WorldWideScience

Sample records for motion induced charging

  1. Stopping power and polarization induced in a plasma by a fast charged particle in circular motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villo-Perez, Isidro [Departamento de Electronica, Tecnologia de las Computadoras y Proyectos, Universidad Politecnica de Cartagena, Cartagena (Spain); Arista, Nestor R. [Division Colisiones Atomicas, Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Garcia-Molina, Rafael [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia (Spain)

    2002-03-28

    We describe the perturbation induced in a plasma by a charged particle in circular motion, analysing in detail the evolution of the induced charge, the electrostatic potential and the energy loss of the particle. We describe the initial transitory behaviour and the different ways in which convergence to final stationary solutions may be obtained depending on the basic parameters of the problem. The results for the stopping power show a resonant behaviour which may give place to large stopping enhancement values as compared with the case of particles in straight-line motion with the same linear velocity. The results also explain a resonant effect recently obtained for particles in circular motion in magnetized plasmas. (author)

  2. Rectified motion in an asymmetrically structured channel due to induced-charge electrokinetic and thermo-kinetic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    It would be advantageous to move fluid by the gradient of random thermal noises that are omnipresent in the natural world. To achieve this motion, we propose a rectifier that uses a thermal noise along with induced-charge electroosmosis and electrophoresis (ICEO and ICEP) around a metal post cylinder in an asymmetrically structured channel and numerically examine its rectification performance. By the boundary element method combined with the thin double layer approximation, we find that rectified motion occurs in the asymmetrically structured channel due to ICEO and ICEP. Further, by thermodynamical and equivalent circuit methods, we discuss a thermal voltage that drives a rectifier consisting of a fluidic channel of an electrolyte and an impedance as a noise source. Our calculations show that fluid can be moved in the asymmetrically structured channel by the fluctuation of electric fields due to a thermal noise only when there is a temperature difference. In addition, our simple noise argument provides a different perspective for the thermo-kinetic phenomena (around a metal post) which was predicted based on the electrolyte Seebeck effect in our previous paper [H. Sugioka, “Nonlinear thermokinetic phenomena due to the Seebeck effect,” Langmuir 30, 8621 (2014)

  3. Rectified motion in an asymmetrically structured channel due to induced-charge electrokinetic and thermo-kinetic phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki, E-mail: hsugioka@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Frontier Research Center, Canon Inc. 30-2, Shimomaruko 3-chome, Ohta-ku, Tokyo 146-8501, Japan and Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Shinshu University 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    It would be advantageous to move fluid by the gradient of random thermal noises that are omnipresent in the natural world. To achieve this motion, we propose a rectifier that uses a thermal noise along with induced-charge electroosmosis and electrophoresis (ICEO and ICEP) around a metal post cylinder in an asymmetrically structured channel and numerically examine its rectification performance. By the boundary element method combined with the thin double layer approximation, we find that rectified motion occurs in the asymmetrically structured channel due to ICEO and ICEP. Further, by thermodynamical and equivalent circuit methods, we discuss a thermal voltage that drives a rectifier consisting of a fluidic channel of an electrolyte and an impedance as a noise source. Our calculations show that fluid can be moved in the asymmetrically structured channel by the fluctuation of electric fields due to a thermal noise only when there is a temperature difference. In addition, our simple noise argument provides a different perspective for the thermo-kinetic phenomena (around a metal post) which was predicted based on the electrolyte Seebeck effect in our previous paper [H. Sugioka, “Nonlinear thermokinetic phenomena due to the Seebeck effect,” Langmuir 30, 8621 (2014)].

  4. Motion of charged particles in the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, G.K.; Rajaram, R.

    1981-01-01

    The adiabatic motion of charged particles in the magnetosphere has been investigated using Mead-Fairfield magnetospheric field model (Mead and Fairfield, 1975). Since the motion of charged particles in a dipolar field geometry is well understood, we bring out in this paper some important features in characteristic motion due to non-dipolar distortions in the field geometry. We look at the tilt averaged picture of the field configuration and estimate theoretically the parameters like bounce period, longitudinal invariant and the bounce averaged drift velocities of the charged particle in the Mead-Fairfield field geometry. These parameters are evaluated as a function of pitch angle and azimuthal position in the region of ring current (5 to 7 Earth radii from the centre of the Earth) for four ranges of magnetic activity. At different longitudes the non-dipolar contribution as a percentage of dipole value in bounce period and longitudinal invariant shows maximum variation for particles close to 90 0 pitch angles. For any low pitch angle, these effects maximize at the midnight meridian. The radial component of the bounce averaged drift velocity is found to be greatest at the dawn-dusk meridians and the contribution vanishes at the day and midnight meridians for all pitch angles. In the absence of tilt-dependent terms in the model, the latitudinal component of the drift velocity vanishes. On the other hand, the relative non-dipolar contribution to bounce averaged azimuthal drift velocity is very high as compared to similar contribution in other characteristic parameters of particle motion. It is also shown that non-dipolar contribution in bounce period, longitudinal invariant and bounce averaged drift velocities increases in magnitude with increase in distance and magnetic activity. (orig.)

  5. Infrasonic induced ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ting-Li

    On January 28, 2004, the CERI seismic network recorded seismic signals generated by an unknown source. Our conclusion is that the acoustic waves were initiated by an explosive source near the ground surface. The meteorological temperature and effective sound speed profiles suggested existence of an efficient near-surface waveguide that allowed the acoustic disturbance to propagate to large distances. An explosion occurring in an area of forest and farms would have limited the number of eyewitnesses. Resolution of the source might be possible by experiment or by detailed analysis of the ground motion data. A seismo-acoustic array was built to investigate thunder-induced ground motions. Two thunder events with similar N-wave waveforms but different horizontal slownesses are chosen to evaluate the credibility of using thunder as a seismic source. These impulsive acoustic waves excited P and S reverberations in the near surface that depend on both the incident wave horizontal slowness and the velocity structure in the upper 30 meters. Nineteen thunder events were chosen to further investigate the seismo-acoustic coupling. The consistent incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Acoustic and seismic signals were used to generate the time-domain transfer function through the deconvolution technique. Possible non-linear interaction for acoustic propagation into the soil at the surface was observed. The reverse radial initial motions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series of the Rayleigh wave type, which has a systematic dispersion relation to incident slownesses inferred from the seismic ground velocity. Air-coupled Rayleigh wave dispersion was used to quantitatively constrain the near-surface site structure with constraints afforded by near-surface body

  6. Motion of Charged Particles near Magnetic Field Discontinuities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodin, I.Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2000-01-01

    The motion of charged particles in slowly changing magnetic fields exhibits adiabatic invariance even in the presence of abrupt magnetic discontinuities. Particles near discontinuities in magnetic fields, what we call ''boundary particles'', are constrained to remain near an arbitrarily fractured boundary even as the particle drifts along the discontinuity. A new adiabatic invariant applies to the motion of these particles

  7. Motions in the relativistic fields of a charged dust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonseca Teixeira, A.F. da.

    1980-04-01

    The general relativistic motion of arbitrarily charged test particles is investigated, in the spherically symmetric fields of a charged, static, incoherent matter with T 0 0 = const. The condition for existence of stable circular orbits is established, inside and outside the diffused source. The null geodesics are also investigated, as a limiting case. (Author) [pt

  8. The motion of a charged particle in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludvigsen, M.

    1979-01-01

    A new approach to the problem of the motion of a self-interacting massive charged particle in general relativity is presented. A charged Robinson-Trautman solution is used as a general relativistic model of such a particle. Such a solution is shown to generate a unique world line in its own H space, which is interpreted as the world line of the particle. Using the R-T dynamical relations, the equation of motion of the particle is derived, which, in the limiting case of zero curvature, is shown to be the same as the classical Lorentz-Dirac equation of motion. (author)

  9. One-carrier free space charge motion under applied voltage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de ALMEIDA, L E.C.; FERREIRA, G F.L. [SAO PAULO UNIV., SAO CARLOS (BRAZIL). INSTITUTO DE FISICA E QUIMICA

    1975-12-01

    It is shown how to transform the system of partial differential equations, describing the free one-carrier space charge motion in solid dielectrics under a given applied voltage and while the charge distribution touches only one of the electrodes, into a first order ordinary differential equation from whose solution all the interesting quantities may be easily derived. It was found that some charge distributions can display current reversal.

  10. Adiabatic motion of charged dust grains in rotating magnetospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Northrop, T.G.; Hill, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Dust grains in the ring systems and rapidly rotating magnetospheres of the outer planets such as Jupiter and Saturn may be sufficiently charged that the magnetic and electric forces on them are comparable with the gravitational force. The adiabatic theory of charged particle motion has previously been applied to electrons and atomic size particles. But it is also applicable to these charged dust grains in the micrometer and smaller size range. We derive here the guiding center equation of motion, drift velocity, and parallel equation of motion for these grains in a rotating magnetosphere. The effects of periodic grain charge-discharge have not been treated previously and have been included in this analysis. Grain charge is affected by the surrounding plasma properties and by the grain plasma velocity (among other factors), both of which may vary over the gyrocircle. The resulting charge-discharge process at the gyrofrequency destroys the invariance of the magnetic moment and causes a grain to move radially. The magnetic moment may increase or decrease, depending on the gyrophase of the charge variation. If it decreases, the motion is always toward synchronous radius for an equatorial grain. But the orbit becomes circular before the grain reaches synchronous radius, a conclusion that follows from an exact constant of the motion. This circularization can be viewed as a consequence of the gradual reduction in the magnetic moment. This circularization also suggests that dust grains leaving Io could not reach the region of the Jovian ring, but several effects could change that conclusion. Excellent qualitative and quantitative agreement is obtained between adiabatic theory and detailed numerical orbit integrations

  11. Motion of charged test particles in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliese, Daniela; Quevedo, Hernando; Ruffini, Remo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the circular motion of charged test particles in the gravitational field of a charged mass described by the Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. We study in detail all the spatial regions where circular motion is allowed around either black holes or naked singularities. The effects of repulsive gravity are discussed by finding all the circles at which a particle can have vanishing angular momentum. We show that the geometric structure of stable accretion disks, made of only test particles moving along circular orbits around the central body, allows us to clearly distinguish between black holes and naked singularities.

  12. One-carrier free space charge motion under applied voltage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camargo, P.C.; Ferreira, G.F.L.

    1976-01-01

    The system of partial differential equations describing the one-carrier free space-charge motion under a given applied voltage is transformed into a system of two ordinary differential equations. The method is applied to find the external current injection [pt

  13. Electromagnetic radiation of charged particles in stochastic motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harko, Tiberiu [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom); Mocanu, Gabriela [Astronomical Institute of the Romanian Academy, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2016-03-15

    The study of the Brownian motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields has many important applications in plasma and heavy ions physics, as well as in astrophysics. In the present paper we consider the electromagnetic radiation properties of a charged non-relativistic particle in the presence of electric and magnetic fields, of an exterior non-electromagnetic potential, and of a friction and stochastic force, respectively. We describe the motion of the charged particle by a Langevin and generalized Langevin type stochastic differential equation. We investigate in detail the cases of the Brownian motion with or without memory in a constant electric field, in the presence of an external harmonic potential, and of a constant magnetic field. In all cases the corresponding Langevin equations are solved numerically, and a full description of the spectrum of the emitted radiation and of the physical properties of the motion is obtained. The power spectral density of the emitted power is also obtained for each case, and, for all considered oscillating systems, it shows the presence of peaks, corresponding to certain intervals of the frequency. (orig.)

  14. Motion of charged particles in a knotted electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrayas, M; Trueba, J L

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider the classical relativistic motion of charged particles in a knotted electromagnetic field. After reviewing how to construct electromagnetic knots from maps between the three-sphere and the two-sphere, we introduce a mean quadratic radius of the energy density distribution in order to study some properties of this field. We study the classical relativistic motion of electrons in the electromagnetic field of the Hopf map, and compute their trajectories. It is observed that these electrons initially at rest are strongly accelerated by the electromagnetic force, becoming ultrarelativistic in a period of time that depends on the knot energy and size.

  15. Motion of charged particles in a knotted electromagnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrayas, M; Trueba, J L, E-mail: joseluis.trueba@urjc.e [Area de Electromagnetismo, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Camino del Molino s/n, 28943 Fuenlabrada, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-06-11

    In this paper we consider the classical relativistic motion of charged particles in a knotted electromagnetic field. After reviewing how to construct electromagnetic knots from maps between the three-sphere and the two-sphere, we introduce a mean quadratic radius of the energy density distribution in order to study some properties of this field. We study the classical relativistic motion of electrons in the electromagnetic field of the Hopf map, and compute their trajectories. It is observed that these electrons initially at rest are strongly accelerated by the electromagnetic force, becoming ultrarelativistic in a period of time that depends on the knot energy and size.

  16. Canonical algorithms for numerical integration of charged particle motion equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, I. N.; Morozov, E. A.; Morozova, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    A technique for numerically integrating the equation of charged particle motion in a magnetic field is considered. It is based on the canonical transformations of the phase space in Hamiltonian mechanics. The canonical transformations make the integration process stable against counting error accumulation. The integration algorithms contain a minimum possible amount of arithmetics and can be used to design accelerators and devices of electron and ion optics.

  17. Some aspects of the classical motion of extended charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franca, H.M.; Marques, G.C.; Silva, A.J. da.

    1977-07-01

    Starting from a covariant equation, we have shown how a consistent equation of motion and an equation for the energy balance are achieved in the nonrelativistic limit. In that limit we can integrate such an equation for any charge distribution by finding its Green's function. Conclusions concerning to the existence of unphysical solutions (and explicit solutions for a larte class of models) can be drawn from an analysis of the location of the poles of the Green's function. A new condition for the nonexistence of pathologicla solutions is discussed [pt

  18. CHARGED PARTICLE MOTION IN AN EXPLOSIVELY GENERATED IONIZING SHOCK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boswell, Christopher J.; O'Connor, Patrick D.

    2009-01-01

    Different aspects of the plasma generated in a gas contained in a tube due to detonation of a small explosive charge located at one end of the tube are presented. The motion of the charged particles within the plasma is monitored using Rogowski coils. Using time-resolved emission spectroscopy the temperature and species in the detonation products and compressed gas behind the shock wave are recorded. From the spectral lines of the emission profiles the temperatures and electron density were evaluated to be in the vicinity of 7,000 K and 5x10 22 m -3 . An ultra fast wave traveling down the guide tube ahead of the hydrodynamic shock and causing any charged particles there to move fast enough to be detected by the Rogowski coils was recorded. From the measurements the phase velocity of the wave was calculated at 525 km/s when krypton filled the tube, and 1300 km/s in the case of argon. The temperature and density measurements are consistent with the data reported in the literature for similar tests. The electrostatic pulse measurements are a new phenomena not previously observed.

  19. Motion of charged particle in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. A Jacobi-metric approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Praloy; Sk, Ripon; Ghosh, Subir [Indian Statistical Institute, Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Kolkata (India)

    2017-11-15

    The present work discusses motion of neutral and charged particles in Reissner-Nordstroem spacetime. The constant energy paths are derived in a variational principle framework using the Jacobi metric which is parameterized by conserved particle energy. Of particular interest is the case of particle charge and Reissner-Nordstroem black hole charge being of same sign, since this leads to a clash of opposing forces - gravitational (attractive) and Coulomb (repulsive). Our paper aims to complement the recent work of Pugliese et al. (Eur Phys J C 77:206. arXiv:1304.2940, 2017; Phys Rev D 88:024042. arXiv:1303.6250, 2013). The energy dependent Gaussian curvature (induced by the Jacobi metric) plays an important role in classifying the trajectories. (orig.)

  20. Motion of charged particle in Reissner-Nordström spacetime: a Jacobi-metric approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Praloy; Sk, Ripon; Ghosh, Subir

    2017-11-01

    The present work discusses motion of neutral and charged particles in Reissner-Nordström spacetime. The constant energy paths are derived in a variational principle framework using the Jacobi metric which is parameterized by conserved particle energy. Of particular interest is the case of particle charge and Reissner-Nordström black hole charge being of same sign, since this leads to a clash of opposing forces—gravitational (attractive) and Coulomb (repulsive). Our paper aims to complement the recent work of Pugliese et al. (Eur Phys J C 77:206. arXiv:1304.2940, 2017; Phys Rev D 88:024042. arXiv:1303.6250, 2013). The energy dependent Gaussian curvature (induced by the Jacobi metric) plays an important role in classifying the trajectories.

  1. Spatial charge motion on an uniform density matrix-general equations in opened and closed circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar Monsanto, S. de.

    1983-01-01

    The motion of a space charge cloud embedded in a matrix of constant immobile charge density is studied in open as well as in closed circuit. In the first case, open circuit, the solution is almost trivial as compared as the other one in which, after some work, the problem is reduced to an ordinary differential equation. The method of solution is parallel to that employed in the study of monopolar free space charge motion. The voltage and the current produced by a system with no net charge but with unbalanced local charge density were calculated using the general equations derived in the first part of the work. (Author) [pt

  2. Motion induced interplay effects for VMAT radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Anneli; Nordström, Fredrik; Ceberg, Crister; Ceberg, Sofie

    2018-04-19

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to simulate breathing motion induced interplay effects for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), to verify the proposed method with measurements, and to use the method to investigate how interplay effects vary with different patient- and machine specific parameters. VMAT treatment plans were created on a virtual phantom in a treatment planning system (TPS). Interplay effects were simulated by dividing each plan into smaller sub-arcs using an in-house developed software and shifting the isocenter for each sub-arc to simulate a sin 6 breathing motion in the superior-inferior direction. The simulations were performed for both flattening-filter (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) plans and for different breathing amplitudes, period times, initial breathing phases, dose levels, plan complexities, CTV sizes, and collimator angles. The resulting sub-arcs were calculated in the TPS, generating a dose distribution including the effects of motion. The interplay effects were separated from dose blurring and the relative dose differences to 2% and 98% of the CTV volume (ΔD 98% and ΔD 2% ) were calculated. To verify the simulation method, measurements were carried out, both static and during motion, using a quasi-3D phantom and a motion platform. The results of the verification measurements during motion were comparable to the results of the static measurements. Considerable interplay effects were observed for individual fractions, with the minimum ΔD 98% and maximum ΔD 2% being  -16.7% and 16.2%, respectively. The extent of interplay effects was larger for FFF compared to FF and generally increased for higher breathing amplitudes, larger period times, lower dose levels, and more complex treatment plans. Also, the interplay effects varied considerably with the initial breathing phase, and larger variations were observed for smaller CTV sizes. In conclusion, a method to simulate motion induced interplay effects was

  3. Motion induced interplay effects for VMAT radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Anneli; Nordström, Fredrik; Ceberg, Crister; Ceberg, Sofie

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method to simulate breathing motion induced interplay effects for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), to verify the proposed method with measurements, and to use the method to investigate how interplay effects vary with different patient- and machine specific parameters. VMAT treatment plans were created on a virtual phantom in a treatment planning system (TPS). Interplay effects were simulated by dividing each plan into smaller sub-arcs using an in-house developed software and shifting the isocenter for each sub-arc to simulate a sin6 breathing motion in the superior–inferior direction. The simulations were performed for both flattening-filter (FF) and flattening-filter free (FFF) plans and for different breathing amplitudes, period times, initial breathing phases, dose levels, plan complexities, CTV sizes, and collimator angles. The resulting sub-arcs were calculated in the TPS, generating a dose distribution including the effects of motion. The interplay effects were separated from dose blurring and the relative dose differences to 2% and 98% of the CTV volume (ΔD98% and ΔD2%) were calculated. To verify the simulation method, measurements were carried out, both static and during motion, using a quasi-3D phantom and a motion platform. The results of the verification measurements during motion were comparable to the results of the static measurements. Considerable interplay effects were observed for individual fractions, with the minimum ΔD98% and maximum ΔD2% being  ‑16.7% and 16.2%, respectively. The extent of interplay effects was larger for FFF compared to FF and generally increased for higher breathing amplitudes, larger period times, lower dose levels, and more complex treatment plans. Also, the interplay effects varied considerably with the initial breathing phase, and larger variations were observed for smaller CTV sizes. In conclusion, a method to simulate motion induced interplay effects was

  4. Chaotic behaviour induced by space charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagniel, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    In numerous non-linear dynamical systems studied in various disciplines (fluid dynamics, celestial mechanisms, chemistry, biology, economy, ecology...), chaotic motions are generated by the dynamics itself whereas no random force is present. This phenomenon, already studied in the particle accelerator field to understand the beam-beam effect, is also observed in numerical experiments on space-charge dominated beams. Stochasticity threshold and halo formation are discussed for a continuous focusing channel (1D beam) and for a FODO channel (2D beam) with the possibility to take into account the defocusing effects of RF gaps localized between the quadrupoles. (authors). 7 refs., 4 figs

  5. Respiratory impact on motion sickness induced by linear motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mert, A.; Klöpping-Ketelaars, I.; Bles, W.

    2009-01-01

    Motion sickness incidence (MSI) for vertical sinusoidal motion reaches a maximum at 0.167 Hz. Normal breathing frequency is close to this frequency. There is some evidence for synchronization of breathing with this stimulus frequency. If this enforced breathing takes place over a larger frequency

  6. Equations of motion for a radiating charged particle in electromagnetic fields on curved spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasanna, A.R.

    1982-11-01

    In this note we present the equations of motion for a radiating charged particle in the framework of general relativity and give a formal procedure of solving the system numerically using iterations, when the motion is confined to the equatorial plane. (author)

  7. Measurement of Neutrino Induced, Charged Current, Charged Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilking, Michael Joseph [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Neutrinos are among the least understood particles in the standard model of particle physics. At neutrino energies in the 1 GeV range, neutrino properties are typically determined by observing the outgoing charged lepton produced in a charged current quasi-elastic interactions. The largest charged current background to these measurements comes from charged current pion production interactions, for which there is very little available data.

  8. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sexton W, Frederick; Walsh S, David; Doyle L, Barney; Dodd E, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a -.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients

  9. Time resolved ion beam induced charge collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEXTON,FREDERICK W.; WALSH,DAVID S.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; DODD,PAUL E.

    2000-04-01

    Under this effort, a new method for studying the single event upset (SEU) in microelectronics has been developed and demonstrated. Called TRIBICC, for Time Resolved Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection, this technique measures the transient charge-collection waveform from a single heavy-ion strike with a {minus}.03db bandwidth of 5 GHz. Bandwidth can be expanded up to 15 GHz (with 5 ps sampling windows) by using an FFT-based off-line waveform renormalization technique developed at Sandia. The theoretical time resolution of the digitized waveform is 24 ps with data re-normalization and 70 ps without re-normalization. To preserve the high bandwidth from IC to the digitizing oscilloscope, individual test structures are assembled in custom high-frequency fixtures. A leading-edge digitized waveform is stored with the corresponding ion beam position at each point in a two-dimensional raster scan. The resulting data cube contains a spatial charge distribution map of up to 4,096 traces of charge (Q) collected as a function of time. These two dimensional traces of Q(t) can cover a period as short as 5 ns with up to 1,024 points per trace. This tool overcomes limitations observed in previous multi-shot techniques due to the displacement damage effects of multiple ion strikes that changed the signal of interest during its measurement. This system is the first demonstration of a single-ion transient measurement capability coupled with spatial mapping of fast transients.

  10. Orbital Motion of Electrically Charged Spheres in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Shubho; Andring, Kevin; Campbell, Desmond; Janeski, John; Keedy, Daniel; Quinn, Sean; Hoffmeister, Brent

    2008-01-01

    The similar mathematical forms of Coulomb's law and Newton's law of gravitation suggest that two uniformly charged spheres should be able to orbit each other just as two uniform spheres of mass are known to do. In this paper we describe an experiment that we performed to demonstrate such an orbit. This is the first published account of a…

  11. Motion of Charged Particles in Electromagnetic Fields and Special

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    charged particles as seen from different inertial frames of reference. ... is solved for various initial conditions of the values of q,. --t -+. -+ m,o, E, v and B to be .... on the choice of the particular frame of reference that is employed to describe the ...

  12. Direct Contribution of Auditory Motion Information to Sound-Induced Visual Motion Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souta Hidaka

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We have recently demonstrated that alternating left-right sound sources induce motion perception to static visual stimuli along the horizontal plane (SIVM: sound-induced visual motion perception, Hidaka et al., 2009. The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether auditory motion signals, rather than auditory positional signals, can directly contribute to the SIVM. We presented static visual flashes at retinal locations outside the fovea together with a lateral auditory motion provided by a virtual stereo noise source smoothly shifting in the horizontal plane. The flashes appeared to move in the situation where auditory positional information would have little influence on the perceived position of visual stimuli; the spatiotemporal position of the flashes was in the middle of the auditory motion trajectory. Furthermore, the auditory motion altered visual motion perception in a global motion display; in this display, different localized motion signals of multiple visual stimuli were combined to produce a coherent visual motion perception so that there was no clear one-to-one correspondence between the auditory stimuli and each visual stimulus. These findings suggest the existence of direct interactions between the auditory and visual modalities in motion processing and motion perception.

  13. Motions of charged particles in Goedel-type spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, Bartolomeu D.B. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1996-10-01

    Goedel-type spacetimes in Hehl`s non propagating torsion theory are reconsidered by supposing that the curvature source is a Weyssenhoff-Raab fluid and an electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field implies space time homogeneity and admits a dual interpretation. From the trajectories of the test particles, it is shown that there is a class of such spacetimes for which charged particles can reach regions inaccessible to neutral particles or even photons. (author). 21 refs., 1 fig.

  14. Motions of charged particles in Goedel-type spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, Bartolomeu D.B.

    1996-10-01

    Goedel-type spacetimes in Hehl's non propagating torsion theory are reconsidered by supposing that the curvature source is a Weyssenhoff-Raab fluid and an electromagnetic field. The electromagnetic field implies space time homogeneity and admits a dual interpretation. From the trajectories of the test particles, it is shown that there is a class of such spacetimes for which charged particles can reach regions inaccessible to neutral particles or even photons. (author). 21 refs., 1 fig

  15. Can walking motions improve visually induced rotational self-motion illusions in virtual reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riecke, Bernhard E; Freiberg, Jacob B; Grechkin, Timofey Y

    2015-02-04

    Illusions of self-motion (vection) can provide compelling sensations of moving through virtual environments without the need for complex motion simulators or large tracked physical walking spaces. Here we explore the interaction between biomechanical cues (stepping along a rotating circular treadmill) and visual cues (viewing simulated self-rotation) for providing stationary users a compelling sensation of rotational self-motion (circular vection). When tested individually, biomechanical and visual cues were similarly effective in eliciting self-motion illusions. However, in combination they yielded significantly more intense self-motion illusions. These findings provide the first compelling evidence that walking motions can be used to significantly enhance visually induced rotational self-motion perception in virtual environments (and vice versa) without having to provide for physical self-motion or motion platforms. This is noteworthy, as linear treadmills have been found to actually impair visually induced translational self-motion perception (Ash, Palmisano, Apthorp, & Allison, 2013). Given the predominant focus on linear walking interfaces for virtual-reality locomotion, our findings suggest that investigating circular and curvilinear walking interfaces offers a promising direction for future research and development and can help to enhance self-motion illusions, presence and immersion in virtual-reality systems. © 2015 ARVO.

  16. Charged NUT field : [Part] I. Motion of test particles and [Part] II. Cosmic censorship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krori, K.D.

    1981-01-01

    Some properties of the charged NUT field are studied. In the first part of the paper, some general aspects of the charged NUT field have been investigated using uncharged and charged particles. The behaviour of the particles near the singularity has also been considered. In the second part of the paper, the charged NUT sources in the context of cosmic censorship hypothesis are studied. Motion of charged particles in the equatorial plane and along the axis is considered. From this investigation the interesting result is discovered that by such a bombardment of charged test particles, the existing event horizons cannot be destroyed but, in contrast to the Reissner-Nordstrom field, naked singularities do not get enveloped by event horizons. (author)

  17. The motion of a charged black hole in an electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicak, J.; Cambridge Univ.

    1980-01-01

    The motion of a charged black hole in a weak, asymptotically uniform electric field is analysed by using the Hamiltonian formalism for coupled electromagnetic and gravitational perturbations of the Reissner-Nordstrom space-time. The hole is shown to accelerate with respect to a distant inertial observer according to Newton's law. The relation of the approximate solution obtained to the exact solution of Ernst, representing the charged C-metric without nodal singularity, is then clarified. (author)

  18. Transverse Motion of a Particle with an Oscillating Charge and Variable Mass in a Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alisultanov, Z. Z.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.

    2018-03-01

    The problem of motion of a particle with an oscillating electric charge and variable mass in an uniform magnetic field has been solved. Three laws of mass variation have been considered: linear growth, oscillations, and stepwise growth. Analytical expressions for the particle velocity at different time dependences of the particle mass are obtained. It is established that simultaneous consideration of changes in the mass and charge leads to a significant change in the particle trajectory.

  19. The classical equations of motion for a spinning point particle with charge and magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, E.G.P.; Rowe, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    The classical, special relativistic equations of motion are derived for a spinning point particle interacting with the electromagnetic field through its charge and magnetic moment. Radiation reaction is included. The energy tensors for the particle and for the field are developed as well-defined distributions; consequently no infinities appear. The magnitude of spin and the rest mass are conserved. (orig.)

  20. Motion of a Charged Particle in a Constant and Uniform Electromagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, L. A.; Rondón, S. H.; Orduz, P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of software developed by the authors that allows the visualization of the motion of a charged particle under the influence of magnetic and electric fields in 3D, at a level suitable for introductory physics courses. The software offers the possibility of studying a great number of physical situations that can…

  1. Vection and visually induced motion sickness: How are they related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrang eKeshavarz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of visually induced motion sickness has been frequently linked to the sensation of illusory self-motion (so-called vection, however, the precise nature of this relationship is still not fully understood. To date, it is still a matter of debate whether or not vection is a necessary prerequisite for visually induced motion sickness (VIMS. That is, can there be visually induced motion sickness without any sensation of self-motion? In this paper, we will describe the possible nature of this relationship, review the literature that may speak to this relationship (including theoretical accounts of vection and VIMS, and offer suggestions with respect to operationally defining and reporting these phenomena in future.

  2. High-accuracy numerical integration of charged particle motion – with application to ponderomotive force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Masaru; Ohkawa, Yushiro; Matsuyama, Akinobu

    2016-01-01

    A high-accuracy numerical integration algorithm for a charged particle motion is developed. The algorithm is based on the Hamiltonian mechanics and the operator decomposition. The algorithm is made to be time-reversal symmetric, and its order of accuracy can be increased to any order by using a recurrence formula. One of the advantages is that it is an explicit method. An effective way to decompose the time evolution operator is examined; the Poisson tensor is decomposed and non-canonical variables are adopted. The algorithm is extended to a time dependent fields' case by introducing the extended phase space. Numerical tests showing the performance of the algorithm are presented. One is the pure cyclotron motion for a long time period, and the other is a charged particle motion in a rapidly oscillating field. (author)

  3. Ultrasound-induced acoustophoretic motion of microparticles in three dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Peter Barkholt; Rossi, M.; Marín, Á. G.

