaffected relatives showed milder impairment, but were different from controls. PKM and MHE predict cognitive impairment in neuroleptic-naive patients with schizophrenia and their unaffected first-degree relatives and may be used to segregate them from first-degree relatives and healthy controls. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Method of tumor volume evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging for outcome prediction in cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul [Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    To evaluate the patterns of tumor shape and to compare tumor volume derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid measurement with that derived from tracing the entire tumor contour using region of interest (ROI)-based 3D volumetry with respect to the prediction outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 98 patients with cervical cancer (stage IB-IIIB). The tumor shape was classified into two categories: ellipsoid and non-ellipsoid shape. ROI-based volumetry was derived from each magnetic resonance slice on the work station. For the diameter-based surrogate 'ellipsoid volume,' the three orthogonal diameters were measured to calculate volume as an ellipsoid. The more than half of tumor (55.1%) had a non-ellipsoid configuration. The predictions for outcome were consistent between two volume groups, with overall survival of 93.6% and 87.7% for small tumor (<20 mL), 62.9% and 69.1% for intermediate-size tumor (20-39 mL), and 14.5% and 16.7% for large tumors ({>=}40 mL) using ROI and diameter based measurement, respectively. Disease-free survival was 93.8% and 90.6% for small tumor, 54.3% and 62.7% for intermediate-size tumor, and 13.7% and 10.3% for large tumor using ROI and diameter based method, respectively. Differences in outcome between size groups were statistically significant, and the differences in outcome predicted by the tumor volume by two different methods. Our data suggested that large numbers of cervical cancers are not ellipsoid. However, simple diameter-based tumor volume measurement appears to be useful in comparison with ROI-based volumetry for predicting outcome in cervical cancer patients.

  4. Method of tumor volume evaluation using magnetic resonance imaging for outcome prediction in cervical cancer treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Kim, Woo Chul

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the patterns of tumor shape and to compare tumor volume derived from simple diameter-based ellipsoid measurement with that derived from tracing the entire tumor contour using region of interest (ROI)-based 3D volumetry with respect to the prediction outcome in cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 98 patients with cervical cancer (stage IB-IIIB). The tumor shape was classified into two categories: ellipsoid and non-ellipsoid shape. ROI-based volumetry was derived from each magnetic resonance slice on the work station. For the diameter-based surrogate 'ellipsoid volume,' the three orthogonal diameters were measured to calculate volume as an ellipsoid. The more than half of tumor (55.1%) had a non-ellipsoid configuration. The predictions for outcome were consistent between two volume groups, with overall survival of 93.6% and 87.7% for small tumor (<20 mL), 62.9% and 69.1% for intermediate-size tumor (20-39 mL), and 14.5% and 16.7% for large tumors (≥40 mL) using ROI and diameter based measurement, respectively. Disease-free survival was 93.8% and 90.6% for small tumor, 54.3% and 62.7% for intermediate-size tumor, and 13.7% and 10.3% for large tumor using ROI and diameter based method, respectively. Differences in outcome between size groups were statistically significant, and the differences in outcome predicted by the tumor volume by two different methods. Our data suggested that large numbers of cervical cancers are not ellipsoid. However, simple diameter-based tumor volume measurement appears to be useful in comparison with ROI-based volumetry for predicting outcome in cervical cancer patients.

  5. The electric motor handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, R.W.; Feltham, P. (eds.)

    2004-05-01

    This handbook outlines the important role that electric motors play in modern society. It covers the field of motor applications from various motor types to their use and repair. It also presents practical applications of electric motors and methods on motor efficiency. More than half of all electricity generated, and 75 per cent of all industrial electricity consumption is consumed by electric motors. Electrical personnel must be aware of all factors involved in electric motors in order to choose and apply the appropriate size of electric motor. These factors include efficiency, sizing and proper application. The efficient use and maximum life expectancy of electric motors depends on proper motor protection, control and maintenance. This handbook includes articles from leading experts on electric motors in modern electrical systems. The content includes: design considerations; proper electric motor sizing techniques; optimal electric motor application; electric motor protection technology; electric motor control principles; electric motor maintenance and troubleshooting; induction electric motors; electric motor bearing currents; electric motor bearing lubrication; electromagnetism; electric motor enclosures; electric motor testing; electric motor repair; DC electric motor; electric motor starters; electric motor brushes; industrial electric motors; electric motor diagrams; AC electric motors; electric motor wiring; electric motor service; electric motor rewinding; electric motor winding; diagram of electric motor wiring; electric motor kit; and, troubleshooting electric motors. A directory of motor manufacturers and suppliers was also included. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and morphometric histologic analysis of prostate tissue composition in predicting the clinical outcome of terazosin therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isen, K. [Karaelmas Univ., Zonguldak (Turkey). School of Medicine; Sinik, Z.; Alkibay, T.; Sezer, C.; Soezen, S.; Atilla, S.; Ataoglu, O.; Isik, S.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or quantitative color-imaged morphometric analysis (MA) of the prostate gland are related to the clinical response to terazosin. Thirty-six male patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with a serum prostate-specific antigen level of 4-10 ng/mL underwent MRI with body coil, transrectal prostate unltrasonography and biopsy prior to terazosin therapy. For MRI-determined stromal and non-stromal BPH, the ratio of the signal intensity of the inner gland to the obturator internus muscle was evaluated. Histologic sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The MA of the specimens was performed by Samba 2000. Results of the two techniques were interpreted according to the terazosin therapy results. The mean stromal percentage was 60.5{+-}18.0%. No statistically significant relationship was found between the clinical outcome of terazosin and the MRI findings. The MA results showed a significant relationship between the percentage of stroma and the percent change of the peak urinary flow rate, but not with the percent change of the international prostate symptom score after terazosin therapy (P<0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging alone is not sufficient in predicting the response to terazosin therapy. Morphometric analysis of BPH tissue composition can be used in predicting the clinical outcome of terazosin therapy but it is suitable only in patients for whom prostatic biopsy is necessary in order to rule out prostate cancer. (author)

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging and morphometric histologic analysis of prostate tissue composition in predicting the clinical outcome of terazosin therapy in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isen, K.; Sinik, Z.; Alkibay, T.; Sezer, C.; Soezen, S.; Atilla, S.; Ataoglu, O.; Isik, S.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or quantitative color-imaged morphometric analysis (MA) of the prostate gland are related to the clinical response to terazosin. Thirty-six male patients with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with a serum prostate-specific antigen level of 4-10 ng/mL underwent MRI with body coil, transrectal prostate unltrasonography and biopsy prior to terazosin therapy. For MRI-determined stromal and non-stromal BPH, the ratio of the signal intensity of the inner gland to the obturator internus muscle was evaluated. Histologic sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The MA of the specimens was performed by Samba 2000. Results of the two techniques were interpreted according to the terazosin therapy results. The mean stromal percentage was 60.5±18.0%. No statistically significant relationship was found between the clinical outcome of terazosin and the MRI findings. The MA results showed a significant relationship between the percentage of stroma and the percent change of the peak urinary flow rate, but not with the percent change of the international prostate symptom score after terazosin therapy (P<0.05). Magnetic resonance imaging alone is not sufficient in predicting the response to terazosin therapy. Morphometric analysis of BPH tissue composition can be used in predicting the clinical outcome of terazosin therapy but it is suitable only in patients for whom prostatic biopsy is necessary in order to rule out prostate cancer. (author)

  8. Support Vector Machine Analysis of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Interoception Does Not Reliably Predict Individual Outcomes of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Sundermann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe approach to apply multivariate pattern analyses based on neuro imaging data for outcome prediction holds out the prospect to improve therapeutic decisions in mental disorders. Patients suffering from panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG often exhibit an increased perception of bodily sensations. The purpose of this investigation was to assess whether multivariate classification applied to a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI interoception paradigm can predict individual responses to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in PD/AG.MethodsThis analysis is based on pretreatment fMRI data during an interoceptive challenge from a multicenter trial of the German PANIC-NET. Patients with DSM-IV PD/AG were dichotomized as responders (n = 30 or non-responders (n = 29 based on the primary outcome (Hamilton Anxiety Scale Reduction ≥50% after 6 weeks of CBT (2 h/week. fMRI parametric maps were used as features for response classification with linear support vector machines (SVM with or without automated feature selection. Predictive accuracies were assessed using cross validation and permutation testing. The influence of methodological parameters and the predictive ability for specific interoception-related symptom reduction were further evaluated.ResultsSVM did not reach sufficient overall predictive accuracies (38.0–54.2% for anxiety reduction in the primary outcome. In the exploratory analyses, better accuracies (66.7% were achieved for predicting interoception-specific symptom relief as an alternative outcome domain. Subtle information regarding this alternative response criterion but not the primary outcome was revealed by post hoc univariate comparisons.ConclusionIn contrast to reports on other neurofunctional probes, SVM based on an interoception paradigm was not able to reliably predict individual response to CBT. Results speak against the clinical applicability of this technique.

  9. Nuclear magnetic resonance in the neonatal period and prediction of the neuro development evolution in premature newborns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreiro, Vilma

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (RMN) is outlined as a progressively more accessible study. The new technology allows, even to omit the sedation of children. In the last 10 years, we have had access to the knowledge of the modifications shown by the brain of the premature newborn in growth as well as in cerebral structures. In 2003, a detailed description was published concerning the technology used to evaluate the images of premature newborns and the evolution of these images according to the own modifications of the progress during the post-conception age [es

  10. Next Day Building Load Predictions based on Limited Input Features Using an On-Line Laterally Primed Adaptive Resonance Theory Artificial Neural Network.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photovoltaic and Grid Integration Group; Robinson, Matt [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Yasaei, Yasser [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Caudell, Thomas [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Martinez-Ramon, Manel [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Mammoli, Andrea [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Optimal integration of thermal energy storage within commercial building applications requires accurate load predictions. Several methods exist that provide an estimate of a buildings future needs. Methods include component-based models and data-driven algorithms. This work implemented a previously untested algorithm for this application that is called a Laterally Primed Adaptive Resonance Theory (LAPART) artificial neural network (ANN). The LAPART algorithm provided accurate results over a two month period where minimal historical data and a small amount of input types were available. These results are significant, because common practice has often overlooked the implementation of an ANN. ANN have often been perceived to be too complex and require large amounts of data to provide accurate results. The LAPART neural network was implemented in an on-line learning manner. On-line learning refers to the continuous updating of training data as time occurs. For this experiment, training began with a singe day and grew to two months of data. This approach provides a platform for immediate implementation that requires minimal time and effort. The results from the LAPART algorithm were compared with statistical regression and a component-based model. The comparison was based on the predictions linear relationship with the measured data, mean squared error, mean bias error, and cost savings achieved by the respective prediction techniques. The results show that the LAPART algorithm provided a reliable and cost effective means to predict the building load for the next day.

  11. Optimal time for predicting left ventricular remodeling after successful primary coronary angioplasty in acute myocardial infarction using serial myocardial contrast echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Tadamichi; Okada, Takenori; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Otsuka, Masaya; Hirai, Yuukou

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the optimal time to assess microvascular integrity within the risk area for myocardial infarction in order to predict unfavorable left ventricular remodeling (LVR) after successful primary coronary angioplasty. Fifty-three patients who underwent myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) just before recanalization, shortly after and 1 day (Day 2) and 3 weeks after recanalization were studied. The no- and low-reflow ratio (LR ratio) was analyzed at each stage. The wall-tinning ratio within the risk area was determined using magnetic resonance imaging performed 3-4 weeks after the recanalization. Thirteen of the 53 patients showed LVR 3-8 months after recanalization. The optimal time to predict LVR was found to be Day 2 based on the receiver operating characteristic curves. The LR ratio on Day 2 (χ 2 =7.39, p=0.007) and the collateral circulation before recanalization (χ 2 =4.57, p=0.03) were chosen as independent variables for predicting LVR. Patients with greater than 0.43 in the LR ratio on Day 2 showed a lower wall-thinning ratio (58±19% vs 72±20%, p=0.05). This study shows that the optimal time to estimate the microvascular integrity for predicting LVR is 1 day after recanalization, which is neither shortly after recanalization nor during the convalescent stage. (author)

  12. Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Volumetry in Predicting Myometrial Invasion, Lymphovascular Space Invasion, and Tumor Grade: Is It Valuable in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage I Endometrial Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hilal; Sarioglu, Fatma Ceren; Bagci, Mustafa; Karadeniz, Tugba; Uluer, Hatice; Sanci, Muzaffer

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this retrospective single-center study was to evaluate the relationship between maximum tumor size, tumor volume, tumor volume ratio (TVR) based on preoperative magnetic resonance (MR) volumetry, and negative histological prognostic parameters (deep myometrial invasion [MI], lymphovascular space invasion, tumor histological grade, and subtype) in International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I endometrial cancer. Preoperative pelvic MR imaging studies of 68 women with surgical-pathologic diagnosis of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I endometrial cancer were reviewed for assessment of MR volumetry and qualitative assessment of MI. Volume of the tumor and uterus was measured with manual tracing of each section on sagittal T2-weighted images. Tumor volume ratio was calculated according to the following formula: TVR = (total tumor volume/total uterine volume) × 100. Receiver operating characteristics curve was performed to investigate a threshold for TVR associated with MI. The Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and linear regression analysis were applied to evaluate possible differences between tumor size, tumor volume, TVR, and negative prognostic parameters. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis of TVR for prediction of deep MI was statistically significant (P = 0.013). An optimal TVR threshold of 7.3% predicted deep myometrial invasion with 85.7% sensitivity, 46.8% specificity, 41.9% positive predictive value, and 88.0% negative predictive value. Receiver operating characteristics curve analyses of TVR, tumor size, and tumor volume for prediction of tumor histological grade or lymphovascular space invasion were not significant. The concordance between radiologic and pathologic assessment for MI was almost excellent (κ value, 0.799; P volumetry, seems to predict deep MI independently in stage I endometrial cancer with insufficient sensitivity and specificity. Its value in clinical practice for

  13. Deep Learning for Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting: A New Approach for Predicting Quantitative Parameter Values from Time Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Elisabeth; Körzdörfer, Gregor; Würfl, Tobias; Wetzl, Jens; Lugauer, Felix; Pfeuffer, Josef; Maier, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate methods from deep learning for application to Magnetic Resonance Fingerprinting (MRF). MRF is a recently proposed measurement technique for generating quantitative parameter maps. In MRF a non-steady state signal is generated by a pseudo-random excitation pattern. A comparison of the measured signal in each voxel with the physical model yields quantitative parameter maps. Currently, the comparison is done by matching a dictionary of simulated signals to the acquired signals. To accelerate the computation of quantitative maps we train a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) on simulated dictionary data. As a proof of principle we show that the neural network implicitly encodes the dictionary and can replace the matching process.

  14. Superconducting DC homopolar motors for ship propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiberger, M.; Reed, M.R.; Creedon, W.P.; O' Hea, B.J. [General Atomic (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Superconducting DC homopolar motors have undergone recent advances in technology, warranting serious consideration of their use for ship propulsion. Homopolar motor propulsion is now practical because of two key technology developments: cryogen-free superconducting refrigeration and high performance motor fiber brushes. These compact motors are ideal for podded applications, where reduced drag and fuel consumption are predicted. In addition, the simple DC motor controller is more efficient and reliable compared with AC motor controllers. Military ships also benefit from increased stealth implicit in homopolar DC excitation, which also allows the option for direct hull or pod mounting. (authors)

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouts, Mark. J. R. J.; Wu, O.; Dijkhuizen, R. M.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a powerful (neuro)imaging modality for the diagnosis and outcome prediction after (acute) stroke. Since MRI allows noninvasive, longitudinal, and three-dimensional assessment of vessel occlusion (with magnetic resonance angiography (MRA)), tissue injury

  16. Motor homopolar

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Muñoz, Agustín

    2007-01-01

    Mostramos la construcción de un modelo de motor homopolar, uno de los más antiguos tipos de motores eléctricos. Se caracterizan porque el campo magnético del imán mantiene siempre la misma polaridad (de ahí su nombre, del griego homos, igual), de modo que, cuando una corriente eléctrica atraviesa el campo magnético, aparece una fuerza que hace girar los elementos no fijados mecánicamente. En el sencillísimo motor homopolar colgado (Schlichting y Ucke 2004), el imán puede girar ...