    2013-01-01

    We derive analytical expressions for the three-dimensional (3D) acoustophoretic motion of spherical microparticles in rectangular microchannels. The motion is generated by the acoustic radiation force and the acoustic streaming-induced drag force. In contrast to the classical theory of Rayleigh...

  4. Ground Motion Characteristics of Induced Earthquakes in Central North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, G. M.; Assatourians, K.; Novakovic, M.

    2017-12-01

    The ground motion characteristics of induced earthquakes in central North America are investigated based on empirical analysis of a compiled database of 4,000,000 digital ground-motion records from events in induced-seismicity regions (especially Oklahoma). Ground-motion amplitudes are characterized non-parametrically by computing median amplitudes and their variability in magnitude-distance bins. We also use inversion techniques to solve for regional source, attenuation and site response effects. Ground motion models are used to interpret the observations and compare the source and attenuation attributes of induced earthquakes to those of their natural counterparts. Significant conclusions are that the stress parameter that controls the strength of high-frequency radiation is similar for induced earthquakes (depth of h 5 km) and shallow (h 5 km) natural earthquakes. By contrast, deeper natural earthquakes (h 10 km) have stronger high-frequency ground motions. At distances close to the epicenter, a greater focal depth (which increases distance from the hypocenter) counterbalances the effects of a larger stress parameter, resulting in motions of similar strength close to the epicenter, regardless of event depth. The felt effects of induced versus natural earthquakes are also investigated using USGS "Did You Feel It?" reports; 400,000 reports from natural events and 100,000 reports from induced events are considered. The felt reports confirm the trends that we expect based on ground-motion modeling, considering the offsetting effects of the stress parameter versus focal depth in controlling the strength of motions near the epicenter. Specifically, felt intensity for a given magnitude is similar near the epicenter, on average, for all event types and depths. At distances more than 10 km from the epicenter, deeper events are felt more strongly than shallow events. These ground-motion attributes imply that the induced-seismicity hazard is most critical for facilities in

  5. Motion-induced blindness and microsaccades: cause and effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonneh, Y.S.; Donner, T.H.; Sagi, D.; Fried, M.; Heeger, D.J.; Arieli, A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that subjective disappearance of visual stimuli results from a spontaneous reduction of microsaccade rate causing image stabilization, enhanced adaptation, and a consequent fading. In motion-induced blindness (MIB), salient visual targets disappear intermittently when

  6. Localized Models of Charged Particle Motion in Martian Crustal Magnetic Cusps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain, D. A.; Poppe, A. R.; Jarvinen, R.; Dong, Y.; Egan, H. L.; Fang, X.

    2017-12-01

    The induced magnetosphere of Mars is punctuated by localized but strong crustal magnetic fields that are observed to play host to a variety of phenomena typically associated with global magnetic fields, such as auroral processes and particle precipitation, field-aligned current systems, and ion outflow. Each of these phenomena occur on the night side, in small-scale magnetic `cusp' regions of vertically aligned field. Cusp regions are not yet capable of being spatially resolved in global scale models that include the ion kinetics necessary for simulating charged particle transport along cusps. Local models are therefore necessary if we are to understand how cusp processes operate at Mars. Here we present the first results of an effort to model the kinetic particle motion and electric fields in Martian cusps. We are adapting both a 1.5D Particle-in-Cell (PIC) model for lunar magnetic cusps regions to the Martian case and a hybrid model framework (used previously for the global Martian plasma interaction and for lunar magnetic anomaly regions) to cusps in 2D. By comparing the models we can asses the importance of electron kinetics in particle transport along cusp field lines. In this first stage of our study we model a moderately strong nightside cusp, with incident hot hydrogen plasma from above, and cold planetary (oxygen) plasma entering the simulation from below. We report on the spatial and temporal distribution of plasma along cusp field lines for this initial case.

  7. Numerical Simulation of the Motion of Charged Suspended Particle in Multi-Phase Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El Khalek, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for computing Numerical simulation of the motion of charged suspended particle in multi-phase flow between two-long parallel plates is described in detail. The equation of motion of a suspended particle was suggested by Closkin. The equations of motion are reduced to ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations and solved numerically by using the Runge-Kutta method. The trajectories of particles are calculated by integrating the equation of motion of a single particle. Numerical solutions of the resulting ordinary differential equations provide velocity distributions for both fluid and solid phases and density distributions for the solid. The present simulation requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. Some typical results for both fluid and particle phases and density distributions of the particles are presented graphically

  8. Motion of Charged Suspended Particle in a Non-Newtonian Fluid between Two Long Parallel Plated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-El Khalek, M.M.

    1998-01-01

    The motion of charged suspended particle in a non-Newtonian fluid between two long parallel plates is discussed. The equation of motion of a suspended particle was suggested by Closkin. The equations of motion are reduced to ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations and solved numerically by using the Runge-Kutta method. The trajectories of particles are calculated by integrating the equation of motion of a single particle. The present simulation requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. The effects of solid particles on flow properties are discussed. Some typical results for both fluid and particle phases and density distributions of the particles are presented graphically

  9. Motion of charged suspended particle in a non-Newtonian fluid between two long parallel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd Elkhalek, M M [Nuclear Research Center-Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    The motion of charged suspended particle in a non-Newtonian fluid between two long parallel plates is discussed. The equation of motion of a suspended particle was suggested by Closkin. The equations of motion are reduced to ordinary differential equations by similarity transformation and solved numerically by using Runge-Kutta method. The trajectories of particles are calculated by integrating the equation of motion of a single particle. The present simulation requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. The effect of solid particles on flow properties are discussed. Some typical results for both fluid and particle phases and density distributions of the particles are presented graphically. 4 figs.

  10. Numerical simulation of the motion of charged suspended particle in multi-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abd Elkhalek, M M [Nuclear Research Center-Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1997-12-31

    A method for computing numerical simulation of the motion of charged suspended particle in multi-phase flow between two-long parallel plates is described in detail. The equation of motion of a suspended particle was suggested by closkin. The equations of motion are reduced to ordinary differential equations by similarity transformations and solved numerically by using Runge-Kutta method. The trajectories of particles are calculated by integrating the equation of motion of a single particle. Numerical solutions of the resulting ordinary differential equations provide velocity distributions for both fluid and solid phases and density distributions for the solid. The present simulation requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. Some typical results for both fluid and particle phases and density distributions of the particles are presented graphically. 4 figs.

  11. Coupled quantum-classical method for long range charge transfer: relevance of the nuclear motion to the quantum electron dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, Robson; Hoff, Diego A; Rego, Luis G C

    2015-01-01

    Charge and excitonic-energy transfer phenomena are fundamental for energy conversion in solar cells as well as artificial photosynthesis. Currently, much interest is being paid to light-harvesting and energy transduction processes in supramolecular structures, where nuclear dynamics has a major influence on electronic quantum dynamics. For this reason, the simulation of long range electron transfer in supramolecular structures, under environmental conditions described within an atomistic framework, has been a difficult problem to study. This work describes a coupled quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method that aims at describing long range charge transfer processes in supramolecular systems, taking into account the atomistic details of large molecular structures, the underlying nuclear motion, and environmental effects. The method is applied to investigate the relevance of electron–nuclei interaction on the mechanisms for photo-induced electron–hole pair separation in dye-sensitized interfaces as well as electronic dynamics in molecular structures. (paper)

  12. Test-particle motion in Einstein's unified field theory. III. Magnetic monopoles and charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.R.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper (paper I), we developed a method for finding the exact equations of structure and motion of multipole test particles in Einstein's unified field theory: the theory of the nonsymmetric field. In that paper we also applied the method and found in Einstein's unified field theory the equations of structure and motion of neutral pole-dipole test particles possessing no electromagnetic multipole moments. In a second paper (paper II), we applied the method and found in Einstein's unified field theory the exact equations of structure and motion of charged test particles possessing no magnetic monopole moments. In the present paper (paper III), we apply the method and find in Einstein's unified field theory the exact equations of structure and motion of charged test particles possessing magnetic monopole moments. It follows from the form of these equations of structure and motion that in general in Einstein's unified field theory a test particle possessing a magnetic monopole moment in a background electromagnetic field must also possess spin

  13. Motion of charged particles in a NUTty Einstein-Maxwell spacetime and causality violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, Gérard; Guenouche, Mourad

    2018-06-01

    We investigate the motion of electrically charged test particles in spacetimes with closed timelike curves, a subset of the black hole or wormhole Reissner-Nordström-NUT spacetimes without periodic identification of time. We show that, while in the wormhole case there are closed worldlines inside a potential well, the wordlines of initially distant charged observers moving under the action of the Lorentz force can never close or self-intersect. This means that for these observers causality is preserved, which is an instance of our weak chronology protection criterion.

  14. Orbital-motion-limited theory of dust charging and plasma response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Xian-Zhu; Luca Delzanno, Gian

    2014-01-01

    The foundational theory for dusty plasmas is the dust charging theory that provides the dust potential and charge arising from the dust interaction with a plasma. The most widely used dust charging theory for negatively charged dust particles is the so-called orbital motion limited (OML) theory, which predicts the dust potential and heat collection accurately for a variety of applications, but was previously found to be incapable of evaluating the dust charge and plasma response in any situation. Here, we report a revised OML formulation that is able to predict the plasma response and hence the dust charge. Numerical solutions of the new OML model show that the widely used Whipple approximation of dust charge-potential relationship agrees with OML theory in the limit of small dust radius compared with plasma Debye length, but incurs large (order-unity) deviation from the OML prediction when the dust size becomes comparable with or larger than plasma Debye length. This latter case is expected for the important application of dust particles in a tokamak plasma

  15. Motion-induced dose artifacts in helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bryan; Chen, Jeff; Battista, Jerry [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Center, Melbourne (Australia)], E-mail: bryan.kim@lhsc.on.ca

    2009-10-07

    Tumor motion is a particular concern for a complex treatment modality such as helical tomotherapy, where couch position, gantry rotation and MLC leaf opening all change with time. In the present study, we have investigated the impact of tumor motion for helical tomotherapy, which could result in three distinct motion-induced dose artifacts, namely (1) dose rounding, (2) dose rippling and (3) IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect. Dose rounding and dose rippling effects have been previously described, while the IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is a newly discovered motion-induced dose artifact. Dose rounding is the penumbral widening of a delivered dose distribution near the edges of a target volume along the direction of tumor motion. Dose rippling is a series of periodic dose peaks and valleys observed within the target region along the direction of couch motion, due to an asynchronous interplay between the couch motion and the longitudinal component of tumor motion. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect is caused by an asynchronous interplay between the temporal patterns of leaf openings and tumor motion. The characteristics of each dose artifact were investigated individually as functions of target motion amplitude and period for both non-IMRT and IMRT helical tomotherapy cases, through computer simulation modeling and experimental verification. The longitudinal dose profiles generated by the simulation program agreed with the experimental data within {+-}0.5% and {+-}1.5% inside the PTV region for the non-IMRT and IMRT cases, respectively. The dose rounding effect produced a penumbral increase up to 20.5 mm for peak-to-peak target motion amplitudes ranging from 1.0 cm to 5.0 cm. Maximum dose rippling magnitude of 25% was calculated, when the target motion period approached an unusually high value of 10 s. The IMRT leaf opening asynchronization effect produced dose differences ranging from -29% to 7% inside the PTV region. This information

  16. Drift of the center of motion for a charged particle due to radiation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ares De Parga, G.; Mares, R. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Zacatenco (Mexico). Dept. de Fisica, Escuela de Fisica y Matematica

    1999-10-01

    Through parametrization of the relativistic Larmor formula, one can find the trajectory of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. Simultaneously, there exists a drift of the center of curvature for the same. This effect is quantitatively compared with the predictions by other equations of motion, such as Dirac, Mo-Papas, Herrera, Bonnor and Cardirola and the one recently obtained by Hartemann and others. The paper proposes an experiment to verify the predicted effect, both qualitative and quantitative.

  17. Drift of the center of motion for a charged particle due to radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ares De Parga, G.; Mares, R.

    1999-01-01

    Through parametrization of the relativistic Larmor formula, one can find the trajectory of a charged particle in a uniform magnetic field. Simultaneously, there exists a drift of the center of curvature for the same. This effect is quantitatively compared with the predictions by other equations of motion, such as Dirac, Mo-Papas, Herrera, Bonnor and Cardirola and the one recently obtained by Hartemann and others. The paper proposes an experiment to verify the predicted effect, both qualitative and quantitative

  18. Equations of motion in general relativity of a small charged black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futamase, T.; Hogan, P. A.; Itoh, Y.

    2008-01-01

    We present the details of a model in general relativity of a small charged black hole moving in an external gravitational and electromagnetic field. The importance of our model lies in the fact that we can derive the equations of motion of the black hole from the Einstein-Maxwell vacuum field equations without encountering infinities. The key assumptions which we base our results upon are that (a) the black hole is isolated and (b) near the black hole the wave fronts of the radiation generated by its motion are smoothly deformed spheres. The equations of motion which emerge fit the pattern of the original DeWitt and Brehme equations of motion (after they 'renormalize'). Our calculations are carried out in a coordinate system in which the null hypersurface histories of the wave fronts can be specified in a simple way, with the result that we obtain a new explicit form, particular to our model, for the well-known ''tail term'' in the equations of motion.

  19. Motion-based, high-yielding, and fast separation of different charged organics in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Mingjun; Lin, Xiankun; Shao, Jingxin; Dai, Luru; He, Qiang

    2015-01-12

    We report a self-propelled Janus silica micromotor as a motion-based analytical method for achieving fast target separation of polyelectrolyte microcapsules, enriching different charged organics with low molecular weights in water. The self-propelled Janus silica micromotor catalytically decomposes a hydrogen peroxide fuel and moves along the direction of the catalyst face at a speed of 126.3 μm s(-1) . Biotin-functionalized Janus micromotors can specifically capture and rapidly transport streptavidin-modified polyelectrolyte multilayer capsules, which could effectively enrich and separate different charged organics in water. The interior of the polyelectrolyte multilayer microcapsules were filled with a strong charged polyelectrolyte, and thus a Donnan equilibrium is favorable between the inner solution within the capsules and the bulk solution to entrap oppositely charged organics in water. The integration of these self-propelled Janus silica micromotors and polyelectrolyte multilayer capsules into a lab-on-chip device that enables the separation and analysis of charged organics could be attractive for a diverse range of applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. CHAOTIC MOTION OF CHARGED PARTICLES IN AN ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD SURROUNDING A ROTATING BLACK HOLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko

    2009-01-01

    The observational data from some black hole candidates suggest the importance of electromagnetic fields in the vicinity of a black hole. Highly magnetized disk accretion may play an importance rule, and large-scale magnetic field may be formed above the disk surface. Then, we expect that the nature of the black hole spacetime would be revealed by magnetic phenomena near the black hole. We will start investigating the motion of a charged test particle which depends on the initial parameter setting in the black hole dipole magnetic field, which is a test field on the Kerr spacetime. Particularly, we study the spin effects of a rotating black hole on the motion of the charged test particle trapped in magnetic field lines. We make detailed analysis for the particle's trajectories by using the Poincare map method, and show the chaotic properties that depend on the black hole spin. We find that the dragging effects of the spacetime by a rotating black hole weaken the chaotic properties and generate regular trajectories for some sets of initial parameters, while the chaotic properties dominate on the trajectories for slowly rotating black hole cases. The dragging effects can generate the fourth adiabatic invariant on the particle motion approximately.

  1. One-Dimensional Brownian Motion of Charged Nanoparticles along Microtubules: A Model System for Weak Binding Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Minoura, Itsushi; Katayama, Eisaku; Sekimoto, Ken; Muto, Etsuko

    2010-01-01

    Various proteins are known to exhibit one-dimensional Brownian motion along charged rodlike polymers, such as microtubules (MTs), actin, and DNA. The electrostatic interaction between the proteins and the rodlike polymers appears to be crucial for one-dimensional Brownian motion, although the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. We examined the interactions of positively-charged nanoparticles composed of polyacrylamide gels with MTs. These hydrophilic nanoparticles bound to MTs ...

  2. Mass change and motion of a scalar charge in cosmological spacetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Roland; Poisson, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Continuing previous work reported in an earlier paper (Burko, Harte and Poisson 2002 Phys. Rev. D 65 124006), we calculate the self-force acting on a point scalar charge in a wide class of cosmological spacetimes. The self-force produces two types of effect. The first is a time-changing inertial mass, and this is calculated exactly for a particle at rest relative to the cosmological fluid. We show that for certain cosmological models, the mass decreases and then increases back to its original value. For all other models except de Sitter spacetime, the mass is restored only to a fraction of its original value. For de Sitter spacetime the mass steadily decreases. The second effect is a deviation relative to geodesic motion, and we calculate this for a charge that moves slowly relative to the dust in a matter-dominated cosmology. We show that the net effect of the self-force is to push on the particle. We show that this is not an artefact of the scalar theory: the electromagnetic self-force acting on an electrically charged particle also pushes on the particle. The paper concludes with a demonstration that the pushing effect can also occur in the context of slow-motion electrodynamics in flat spacetime

  3. Numerical analysis of the motion of a suspended charged particle in multi-phase flow. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-khalek, M M [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The motion of a suspended charged particle in a two component viscous fluid through two infinite parallel plates was studied. The motion takes place under constant magnetic field normal to the plane of the motion. The effect of some parameters as particle volume, fluid density, viscosity of the fluid, and the magnetic force used on the motion were investigated. The particle is assumed moving initially from the midpoint of the channel with a velocity equal to the velocity of the fluid. The trajectory of solid spherical suspended charged particle is calculated by integrating the equations of motion of a single particle. The present simulation requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. The differential equations of motion were numerically solved by Runge-Kutta method. Some conclusions about the path lines were deduced. 5 figs.

  4. Motion of a suspended charged particle in a NON-Newtonian fluid. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel-Khalek, M M [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-03-01

    The path lines of a solid spherical charged particle suspended in a non-newton electrical conducting viscous fluid through two infinite parallel plates in the presence of a constant magnetic field normal to the plane of particle motion were determined. The effect of some parameters such as particle volume, fluid density, fluid viscosity, and the use magnetic field strength on these path lines were determined. The present solution requires some empirical parameters concerning the collision of the particles with the wall. The differential equations of motion were numerically solved by Runge-Kutta method. Some conclusions about width, maximum height and number of collisions with upper and lower plates were deduced. 4 figs.

  5. Adiabatic, chaotic and quasi-adiabatic charged particle motion in two-dimensional magnetic field reversals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buechner, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    For a number of problems in the Plasma Astrophysics it is necessary to know the laws, which govern the non adiabatic charged particle dynamics in strongly curves magnetic field reversals. These are, e.q., the kinetic theory of the microscopic and macroscopicstability of current sheets in collionless plasma, of microturbulence, causing anomalous resistivity and dissipating currents, the problem of spontaneous reconnection, the formation of non Maxwellian distribution functions, particle acceleration and the use of particles as a diagnostic tool ('tracers'). To find such laws we derived from the differential equations of motion discrete mappings. These mappings allow an investigation of the motion after the break down of the adiabaticity of the magnetic moment. (author). 32 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Study on the effects of ion motion on laser-induced plasma wakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Suyun; Yu Wei; Yuan Xiao; Xu Han; Cao, L. H.; Cai, H. B.; Zhou, C. T.

    2012-01-01

    A 2D analytical model is presented for the generation of plasma wakes (or bubbles) with an ultra-intense laser pulse by taking into account the response of plasma ions. It is shown that the effect of ion motion becomes significant at the laser intensity exceeding 10 21 W/cm 2 and plasma background density below 10 19 cm −3 . In this regime, ion motion tends to suppress the electrostatic field induced by charge separation and makes the electron acceleration less effective. As a result, the assumption of immobile ions overestimates the efficiency of laser wake-field acceleration of electrons. Based on the analytical model, the dynamics of plasma ions in laser-induced wake field is investigated. It is found that only one bubble appears as the plasmas background density exceeds the resonant density and the deposited laser energy is concentrated into the bubble, resulting in the generation of an ion bunch with extremely high energy density.

  7. On the motion of a charged particle in the field of a magnetic monopole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bollini, C.G.; Ferreira, P.L.

    1977-01-01

    A quantum mechanical treatment of the motion of a charged particle in the field of fixed magnetic monopole is given based on a representation of the corresponding vector potential. The results are closely similar to those obtained in the work of T.S. Wu and C.N. Yang which stems from ideas borrowed from the mathematical fiber bundle theory. Although the present paper deals with the non-relativistic problems, it is clear that the extension to the case of a Pauli or Dirac particle can be easily done using the spinor monopole harmonics [pt

  8. Modelling of charged satellite motion in Earth's gravitational and magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Bar, S. E.; Abd El-Salam, F. A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work Lagrange's planetary equations for a charged satellite subjected to the Earth's gravitational and magnetic force fields are solved. The Earth's gravity, and magnetic and electric force components are obtained and expressed in terms of orbital elements. The variational equations of orbit with the considered model in Keplerian elements are derived. The solution of the problem in a fully analytical way is obtained. The temporal rate of changes of the orbital elements of the spacecraft are integrated via Lagrange's planetary equations and integrals of the normalized Keplerian motion obtained by Ahmed (Astron. J. 107(5):1900, 1994).

  9. Active Control Does Not Eliminate Motion-Induced Illusory Displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Thornton

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available When the sine-wave grating of a Gabor patch drifts to the left or right, the perceived position of the entire object is shifted in the direction of local motion. In the current work we explored whether active control of the physical position of the patch overcomes such motion induced illusory displacement. In Experiment 1 we created a simple computer game and asked participants to continuously guide a Gabor patch along a randomly curving path using a joystick. When the grating inside the Gabor patch was stationary, participants could perform this task without error. When the grating drifted to either left or right, we observed systematic errors consistent with previous reports of motion-induced illusory displacement. In Experiment 2 we created an iPad application where the built-in accelerometer tilt control was used to steer the patch through as series of “gates”. Again, we observed systematic guidance errors that depended on the direction and speed of local motion. In conclusion, we found no evidence that participants could adapt or compensate for illusory displacement given active control of the target.

  10. DEM modeling of ball mills with experimental validation: influence of contact parameters on charge motion and power draw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boemer, Dominik; Ponthot, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Discrete element method simulations of a 1:5-scale laboratory ball mill are presented in this paper to study the influence of the contact parameters on the charge motion and the power draw. The position density limit is introduced as an efficient mathematical tool to describe and to compare the macroscopic charge motion in different scenarios, i.a. with different values of the contact parameters. While the charge motion and the power draw are relatively insensitive to the stiffness and the damping coefficient of the linear spring-slider-damper contact law, the coefficient of friction has a strong influence since it controls the sliding propensity of the charge. Based on the experimental calibration and validation by charge motion photographs and power draw measurements, the descriptive and predictive capabilities of the position density limit and the discrete element method are demonstrated, i.e. the real position of the charge is precisely delimited by the respective position density limit and the power draw can be predicted with an accuracy of about 5 %.

  11. Motion-Induced Blindness Using Increments and Decrements of Luminance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stine Wm Wren

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Motion-induced blindness describes the disappearance of stationary elements of a scene when other, perhaps non-overlapping, elements of the scene are in motion. We measured the effects of increment (200.0 cd/m2 and decrement targets (15.0 cd/m2 and masks presented on a grey background (108.0 cd/m2, tapping into putative ON- and OFF-channels, on the rate of target disappearance psychophysically. We presented two-frame motion, which has coherent motion energy, and dynamic Glass patterns and dynamic anti-Glass patterns, which do not have coherent motion energy. Using the method of constant stimuli, participants viewed stimuli of varying durations (3.1 s, 4.6 s, 7.0 s, 11 s, or 16 s in a given trial and then indicated whether or not the targets vanished during that trial. Psychometric function midpoints were used to define absolute threshold mask duration for the disappearance of the target. 95% confidence intervals for threshold disappearance times were estimated using a bootstrap technique for each of the participants across two experiments. Decrement masks were more effective than increment masks with increment targets. Increment targets were easier to mask than decrement targets. Distinct mask pattern types had no effect, suggesting that perceived coherence contributes to the effectiveness of the mask. The ON/OFF dichotomy clearly carries its influence to the level of perceived motion coherence. Further, the asymmetry in the effects of increment and decrement masks on increment and decrement targets might lead one to speculate that they reflect the ‘importance’ of detecting decrements in the environment.

  12. Charge imbalance induced by a temperature gradient in superconducting aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamin, H.J.; Clarke, J.; Van Harlingen, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The quasiparticle transport current induced in a superconducting aluminum film by a temperature gradient has been measured by means of the spatially decaying charge imbalance generated near the end of the sample where the current is divergent. The magnitude and decay length of the charge imbalance are in good agreement with the predictions of a simple model that takes into account the nonuniformity of the temperature gradient. The inferred value of the thermopower in the superconducting state agrees reasonably well with the value measured in the normal state. Measurements of the decay length of charge imbalance induced by current injection yield a value of the inelastic relaxation time tau/sub E/ of about 2 ns. This value is substantially smaller than that obtained from other measurements for reasons that are not known

  13. An induced charge readout scheme incorporating image charge splitting on discrete pixels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataria, D.O.; Lapington, J.S.

    2003-01-01

    Top hat electrostatic analysers used in space plasma instruments typically use microchannel plates (MCPs) followed by discrete pixel anode readout for the angular definition of the incoming particles. Better angular definition requires more pixels/readout electronics channels but with stringent mass and power budgets common in space applications, the number of channels is restricted. We describe here a technique that improves the angular definition using induced charge and an interleaved anode pattern. The technique adopts the readout philosophy used on the CRRES and CLUSTER I instruments but has the advantages of the induced charge scheme and significantly reduced capacitance. Charge from the MCP collected by an anode pixel is inductively split onto discrete pixels whose geometry can be tailored to suit the scientific requirements of the instrument. For our application, the charge is induced over two pixels. One of them is used for a coarse angular definition but is read out by a single channel of electronics, allowing a higher rate handling. The other provides a finer angular definition but is interleaved and hence carries the expense of lower rate handling. Using the technique and adding four channels of electronics, a four-fold increase in the angular resolution is obtained. Details of the scheme and performance results are presented

  14. Charged particle motion in a time-dependent flux-driven ring: an exactly solvable model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, P-G; Tang, C-S

    2007-01-01

    We consider a charged particle driven by a time-dependent flux threading a quantum ring. The dynamics of the charged particle is investigated using a classical treatment, a Fourier expansion technique, a time-evolution method, and the Lewis-Riesenfeld approach. We have shown that, by properly managing the boundary conditions, a time-dependent wavefunction can be obtained using a general non-Hermitian time-dependent invariant, which is a specific linear combination of initial angular-momentum and azimuthal-angle operators. It is shown that the linear invariant eigenfunction can be realized as a Gaussian-type wavepacket with a peak moving along the classical angular trajectory, while the distribution of the wavepacket is determined by the ratio of the coefficient of the initial angle to that of the initial canonical angular momentum. From the topologically nontrivial nature as well as the classical trajectory and angular momentum, one can determine the dynamical motion of the wavepacket. It should be noted that the peak position is no longer an expectation value of the angle operator, and hence the Ehrenfest theorem is not directly applicable in such a topologically nontrivial system

  15. One-dimensional Brownian motion of charged nanoparticles along microtubules: a model system for weak binding interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoura, Itsushi; Katayama, Eisaku; Sekimoto, Ken; Muto, Etsuko

    2010-04-21

    Various proteins are known to exhibit one-dimensional Brownian motion along charged rodlike polymers, such as microtubules (MTs), actin, and DNA. The electrostatic interaction between the proteins and the rodlike polymers appears to be crucial for one-dimensional Brownian motion, although the underlying mechanism has not been fully clarified. We examined the interactions of positively-charged nanoparticles composed of polyacrylamide gels with MTs. These hydrophilic nanoparticles bound to MTs and displayed one-dimensional Brownian motion in a charge-dependent manner, which indicates that nonspecific electrostatic interaction is sufficient for one-dimensional Brownian motion. The diffusion coefficient decreased exponentially with an increasing particle charge (with the exponent being 0.10 kBT per charge), whereas the duration of the interaction increased exponentially (exponent of 0.22 kBT per charge). These results can be explained semiquantitatively if one assumes that a particle repeats a cycle of binding to and movement along an MT until it finally dissociates from the MT. During the movement, a particle is still electrostatically constrained in the potential valley surrounding the MT. This entire process can be described by a three-state model analogous to the Michaelis-Menten scheme, in which the two parameters of the equilibrium constant between binding and movement, and the rate of dissociation from the MT, are derived as a function of the particle charge density. This study highlights the possibility that the weak binding interactions between proteins and rodlike polymers, e.g., MTs, are mediated by a similar, nonspecific charge-dependent mechanism. Copyright 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quasicharacteristic radiation of relativistic electrons at orientation motion in lithium halides crystals along charged planes and axes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksyuta, N. V.; Vysotskii, V. I.; Efimenko, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of the orientation motion of relativistic electrons in charged (111) planes and charged [110] axes of lithium halides ionic crystals of LiF, LiCl, LiBr and LiI. On the basis of these investigations the spectra of quasicharacteristic radiation for the electron beams with various Lorentz-factors both in planar and axial cases have been calculated numerically.

  17. Current-induced domain wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnetic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, CNRS, Universite Paris-sud 11, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Boulle, O [SPINTEC, CEA/CNRS/UJF/GINP, INAC, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Klaeui, M, E-mail: Klaeui@uni-mainz.de [SwissFEL, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laboratory of Nanomagnetism and Spin Dynamics, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-28

    We review the details of domain wall (DW) propagation due to spin-polarized currents that could potentially be used in magnetic data storage devices based on domains and DWs. We discuss briefly the basics of the underlying spin torque effect and show how the two torques arising from the interaction between the spin-polarized charge carriers and the magnetization lead to complex dynamics of a spin texture such as a DW. By direct imaging we show how confined DWs in nanowires can be displaced using currents in in-plane soft-magnetic materials, and that when using short pulses, fast velocities can be attained. For high-anisotropy out-of-plane magnetized wires with narrow DWs we present approaches to deducing the torque terms and show that in these materials potentially more efficient domain wall motion could be achieved.