  17. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang; Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Colliez, Florence; Joudiou, Nicolas [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium); El Bachiri, Sabrina [Université Catholique de Louvain, IMMAQ Technological Platform, Methodology and Statistical Support, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Grégoire, Vincent [Université Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Brussels (Belgium); Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium); Jordan, Bénédicte F., E-mail: benedicte.jordan@uclouvain.be [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}*. R{sub 1} is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R{sub 2}* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}* with pO{sub 2} assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO{sub 2}. Global and lipids R{sub 1} were found to be correlated to pO{sub 2} in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R{sub 2}* was found to be inversely correlated to pO{sub 2} in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R{sub 2}* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. {sup 18}F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R{sub 1} and R{sub 2}* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R{sub 1

  18. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang; Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Colliez, Florence; Joudiou, Nicolas; El Bachiri, Sabrina; Grégoire, Vincent; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R_1, water R_1, lipids R_1, and R_2*. R_1 is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R_2* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R_1, water R_1, lipids R_1, and R_2* with pO_2 assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R_1, R_2*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O_2, 5% CO_2). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO_2. Global and lipids R_1 were found to be correlated to pO_2 in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R_2* was found to be inversely correlated to pO_2 in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R_2* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. "1"8F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R_1 and R_2* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R_1 parameters showed limitations in terms of predicting the outcome of RT in the tumor models studied, whereas R_2* was found to be

  19. Application of stepping motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This book is divided into three parts, which is about practical using of stepping motor. The first part has six chapters. The contents of the first part are about stepping motor, classification of stepping motor, basic theory og stepping motor, characteristic and basic words, types and characteristic of stepping motor in hybrid type and basic control of stepping motor. The second part deals with application of stepping motor with hardware of stepping motor control, stepping motor control by microcomputer and software of stepping motor control. The last part mentions choice of stepping motor system, examples of stepping motor, measurement of stepping motor and practical cases of application of stepping motor.

  20. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging-derived pulmonary artery distensibility index correlates with pulmonary artery stiffness and predicts functional capacity in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Ki-Woon; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Kim, Young-Jin; Choi, Byoung-Wook; Yang, Woo-In; Shim, Chi-Young; Ha, Jongwon; Chung, Namsik; Lee, Hye-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Increased stiffness of the pulmonary vascular bed is known to increase mortality in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); and pulmonary artery (PA) stiffness is also thought to be associated with exercise capacity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI)-derived PA distensibility index correlates with PA stiffness estimated on right heart catheterization (RHC) and predicts functional capacity (FC) in patients with PAH. Thirty-five consecutive PAH patients (23% male, mean age, 44±13 years; 69% idiopathic) underwent CMRI, RHC, and 6-min walk test (6MWT). PA distensibility indices were derived from cross-sectional area change (%) in the transverse view, perpendicular to the axis of the main PA, on CMRI [(maximum area-minimum area)/minimum area during cardiac cycle]. Among the PA stiffness indices, pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and PA capacitance were calculated using hemodynamic dataset from RHC. CMRI-derived PA distensibility was inversely correlated with PVR (R 2 =0.34, P 2 =0.35, P 2 =0.61, P<0.001). Furthermore, PA distensibility <20% predicted poor FC (<400 m in 6MWT) with a sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 94%. Non-invasive CMRI-derived PA distensibility index correlates with PA stiffness and can predict FC in patients with PAH. (author)

  1. Predicting the severity and prognosis of trismus after intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oral cancer patients by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chun Hsieh

    Full Text Available To develop magnetic resonance imaging (MRI indicators to predict trismus outcome for post-operative oral cavity cancer patients who received adjuvant intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT, 22 patients with oral cancer treated with IMRT were studied over a two-year period. Signal abnormality scores (SA scores were computed from Likert-type ratings of the abnormalities of nine masticator structures and compared with the Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA test between groups. Seventeen patients (77.3% experienced different degrees of trismus during the two-year follow-up period. The SA score correlated with the trismus grade (r = 0.52, p<0.005. Patients having progressive trismus had higher mean doses of radiation to multiple structures, including the masticator and lateral pterygoid muscles, and the parotid gland (p<0.05. In addition, this group also had higher SA-masticator muscle dose product at 6 months and SA scores at 12 months (p<0.05. At the optimum cut-off points of 0.38 for the propensity score, the sensitivity was 100% and the specificity was 93% for predicting the prognosis of the trismus patients. The SA score, as determined using MRI, can reflect the radiation injury and correlate to trismus severity. Together with the radiation dose, it could serve as a useful biomarker to predict the outcome and guide the management of trismus following radiation therapy.

  2. A Combined Pharmacokinetic and Radiologic Assessment of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Response to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semple, Scott; Harry, Vanessa N. MRCOG.; Parkin, David E.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the combination of pharmacokinetic and radiologic assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an early response indicator in women receiving chemoradiation for advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty women with locally advanced cervical cancer were included in a prospective cohort study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was carried out before chemoradiation, after 2 weeks of therapy, and at the conclusion of therapy using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Radiologic assessment of uptake parameters was obtained from resultant intensity curves. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a multicompartment model was also performed. General linear modeling was used to combine radiologic and pharmacokinetic parameters and correlated with eventual response as determined by change in MRI tumor size and conventional clinical response. A subgroup of 11 women underwent repeat pretherapy MRI to test pharmacokinetic reproducibility. Results: Pretherapy radiologic parameters and pharmacokinetic K trans correlated with response (p < 0.01). General linear modeling demonstrated that a combination of radiologic and pharmacokinetic assessments before therapy was able to predict more than 88% of variance of response. Reproducibility of pharmacokinetic modeling was confirmed. Conclusions: A combination of radiologic assessment with pharmacokinetic modeling applied to dynamic MRI before the start of chemoradiation improves the predictive power of either by more than 20%. The potential improvements in therapy response prediction using this type of combined analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may aid in the development of more individualized, effective therapy regimens for this patient group.

  3. Motor-operated valve (MOV) actuator motor and gearbox testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWall, K.; Watkins, J.C.; Bramwell, D.

    1997-07-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory tested the performance of electric motors and actuator gearboxes typical of the equipment installed on motor-operated valves used in nuclear power plants. Using a test stand that simulates valve closure loads against flow and pressure, the authors tested five electric motors (four ac and one dc) and three gearboxes at conditions a motor might experience in a power plant, including such off-normal conditions as operation at high temperature and reduced voltage. They also monitored the efficiency of the actuator gearbox. All five motors operated at or above their rated starting torque during tests at normal voltages and temperatures. For all five motors, actual torque losses due to voltage degradation were greater than the losses calculated by methods typically used for predicting motor torque at degraded voltage conditions. For the dc motor the actual torque losses due to elevated operating temperatures were greater than the losses calculated by the typical predictive method. The actual efficiencies of the actuator gearboxes were generally lower than the running efficiencies published by the manufacturer and were generally nearer the published pull-out efficiencies. Operation of the gearbox at elevated temperature did not affect the operating efficiency

  4. What happens to the motor theory of perception when the motor system is damaged?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasenko, Alena; Garcea, Frank E; Mahon, Bradford Z

    2013-09-01

    Motor theories of perception posit that motor information is necessary for successful recognition of actions. Perhaps the most well known of this class of proposals is the motor theory of speech perception, which argues that speech recognition is fundamentally a process of identifying the articulatory gestures (i.e. motor representations) that were used to produce the speech signal. Here we review neuropsychological evidence from patients with damage to the motor system, in the context of motor theories of perception applied to both manual actions and speech. Motor theories of perception predict that patients with motor impairments will have impairments for action recognition. Contrary to that prediction, the available neuropsychological evidence indicates that recognition can be spared despite profound impairments to production. These data falsify strong forms of the motor theory of perception, and frame new questions about the dynamical interactions that govern how information is exchanged between input and output systems.

  5. Clinical evaluation of MR temperature monitoring of laser-induced thermotherapy in human liver using the proton-resonance-frequency method and predictive models of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickhefel, Antje; Rosenberg, Christian; Weiss, Clifford R; Rempp, Hansjörg; Roland, Joerg; Schick, Fritz; Hosten, Norbert

    2011-03-01

    To assess the feasibility, precision, and accuracy of real-time temperature mapping (TMap) during laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) for clinical practice in patients liver with a gradient echo (GRE) sequence using the proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. LITT was performed on 34 lesions in 18 patients with simultaneous real-time visualization of relative temperature changes. Correlative contrast-enhanced T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images of the liver were acquired after treatment using the same slice positions and angulations as TMap images acquired during LITT. For each slice, TMap and follow-up images were registered for comparison. Afterwards, segmentation based on temperature (T) >52°C on TMap and based on necrosis seen on follow-up images was performed. These segmented structures were overlaid and divided into zones where the TMap was found to either over- or underestimate necrosis on the postcontrast images. Regions with T>52°C after 20 minutes were defined as necrotic tissue based on data received from two different thermal dose models. The average intersecting region of TMap and necrotic zone was 87% ± 5%, the overestimated 13% ± 4%, and the underestimated 13% ± 5%. This study demonstrates that MR temperature mapping appears reasonably capable of predicting tissue necrosis on the basis of indicating regions having greater temperatures than 52°C and could be used to monitor and adjust the thermal therapy appropriately during treatment. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Predicting postnatal renal function of prenatally detected posterior urethral valves using fetal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Alice; Panait, Nicoleta; Panuel, Michel; Alessandrini, Pierre; D'Ercole, Claude; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Merrot, Thierry

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of fetal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) determination to predict postnatal renal function (nadir creatinine at 1 year and eGFR) of men with posterior urethral valves (PUV). Between 2003 and 2014, 11 MRI were performed on fetuses (between 28 and 32 weeks) in whom second trimester sonography suggested severe bilateral urinary tract anomalies, suspected of PUV. The ADC of the 11 fetuses ranged from 1.3 to 2.86 mm 2  s -1 (median = 1.79 mm 2  s -1 , normal range for fetal kidney: 1.1-1.8). Two pregnancies with ADC > 2.6 mm 2  s -1 were interrupted; the autopsy confirmed PUV and Potter syndrome. For the remaining nine babies, the follow-up was 5.4 years (0.8-10). Four children with abnormal ADC (1.8-2.3) had chronic kidney disease. The remaining five cases with normal nadir creatinine and eGFR had normal ADC. One case with unilateral elevated ADC had a poor ipsilateral renal function on dimercaptosuccinic acid scan. Here, it seems that diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with ADC determination could be useful in accurately evaluating fetal kidneys in PUV and predicting renal function. It may be an additional, non-invasive method when biologic and sonographic findings are inconclusive, especially in the case of oligohydramnios. Further studies are needed to confirm our data. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Prediction of the filter no-reflow phenomenon in patients with angina pectoris by using multimodality: Magnetic resonance imaging, optical coherence tomography, and serum biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kenji; Ehara, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Takao; Otsuka, Kenichiro; Yoshikawa, Junichi; Shimada, Kenei

    2016-05-01

    Although the occurrence of no-reflow during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has been shown to be associated with worse short- and long-term clinical outcomes, the clinical relevance of preventing flow deterioration by using the filter-based distal protection devices (DPDs) is controversial. We investigated predictors of the filter no-reflow (FNR) phenomenon during PCI by using multimodality, such as hyperintense plaques (HIPs) in the coronary artery on T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) non-contrast magnetic resonance, plaque composition by using optical coherence tomography (OCT), and serum biomarkers, in patients with angina pectoris. Fifty lesions from 50 patients with angina were examined. All patients underwent T1WI within 24 h before invasive coronary angiography was performed, and preinterventional OCT was performed on a native atherosclerotic culprit lesion. The signal intensity of coronary plaque to cardiac muscle ratio (PMR) was calculated on a standard console of the magnetic resonance system. Of the 50 lesions, 20 lesions showed FNR during PCI, while non-FNR was observed in 30 lesions. A cut-off value >1.85 of PMR had a sensitivity of 65%, a specificity of 93%, a positive predictive value of 87%, and a negative predictive value of 80% for identifying lesions with FNR. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence of HIPs with PMR >1.85 (p=0.008) was the only independent predictor of the FNR phenomenon during PCI. This study shows that the presence of HIPs with PMR >1.85 on T1WI was a novel independent predictor of the FNR phenomenon during PCI in angina patients. This result may help in identifying high-risk lesions for no-reflow to deploy filter-based DPDs. Copyright © 2015 Japanese College of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-DRAGON score: 3-month outcome prediction after intravenous thrombolysis for anterior circulation stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turc, Guillaume; Apoil, Marion; Naggara, Olivier; Calvet, David; Lamy, Catherine; Tataru, Alina M; Méder, Jean-François; Mas, Jean-Louis; Baron, Jean-Claude; Oppenheim, Catherine; Touzé, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    The DRAGON score, which includes clinical and computed tomographic scan parameters, showed a high specificity to predict 3-month outcome in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated by intravenous tissue plasminogen activator. We adapted the score for patients undergoing MRI as the first-line diagnostic tool. We reviewed patients with consecutive anterior circulation ischemic stroke treated ≤ 4.5 hour by intravenous tissue plasminogen activator between 2003 and 2012 in our center, where MRI is systematically implemented as first-line diagnostic work-up. We derived the MRI-DRAGON score keeping all clinical parameters of computed tomography-DRAGON (age, initial National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and glucose level, prestroke handicap, onset to treatment time), and considering the following radiological variables: proximal middle cerebral artery occlusion on MR angiography instead of hyperdense middle cerebral artery sign, and diffusion-weighted imaging Alberta Stroke Program Early Computed Tomography Score (DWI ASPECTS) ≤ 5 instead of early infarct signs on computed tomography. Poor 3-month outcome was defined as modified Rankin scale >2. We calculated c-statistics as a measure of predictive ability and performed an internal cross-validation. Two hundred twenty-eight patients were included. Poor outcome was observed in 98 (43%) patients and was significantly associated with all parameters of the MRI-DRAGON score in multivariate analysis, except for onset to treatment time (nonsignificant trend). The c-statistic was 0.83 (95% confidence interval, 0.78-0.88) for poor outcome prediction. All patients with a MRI-DRAGON score ≤ 2 (n=22) had a good outcome, whereas all patients with a score ≥ 8 (n=11) had a poor outcome. The MRI-DRAGON score is a simple tool to predict 3-month outcome in acute stroke patients screened by MRI then treated by intravenous tissue plasminogen activator and may help for therapeutic decision.

  9. Nondestructive prediction and visualization of plumpness in live Eriocheir sinensis using low-field 1 H magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongcai; Mei, Jun; Chen, Shunsheng; Wu, Xugan

    2018-02-06

    The plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) depends on the grading scale and its commercial value. In this work, a low-field T 1 -weighted 1 H magnetic resonance imaging (LF- 1 H MRI) technique was developed to nondestructively analyze the plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live E. sinensis. Both male and female E. sinensis were characterized by two-dimensional (2D) LF- 1 H MRI. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3D) LF- 1 H MRI model that quantitatively integrated the total volume of lipid tissues in live E. sinensis was used. The results showed 2D LF- 1 H MRI could accurately discriminate the plumpness of hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in live E. sinensis. The results of the 3D LF- 1 H MRI model displayed that the lipid volume of E. sinensis could be used to quantify lipid accumulation in lipid tissues. LF- 1 H MRI technology was successfully developed to accurately discriminate the development of E. sinensis hepatopancreas and gonad tissues in a nondestructive manner, indicating its application potential in grading commercial live crabs or advising crab farmers on breeding and fattening processes. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Toward the Prediction of Water Exchange Rates in Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents: A Density Functional Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regueiro-Figueroa, Martín; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos

    2015-06-18

    We present a theoretical investigation of Gd-Owater bonds in different complexes relevant as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The analysis of the Ln-Owater distances, electron density (ρBCP), and electron localization function (ELF) at the bond critical points of [Ln(DOTA)(H2O)](-) and [Ln(DTPA-BMA)(H2O)] indicates that the strength of the Ln-Owater bonds follows the order DTPA-BMA > DOTA (M isomer) > DOTA (m isomer). The ELF values decrease along the 4f period as the Ln-Owater bonds get shorter, in line with the labile capping bond phenomenon. Extension of these calculations to other Gd(3+) complexes allowed us to correlate the experimentally observed water exchange rates and the calculated ρBCP and ELF values. The water exchange reaction becomes faster as the Gd-Owater bonds are weakened, which is reflected in longer bond distances and lower values of ρBCP and ELF. DKH2 calculations show that the two coordinated water molecules may also have significantly different (17)O hyperfine coupling constants (HFCCs).