  18. A facility for low energy charged particle induced reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilaithong, T.; Singkarat, S.; Yu, L.D.; Intarasiri, S.; Tippawan, U.

    2000-01-01

    In Chiang Mai, a highly stable low energy ion accelerator (0 - 350 kV) facility is being established. A subnano-second pulsing system will be incorporated into the beam transport line. The detecting system will consist of a time-of-flight charged particle spectrometer and a high resolution gamma-ray system. The new facility will be used in the studies of low energy heavy ion backscattering and charged particle induced cross section measurement in the interests of material characterization and nucleosynthesis. (author)

  19. Electromagnetic radiation damping of charges in external gravitational fields (weak field, slow motion approximation). [Harmonic coordinates, weak field slow-motion approximation, Green function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudolph, E [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Muenchen (F.R. Germany)

    1975-01-01

    As a model for gravitational radiation damping of a planet the electromagnetic radiation damping of an extended charged body moving in an external gravitational field is calculated in harmonic coordinates using a weak field, slowing-motion approximation. Special attention is paid to the case where this gravitational field is a weak Schwarzschild field. Using Green's function methods for this purpose it is shown that in a slow-motion approximation there is a strange connection between the tail part and the sharp part: radiation reaction terms of the tail part can cancel corresponding terms of the sharp part. Due to this cancelling mechanism the lowest order electromagnetic radiation damping force in an external gravitational field in harmonic coordinates remains the flat space Abraham Lorentz force. It is demonstrated in this simplified model that a naive slow-motion approximation may easily lead to divergent higher order terms. It is shown that this difficulty does not arise up to the considered order.

  20. Neutron-Induced Charged Particle Studies at LANSCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Young; Haight, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Direct measurements on neutron-induced charged particle reactions are of interest for nuclear astrophysics and applied nuclear energy. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) produces neutrons in energy of thermal to several hundreds MeV. There has been an effort at LANSCE to upgrade neutron-induced charged particle detection technique, which follows on (n,z) measurements made previously here and will have improved capabilities including larger solid angles, higher efficiency, and better signal to background ratios. For studying cross sections of low-energy neutron induced alpha reactions, Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is designed with segmented anodes for improving signal-to-noise ratio near reaction thresholds. Since double-differential cross sections on (n,p) and (n,a) reactions up to tens of MeV provide important information on deducing nuclear level density, the ionization chamber will be coupled with silicon strip detectors (DSSD) in order to stop energetic charged particles. In this paper, we will present the status of this development including the progress on detector design, calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy - Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  1. Electric-field Induced Microdynamics of Charged Rods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyongok eKang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field induced phase/state transitions are observed in AC electric fields with small amplitudes and low frequencies in suspensions of charged fibrous viruses (fd, which are model systems for highly charged rod-like colloids. Texture- and particle-dynamics in these field-induced states, and on crossing transition lines, are explored by image time-correlation and dynamic light scattering, respectively. At relatively low frequencies, starting from a system within the isotropic-nematic coexistence region, a transition from a nematic to a chiral nematic is observed, as well as a dynamical state where nematic domains melt and reform. These transitions are preliminary due to field-induced dissociation/association of condensed ions. At higher frequencies a uniform state is formed that is stabilized by hydrodynamic interactions through field-induced electro-osmotic flow where the rods align along the field direction. There is a point in the field-amplitude versus frequency plane where various transition lines meet. This point can be identified as a non-equilibrium critical point, in the sense that a length scale and a time scale diverge on approach of that point. The microscopic dynamics exhibits discontinuities on crossing transition lines that were identified independently by means of image and signal correlation spectroscopy.

  2. Discretization of the induced-charge boundary integral equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P; Eisenberg, Robert S; Gillespie, Dirk

    2009-07-01

    Boundary-element methods (BEMs) for solving integral equations numerically have been used in many fields to compute the induced charges at dielectric boundaries. In this paper, we consider a more accurate implementation of BEM in the context of ions in aqueous solution near proteins, but our results are applicable more generally. The ions that modulate protein function are often within a few angstroms of the protein, which leads to the significant accumulation of polarization charge at the protein-solvent interface. Computing the induced charge accurately and quickly poses a numerical challenge in solving a popular integral equation using BEM. In particular, the accuracy of simulations can depend strongly on seemingly minor details of how the entries of the BEM matrix are calculated. We demonstrate that when the dielectric interface is discretized into flat tiles, the qualocation method of Tausch [IEEE Trans Comput.-Comput.-Aided Des. 20, 1398 (2001)] to compute the BEM matrix elements is always more accurate than the traditional centroid-collocation method. Qualocation is not more expensive to implement than collocation and can save significant computational time by reducing the number of boundary elements needed to discretize the dielectric interfaces.

  3. Discretization of the induced-charge boundary integral equation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, J. P.; Eisenberg, R. S.; Gillespie, D.; Rush Univ. Medical Center

    2009-07-01

    Boundary-element methods (BEMs) for solving integral equations numerically have been used in many fields to compute the induced charges at dielectric boundaries. In this paper, we consider a more accurate implementation of BEM in the context of ions in aqueous solution near proteins, but our results are applicable more generally. The ions that modulate protein function are often within a few angstroms of the protein, which leads to the significant accumulation of polarization charge at the protein-solvent interface. Computing the induced charge accurately and quickly poses a numerical challenge in solving a popular integral equation using BEM. In particular, the accuracy of simulations can depend strongly on seemingly minor details of how the entries of the BEM matrix are calculated. We demonstrate that when the dielectric interface is discretized into flat tiles, the qualocation method of Tausch et al. [IEEE Trans Comput.-Comput.-Aided Des. 20, 1398 (2001)] to compute the BEM matrix elements is always more accurate than the traditional centroid-collocation method. Qualocation is not more expensive to implement than collocation and can save significant computational time by reducing the number of boundary elements needed to discretize the dielectric interfaces.

  4. Pleasant music as a countermeasure against visually induced motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Behrang; Hecht, Heiko

    2014-05-01

    Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known side-effect in virtual environments or simulators. However, effective behavioral countermeasures against VIMS are still sparse. In this study, we tested whether music can reduce the severity of VIMS. Ninety-three volunteers were immersed in an approximately 14-minute-long video taken during a bicycle ride. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four experimental groups, either including relaxing music, neutral music, stressful music, or no music. Sickness scores were collected using the Fast Motion Sickness Scale and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire. Results showed an overall trend for relaxing music to reduce the severity of VIMS. When factoring in the subjective pleasantness of the music, a significant reduction of VIMS occurred only when the presented music was perceived as pleasant, regardless of the music type. In addition, we found a gender effect with women reporting more sickness than men. We assume that the presentation of pleasant music can be an effective, low-cost, and easy-to-administer method to reduce VIMS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Integration Assessment of Visiting Vehicle Induced Electrical Charging of the International Space Station Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Leonard; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Galofaro, Joel T.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) undergoes electrical charging in low Earth orbit (LEO) due to positively biased, exposed conductors on solar arrays that collect electrical charges from the space plasma. Exposed solar array conductors predominately collect negatively charged electrons and thus drive the metal ISS structure electrical ground to a negative floating potential (FP) relative to plasma. This FP is variable in location and time as a result of local ionospheric conditions. ISS motion through Earth s magnetic field creates an addition inductive voltage up to 20 positive and negative volts across ISS structure depending on its attitude and location in orbit. ISS Visiting Vehicles (VVs), such as the planned Orion crew exploration vehicle, contribute to the ISS plasma charging processes. Upon physical contact with ISS, the current collection properties of VVs combine with ISS. This is an ISS integration concern as FP must be controlled to minimize arcing of ISS surfaces and ensure proper management of extra vehicular activity crewman shock hazards. This report is an assessment of ISS induced charging from docked Orion vehicles employing negatively grounded, 130 volt class, UltraFlex (ATK Space Systems) solar arrays. To assess plasma electron current collection characteristics, Orion solar cell test coupons were constructed and subjected to plasma chamber current collection measurements. During these tests, coupon solar cells were biased between 0 and 120 V while immersed in a simulated LEO plasma. Tests were performed using several different simulated LEO plasma densities and temperatures. These data and associated theoretical scaling of plasma properties, were combined in a numerical model which was integrated into the Boeing Plasma Interaction Model. It was found that the solar array design for Orion will not affect the ISS FP by more than about 2 V during worst case charging conditions. This assessment also motivated a trade study to determine

  6. Charge-Induced Fluctuation Forces in Graphitic Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Drosdoff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Charge fluctuations in nanocircuits with capacitor components are shown to give rise to a novel type of long-ranged interaction, which coexist with the regular Casimir–van der Waals force. The developed theory distinguishes between thermal and quantum mechanical effects, and it is applied to capacitors involving graphene nanostructures. The charge fluctuations mechanism is captured via the capacitance of the system with geometrical and quantum mechanical components. The dependence on the distance separation, temperature, size, and response properties of the system shows that this type of force can have a comparable and even dominant effect to the Casimir interaction. Our results strongly indicate that fluctuation-induced interactions due to various thermodynamic quantities can have important thermal and quantum mechanical contributions at the microscale and the nanoscale.

  7. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-06-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu 3 Fe 4 O 12 and LaCu 3 Fe 4- x Mn x O 12 , as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO 3 . The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding -70 × 10 -6 K -1 near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution.

  8. Charged particle induced energy dispersive X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, S.A.E.

    1979-01-01

    This review article deals with the X-ray emission induced by heavy, charged particles and the use of this process as an analytical method (PIXE). The physical processes involved, X-ray emission and the various reactions contributing to the background, are described in some detail. The sensitivity is calculated theoretically and the results compared with practical experience. A discussion is given on how the sensitivity can be optimized. The experimental arrangements are described and the various technical problems discussed. The analytical procedure, especially the sample preparation, is described in considerable detail. A number of typical practical applications are discussed. (author)

  9. Verification of motion induced thread effect during tomotherapy using gel dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edvardsson, Anneli; Ljusberg, Anna; Ceberg, Crister; Medin, Joakim; Ambolt, Lee; Nordström, Fredrik; Ceberg, Sofie

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how breathing motion during tomotherapy (Accuray, CA, USA) treatment affects the absorbed dose distribution. The experiments were carried out using gel dosimetry and a motion device simulating respiratory-like motion (HexaMotion, ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden). Normoxic polyacrylamide gels (nPAG) were irradiated, both during respiratory-like motion and in a static mode. To be able to investigate interplay effects the static absorbed dose distribution was convolved with the motion function and differences between the dynamic and convolved static absorbed dose distributions were interpreted as interplay effects. The expected dose blurring was present and the interplay effects formed a spiral pattern in the lower dose volume. This was expected since the motion induced affects the preset pitch and the theoretically predicted thread effect may emerge. In this study, the motion induced thread effect was experimentally verified for the first time

  10. Induced Charge Fluctuations in Semiconductor Detectors with a Cylindrical Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, Victor V.

    2018-01-01

    Now, compound semiconductors are very appealing for hard X-ray room-temperature detectors for medical and astrophysical applications. Despite the attractive properties of compound semiconductors, such as high atomic number, high density, wide band gap, low chemical reactivity and long-term stability, poor hole and electron mobility-lifetime products degrade the energy resolution of these detectors. The main objective of the present study is in development of a mathematical model of the process of the charge induction in a cylindrical geometry with accounting for the charge carrier trapping. The formulae for the moments of the distribution function of the induced charge and the formulae for the mean amplitude and the variance of the signal at the output of the semiconductor detector with a cylindrical geometry were derived. It was shown that the power series expansions of the detector amplitude and the variance in terms of the inverse bias voltage allow determining the Fano factor, electron mobility lifetime product, and the nonuniformity level of the trap density of the semiconductor material.

  11. Analysis of charged particle induced reactions for beam monitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surendra Babu, K. [IOP, Academia Sinica, Taipe, Taiwan (China); Lee, Young-Ouk [Nuclear Data Evaluation Laboratory, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Mukherjee, S., E-mail: smukherjee_msuphy@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara 390 002 (India)

    2012-07-15

    The reaction cross sections for different residual nuclides produced in the charged particle (p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}) induced reactions were calculated and compared with the existing experimental data which are important for beam monitoring and medical diagnostic applications. A detailed literature compilation and comparison were made on the available data sets for the above reactions. These calculations were carried out using the statistical model code TALYS up to 100 MeV, which contains Kalbach's latest systematic for the emission of complex particles and complex particle-induced reactions. All optical model calculations were performed by ECIS-03, which is built into TALYS. The level density, optical model potential parameters were adjusted to get the better description of experimental data. Various pre-equilibrium models were used in the present calculations with default parameters.

  12. Combining Motion-Induced Blindness with Binocular Rivalry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Jaworska

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Motion-induced blindness (MIB and binocular rivalry (BR are examples of multistable phenomena in which our perception varies despite constant retinal input. It has been suggested that both phenomena are related and share a common underlying mechanism. We tried to determine whether experimental manipulations of the target dot and the mask systematically affect MIB and BR in an experimental paradigm that can elicit both phenomena. Eighteen observers fixated the center of a split-screen stereo display that consisted of a distracter mask and a superimposed target dot with different colour (isoluminant Red/Green in corresponding peripheral areas of the left and right eye. Observers reported perceived colour and disappearance of the target dot by pressing and releasing corresponding keys. In a within-subjects design the mask was presented in rivalry or not—with orthogonal drift in the left and right eye or with the same drift in both eyes. In control conditions the mask remained stationary. In addition, the size of the target dot was varied (small, medium, and large. Our results suggest that MIB measured by normalized frequency and duration of target disappearance and BR measured by normalized frequency and duration of colour reversals of the target were both affected by motion in the mask. Surprisingly, binocular rivalry in the mask had only a small effect on BR of the target and virtually no effect on MIB. The overall pattern of normalized MIB and BR measures, however, differed across experimental conditions. In conclusion, the results show some degree of dissociation between MIB and BR. Further analyses will inform whether or not the two phenomena occur independently of each other.

  13. Aggregation in charged nanoparticles solutions induced by different interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, S.; Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2016-05-23

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the aggregation of anionic silica nanoparticles as induced through different interactions. The nanoparticle aggregation is induced by addition of salt (NaCl), cationic protein (lysozyme) and non-ionic surfactant (C12E10) employing different kind of interactions. The results show that the interaction in presence of salt can be explained using DLVO theory whereas non-DLVO forces play important role for interaction of nanoparticles with protein and surfactant. The presence of salt screens the repulsion between charged nanoparticles giving rise to a net attraction in the DLVO potential. On the other hand, strong electrostatic attraction between nanoparticle and oppositely charged protein leads to protein-mediated nanoparticle aggregation. In case of non-ionic surfactant, the relatively long-range attractive depletion interaction is found to be responsible for the particle aggregation. Interestingly, the completely different interactions lead to similar kind of aggregate morphology. The nanoparticle aggregates formed are found to have mass fractal nature having a fractal dimension (~2.5) consistent with diffusion limited type of fractal morphology in all three cases.

  14. Using Simulated Ground Motions to Constrain Near-Source Ground Motion Prediction Equations in Areas Experiencing Induced Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydlon, S. A.; Dunham, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    Recent increases in seismic activity in historically quiescent areas such as Oklahoma, Texas, and Arkansas, including large, potentially induced events such as the 2011 Mw 5.6 Prague, OK, earthquake, have spurred the need for investigation into expected ground motions associated with these seismic sources. The neoteric nature of this seismicity increase corresponds to a scarcity of ground motion recordings within 50 km of earthquakes Mw 3.0 and greater, with increasing scarcity at larger magnitudes. Gathering additional near-source ground motion data will help better constraints on regional ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs) and will happen over time, but this leaves open the possibility of damaging earthquakes occurring before potential ground shaking and seismic hazard in these areas are properly understood. To aid the effort of constraining near-source GMPEs associated with induced seismicity, we integrate synthetic ground motion data from simulated earthquakes into the process. Using the dynamic rupture and seismic wave propagation code waveqlab3d, we perform verification and validation exercises intended to establish confidence in simulated ground motions for use in constraining GMPEs. We verify the accuracy of our ground motion simulator by performing the PEER/SCEC layer-over-halfspace comparison problem LOH.1 Validation exercises to ensure that we are synthesizing realistic ground motion data include comparisons to recorded ground motions for specific earthquakes in target areas of Oklahoma between Mw 3.0 and 4.0. Using a 3D velocity structure that includes a 1D structure with additional small-scale heterogeneity, the properties of which are based on well-log data from Oklahoma, we perform ground motion simulations of small (Mw 3.0 - 4.0) earthquakes using point moment tensor sources. We use the resulting synthetic ground motion data to develop GMPEs for small earthquakes in Oklahoma. Preliminary results indicate that ground motions can be amplified

  15. Combustion and emissions control in diesel-methane dual fuel engines: The effects of methane supply method combined with variable in-cylinder charge bulk motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlucci, Antonio P.; Laforgia, Domenico; Saracino, Roberto; Toto, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We studied dual fuel combustion in diesel engines. → Bulk flow structure of in-cylinder charge and methane supply method were investigated. → Swirl charge motion is capable to enhance air-methane mixture oxidation at low loads. → Methane port injection is capable to reduce unburned hydrocarbons and nitric oxides. - Abstract: In this paper, the results of an extensive experimental campaign about dual fuel combustion development and the related pollutant emissions are reported, paying particular attention to the effect of both the in-cylinder charge bulk motion and methane supply method. A diesel common rail research engine was converted to operate in dual fuel mode and, by activating/deactivating the two different inlet valves of the engine (i.e. swirl and tumble), three different bulk flow structures of the charge were induced inside the cylinder. A methane port injection method was proposed, in which the gaseous fuel was injected into the inlet duct very close to the intake valves, in order to obtain a stratified-like air-fuel mixture up to the end of the compression stroke. For comparison purposes, a homogeneous-like air-fuel mixture was obtained injecting methane more upstream the intake line. Combining the different positions of the methane injector and the three possible bulk flow structures, seven different engine inlet setup were tested. In this way, it was possible to evaluate the effects on dual fuel combustion due to the interaction between methane injector position and charge bulk motion. In addition, methane injection pressure and diesel pilot injection parameters were varied setting the engine at two operating conditions. For some interesting low load tests, the combustion development was studied more in detail by means of direct observation of the process, using an in-cylinder endoscope and a digital CCD camera. Each combustion image was post-processed by a dedicated software, in order to extract only those portions with flame

  16. Motion of the relativistic charged particle in an axisymmetric toroidal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiyoda, K; Sugimoto, H [Electrotechnical Labs., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1980-01-01

    The relativistic theory of motion of one particle by Morozov and Solov'ev is summarized for convenience of the present study. Then, a drift equation is given and four constants of motion, E/sub 0/, J perpendicular, J and J parallel, are obtained. These constants of motion are used in analyzing the particle motion in an axisymmetric toroidal system. The displacement of the particle from the magnetic surface, ..delta..r, and the period of the banana motion, tau, are obtained. The relativistic expressions of the displacement, ..delta..r, and the period, tau, are obtained by multiplying the corresponding nonrelativistic expressions by (1 - v parallel/sup 2//c/sup 2/) - 1/2, where the relativistic expression of ..delta..r includes the relativistic mass in terms of Larmor radius r/sub L/.

  17. Microscopic kinetic analysis of space-charge induced optical microbunching in a relativistic electron beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Marinelli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal space-charge forces from density fluctuations generated by shot noise can be a major source of microbunching instability in relativistic high brightness electron beams. The gain in microbunching due to this effect is broadband, extending at least up to optical frequencies, where the induced structure on the beam distribution gives rise to effects such as coherent optical transition radiation. In the high-frequency regime, theoretical and computational analyses of microbunching formation require a full three-dimensional treatment. In this paper we address the problem of space-charge induced optical microbunching formation in the high-frequency limit when transverse thermal motion due to finite emittance is included for the first time. We derive an analytical description of this process based on the beam’s plasma dielectric function. We discuss the effect of transverse temperature on the angular distribution of microbunching gain and its connection to the physics of Landau damping in longitudinal plasma oscillations. Application of the theory to a relevant experimental scenario is discussed. The analytical results obtained are then compared to the predictions arising from high resolution three-dimensional molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. The motional stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is the worldwide standard technique for internal magnetic field pitch angle measurements in magnetized plasmas. Traditionally, it is based on using polarimetry to measure the polarization direction of light emitted from a hydrogenic species in a neutral beam. As the beam passes through the magnetized plasma at a high velocity, in its rest frame it perceives a Lorentz electric field. This field causes the H-alpha emission to be split and polarized. A new technique under development adds laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to a diagnostic neutral beam (DNB) for an MSE measurement that will enable radially resolved magnetic field magnitude as well as pitch angle measurements in even low-field (experiments. An MSE-LIF system will be installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. It will enable reconstructions of the plasma pressure, q-profile and current as well as, in conjunction with the existing MSE system, measurements of radial electric fields.

  19. Effects of thermal motion on electromagnetically induced absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilchin, E.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Firstenberg, O.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the effect of thermal motion and buffer-gas collisions on a four-level closed N system interacting with strong pump(s) and a weak probe. This is the simplest system that experiences electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) due to transfer of coherence via spontaneous emission from the excited state to the ground state. We investigate the influence of Doppler broadening, velocity-changing collisions (VCC), and phase-changing collisions (PCC) with a buffer gas on the EIA spectrum of optically active atoms. In addition to exact expressions, we present an approximate solution for the probe absorption spectrum, which provides physical insight into the behavior of the EIA peak due to VCC, PCC, and the wave-vector difference between the pump and probe beams. VCC are shown to produce a wide pedestal at the base of the EIA peak, which is scarcely affected by the pump-probe angular deviation, whereas the sharp central EIA peak becomes weaker and broader due to the residual Doppler-Dicke effect. Using diffusionlike equations for the atomic coherences and populations, we construct a spatial-frequency filter for a spatially structured probe beam and show that Ramsey narrowing of the EIA peak is obtained for beams of finite width.

  20. Spontaneous local alpha oscillations predict motion-induced blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händel, Barbara F; Jensen, Ole

    2014-11-01

    Bistable visual illusions are well suited for exploring the neuronal states of the brain underlying changes in perception. In this study, we investigated oscillatory activity associated with 'motion-induced blindness' (MIB), which denotes the perceptual disappearance of salient target stimuli when a moving pattern is superimposed on them (Bonneh et al., ). We applied an MIB paradigm in which illusory target disappearances would occur independently in the left and right hemifields. Both illusory and real target disappearance were followed by an alpha lateralization with weaker contralateral than ipsilateral alpha activity (~10 Hz). However, only the illusion showed early alpha lateralization in the opposite direction, which preceded the alpha effect present for both conditions and coincided with the estimated onset of the illusion. The duration of the illusory disappearance was further predicted by the magnitude of this early lateralization when considered over subjects. In the gamma band (60-80 Hz), we found an increase in activity contralateral relative to ipsilateral only after a real disappearance. Whereas early alpha activity was predictive of onset and length of the illusory percept, gamma activity showed no modulation in relation to the illusion. Our study demonstrates that the spontaneous changes in visual alpha activity have perceptual consequences. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Neural mechanisms underlying sound-induced visual motion perception: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidaka, Souta; Higuchi, Satomi; Teramoto, Wataru; Sugita, Yoichi

    2017-07-01

    Studies of crossmodal interactions in motion perception have reported activation in several brain areas, including those related to motion processing and/or sensory association, in response to multimodal (e.g., visual and auditory) stimuli that were both in motion. Recent studies have demonstrated that sounds can trigger illusory visual apparent motion to static visual stimuli (sound-induced visual motion: SIVM): A visual stimulus blinking at a fixed location is perceived to be moving laterally when an alternating left-right sound is also present. Here, we investigated brain activity related to the perception of SIVM using a 7T functional magnetic resonance imaging technique. Specifically, we focused on the patterns of neural activities in SIVM and visually induced visual apparent motion (VIVM). We observed shared activations in the middle occipital area (V5/hMT), which is thought to be involved in visual motion processing, for SIVM and VIVM. Moreover, as compared to VIVM, SIVM resulted in greater activation in the superior temporal area and dominant functional connectivity between the V5/hMT area and the areas related to auditory and crossmodal motion processing. These findings indicate that similar but partially different neural mechanisms could be involved in auditory-induced and visually-induced motion perception, and neural signals in auditory, visual, and, crossmodal motion processing areas closely and directly interact in the perception of SIVM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prediction of Motion Induced Image Degradation Using a Markerless Motion Tracker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rasmus Munch; Johannesen, Helle Hjorth; Henriksen, Otto Mølby

    In this work a markerless motion tracker, TCL2, is used to predict image quality in 3D T1 weighted MPRAGE MRI brain scans. An experienced radiologist scored the image quality for 172 scans as being usable or not usable, i.e. if a repeated scan was required. Based on five motion parameters......, a classification algorithm was trained and an accuracy for identifying not usable images of 95.9% was obtained with a sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 96.3%. This work shows the feasibility of the markerless motion tracker for predicting image quality with a high accuracy....

  3. Haptically Induced Illusory Self-motion and the Influence of Context of Motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Nordahl, Rolf; Sikström, Erik

    2012-01-01

    of the feet. The experiment was based on the a within-subjects design and included four conditions, each representing one context of motion: an elevator, a train compartment, a bathroom, and a completely dark environment. The audiohaptic stimuli was identical across all conditions. The participants’ sensation...... of movement was assessed by means of existing measures of illusory self-motion, namely, reported self-motion illusion per stimulus type, illusion compellingness, intensity and onset time. Finally the participants were also asked to estimate the experienced direction of movement. While the data obtained from...

  4. Mass and charge distributions in Fe-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madani, H.; Mignerey, A.C.; Marchetti, A.A.; Weston-Dawkes, A.P.; Kehoe, W.L.; Obenshain, F.

    1995-01-01

    The charge and mass of the projectile-like fragments produced in the 12-MeV/nucleon 56 Fe + 165 Ho reaction were measured at a laboratory scattering angle of 16 degrees. The mass and charge distributions of the projectile-like fragments were generated as a function of total kinetic energy loss (TKEL), and characterized by their neutron and proton centroids and variances, and correlation factors. A weak drift of the system towards mass asymmetry, opposite to the direction which minimizes the potential energy of the composite system, was observed. The increase in the variances with energy loss is consistent with a nucleon exchange mechanism as a means for energy dissipation. Predictions of two nucleon exchange models, Randrup's and, Tassan-Got's models, are compared to the experimental results of the 672-MeV 56 Fe + 165 Ho reaction and to other Fe-induced reactions. The proton and neutron centroids were found to be generally better reproduced by Tassan-Got's model than by Randrup's model. The variances and correlation factor are well reproduced for asymmetric systems by both models

  5. Laser-induced charge exchange in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riera, A.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of laser-induced charge transfer (LICT) in ion-atom collisions is presented for the range of impact energies in which a quasimolecular description is appropriate. For each relative orientation of the AC field, LICT cross sections can be obtained with trivial modifications of standard programs. Simpler, perturbative expressions for the orientation-averaged cross sections are accurate for I v -1 6 W s cm -3 , and the analytical Landau-Zener perturbative expression often provides good estimates for these cross sections. The practical advantages of the dressed state formalism as an alternative approach are critically examined, and the general characteristics of LICT cross sections in multicharged ion-atom collisions are shown with the help of an example. (Auth.)

  6. Plasmon-induced charge separation: chemistry and wide applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuma, Tetsu; Nishi, Hiroyasu; Ishida, Takuya

    2017-05-01

    Recent development of nanoplasmonics has stimulated chemists to utilize plasmonic nanomaterials for efficient and distinctive photochemical applications, and physicists to boldly go inside the "wet" chemistry world. The discovery of plasmon-induced charge separation (PICS) has even accelerated these trends. On the other hand, some confusion is found in discussions about PICS. In this perspective, we focus on differences between PICS and some other phenomena such as co-catalysis effect and plasmonic nanoantenna effect. In addition, materials and nanostructures suitable for PICS are shown, and characteristics and features unique to PICS are documented. Although it is well known that PICS has been applied to photovoltaics and photocatalysis, here light is shed on other applications that take better advantage of PICS, such as chemical sensing and biosensing, various photochromisms, photoswitchable functionalities and nanoscale photofabrication.

  7. Charged particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, C.

    1999-01-01

    We report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal reason for setting up the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged-particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The main goal of NACRE network was the transparency in the procedure of calculating the rates. More specifically this compilation aims at: 1. updating the experimental and theoretical data; 2. distinctly identifying the sources of the data used in rate calculation; 3. evaluating the uncertainties and errors; 4. providing numerically integrated reaction rates; 5. providing reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. The compilation is concerned with the reaction rates that are large enough for the target lifetimes shorter than the age of the Universe, taken equal to 15 x 10 9 y. The reaction rates are provided for temperatures lower than T = 10 10 K. In parallel with the rate compilation a cross section data base has been created and located at the site http://pntpm.ulb.ac.be/nacre..htm. (authors)

  8. Ion induced charge collection in GaAs MESFETs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A.; Knudson, A.; McMorrow, D.; Anderson, W.; Roussos, J.; Espy, S.; Buchner, S.; Kang, K.; Kerns, D.; Kerns, S.

    1989-01-01

    Charge collection measurements on GaAs MESFET test structures demonstrate that more charge can be collected at the gate than is deposited in the active layer and more charge can be collected at the drain than the total amount of charge produced by the ion. Enhanced charge collection at the gate edge is also observed. The current transients produced by the energetic ions have been measured directly with about 20 picosecond resolution

  9. Chaotic motion of a harmonically bound charged particle in a magnetic field, in the presence of a half-plane barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Wiegel, F.W.; Creswick, Richard J.

    1991-01-01

    The motion in the plane of an harmonically bound charged particle interacting with a magnetic field and a half-plane barrier along the positive x-axis is studied. The magnetic field is perpendicular to the plane in which the particle moves. This motion is integrable in between collisions of the

  10. On the theory of the relativistic motion of a charged particle in the field of intense electromagnetic radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milant' ev, V. P., E-mail: vmilantiev@sci.pfu.edu.ru; Castillo, A. J., E-mail: vmilant@mail.ru [Peoples' Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2013-04-15

    Averaged relativistic equations of motion of a charged particle in the field of intense electromagnetic radiation have been obtained in the geometrical optics approximation using the Bogoliubov method. Constraints are determined under which these equations are valid. Oscillating additions to the smoothed dynamical variables of the particle have been found; they are reduced to known expressions in the case of the circularly and linearly polarized plane waves. It has been shown that the expressions for the averaged relativistic force in both cases contain new additional small terms weakening its action. The known difference between the expressions for the ponderomotive force in the cases of circularly and linearly polarized waves has been confirmed.

  11. The motion of color-charged particles as a means of testing the non-Abelian dark matter model

    OpenAIRE

    Dzhunushaliev, V.; Folomeev, V.; Protsenko, N.