  11. Investigating the prediction value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minarikova, Lenka; Bogner, Wolfgang; Zaric, Olgica; Trattnig, Siegfried; Gruber, Stephan; Pinker, Katja; Valkovic, Ladislav; Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna; Bartsch, Rupert; Helbich, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    To explore the predictive value of parameters derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI at different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in breast cancer. Institutional review board approval and written, informed consent from 42 breast cancer patients were obtained. The patients were investigated before and at three different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using tumour diameter and volume from CE-MRI and ADC values obtained from drawn 2D and segmented 3D regions of interest. Prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic analysis. There was no significant difference between pathologic complete response and non-pCR in baseline size measures (p > 0.39). Diameter change was significantly different in pCR (p < 0.02) before the mid-therapy point. The best predictor was lesion diameter change observed before mid-therapy (AUC = 0.93). Segmented volume was not able to differentiate between pCR and non-pCR at any time-point. The ADC values from 3D-ROI were not significantly different from 2D data (p = 0.06). The best AUC (0.79) for pCR prediction using DWI was median ADC measured before mid-therapy of NACT. The results of this study should be considered in NACT monitoring planning, especially in MRI protocol designing and time point selection. (orig.)

  12. Fragment-based {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift predictions in molecular crystals: An alternative to planewave methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, Joshua D.; Beran, Gregory J. O., E-mail: gregory.beran@ucr.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Monaco, Stephen; Schatschneider, Bohdan [The Pennsylvania State University, The Eberly Campus, 2201 University Dr, Lemont Furnace, Pennsylvania 15456 (United States)

    2015-09-14

    We assess the quality of fragment-based ab initio isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shift predictions for a collection of 25 molecular crystals with eight different density functionals. We explore the relative performance of cluster, two-body fragment, combined cluster/fragment, and the planewave gauge-including projector augmented wave (GIPAW) models relative to experiment. When electrostatic embedding is employed to capture many-body polarization effects, the simple and computationally inexpensive two-body fragment model predicts both isotropic {sup 13}C chemical shifts and the chemical shielding tensors as well as both cluster models and the GIPAW approach. Unlike the GIPAW approach, hybrid density functionals can be used readily in a fragment model, and all four hybrid functionals tested here (PBE0, B3LYP, B3PW91, and B97-2) predict chemical shifts in noticeably better agreement with experiment than the four generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals considered (PBE, OPBE, BLYP, and BP86). A set of recommended linear regression parameters for mapping between calculated chemical shieldings and observed chemical shifts are provided based on these benchmark calculations. Statistical cross-validation procedures are used to demonstrate the robustness of these fits.

  13. Investigating the prediction value of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T in response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minarikova, Lenka; Bogner, Wolfgang; Zaric, Olgica; Trattnig, Siegfried; Gruber, Stephan [Medical University of Vienna, High-field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Pinker, Katja [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging and Therapy Service, New York, NY (United States); Valkovic, Ladislav [Medical University of Vienna, High-field MR Centre, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging, Vienna (Austria); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Department of Imaging Methods, Institute of Measurement Science, Bratislava (Slovakia); University of Oxford, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford Centre for Clinical Magnetic Resonance Research, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bago-Horvath, Zsuzsanna [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Vienna (Austria); Bartsch, Rupert [Medical University of Vienna, Clinical Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Helbich, Thomas H. [Medical University of Vienna, Division of Molecular and Gender Imaging, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-05-15

    To explore the predictive value of parameters derived from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI at different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in breast cancer. Institutional review board approval and written, informed consent from 42 breast cancer patients were obtained. The patients were investigated before and at three different time-points during neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) using tumour diameter and volume from CE-MRI and ADC values obtained from drawn 2D and segmented 3D regions of interest. Prediction of pathologic complete response (pCR) was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic analysis. There was no significant difference between pathologic complete response and non-pCR in baseline size measures (p > 0.39). Diameter change was significantly different in pCR (p < 0.02) before the mid-therapy point. The best predictor was lesion diameter change observed before mid-therapy (AUC = 0.93). Segmented volume was not able to differentiate between pCR and non-pCR at any time-point. The ADC values from 3D-ROI were not significantly different from 2D data (p = 0.06). The best AUC (0.79) for pCR prediction using DWI was median ADC measured before mid-therapy of NACT. The results of this study should be considered in NACT monitoring planning, especially in MRI protocol designing and time point selection. (orig.)

  14. Prediction of radiation necrosis in a rodent model using magnetic resonance imaging apparent transverse relaxation (R_{2}^{*} )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliveau, Jean-Guy; Jensen, Michael D.; Stewart, James M. P.; Solovey, Igor; Klassen, L. Martyn; Bauman, Glenn S.; Menon, Ravi S.

    2018-02-01

    Background and purpose. Radiation necrosis remains an irreversible long-term side-effect following radiotherapy to the brain. The ability to predict areas that could ultimately develop into necrosis could lead to prevention and management of radiation necrosis. Materials and Methods. Fischer 344 rats were irradiated using two platforms (micro-CT irradiator and x-Rad 225 IGRT) with radiation up to 30 Gy for the micro-CT and 40 Gy for the xRAD-224 to half the brain. Animals were subsequently imaged using a 9.4 T MRI scanner every 2-4 weeks for up to 28 weeks using a 7-echo gradient echo sequence. The apparent transverse relaxation constant (R2* ) was calculated and retrospectively analyzed. Results. Animals irradiated with the low-dose rate micro-CT did not exhibit any symptoms or imaging changes associated with RN. Animals irradiated with the xRAD-225 exhibited imaging changes consistent with RN at week 24. Analysis of the R2* coefficient within the lesion and hippocampus shows the potential for detection of RN up to 10 weeks prior to morphological changes. Conclusions. The ability to predict areas of RN and increases of R2* within the hippocampus provides a method for long-term monitoring and prediction of RN.

  15. Maximal Voluntary Activation of the Elbow Flexors Is under Predicted by Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Compared to Motor Point Stimulation Prior to and Following Muscle Fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W. J. Cadigan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic (TMS and motor point stimulation have been used to determine voluntary activation (VA. However, very few studies have directly compared the two stimulation techniques for assessing VA of the elbow flexors. The purpose of this study was to compare TMS and motor point stimulation for assessing VA in non-fatigued and fatigued elbow flexors. Participants performed a fatigue protocol that included twelve, 15 s isometric elbow flexor contractions. Participants completed a set of isometric elbow flexion contractions at 100, 75, 50, and 25% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC prior to and following fatigue contractions 3, 6, 9, and 12 and 5 and 10 min post-fatigue. Force and EMG of the bicep and triceps brachii were measured for each contraction. Force responses to TMS and motor point stimulation and EMG responses to TMS (motor evoked potentials, MEPs and Erb's point stimulation (maximal M-waves, Mmax were also recorded. VA was estimated using the equation: VA% = (1−SITforce/PTforce × 100. The resting twitch was measured directly for motor point stimulation and estimated for both motor point stimulation and TMS by extrapolation of the linear regression between the superimposed twitch force and voluntary force. MVC force, potentiated twitch force and VA significantly (p < 0.05 decreased throughout the elbow flexor fatigue protocol and partially recovered 10 min post fatigue. VA was significantly (p < 0.05 underestimated when using TMS compared to motor point stimulation in non-fatigued and fatigued elbow flexors. Motor point stimulation compared to TMS superimposed twitch forces were significantly (p < 0.05 higher at 50% MVC but similar at 75 and 100% MVC. The linear relationship between TMS superimposed twitch force and voluntary force significantly (p < 0.05 decreased with fatigue. There was no change in triceps/biceps electromyography, biceps/triceps MEP amplitudes, or bicep MEP amplitudes throughout the fatigue protocol at

  16. Predicting the conditions under which vibroacoustic resonances with external periodic loads occur in the primary coolant circuits of VVER-based NPPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, K. N.; Fedorov, A. I.; Zaporozhets, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The accident at the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) caused by an earthquake showed the need of taking further efforts aimed at improving the design and engineering solutions for ensuring seismic resistance of NPPs with due regard to mutual influence of the dynamic processes occurring in the NPP building structures and process systems. Resonance interaction between the vibrations of NPP equipment and coolant pressure pulsations leads to an abnormal growth of dynamic stresses in structural materials, accelerated exhaustion of equipment service life, and increased number of sudden equipment failures. The article presents the results from a combined calculation-theoretical and experimental substantiation of mutual amplification of two kinds of external periodic loads caused by rotation of the reactor coolant pump (RCP) rotor and an earthquake. The data of vibration measurements at an NPP are presented, which confirm the predicted multiple amplification of vibrations in the steam generator and RCP at a certain combination of coolant thermal-hydraulic parameters. It is shown that the vibration frequencies of the main equipment may fall in the frequency band corresponding to the maximal values in the envelope response spectra constructed on the basis of floor accelerograms. The article presents the results from prediction of conditions under which vibroacoustic resonances with external periodic loads take place, which confirm the occurrence of additional earthquake-induced multiple growth of pressure pulsation intensity in the steam generator at the 8.3 Hz frequency and additional multiple growth of vibrations of the RCP and the steam generator cold header at the 16.6 Hz frequency. It is shown that at the elastic wave frequency equal to 8.3 Hz in the coolant, resonance occurs with the frequency of forced vibrations caused by the rotation of the RCP rotor. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of exceeding the design level of equipment vibrations

  17. Development and internal validation of a side-specific, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging-based nomogram for the prediction of extracapsular extension of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Alberto; Gupta, Akriti; Lewis, Sara C; Cumarasamy, Shivaram; Haines, Kenneth G; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Tewari, Ashutosh K

    2018-04-19

    To develop a nomogram for predicting side-specific extracapsular extension (ECE) for planning nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy. We retrospectively analysed data from 561 patients who underwent robot-assisted radical prostatectomy between February 2014 and October 2015. To develop a side-specific predictive model, we considered the prostatic lobes separately. Four variables were included: prostate-specific antigen; highest ipsilateral biopsy Gleason grade; highest ipsilateral percentage core involvement; and ECE on multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI). A multivariable logistic regression analysis was fitted to predict side-specific ECE. A nomogram was built based on the coefficients of the logit function. Internal validation was performed using 'leave-one-out' cross-validation. Calibration was graphically investigated. The decision curve analysis was used to evaluate the net clinical benefit. The study population consisted of 829 side-specific cases, after excluding negative biopsy observations (n = 293). ECE was reported on mpMRI and final pathology in 115 (14%) and 142 (17.1%) cases, respectively. Among these, mpMRI was able to predict ECE correctly in 57 (40.1%) cases. All variables in the model except highest percentage core involvement were predictors of ECE (all P ≤ 0.006). All variables were considered for inclusion in the nomogram. After internal validation, the area under the curve was 82.11%. The model demonstrated excellent calibration and improved clinical risk prediction, especially when compared with relying on mpMRI prediction of ECE alone. When retrospectively applying the nomogram-derived probability, using a 20% threshold for performing nerve-sparing, nine out of 14 positive surgical margins (PSMs) at the site of ECE resulted above the threshold. We developed an easy-to-use model for the prediction of side-specific ECE, and hope it serves as a tool for planning nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy and in the reduction of PSM in

  18. Impact of the integration of proton magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy to PI-RADS 2 for prediction of high grade and high stage prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leapman, Michael S.; Wang, Zhen J.; Behr, Spencer C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Zagoria, Ronald J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Westphalen, Antonio C., E-mail: antonio.westphalen@ucsf.edu [University of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2017-09-15

    Objective: To compare the predictions of dominant Gleason pattern ≥ 4 or non-organ confined disease with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS v2) with or without proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ({sup 1}H-MRSI). Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine men underwent 3-tesla endorectal multiparametric MRI including {sup 1}H-MRSI and prostatectomy. Two radiologists assigned PI-RADS v2 and {sup 1}H-MRSI scores to index lesions. Statistical analyses used logistic regressions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and 2 x 2 tables for diagnostic accuracies. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of {sup 1}H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for high-grade prostate cancer (PCa) were 85.7% (57.1%) and 92.9% (100%), and 56% (68.0%) and 24.0% (24.0%). The sensitivity and specificity of {sup 1}H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for extra-prostatic extension (EPE) were 64.0% (40%) and 20.0% (48%), and 50.0% (57.1%) and 71.4% (64.3%). The area under the ROC curves (AUC) for prediction of high-grade prostate cancer were 0.65 and 0.61 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.72 and 0.70 when combined with {sup 1}H-MRSI (readers 1 and 2, p = 0.04 and 0.21). For prediction of EPE the AUC were 0.54 and 0.60 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.55 and 0.61 when combined with {sup 1}H-MRSI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: {sup 1}H-MRSI might improve the discrimination of high-grade prostate cancer when combined to PI-RADS v2, particularly for PI-RADS v2 score 4 lesions, but it does not affect the prediction of EPE. (author)

  19. Impact of the integration of proton magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy to PI-RADS 2 for prediction of high grade and high stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leapman, Michael S.; Wang, Zhen J.; Behr, Spencer C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Zagoria, Ronald J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Westphalen, Antonio C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To compare the predictions of dominant Gleason pattern ≥ 4 or non-organ confined disease with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS v2) with or without proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ("1H-MRSI). Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine men underwent 3-tesla endorectal multiparametric MRI including "1H-MRSI and prostatectomy. Two radiologists assigned PI-RADS v2 and "1H-MRSI scores to index lesions. Statistical analyses used logistic regressions, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and 2 x 2 tables for diagnostic accuracies. Results: The sensitivity and specificity of "1H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for high-grade prostate cancer (PCa) were 85.7% (57.1%) and 92.9% (100%), and 56% (68.0%) and 24.0% (24.0%). The sensitivity and specificity of "1H-MRSI and PI-RADS v2 for extra-prostatic extension (EPE) were 64.0% (40%) and 20.0% (48%), and 50.0% (57.1%) and 71.4% (64.3%). The area under the ROC curves (AUC) for prediction of high-grade prostate cancer were 0.65 and 0.61 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.72 and 0.70 when combined with "1H-MRSI (readers 1 and 2, p = 0.04 and 0.21). For prediction of EPE the AUC were 0.54 and 0.60 for PI-RADS v2 and 0.55 and 0.61 when combined with "1H-MRSI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: "1H-MRSI might improve the discrimination of high-grade prostate cancer when combined to PI-RADS v2, particularly for PI-RADS v2 score 4 lesions, but it does not affect the prediction of EPE. (author)