    2018-01-01

    A possibility is discussed for experimental testing of the dark matter model supported by a classic non-Abelian SU(3) gauge (Yang-Mills) field. Our approach is based on the analysis of the motion of color-charged particles on the background of color electric and magnetic fields using the Wong equations. Estimating the magnitudes of the color fields near the edge of a galaxy, we employ them in obtaining the general analytic solutions to the Wong equations. Using the latter, we calculate the ma...

  12. Discrete allowed and forbidden states in the classical mechanical domain in the charged particle motion in a magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, R.K.; Punithavelu, A.M.; Banerjee, S.B.

    1994-01-01

    The properties of the motion of charged particles injected almost parallel to the magnetic field are studied by measuring the electron current as a function of the cathode voltage (electron energy), as electrons from the gun traverse a distance L to the detector. The plate current is found to exhibit oscillatory behaviour in contradistinction with the behaviour expected according to the standard classical mechanical paradigm, with the peaks fitting a relation obtained from a quantum like theory predicting such a behaviour. (author). 4 refs, 1 fig, 1 tab

  13. Analytical solutions for the motion of a charged particle in electric and magnetic fields via non-singular fractional derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Delgado, V. F.; Gómez-Aguilar, J. F.; Taneco-Hernandez, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we propose fractional differential equations for the motion of a charged particle in electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields. Exact solutions are obtained for the fractional differential equations by employing the Laplace transform method. The temporal fractional differential equations are considered in the Caputo-Fabrizio-Caputo and Atangana-Baleanu-Caputo sense. Application examples consider constant, ramp and harmonic fields. In addition, we present numerical results for different values of the fractional order. In all cases, when α = 1, we recover the standard electrodynamics.

  14. The effects of area postrema lesions and selective vagotomy on motion-induced conditioned taste aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Robert A.; Sutton, R. L.; Mckenna, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is one of several behaviors which was suggested as a putative measure of motion sickness in rats. A review is made of studies which used surgical disruption of area postrema or the vagus nerve to investigate whether CTA and vomiting induced by motion may depend on common neural pathways or structures. When the chemoreceptive function of the area postrema (AP) is destroyed by complete ablation, rats develop CTA and cats and monkeys develop CTA and vomit. Thus the AP is not crucially involved in either CTA or vomiting induced by motion. However, after complete denervation of the stomach or after labyrinthectomy rats do not develop CTA when motion is used as the unconditioned stimulus. Studies of brainstem projections of the vagus nerve, the area postrema, the periaqueductal grey, and the vestibular system are used as the basis for speculation about regions which could mediate both motion-induced vomiting and behavioral food aversion.

  15. Induced motion of domain walls in multiferroics with quadratic interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerasimchuk, Victor S., E-mail: viktor.gera@gmail.com [National Technical University of Ukraine “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Peremohy Avenue 37, 03056 Kiev (Ukraine); Shitov, Anatoliy A., E-mail: shitov@mail.ru [Donbass National Academy of Civil Engineering, Derzhavina Street 2, 86123 Makeevka, Donetsk Region (Ukraine)

    2013-10-15

    We theoretically study the dynamics of 180-degree domain wall of the ab-type in magnetic materials with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction in external alternating magnetic and electric fields. The features of the oscillatory and translational motions of the domain walls and stripe structures depending on the parameters of external fields and characteristics of the multiferroics are discussed. The possibility of the domain walls drift in a purely electric field is established. - Highlights: • We study DW and stripe DS in multiferroics with quadratic magnetoelectric interaction. • We build up the theory of oscillatory and translational (drift) DW and DS motion. • DW motion can be caused by crossed alternating electric and magnetic fields. • DW motion can be caused by alternating “pure” electric field. • DW drift velocity is formed by the AFM and Dzyaloshinskii interaction terms.

  16. The Impact of Motion Induced Interruptions on Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-23

    found that even participants presenting with minor physiological effects of motion experienced a decline in multitasking performance. Further, Yu...literature has investigated the impact of task based interruptions such as being inter- rupted by a phone call or writing an email . In these...Engineers Journal. 102 (2) 65-72. Matsangas, P. (2013). The Effect of Mild Motion Sickness and Sopite Syndrome on Multitasking Cognitive Performance

  17. Constants of motion for the planar orbit of a charged particle in a static and uniform magnetic field: the magnetic Laplace–Runge–Lenz vector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velasco-Martínez, D; Kunold, A; Cardoso, J L; Ibarra-Sierra, V G; Sandoval-Santana, J C

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we introduce an alternative approach to studying the motion of a planar charged particle subject to a static uniform magnetic field. It is well known that an electric charge under a uniform magnetic field has a planar motion if its initial velocity is perpendicular to the magnetic field. Although some constants of motion (CsM), as the energy and the angular momentum, have been widely discussed for this system, others have been neglected. We find that the angular momentum, the generator of the magnetic translations and the magnetic Laplace–Runge–Lenz vector are CsM for this particular system. We show also that these three quantities form an orthogonal basis of vectors. The present work addresses many aspects of the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field that should be useful for students and tutors of the classical mechanics courses at the senior undergraduate level. (paper)

  18. Motion of a point charge in electromagnetic fields under consideration of radiation damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoeckel, H.

    1976-01-01

    The 'new equation' of Mo and Papas for the description of a point charge in an electromagnetic field under consideration of radiation damping, published in 1971, doesn't show the known disadvantages of the Lorentz-Dirac equation, taken as a basis up to now. Different forms of the Mo-Papas equation are derived and the resulting force- and power-balances are discussed. Exact and approximated solutions are derived for simple given fields, for instance for a homogeneous magnetic field, a homogeneous electric field and for the field of a resting point charge. The scattering angles are calculated for the scattering of a point charge by a homogeneous magnetic resp. electric field of finite extension. The results agree well with approximation formulas of other authors. (author)

  19. Enhancement of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitsas, Michael M [Saline, MI; Raghavan, Kamaldev [Houston, TX

    2011-11-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to increase Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Enhancement is needed in such applications as harnessing of clean and renewable energy from ocean/river currents using the ocean energy converter VIVACE (Vortex Induced Vibration for Aquatic Clean Energy).

  20. Motionally-induced electromagnetic fields generated by idealized ocean currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, R. H.; Mysak, L. A.

    Using the induction equation, we investigate the generation of electromagnetic fields by the motional electromagnetic induction due to ocean currents. In this paper, solutions are presented for a linear induction equation for the magnetic flux density vector which contains prescribed time-independent ocean current and conductivity fields. Once the magnetic flux density is known, the electric field and electric current density are easily obtained by differentiation. Solutions are given for several examples of idealized flow which include: 1) Vertically and horizontally sheared plane-parallel flow with depth-dependent conductivity; 2) A simple Stommel circulation gyre; and 3) Symmetric gyres. The results indicate that typical ocean current features induce magnetic fields with magnitudes reaching 100's of nT within the water and about 1-10 outside of the water. For the case of a field of gyres, the ocean-induced magnetic fields decay away from the ocean on spatial scales set by the horizontal scale of the ocean feature. At the altitudes of magnetic field satellite surveys, ocean-induced magnetic fields may retain values of a few nT, which are strong enough to be detected. Thus it is concluded that satellite observations of the earth's main magnetic field and, in particular, the observed temporal variations, could be affected by the ocean circulation. Summary and discussion In Section 3, we found exact solutions to the induction equation for idealized flows. The results gave magnitudes of about tens to hundreds of nT for the magnetic fields bH, about 10-5 V/m for the electric fields E, and about 10-5 A/m2 for the electric current density J induced by the ocean currents. These figures are in general agreement with the calculations of Lilley et al. (1993). In Section 4.2 we obtained solutions for the magnetic field above the ocean surface for the case of a Stommel gyre and a field of symmetric gyres. It was found in the last case that ocean gyres with a total transport

  1. Motion Cues in Flight Simulation and Simulator Induced Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    military F7 .. vehicles, surface excavation equipment, underground mining devices, railway locomotives, .A space vehicles, shiv bridges, and submarines. Of...Evaluatort Rleference to Fukuda is: Fukuda, T. Postural behavior and motion sickness. Acca Otolaryngol. (Stockholm), 1976, B1:37-241.) %kI RTD-5

  2. Neural correlates of visually induced self-motion illusion in depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Gyula; Raabe, Markus; Greenlee, Mark W

    2008-08-01

    Optic-flow fields can induce the conscious illusion of self-motion in a stationary observer. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to reveal the differential processing of self- and object-motion in the human brain. Subjects were presented a constantly expanding optic-flow stimulus, composed of disparate red-blue dots, viewed through red-blue glasses to generate a vivid percept of three-dimensional motion. We compared the activity obtained during periods of illusory self-motion with periods of object-motion percept. We found that the right MT+, precuneus, as well as areas located bilaterally along the dorsal part of the intraparietal sulcus and along the left posterior intraparietal sulcus were more active during self-motion perception than during object-motion. Additional signal increases were located in the depth of the left superior frontal sulcus, over the ventral part of the left anterior cingulate, in the depth of the right central sulcus and in the caudate nucleus/putamen. We found no significant deactivations associated with self-motion perception. Our results suggest that the illusory percept of self-motion is correlated with the activation of a network of areas, ranging from motion-specific areas to regions involved in visuo-vestibular integration, visual imagery, decision making, and introspection.

  3. Reduction of vortex induced forces and motion through surface roughness control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernitsas, Michael M; Raghavan, Kamaldev

    2014-04-01

    Roughness is added to the surface of a bluff body in a relative motion with respect to a fluid. The amount, size, and distribution of roughness on the body surface is controlled passively or actively to modify the flow around the body and subsequently the Vortex Induced Forces and Motion (VIFM). The added roughness, when designed and implemented appropriately, affects in a predetermined way the boundary layer, the separation of the boundary layer, the level of turbulence, the wake, the drag and lift forces, and consequently the Vortex Induced Motion (VIM), and the fluid-structure interaction. The goal of surface roughness control is to decrease/suppress Vortex Induced Forces and Motion. Suppression is required when fluid-structure interaction becomes destructive as in VIM of flexible cylinders or rigid cylinders on elastic support, such as underwater pipelines, marine risers, tubes in heat exchangers, nuclear fuel rods, cooling towers, SPAR offshore platforms.

  4. p-n Junction Dynamics Induced in a Graphene Channel by Ferroelectric-Domain Motion in the Substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurchak, Anatolii I.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Strikha, Maksym V.; Morozovska, Anna N.

    2017-01-01

    The p - n junction dynamics induced in a graphene channel by stripe-domain nucleation, motion, and reversal in a ferroelectric substrate is explored using a self-consistent approach based on Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire phenomenology combined with classical electrostatics. Relatively low gate voltages are required to induce the hysteresis of ferroelectric polarization and graphene charge in response to the periodic gate voltage. Pronounced nonlinear hysteresis of graphene conductance with a wide memory window corresponds to high amplitudes of gate voltage. Also, we reveal the extrinsic size effect in the dependence of the graphene-channel conductivity on its length. We predict that the top-gate–dielectric-layer–graphene-channel–ferroelectric-substrate nanostructure considered here can be a promising candidate for the fabrication of the next generation of modulators and rectifiers based on the graphene p - n junctions.

  5. Charge carrier motion in disordered conjugated polymers: a multiscale ab-initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    We developed an ab-initio multiscale method for simulation of carrier transport in large disordered systems, based on direct calculation of electronic states and electron-phonon coupling constants. It enabled us to obtain the never seen before rich microscopic details of carrier motion in conjugated polymers, which led us to question several assumptions of phenomenological models, widely used in such systems. The macroscopic mobility of disordered poly(3- hexylthiophene) (P3HT) polymer, extracted from our simulation, is in agreement with experimental results from the literature.

  6. Charging-delay induced dust acoustic collisionless shock wave: Roles of negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Samiran; Bharuthram, R.; Khan, Manoranjan; Gupta, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of charging-delay and negative ions on nonlinear dust acoustic waves are investigated. It has been found that the charging-delay induced anomalous dissipation causes generation of dust acoustic collisionless shock waves in an electronegative dusty plasma. The small but finite amplitude wave is governed by a Korteweg-de Vries Burger equation in which the Burger term arises due to the charging-delay. Numerical investigations reveal that the charging-delay induced dissipation and shock strength decreases (increases) with the increase of negative ion concentration (temperature)

  7. Cost based interconnection charges as a way to induce competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten

    The objective of this paper is to analyse the relationship between regulation of interconnection charges and the level of competition. One of the most important issues in the debate on interconnect regulation has been use of forward looking costs for setting of interconnection charges. This debat...... has been ongoing within the EU as well as in US. This paper discusses the European experiences and in particular the Danish experiences with use of cost based interconnection charges, and their impact on competition in the telecom market....

  8. Empirical Ground Motion Characterization of Induced Seismicity in Alberta and Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, M.; Atkinson, G. M.; Assatourians, K.

    2017-12-01

    We develop empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for ground motions from induced earthquakes in Alberta and Oklahoma following the stochastic-model-based method of Atkinson et al. (2015 BSSA). The Oklahoma ground-motion database is compiled from over 13,000 small to moderate seismic events (M 1 to 5.8) recorded at 1600 seismic stations, at distances from 1 to 750 km. The Alberta database is compiled from over 200 small to moderate seismic events (M 1 to 4.2) recorded at 50 regional stations, at distances from 30 to 500 km. A generalized inversion is used to solve for regional source, attenuation and site parameters. The obtained parameters describe the regional attenuation, stress parameter and site amplification. Resolving these parameters allows for the derivation of regionally-calibrated GMPEs that can be used to compare ground motion observations between waste water injection (Oklahoma) and hydraulic fracture induced events (Alberta), and further compare induced observations with ground motions resulting from natural sources (California, NGAWest2). The derived GMPEs have applications for the evaluation of hazards from induced seismicity and can be used to track amplitudes across the regions in real time, which is useful for ground-motion-based alerting systems and traffic light protocols.

  9. Charge transfer induced activity of graphene for oxygen reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Anli; Xia, Weijun; Dou, Shuo; Wang, Shuangyin; Zhang, Lipeng; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-01-01

    Tetracyanoethylene (TCNE), with its strong electron-accepting ability, was used to dope graphene as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The charge transfer process was observed from graphene to TCNE by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman characterizations. Our density functional theory calculations found that the charge transfer behavior led to an enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity for the ORR. (paper)

  10. Strong charge state dependence of H+ and H2+ sputtering induced by slow highly charged ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakutani, N.; Azuma, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Komaki, K.; Kuroki, K.

    1995-01-01

    Secondary ion emission has been studied for very slow ( similar 0.01ν B ) highly charged Ar and N ions bombarding C 60 containing hydrogen as an impurity. It is found that the fragmentations of C 60 are very rare even for Ar 16+ bombardments. On the other hand, the sputtering of H + and H 2 + has been observed to increase drastically as a function of incident charge q like q γ (e.g., γ similar 4.6 for H + sputtering by 500 eV Ar q+ ). (orig.)

  11. Thermally induced micro-motion by inflection in optical potential

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šiler, Martin; Jákl, Petr; Brzobohatý, Oto; Ryabov, A.; Filip, R.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, MAY (2017), s. 1-8, č. článku 1697. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36681G; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : molecular motors * brownian-motion * manipulation * efficiency * tweezers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers OBOR OECD: Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  12. Using the charge-stabilization technique in the double ionization potential equation-of-motion calculations with dianion references.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuś, Tomasz; Krylov, Anna I

    2011-08-28

    The charge-stabilization method is applied to double ionization potential equation-of-motion (EOM-DIP) calculations to stabilize unstable dianion reference functions. The auto-ionizing character of the dianionic reference states spoils the numeric performance of EOM-DIP limiting applications of this method. We demonstrate that reliable excitation energies can be computed by EOM-DIP using a stabilized resonance wave function instead of the lowest energy solution corresponding to the neutral + free electron(s) state of the system. The details of charge-stabilization procedure are discussed and illustrated by examples. The choice of optimal stabilizing Coulomb potential, which is strong enough to stabilize the dianion reference, yet, minimally perturbs the target states of the neutral, is the crux of the approach. Two algorithms of choosing optimal parameters of the stabilization potential are presented. One is based on the orbital energies, and another--on the basis set dependence of the total Hartree-Fock energy of the reference. Our benchmark calculations of the singlet-triplet energy gaps in several diradicals show a remarkable improvement of the EOM-DIP accuracy in problematic cases. Overall, the excitation energies in diradicals computed using the stabilized EOM-DIP are within 0.2 eV from the reference EOM spin-flip values. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  13. Drift motion of a charged particle in the crossed axial magnetic and radial electric fields, and the electric field of a rotating potential wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliseev, Yu.N.; Stepanov, K.N.

    1983-01-01

    In the drift motion approximation solution of the problem is obtained on the motion of a nonrelativistic charged particle in the crossed axial magnetic and radial electric fields, and the electric field of a rotating potential wave under cherenkov and modified cyclotron resonances. The static radial electric field potential is supposed to be close to the parabolic one. The drift motion equations and their integrals are preseOted. The experimentally obtained effect of plasma ionic component division in the crossed fields under the excitation of ion cyclotron oscillations is explained with the help of the theory developed in the paper

  14. Variational Symplectic Integrator for Long-Time Simulations of the Guiding-Center Motion of Charged Particles in General Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Hong; Guan Xiaoyin

    2008-01-01

    A variational symplectic integrator for the guiding-center motion of charged particles in general magnetic fields is developed for long-time simulation studies of magnetized plasmas. Instead of discretizing the differential equations of the guiding-center motion, the action of the guiding-center motion is discretized and minimized to obtain the iteration rules for advancing the dynamics. The variational symplectic integrator conserves exactly a discrete Lagrangian symplectic structure, and has better numerical properties over long integration time, compared with standard integrators, such as the standard and variable time-step fourth order Runge-Kutta methods

  15. Variational Symplectic Integrator for Long-Time Simulations of the Guiding-Center Motion of Charged Particles in General Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, H.; Guan, X.

    2008-01-01

    A variational symplectic integrator for the guiding-center motion of charged particles in general magnetic fields is developed for long-time simulation studies of magnetized plasmas. Instead of discretizing the differential equations of the guiding-center motion, the action of the guiding-center motion is discretized and minimized to obtain the iteration rules for advancing the dynamics. The variational symplectic integrator conserves exactly a discrete Lagrangian symplectic structure, and has better numerical properties over long integration time, compared with standard integrators, such as the standard and variable time-step fourth order Runge-Kutta methods.

  16. Study of position resolution for cathode readout MWPC with measurement of induced charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, J.; Iwasaki, H.; Kageyama, T.; Kuribayashi, S.; Nakamura, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takeda, T.

    1983-01-01

    A readout technqiue of multiwire proportional chambers by measurement of charges induced on cathode strips, orthogonal to anode wires, requires an algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position. With given chamber parameters and under the influence of noise, resolution limits depend on the chosen algorithm. We have studied the position resolution obtained by the centroid method and by the charge-ratio method, both using three consecutive cathode strips. While the centroid method uses a single number, the center of gravity of the measured charges, the charge-ratio method uses the ratios of the charges Qsub(i-1)/Qsub(i) and Qsub(i+1)/Qsub(i) where Qsub(i) is the largest. To obtain a given resolution, the charge-ratio method generally allows wider cathode strips and therefore a smaller number of readout channels than the centroid method. (orig.)

  17. Planar density of vacuum charge induced by a supercritical Coulomb potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalilov, V.R., E-mail: khalilov@phys.msu.ru; Mamsurov, I.V.

    2017-06-10

    Analytical expressions for the planar density of an induced vacuum charge are obtained in a strong Coulomb potential in coordinate space. Treatment is based on a self-adjoint extension approach for constructing of the Green's function of a charged fermion in an external electromagnetic field. Induced vacuum charge density is calculated and analyzed in subcritical and supercritical Coulomb potentials for massless and massive fermions. We argue that the virtual and so-called real vacuum polarizations contribute in an induced vacuum charge in a supercritical Coulomb potential. The behavior of the polarization vacuum charge density is investigated at long and short distances from the Coulomb center. The induced vacuum charge has a screening sign. Screening of a Coulomb impurity in graphene is briefly discussed. The real vacuum polarization charge density that acquires the quantum electrodynamics vacuum in a supercritical Coulomb potential due to the real vacuum polarization is calculated. It is shown that the vacuum charge densities essentially differ in massive and massless cases. We expect that our results can, as a matter of principle, be tested in graphene with a supercritical Coulomb impurity.

  18. Planar density of vacuum charge induced by a supercritical Coulomb potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.R. Khalilov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Analytical expressions for the planar density of an induced vacuum charge are obtained in a strong Coulomb potential in coordinate space. Treatment is based on a self-adjoint extension approach for constructing of the Green's function of a charged fermion in an external electromagnetic field. Induced vacuum charge density is calculated and analyzed in subcritical and supercritical Coulomb potentials for massless and massive fermions. We argue that the virtual and so-called real vacuum polarizations contribute in an induced vacuum charge in a supercritical Coulomb potential. The behavior of the polarization vacuum charge density is investigated at long and short distances from the Coulomb center. The induced vacuum charge has a screening sign. Screening of a Coulomb impurity in graphene is briefly discussed. The real vacuum polarization charge density that acquires the quantum electrodynamics vacuum in a supercritical Coulomb potential due to the real vacuum polarization is calculated. It is shown that the vacuum charge densities essentially differ in massive and massless cases. We expect that our results can, as a matter of principle, be tested in graphene with a supercritical Coulomb impurity.

  19. Dielectrophoretic deformation of thin liquid films induced by surface charge patterns on dielectric substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, C.W.J.; Kuijpers, C.J.; Zeegers, J.C.H.; Darhuber, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the deformation of thin liquid films induced by surface charge patterns at the solid–liquid interface quantitatively by experiments and numerical simulations. We deposited a surface charge distribution on dielectric substrates by applying potential differences between a conductive liquid

  20. Motion-induced eddy current thermography for high-speed inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This letter proposes a novel motion-induced eddy current based thermography (MIECT for high-speed inspection. In contrast to conventional eddy current thermography (ECT based on a time-varying magnetic field created by an AC coil, the motion-induced eddy current is induced by the relative motion between magnetic field and inspected objects. A rotating magnetic field created by three-phase windings is used to investigate the heating principle and feasibility of the proposed method. Firstly, based on Faraday’s law the distribution of MIEC is investigated, which is then validated by numerical simulation. Further, experimental studies are conducted to validate the proposed method by creating rotating magnetic fields at different speeds from 600 rpm to 6000 rpm, and it is verified that rotating speed will increase MIEC intensity and thereafter improve the heating efficiency. The conclusion can be preliminarily drawn that the proposed MIECT is a platform suitable for high-speed inspection.

  1. Relativistic motion of charged particles in the interaction of short pulses of intense laser light with plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez R, F.

    2004-01-01

    In the chapter 1 we show the foundations of the special relativity in the frame of the classical mechanics and we develop the necessary theory for the theoretical description of the relativistic dynamics of charged particles in the interaction with electromagnetic fields. It will see that starting from the energy conservation principle is derived the Einstein's law that establishes the relationship among this and the mass. Later on, it will take the action of a charged particle in a given radiation field and in the one which only we will take two parts, the action of the free particle and the one that defines the interaction of this with the field. The equations of motion of a charge in an electromagnetic field come given by the Lagrange equations, being obtained an expression for the force, well-known as Lorentz force, which consists of two terms, the first of them is the force that the electric field E exercises on the particle; which doesn't depend on the charge speed and is oriented in the direction of the field, the second term represents the force that exercises the magnetic field B and that it is proportional to the charge speed, being perpendicular to the direction of it. In the chapter 2 an integration method of the Hamilton-Jacobi for the case of a pulse is that allows to found analytical forms for the moment, the energy and the charge position is developed with detail. We will present, also, a discussion of the classical theory of the relativistic dynamic of free electrons. They are also obtained, invariant quantities like the phase, before the frame of the reference inertial changes, well-known as Lorentz invariants of the system. In this part it is considered to the electron in the laboratory frame (frame in which the particle is initially in repose regarding the observer), of which the speed and the acceleration quadrivectors can be calculated. We demonstrate that the η phase is a Lorentz invariant. It is shown, also that the proper time interval d

  2. Evidence for charge-trapping inducing polymorphic structural-phase transition in pentacene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masahiko; Kehoe, Tom B; Yoneya, Makoto; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Duffy, Claudia M; Minakata, Takashi; Phillips, Richard T; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2015-01-07

    Trapped-charge-induced transformation of pentacene polymorphs is observed by using in situ Raman spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the charge should be localized in pentacene molecules at the interface with static intermolecular disorder along the long axis. Quantum chemical calculations of the intermolecular transfer integrals suggest the disorder to be large enough to induce Anderson-type localization. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Study of the liquid water luminescence induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Mircea; Stere, Oana; Haiduc, Maria; Caramete, Laurentiu

    2004-01-01

    Many observations suggested that liquid water (with impurities) could give a luminescence output when irradiated with charged particles. We investigate theoretical and practical possibility of detecting such luminescence. Preliminary results on this possibility are presented, and a layout of the device proposed for measuring luminescence is given. (authors)

  4. Charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmi, Kinanti Aldilla, E-mail: kinanti.aldilla@ui.ac.id; Yudiarsah, Efta [Physics Department, FMIPA, Universitas Indonesia, Kampus UI Depok (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    By using tight binding Hamiltonian model, charge transport properties of poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA in variation of backbone disorder and amplitude of base-pair twisting motion is studied. The DNA chain used is 32 base pairs long poly(dA)-poly(dT) molecule. The molecule is contacted to electrode at both ends. The influence of environment on charge transport in DNA is modeled as variation of backbone disorder. The twisting motion amplitude is taking into account by assuming that the twisting angle distributes following Gaussian distribution function with zero average and standard deviation proportional to square root of temperature and inversely proportional to the twisting motion frequency. The base-pair twisting motion influences both the onsite energy of the bases and electron hopping constant between bases. The charge transport properties are studied by calculating current using Landauer-Buttiker formula from transmission probabilities which is calculated by transfer matrix methods. The result shows that as the backbone disorder increases, the maximum current decreases. By decreasing the twisting motion frequency, the current increases rapidly at low voltage, but the current increases slower at higher voltage. The threshold voltage can increase or decrease with increasing backbone disorder and increasing twisting frequency.

  5. Stress Induced Charge-Ordering Process in LiMn_2O_4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yan; Yu, Dunji; An, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we report the stress-induced Mn charge-ordering process in the LiMn_2O_4 spinel, evidenced by the lattice strain evolutions due to the Jahn–Teller effects. In situ neutron diffraction reveals the initial stage of this process at low stress, indicating the eg electron localization at the preferential Mn sites during the early phase transition as an underlying charge-ordering mechanism in the charge-frustrated LiMn_2O_4. The initial stage of this transition exhibits as a progressive lattice and charge evolution, without showing a first-order behavior.

  6. Rashba spin–orbit coupling effects on a current-induced domain wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jisu; Seo, Soo-Man; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2012-01-01

    A current-induced domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires with a strong structural inversion asymmetry [I.M. Miron, T. Moore, H. Szambolics, L.D. Buda-Prejbeanu, S. Auffret, B. Rodmacq, S. Pizzini, J. Vogel, M. Bonfim, A. Schuhl, G. Gaudin, Nat. Mat. 10 (2011) 419] seems to have novel features such as the domain wall motion along the current direction or the delay of the onset of the Walker breakdown. In such a highly asymmetric system, the Rashba spin–orbit coupling (RSOC) may affect a domain wall motion. We studied theoretically the RSOC effects on a domain wall motion and found that the RSOC, indeed, can induce the domain wall motion along the current direction in certain situations. It also delays the Walker breakdown and for a strong RSOC, the Walker breakdown does not occur at all. The RSOC effects are sensitive to the magnetic anisotropy of nanowires and also to the ratio between the Gilbert damping parameter α and the non-adiabaticity parameter β. - Highlights: ► Effects of Rashba spin–orbit coupling on a domain wall motion is calculated. ► The effects depend highly on the anisotropy of a magnetic system. ► It modifies the wall velocity for the system with a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. ► The modified velocity can be along the current direction in certain situations. ► Rashba spin–orbit coupling also hinders the onset of the Walker breakdown.

  7. Prospective motion correction with volumetric navigators (vNavs) reduces the bias and variance in brain morphometry induced by subject motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdall, M Dylan; Reuter, Martin; Qureshi, Abid; Buckner, Randy L; Fischl, Bruce; van der Kouwe, André J W

    2016-02-15

    Recent work has demonstrated that subject motion produces systematic biases in the metrics computed by widely used morphometry software packages, even when the motion is too small to produce noticeable image artifacts. In the common situation where the control population exhibits different behaviors in the scanner when compared to the experimental population, these systematic measurement biases may produce significant confounds for between-group analyses, leading to erroneous conclusions about group differences. While previous work has shown that prospective motion correction can improve perceived image quality, here we demonstrate that, in healthy subjects performing a variety of directed motions, the use of the volumetric navigator (vNav) prospective motion correction system significantly reduces the motion-induced bias and variance in morphometry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  9. Frequency filtering based analysis on the cardiac induced lung tumor motion and its impact on the radiotherapy management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ting; Qin, Songbing; Xu, Xiaoting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/objectives: Lung tumor motion may be impacted by heartbeat in addition to respiration. This study seeks to quantitatively analyze heart-motion-induced tumor motion and to evaluate its impact on lung cancer radiotherapy. Methods/materials: Fluoroscopy images were acquired for 30 lung cancer patients. Tumor, diaphragm, and heart were delineated on selected fluoroscopy frames, and their motion was tracked and converted into temporal signals based on deformable registration propagation. The clinical relevance of heart impact was evaluated using the dose volumetric histogram of the redefined target volumes. Results: Correlation was found between tumor and cardiac motion for 23 patients. The heart-induced motion amplitude ranged from 0.2 to 2.6 mm. The ratio between heart-induced tumor motion and the tumor motion was inversely proportional to the amplitude of overall tumor motion. When the heart motion impact was integrated, there was an average 9% increase in internal target volumes for 17 patients. Dose coverage decrease was observed on redefined planning target volume in simulated SBRT plans. Conclusions: The tumor motion of thoracic cancer patients is influenced by both heart and respiratory motion. The cardiac impact is relatively more significant for tumor with less motion, which may lead to clinically significant uncertainty in radiotherapy for some patients

  10. Respiratory-induced prostate motion: quantification and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Shawn; Crook, Juanita M.; Kendal, Wayne S.; Zanto, Janos S.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The precise localization of the prostate is critical for dose-escalated conformal radiotherapy. This study identifies and characterizes a potential cause of inaccurate prostatic localization--respiratory-induced movement. Methods and Materials: Prostate movement during respiration was measured fluoroscopically using implanted gold fiducial markers. Twenty sequential patients with CT 1 -T 3 N 0 M 0 prostate carcinoma were evaluated prone, immobilized in customized thermoplastic shells. A second 20 patients were evaluated both prone (with and without their thermoplastic shells) and supine (without their shells). Results: When the patients were immobilized prone in thermoplastic shells, the prostate moved synchronously with respiration. In the study the prostate was displaced a mean distance of 3.3 ± 1.8 (SD) mm (range, 1-10.2 mm), with 23% (9/40) of the displacements being 4 mm or greater. The respiratory-associated prostate movement decreased significantly when the thermoplastic shells were removed. Conclusion: Significant prostate movement can be induced by respiration when patients are immobilized in thermoplastic shells. This movement presumably is related to transmitted intraabdominal pressure within the confined space of the shells. Careful attention to the details of immobilization and to the possibility of respiratory-induced prostate movements is important when employing small field margins in prostatic radiotherapy

  11. The development of equipment for the technical assessment of respiratory motion induced artefacts in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.C.; Davies, S.C.; Zananiri, F.V.; Follett, D.H.; Halliwell, M.; Wells, P.N.T.; Bean, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    A device and technique to study the effects of respiratory motion on the quality of magnetic resonance images is proposed. The construction of the device enables a variety of test objects to be mounted and used in the evaluation of imaging parameters that may be affected by motion. The equipment is constructed of cast acrylic and the movement is actuated and controlled pneumatically thus ensuring that there are no interactions with the magnetic field and radiofrequency detection system to cause further image artefacts. Separate studies have been performed, using ultrasound, to assess the degree and rate of movement of organs owing to respiration in order to derive the motion parameters for the apparatus. Preliminary results indicate that the technique produces motion induced artefacts simulating those which are the result of the effects of respiration. (author)

  12. Highly charged ion impact induced nanodefects in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makgato, T.N., E-mail: thuto.makgato@wits.ac.za [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Microscopy and Microanalysis Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Sideras-Haddad, E. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, Physics Building, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Shrivastava, S. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Schenkel, T. [E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ritter, R.; Kowarik, G.; Aumayr, F. [Institute of Applied Physics, TU Wien-Vienna University of Technology, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.; Bernitt, S.; Beilmann, C.; Ginzel, R. [Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the interaction of slow highly charged ion (SHCI) beams with insulating type Ib diamond (1 1 1) surfaces. Bismuth and Xenon SHCI beams produced using an Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and an Electron Cyclotron Resonance source (ECR) respectively, are accelerated onto type Ib diamond (1 1 1) surfaces with impact velocities up to ≈0.4 υ{sub Bohr}. SHCIs with charge states corresponding to potential energies between 4.5 keV and 110 keV are produced for this purpose. Atomic Force Microscopy analysis (AFM) of the diamond surfaces following SHCI impact reveals surface morphological modifications characterized as nanoscale craters (nano-craters). To interpret the results from Tapping Mode AFM analysis of the irradiated diamond surfaces we discuss the interplay between kinetic and potential energy in nano-crater formation using empirical data together with Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) Monte Carlo Simulations.

  13. Anisotropy in highly charged ion induced molecule fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhasz, Z.; Sulik, B.; Fremont, F.; Chesnel, J.Y.; Hajaji, A.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Studying fragmentation processes of biologically relevant molecules due to highly charged ion impact is important to understand radiation damage in biological tissues. Energy spectra of the charged molecule fragments may reveal the different fragmentation patterns meanwhile the angular distributions of the fragments characterize the dependence of fragmentation probability on the initial orientation of the molecule. The research to explore the angular distribution of the molecule fragments has only recently been started[1]. In 2006 we performed measurements at ARIBE facility at GANIL, Caen (France), in order to investigate orientation effects in molecule fragmentation. Fragmentation of H 2 O, C 6 H 6 and CH 4 , which represent different level of symmetry, have been studied by 60 keV N 6+ ion impact. Energy spectra of the charged fragments at different observation angles have been taken. As our example spectra show the different protonic peaks can be attributed to different fragmentation processes. Significant anisotropy can be seen in the different processes. The strongest evidence for the anisotropy can be seen in the spectra of C 6 H 6 , where the spectra appear isotropic in almost the whole observed energy range except one peak, which has a strong angular dependence and is maximal around 90 deg. (author)

  14. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S.; Sofferman, D. L.; Beskin, I.

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport

  15. Localization of pellicle-induced open contacts using Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, E.I. Jr.; Soden, J.M.

    1993-08-01

    The recently developed Charge-Induced Voltage Alteration (CIVA) technique for localizing open metal conductors was used successfully to identify transistors with electrically open metal-1 contacts to silicon. The transistors were in the I/O port circuitry of a failing microcontroller and were completely covered by a metal-2 power bus. The root cause of the open contacts was a subtle scratch in the pellicle over the contact reticle. The scratch prevented full exposure of the photoresist, resulting in incomplete removal of the interlevel oxide in several contact windows. In addition to this powerful new application of CIVA, a number of failure analysis techniques utilizing both the electrical and physical properties of the failing microcontrollers were employed to identify and confirm the open contacts. These techniques are reviewed and recommendations are given for improved pellicle/reticle inspection.

  16. The efficacy of airflow and seat vibration on reducing visually induced motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D’Amour, Sarah; Bos, Jelte E.; Keshavarz, Behrang

    2017-01-01

    Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known sensation in virtual environments and simulators, typically characterized by a variety of symptoms such as pallor, sweating, dizziness, fatigue, and/or nausea. Numerous methods to reduce VIMS have been previously introduced; however, a reliable

  17. The effect of internal and external fields of view on visually induced motion sickness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Vries, S.C. de; Emmerik, M.L. van; Groen, E.L.

    2010-01-01

    Field of view (FOV) is said to affect visually induced motion sickness. FOV, however, is characterized by an internal setting used by the graphics generator (iFOV) and an external factor determined by screen size and viewing distance (eFOV). We hypothesized that especially the incongruence between

  18. A novel magnetoresistance induced by charge ordering in ferromagnetic/charge-ordered/ferromagnetic trilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiou; Li, Jinwei; Su, Kunpeng; Huo, Dexuan; Tan, Weishi

    2015-10-01

    Microstructure, magnetoresistance (MR) and magnetic properties of Pr0.7Sr0.3MnO3/La0.5Ca0.5MnO3/Pr0.7Sr0.3MnO3 trilayers, which are shown to be tunable with different La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 spacer thickness, are investigated. The trilayer with 6 nm thick La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 spacer show \\text{MR}∼37{%} at 195 K in 1 T and \\text{MR}∼80{%} at 220 K in 9 T, which is realized through the double-exchange mechanism. In contrast, trilayers with the thicker La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 spacer show enhanced MR at a wide low-temperature range. The obtained \\text{MR}∼52{%} at 50 K in 1 T in the trilayer with 18 nm thick La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 spacer is superior to that of other magnetic nanoscales. We surmise that this MR originates in the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic competition accompanied with the formation of a charge-ordered antiferromagnetic state and the collapse of the charge-ordered state at the applied magnetic field, rather than in the double-exchange mechanism. Large and tunable MR can be realized by controlling the strain state (the thickness of the La0.5Ca0.5MnO3 spacer), which can be applied in the used devices.

  19. Full Range of Motion Induces Greater Muscle Damage Than Partial Range of Motion in Elbow Flexion Exercise With Free Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroni, Bruno M; Pompermayer, Marcelo G; Cini, Anelize; Peruzzolo, Amanda S; Radaelli, Régis; Brusco, Clarissa M; Pinto, Ronei S

    2017-08-01

    Baroni, BM, Pompermayer, MG, Cini, A, Peruzzolo, AS, Radaelli, R, Brusco, CM, and Pinto, RS. Full range of motion induces greater muscle damage than partial range of motion in elbow flexion exercise with free weights. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2223-2230, 2017-Load and range of motion (ROM) applied in resistance training (RT) affect the muscle damage magnitude and the recovery time-course. Because exercises performed with partial ROM allow a higher load compared with those with full ROM, this study investigated the acute effect of a traditional RT exercise using full ROM or partial ROM on muscle damage markers. Fourteen healthy men performed 4 sets of 10 concentric-eccentric repetitions of unilateral elbow flexion on the Scott bench. Arms were randomly assigned to partial-ROM (50-100°) and full-ROM (0-130°) conditions, and load was determined as 80% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the full- and partial-ROM tests. Muscle damage markers were assessed preexercise, immediately, and 24, 48, and 72 hours after exercise. Primary outcomes were peak torque, muscle soreness during palpation and elbow extension, arm circumference, and joint ROM. The load lifted in the partial-ROM condition (1RM = 19.1 ± 3.0 kg) was 40 ± 18% higher compared with the full-ROM condition (1RM = 13.7 ± 2.2 kg). Seventy-two hours after exercise, the full-ROM condition led to significant higher soreness sensation during elbow extension (1.3-4.1 cm vs. 1.0-1.9 cm) and smaller ROM values (97.5-106.1° vs. 103.6-115.7°). Peak torque, soreness from palpation, and arm circumference were statistically similar between conditions, although mean values in all time points of these outcomes have suggested more expressive muscle damage for the full-ROM condition. In conclusion, elbow flexion exercise with full ROM seems to induce greater muscle damage than partial-ROM exercises, even though higher absolute load was achieved with partial ROM.

  20. Tip Induced Motion of Adatoms on Metal Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuerpick, U.; Rahman, T.S.

    1999-01-01

    From total energy calculations we show that for certain tip-adatom separations the activation barrier for the adatom to move towards the tip disappears and the adatom experiences an attractive force in the direction of the tip. For a Cu adatom at a (100) microfaceted step on Cu(111) this happens at a lateral separation of about one lattice constant, in agreement with recent experimental findings. Simultaneously, the activation barrier in the direction away from the tip increases significantly. The details of the changes in the potential energy surface induced by the tip are found to depend on the characteristics of the tip apex and its height above the adatom. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  1. Mass and charge distributions in chlorine-induced nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchetti, A.A.

    1991-01-01

    Projectile-like fragments were detected and characterized in terms of A, Z, and energy for the reactions 37 Cl on 40 Ca and 209 Bi at E/A = 7.3 MeV, and 35 Cl, on 209 Bi at E/A = 15 MeV, at angles close to the grazing angle. Mass and charge distributions were generated in the N-Z plane as a function of energy loss, and have been parameterized in terms of their centroids, variances, and coefficients of correlation. Due to experimental problems, the mass resolution corresponding to the 31 Cl on 209 Bi reaction was very poor. This prompted the study and application of a deconvolution technique for peak enhancement. The drifts of the charge and mass centroids for the system 37 Cl on 40 Ca are consistent with a process of mass and charge equilibration mediated by nucleon exchange between the two partners, followed by evaporation. The asymmetric systems show a strong drift towards larger asymmetry, with the production of neutron-rich nuclei. It was concluded that this is indicative of a net transfer of protons from the light to the heavy partner, and a net flow of neutrons in the opposite direction. The variances for all systems increase with energy loss, as it would be expected from a nucleon exchange mechanism; however, the variances for the reaction 37 Cl on 40 Ca are higher than those expected from that mechanism. The coefficients of correlation indicate that the transfer of nucleons between projectile and target is correlated. The results were compared to the predictions of two current models based on a stochastic nucleon exchange mechanism. In general, the comparisons between experimental and predicted variances support this mechanism; however, the need for more realistic driving forces in the model calculations is indicated by the disagreement between predicted and experimental centroids

  2. Stochastic resonance induced by novel random transitions of motion of FitzHugh-Nagumo neuron model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guangjun; Xu Jianxue

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to the previous studies which have dealt with stochastic resonance induced by random transitions of system motion between two coexisting limit cycle attractors in the FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neuron model after Hopf bifurcation and which have dealt with the phenomenon of stochastic resonance induced by external noise when the model with periodic input has only one attractor before Hopf bifurcation, in this paper we have focused our attention on stochastic resonance (SR) induced by a novel transition behavior, the transitions of motion of the model among one attractor on the left side of bifurcation point and two attractors on the right side of bifurcation point under the perturbation of noise. The results of research show: since one bifurcation of transition from one to two limit cycle attractors and the other bifurcation of transition from two to one limit cycle attractors occur in turn besides Hopf bifurcation, the novel transitions of motion of the model occur when bifurcation parameter is perturbed by weak internal noise; the bifurcation point of the model may stochastically slightly shift to the left or right when FHN neuron model is perturbed by external Gaussian distributed white noise, and then the novel transitions of system motion also occur under the perturbation of external noise; the novel transitions could induce SR alone, and when the novel transitions of motion of the model and the traditional transitions between two coexisting limit cycle attractors after bifurcation occur in the same process the SR also may occur with complicated behaviors types; the mechanism of SR induced by external noise when FHN neuron model with periodic input has only one attractor before Hopf bifurcation is related to this kind of novel transition mentioned above

  3. Laser-induced charge separation in organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Behn, Dino; Kjelstrup-Hansen, Jakob

    Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self-assemble into c......Organic semiconductors have unique properties that can be tailored via synthetic chemistry for specific applications, which combined with their low price and straight-forward processing over large areas make them interesting materials for future devices. Certain oligomers can self......-assemble into crystalline nanofibers by vapor deposition onto muscovite mica substrates, and we have recently shown that such nanofibers can be transferred to different substrates by roll-printing and used as the active material in e.g. organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), organic light-emitting transistors (OLETs......), and organic phototransistors (OPTs). However, several device-related issues incl. charge-separation and local band structure remain poorly understood. In this work, we use electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) combined with optical microscopy to study the local surface charge of an individual organic nanofiber...

  4. Motion of a particle in a radial space-charge field and in an axial magnetic field; Le mouvement d'une particule dans un champ de charge d'espace radial et un champ magnetique axial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canobbio, E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Services de Physique Appliquee, Service d' Ionique Generale, Section d' Etudes des Interactions Ondes Plasmas; Finzi, U [Institut de Physique Theorique de Milan (Italy)

    1966-07-01

    The motion of a charged particle in an axial uniform steady magnetic field, under the action of a radial space charge is calculated. A cylindrical symmetric charge distribution similar to the one which is observed in HF plasma accelerators is assumed. The particle motion is discussed with the method of effective potentials. A radial acceleration of ions is shown to be possible if the space charge density is sufficiently high. The displacement of the turning points of the trajectories due to the electrostatic field is calculated in the low plasma density approximation. Finally a HF circularly polarized electric field is introduced, the shift in cyclotron resonance is calculated and a low frequency resonance is found to be possible. (authors) [French] On etudie le mouvement d'une particule dans un champ magnetique axial uniforme et constant en presence d'un champ de charge d'espace radial. On considere une distribution de charge a symetrie cylindrique, semblable a celle qu'on observe dans les accelerateurs de plasma a H.F. On se sert des potentiels effectifs pour discuter les caracteristiques du mouvement. Une acceleration radiale des ions est possible lorsque la densite de charge est assez elevee. On calcule aussi les deplacements des points de rebroussement des trajectoires produits par un champ electrostatique faible. On introduit enfin un champ electrique HF polarise circulairement et on calcule le deplacement de la resonance de cyclotron du au champ de charge d'espace. En meme temps on voit apparaitre dans l'energie cinetique de la particule une resonance a basse frequence. (auteurs)

  5. Laser-induced charge transfer in the CH6+ quasimolecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1985-01-01

    The charge transfer cross section is calculated for C 6+ +CH(1s) collisions, through photon assisted 5gsigma--6hsigma, 5gsigma--4fsigma, 5gsigma--4fπ, and 5gsigma--4dsigma transitions. The theory developed by Copeland and Tang, and ourselves, is employed, and the validity of the approximations used is tested. The four processes considered have widely different characteristics with regards to the laser wavelength needed, the collision dynamics and the applicability of back-of-the-envelope estimates based on the Landau--Zener approximation. We point out the relevance of those processes to the impurity diagnostics of magnetically confined fusion plasmas and to the development of short wavelength lasers

  6. Spin current induced by a charged tip in a quantum point contact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchamkhalova, B.S., E-mail: s.bagun@gmail.com

    2017-03-15

    We show that the charged tip of the probe microscope, which is widely used in studying the electron transport in low-dimensional systems, induces a spin current. The effect is caused by the spin–orbit interaction arising due to an electric field produced by the charged tip. The tip acts as a spin-flip scatterer giving rise to the spin polarization of the net current and the occurrence of a spin density in the system.

  7. Radiation induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in isolation layers of nanoscale MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrev, G. I.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Pershenkov, V. S.

    2008-03-01

    The sensitivity of sub-100 nm devices to microdose effects, which can be considered as intermediate case between cumulative total dose and single event errors, is investigated. A detailed study of radiation-induced leakage due to stochastic charge trapping in irradiated planar and nonplanar devices is developed. The influence of High-K insulators on nanoscale ICs reliability is discussed. Low critical values of trapped charge demonstrate a high sensitivity to single event effect.

  8. Electrostatic potential fluctuation induced by charge discreteness in a nanoscale trench

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Taesang; Kim, S. S.; Jho, Y. S.; Park, Gunyoung; Chang, C. S.

    2007-01-01

    A simplified two-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation is performed to estimate the charging potential fluctuations caused by strong binary Coulomb interactions between discrete charged particles in nanometer scale trenches. It is found that the discrete charge effect can be an important part of the nanoscale trench research, inducing scattering of ion trajectories in a nanoscale trench by a fluctuating electric field. The effect can enhance the ion deposition on the side walls and disperse the material contact energy of the incident ions, among others

  9. Static and Dynamic Water Motion-Induced Instability in Oxide Thin-Film Transistors and Its Suppression by Using Low-k Fluoropolymer Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seungbeom; Jo, Jeong-Wan; Kim, Jaeyoung; Song, Seungho; Kim, Jaekyun; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2017-08-09

    Here, we report static and dynamic water motion-induced instability in indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) and its effective suppression with the use of a simple, solution-processed low-k (ε ∼ 1.9) fluoroplastic resin (FPR) passivation layer. The liquid-contact electrification effect, in which an undesirable drain current modulation is induced by a dynamic motion of a charged liquid such as water, can cause a significant instability in IGZO TFTs. It was found that by adopting a thin (∼44 nm) FPR passivation layer for IGZO TFTs, the current modulation induced by the water-contact electrification was greatly reduced in both off- and on-states of the device. In addition, the FPR-passivated IGZO TFTs exhibited an excellent stability to static water exposure (a threshold voltage shift of +0.8 V upon 3600 s of water soaking), which is attributed to the hydrophobicity of the FPR passivation layer. Here, we discuss the origin of the current instability caused by the liquid-contact electrification as well as various static and dynamic stability tests for IGZO TFTs. On the basis of our findings, we believe that the use of a thin, solution-processed FPR passivation layer is effective in suppressing the static and dynamic water motion-induced instabilities, which may enable the realization of high-performance and environment-stable oxide TFTs for emerging wearable and skin-like electronics.

  10. Molecular Dynamics Study of Thermally Augmented Nanodroplet Motion on Chemical Energy Induced Wettability Gradient Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Monojit; Chowdhury, Anamika; Bhusan, Richa; DasGupta, Sunando

    2015-10-20

    Droplet motion on a surface with chemical energy induced wettability gradient has been simulated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to highlight the underlying physics of molecular movement near the solid-liquid interface including the contact line friction. The simulations mimic experiments in a comprehensive manner wherein microsized droplets are propelled by the surface wettability gradient against forces opposed to motion. The liquid-wall Lennard-Jones interaction parameter and the substrate temperature are varied to explore their effects on the three-phase contact line friction coefficient. The contact line friction is observed to be a strong function of temperature at atomistic scales, confirming their experimentally observed inverse functionality. Additionally, the MD simulation results are successfully compared with those from an analytical model for self-propelled droplet motion on gradient surfaces.

  11. Detection of cyclic-fold bifurcation in electrostatic MEMS transducers by motion-induced current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangtak; Khater, Mahmoud; Effa, David; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a new detection method of cyclic-fold bifurcations in electrostatic MEMS transducers based on a variant of the harmonic detection of resonance method. The electrostatic transducer is driven by an unbiased harmonic signal at half its natural frequency, ω a   =  1/2 ω o . The response of the transducer consists of static displacement and a series of harmonics at 2 ω a , 4 ω a , and so on. Its motion-induced current is shifted by the excitation frequency, ω a , to appear at 3 ω a , 5 ω a , and higher odd harmonics, providing higher sensitivity to the measurement of harmonic motions. With this method, we successfully detected the variation in the location of the cyclic-fold bifurcation of an encapsulated electrostatic MEMS transducer. We also detected a regime of tapping mode motions subsequent to the bifurcation.

  12. Detection of cyclic-fold bifurcation in electrostatic MEMS transducers by motion-induced current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sangtak; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Khater, Mahmoud; Effa, David; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new detection method of cyclic-fold bifurcations in electrostatic MEMS transducers based on a variant of the harmonic detection of resonance method. The electrostatic transducer is driven by an unbiased harmonic signal at half its natural frequency, ω a   =  1/2  ω o . The response of the transducer consists of static displacement and a series of harmonics at 2  ω a , 4  ω a , and so on. Its motion-induced current is shifted by the excitation frequency, ω a , to appear at 3  ω a , 5  ω a , and higher odd harmonics, providing higher sensitivity to the measurement of harmonic motions. With this method, we successfully detected the variation in the location of the cyclic-fold bifurcation of an encapsulated electrostatic MEMS transducer. We also detected a regime of tapping mode motions subsequent to the bifurcation. (paper)

  13. Charge-induced spin torque in Weyl semimetals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurebayashi, Daichi; Nomura, Kentaro

    In this work, we present phenomenological and microscopic derivations of spin torques in magnetically doped Weyl semimetals. As a result, we obtain the analytical expression of the spin torque generated, without a flowing current, when the chemical potential is modulated. We also find that this spin torque is a direct consequence of the chiral anomaly. Therefore, observing this spin torque in magnetic Weyl semimetals might be an experimental evidence of the chiral anomaly. This spin torque has also a great advantage in application. In contrast to conventional current-induced spin torques such as the spin-transfer torques, this spin torque does not accompany a constant current flow. Thus, devices using this operating principle is free from the Joule heating and possibly have higher efficiency than devices using conventional current-induced spin torques. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP15H05854 and JP26400308.

  14. Breaking the hydrophobicity of the MscL pore: insights into a charge-induced gating mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Chandramouli

    Full Text Available The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL is a protein that responds to membrane tension by opening a transient pore during osmotic downshock. Due to its large pore size and functional reconstitution into lipid membranes, MscL has been proposed as a promising artificial nanovalve suitable for biotechnological applications. For example, site-specific mutations and tailored chemical modifications have shown how MscL channel gating can be triggered in the absence of tension by introducing charged residues at the hydrophobic pore level. Recently, engineered MscL proteins responsive to stimuli like pH or light have been reported. Inspired by experiments, we present a thorough computational study aiming at describing, with atomistic detail, the artificial gating mechanism and the molecular transport properties of a light-actuated bacterial MscL channel, in which a charge-induced gating mechanism has been enabled through the selective cleavage of photo-sensitive alkylating agents. Properties such as structural transitions, pore dimension, ion flux and selectivity have been carefully analyzed. Besides, the effects of charge on alternative sites of the channel with respect to those already reported have been addressed. Overall, our results provide useful molecular insights into the structural events accompanying the engineered MscL channel gating and the interplay of electrostatic effects, channel opening and permeation properties. In addition, we describe how the experimentally observed ionic current in a single-subunit charged MscL mutant is obtained through a hydrophobicity breaking mechanism involving an asymmetric inter-subunit motion.

  15. Micromagnetic analysis of current-induced domain wall motion in a bilayer nanowire with synthetic antiferromagnetic coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komine, Takashi, E-mail: komine@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp; Aono, Tomosuke [Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University 4-12-1, Nakanarusawa, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 316-8511 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate current-induced domain wall motion in bilayer nanowire with synthetic antiferromagnetic (SAF) coupling by modeling two body problems for motion equations of domain wall. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling and magnetostatic interactions on current-induced domain wall motion in SAF nanowires was also investigated. By assuming the rigid wall model for translational motion, the interlayer exchange coupling and the magnetostatic interaction between walls and domains in SAF nanowires enhances domain wall speed without any spin-orbit-torque. The enhancement of domain wall speed was discussed by energy distribution as a function of wall angle configuration in bilayer nanowires.

  16. Negative charge induced degradation of PMOSFETs with BF2-implanted p+-poly gate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.Y.; Sung, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A new degradation phenomenon on thin gate oxide PMOS-FETs with BF 2 implanted p + -poly gate has been demonstrated and investigated. The cause of this type of degradation is a combination of the boron penetration through the gate oxide and charge trap generation due to the presence of fluorine in the gate oxide and some other processing-induced effects. The negative charge-induced degradation other than enhanced boron diffusion has been studied in detail here. The impact of this process-sensitive p + -poly gate structure on deep submicron CMOS process integration has been discussed. (author)

  17. Estimation of Source and Attenuation Parameters from Ground Motion Observations for Induced Seismicity in Alberta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, M.; Atkinson, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    We use a generalized inversion to solve for site response, regional source and attenuation parameters, in order to define a region-specific ground-motion prediction equation (GMPE) from ground motion observations in Alberta, following the method of Atkinson et al. (2015 BSSA). The database is compiled from over 200 small to moderate seismic events (M 1 to 4.2) recorded at ~50 regional stations (distances from 30 to 500 km), over the last few years; almost all of the events have been identified as being induced by oil and gas activity. We remove magnitude scaling and geometric spreading functions from observed ground motions and invert for stress parameter, regional attenuation and site amplification. Resolving these parameters allows for the derivation of a regionally-calibrated GMPE that can be used to accurately predict amplitudes across the region in real time, which is useful for ground-motion-based alerting systems and traffic light protocols. The derived GMPE has further applications for the evaluation of hazards from induced seismicity.

  18. Current-induced domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires with spatial variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ieda, Jun'ichi; Sugishita, Hiroki; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2010-01-01

    We model current-induced domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires with the variable width. Employing the collective coordinate method we trace the wall dynamics. The effect of the width modulation is implemented by spatial dependence of an effective magnetic field. The wall destination in the potential energy landscape due to the magnetic anisotropy and the spatial nonuniformity is obtained as a function of the current density. For a nanowire of a periodically modulated width, we identify three (pinned, nonlinear, and linear) current density regimes for current-induced wall motion. The threshold current densities depend on the pulse duration as well as the magnitude of wire modulation. In the nonlinear regime, application of ns order current pulses results in wall displacement which opposes or exceeds the prediction of the spin transfer mechanism. The finding explains stochastic nature of the domain wall displacement observed in recent experiments.

  19. Perception of linear horizontal self-motion induced by peripheral vision /linearvection/ - Basic characteristics and visual-vestibular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthoz, A.; Pavard, B.; Young, L. R.

    1975-01-01

    The basic characteristics of the sensation of linear horizontal motion have been studied. Objective linear motion was induced by means of a moving cart. Visually induced linear motion perception (linearvection) was obtained by projection of moving images at the periphery of the visual field. Image velocity and luminance thresholds for the appearance of linearvection have been measured and are in the range of those for image motion detection (without sensation of self motion) by the visual system. Latencies of onset are around 1 sec and short term adaptation has been shown. The dynamic range of the visual analyzer as judged by frequency analysis is lower than the vestibular analyzer. Conflicting situations in which visual cues contradict vestibular and other proprioceptive cues show, in the case of linearvection a dominance of vision which supports the idea of an essential although not independent role of vision in self motion perception.

  20. Study of plasma charging-induced white pixel defect increase in CMOS active pixel sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokashiki, Ken; Bai, KeunHee; Baek, KyeHyun; Kim, Yongjin; Min, Gyungjin; Kang, Changjin; Cho, Hanku; Moon, Jootae

    2007-01-01

    Plasma process-induced 'white pixel defect' (WPD) of CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) is studied for Si3N4 spacer etch back process by using a magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE) system. WPD preferably takes place at the wafer edge region when the magnetized plasma is applied to Si3N4 etch. Plasma charging analysis reveals that the plasma charge-up characteristic is well matching the edge-intensive WPD generation, rather than the UV radiation. Plasma charging on APS transfer gate might lead to a gate leakage, which could play a role in generation of signal noise or WPD. In this article the WPD generation mechanism will be discussed from plasma charging point of view

  1. Chirality induction and protonation-induced molecular motions in helical molecular strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomiets, Elena; Berl, Volker; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The long oligopyridinedicarboxamide strand 9, containing 15 heterocyclic rings has been synthesized and its helical structure determined by X-ray crystallography. It was shown that the shorter analogue 6 displays induced circular dichroism and amplification of induced chirality upon dissolution in an optically active solvent, diethyl-L-tartrate. A novel class of helical foldamers was prepared, strands 14-16, based on two oligopyridine carboxamide segments linked through a L-tartaric acid derived spacer. These tartro strands display internal chirality induction as well as chirality amplification. NMR spectroscopy (on 8 and 9) and circular dichroism (on 16) studies show that the oligopyridine carboxamide strands undergo reversible unfolding/folding upon protonation. The protonation-induced unfolding has been confirmed by X-ray crystallographic determination of the molecular structure of the extended protonated heptameric form 8(+). The molecular-scale mechano-chemical motions of the protonation-induced structural switching consist of a change of the length of the molecule, from 6 angstroms (6, coiled form) to 29 angstroms (8(+), uncoiled form) for the heptamer and from 12.5 angstroms (9, coiled form, X-ray structure) to 57 angstroms (9(+), uncoiled form, from modeling) for the pentadecamer. Similar unfolding/folding motional processes take place in the L-tartro strands 15 and 16 upon protonation/deprotonation, with loss of helicity-induced circular dichroism on unfolding as shown for the protonated form 16(+).

  2. Effects of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection of fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Leping; Peterson, George P.; Yoda, Minani; Wang Buxuan

    2012-01-01

    The role of temperature gradient induced nanoparticle motion on conduction and convection was investigated. Possible mechanisms for variations resulting from variations in the thermophysical properties are theoretically and experimentally discussed. The effect of the nanoparticle motion on conduction is demonstrated through thermal conductivity measurement of deionized water with suspended CuO nanoparticles (50 nm in diameter) and correlated with the contributions of Brownian diffusion, thermophoresis, etc. The tendencies observed is that the magnitude of and the variation in the thermal conductivity increases with increasing volume fraction for a given temperature, which is due primarily to the Brownian diffusion of the nanoparticles. Using dimensional analysis, the thermal conductivity is correlated and both the interfacial thermal resistance and near-field radiation are found to be essentially negligible. A modification term that incorporates the contributions of Brownian motion and thermophoresis is proposed. The effect of nanoscale convection is illustrated through an experimental investigation that utilized fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle tracers (200 nm in diameter) and multilayer nanoparticle image velocimetry. The results indicate that both the magnitude and the deviation of the fluid motion increased with increasing heat flux in the near-wall region. Meanwhile, the fluid motion tended to decrease with the off-wall distance for a given heating power. A corresponding numerical study of convection of pure deionized water shows that the velocity along the off-wall direction is several orders of magnitude lower than that of deionized water, which indicates that Brownian motion in the near-wall region is crucial for fluid with suspended nanoparticles in convection.