  20. Pretreatment Endorectal Coil Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict Biochemical Tumor Control in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Combination Brachytherapy and External-Beam Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riaz, Nadeem; Afaq, Asim; Akin, Oguz; Pei Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Cox, Brett; Hricak, Hedvig; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the utility of endorectal coil magenetic resonance imaging (eMRI) in predicting biochemical relapse in prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2008, 279 men with intermediate- or high-risk prostate cancer underwent eMRI of their prostate before receiving brachytherapy and supplemental intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Endorectal coil MRI was performed before treatment and retrospectively reviewed by two radiologists experienced in genitourinary MRI. Image-based variables, including tumor diameter, location, number of sextants involved, and the presence of extracapsular extension (ECE), were incorporated with other established clinical variables to predict biochemical control outcomes. The median follow-up was 49 months (range, 1–13 years). Results: The 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival for the cohort was 92%. Clinical findings predicting recurrence on univariate analysis included Gleason score (hazard ratio [HR] 3.6, p = 0.001), PSA (HR 1.04, p = 0.005), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (HR 4.1, p = 0.002). Clinical T stage and the use of androgen deprivation therapy were not correlated with biochemical failure. Imaging findings on univariate analysis associated with relapse included ECE on MRI (HR 3.79, p = 0.003), tumor size (HR 2.58, p = 0.04), and T stage (HR 1.71, p = 0.004). On multivariate analysis incorporating both clinical and imaging findings, only ECE on MRI and Gleason score were independent predictors of recurrence. Conclusions: Pretreatment eMRI findings predict for biochemical recurrence in intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with combination brachytherapy and external-beam radiotherapy. Gleason score and the presence of ECE on MRI were the only significant predictors of biochemical relapse in this group of patients.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging versus Acute Physiology And Chronic Healthy Evaluation II score in predicting the severity of acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Wei; Zhang Xiaoming; Xiao Bo; Zeng Nanlin; Pan Huashan; Feng Zhisong; Xu Xiaoxue

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation between established magnetic resonance (MR) imaging criteria of disease severity in acute pancreatitis and the Acute Physiology And Chronic Healthy Evaluation II (APACHE II) score, and to assess the utility of each prognostic indicators in acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods: In this study there were 94 patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), all had abdominal MR imaging. MR findings were categorized into edematous and necrotizing AP and graded according to the MR severity index (MRSI). The APACHE II score was calculated within 24 h of admission, and local complications, death, duration of hospitalization and ICU were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed to determine their correlation. Results: In patients with pancreatitis, no significant correlation can be found between the APACHE II score and the MRSI score (P = 0.196). The MRSI score correlated well with morbidity (P = 0.006) but not with mortality (P = 0.137). The APACHE II score correlated well with mortality (P = 0.002) but not with the morbidity (P = 0.112). The MRSI score was superior to the APACHE II score as a predictor of the length of hospitalization (r = 0.52 vs. r = 0.35). A high MRSI and APACHE II score correlated with the need for being in the intensive care unit (ICU) (P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively). Conclusion: In patients with pancreatitis, MRSI is superior to APACHE II in assessing local complications from pancreatitis but has a limited role in determining systemic complications in which the APACHE II score excels.

  2. Survival prediction using temporal muscle thickness measurements on cranial magnetic resonance images in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furtner, Julia; Prayer, Daniela [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Berghoff, Anna S.; Zielinski, Christoph C.; Preusser, Matthias [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Albtoush, Omar M. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); University of Jordan, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Amman (Jordan); Woitek, Ramona; Asenbaum, Ulrika [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Widhalm, Georg; Gatterbauer, Brigitte [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Neurosurgery, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, Karin [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiotherapy, Vienna (Austria); Birner, Peter [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Medicine I, Vienna (Austria); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Pathology, Vienna (Austria); Aretin, Bernadette [General Hospital Vienna, Pharmacy Department, Vienna (Austria); Bartsch, Rupert [Medical University of Vienna, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Central Nervous System Tumor Unit (CCC-CNS), Vienna (Austria); Schoepf, Veronika [University of Graz, Institute of Psychology, Graz (Austria); BioTechMed, Graz (Austria)

    2017-08-15

    To evaluate the prognostic relevance of temporal muscle thickness (TMT) in brain metastasis patients. We retrospectively analysed TMT on magnetic resonance (MR) images at diagnosis of brain metastasis in two independent cohorts of 188 breast cancer (BC) and 247 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (overall: 435 patients). Survival analysis using a Cox regression model showed a reduced risk of death by 19% with every additional millimetre of baseline TMT in the BC cohort and by 24% in the NSCLC cohort. Multivariate analysis included TMT and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) as covariates in the BC cohort (TMT: HR 0.791/CI [0.703-0.889]/p < 0.001; DS-GPA: HR 1.433/CI [1.160-1.771]/p = 0.001), and TMT, gender and DS-GPA in the NSCLC cohort (TMT: HR 0.710/CI [0.646-0.780]/p < 0.001; gender: HR 0.516/CI [0.387-0.687]/p < 0.001; DS-GPA: HR 1.205/CI [1.018-1.426]/p = 0.030). TMT is easily and reproducibly assessable on routine MR images and is an independent predictor of survival in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastasis from BC and NSCLC. TMT may help to better define frail patient populations and thus facilitate patient selection for therapeutic measures or clinical trials. Further prospective studies are needed to correlate TMT with other clinical frailty parameters of patients. (orig.)

  3. Survival prediction using temporal muscle thickness measurements on cranial magnetic resonance images in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtner, Julia; Prayer, Daniela; Berghoff, Anna S.; Zielinski, Christoph C.; Preusser, Matthias; Albtoush, Omar M.; Woitek, Ramona; Asenbaum, Ulrika; Widhalm, Georg; Gatterbauer, Brigitte; Dieckmann, Karin; Birner, Peter; Aretin, Bernadette; Bartsch, Rupert; Schoepf, Veronika

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic relevance of temporal muscle thickness (TMT) in brain metastasis patients. We retrospectively analysed TMT on magnetic resonance (MR) images at diagnosis of brain metastasis in two independent cohorts of 188 breast cancer (BC) and 247 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients (overall: 435 patients). Survival analysis using a Cox regression model showed a reduced risk of death by 19% with every additional millimetre of baseline TMT in the BC cohort and by 24% in the NSCLC cohort. Multivariate analysis included TMT and diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (DS-GPA) as covariates in the BC cohort (TMT: HR 0.791/CI [0.703-0.889]/p < 0.001; DS-GPA: HR 1.433/CI [1.160-1.771]/p = 0.001), and TMT, gender and DS-GPA in the NSCLC cohort (TMT: HR 0.710/CI [0.646-0.780]/p < 0.001; gender: HR 0.516/CI [0.387-0.687]/p < 0.001; DS-GPA: HR 1.205/CI [1.018-1.426]/p = 0.030). TMT is easily and reproducibly assessable on routine MR images and is an independent predictor of survival in patients with newly diagnosed brain metastasis from BC and NSCLC. TMT may help to better define frail patient populations and thus facilitate patient selection for therapeutic measures or clinical trials. Further prospective studies are needed to correlate TMT with other clinical frailty parameters of patients. (orig.)

  4. Can Vascular Patterns on Preoperative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Help Predict Skin Necrosis after Nipple-Sparing Mastectomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Manisha; Pien, Irene J; Buretta, Kate J; Hwang, E Shelley; Greenup, Rachel A; Ghate, Sujata V; Hollenbeck, Scott T

    2016-08-01

    Nipple-areola complex (NAC) and skin flap ischemia and necrosis can occur after nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM). The purpose of this study was to correlate vascular findings on MRI with outcomes in patients who underwent NSM. Female patients at a single institution who underwent NSM and had a preoperative breast MRI between 2010 and 2014 were identified. Medical records were reviewed for patient demographics, surgical factors, and complications. Magnetic resonance images were reviewed by 2 radiologists, blinded to outcomes, for the presence of dual vs single blood supply to the breast. The association between blood supply on MRI with ischemic and necrotic complications after NSM was analyzed. One hundred and sixty-four NSM procedures were performed in 105 patients (mean age 45.5 years, range 25 to 69 years) who had a preoperative MRI. The majority of procedures were performed for malignancy (89 of 164 [54.3%]) or prophylaxis (73 of 164 [44.5%]). Nipple-areola complex or skin flap ischemia or necrosis occurred in 40 (24.4%) breasts. Ischemia or necrosis after NSM was less likely to occur in breasts with dual compared with single blood supply (20.8% vs 38.2%; p = 0.03). There was no association between surgical complications and age, BMI, smoking history, previous radiation therapy, indication for NSM, surgical specimen weight, surgical incision type, reconstruction approach, or operating surgeon on univariate analysis. Preoperative MRI characterization of breast vascularity can be considered when planning NSM. The presence of a dual blood supply to the breast on MRI is associated with a decreased risk of nipple-areola complex and skin flap ischemia and necrosis after NSM. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Preoperative Lateralization Modalities for Cushing Disease: Is Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Cavernous Sinus Sampling More Predictive of Intraoperative Findings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hai; Yedinak, Chris; Ozpinar, Alp; Anderson, Jim; Dogan, Aclan; Delashaw, Johnny; Fleseriu, Maria

    2015-06-01

    Objective To analyze whether cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) are consistent with intraoperative findings in Cushing disease (CD) patients. Design Retrospective outcomes study. Setting Oregon Health & Science University; 2006 and 2013. Participants A total of 37 CD patients with preoperative dMRI and CSS to confirm central adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) hypersecretion. Patients were 78% female; mean age was 41 years (at diagnosis), and all had a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Main Outcome Measures Correlations among patient characteristics, dMRI measurements, CSS results, and intraoperative findings. Results All CSS indicated presence of CD. Eight of 37 patients had no identifiable tumor on dMRI. Three of 37 patients had no tumor at surgery. dMRI tumor size was inversely correlated with age (rs = - 0.4; p = 0.01) and directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.3; p < 0.05). Preoperative dMRI was directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.5; p < 0.002). CSS lateralization showed no correlation with intraoperative findings (rs = 0.145; p = 0.40) or lateralization observed on preoperative dMRI (rs = 0.17; p = 0.29). Postoperative remission rate was 68%. Conclusion dMRI localization was most consistent with intraoperative findings; CSS results were less reliable. Results suggest that small ACTH-secreting tumors continue to pose a challenge to reliable preoperative localization.

  6. Prediction of Vestibular Imbalance in Acute Peripheral Vestibulopathy by Measuring Horizontal Ocular Deviation on Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yeon-Jun; Kim, Kun Woo; Choi, Ji Eun; Lee, Min Young; Yoo, Dong Soo; Jung, Jae Yun

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate whether horizontal ocular deviation (OD) from MR imaging in the emergency room (ER) reflects vestibular imbalance, by comparing the horizontal OD in patients with acute vestibulopathy to controls. Retrospective review. A total of 69 patients with acute unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy and 30 healthy subjects were included. Horizontal OD was quantified by using the axial T2-weighted fast-spin echo (FSE) images of the brain at 1.5 T. In the study group, the results of VFTs (videonystagmography [VNG], caloric test, rotary chair test, and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials [cVEMP]) were also reviewed. The averaged angle of right and left horizontal ODs was compared between patients with acute unilateral vestibulopathy and healthy controls. Also, the correlation between horizontal OD and results of VFTs was analyzed in the study group. The averaged angle of horizontal OD in study group (23.7° ± 11.6°) was significantly greater than that of control group (4.27° ± 3.7°) (p < 0.05). Horizontal OD significantly correlated with slow phase velocity of spontaneous nystagmus (SN), the value of caloric paresis (CP) on caloric testing, rotary chair gain, asymmetry ratio of rotary chair test and interaural difference (IAD) of cVEMP, regardless of time intervals between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and VFTs. Horizontal OD significantly correlated with parameters of VFT which reflect the vestibular imbalance. Therefore, horizontal OD can be used as an indicator of unilateral peripheral vestibular weakness.

  7. Predicting human decisions in socioeconomic interaction using real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Maurice; Mönch, Tobias; Müller, Charles; Bernarding, Johannes

    2009-02-01

    A major field in cognitive neuroscience investigates neuronal correlates of human decision-making processes [1, 2]. Is it possible to predict a decision before it is actually revealed by the volunteer? In the presented manuscript we use a standard paradigm from economic behavioral research that proved emotional influences on human decision making: the Ultimatum Game (UG). In the UG, two players have the opportunity to split a sum of money. One player is deemed the proposer and the other, the responder. The proposer makes an offer as to how this money should be split between the two. The second player can either accept or reject this offer. If it is accepted, the money is split as proposed. If rejected, then neither player receives anything. In the presented study a real-time fMRI system was used to derive the brain activation of the responder. Using a Relevance-Vector-Machine classifier it was possible to predict if the responder will accept or reject an offer. The classification result was presented to the operator 1-2 seconds before the volunteer pressed a button to convey his decision. The classification accuracy reached about 70% averaged over six subjects.

  8. Predictive values of BI-RADS® magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Piato, Sebastião; Roveda, Décio; Faria Castro Fleury, Eduardo de

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate BI-RADS indicators in the detection of DCIS by MRI. Materials and methods: Prospective observational study that started in 2014 and lasted 24 months. A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated, who presented with suspicious or highly suspicious microcalcifications on screening mammography (BI-RADS categories 4 and 5) and underwent stereotactic-guided breast biopsy, having had an MRI scan performed prior to biopsy. Results: Altogether, 38 cases were characterized as positive for malignancy, of which 25 were DCIS and 13 were invasive ductal carcinoma cases. MRI had a sensitivity of 96%; specificity of 75.67%; positive predictive value (PPV) for DCIS detection of 57.14%; negative predictive value (NPV) in the detection of DCIS of 98.24%; and an accuracy of 80.80%. Conclusion: BI-RADS as a tool for the detection of DCIS by MRI is a powerful instrument whose sensitivity was higher when compared to that observed for mammography in the literature. Likewise, the PPV obtained by MRI was higher than that observed in the present study for mammography, and the high NPV obtained on MRI scans can provide early evidence to discourage breast biopsy in selected cases.

  9. Use of quantitative diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging to predict human papilloma virus status in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Mitsuhiko; Saito, Naoko; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kuba, Kiyomi; Sugasawa, Masashi

    2014-05-01

    Although identification of human papilloma virus (HPV) status in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is essential in predicting treatment response, no imaging modality can currently determine whether a tumor is HPV-related. In this retrospective study, 26 patients with OPSCC confined to the lateral wall or the base of tongue underwent neck magnetic resonance imaging, using T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) in a region of interest covering the largest available primary tumor area of OPSCC on a single slice of the ADC map were calculated using two b values (0 and 1,000 s/mm(2)). Mean and minimum ADCs were compared with HPV status, using p16 immunohistochemistry as a surrogate marker for HPV infection. Mean and minimum ADCs for HPV(+) OPSCC were significantly lower than those for HPV(-) OPSCC. A cut-off value of mean ADC for HPV(+) OPSCC of 1.027 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s yielded sensitivity and specificity of 83.33 and 78.57%, respectively. In conclusion, the present study indicates that ADC could be used to predict HPV status in patients with OPSCC.

  10. Shifting wavelengths of ultraweak photon emissions from dying melanoma cells: their chemical enhancement and blocking are predicted by Cosic's theory of resonant recognition model for macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotta, Blake T; Murugan, Nirosha J; Karbowski, Lukasz M; Lafrenie, Robert M; Persinger, Michael A

    2014-02-01

    During the first 24 h after removal from incubation, melanoma cells in culture displayed reliable increases in emissions of photons of specific wavelengths during discrete portions of this interval. Applications of specific filters revealed marked and protracted increases in infrared (950 nm) photons about 7 h after removal followed 3 h later by marked and protracted increases in near ultraviolet (370 nm) photon emissions. Specific wavelengths within the visible (400 to 800 nm) peaked 12 to 24 h later. Specific activators or inhibitors for specific wavelengths based upon Cosic's resonant recognition model elicited either enhancement or diminishment of photons at the specific wavelength as predicted. Inhibitors or activators predicted for other wavelengths, even within 10 nm, were less or not effective. There is now evidence for quantitative coupling between the wavelength of photon emissions and intrinsic cellular chemistry. The results are consistent with initial activation of signaling molecules associated with infrared followed about 3 h later by growth and protein-structural factors associated with ultraviolet. The greater-than-expected photon counts compared with raw measures through the various filters, which also function as reflective material to other photons, suggest that photons of different wavelengths might be self-stimulatory and could play a significant role in cell-to-cell communication.