  3. Secondary-electron yield from Au induced by highly charged Ta ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Stöckli, M. P.; Fry, D.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 173, - (2001), s. 281-286 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010819 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : highly charged ion-surface interaction * ion-induced electron emission * angle impact effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.041, year: 2001

  4. Numerical analysis of finite Debye-length effects in induced-charge electro-osmosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Soni, G.

    2009-01-01

    For a microchamber filled with a binary electrolyte and containing a flat unbiased center electrode at one wall, we employ three numerical models to study the strength of the resulting induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flow rolls: (i) a full nonlinear continuum model resolving the double laye...

  5. The status and new trends of ion beam induced charge technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Rongrong; Qiu Huiyuan; Zhu Dezhang

    2002-01-01

    Ion beam induced charge technique (IBIC) with low beam current (fA level) and high efficiency is a new development of nuclear microscopy. It has been widely applied to the fields of semiconductor and microelectronic materials. The principle and the experimental method of the IBIC technique were described and reviewed its status and new trends were reviewed

  6. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, H.A.

    2006-11-01

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  7. Induced charge of spherical dust particle on plasma-facing wall in non-uniform electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Y.; Smirnov, R.; Zhu, S.

    2005-01-01

    Induced charge of a spherical dust particle on a plasma-facing wall is investigated analytically, where non-uniform electric field is applied externally. The one-dimensional non-uniform electrostatic potential is approximated by the polynomial of the normal coordinate toward the wall. The bipolar coordinate is introduced to solve the Laplace equation of the induced electrostatic potential. The boundary condition at the dust surface determines the unknown coefficients of the general solution of the Laplace equation for the induced potential. From the obtained potential the surface induced charge can be calculated. This result allows estimating the effect of the surrounding plasma, which shields the induced charge. (author)

  8. The impact of irradiation induced specimen charging on microanalysis in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens-Kalceff, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: It is necessary to assess and characterize the perturbing influences of experimental probes on the specimens under investigation. The significant influence of electron beam irradiation on poorly conducting materials has been assessed by a combination of specialized analytical scanning electron and scanning probe microscopy techniques including Cathodoluminescence Microanalysis and Kelvin Probe Microscopy. These techniques enable the defect structure and the residual charging of materials to be characterized at high spatial resolution. Cathodoluminescence is the non-incandescent emission of light resulting from the electron irradiation. CL microscopy and spectroscopy in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) enables high spatial resolution and high sensitivity detection of defects in poorly conducting materials. Local variations in the distribution of defects can be non-destructively characterized with high spatial (lateral and depth) resolution by adjusting electron beam parameters to select the specimen micro-volume of interest. Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM) is a Scanning Probe Microscopy technique in which long-range Coulomb forces between a conductive atomic force probe and the specimen enable the surface potential to be characterized with high spatial resolution. A combination of Kelvin Probe Microscopy (KPM) and Cathodoluminescence (CL) microanalysis has been used to characterize ultra pure silicon dioxide exposed to electron irradiation in a Scanning Electron Microscope. Silicon dioxide is an excellent model specimen with which to investigate charging induced effects. It is a very poor electrical conductor, homogeneous and electron irradiation produces easily identifiable surface modification which enables irradiated regions to be easily and unambiguously located. A conductive grounded coating is typically applied to poorly conducting specimens prior to investigation in an SEM to prevent deflection of the electron beam and surface charging, however

  9. Design of super-efficient mixer based on induced charge electroosmotic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The super-efficient sample mixing induced by the induced-charge electrokinetic flow around conducting/Janus cylinder was numerically studied in a confined |U-shaped microchannel with suddenly applied DC weak electric filed. It’s found that there are four large circulations around the conducting cylinder and two smaller circulations around the Janus cylinder. The results show that samples can still be well mixed with high flux due to the induced electroosmosis. It is demonstrated that the local flow circulations provide effective means to enhance the flow mixing between different solutions. The dependence of the degree of mixing enhancement on the electric field is also predicted.

  10. Study of uranium dioxyde sputtering induced by multicharged heavy ions at low and very low kinetic energy: projectile charge effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haranger, F.

    2003-12-01

    Ion beam irradiation of a solid can lead to the emission of neutral or ionized atoms, molecules or clusters from the surface. This comes as a result of the atomic motion in the vicinity of the surface, induced by the transfer of the projectile energy. Then, the study of the sputtering process appears as a means to get a better understanding of the excited matter state around the projectile trajectory. In the case of slow multicharged ions, a strong electronic excitation can be achieved by the projectile neutralization above the solid surface and / or its deexcitation below the surface. Parallel to this, the slowing down of such ions is essentially related to elastic collision with the target atoms. The study of the effect of the initial charge state of slow multicharged ions, in the sputtering process, has been carried out by measuring the absolute angular distributions of emission of uranium atoms from a uranium dioxide surface. The experiments have been performed in two steps. First, the emitted particles are collected onto a substrate during irradiation. Secondly, the surface of the collectors is analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). This method allows the characterization of the emission of neutrals, which are the vast majority of the sputtered particles. The results obtained provide an access to the evolution of the sputtering process as a function of xenon projectile ions charge state. The measurements have been performed over a wide kinetic energy range, from 81 down to 1.5 keV. This allowed a clear separation of the contribution of the kinetic energy and initial projectile charge state to the sputtering phenomenon. (author)

  11. Effect of plasma-induced surface charging on catalytic processes: application to CO2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Kristof M.; Huygh, Stijn; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the nature and effect of the multitude of plasma-surface interactions in plasma catalysis is a crucial requirement for further process development and improvement. A particularly intriguing and rather unique property of a plasma-catalytic setup is the ability of the plasma to modify the electronic structure, and hence chemical properties, of the catalyst through charging, i.e. the absorption of excess electrons. In this work, we develop a quantum chemical model based on density functional theory to study excess negative surface charges in a heterogeneous catalyst exposed to a plasma. This method is specifically applied to investigate plasma-catalytic CO2 activation on supported M/Al2O3 (M = Ti, Ni, Cu) single atom catalysts. We find that (1) the presence of a negative surface charge dramatically improves the reductive power of the catalyst, strongly promoting the splitting of CO2 to CO and oxygen, and (2) the relative activity of the investigated transition metals is also changed upon charging, suggesting that controlled surface charging is a powerful additional parameter to tune catalyst activity and selectivity. These results strongly point to plasma-induced surface charging of the catalyst as an important factor contributing to the plasma-catalyst synergistic effects frequently reported for plasma catalysis.

  12. Time-resolved ion beam induced charge collection (TRIBICC) in micro-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoene, H.; Walsh, D.S.; Sexton, F.W.; Doyle, B.L.; Aurand, J.F.; Dodd, P.E.; Flores, R.S.; Wing, N.

    1998-01-01

    The entire current transient induced by single 12 MeV Carbon ions was measured at a 5GHz analog bandwidth. A focused ion micro-beam was used to acquire multiple single ion transients at multiple locations of a single CMOS transistor. The current transients reveal clear and discernible contributions of drift and diffusive charge collection. Transients measured for drain and off-drain ion strikes compare well to 3D DAVINCI calculations. Estimates are presented for the drift assisted funneling charge collection depth

  13. Possible Diamond-Like Nanoscale Structures Induced by Slow Highly-Charged Ions on Graphite (HOPG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sideras-Haddad, E.; Schenkel, T.; Shrivastava, S.; Makgato, T.; Batra, A.; Weis, C. D.; Persaud, A.; Erasmus, R.; Mwakikunga, B.

    2009-01-06

    The interaction between slow highly-charged ions (SHCI) of different charge states from an electron-beam ion trap and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surfaces is studied in terms of modification of electronic states at single-ion impact nanosizeareas. Results are presented from AFM/STM analysis of the induced-surface topological features combined with Raman spectroscopy. I-V characteristics for a number of different impact regions were measured with STM and the results argue for possible formation of diamond-like nanoscale structures at the impact sites.

  14. Inverse scaling trends for charge-trapping-induced degradation of FinFETs performance

    OpenAIRE

    Amoroso, Salvatore Maria; Georgiev, Vihar P.; Gerrer, Louis; Towie, Ewan; Wang, Xingsheng; Riddet, Craig; Brown, Andrew Robert; Asenov, Asen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of a single discrete charge trapped at the top oxide interface on the performance of scaled nMOS FinFET transistors. The charge-trapping-induced gate voltage shift is simulated as a function of the device scaling and for several regimes of conduction-from subthreshold to ON-state. Contrary to what is expected for planar MOSFETs, we show that the trap impact decreases with scaling down the FinFET size and the applied gate voltage. By comparing drift-dif...

  15. Modeling of radiation-induced charge trapping in MOS devices under ionizing irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petukhov, M. A., E-mail: m.a.petukhov@gmail.com; Ryazanov, A. I. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The numerical model of the radiation-induced charge trapping process in the oxide layer of a MOS device under ionizing irradiation is developed; the model includes carrier transport, hole capture by traps in different states, recombination of free electrons and trapped holes, kinetics of hydrogen ions which can be accumulated in the material during transistor manufacture, and accumulation and charging of interface states. Modeling of n-channel MOSFET behavior under 1 MeV photon irradiation is performed. The obtained dose dependences of the threshold voltage shift and its contributions from trapped holes and interface states are in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. Assessment of motion-induced fluidization of dense pyroclastic gravity currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Salatino

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses some fundamental aspects of the dynamics of dense granular flows down inclines relevant to pyroclastic density currents. A simple mechanistic framework is presented to analyze the dynamics of the frontal zone, with a focus on the establishment of conditions that promote air entrainment at the head of the current and motion-induced self-fluidization of the flow. The one-dimensional momentum balance on the current along the incline is considered under the hypothesis of strongly turbulent flow and pseudo-homogeneous behaviour of the two-phase gas-solid flow. Departures from one-dimensional flow in the frontal region are also analyzed and provide the key to the assessment of air cross-flow and fluidization of the solids in the head of the current. The conditions for the establishment of steady motion of pyroclastic flows down an incline, in either the fluidized or «dry» granular states, are examined.

  17. Enhancing the smoothness of joint motion induced by functional electrical stimulation using co-activation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruppel Mirjana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The motor precision of today’s neuroprosthetic devices that use artificial generation of limb motion using Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES is generally low. We investigate the adoption of natural co-activation strategies as present in antagonistic muscle pairs aiming to improve motor precision produced by FES. In a test in which artificial knee-joint movements were generated, we could improve the smoothness of FES-induced motion by 513% when applying co-activation during the phases in which torque production is switched between muscles – compared to no co-activation. We further demonstrated how the co-activation level influences the joint stiffness in a pendulum test.

  18. The effect of internal and external fields of view on visually induced motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jelte E; de Vries, Sjoerd C; van Emmerik, Martijn L; Groen, Eric L

    2010-07-01

    Field of view (FOV) is said to affect visually induced motion sickness. FOV, however, is characterized by an internal setting used by the graphics generator (iFOV) and an external factor determined by screen size and viewing distance (eFOV). We hypothesized that especially the incongruence between iFOV and eFOV would lead to sickness. To that end we used a computer game environment with different iFOV and eFOV settings, and found the opposite effect. We speculate that the relative large differences between iFOV and eFOV used in this experiment caused the discrepancy, as may be explained by assuming an observer model controlling body motion. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment of Respiration-Induced Motion and Its Impact on Treatment Outcome for Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presented the analysis of free-breathing lung tumor motion characteristics using GE 4DCT and Varian RPM systems. Tumor respiratory movement was found to be associated with GTV size, the superior-inferior tumor location in the lung, and the attachment degree to rigid structure (e.g., chest wall, vertebrae, or mediastinum, with tumor location being the most important factor among the other two. Improved outcomes in survival and local control of 43 lung cancer patients were also reported. Consideration of respiration-induced motion based on 4DCT for lung cancer yields individualized margin and more accurate and safe target coverage and thus can potentially improve treatment outcome.

  20. Bulk-Like Electrical Properties Induced by Contact-Limited Charge Transport in Organic Diodes: Revised Space Charge Limited Current

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Guangwei; Gao, Nan; Lu, Congyan; Wang, Wei; Ji, Zhuoyu; Bi, Chong; Han, Zhiheng; Lu, Nianduan; Yang, Guanhua; Li, Yuan; Liu, Qi; Li, Ling; Liu, Ming

    2018-01-01

    , the charge transport properties of organic diodes are usually characterized by probing the current–voltage (I–V) curves of the devices. However, to unveil the landscape of the underlying potential/charge distribution, which essentially determines the I

  1. Towards an understanding of induced-charge electrokinetics at large applied voltages in concentrated solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazant, Martin Z; Kilic, Mustafa Sabri; Storey, Brian D; Ajdari, Armand

    2009-11-30

    The venerable theory of electrokinetic phenomena rests on the hypothesis of a dilute solution of point-like ions in quasi-equilibrium with a weakly charged surface, whose potential relative to the bulk is of order the thermal voltage (kT/e approximately 25 mV at room temperature). In nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena, such as AC or induced-charge electro-osmosis (ACEO, ICEO) and induced-charge electrophoresis (ICEP), several V approximately 100 kT/e are applied to polarizable surfaces in microscopic geometries, and the resulting electric fields and induced surface charges are large enough to violate the assumptions of the classical theory. In this article, we review the experimental and theoretical literatures, highlight discrepancies between theory and experiment, introduce possible modifications of the theory, and analyze their consequences. We argue that, in response to a large applied voltage, the "compact layer" and "shear plane" effectively advance into the liquid, due to the crowding of counterions. Using simple continuum models, we predict two general trends at large voltages: (i) ionic crowding against a blocking surface expands the diffuse double layer and thus decreases its differential capacitance, and (ii) a charge-induced viscosity increase near the surface reduces the electro-osmotic mobility; each trend is enhanced by dielectric saturation. The first effect is able to predict high-frequency flow reversal in ACEO pumps, while the second may explain the decay of ICEO flow with increasing salt concentration. Through several colloidal examples, such as ICEP of an uncharged metal sphere in an asymmetric electrolyte, we show that nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena are generally ion-specific. Similar theoretical issues arise in nanofluidics (due to confinement) and ionic liquids (due to the lack of solvent), so the paper concludes with a general framework of modified electrokinetic equations for finite-sized ions.

  2. Energy-imbalance mechanism of domain wall motion induced by propagation spin waves in finite magnetic nanostripe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jinrong; Han, Zhaoyan; Su, Yuanchang; Hu, Jingguo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of the domain wall (DW) motions induced by spin wave in finite magnetic nanostripe is studied by micromagnetic simulations. We find that the spin-wave induced DM motions are always accompanied by an energy imbalance between two sides of the DW. The DW motion can be attributed to the expansion of the low-energy-density area and the contraction of the high-energy-density area. The energy imbalance strongly depends on whether the spin wave passes through the DW or is reflected by the DW. In the area of the spin wave propagation, the energy density increases with the time. However, in the superposition area of the incident spin wave and the reflected spin wave, the energy density decreases with the increasing of the time. It shows that this energy imbalance can be controlled by tuning the frequency of the spin wave. Finally, the effect of the damping parameter value is discussed. - Highlights: • The mechanism of the spin-wave induced DW motions is studied. • The spin-wave induced DW motions and the energy imbalance mechanism are given. • The DW motion with the same direction to that of SW is explained. • The DW motion with the opposite direction to that of SW is explained

  3. Source mechanism inversion and ground motion modeling of induced earthquakes in Kuwait - A Bayesian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, C.; Toksoz, M. N.; Marzouk, Y.; Al-Enezi, A.; Al-Jeri, F.; Buyukozturk, O.

    2016-12-01

    The increasing seismic activity in the regions of oil/gas fields due to fluid injection/extraction and hydraulic fracturing has drawn new attention in both academia and industry. Source mechanism and triggering stress of these induced earthquakes are of great importance for understanding the physics of the seismic processes in reservoirs, and predicting ground motion in the vicinity of oil/gas fields. The induced seismicity data in our study are from Kuwait National Seismic Network (KNSN). Historically, Kuwait has low local seismicity; however, in recent years the KNSN has monitored more and more local earthquakes. Since 1997, the KNSN has recorded more than 1000 earthquakes (Mw Institutions for Seismology (IRIS) and KNSN, and widely felt by people in Kuwait. These earthquakes happen repeatedly in the same locations close to the oil/gas fields in Kuwait (see the uploaded image). The earthquakes are generally small (Mw stress of these earthquakes was calculated based on the source mechanisms results. In addition, we modeled the ground motion in Kuwait due to these local earthquakes. Our results show that most likely these local earthquakes occurred on pre-existing faults and were triggered by oil field activities. These events are generally smaller than Mw 5; however, these events, occurring in the reservoirs, are very shallow with focal depths less than about 4 km. As a result, in Kuwait, where oil fields are close to populated areas, these induced earthquakes could produce ground accelerations high enough to cause damage to local structures without using seismic design criteria.

  4. Induced-Charge Enhancement of the Diffusion Potential in Membranes with Polarizable Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhkov, I I; Lebedev, D V; Solodovnichenko, V S; Shiverskiy, A V; Simunin, M M

    2017-12-01

    When a charged membrane separates two salt solutions of different concentrations, a potential difference appears due to interfacial Donnan equilibrium and the diffusion junction. Here, we report a new mechanism for the generation of a membrane potential in polarizable conductive membranes via an induced surface charge. It results from an electric field generated by the diffusion of ions with different mobilities. For uncharged membranes, this effect strongly enhances the diffusion potential and makes it highly sensitive to the ion mobilities ratio, electrolyte concentration, and pore size. Theoretical predictions on the basis of the space-charge model extended to polarizable nanopores fully agree with experimental measurements in KCl and NaCl aqueous solutions.

  5. Charge and spin current oscillations in a tunnel junction induced by magnetic field pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dartora, C.A., E-mail: cadartora@eletrica.ufpr.br [Electrical Engineering Department, Federal University of Parana (UFPR), C.P. 19011 Curitiba, 81.531-970 PR (Brazil); Nobrega, K.Z., E-mail: bzuza1@yahoo.com.br [Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technolgy of Maranhão (IFMA), Av. Marechal Castelo Branco, 789, São Luís, 65.076-091 MA (Brazil); Cabrera, G.G., E-mail: cabrera@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin’, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), C.P. 6165, Campinas 13.083-970 SP (Brazil)

    2016-08-15

    Usually, charge and spin transport properties in tunnel junctions are studied in the DC bias regime and/or in the adiabatic regime of time-varying magnetic fields. In this letter, the temporal dynamics of charge and spin currents in a tunnel junction induced by pulsed magnetic fields is considered. At low bias voltages, energy and momentum of the conduction electrons are nearly conserved in the tunneling process, leading to the description of the junction as a spin-1/2 fermionic system coupled to time-varying magnetic fields. Under the influence of pulsed magnetic fields, charge and spin current can flow across the tunnel junction, displaying oscillatory behavior, even in the absence of DC bias voltage. A type of spin capacitance function, in close analogy to electric capacitance, is predicted.

  6. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Hu, Angela; Wang Kai; Newman, Francis; Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D LAD (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D LAD and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V 25.2 for the heart. MHD and D LAD were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D LAD or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D LAD can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated treatment.

  7. Damage induced by high energy multiply charged oxygen ions in oxide coated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)]. E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.in; Dahiwale, S.S. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Kulkarni, V.R. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Bogle, K.A. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Shinde, N.S. [Ecotopia Science Institute, Division of Energy Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya (Japan); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2006-03-15

    P-type oxide coated silicon samples of resistivity 120 {omega} cm were irradiated with 60 MeV oxygen ions of fixed charge states 4{sup +}, 5{sup +}, 6{sup +} and 7{sup +} at an equal fluence of, {phi}, {approx}10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}. The induced damage was estimated by Hall voltage, Hall coefficient, carrier concentration and lifetime of minority carriers. The results indicate that Hall voltage (V {sub H}) and Hall coefficient (R {sub H}) increases, while carrier concentration (n) decreases with the charge state of impinging oxygen ions. The V {sub H} increases from 22 mV to 76.5 mV at typical current of 0.5 mA, R {sub H} from 0.42 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup 3}/C to 2.16 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup 3}/C and n decreases from 9 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} to 2.88 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the different charge states. This fact is an evidence that the oxygen ions with an individual fixed charge state passing through very thin 40 A layer of silicon dioxide, induces significant damage at the SiO{sub 2}-Si interface through the mechanism of electronic stopping power. The lifetime of minority charge carriers, {tau} (bulk property), remains constant at around 6 {mu}s for all the charge states of the 60 MeV energy oxygen ion irradiated samples at a constant fluence of, {phi}, 10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2}.

  8. Thermally Induced Lateral Motion of α-Zirconium Phosphate Layers Intercalated with Hexadecylamines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Kookheon

    2005-03-01

    Well-defined intercalated structure, either interdigitated layers or bilayers, of hexadecylamines (HDAs) in a confined space of a highly-functionalized layered material, α- zirconium phosphate (α-ZrP), was prepared and these two distinct intercalated structures can serve as model systems to investigate the interaction of the two monolayers whose amphiphilic tails are adjacent to each other. Acidic functional groups (-POH) on the α-ZrP are in well-ordered array and the number of functional group is quite high (i.e., cationic exchange capacity (CEC) = 664 mmole/100 g, area per one charge site = 0.24 nm^2) enough to realize the bilayers (i.e., discrete two monolayers) of HDAs within the α-ZrP interlayer. We employed the two-step intercalation mechanism for the preparation of well- ordered interdigitated layers as well as the bilayers of alkyl chains attached to both sides of the α-ZrP intergallery. An intriguing lateral motion of the α-ZrP sheets was observed with in-situ SAXS measurements for the interdigitated layer during heating and cooling cycle and verified with TEM. This lateral motion is believed to be due to the transition from the tilted to the untilted conformation of the interdigitated HDA chains and this transition is found to be thermally reversible.

  9. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Do; Awano, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching

  10. High efficiency of the spin-orbit torques induced domain wall motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Do, E-mail: bang@spin.mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp [Toyota Technological Institute, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Institute of Materials Science, VAST, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Awano, Hiroyuki [Toyota Technological Institute, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    We investigated current-induced DW motion in asymmetric interfacial multilayered Tb/Co wires for various thicknesses of magnetic and Pt-capping layers. It is found that the driving mechanism for the DW motion changes from interfacial to bulk effects at much thick magnetic layer (up to 19.8 nm). In thin wires, linearly depinning field dependence of critical current density and in-plane field dependence of DW velocity suggest that the extrinsic pinning governs field-induced DW motion and injecting current can be regarded as an effective field. It is expected that the high efficiency of spin-orbit torques in thick magnetic multilayers would have important implication for future spintronic devices based on in-plane current induced-DW motion or switching.

  11. Thermally induced motion of marine sediments resulting from disposal of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez, P.F.; Dawson, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Coupled creep and heat transfer calculations have been performed to assess the sensitivity of heat load, viscosity, and canister density on the motion of waste canisters buried in marine sediments. Results indicate that no upward movement is predicted for heat loads remaining within the metallurgical and geochemical constraints placed on the temperature of sediments near the canister for the times analyzed. Upward movement of the canister is again not observed in calculations involving reasonable variations of the sediment viscosity and canister density. Maximum effective deviatoric stress levels due to thermally induced differential body forces are significantly less than the sediment's short term peak strength

  12. Fluctuations in induced charge introduced by Te inclusions within CdZnTe radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bale, Derek S.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, homogenization theory based on a multiple-scale perturbation of the electron transport equation has been used to derive a mathematical framework for modeling the excess charge lost to Te inclusions within radiation detectors based on semi-insulating cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe). In that theory, the heterogeneous material is mathematically replaced by a homogenized CdZnTe crystal whose effective electron attenuation length incorporates the additional uniform electron trapping caused by the inclusions. In this paper, the homogenization theory is extended to incorporate fluctuations in the induced charge (i.e., charge collection nonuniformities) introduced by the random position and size distributions of a noncorrelated population of small (i.e, <20 μm) Te inclusions. Analysis of the effective parameters derived within the homogenized framework is used to develop a probability distribution of effective electron attenuation lengths, and therefore effective mobility-lifetime products, as a function of both the position and size distribution of Te inclusions. Example distributions are detailed for the case of an exponential size distribution at various number densities. Further, it is demonstrated that the inclusion-induced material nonuniformities derived in this paper can be numerically sampled efficiently, making them applicable to Monte Carlo device simulation of realistic CdZnTe detectors. Simulated charge induction maps and pulse-height spectra are presented and compared to recently published measurements.

  13. Flocculation of Clay Colloids Induced by Model Polyelectrolytes: Effects of Relative Charge Density and Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhawoth, Yasine; Michot, Laurent J; Levitz, Pierre; Malikova, Natalie

    2017-10-06

    Flocculation and its tuning are of utmost importance in the optimization of several industrial protocols in areas such as purification of waste water and civil engineering. Herein, we studied the polyelectrolyte-induced flocculation of clay colloids on a model system consisting of purified clay colloids of well-defined size fractions and ionene polyelectrolytes presenting regular and tunable chain charge density. To characterize ionene-induced clay flocculation, we turned to the combination of light absorbance (turbidity) and ζ-potential measurements, as well as adsorption isotherms. Our model system allowed us to identify the exact ratio of positive and negative charges in clay-ionene mixtures, the (c+/c-) ratio. For all samples studied, the onset of efficient flocculation occurred consistently at c+/c- ratios significantly below 1, which indicated the formation of highly ionene-deficient aggregates. At the same time, the ζ-potential measurements indicated an apparent zero charge on such aggregates. Thus, the ζ-potential values could not provide the stoichiometry inside the clay-ionene aggregates. The early onset of flocculation in clay-ionene mixtures is reminiscent of the behavior of multivalent salts and contrasts that of monovalent salts, for which a large excess amount of ions is necessary to achieve flocculation. Clear differences in the flocculation behavior are visible as a function of the ionene charge density, which governs the conformation of the ionene chains on the clay surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. The measurement and modeling of alpha-particle-induced charge collection in dynamic memories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldiges, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of α-particle-induced charge collection in high-density dynamic random access memories. A novel technique for the measurement of charge collection in high-density memory cells and bit lines due to α-particle strikes was developed. The technique involves D.C. tests on simple test structures with an α-particle source on the device package as a lid. The advantages of this new measurement technique are: the method allows for in-situ measurements of charge collection on both MOS capacitors and bit lines found in present-day memories; the on-chip measurement technique minimizes errors due to external probes loading the device under test; the measurements can be controlled by a personal computer, with the data being able to be reduced on the same machine. Results obtained using this new measurement technique show that the charge collection is found to depend upon test-structure size and the configuration of its neighbors. Results of two-dimensional simulations of charge flow along the surface of an MOS capacitor from current injection due to an α-particle strike indicate that a spatial potential variation of 0.5V may occur between the point of current injection and capacitor edge for a 1M dRAM capacitor

  15. Recombination of charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in silicon doped by transition metals impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakevich, L A

    2003-01-01

    It has been studied the peculiarities of recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers on radiation-induced defects in received according to Czochralski method p-silicon (p approx 3 - 20 Ohm centre dot cm), doped by one of the impurities of transition metals of the IV-th group of periodic table (titanium, zirconium, hafnium). Experimental results are obtained out of the analysis of temperature and injection dependence of the life time of charge carriers. The results are explained taking into consideration the influences of elastic stress fields created by the aggregates of transition metals atoms on space distribution over the crystal of oxygen and carbon background impurities as well as on the migration of movable radiation-induced defects during irradiation. (authors).

  16. Simulations of induced-charge electro-osmosis in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben, Yuxing

    2005-03-01

    Theories of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena generally assume a uniform, neutral bulk electroylte in contact with a polarizable thin double layer near a metal or dielectric surface, which acts as a "capacitor skin". Induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) is the general effect of nonlinear electro-osmotic slip, when an applied electric field acts on its own induced (diffuse) double-layer charge. In most theoretical and experimental work, ICEO has been studied in very simple geometries, such as colloidal spheres and planar, periodic micro-electrode arrays. Here we use finite-element simulations to predict how more complicated geometries of polarizable surfaces and/or electrodes yield flow profiles with subtle dependence on the amplitude and frequency of the applied voltage. We also consider how the simple model equations break down, due to surface conduction, bulk diffusion, and concentration polarization, for large applied voltages (as in most experiments).

  17. Charge collection efficiency degradation induced by MeV ions in semiconductor devices: Model and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittone, E., E-mail: ettore.vittone@unito.it [Department of Physics, NIS Research Centre and CNISM, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Pastuovic, Z. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Breese, M.B.H. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Garcia Lopez, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores (CNA), Sevilla University, J. Andalucia, CSIC, Av. Thomas A. Edison 7, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jaksic, M. [Department for Experimental Physics, Ruder Boškovic Institute (RBI), P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Raisanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, Helsinki 00014 (Finland); Siegele, R. [Centre for Accelerator Science (ANSTO), Locked bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW 2234 (Australia); Simon, A. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna International Centre, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Vizkelethy, G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), PO Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Highlights: • We study the electronic degradation of semiconductors induced by ion irradiation. • The experimental protocol is based on MeV ion microbeam irradiation. • The radiation induced damage is measured by IBIC. • The general model fits the experimental data in the low level damage regime. • Key parameters relevant to the intrinsic radiation hardness are extracted. - Abstract: This paper investigates both theoretically and experimentally the charge collection efficiency (CCE) degradation in silicon diodes induced by energetic ions. Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) measurements carried out on n- and p-type silicon diodes which were previously irradiated with MeV He ions show evidence that the CCE degradation does not only depend on the mass, energy and fluence of the damaging ion, but also depends on the ion probe species and on the polarization state of the device. A general one-dimensional model is derived, which accounts for the ion-induced defect distribution, the ionization profile of the probing ion and the charge induction mechanism. Using the ionizing and non-ionizing energy loss profiles resulting from simulations based on the binary collision approximation and on the electrostatic/transport parameters of the diode under study as input, the model is able to accurately reproduce the experimental CCE degradation curves without introducing any phenomenological additional term or formula. Although limited to low level of damage, the model is quite general, including the displacement damage approach as a special case and can be applied to any semiconductor device. It provides a method to measure the capture coefficients of the radiation induced recombination centres. They can be considered indexes, which can contribute to assessing the relative radiation hardness of semiconductor materials.

  18. Electron yield from Be-Cu induced by highly charged Xe q+ ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Láska, Leoš; Stöckli, M. P.; Fehrenbach, C. W.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 196, - (2002), s. 61-67 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1010105; GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : highly charged ion-induced electron emission * angle impact effect * Be-Cu Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.158, year: 2002

  19. Conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction: Mean-field approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yu B.; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Zakrzewski, W.J.

    2006-01-01

    A simple phenomenological model for describing the conformational dynamics of biological macromolecules via the nonlinearity-induced instabilities is proposed. It is shown that the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom of closed molecular aggregates may act as drivers giving ...... impetus to conformational dynamics of biopolymers. It is demonstrated that initially circular aggregates may undergo transformation to polygonal shapes and possible application to aggregates of bacteriochlorophyl a molecules is considered....

  20. Charge and mass distribution in 20Ne induced fission of 181Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Goswami, A.; Reddy, A.V.R.; Guin, R.

    2005-01-01

    Charge and mass distribution studies have been carried out at E lab =180 MeV in 20 Ne induced fission of 181 Ta. The mass distribution has been found to be symmetric. The width of the mass distribution has been theoretically calculated using the random neck rupture of Brosa et al. A good agreement between the calculated and experimental mass distribution has been observed. (author)

  1. Electrostatic charge bounds for ball lightning models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, Karl D

    2008-01-01

    Several current theories concerning the nature of ball lightning predict a substantial electrostatic charge in order to account for its observed motion and shape (Turner 1998 Phys. Rep. 293 1; Abrahamson and Dinniss 2000 Nature 403 519). Using charged soap bubbles as a physical model for ball lightning, we show that the magnitude of charge predicted by some of these theories is too high to allow for the types of motion commonly observed in natural ball lightning, which includes horizontal motion above the ground and movement near grounded conductors. Experiments show that at charge levels of only 10-15 nC, 3-cm-diameter soap bubbles tend to be attracted by induced charges to the nearest grounded conductor and rupture. We conclude with a scaling rule that can be used to extrapolate these results to larger objects and surroundings

  2. Utilizing the energy from induced wind produce by highway vehicle motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abas Abd Wahab; Tong, C.W.

    2000-01-01

    A research work has been conducted at the Faculty of mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia to utilize energy from airflow induced by moving vehicles along the highway for advertising and signboard lighting. Series of data collections have been made at Km 20 Johor Bahru - Kuala Lumpur Plus Highway. Wind anemometer equipped with data recorder has been placed at the highway divider to measure the wind speed induced by the vehicles moving from Johor Bahru to Kuala Lumpur and vice versa. From the data analysis it has been found that the to and from Kuala Lumpur motion of the vehicles induced a stable and continuous source of airflow (wind) ranges from 2 to 4 m/s. The energy in this induced wind has been estimated and has the potential to be used for the above said purpose. Five design models have been tested in the Faculty of mechanical Engineering Low Speed Wind Tunnel and the twisted vertical blades with circular end covers has proven to be the most efficient and suitable. The optimum sizing of the vertical axis wind turbine has also been determined. The details of the collection of wind induced data and analysis, estimation of energy content, the vertical axis wind turbine models testing and results are presented in this paper. (Author)

  3. Potential of mechanical metamaterials to induce their own global rotational motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, K. K.; Wojciechowski, K. W.; Dudek, M. R.; Gatt, R.; Mizzi, L.; Grima, J. N.

    2018-05-01

    The potential of several classes of mechanical metamaterials to induce their own overall rotational motion through the individual rotation of their subunits is examined. Using a theoretical approach, we confirm that for various rotating rigid unit systems, if by design the sum of angular momentum of subunits rotating in different directions is made to be unequal, then the system will experience an overall rotation, the extent of which may be controlled through careful choice of the geometric parameters defining these systems. This phenomenon of self-induced rotation is also confirmed experimentally. Furthermore, we discuss how these systems can be designed in a special way so as to permit extended rotations which allows them to overcome geometric lockage and the relevance of this concept in applications ranging from satellites to spacecraft and telescopes employed in space.

  4. Spatiotemporal kinetics of γ-H2AX protein on charged particles induced DNA damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, H., E-mail: hniu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chang, H.C. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Cho, I.C. [Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University and Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Liu, C.S. [Cancer Center of Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chou, W.T. [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages, and these complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. • In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in particle irradiated HeLa cells. • The HeLa cells were irradiated by 400 keV alpha-particles in four different dosages. • The result shows that a good linear relationship can be observed between foci number and radiation dose. • The data shows that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agree with the two components DNA repairing model, and it was decreasing as the radiation dose increased. • These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA repair. - Abstract: In several researches, it has been demonstrated that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages. These complex damages have higher ability to cause the cell death or cell carcinogenesis. For this reason, clarifying the DNA repair mechanism after charged particle irradiation plays an important role in the development of charged particle therapy and space exploration. Unfortunately, the detail spatiotemporal kinetic of DNA damage repair is still unclear. In this study, we used γ-H2AX protein to investigate the spatiotemporal kinetics of DNA double strand breaks in alpha-particle irradiated HeLa cells. The result shows that the intensity of γ-H2AX foci increased gradually, and reached to its maximum at 30 min after irradiation. A good linear relationship can be observed between foci intensity and radiation dose. After 30 min, the γ-H2AX foci intensity was decreased with time passed, but remained a large portion (∼50%) at 48 h passed. The data show that the dissolution rate of γ-H2AX foci agreed with two components DNA repairing model. These results suggest that charged particles can induce more complex DNA damages and causing the retardation of DNA

  5. Transformations of visual memory induced by implied motions of pattern elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, R A; Freyd, J J

    1985-10-01

    Four experiments measured distortions in short-term visual memory induced by displays depicting independent translations of the elements of a pattern. In each experiment, observers saw a sequence of 4 dot patterns and were instructed to remember the third pattern and to compare it with the fourth. The first three patterns depicted translations of the dots in consistent, but separate directions. Error rates and reaction times for rejecting the fourth pattern as different from the third were substantially higher when the dots in that pattern were displaced slightly forward, in the same directions as the implied motions, compared with when the dots were displaced in the opposite, backward directions. These effects showed little variation across interstimulus intervals ranging from 250 to 2,000 ms, and did not depend on whether the displays gave rise to visual apparent motion. However, they were eliminated when the dots in the fourth pattern were displaced by larger amounts in each direction, corresponding to the dot positions in the next and previous patterns in the same inducing sequence. These findings extend our initial report of the phenomenon of "representational momentum" (Freyd & Finke, 1984a), and help to rule out alternatives to the proposal that visual memories tend to undergo, at least to some extent, the transformations implied by a prior sequence of observed events.

  6. On Developing Field-Effect-Tunable Nanofluidic Ion Diodes with Bipolar, Induced-Charge Electrokinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We introduce herein the induced-charge electrokinetic phenomenon to nanometer fluidic systems; the design of the nanofluidic ion diode for field-effect ionic current control of the nanometer dimension is developed by enhancing internal ion concentration polarization through electrochemical transport of inhomogeneous inducing-counterions resulting from double gate terminals mounted on top of a thin dielectric layer, which covers the nanochannel connected to microfluidic reservoirs on both sides. A mathematical model based on the fully-coupled Poisson-Nernst-Plank-Navier-Stokes equations is developed to study the feasibility of this structural configuration causing effective ionic current rectification. The effect of various physiochemical and geometrical parameters, such as the native surface charge density on the nanochannel sidewalls, the number of gate electrodes (GE, the gate voltage magnitude, and the solution conductivity, permittivity, and thickness of the dielectric coating, as well as the size and position of the GE pair of opposite gate polarity, on the resulted rectification performance of the presented nanoscale ionic device is numerically analyzed by using a commercial software package, COMSOL Multiphysics (version 5.2. Three types of electrohydrodynamic flow, including electroosmosis of 1st kind, induced-charge electroosmosis, and electroosmosis of 2nd kind that were originated by the Coulomb force within three distinct charge layers coexist in the micro/nanofluidic hybrid network and are shown to simultaneously influence the output current flux in a complex manner. The rectification factor of a contrast between the ‘on’ and ‘off’ working states can even exceed one thousand-fold in the case of choosing a suitable combination of several key parameters. Our demonstration of field-effect-tunable nanofluidic ion diodes of double external gate electrodes proves invaluable for the construction of a flexible electrokinetic platform

  7. Fractional charges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  8. Charges collection induced in APS by heavy particles: influence of design parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belredon, Xavier

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the design parameters influence on heavy ions-induced charge collection physics in APS. The goal is to determine the key parameters for an optimised space environment 'particle detector' APS design. It appears that diffusion is the dominant charge collection mechanism in all the studied technology types, with a smaller magnitude in case of epitaxial technologies. Following proton irradiation, a delayed charge collection and loss of collected charges have been observed. These phenomena are explained by the combination of carriers diffusion and action of the traps generated in the device. Even if they cannot be avoid in space applications, these effects are reduced in case of epitaxial technologies. This work led to the design parameters definition of an optimized APS 'particle detector' and to its fabrication. The results obtained on this APS confirm the previous conclusions and let us define the detection range of such detectors from 0.03 to 50 MeV.cm 2 .mg -1 . (author) [fr

  9. Clinical significance of exercise-induced left ventricular wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimchi, A.; Rozanski, A.; Fletcher, C.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Berman, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    We studied the relationship between the heart rate at the time of onset of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality and the severity of coronary artery disease in 89 patients who underwent exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography as part of their evaluation for coronary artery disease. Segmental wall motion was scored with a five-point system (3 = normal; -1 = dyskinesis); a decrease of one score defined the onset of wall motion abnormality. The onset of wall motion abnormality at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate had 100% predictive accuracy for coronary artery disease and higher sensitivity than the onset of ischemic ST segment depression at similar heart rate during exercise: 36% (25 of 69 patients with coronary disease) vs 19% (13 of 69 patients), p = 0.01. Wall motion abnormality occurring at less than or equal to 70% of maximal predicted heart rate was present in 49% of patients (23 of 47) with critical stenosis (greater than or equal to 90% luminal diameter narrowing), and in only 5% of patients (2 of 42) without such severe stenosis, p less than 0.001. The sensitivity of exercise-induced wall motion abnormality occurring at a low heart rate for the presence of severe coronary artery disease was similar to that of a deterioration in wall motion by more than two scores during exercise (49% vs 53%) or an absolute decrease of greater than or equal to 5% in exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (49% vs 45%)

  10. Bulk-Like Electrical Properties Induced by Contact-Limited Charge Transport in Organic Diodes: Revised Space Charge Limited Current

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Guangwei

    2018-02-22

    Charge transport governs the operation and performance of organic diodes. Illuminating the charge-transfer/transport processes across the interfaces and the bulk organic semiconductors is at the focus of intensive investigations. Traditionally, the charge transport properties of organic diodes are usually characterized by probing the current–voltage (I–V) curves of the devices. However, to unveil the landscape of the underlying potential/charge distribution, which essentially determines the I–V characteristics, still represents a major challenge. Here, the electrical potential distribution in planar organic diodes is investigated by using the scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy technique, a method that can clearly separate the contact and bulk regimes of charge transport. Interestingly, by applying to devices based on novel, high mobility organic materials, the space-charge-limited-current-like I–V curves, which are previously believed to be a result of the bulk transport, are surprisingly but unambiguously demonstrated to be caused by contact-limited conduction. A model accounting is developed for the transport properties of both the two metal/organic interfaces and the bulk. The results indicate that pure interface-dominated transport can indeed give rise to I–V curves similar to those caused by bulk transport. These findings provide a new insight into the charge injection and transport processes in organic diodes.

  11. Respiration Induced Heart Motion and Indications of Gated Delivery for Left-Sided Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xiangrong.qi@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Hu, Angela [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Wang Kai [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Newman, Francis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Crosby, Marcus; Hu Bin; White, Julia; Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate respiration-induced heart motion for left-sided breast irradiation using a four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) technique and to determine novel indications to assess heart motion and identify breast patients who may benefit from a gated treatment. Methods and Materials: Images of 4DCT acquired during free breathing for 20 left-sided breast cancer patients, who underwent whole breast irradiation with or without regional nodal irradiation, were analyzed retrospectively. Dose distributions were reconstructed in the phases of 0%, 20%, and 50%. The intrafractional heart displacement was measured in three selected transverse CT slices using D{sub LAD} (the distance from left ascending aorta to a fixed line [connecting middle point of sternum and the body] drawn on each slice) and maximum heart depth (MHD, the distance of the forefront of the heart to the line). Linear regression analysis was used to correlate these indices with mean heart dose and heart dose volume at different breathing phases. Results: Respiration-induced heart displacement resulted in observable variations in dose delivered to the heart. During a normal free-breathing cycle, heart-induced motion D{sub LAD} and MHD changed up to 9 and 11 mm respectively, resulting in up to 38% and 39% increases of mean doses and V{sub 25.2} for the heart. MHD and D{sub LAD} were positively correlated with mean heart dose and heart dose volume. Respiratory-adapted gated treatment may better spare heart and ipsilateral-lung compared with the conventional non-gated plan in a subset of patients with large D{sub LAD} or MHD variations. Conclusion: Proposed indices offer novel assessment of heart displacement based on 4DCT images. MHD and D{sub LAD} can be used independently or jointly as selection criteria for respiratory gating procedure before treatment planning. Patients with great intrafractional MHD variations or tumor(s) close to the diaphragm may particularly benefit from the gated

  12. Nonmonotonic anisotropy in charge conduction induced by antiferrodistortive transition in metallic SrTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qian; Loret, Bastien; Xu, Bin; Yang, Xiaojun; Rischau, Carl Willem; Lin, Xiao; Fauqué, Benoît; Verstraete, Matthieu J.; Behnia, Kamran

    2016-07-01

    Cubic SrTiO3 becomes tetragonal below 105 K. The antiferrodistortive (AFD) distortion leads to clockwise and counterclockwise rotation of adjacent TiO6 octahedra. This insulator becomes a metal upon the introduction of extremely low concentration of n -type dopants. However, signatures of the structural phase transition in charge conduction have remained elusive. Employing the Montgomery technique, we succeed in resolving the anisotropy of charge conductivity induced by the AFD transition, in the presence of different types of dopants. We find that the slight lattice distortion (liquids, the anisotropy has opposite signs for elastic and inelastic scattering. Increasing the concentration of dopants leads to a drastic shift in the temperature of the AFD transition either upward or downward. The latter result puts strong constraints on any hypothetical role played by the AFD soft mode in the formation of Cooper pairs and the emergence of superconductivity in SrTiO3.

  13. Charged-particle magnetic-quadrupole spectrometer for neutron induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Grimes, S.M.; Tuckey, B.J.; Anderson, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A spectrometer has been developed for measuring the charged particle production cross sections and spectra in neutron-induced reactions. The spectrometer consists of a magnetic quadrupole doublet which focuses the charged particles onto a silicon surface barrier detector telescope which is 2 meters or more from the irradiated sample. Collimators, shielding, and the large source-to-detector distance reduce the background enough to use the spectrometer with a 14-MeV neutron source producing 4 . 10 12 n/s. The spectrometer has been used in investigations of proton, deuteron, and alpha particle production by 14-MeV neutrons incident on various materials. Protons with energies as low as 1.1 MeV have been measured. The good resolution of the detectors has also made possible an improved measurement of the neutron- neutron scattering length from the 0 0 proton spectrum from deuteron breakup by 14-MeV neutrons

  14. The effects of structural setting on the azimuthal velocities of blast induced ground motion in perlite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beattie, Susan G. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    A series of small scale explosive tests were performed during the spring of 1994 at a perlite mine located near Socorro, NM. The tests were designed to investigate the azimuthal or directional relationship between small scale geologic structures such as joints and the propagation of explosively induced ground motion. Three shots were initiated within a single borehole located at ground zero (gz) at depths varying from the deepest at 83 m (272 ft) to the shallowest at 10 m (32 ft). The intermediate shot was initiated at a depth of 63 m (208 ft). An array of three component velocity and acceleration transducers were placed in two concentric rings entirely surrounding the single shot hole at 150 and 300 azimuths as measured from ground zero. Data from the transducers was then used to determine the average propagation velocity of the blast vibration through the rock mass at the various azimuths. The rock mass was mapped to determine the prominent joint orientations (strike and dip) and the average propagation velocities were correlated with this geologic information. The data from these experiments shows that there is a correlation between the orientation of prominent joints and the average velocity of ground motion. It is theorized that this relationship is due to the relative path the ground wave follows when encountering a joint or structure within the rock mass. The more prominent structures allow the wave to follow along their strike thereby forming a sort of channel or path of least resistance and in turn increasing the propagation velocity. Secondary joints or structures may act in concert with more prominent features to form a network of channels along which the wave moves more freely than it may travel against the structure. The amplitudes of the ground motion was also shown to vary azimuthally with the direction of the most prominent structures.

  15. Delta-sleep inducing peptide entrapment in the charged macroporous matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhanova, Tatiana V.; Artyukhov, Alexander A.; Gurevich, Yakov M.; Semenikhina, Marina A.; Prudchenko, Igor A.; Shtilman, Mikhail I.; Markvicheva, Elena A.

    2014-01-01

    Various biomolecules, for example proteins, peptides etc., entrapped in polymer matrices, impact interactions between matrix and cells, including stimulation of cell adhesion and proliferation. Delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) possesses numerous beneficial properties, including its abilities in burn treatment and neuronal protection. DSIP entrapment in two macroporous polymer matrices based on copolymer of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-DMAEMA-MBAA) and copolymer of acrylic acid and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-AA-MBAA) has been studied. Quite 100% of DSIP has been entrapped into positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix, while the quantity of DSIP adsorbed on negatively charged Co-AA-MBAA was only 2–6%. DSIP release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA was observed in saline solutions (0.9% NaCl and PBS) while there was no DSIP release in water or 25% ethanol, thus ionic strength was a reason of this process. - Graphical abstract: Delta-sleep inducing peptide possessing neuroprotective and wound healing properties was adsorbed on positively charged polymer matrix Co-DMAEMA-MBAA for tissue engineering. The peptide released from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix in function of ionic strength of solution, pH decreasing stimulated peptide release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix for 3 h. This construction could be a base of new bioactive implants. - Highlights: • Macroporous positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix pore size was 20–35 μm. • DSIP was adsorbed on Co-DMAEMA-MBAA totally in 16 h. • Its release depends on ionic strength of solution (no release in 25% ethanol or water). • Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix swelling depends on pH and ionic strength of solution. • DSIP is destroyed in PBS and 0.9% NaCl in 5 days, but in water it was more stable

  16. Delta-sleep inducing peptide entrapment in the charged macroporous matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhanova, Tatiana V., E-mail: sukhanovat@mail.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Laboratory of Cell Interactions, Miklukho-Maklaya st., 16/10 Moscow (Russian Federation); Artyukhov, Alexander A.; Gurevich, Yakov M.; Semenikhina, Marina A. [Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Research and Teaching Center “Biomaterials”, Miusskaya sq., 9 Moscow (Russian Federation); Prudchenko, Igor A. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Laboratory of Peptide Chemistry, Miklukho-Maklaya st., 16/10 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shtilman, Mikhail I. [Mendeleyev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Research and Teaching Center “Biomaterials”, Miusskaya sq., 9 Moscow (Russian Federation); Markvicheva, Elena A. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Laboratory Polymers for Biology, Miklukho-Maklaya st., 16/10 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-01

    Various biomolecules, for example proteins, peptides etc., entrapped in polymer matrices, impact interactions between matrix and cells, including stimulation of cell adhesion and proliferation. Delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) possesses numerous beneficial properties, including its abilities in burn treatment and neuronal protection. DSIP entrapment in two macroporous polymer matrices based on copolymer of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-DMAEMA-MBAA) and copolymer of acrylic acid and methylen-bis-acrylamide (Co-AA-MBAA) has been studied. Quite 100% of DSIP has been entrapped into positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix, while the quantity of DSIP adsorbed on negatively charged Co-AA-MBAA was only 2–6%. DSIP release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA was observed in saline solutions (0.9% NaCl and PBS) while there was no DSIP release in water or 25% ethanol, thus ionic strength was a reason of this process. - Graphical abstract: Delta-sleep inducing peptide possessing neuroprotective and wound healing properties was adsorbed on positively charged polymer matrix Co-DMAEMA-MBAA for tissue engineering. The peptide released from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix in function of ionic strength of solution, pH decreasing stimulated peptide release from Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix for 3 h. This construction could be a base of new bioactive implants. - Highlights: • Macroporous positively charged Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix pore size was 20–35 μm. • DSIP was adsorbed on Co-DMAEMA-MBAA totally in 16 h. • Its release depends on ionic strength of solution (no release in 25% ethanol or water). • Co-DMAEMA-MBAA matrix swelling depends on pH and ionic strength of solution. • DSIP is destroyed in PBS and 0.9% NaCl in 5 days, but in water it was more stable.

  17. Charge-induced secondary atomization in diffusion flames of electrostatic sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Alessandro; Chen, Gung

    1994-01-01

    The combustion of electrostatic sprays of heptane in laminar counterflow diffusion flames was experimentally studied by measuring droplet size and velocity distributions, as well as the gas-phase temperature. A detailed examination of the evolution of droplet size distribution as droplets approach the flame shows that, if substantial evaporation occurs before droplets interact with the flame, an initially monodisperse size distribution becomes bimodal. A secondary sharp peak in the size histogram develops in correspondence of diameters about one order of magnitude smaller than the mean. No evaporation mechanism can account for the development of such bimodality, that can be explained only in terms of a disintegration of droplets into finer fragments of size much smaller than that of the parent. Other evidence in support of this interpretation is offered by the measurements of droplet size-velocity correlation and velocity component distributions, showing that, as a consequence of the ejection process, the droplets responsible for the secondary peak have velocities uncorrelated with the mean flow. The fission is induced by the electric charge. When a droplet evaporates, in fact, the electric charge density on the droplet surface increases while the droplet shrinks, until the so-called Rayleigh limit is reached at which point the repulsion of electric charges overcomes the surface tension cohesive force, ultimately leading to a disintegraton into finer fragments. We report on the first observation of such fissions in combustion environments. If, on the other hand, insufficient evaporation has occurred before droplets enter the high temperature region, there appears to be no significant evidence of bimodality in their size distribution. In this case, in fact, the concentration of flame chemi-ions or, in the case of positively charged droplets, electrons may be sufficient for them to neutralize the charge on the droplets and to prevent disruption.

  18. Simulation analyses of vibration tests on pile-group effects using blast-induced ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayuki Hashimoto; Kazushige Fujiwara; Katsuichirou Hijikata; Hideo Tanaka; Kohji Koyamada; Atsushi Suzuki; Osamu Kontani

    2005-01-01

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site to promote better understanding of the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, especially pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated pit. One structure was supported on 25 tubular steel piles and the other on 4. The test pit was backfilled with sand of an appropriate grain size distribution to ensure good compaction. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for the tests. The 3D Finite Element Method (3D FEM)and a Genetic Algorithm (GA) were employed to identify the shear wave velocities and damping factors of the compacted sand, especially of the surface layer. A beam-interaction spring model was employed to simulate the test results of the piles and the pile-supported structures. The superstructure and pile foundation were modeled by a one-stick model comprising lumped masses and beam elements. The pile foundations were modeled just as they were, with lumped masses and beam elements to simulate the test results showing that, for the 25-pile structure, piles at different locations showed different responses. It was confirmed that the analysis methods employed were very useful for evaluating the nonlinear behavior of the soil-pile-structure system, even under severe ground motions. (authors)

  19. Large scale vibration tests on pile-group effects using blast-induced ground motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuichirou Hijikata; Hideo Tanaka; Takayuki Hashimoto; Kazushige Fujiwara; Yuji Miyamoto; Osamu Kontani

    2005-01-01

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for vibration tests. The main objective of this research is to investigate the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, in particular, pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated 4 m deep pit. Their test-structures were exactly the same. One structure had 25 steel piles and the other had 4 piles. The test pit was backfilled with sand of appropriate grain size distributions to obtain good compaction, especially between the 25 piles. Accelerations were measured at the structures, in the test pit and in the adjacent free field, and pile strains were measured. Dynamic modal tests of the pile-supported structures and PS measurements of the test pit were performed before and after the vibration tests to detect changes in the natural frequencies of the soil-pile-structure systems and the soil stiffness. The vibration tests were performed six times with different levels of input motions. The maximum horizontal acceleration recorded at the adjacent ground surface varied from 57 cm/s 2 to 1,683 cm/s 2 according to the distances between the test site and the blast areas. (authors)

  20. The efficacy of airflow and seat vibration on reducing visually induced motion sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amour, Sarah; Bos, Jelte E; Keshavarz, Behrang

    2017-09-01

    Visually induced motion sickness (VIMS) is a well-known sensation in virtual environments and simulators, typically characterized by a variety of symptoms such as pallor, sweating, dizziness, fatigue, and/or nausea. Numerous methods to reduce VIMS have been previously introduced; however, a reliable countermeasure is still missing. In the present study, the effect of airflow and seat vibration to alleviate VIMS was investigated. Eighty-two participants were randomly assigned to one of four groups (airflow, vibration, combined airflow and vibration, and control) and then exposed to a 15 min long video of a bicycle ride shot from first-person view. VIMS was measured using the Fast Motion Sickness Scale (FMS) and the Simulator Sickness Questionnaire (SSQ). Results showed that the exposure of airflow significantly reduced VIMS, whereas the presence of seat vibration, in contrast, did not have an impact on VIMS. Additionally, we found that females reported higher FMS scores than males, however, this sex difference was not found in the SSQ scores. Our findings demonstrate that airflow can be an effective and easy-to-apply technique to reduce VIMS in virtual environments and simulators, while vibration applied to the seat is not a successful method.

  1. Irritant-Induced Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Disorder: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinow, Anna M; Thompson, Jennifer; Forrest, L Arick; deSilva, Brad W

    2015-12-01

    To review our experience with the diagnosis and treatment of irritant-induced paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (IPVFMD). Retrospective chart review. Tertiary academic referral center. Thirty-four cases that met IPVFMD criteria and 76 cases of non-IPVFMD were selected from a database of patients with paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder-the diagnosis of which was made on the basis of flexible fiberoptic laryngoscopy and augmented by an odor challenge. Clinical charts were reviewed to document history of environmental allergies, pulmonary disease, gastroesophageal reflux, psychiatric disorder, fibromyalgia, tobacco use, alcohol use, dysphonia, cough, dysphagia, and treatment outcomes. There were no statistical differences between the IPVFMD and non-IPVFMD groups. Of the patients who were assigned and attended laryngeal control therapy, 13 (65%) reported improvement of symptoms. Symptom improvement increased to 100% in those patients who attended at least 2 laryngeal control therapy sessions. IPVFMD should be considered in patients presenting with respiratory symptoms after irritant exposure. Sensitivity of diagnosis can be improved via a standardized approach consisting of a careful history and physical examination, including laryngoscopy in the presence of triggers. Laryngeal control therapy is a well-tolerated and effective method of managing IPVFMD. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  2. Beating motion of a circular cylinder in vortex-induced vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Linwei; Chan, Eng-Soon; Wei, Yan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, beating phenomenon of a circular cylinder in vortex-induced vibration is studied by numerical simulations in a systematic manner. The cylinder mass coefficients of 2 and 10 are considered, and the Reynolds number is 150. Two distinctive frequencies, namely cylinder oscillation and vortex shedding frequencies, are obtained from the harmonic analysis of the cylinder displacement. The result is consistent with that observed in laboratory experiments. It is found that the cylinder oscillation frequency changes with the natural frequency of the cylinder while the reduced velocity is varied. The added-mass coefficient of the cylinder in beating motion is therefore estimated. Meanwhile, the vortex shedding frequency does not change dramatically in the beating situations. In fact, it is very close to 0.2. Accordingly, the lift force coefficient has two main components associated with these two frequencies. Besides, higher harmonics of the cylinder oscillation frequency appear in the spectrum of the lift coefficient. Moreover, the vortex shedding timing is studied in the beating motion by examining the instantaneous flow fields in the wake, and two scenarios of the vortex formation are observed.

  3. Validation of the dyspnea index in adolescents with exercise-induced paradoxical vocal fold motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guzman, Vanessa; Ballif, Catherine L; Maurer, Rie; Hartnick, Christopher J; Raol, Nikhila

    2014-09-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) affects almost 1 million adolescents in the United States. However, to date, no disease-specific objective measure exists to assess symptom severity and response to treatment in adolescents with exercise-induced PVFM. To validate the Dyspnea Index (DI) quality-of-life instrument (previously validated for adults with breathing disorders) in children aged 12 to 18 years with exercise-induced PVFM and to determine the minimum significant DI change corresponding to patient-reported or caregiver-reported improvement or worsening of symptoms. A longitudinal study of 56 patients (age range, 12-18 years) diagnosed as having exercise-induced PVFM and their caregivers from February 1, 2013, to September 30, 2013, in an outpatient pediatric otolaryngology office practice. The DI was administered to patients and caregivers, with items modified to reflect the perspective of caregivers. Appropriate DI change was measured to reflect improvement or worsening of symptoms. Test-retest reliability was accomplished by having a subset of patients and caregivers complete the instrument twice within 2 weeks before therapy. Internal consistency was assessed by calculation of Cronbach α. Discriminant validity and convergent validity were determined by comparing DIs with assessment of global change in symptoms. The patient and caregiver mean (SD) DI changes were -12.9 (9.6) and -14.7 (9.3), respectively (P therapy.