  11. String-like lumen in below-the-knee chronic total occlusions on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography predicts intraluminal recanalization and better blood flow restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yue-Qi; Lu, Hai-Tao; Wei, Li-Ming; Cheng, Ying-Sheng; Wang, Jian-Bo; Zhao, Jun-Gong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Shanghai (China); Liu, Fang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, Department of Endocrinology, Shanghai (China)

    2017-07-15

    To determine whether string-like lumina (SLs) on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) predict better outcomes in diabetic patients with below-the-knee (BTK) chronic total occlusions (CTOs). This study involved 317 long-segment (>5 cm) BTK CTOs of 245 patients that were examined using CE-MRA and treated using endovascular angioplasty. An SL with a CTO was slowly filled with blood on conventional CE-MRA. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of procedural success, recanalisation method and immediate blood flow restoration. The target-lesion patency and limb-salvage rates were assessed. SL-positive CTOs (n = 60) achieved a higher technique success rate, preferred intraluminal angioplasty and better blood flow restoration than SL-negative CTOs (n = 257, P < 0.05). Multivariate analyses revealed that lesion length was the independent predictor of procedural success (P = 0.028). SL was a predictor of intraluminal angioplasty (P < 0.001) and good blood-flow restoration (P = 0.004). Kaplan-Meier analyses at 12 months revealed a higher target lesion patency rate (P = 0.04) and limb-salvage rate (P = 0.35) in SL-positive CTOs. In patients with BTK CTOs, SL predicted intraluminal angioplasty and good blood-flow restoration for BTK CTOs. (orig.)

  12. Electroencephalogram and magnetic resonance imaging comparison as a predicting factor for neurodevelopmental outcome in hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy infant treated with hypothermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Del Balzo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is an important cause of acute neurological damage in newborns at (or near term. Several trials in recent years have shown that moderate hypothermia by total body cooling or selective head is an effective intervention to reduce mortality and major disability in infants survived a perinatal hypoxic-ischemic attack. Follow-up in these patients is very important to establish neurodevelopmental outcome, and specific markers can lead us to detect predicting sign for good or poor outcome. We reported a few cases of newborn with HIE treated with hypothermia, in whom the comparison between electroencephalogram (EEG and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI represents the first marker for neurodevelopment outcome prediction. The continuous EEG monitoring showed a depressed EEG activity with diffuse burst depression in 7 patients. No epileptic abnormalities were registered. In 10 out of 20 patients no abnormalities of the background activity and no epileptic abnormalities were observed. We found that a depressed EEG activity during the first 72 h of life and a diffused alteration of basal ganglia at MRI were correlated with a poor neurodevelopmental outcome at 18 months of follow-up.

  13. Diagnostic value of the flow profile in the distal descending aorta by phase-contrast magnetic resonance for predicting severe coarctation of the aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzarelli, Stefano; Ordovas, Karen Gomes; Hope, Michael D; Meadows, Jeffery J; Higgins, Charles B; Meadows, Alison Knauth

    2011-06-01

    To compare aortic flow profiles at the level of the proximal descending (PDAo) and distal descending aorta (DDAo) in patients investigated for coarctation of the aorta (CoA), and compare their respective diagnostic value for predicting severe CoA. Diastolic flow decay in the PDAo predicts severe CoA, but flow measurements at this level are limited by flow turbulence, aliasing, and stent-related artifacts. We studied 49 patients evaluated for CoA with phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI). Parameters of diastolic flow decay in the PDAo and DDAo were compared. Their respective diagnostic value was compared with the standard reference of transcatheter peak gradient ≥20 mmHg. Flow measurement in the PDAo required repeated acquisition with adjustment of encoding velocity or location of the imaging plane in 69% of patients; measurement in the DDAo was achieved in single acquisition in all cases. Parameters of diastolic flow decay in the PDAo and DDAo, including rate-corrected (RC) deceleration time and RC flow deceleration yielded a good correlation (r = 0.78; P RC deceleration time at DDAo (sensitivity 85%, specificity 85%). Characterization of aortic flow profiles at the DDAo offers a quick and reliable noninvasive means of assessing hemodynamically significant CoA. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Serum C-reactive Protein Levels Demonstrate Predictive Value for Radiographic and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Outcomes in Patients with Active Ankylosing Spondylitis Treated with Golimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Jürgen; Baraliakos, Xenofon; Hermann, Kay-Geert A; Xu, Stephen; Hsu, Benjamin

    2016-09-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) associates with radiographic progression in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) untreated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antagonists. We assessed correlations between serum CRP and radiographic progression/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected inflammation after 2 years of anti-TNF therapy. Patients with active AS receiving golimumab (GOL)/placebo through Week 16 (early escape) or Week 24 (crossover by design), followed by GOL through 4 years, had sera/images obtained through Week 208. Lateral spinal radiographs and spinal MRI were scored with the modified Stoke AS Spine Score (mSASSS) and the AS spine MRI activity (ASspiMRI-a) score, respectively. ANOVA assessed differences based on CRP levels and mSASSS progression. The relationships between CRP levels and mSASSS/ASspiMRI-a were assessed by Spearman correlation and logistic regression. Of the randomized GO-RAISE patients, 299 (84.0%) had pre- and posttreatment spinal radiographs. Larger proportions of patients with Week 104 CRP ≥ 0.5 mg/dl (n = 47) versus formation risk. Elevated CRP after 2 years of anti-TNF treatment correlated with greater radiographic progression risk at 4 years. Elevated CRP at baseline or Week 14/Week 24 of anti-TNF treatment weakly predicted subsequent radiographic progression and modestly predicted residual spinal inflammation in patients with AS treated with anti-TNF. Findings are useful regarding new treatment options in patients treated with anti-TNF. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00265083.

  15. 3D FSE Cube and VIPR-aTR 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging predicts canine cranial cruciate ligament structural properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Molly; Al saleh, Habib; Waller, Kenneth R; Bleedorn, Jason A; McCabe, Ronald P; Vanderby, Ray; Markel, Mark D; Brounts, Sabrina H; Block, Walter F; Muir, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of cranial cruciate ligament (CrCL) structural properties in client-owned dogs with incipient cruciate rupture would be advantageous. The objective of this study was to determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurement of normal CrCL volume in an ex-vivo canine model predicts structural properties. Stifles from eight dogs underwent 3.0 Tesla 3D MRI. CrCL volume and normalized median grayscale values were determined using 3D Fast Spin Echo (FSE) Cube and Vastly under-sampled Isotropic PRojection (VIPR)-alternative repetition time (aTR) sequences. Stifles were then mechanically tested. After joint laxity testing, CrCL structural properties were determined, including displacement at yield, yield load, load to failure, and stiffness. Yield load and load to failure (R(2)=0.56, P 0.57, P <0.005). In conclusion, 3D MRI offers a predictive method for estimating canine CrCL structural properties. 3D MRI may be useful for monitoring CrCL properties in clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Predictive Value for the Site of Postradiotherapy Relapse in a Prospective Longitudinal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laprie, Anne; Catalaa, Isabelle; Cassol, Emmanuelle; McKnight, Tracy R.; Berchery, Delphine; Marre, Delphine; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Berry, Isabelle; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI)-defined, metabolically abnormal tumor regions and subsequent sites of relapse in data from patients treated with radiotherapy (RT) in a prospective clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three examinations were performed prospectively for 9 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme studied in a Phase I trial combining Tipifarnib and RT. The patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRSI before treatment and every 2 months until relapse. The MRSI data were categorized by the choline (Cho)/N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) ratio (CNR) as a measure of spectroscopic abnormality. CNRs corresponding to T1 and T2 MRI for 1,207 voxels were evaluated before RT and at recurrence. Results: Before treatment, areas of CNR2 (CNR ≥2) represented 25% of the contrast-enhancing (T1CE) regions and 10% of abnormal T2 regions outside T1CE (HyperT2). The presence of CNR2 was often an early indicator of the site of relapse after therapy. In fact, 75% of the voxels within the T1CE+CNR2 before therapy continued to exhibit CNR2 at relapse, compared with 22% of the voxels within the T1CE with normal CNR (p < 0.05). The location of new contrast enhancement with CNR2 corresponded in 80% of the initial HyperT2+CNR2 vs. 20.7% of the HyperT2 voxels with normal CNR (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Metabolically active regions represented a small percentage of pretreatment MRI abnormalities and were predictive for the site of post-RT relapse. The incorporation of MRSI data in the definition of RT target volumes for selective boosting may be a promising avenue leading to increased local control of glioblastomas

  17. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can assess vascularity within fracture non-unions and predicts good outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoierer, Oliver; Bender, Daniel; Schmidmaier, Gerhard [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg Trauma Research Group, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Heidelberg (Germany); Bloess, Konstantin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre [University Hospital Heidelberg, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Burkholder, Iris [University of Applied Sciences of the Saarland, Department of Nursing and Health, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    To prospectively evaluate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can assess vascularity within non-unions and predicts clinical outcome in combination with the clinical Non-Union Scoring System (NUSS). Fifty-eight patients with non-unions of extremities on CT underwent 3-T DCE MRI. Signal intensity curves obtained from a region-of-interest analysis were subdivided into those with more intense contrast agent uptake within the non-union than in adjacent muscle (vascularised non-union) and those with similar or less contrast uptake. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the Tofts model K{sub trans}, K{sub ep}, iAUC and V{sub e} were correlated with union at CT 1 year later (n = 49). Despite inserted osteosynthetic material, DCE parameters could be evaluated in 57 fractures. The sensitivity/specificity of vascularised non-unions as an indicator of good outcome was 83.9 %/50.0 % compared to 96.8 %/33.3 % using NUSS (n = 49). Logistic regression revealed a significant impact of NUSS on outcome (P = 0.04, odds ratio = 0.93). At first examination, median iAUC (initial area under the enhancement curve) for the ratio non-union/muscle was 10.28 in patients with good outcome compared with 3.77 in non-responders (P = 0.023). K{sub trans}, K{sub ep} and V{sub e} within the non-union were not significantly different initially (n = 57) or 1 year later (n = 19). DCE MRI can assess vascularity in fracture non-unions. A vascularised non-union correlates with good outcome. (orig.)

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging can assess vascularity within fracture non-unions and predicts good outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoierer, Oliver; Bender, Daniel; Schmidmaier, Gerhard; Bloess, Konstantin; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Weber, Marc-Andre; Burkholder, Iris

    2014-01-01

    To prospectively evaluate whether dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI can assess vascularity within non-unions and predicts clinical outcome in combination with the clinical Non-Union Scoring System (NUSS). Fifty-eight patients with non-unions of extremities on CT underwent 3-T DCE MRI. Signal intensity curves obtained from a region-of-interest analysis were subdivided into those with more intense contrast agent uptake within the non-union than in adjacent muscle (vascularised non-union) and those with similar or less contrast uptake. The pharmacokinetic parameters of the Tofts model K trans , K ep , iAUC and V e were correlated with union at CT 1 year later (n = 49). Despite inserted osteosynthetic material, DCE parameters could be evaluated in 57 fractures. The sensitivity/specificity of vascularised non-unions as an indicator of good outcome was 83.9 %/50.0 % compared to 96.8 %/33.3 % using NUSS (n = 49). Logistic regression revealed a significant impact of NUSS on outcome (P = 0.04, odds ratio = 0.93). At first examination, median iAUC (initial area under the enhancement curve) for the ratio non-union/muscle was 10.28 in patients with good outcome compared with 3.77 in non-responders (P = 0.023). K trans , K ep and V e within the non-union were not significantly different initially (n = 57) or 1 year later (n = 19). DCE MRI can assess vascularity in fracture non-unions. A vascularised non-union correlates with good outcome. (orig.)

  19. Atlas of neutron resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Mughabghab, Said

    2018-01-01

    Atlas of Neutron Resonances: Resonance Properties and Thermal Cross Sections Z= 1-60, Sixth Edition, contains an extensive list of detailed individual neutron resonance parameters for Z=1-60, as well as thermal cross sections, capture resonance integrals, average resonance parameters and a short survey of the physics of thermal and resonance neutrons. The long introduction contains: nuclear physics formulas aimed at neutron physicists; topics of special interest such as valence neutron capture, nuclear level density parameters, and s-, p-, and d-wave neutron strength functions; and various comparisons of measured quantities with the predictions of nuclear models, such as the optical model. As in the last edition, additional features have been added to appeal to a wider spectrum of users. These include: spin-dependent scattering lengths that are of interest to solid-state physicists, nuclear physicists and neutron evaluators; calculated and measured Maxwellian average 5-keV and 30-keV capture cross sections o...

  20. Cerebellar contribution to motor and cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis: An MRI sub-regional volumetric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosio, Alessandro; Pagani, Elisabetta; Riccitelli, Gianna C; Colombo, Bruno; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Falini, Andrea; Comi, Giancarlo; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the role of cerebellar sub-regions on motor and cognitive performance in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Whole and sub-regional cerebellar volumes, brain volumes, T2 hyperintense lesion volumes (LV), and motor performance scores were obtained from 95 relapse-onset MS patients and 32 healthy controls (HC). MS patients also underwent an evaluation of working memory and processing speed functions. Cerebellar anterior and posterior lobes were segmented using the Spatially Unbiased Infratentorial Toolbox (SUIT) from Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM12). Multivariate linear regression models assessed the relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures and motor/cognitive scores. Compared to HC, only secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) patients had lower cerebellar volumes (total and posterior cerebellum). In MS patients, lower anterior cerebellar volume and brain T2 LV predicted worse motor performance, whereas lower posterior cerebellar volume and brain T2 LV predicted poor cognitive performance. Global measures of brain volume and infratentorial T2 LV were not selected by the final multivariate models. Cerebellar volumetric abnormalities are likely to play an important contribution to explain motor and cognitive performance in MS patients. Consistently with functional mapping studies, cerebellar posterior-inferior volume accounted for variance in cognitive measures, whereas anterior cerebellar volume accounted for variance in motor performance, supporting the assessment of cerebellar damage at sub-regional level.

  1. Sex differences in motor and cognitive abilities predicted from human evolutionary history with some implications for models of the visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Geoff

    2013-01-01

    This article expands the knowledge base available to sex researchers by reviewing recent evidence for sex differences in coincidence-anticipation timing (CAT), motor control with the hand and arm, and visual processing of stimuli in near and far space. In CAT, the differences are between sex and, therefore, typical of other widely reported sex differences. Men perform CAT tasks with greater accuracy and precision than women, who tend to underestimate time to arrival. Null findings arise because significant sex differences are found with easy but not with difficult tasks. The differences in motor control and visual processing are within sex, and they underlie reciprocal patterns of performance in women and men. Motor control is exerted better by women with the hand than the arm. In contrast, men showed the reverse pattern. Visual processing is performed better by women with stimuli within hand reach (near space) as opposed to beyond hand reach (far space); men showed the reverse pattern. The sex differences seen in each of these three abilities are consistent with the evolutionary selection of men for hunting-related skills and women for gathering-related skills. The implications of the sex differences in visual processing for two visual system models of human vision are discussed.

  2. Quantification of pulmonary regurgitation and prediction of pulmonary valve replacement by echocardiography in patients with congenital heart defects in comparison to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellas, Claudia; Kammerer, Laura; Gravenhorst, Verena; Lotz, Joachim; Paul, Thomas; Steinmetz, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Pulmonary regurgitation (PR) is common in patients with congenital heart defects (CHD) and contributes to morbidity and mortality in the long-term. We investigated in this retrospective analysis whether readily accessible echocardiographic parameters are useful for quantification of PR and for predicting pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) in comparison to the gold-standard phase contrast (PC) flow measurements from cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Continuous wave (CW) Doppler and colour flow images in echocardiograms from 53 patients with CHD were analysed. Slope and jet-to-RVOT ratio correlated significantly with CMR-assessed regurgitation fraction (RF), whereas pressure half time (PHT) showed an inverse correlation. Patients with mild PR in CMR had significantly higher PHT, lower slope and jet-to-RVOT ratio than patients with moderate or severe regurgitation. The AUC regarding PR severity was 0.778 for PHT (95% CI, 0.649-0.907; P = 0.007 for CMR-RF ≤ 35%), 0.744 for slope (95% CI, 0.603-0.885; P = 0.017 for CMR-RF > 35%) and 0.652 for jet-to-RVOT ratio (95% CI, 0.473-0.860; P = 0.168 for CMR-RF > 35%). The optimal cut-off values calculated from ROC analysis were 95 ms for PHT and 4.9 m/s 2 for slope. In logistic regression analysis, slope emerged as the most valuable parameter for predicting the indication for PVR (OR 12.9, 95% CI, 1.8-90.9, P = 0.010). In conclusion, echocardiographic assessment of PR was feasible. Both parameters, PHT and in particular slope, were predictors for PVR. Thus, echocardiography appears appropriate in the management of patients with PR.

  3. Left and right ventricular dyssynchrony and strains from cardiovascular magnetic resonance feature tracking do not predict deterioration of ventricular function in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Linyuan; Wehner, Gregory J; Suever, Jonathan D; Charnigo, Richard J; Alhadad, Sudad; Stearns, Evan; Mojsejenko, Dimitri; Haggerty, Christopher M; Hickey, Kelsey; Valente, Anne Marie; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2016-08-22

    Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (rTOF) suffer from progressive ventricular dysfunction decades after their surgical repair. We hypothesized that measures of ventricular strain and dyssynchrony would predict deterioration of ventricular function in patients with rTOF. A database search identified all patients at a single institution with rTOF who underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) at least twice, >6 months apart, without intervening surgical or catheter procedures. Seven primary predictors were derived from the first CMR using a custom feature tracking algorithm: left (LV), right (RV) and inter-ventricular dyssynchrony, LV and RV peak global circumferential strains, and LV and RV peak global longitudinal strains. Three outcomes were defined, whose changes were assessed over time: RV end-diastolic volume, and RV and LV ejection fraction. Multivariate linear mixed models were fit to investigate relationships of outcomes to predictors and ten potential baseline confounders. One hundred fifty-three patients with rTOF (23 ± 14 years, 50 % male) were included. The mean follow-up duration between the first and last CMR was 2.9 ± 1.3 years. After adjustment for confounders, none of the 7 primary predictors were significantly associated with change over time in the 3 outcome variables. Only 1-17 % of the variability in the change over time in the outcome variables was explained by the baseline predictors and potential confounders. In patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot, ventricular dyssynchrony and global strain derived from cine CMR were not significantly related to changes in ventricular size and function over time. The ability to predict deterioration in ventricular function in patients with rTOF using current methods is limited.

  4. Predictive value of the time-intensity curves on dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for lymphatic spreading in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Lee, Chol Joo; Ichikawa, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) has emerged as a promising diagnostic modality in various breast cancer treatments. However, little is known about the correlation between the pattern of time to signal intensity curves (TIC) on the CE-MRI and clinicopathologic features. This study was designed to investigate these correlations and evaluate the predictive value of TIC on CE-MRI in order to identify high-risk patients. Between 2001 and 2003, 101 lesions were evaluated to detect malignancy on CE-MRI in 101 women who were suspected of having breast tumors based on either clinical findings or conventional imaging studies. Moreover, the clinicopathologic findings were compared with the pattern of TIC for the 69 surgically treated malignant lesions. In detecting malignancy, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 78.7%, 88.5%, and 81.2%, respectively, in the 101 breast lesions. Especially for the 69 surgically treated malignant lesions, in comparison with breast cancer tumors with the benign pattern of TIC, the breast cancer tumors with a malignant pattern were found more frequently in lymphatic invasion (P<0.01) and lymph node metastasis (P<0.005), although no statistical correlation regarding the histological type, tumor size, vascular invasion, extensive intraductal component, hormone receptor status, or pathological stage was noted between the two groups. According to a logistic regression model, lymph node metastasis was found to be a significant independent variable. The pattern of TIC could be used to predict lymphatic spreading associated with lymph node metastasis prior to surgery as well as to detect malignancy. Therefore, a more detailed evaluation should be made to identify the presence of lymphatic spreading in patients with a malignant pattern of TIC. (author)

  5. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for pretreatment prediction and monitoring of treatment response of patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Line; Olsen, Dag Rune; Seierstad, Therese; Fangberget, Anne; Geier, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Background. For patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), the European Guidelines for Breast Imaging recommends magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to be performed before start of NACT, when half of the NACT has been administered and prior to surgery. This is the first study addressing the value of flow-insensitive apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) obtained from diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI at the recommended time points for pretreatment prediction and monitoring of treatment response. Materials and methods. Twenty-five LABC patients were included in this prospective study. DW MRI was performed using single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging with b-values of 100, 250 and 800 s/mm 2 prior to NACT, after four cycles of NACT and at the conclusion of therapy using a 1.5 T MR scanner. ADC in the breast tumor was calculated from each assessment. The strength of correlation between pretreatment ADC, ADC changes and tumor volume changes were examined using Spearman's rho correlation test. Results. Mean pretreatment ADC was 1.11 ± 0.21 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. After 4 cycles of NACT, ADC was significantly increased (1.39 ± 0.36 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s; p=0.018). There was no correlation between individual pretreatment breast tumor ADC and MR response measured after four cycles of NACT (p=0.816) or prior to surgery (p=0.620). Conclusion. Pretreatment tumor ADC does not predict treatment response for patients with LABC undergoing NACT. Furthermore, ADC increase observed mid-way in the course of NACT does not correlate with tumor volume changes.

  6. Early biomarkers from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging to predict the response to antiangiogenic therapy in high-grade gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piludu, Francesca; Vidiri, Antonello [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging Department, Rome (Italy); Marzi, Simona [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Medical Physics Laboratory, Rome (Italy); Pace, Andrea; Villani, Veronica [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Neurology Division, Rome (Italy); Fabi, Alessandra [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncology Department, Rome (Italy); Carapella, Carmine Maria [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Oncologic Surgery Department, Rome (Italy); Terrenato, Irene [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Biostatistics-Scientific Direction, Rome (Italy); Antenucci, Anna [Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Clinical Pathology, Rome (Italy)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether early changes in tumor volume and perfusion measurements derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may predict response to antiangiogenic therapy in recurrent high-grade gliomas. Twenty-seven patients who received bevacizumab every 3 weeks were enrolled in the study. For each patient, three MRI scans were performed: at baseline, after the first dose, and after the fourth dose of bevacizumab. The entire tumor volume (V{sub tot}), as well as contrast-enhanced and noncontrast-enhanced tumor subvolumes (V{sub CE-T1} and V{sub NON-CE-T1}, respectively) were outlined using post-contrast T1-weighted images as a guide for the tumor location. Histogram analysis of normalized IAUGC (nIAUGC) and transfer constant K{sup trans} maps were performed. Each patient was classified as a responder patient if he/she had a partial response or a stable disease or as a nonresponder patient if he/she had progressive disease. Responding patients showed a larger reduction in V{sub NON-CE-T1} after a single dose, compared to nonresponding patients. Tumor subvolumes with increased values of nIAUGC and K{sup trans}, after a single dose, significantly differed between responders and nonresponders. The radiological response was found to be significantly associated to the clinical outcome. After a single dose, V{sub tot} was predictive of overall survival (OS), while V{sub CE-T1} showed a tendency of correlation with OS. Tumor subvolumes with increased nIAUGC and K{sup trans} showed the potential for improving the diagnostic accuracy of DCE. Early assessments of the entire tumor volume, including necrotic areas, may provide complementary information of tumor behavior in response to anti-VEGF therapies and is worth further investigation. (orig.)

  7. Can pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging predict recurrence-free survival after whole-gland high-intensity focused ablation for prostate cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosset, Remy; Bratan, Flavie [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Crouzet, Sebastien [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faculte de Medecine Lyon Est, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Tonoli-Catez, Helene [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Mege-Lechevallier, Florence [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Lyon (France); Gelet, Albert [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urology, Lyon (France); Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France); Rouviere, Olivier [Hopital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Urinary and Vascular Radiology, Lyon (France); Universite de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faculte de Medecine Lyon Est, Universite Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Inserm, U1032, LabTau, Lyon (France)

    2017-04-15

    Our aim was to assess whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features predict recurrence-free survival (RFS) after prostate cancer high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. We retrospectively selected 81 patients who underwent (i) whole-gland HIFU ablation between 2007 and 2011 as first-line therapy or salvage treatment after radiotherapy or brachytherapy, and (ii) pre- and postoperative MRI. On preoperative imaging, two senior (R1, R2) and one junior (R3) readers assessed the number of sectors invaded by the lesion with the highest Likert score (dominant lesion) using a 27-sector diagram. On postoperative imaging, readers assessed destruction of the dominant lesion using a three-level score. Multivariate analysis included the number of sectors invaded by the dominant lesion, its Likert and destruction scores, the pre-HIFU prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, and the clinical setting (primary/salvage). The most significant predictor was the number of prostate sectors invaded by the dominant lesion for R2 and R3 (p≤0.001) and the destruction score of the dominant lesion for R1 (p = 0.011). The pre-HIFU PSA level was an independent predictor for R2 (p = 0.014), but with only marginal significance for R1 (p = 0.059) and R3 (p = 0.053). The dominant lesion's size and destruction assessed by MRI provide independent prognostic information compared with usual predictors. (orig.)

  8. Prediction of pathologic staging with magnetic resonance imaging after preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer: pooled analysis of KROG 10-01 and 11-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Jang, Hong Seok; Kim, Jun-Gi; Lee, Myung Ah; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Oh, Jae Hwan; Park, Sung Chan; Kim, Sun Young; Baek, Ji Yeon; Park, Hee Chul; Kim, Hee Cheol; Nam, Taek-Keun; Chie, Eui Kyu; Jung, Ji-Han; Oh, Seong Taek

    2014-10-01

    The reported overall accuracy of MRI in predicting the pathologic stage of nonirradiated rectal cancer is high. However, the role of MRI in restaging rectal tumors after neoadjuvant CRT is contentious. Thus, we evaluate the accuracy of restaging magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for rectal cancer patients who receive preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT). We analyzed 150 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (T3-4N0-2) who had received preoperative CRT. Pre-CRT MRI was performed for local tumor and nodal staging. All patients underwent restaging MRI followed by total mesorectal excision after the end of radiotherapy. The primary endpoint of the present study was to estimate the accuracy of post-CRT MRI as compared with pathologic staging. Pathologic T classification matched the post-CRT MRI findings in 97 (64.7%) of 150 patients. 36 (24.0%) of 150 patients were overstaged in T classification, and the concordance degree was moderate (k=0.33, prectal cancer patients who received preoperative CRT. The diagnostic accuracy of restaging MRI is relatively high in rectal cancer patients who achieved clinical downstaging after CRT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Task-Relevant Information Modulates Primary Motor Cortex Activity Before Movement Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Cristian B; Van Opstal, Filip; Peigneux, Philippe; Verguts, Tom; Gevers, Wim

    2018-01-01

    Monkey neurophysiology research supports the affordance competition hypothesis (ACH) proposing that cognitive information useful for action selection is integrated in sensorimotor areas. In this view, action selection would emerge from the simultaneous representation of competing action plans, in parallel biased by relevant task factors. This biased competition would take place up to primary motor cortex (M1). Although ACH is plausible in environments affording choices between actions, its relevance for human decision making is less clear. To address this issue, we designed an functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment modeled after monkey neurophysiology studies in which human participants processed cues conveying predictive information about upcoming button presses. Our results demonstrate that, as predicted by the ACH, predictive information (i.e., the relevant task factor) biases activity of primary motor regions. Specifically, first, activity before movement onset in contralateral M1 increases as the competition is biased in favor of a specific button press relative to activity in ipsilateral M1. Second, motor regions were more tightly coupled with fronto-parietal regions when competition between potential actions was high, again suggesting that motor regions are also part of the biased competition network. Our findings support the idea that action planning dynamics as proposed in the ACH are valid both in human and non-human primates.

  10. Study of linear induction motor characteristics : the Oberretl model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-30

    The Oberretl theory of the double-sided linear induction motor (LIM) is examined, starting with the idealized model and accompanying assumptions, and ending with relations for predicted thrust, airgap power, and motor efficiency. The effect of varyin...

  11. Jidosha's Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Shirakawa Okuma, Rosely; Calderón Orejuela, Javier

    2016-01-01

    La tesis narra la situación de una empresa concesionaria de vehículos nuevos, Jidosha's Motors, perteneciente a una corporación japonesa que cuenta con una cultura muy arraigada de ética y de cumplimiento. Se plantean respuestas, se identifican problemas y sus alternativas de solución para una toma adecuada de decisiones por parte de los directivos, siguiendo una estructura de análisis de situaciones de negocios (ASN). Tesis

  12. Functional rearrangement of the primary and secondary motor cortex in patients with primary tumors of the central nervous system located in the region of the central sulcus depending on the histopathological type and the size of tumor: Examination by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryszewski, Bartosz; Pfajfer, Lucjan; Antosik-Biernacka, Aneta; Tybor, Krzysztof; Śmigielski, Janusz; Zawirski, Marek; Majos, Agata

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the reorganization of the centers of the motor cortex in patients with primary neuroepithelial tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) located in the region of the central sulcus in relation to the histopathological type and the size of tumor, as determined by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The fMRI was performed prior to the surgical treatment of patients with tumors located in the region of the central sulcus (WHO stage I and II, n=15; WHO stage III and IV, n=25). The analysis included a record of the activity in the areas of the primary motor cortex (M1) and the secondary motor cortex: the premotor cortex (PMA) and the accessory motor area (SMA). The results were correlated with the histopathological type of the tumor and its size expressed in cm 3 . The frequency of activation of the motor center was higher in the group of patients who had less aggressive tumors, such as low-grade glioma (LGG), as well as in tumors of lower volume, and this was true both for the hemisphere where the tumor was located and in the contralateral one. Mean values of t-statistics of activation intensity, mean numbers of activated clusters, and their ranges were lower in all analyzed motor areas of LGG tumors. The values of t-statistics and activation areas were higher in the case of small tumors located in ipsilateral centers, and in large tumors located in contralateral centers, aside from the SMA area where the values of t-statistics were equal for both groups. The contralateral SMA area was characterized by the highest stability of all examined centers of secondary motor cortex. No significant association (p>0.05) was observed between the absolute value of the mean registered activity (t-statistics) and the size of examined areas (number of clusters) when the groups were stratified with regards to the analyzed parameters. The presence of a neoplastic lesion, its histopathological type and finally its size modulate the

  13. The use of FDG-PET/CT and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for response prediction before, during and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, Maarten; Roels, Sarah; Haustermans, Karin; Deroose, Christophe; Vandecaveye, Vincent; Keyzer, Frederik de; Penninckx, Freddy; Sagaert, Xavier; Cutsem, Eric van

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the use of FDG-PET/CT before, during and after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) before CRT for the prediction of pathological response (pCR) in rectal cancer patients. Material and methods. Twenty-two rectal cancer patients treated with long course CRT were included. An FDG-PET/CT was performed prior to the start of CRT, after 10 to 12 fractions of CRT and five weeks after the end of CRT. The tumor was delineated using a gradient based delineation method and the maximal standardized uptake values (SUV max ) were calculated. A DW-MRI was performed before start of CRT. Mean apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were determined. The ΔSUV max during and after CRT and the initial ADC values were correlated to the histopathological findings after total mesorectal excision (TME). Results. ΔSUV max during and after CRT significantly correlated with the pathological response to treatment (during CRT: ΔSUV max = 59% ± 12% for pCR vs. 25% ± 27% if no pCR, p=0.0036; post-CRT: 90% ± 11 for pCR vs. 63% ± 22 if no pCR p=0.013). ROC curve analysis revealed an optimal threshold for ΔSUV max of 40% during CRT and 76% after CRT. The initial ADC value was also significantly correlated with pCR (0.94 ± 0.12 x 10-3 mm 2 /s for pCR vs. 1.2 ± 0.24 x 10-3 mm 2 /s, p=0.002) and ROC curve analysis revealed an optimal threshold of 1.06 x 10-3 mm 2 /s. Combining the provided ΔSUV max thresholds during and after CRT increased specificity of the prediction (sensitivity 100% and specificity 94%). The combination of the thresholds for the initial ADC value and the ΔSUV max during CRT increased specificity of the prediction to a similar level (sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 94%). Conclusions. The combination of the different time points and the different imaging modalities increased the specificity of the response assessment both during and after CRT.

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung [Dept. of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT.

  15. Diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy in predicting the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin status of rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Hoon; Kim, Young Hoon; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung Ho; Kang, Sung Bum; Kim, Duck Woo; Kim, Jae Hyun; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Sang Min

    2014-01-01

    To measure the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in patients with rectal cancer for a prediction of the local tumor stage and circumferential resection margin (CRM). Two independent radiologists reviewed CT and MRI obtained after neoadjuvant CRT. The accuracy of the local tumor staging and the diagnostic performance for the prediction of CRM involvement were calculated. The agreement between the measurements of the distance to potential CRM on both imaging modalities and the histopathology findings was assessed using Bland-Altman plots. 57 patients (mean age, 59.2 years; 24 females) were included. The accuracy of T and N staging were 43.9% (95% confidence interval, 30.8-57.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 63.2% (49.4-75.6%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on MRI for Observer 1. The accuracy of T and N staging were 54.4% (40.7-67.7%) and 77.2% (64.2-87.3%) on CT and 68.4% (54.7-80.1%) and 80.7% (68.1-90.0%) on MRI for Observer 2. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 83.3% (43.7-97.0%) and 88.2% (76.6-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 1. Sensitivity and specificity on CRM involvement were 66.7% (30.0-90.3%) and 88.2% (76.7-94.5%) on CT and 100% (61.0-100%) and 90.2% (79.0-95.7%) on MRI for Observer 2. Bland-Altman plots showed wide discrepancies between measurements of the distance to CRM on each CT and MRI and those on histopathology findings. CT and MRI showed limited performance in predicting the local tumor staging and CRM involvement in patients with neoadjuvant CRT although MRI tended to show a better performance than CT

  16. Factors predicting aggressiveness of non-hypervascular hepatic nodules detected on hepatobiliary phase of gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic-acid magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanefuji, Tsutomu; Takano, Toru; Suda, Takeshi; Akazawa, Kouhei; Yokoo, Takeshi; Kamimura, Hiroteru; Kamimura, Kenya; Tsuchiya, Atsunori; Takamura, Masaaki; Kawai, Hirokazu; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Nomoto, Minoru; Terai, Shuji

    2015-04-21

    To establish a prognostic formula that distinguishes non-hypervascular hepatic nodules (NHNs) with higher aggressiveness from less hazardous one. Seventy-three NHNs were detected in gadolinium ethoxybenzyl diethylene-triamine-pentaacetic-acid magnetic resonance imaging (Gd-EOB-DTPA-MRI) study and confirmed to change 2 mm or more in size and/or to gain hypervascularity. All images were interpreted independently by an experienced, board-certified abdominal radiologist and hepatologist; both knew that the patients were at risk for hepatocellular carcinoma development but were blinded to the clinical information. A formula predicting NHN destiny was developed using a generalized estimating equation model with thirteen explanatory variables: age, gender, background liver diseases, Child-Pugh class, NHN diameter, T1-weighted imaging/T2-weighted imaging detectability, fat deposition, lower signal intensity in arterial phase, lower signal intensity in equilibrium phase, α-fetoprotein, des-γ-carboxy prothrombin, α-fetoprotein-L3, and coexistence of classical hepatocellular carcinoma. The accuracy of the formula was validated in bootstrap samples that were created by resampling of 1000 iterations. During a median follow-up period of 504 d, 73 NHNs with a median diameter of 9 mm (interquartile range: 8-12 mm) grew or shrank by 68.5% (fifty nodules) or 20.5% (fifteen nodules), respectively, whereas hypervascularity developed in 38.4% (twenty eight nodules). In the fifteen shrank nodules, twelve nodules disappeared, while 11.0% (eight nodules) were stable in size but acquired vascularity. A generalized estimating equation analysis selected five explanatories from the thirteen variables as significant factors to predict NHN progression. The estimated regression coefficients were 0.36 for age, 6.51 for lower signal intensity in arterial phase, 8.70 or 6.03 for positivity of hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus, 9.37 for des-γ-carboxy prothrombin, and -4.05 for fat

  17. A model of prediction and cross-validation of fat-free mass in men with motor complete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Dolbow, David R; Gater, David R

    2012-07-01

    To establish and validate prediction equations by using body weight to predict legs, trunk, and whole-body fat-free mass (FFM) in men with chronic complete spinal cord injury (SCI). Cross-sectional design. Research setting in a large medical center. Individuals with SCI (N=63) divided into prediction (n=42) and cross-validation (n=21) groups. Not applicable. Whole-body FFM and regional FFM were determined by using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Body weight was measured by using a wheelchair weighing scale after subtracting the weight of the chair. Body weight predicted legs FFM (legs FFM=.09×body weight+6.1; R(2)=.25, standard error of the estimate [SEE]=3.1kg, PFFM (trunk FFM=.21×body weight+8.6; R(2)=.56, SEE=3.6kg, PFFM (whole-body FFM=.288×body weight+26.3; R(2)=.53, SEE=5.3kg, PFFM(predicted) (FFM predicted from the derived equations) shared 86% of the variance in whole-body FFM(measured) (FFM measured using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan) (R(2)=.86, SEE=1.8kg, PFFM(measured), and 66% of legs FFM(measured). The trunk FFM(predicted) shared 69% of the variance in trunk FFM(measured) (R(2)=.69, SEE=2.7kg, PFFM(predicted) shared 67% of the variance in legs FFM(measured) (R(2)=.67, SEE=2.8kg, PFFM did not differ between the prediction and validation groups. Body weight can be used to predict whole-body FFM and regional FFM. The predicted whole-body FFM improved the prediction of trunk FFM and legs FFM. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Predictors and brain connectivity changes associated with arm motor function improvement from intensive practice in chronic stroke [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George F. Wittenberg

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: The brain changes that underlie therapy-induced improvement in motor function after stroke remain obscure. This study sought to demonstrate the feasibility and utility of measuring motor system physiology in a clinical trial of intensive upper extremity rehabilitation in chronic stroke-related hemiparesis. Methods: This was a substudy of two multi-center clinical trials of intensive robotic and intensive conventional therapy arm therapy in chronic, significantly hemiparetic, stroke patients. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was used to measure motor cortical output to the biceps and extensor digitorum communus muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was used to determine the cortical anatomy, as well as to measure fractional anisotropy, and blood oxygenation (BOLD during an eyes-closed rest state. Region-of-interest time-series correlation analysis was performed on the BOLD signal to determine interregional connectivity. Functional status was measured with the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer and Wolf Motor Function Test. Results: Motor evoked potential (MEP presence was associated with better functional outcomes, but the effect was not significant when considering baseline impairment. Affected side internal capsule fractional anisotropy was associated with better function at baseline. Affected side primary motor cortex (M1 activity became more correlated with other frontal motor regions after treatment. Resting state connectivity between affected hemisphere M1 and dorsal premotor area (PMAd predicted recovery. Conclusions: Presence of motor evoked potentials in the affected motor cortex and its functional connectivity with PMAd may be useful in predicting recovery. Functional connectivity in the motor network shows a trends towards increasing after intensive robotic or non-robotic arm therapy. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifiers: NCT00372411 \\& NCT00333983.

  19. A CFD study of Screw Compressor Motor Cooling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, S.

    2017-08-01

    Screw compressors use electric motors to drive the male screw rotor. They are cooled by the suction refrigerant vapor that flows around the motor. The thermal conditions of the motor can dramatically influence the performance and reliability of the compressor. The more optimized this flow path is, the better the motor performance. For that reason it is important to understand the flow characteristics around the motor and the motor temperatures. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to provide a detailed analysis of the refrigerant’s flow behavior and motor temperatures to identify the undesirable hot spots in the motor. CFD analysis can be used further to optimize the flow path and determine the reduction of hot spots and cooling effect. This study compares the CFD solutions of a motor cooling model to a motor installed with thermocouples measured in the lab. The compressor considered for this study is an R134a screw compressor. The CFD simulation of the motor consists of a detailed breakdown of the stator and rotor components. Orthotropic thermal conductivity material properties are used to represent the simplified motor geometry. In addition, the analysis includes the motor casings of the compressor to draw heat away from the motor by conduction. The study will look at different operating conditions and motor speeds. Finally, the CFD study will investigate the predicted motor temperature change by varying the vapor mass flow rates and motor speed. Recommendations for CFD modeling of such intricate heat transfer phenomenon have thus been proposed.

  20. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Predict the Clinical Outcome of Non-Surgical Treatment for Lumbar Interverterbal Disc Herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Chung Hwan; Shin, Myung Jin; Ryu, Dae Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Jung, Seung Moon; Park, Man Soo; Song, Jae Seok

    2007-01-01

    We wanted to investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) findings and the clinical outcome after treatment with non-surgical transforaminal epidural steroid injections (ESI) for lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. Transforaminal ESI were performed in 91 patients (50 males and 41 females, age range: 13 78 yrs) because of lumbosacral HIVD from March 2001 to August 2002. Sixty eight patients whose MRIs and clinical follow-ups were available were included in this study. The medical charts were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups; the successful (responders, n = 41) and unsatisfactory (non-responders, n = 27) outcome groups. A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction score greater than two and a pain reduction score greater than 50%. The MR findings were retrospectively analyzed and compared between the two groups with regard to the type (protrusion, extrusion or sequestration), hydration (the T2 signal intensity), location (central, right/left central, subarticular, foraminal or extraforaminal), and size (volume) of the HIVD, the grade of nerve root compression (grade 1 abutment, 2 displacement and 3 entrapment), and an association with spinal stenosis. There was no significant difference between the responders and nonresponders in terms of the type, hydration and size of the HIVD, or an association with spinal stenosis (p > 0.05). However, the location of the HIVD and the grade of nerve root compression were different between the two groups (p < 0.05). MRI could play an important role in predicting the clinical outcome of non-surgical transforaminal ESI treatment for patients with lumbar HIVD

  1. The Use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Predict the Clinical Outcome of Non-Surgical Treatment for Lumbar Interverterbal Disc Herniation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Kim, Chung Hwan; Shin, Myung Jin; Ryu, Dae Sik; Ahn, Jae Hong; Jung, Seung Moon; Park, Man Soo [GangNeung Asan Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, GangNeung, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jae Seok [University of Kwandong College of Medicine, GangNeung (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    We wanted to investigate the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) findings and the clinical outcome after treatment with non-surgical transforaminal epidural steroid injections (ESI) for lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. Transforaminal ESI were performed in 91 patients (50 males and 41 females, age range: 13 78 yrs) because of lumbosacral HIVD from March 2001 to August 2002. Sixty eight patients whose MRIs and clinical follow-ups were available were included in this study. The medical charts were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups; the successful (responders, n = 41) and unsatisfactory (non-responders, n = 27) outcome groups. A successful outcome required a patient satisfaction score greater than two and a pain reduction score greater than 50%. The MR findings were retrospectively analyzed and compared between the two groups with regard to the type (protrusion, extrusion or sequestration), hydration (the T2 signal intensity), location (central, right/left central, subarticular, foraminal or extraforaminal), and size (volume) of the HIVD, the grade of nerve root compression (grade 1 abutment, 2 displacement and 3 entrapment), and an association with spinal stenosis. There was no significant difference between the responders and nonresponders in terms of the type, hydration and size of the HIVD, or an association with spinal stenosis (p > 0.05). However, the location of the HIVD and the grade of nerve root compression were different between the two groups (p < 0.05). MRI could play an important role in predicting the clinical outcome of non-surgical transforaminal ESI treatment for patients with lumbar HIVD.

  2. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and frozen-section analysis efficiently predict upgrading, upstaging, and extraprostatic extension in patients undergoing nerve-sparing robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Roberto; Cozzi, Gabriele; Petralia, Giuseppe; Alessi, Sarah; Renne, Giuseppe; Bottero, Danilo; Brescia, Antonio; Cioffi, Antonio; Cordima, Giovanni; Ferro, Matteo; Matei, Deliu Victor; Mazzoleni, Federica; Musi, Gennaro; Mistretta, Francesco Alessandro; Serino, Alessandro; Tringali, Valeria Maria Lucia; Coman, Ioan; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) in predicting upgrading, upstaging, and extraprostatic extension in patients with low-risk prostate cancer (PCa). MpMRI may reduce positive surgical margins (PSM) and improve nerve-sparing during robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) for localized prostate cancer PCa.This was a retrospective, monocentric, observational study. We retrieved the records of patients undergoing RARP from January 2012 to December 2013 at our Institution. Inclusion criteria were: PSA <10 ng/mL; clinical stage predict upgrading and/or upstaging at final pathology.

  3. Multiquark resonant states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, B.A.

    1982-01-01

    The invariant mass spectra of forty nine hadronic systems with hypercharge, strangeness and baryon number, varied in wide limits have been studied. Resonance peaks have been found in the invariant mass spectra of Y 2 and #betta#pπ 2495 MeV/c 2 resonant states. Three more candidates for anti qq 4 states were found #bettaπ# + π + : 1705, 2072, 2605 MeV/c 2 . The masses of all these candidates are in good agreement with Bag Model predictions. A hypercharge selection rule is suggested: ''The hypercharge of hadronic resonances in weak gravitational fields cannot exceed one Y <= 1

  4. Fine motor control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gross (large, general) motor control. An example of gross motor control is waving an arm in greeting. Problems ... out the child's developmental age. Children develop fine motor skills over time, by practicing and being taught. To ...

  5. Assessment of Motor Units in Neuromuscular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Robert D; McCombe, Pamela A

    2017-01-01

    The motor unit comprises the anterior horn cell, its axon, and the muscle fibers that it innervates. Although the true number of motor units is unknown, the number of motor units appears to vary greatly between different muscles and between different individuals. Assessment of the number and function of motor units is needed in diseases of the anterior horn cell and other motor nerve disorders. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is the most important disease of anterior horn cells. The need for an effective biomarker for assessing disease progression and for use in clinical trials in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis has stimulated the study of methods to measure the number of motor units. Since 1970 a number of different methods, including the incremental, F-wave, multipoint, and statistical methods, have been developed but none has achieved widespread applicability. Two methods (MUNIX and the multipoint incremental method) are in current use across multiple centres and are discussed in detail in this review, together with other recently published methods. Imaging with magnetic resonance and ultrasound is increasingly being applied to this area. Motor unit number estimates have also been applied to other neuromuscular diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy, compression neuropathies, and prior poliomyelitis. The need for an objective measure for the assessment of motor units remains tantalizingly close but unfulfilled in 2016.

  6. Control of permanent magnet synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Vaez-Zadeh, Sadegh

    2018-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive, coherent, and up-to-date book devoted solely to the control of permanent magnet synchronous (PMS) motors, as the fastest growing AC motor. It covers a deep and detailed presentation of major PMS motor modeling and control methods. The readers can find rich materials on the fundamentals of PMS motor control in addition to new motor control methods, which have mainly been developed in the last two decades, including recent advancements in the field in a systematic manner. These include extensive modeling of PMS motors and a full range of vector control and direct torque control schemes, in addition to predictive control, deadbeat control, and combined control methods. All major sensorless control and parameter estimation methods are also studied. The book covers about 10 machine models in various reference frames and 70 control and estimation schemes with sufficient analytical and implementation details including about 200 original figures. A great emphasis is placed on energy-s...

  7. Prediction of postoperative diabetes insipidus using morphological hyperintensity patterns in the pituitary stalk on magnetic resonance imaging after transsphenoidal surgery for sellar tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Kita, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takuya; Fukui, Issei; Sasagawa, Yasuo; Oishi, Masahiro; Tachibana, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Nakada, Mitsutoshi

    2016-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus (DI) remains a complication of transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) for sellar and parasellar tumors. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) appears as hyper intensity (HI) in the pituitary stalk and the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its disappearance from the posterior lobe occurs with DI, indicating a lack of ADH. The appearance of HI in the pituitary stalk indicates disturbances in ADH transport. This retrospective study included 172 patients undergoing TSS for sellar tumors at our institute from 2006 to 2014. Sequential T1-weighted MR images without enhancement were evaluated for HI in the pituitary stalk and the posterior lobe to assess the localization of ADH before and at intervals after TSS. DI was assessed pre- and postoperatively. HI in the pituitary stalk showed the following morphology: (1) ovoid in the distal end of the pituitary stalk (group A), (2) linear in the distal part of the pituitary stalk (group B), (3) linear in the whole pituitary stalk (group C). Preoperative DI occurred in 6 patients (3.5 %) with no HI observed in the posterior lobe. Postoperative DI was transient in 82 patients (47.7 %), and permanent in 11 (6.4 %). One week after surgery, HI was absent in the posterior lobe in 74 patients (43.0 %), and present in the pituitary stalk in 99 patients (57.6 %); both were significantly correlated with postoperative DI (p < 0.001). The absence of HI in the posterior lobe (A, 48.9 %; B, 68.3 %; C, 92.3 %), persistence of DI (A, 3.7 days; B, 45.9 days; C, 20.5 months), and duration until HI recovery in the posterior lobe (A, 3.6 months; B, 6.8 months; C, 22.9 months) were greatest in group C, followed by group B, and then group A. Fourteen group A patients did not have postoperative DI despite having HI in the pituitary stalk and the posterior lobe. Four group C patients developed permanent DI with persistence HI in the pituitary stalk. HI in the pituitary stalk and its

  8. Motor control for a brushless DC motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, William J. (Inventor); Faulkner, Dennis T. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    This invention relates to a motor control system for a brushless DC motor having an inverter responsively coupled to the motor control system and in power transmitting relationship to the motor. The motor control system includes a motor rotor speed detecting unit that provides a pulsed waveform signal proportional to rotor speed. This pulsed waveform signal is delivered to the inverter to thereby cause an inverter fundamental current waveform output to the motor to be switched at a rate proportional to said rotor speed. In addition, the fundamental current waveform is also pulse width modulated at a rate proportional to the rotor speed. A fundamental current waveform phase advance circuit is controllingly coupled to the inverter. The phase advance circuit is coupled to receive the pulsed waveform signal from the motor rotor speed detecting unit and phase advance the pulsed waveform signal as a predetermined function of motor speed to thereby cause the fundamental current waveform to be advanced and thereby compensate for fundamental current waveform lag due to motor winding reactance which allows the motor to operate at higher speeds than the motor is rated while providing optimal torque and therefore increased efficiency.

  9. High frequency electromagnetic processes in induction motors supplied from PWM inverters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ţilea

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the electromagnetic interference between induction motors and inverters when at high frequency electromagnetic process appears in induction motors having a parallel resonant effect because of parasitic capacitive coupling between windings and ground, using a numerical model in simulink and a high frequency induction motor equivalent circuit model this effect is shown.

  10. Multi-chronic musculoskeletal pain is a useful clinical index to predict the risk of falls in older adults with normal motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tsuyoshi; Misu, Shogo; Sawa, Ryuichi; Doi, Takehiko; Yamada, Minoru

    2015-10-01

    The number of chronic musculoskeletal pain sites (nCMSP) is reportedly associated with risk of falls. Older participants in community-based research show a wide range of physical functions, but few studies have focused on the risk of falls in older adults with normal motor function (NMF). Clarification of the effects of pain on dual-tasking performance is also important, given the strong link between falls and dual-tasking. The objectives were to investigate the associations between: (1) nCMSP and falls; and (2) nCMSP and dual-task performance in older adults with NMF. A total of 112 older adults with NMF (44 men, 68 women; 73.4 ± 4.6 years) were classified as fallers (n = 22) or non-fallers (n = 90) according to their fall history. Musculoskeletal pain in the lower body was assessed using questions ascertaining pain in musculoskeletal sites (back, hip, knee, foot, or toe). Participants were assigned to three pain groups according to nCMSP. Basic physical performances and gait performances (normal gait, fast gait, or dual-task gait) were measured. The nCMSP represented a significant risk factor for falls according to logistic regression modeling after adjusting for the five chair stand test and fear of falls. The nCMSP was not associated with any gait variables. Potential fall risk may be increased by nCMSP, even in older adults with NMF. Pain-related reduction in attention resources may not represent a risk factor for falls among older adults with NMF. The nCMSP represents a potential risk factor for falls in older adults with NMF.

  11. Predictive values of Bi-Rads categories 3, 4 and 5 in non-palpable breast masses evaluated by mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging; Valores preditivos das categorias 3, 4 e 5 do sistema Bi-Rads em lesoes mamarias nodulares nao-palpaveis avaliadas por mamografia, ultra-sonografia e ressonancia magnetica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roveda Junior, Decio; Fleury, Eduardo de Castro Faria [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Servico de Diagnostico por Imagem]. E-mail: decio.jr@uol.com.br; Piato, Sebastiao [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Obstetricia e Ginecologia. Clinica Ginecologica; Oliveira, Vilmar Marques de [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Obstetricia e Ginecologia. Ginecologia Geral; Rinaldi, Jose Francisco [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Obstetricia e Ginecologia. Clinica de Mastologia; Ferreira, Carlos Alberto Pecci [Santa Casa de Misericordia de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas. Dept. de Clinica Medica. Servico de Imagenologia Mamaria

    2007-03-15

    Objective: To evaluate the predictive value of BI-RADS{sup TM} categories 3, 4 and 5 in non-palpable breast masses assessed by mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Materials And Methods: Twenty-nine patients with BI-RADS categories 3, 4 and 5 non-palpable breast masses identified by mammograms were submitted to complementary ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging studies, besides excisional biopsy. In total, 30 biopsies were performed. The lesions as well as their respective BI-RADS classification into 3, 4 and 5 were correlated with the histopathological results. The predictive values calculation was made by means of specific mathematical equations. Results: Negative predictive values for category 3 were: mammography, 69.23%; ultrasound, 70.58%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 100%. Positive predictive values for category 4 were: mammography, 63.63%; ultrasound, 50%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 30.76%. For category 5, positive predictive values were: mammography and ultrasound, 100%; and magnetic resonance imaging, 92.85%. Conclusion: For category 3, the negative predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging was high, and for categories 4 and 5, the positive predictive values of the three modalities were moderate. (author)

  12. High efficiency motors; Motores de alta eficiencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga Favela, Ivan Jaime [Energia Controlada de Mexico, S. A. de C. V., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1993-12-31

    This paper is a technical-financial study of the high efficiency and super-premium motors. As it is widely known, more than 60% of the electrical energy generated in the country is used for the operation of motors, in industry as well as in commerce. Therefore the importance that the motors have in the efficient energy use. [Espanol] El presente trabajo es un estudio tecnico-financiero de los motores de alta eficiencia y los motores super premium. Como es ampliamente conocido, mas del 60% de la energia electrica generada en el pais, es utilizada para accionar motores, dentro de la industria y el comercio. De alli la importancia que los motores tienen en el uso eficiente de la energia.

  13. High efficiency motors; Motores de alta eficiencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uranga Favela, Ivan Jaime [Energia Controlada de Mexico, S. A. de C. V., Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    1992-12-31

    This paper is a technical-financial study of the high efficiency and super-premium motors. As it is widely known, more than 60% of the electrical energy generated in the country is used for the operation of motors, in industry as well as in commerce. Therefore the importance that the motors have in the efficient energy use. [Espanol] El presente trabajo es un estudio tecnico-financiero de los motores de alta eficiencia y los motores super premium. Como es ampliamente conocido, mas del 60% de la energia electrica generada en el pais, es utilizada para accionar motores, dentro de la industria y el comercio. De alli la importancia que los motores tienen en el uso eficiente de la energia.

  14. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. I. Simulation predictions of resonance Raman and pump-probe transient absorption spectra of cavity and non-cavity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zho, Chen-Chen; Farr, Erik P.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    We use one-electron non-adiabatic mixed quantum/classical simulations to explore the temperature dependence of both the ground-state structure and the excited-state relaxation dynamics of the hydrated electron. We compare the results for both the traditional cavity picture and a more recent non-cavity model of the hydrated electron and make definite predictions for distinguishing between the different possible structural models in future experiments. We find that the traditional cavity model shows no temperature-dependent change in structure at constant density, leading to a predicted resonance Raman spectrum that is essentially temperature-independent. In contrast, the non-cavity model predicts a blue-shift in the hydrated electron's resonance Raman O-H stretch with increasing temperature. The lack of a temperature-dependent ground-state structural change of the cavity model also leads to a prediction of little change with temperature of both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the hydrated electron following photoexcitation. This is in sharp contrast to the predictions of the non-cavity model, where both the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time are expected to decrease significantly with increasing temperature. These simulation-based predictions should be directly testable by the results of future time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. Finally, the temperature-dependent differences in predicted excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time of the two models also lead to different predicted pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy of the hydrated electron as a function of temperature. We perform such experiments and describe them in Paper II [E. P. Farr et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074504 (2017)], and find changes in the excited-state lifetime and hot ground-state cooling time with temperature that match well with the predictions of the non-cavity model. In particular, the experiments

  15. Synchrobetatron resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-03-01

    At the 1975 Particle Accelerator Conference it was reported that a class of resonances were observed in SPEAR II that had not appeared before in SPEAR I. While the existence of sideband resonances of the main betatron oscillation frequencies has been previously observed and analyzed, the resonances observed in SPEAR do not appear to be of the same variety. Experiments were performed at SPEAR to identify the mechanism believed to be the most likely explanation. Some of the current experimental knowledge and theoretical views on the source of these resonances are presented

  16. Snake resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tepikian, S.

    1988-01-01

    Siberian Snakes provide a practical means of obtaining polarized proton beams in large accelerators. The effect of snakes can be understood by studying the dynamics of spin precession in an accelerator with snakes and a single spin resonance. This leads to a new class of energy independent spin depolarizing resonances, called snake resonances. In designing a large accelerator with snakes to preserve the spin polarization, there is an added constraint on the choice of the vertical betatron tune due to the snake resonances. 11 refs., 4 figs

  17. Narrow n anti n resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdanova, L.N.; Dalkarov, O.D.; Kerbikov, B.O.; Shapiro, I.S.

    1975-01-01

    The present status of the problem of quasinuclear states in systems of nucleons and antinucleons is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental data on narrow meson resonances near N anti N threshold which appeared in 1971-74

  18. Geometrical tuning of nanoscale split-ring resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Claus; Kristensen, Anders; Xiao, Sanshui

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the capacitance tuning of nanoscale split-ring resonators. An LC-model predicts a simple dependence of resonance frequency on slit aspect ratio. Experimental and numerical data follow the predictions of the LC-model....

  19. The body knows what it should do: Automatic motor compensation for illusory heaviness contagion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohisa eAsai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We can share various feelings with others just through observation, as if it were an automatic resonance. This connective function between the self and others could promote the facilitation of our social communication; however, it is still unclear as to how it works in terms of self-other representation. In this study, we showed participants a picture of a model holding a ball, which was weighted with sand. We instructed participants to move one of their arms to a horizontal position and hold it immobile. Those participants who knew the actual weight of the ball (1kg tended to raise this arm above the horizontal, in response to their expectation of the need to resist the weight of the ball. This compensatory reaction to the illusion of heaviness suggests that our bodily resonance could be mandatory and predictive. We discuss this new behavioral phenomenon in terms of motor simulation or the mirror-neuron system.

  20. Design of Electromagnetic Moving-coil type Voice Coil Motor for Scanning mirror of Barcode reader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Bu Hyun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Shim, Hyun Ho; Park, Sang Goo [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Yop [Sogang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A voice coil actuator with moving coil type for scanning mirror system of barcode reader has been developed. The actuator has a simple structure including a magnet, a coil and a pin. The performance of the actuator is analyzed by a linearized theoretical model. And the dynamic performance of the proposed actuator is predicted through motor constant and restoring constant obtained by finite element simulations. The theoretical model was verified by the prototype which has 64 Hz resonance frequency and 60 deg reflecting angle. We also discovered that that 3 V input can make the actuator rotate over 61.8 deg reflecting angle at 50 Hz resonance frequency. The proposed actuator can simplify its driving configuration because of its implementation of open-loop control.

  1. Transit time for resonant tunneling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Calderon, G.; Rubio, A.

    1990-09-01

    This work considers properties of the partial widths in one dimensional elastic resonant tunneling in order to propose a transit-time τ tr = (h/2π)/Γ n T res ) where Γ n is the elastic width and T res the transmission coefficient at resonance energy. This time is interpreted as an average over the resonance energy width. It is shown that the tunneling current density integrated across a sharp resonance is inversely proportional to τ tr . This transit time may be much larger than the values predicted by other definitions. (author). 20 refs

  2. Nonlinear resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, Shanmuganathan

    2016-01-01

    This introductory text presents the basic aspects and most important features of various types of resonances and anti-resonances in dynamical systems. In particular, for each resonance, it covers the theoretical concepts, illustrates them with case studies, and reviews the available information on mechanisms, characterization, numerical simulations, experimental realizations, possible quantum analogues, applications and significant advances made over the years. Resonances are one of the most fundamental phenomena exhibited by nonlinear systems and refer to specific realizations of maximum response of a system due to the ability of that system to store and transfer energy received from an external forcing source. Resonances are of particular importance in physical, engineering and biological systems - they can prove to be advantageous in many applications, while leading to instability and even disasters in others. The book is self-contained, providing the details of mathematical derivations and techniques invo...

  3. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | Indian Academy of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Music, brain, neuroscience, amusia, fMRI, r¯aga, emotion. ... study varying aspects of the human brain such as auditoryand motor perception and learning, attention, memory, andemotion. ... Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News.

  4. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-01-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the resutls on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monople giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excelent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that the decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  5. Statistical decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, H.; Teruya, N.; Wolynec, E.

    1986-02-01

    Statistical calculations to predict the neutron spectrum resulting from the decay of Giant Resonances are discussed. The dependence of the results on the optical potential parametrization and on the level density of the residual nucleus is assessed. A Hauser-Feshbach calculation is performed for the decay of the monopole giant resonance in 208 Pb using the experimental levels of 207 Pb from a recent compilation. The calculated statistical decay is in excellent agreement with recent experimental data, showing that decay of this resonance is dominantly statistical, as predicted by continuum RPA calculations. (Author) [pt

  6. Network connectivity and individual responses to brain stimulation in the human motor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas-Morales, Lizbeth; Volz, Lukas J; Michely, Jochen; Rehme, Anne K; Pool, Eva-Maria; Nettekoven, Charlotte; Eickhoff, Simon B; Fink, Gereon R; Grefkes, Christian

    2014-07-01

    The mechanisms driving cortical plasticity in response to brain stimulation are still incompletely understood. We here explored whether neural activity and connectivity in the motor system relate to the magnitude of cortical plasticity induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Twelve right-handed volunteers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during rest and while performing a simple hand motor task. Resting-state functional connectivity, task-induced activation, and task-related effective connectivity were assessed for a network of key motor areas. We then investigated the effects of intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) on motor-evoked potentials (MEP) for up to 25 min after stimulation over left primary motor cortex (M1) or parieto-occipital vertex (for control). ITBS-induced increases in MEP amplitudes correlated negatively with movement-related fMRI activity in left M1. Control iTBS had no effect on M1 excitability. Subjects with better response to M1-iTBS featured stronger preinterventional effective connectivity between left premotor areas and left M1. In contrast, resting-state connectivity did not predict iTBS aftereffects. Plasticity-related changes in M1 following brain stimulation seem to depend not only on local factors but also on interconnected brain regions. Predominantly activity-dependent properties of the