  4. Orientation Preferences and Motion Sickness Induced in a Virtual Reality Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Chao, Jian-Gang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Jin-Kun; Chen, Xue-Wen; Tan, Cheng

    2017-10-01

    Astronauts' orientation preferences tend to correlate with their susceptibility to space motion sickness (SMS). Orientation preferences appear universally, since variable sensory cue priorities are used between individuals. However, SMS susceptibility changes after proper training, while orientation preferences seem to be intrinsic proclivities. The present study was conducted to investigate whether orientation preferences change if susceptibility is reduced after repeated exposure to a virtual reality (VR) stimulus environment that induces SMS. A horizontal supine posture was chosen to create a sensory context similar to weightlessness, and two VR devices were used to produce a highly immersive virtual scene. Subjects were randomly allocated to an experimental group (trained through exposure to a provocative rotating virtual scene) and a control group (untrained). All subjects' orientation preferences were measured twice with the same interval, but the experimental group was trained three times during the interval, while the control group was not. Trained subjects were less susceptible to SMS, with symptom scores reduced by 40%. Compared with untrained subjects, trained subjects' orientation preferences were significantly different between pre- and posttraining assessments. Trained subjects depended less on visual cues, whereas few subjects demonstrated the opposite tendency. Results suggest that visual information may be inefficient and unreliable for body orientation and stabilization in a rotating visual scene, while reprioritizing preferences for different sensory cues was dynamic and asymmetric between individuals. The present findings should facilitate customization of efficient and proper training for astronauts with different sensory prioritization preferences and dynamic characteristics.Chen W, Chao J-G, Zhang Y, Wang J-K, Chen X-W, Tan C. Orientation preferences and motion sickness induced in a virtual reality environment. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017

  5. Ion desorption induced by charged particle beams: mechanisms and mass spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, E.F. da; Schweikert, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    Surface analysis, through desorption, induced by fast particles, is presented and discussed. The stopping of projectils is essentially made by collisions with the target electrons. The desorbed particles are generally emmited with kinetic energy from 0.1 to 20 eV. Mass, charge, velocity and emission angle give information about the surface components, its structure as well as beam-solid interaction processes. Time-of-flight mass spectroscopy of desorbed ions, determine the mass of organic macromolecules and biomolecules. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  6. Laser-induced charge transfer in the HeH2+ quasimolecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-01-01

    In a recent publication, the charge transfer cross section for He 2+ +H(ls) collisions through photon-assisted 2psigma--3dsigma transitions was calculated; this calculation, however, contained several errors whose quantitative--even qualitative effect on the results is not obvious. We present a correct evaluation of this laser-induced cross section, which turns out to be larger, and present a maximum for longer wavelengths, than the values previously reported. In addition, we have checked the applicability of perturbation theory, of the stationary phase, uniform and Landau--Zener approximations, and the importance of potentially competitive photon-assisted reactions

  7. Nano-electron beam induced current and hole charge dynamics through uncapped Ge nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchand, A.; El Hdiy, A.; Troyon, M. [Laboratoire de Recherche en Nanosciences, Bat. 6, case no 15, UFR Sciences, Universite de Reims Champagne Ardenne, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Amiard, G.; Ronda, A.; Berbezier, I. [IM2NP, Faculte des Sciences et Techniques, Campus de Saint Jerome - Case 142, Avenue Escadrille Normandie Niemen, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2012-04-16

    Dynamics of hole storage in spherical Ge nanocrystals (NCs) formed by a two step dewetting/nucleation process on an oxide layer grown on an n-doped <001> silicon substrate is studied using a nano-electron beam induced current technique. Carrier generation is produced by an electron beam irradiation. The generated current is collected by an atomic force microscope--tip in contact mode at a fixed position away from the beam spot of about 0.5 {mu}m. This distance represents the effective diffusion length of holes. The time constants of holes charging are determined and the effect of the NC size is underlined.

  8. Formation of surface nano-structures by plasma expansion induced by highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moslem, W. M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Port Said University, Port Said (Egypt); Centre for Theoretical Physics, The British University in Egypt (BUE), El-Shorouk City, Cairo (Egypt) and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences, Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); El-Said, A. S. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nuclear and Radiation Physics Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, 35516 Mansoura (Egypt) and Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Bautzner Landstr. 128, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Slow highly charged ions (HCIs) create surface nano-structures (nano-hillocks) on the quartz surface. The formation of hillocks was only possible by surpassing a potential energy threshold. By using the plasma expansion approach with suitable hydrodynamic equations, the creation mechanism of the nano-hillocks induced by HCIs is explained. Numerical analysis reveal that within the nanoscale created plasma region, the increase of the temperature causes an increase of the self-similar solution validity domain, and consequently the surface nano-hillocks become taller. Furthermore, the presence of the negative (positive) nano-dust particles would lead to increase (decrease) the nano-hillocks height.

  9. Top-gate dielectric induced doping and scattering of charge carriers in epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puls, Conor P.; Staley, Neal E.; Moon, Jeong-Sun; Robinson, Joshua A.; Campbell, Paul M.; Tedesco, Joseph L.; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Eddy, Charles R.; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Liu, Ying

    2011-07-01

    We show that an e-gun deposited dielectric impose severe limits on epitaxial graphene-based device performance based on Raman spectroscopy and low-temperature transport measurements. Specifically, we show from studies of epitaxial graphene Hall bars covered by SiO2 that the measured carrier density is strongly inhomogenous and predominantly induced by charged impurities at the grapheme/dielectric interface that limit mobility via Coulomb interactions. Our work emphasizes that material integration of epitaxial graphene and a gate dielectric is the next major road block towards the realization of graphene-based electronics.

  10. Measurement of changes in nuclear charge radii of 2r by laser-induced resonance fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Khoang Tkhi Kim Khueh; Chan Kong Tam; Kul'dzhanov, B.K.

    1987-01-01

    The optical isotopic shifts of Zr stable isotopes have been measured in three atomic transitions of type 4d 2 5s 2 → 4d 2 5s5p using the technique of laser-induced resonance fluorescence. The changes of nuclear mean-square charge radius Δ 2 > have been determined. The extracted values of Δ 2 > are compared to predictions of the droplet model. It is shown that the droplet model calculations can be made to agree with the experimental results, if changes of nuclear dynamical octupole deformation and of surface diffuseness parameter are taken into account

  11. Laser-induced charge transfer in the HeH/sup 2 +/ quasimolecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1983-11-01

    In a recent publication, the charge transfer cross section for He/sup 2 +/+H(ls) collisions through photon-assisted 2psigma--3dsigma transitions was calculated; this calculation, however, contained several errors whose quantitative--even qualitative effect on the results is not obvious. We present a correct evaluation of this laser-induced cross section, which turns out to be larger, and present a maximum for longer wavelengths, than the values previously reported. In addition, we have checked the applicability of perturbation theory, of the stationary phase, uniform and Landau--Zener approximations, and the importance of potentially competitive photon-assisted reactions.

  12. Induced-charge electroosmosis around conducting and Janus cylinder in microchip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Kai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The induced-charge elecetroosmosis around conducting/Janus cylinder with arbitrary Debye thickness is studied numerically, when an direct current weak electric filed is suddenly applied in a confined microchannel. It’s found that there are four large circulations around the conducting cylinder, and the total flux in the microchannel is zero; there are two smaller circulations around the Janus cylinder, and they are compressed to wall. A bulk flux, which has a parabolic relation with the applied electric field, is also predicted.

  13. Charge-Dipole Acceleration of Polar Gas Molecules towards Charged Nanoparticles: Involvement in Powerful Charge-Induced Catalysis of Heterophase Chemical Reactions and Ball Lightning Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Meshcheryakov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In humid air, the substantial charge-dipole attraction and electrostatic acceleration of surrounding water vapour molecules towards charged combustible nanoparticles cause intense electrostatic hydration and preferential oxidation of these nanoparticles by electrostatically accelerated polar water vapour molecules rather than nonaccelerated nonpolar oxygen gas molecules. Intense electrostatic hydration of charged combustible nanoparticles converts the nanoparticle's oxide-based shells into the hydroxide-based electrolyte shells, transforming these nanoparticles into reductant/air core-shell nanobatteries, periodically short-circuited by intraparticle field and thermionic emission. Partially synchronized electron emission breakdowns within trillions of nanoparticles-nanobatteries turn a cloud of charged nanoparticles-nanobatteries into a powerful radiofrequency aerosol generator. Electrostatic oxidative hydration and charge-catalyzed oxidation of charged combustible nanoparticles also contribute to a self-oscillating thermocycling process of evolution and periodic autoignition of inflammable gases near to the nanoparticle's surface. The described effects might be of interest for the improvement of certain nanotechnological heterophase processes and to better understand ball lightning phenomenon.

  14. Onset of turbulence induced by electron nonthermality in a complex plasma in presence of positively charged dust grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Sarkar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper onset of turbulence has been detected from the study of non linear dust acoustic wave propagation in a complex plasma considering electrons nonthermal and equilibrium dust charge positive. Dust grains are charged by secondary electron emission process. Our analysis shows that increase in electron nonthermality makes the grain charging process faster by reducing the magnitude of the nonadiabaticity induced pseudo viscosity. Consequently nature of dust charge variation changes from nonadiabatic to adiabatic one. For further increase of electron nonthermality, this pseudo viscosity becomes negative and hence generates a turbulent grain charging behaviour. This turbulent grain charging phenomenon is exclusively the outcome of this nonlinear study which was not found in linear analysis.

  15. The time-dependent coupled oscillator model for the motion of a charged particle in the presence of a time-varying magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menouar, Salah; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of the time-dependent coupled oscillator model for the motion of a charged particle subjected to a time-dependent external magnetic field is investigated. We use the canonical transformation approach for the classical treatment of the system, whereas the unitary transformation approach is used in managing the system in the framework of quantum mechanics. For both approaches, the original system is transformed into a much more simple system that is the sum of two independent harmonic oscillators with time-dependent frequencies. We therefore easily identify the wavefunctions in the transformed system with the help of an invariant operator of the system. The full wavefunctions in the original system are derived from the inverse unitary transformation of the wavefunctions associated with the transformed system.

  16. Electronic charge rearrangement at metal/organic interfaces induced by weak van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Ambrosetti, Alberto; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    Electronic charge rearrangements at interfaces between organic molecules and solid surfaces play a key role in a wide range of applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. It is common to utilize electrostatics and Pauli pushback to control the interface electronic properties, while the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions are often considered to have a negligible direct contribution (beyond the obvious structural relaxation). Here, we apply a fully self-consistent Tkatchenko-Scheffler vdW density functional to demonstrate that the weak vdW interactions can induce sizable charge rearrangements at hybrid metal/organic systems (HMOS). The complex vdW correlation potential smears out the interfacial electronic density, thereby reducing the charge transfer in HMOS, changes the interface work functions by up to 0.2 eV, and increases the interface dipole moment by up to 0.3 Debye. Our results suggest that vdW interactions should be considered as an additional control parameter in the design of hybrid interfaces with the desired electronic properties.

  17. Single ion induced surface nanostructures: a comparison between slow highly charged and swift heavy ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumayr, Friedrich; Facsko, Stefan; El-Said, Ayman S; Trautmann, Christina; Schleberger, Marika

    2011-10-05

    This topical review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the formation of surface nanostructures, an intriguing phenomenon in ion-surface interaction due to the impact of individual ions. In many solid targets, swift heavy ions produce narrow cylindrical tracks accompanied by the formation of a surface nanostructure. More recently, a similar nanometric surface effect has been revealed for the impact of individual, very slow but highly charged ions. While swift ions transfer their large kinetic energy to the target via ionization and electronic excitation processes (electronic stopping), slow highly charged ions produce surface structures due to potential energy deposited at the top surface layers. Despite the differences in primary excitation, the similarity between the nanostructures is striking and strongly points to a common mechanism related to the energy transfer from the electronic to the lattice system of the target. A comparison of surface structures induced by swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions provides a valuable insight to better understand the formation mechanisms. © 2011 IOP Publishing Ltd

  18. Metallicity at interphase boundaries due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa

    2018-02-09

    The electronic properties of interphase boundaries are of basic importance for most materials, particularly when those properties deviate strongly from the bulk behavior. We introduce a mechanism that can result in metallicity at stoichiometric interphase boundaries between semiconductors based on the idea of polar catastrophe, which is usually considered only in the context of heterostructures. To this end, we perform ab initio calculations within density functional theory to investigate the electronic states at stoichiometric SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries. In this system, one would not expect polar catastrophe to have a role according to state-of-the-art theory because the interface lacks formal charge discontinuity. However, we observe the formation of a hole gas between the semiconductors SnO and SnO2. To explain these findings, we provide a generalized theory based on the idea that the charge density discontinuity between SnO and SnO2, a consequence of lattice mismatch, drives a polar catastrophe scenario. As a result, SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries can develop metallicity depending on the grain size. The concept of metallicity due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity is of general validity and applies to many interphase boundaries with lattice mismatch.

  19. Numerical analysis of finite Debye-length effects in induced-charge electro-osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Andersen, Mathias Baekbo; Soni, Gaurav; Meinhart, Carl; Bruus, Henrik

    2009-06-01

    For a microchamber filled with a binary electrolyte and containing a flat unbiased center electrode at one wall, we employ three numerical models to study the strength of the resulting induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flow rolls: (i) a full nonlinear continuum model resolving the double layer, (ii) a linear slip-velocity model not resolving the double layer and without tangential charge transport inside this layer, and (iii) a nonlinear slip-velocity model extending the linear model by including the tangential charge transport inside the double layer. We show that, compared to the full model, the slip-velocity models significantly overestimate the ICEO flow. This provides a partial explanation of the quantitative discrepancy between observed and calculated ICEO velocities reported in the literature. The discrepancy increases significantly for increasing Debye length relative to the electrode size, i.e., for nanofluidic systems. However, even for electrode dimensions in the micrometer range, the discrepancies in velocity due to the finite Debye length can be more than 10% for an electrode of zero height and more than 100% for electrode heights comparable to the Debye length.

  20. Fractional-topological-charge-induced vortex birth and splitting of light fields on the submicron scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yiqi; Lu, Qinghong; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2017-02-01

    The study of vortex dynamics is of fundamental importance in understanding the structured light's propagation behavior in the realm of singular optics. Here, combining with the large-angle holographic lithography in photoresist, a simple experiment to trace and visualize the vortex birth and splitting of light fields induced by various fractional topological charges is reported. For a topological charge M =1.76 , the recorded microstructures reveal that although it finally leads to the formation of a pair of fork gratings, these two vortices evolve asynchronously. More interestingly, it is observed on the submicron scale that high-order topological charges M =3.48 and 3.52, respectively, give rise to three and four characteristic forks embedded in the samples with one-wavelength resolution of about 450 nm. Numerical simulations based on orbital angular momentum eigenmode decomposition support well the experimental observations. Our method could be applied effectively to study other structured matter waves, such as the electron and neutron beams.

  1. On the nano-hillock formation induced by slow highly charged ions on insulator surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemell, C.; El-Said, A. S.; Meissl, W.; Gebeshuber, I. C.; Trautmann, C.; Toulemonde, M.; Burgdörfer, J.; Aumayr, F.

    2007-10-01

    We discuss the creation of nano-sized protrusions on insulating surfaces using slow highly charged ions. This method holds the promise of forming regular structures on surfaces without inducing defects in deeper lying crystal layers. We find that only projectiles with a potential energy above a critical value are able to create hillocks. Below this threshold no surface modification is observed. This is similar to the track and hillock formation induced by swift (˜GeV) heavy ions. We present a model for the conversion of potential energy stored in the projectiles into target-lattice excitations (heat) and discuss the possibility to create ordered structures using the guiding effect observed in insulating conical structures.

  2. Topology and shape optimization of induced-charge electro-osmotic micropumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Misha Marie; Okkels, Fridolin; Bazant, M. Z.

    2009-01-01

    For a dielectric solid surrounded by an electrolyte and positioned inside an externally biased parallel-plate capacitor, we study numerically how the resulting induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flow depends on the topology and shape of the dielectric solid. In particular, we extend existing...... conventional electrokinetic models with an artificial design field to describe the transition from the liquid electrolyte to the solid dielectric. Using this design field, we have succeeded in applying the method of topology optimization to find system geometries with non-trivial topologies that maximize...... the net induced electro-osmotic flow rate through the electrolytic capacitor in the direction parallel to the capacitor plates. Once found, the performance of the topology-optimized geometries has been validated by transferring them to conventional electrokinetic models not relying on the artificial...

  3. The influence hydrogen atom addition has on charge switching during motion of the metal atom in endohedral Ca@C60H4 isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggi, G.; Besley, E.; Stace, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Density functional theory has been applied in a study of charge transfer between an endohedral calcium atom and the fullerene cage in Ca@C60H4 and [Ca@C60H4]+ isomers. Previous calculations on Ca@C60 have shown that the motion of calcium within a fullerene is accompanied by large changes in electron density on the carbon cage. Based on this observation, it has been proposed that a tethered endohedral fullerene might form the bases of a nanoswitch. Through the addition of hydrogen atoms to one hemisphere of the cage it is shown that, when compared with Ca@C60, asymmetric and significantly reduced energy barriers can be generated with respect to motion of the calcium atom. It is proposed that hydrogen atom addition to a fullerene might offer a route for creating a bi-stable nanoswitch that can be fine-tuned through the selection of an appropriate isomer and number of atoms attached to the cage of an endohedral fullerene. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Fullerenes: past, present and future, celebrating the 30th anniversary of Buckminster Fullerene’. PMID:27501967

  4. Induced motion of a sphere due to a flexible elastic sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallabandi, Bhargav; Oppenheimer, Naomi; Salez, Thomas; Stone, Howard A.

    2017-11-01

    A sphere translating parallel to a rigid wall in Stokes flow experiences an increased drag but no normal force. In contrast, a sphere translating along the surface of a soft elastic substrate experiences an induced normal force due to the coupling between hydrodynamic stresses and elastic deformation. Here, we use theory and experiments to show that an analogous effect occurs for a particle moving near a flexible elastic membrane with bending and stretching resistances. Applying the Lorentz reciprocal theorem in the lubrication limit, we find that the induced force on the particle is repulsive, scaling with the square of its translational speed and inversely with the bending modulus and tension of the membrane. The theoretical predictions are validated by experiments of a sphere driven by gravity down a vertically suspended elastic sheet, where we observe a spontaneous motion of the sphere away from the sheet. The general theoretical approach and the specific results are pertinent to the dynamics of objects near biological membranes and other deformable interfaces.

  5. Charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, Cornelia; Angulo, C.; Arnould, M.

    2000-01-01

    The rapidly growing wealth of nuclear data becomes less and less easily accessible to the astrophysics community. Mastering this volume of information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into stellar evolution or nucleosynthesis models become urgent goals of prime necessity. we report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal motivation for the setting-up of the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged-particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. When cross section data are not available in the whole needed range of energies, the theoretical predictions obtained in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach model is used. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. Reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates are also provided. (authors)

  6. Charged-particle induced thermonuclear reaction rates: a compilation for astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grama, Cornelia

    1999-01-01

    The rapidly growing wealth of nuclear data becomes less and less easily accessible to the astrophysics community. Mastering this volume of information and making it available in an accurate and usable form for incorporation into stellar evolution or nucleosynthesis models become urgent goals of prime necessity. We report on the results of the European network NACRE (Nuclear Astrophysics Compilation of REaction rates). The principal motivation for the setting-up of the NACRE network has been the necessity of building up a well-documented and detailed compilation of rates for charged -particle induced reactions on stable targets up to Si and on unstable nuclei of special significance in astrophysics. This work is meant to supersede the only existing compilation of reaction rates issued by Fowler and collaborators. The cross section data and/or resonance parameters for a total of 86 charged-particle induced reactions are given and the corresponding reaction rates are calculated and given in tabular form. When cross section data are not available in the whole needed range of energies the theoretical predictions obtained in the framework of the Hauser-Feshbach model are used. Uncertainties are analyzed and realistic upper and lower bounds of the rates are determined. Reverse reaction rates and analytical approximations of the adopted rates are also provided. (author)

  7. The charge transfer induced by Cr doping in MgB2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Huarong; Zhao Jiyin; Shi Lei

    2005-01-01

    Mg 1-x Cr x B 2 polycrystal bulk samples with 0 x 5% have been synthesized by a solid-state reaction and studied by X-ray diffraction, SEM and Raman spectrum. It is found that the c-axis of the lattice decreases as the Cr content increases, while the a-axis remains unchanged. Moreover, crystal grain size increases apparently with Cr doping concentration increase. The normal-state resistivity increases and the superconducting transition temperature (T c ) decreases from 38.2 K (x = 0) to 35.1 K (x 0.03) with the increase of Cr content. It is suggested that the charge transfer between the Mg-layer and the B-layer causes the decrease of the charge carrier concentration and induces the changes of T c and normal-state resistivity. On the other hand, by the Raman scattering study, it is found that the linewidth of Raman spectrum increases with the increase of Cr content, which is resulted by the competition between the electron-phonon interaction and substitution-induced disorder. The Raman peak has no evident shift due to the countervailing between the effects of the electron-phonon coupling and the grain size

  8. A hybrid approach for quantizing complicated motion of a charged particle in time-varying magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menouar, Salah; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2015-01-01

    Quantum characteristics of a charged particle subjected to a singular oscillator potential under an external magnetic field is investigated via SU(1,1) Lie algebraic approach together with the invariant operator and the unitary transformation methods. The system we managed is somewhat complicated since we considered not only the time-variation of the effective mass of the system but also the dependence of the external magnetic field on time in an arbitrary fashion. In this case, the system is a kind of time-dependent Hamiltonian systems which require more delicate treatment when we study it. The complete wave functions are obtained without relying on the methods of perturbation and/or approximation, and the global phases of the system are identified. To promote the understanding of our development, we applied it to a particular case, assuming that the effective mass slowly varies with time under a time-dependent magnetic field

  9. On the possibility of gamma-laser pumping occurring at a charged particle counter motion and in density-modulated electron beams by a high frequency intensive radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksyuta, N.V.

    1999-01-01

    The given report deals with the problem of motion and radiation of relativistic electron in a field of opposite plane density-modulated relativistic electron beam. Physical essence of high-frequency intensive radiation origin could be explained, first by the additional Lorentz reduction of the electron beam modulation period (modulation period Λ in a laboratory co-ordinate system reduces by a factor γ as compared with the modulation period in a beam co-ordinate system) and, secondly, a simultaneous γ-fold increase of transverse components of relativistic electrons of the beam electric and magnetic fields. Such a moving modulated electron beam can be regarded as a dynamic micro-ondulator. Unlike static micro-ondulators we can observe here one more positive moment along with a small period Λ = Λ'/γ, i.e. the electric and magnetic fields in a transverse direction are changed according to the law of exp(-2πx/Λ'). It means that charged particle interaction with a dynamic micro-ondulator will be effective in a wide range of transverse distances, i.e., to get an intensive short wave radiation one can use charged particle beams with rather large apertures which leads to an additional radiation intensity increase. A discussion is given showing that the proposed dynamic modulator possesses some essential merits. A detailed calculation is presented. (author)

  10. Dynamic RSA for the evaluation of inducible micromotion of Oxford UKA during step-up and step-down motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsager, Kristian; Kaptein, Bart L; Rømer, Lone; Jørgensen, Peter B; Stilling, Maiken

    2017-06-01

    Background and purpose - Implant inducible micromotions have been suggested to reflect the quality of the fixation interface. We investigated the usability of dynamic RSA for evaluation of inducible micromotions of the Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty (UKA) tibial component, and evaluated factors that have been suggested to compromise the fixation, such as fixation method, component alignment, and radiolucent lines (RLLs). Patients and methods - 15 patients (12 men) with a mean age of 69 (55-86) years, with an Oxford UKA (7 cemented), were studied after a mean time in situ of 4.4 (3.6-5.1) years. 4 had tibial RLLs. Each patient was recorded with dynamic RSA (10 frames/second) during a step-up/step-down motion. Inducible micromotions were calculated for the tibial component with respect to the tibia bone. Postoperative component alignment was measured with model-based RSA and RLLs were measured on screened radiographs. Results - All tibial components showed inducible micromotions as a function of the step-cycle motion with a mean subsidence of up to -0.06 mm (95% CI: -0.10 to -0.03). Tibial component inducible micromotions were similar for cemented fixation and cementless fixation. Patients with tibial RLLs had 0.5° (95% CI: 0.18-0.81) greater inducible medio-lateral tilt of the tibial component. There was a correlation between postoperative posterior slope of the tibial plateau and inducible anterior-posterior tilt. Interpretation - All patients had inducible micromotions of the tibial component during step-cycle motion. RLLs and a high posterior slope increased the magnitude of inducible micromotions. This suggests that dynamic RSA is a valuable clinical tool for the evaluation of functional implant fixation.

  11. EEG based time and frequency dynamics analysis of visually induced motion sickness (VIMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsalan Naqvi, Syed Ali; Badruddin, Nasreen; Jatoi, Munsif Ali; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Hazabbah, Wan; Abdullah, Baharudin

    2015-12-01

    3D movies are attracting the viewers as they can see the objects flying out of the screen. However, many viewers have reported various problems which are usually faced after watching 3D movies. These problems include visual fatigue, eye strain, headaches, dizziness, blurred vision or collectively may be termed as visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). This research focuses on the comparison between 3D passive technology with a conventional 2D technology to find that whether 3D is causing trouble in the viewers or not. For this purpose, an experiment was designed in which participants were randomly assigned to watch 2D or a 3D movie. The movie was specially designed to induce VIMS. The movie was shown for the duration of 10 min to every participant. The electroencephalogram (EEG) data was recorded throughout the session. At the end of the session, participants rated their feelings using simulator sickness questionnaire (SSQ). The SSQ data was analyzed and the ratings of 2D and 3D participants were compared statistically by using a two tailed t test. From the SSQ results, it was found that participants watching 3D movies reported significantly higher symptoms of VIMS (p value EEG data was analyzed by using MATLAB and topographic plots are created from the data. A significant difference has been observed in the frontal-theta power which increases with the passage of time in 2D condition while decreases with time in 3D condition. Also, a decrease in beta power has been found in the temporal lobe of 3D group. Therefore, it is concluded that there are negative effects of 3D movies causing significant changes in the brain activity in terms of band powers. This condition leads to produce symptoms of VIMS in the viewers.

  12. Topological dynamics and current-induced motion in a skyrmion lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, J. C.; Jalil, M. B. A.

    2016-03-01

    We study the Thiele equation for current-induced motion in a skyrmion lattice through two soluble models of the pinning potential. Comprised by a Magnus term, a dissipative term and a pinning force, Thiele’s equation resembles Newton’s law but in virtue of the topological character to the first, it differs significantly from Newtonian mechanics and because the Magnus force is dominant, unlike its mechanical counterpart—the Coriolis force—skyrmion trajectories do not necessarily have mechanical counterparts. This is important if we are to understand skyrmion dynamics and tap into its potential for data-storage technology. We identify a pinning threshold velocity for the one-dimensional pinning potential and for a two-dimensional attractive potential we find a pinning point and the skyrmion trajectories toward that point are spirals whose frequency (compare Kepler’s second law) and amplitude-decay depend only on the Gilbert constant and potential at the pinning point. Other scenarios, e.g. other choices of initial spin velocity, a repulsive potential, etc are also investigated.

  13. Topological dynamics and current-induced motion in a skyrmion lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J C; Jalil, M B A

    2016-01-01

    We study the Thiele equation for current-induced motion in a skyrmion lattice through two soluble models of the pinning potential. Comprised by a Magnus term, a dissipative term and a pinning force, Thiele’s equation resembles Newton’s law but in virtue of the topological character to the first, it differs significantly from Newtonian mechanics and because the Magnus force is dominant, unlike its mechanical counterpart—the Coriolis force—skyrmion trajectories do not necessarily have mechanical counterparts. This is important if we are to understand skyrmion dynamics and tap into its potential for data-storage technology. We identify a pinning threshold velocity for the one-dimensional pinning potential and for a two-dimensional attractive potential we find a pinning point and the skyrmion trajectories toward that point are spirals whose frequency (compare Kepler’s second law) and amplitude-decay depend only on the Gilbert constant and potential at the pinning point. Other scenarios, e.g. other choices of initial spin velocity, a repulsive potential, etc are also investigated. (paper)

  14. Cross-modal prediction changes the timing of conscious access during the motion-induced blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Acer Y C; Kanai, Ryota; Seth, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    Despite accumulating evidence that perceptual predictions influence perceptual content, the relations between these predictions and conscious contents remain unclear, especially for cross-modal predictions. We examined whether predictions of visual events by auditory cues can facilitate conscious access to the visual stimuli. We trained participants to learn associations between auditory cues and colour changes. We then asked whether congruency between auditory cues and target colours would speed access to consciousness. We did this by rendering a visual target subjectively invisible using motion-induced blindness and then gradually changing its colour while presenting congruent or incongruent auditory cues. Results showed that the visual target gained access to consciousness faster in congruent than in incongruent trials; control experiments excluded potentially confounding effects of attention and motor response. The expectation effect was gradually established over blocks suggesting a role for extensive training. Overall, our findings show that predictions learned through cross-modal training can facilitate conscious access to visual stimuli. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The quantum mechanical measuring process as a scattering phenomenon inducing a collective coherent motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requardt, M.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper we want to discuss the quantum mechanical measuring process within the realm of many body quantum theory. Our starting point is to consider this process as a special scattering phenomenon where within one of the partners, i.e. the many body measuring device, a collective coherent motion is induced by the interaction with the microobject. We start our investigation with the many body system having a large but finite number N of degrees of freedom which is the real situation. We then study in detail what will happen in the limit N->infinite, however emphasizing that this transition is actually only performed in the mind of the observer. This implies that certain tail events together with their phase correlations have to be truncated. We show that the dichotomy 'pure state' versus 'mixture' as outgoing scattering states will vanish in this limit in so far as it has no observable consequences provided one is only interested in the state of the microobject. Furthermore, we discuss the role of the observer, the notion of 'event', the relation between single preparation and ensemble picture, and the so-called 'reduction of the wave function' in the light of our approach, i.e. explaining the phenomena accompanying the measuring process in terms of many body quantum theory. (orig.)

  16. Role of spin diffusion in current-induced domain wall motion for disordered ferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu; Kim, Won-Seok; Bisig, André ; Klä ui, Mathias; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Manchon, Aurelien

    2015-01-01

    Current-induced spin transfer torque and magnetization dynamics in the presence of spin diffusion in disordered magnetic textures is studied theoretically. We demonstrate using tight-binding calculations that weak, spin-conserving impurity scattering dramatically enhances the nonadiabaticity. To further explore this mechanism, a phenomenological drift-diffusion model for incoherent spin transport is investigated. We show that incoherent spin diffusion indeed produces an additional spatially dependent torque of the form ∼∇2[m×(u⋅∇)m]+ξ∇2[(u⋅∇)m], where m is the local magnetization direction, u is the direction of injected current, and ξ is a parameter characterizing the spin dynamics (precession, dephasing, and spin-flip). This torque, which scales as the inverse square of the domain wall width, only weakly enhances the longitudinal velocity of a transverse domain wall but significantly enhances the transverse velocity of vortex walls. The spatial-dependent spin transfer torque uncovered in this study is expected to have significant impact on the current-driven motion of abrupt two-dimensional textures such as vortices, skyrmions, and merons.

  17. Does 3D produce more symptoms of visually induced motion sickness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syed Ali Arsalan; Badruddin, Nasreen; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Hazabbah, Wan; Abdullah, Baharudin

    2013-01-01

    3D stereoscopy technology with high quality images and depth perception provides entertainment to its viewers. However, the technology is not mature yet and sometimes may have adverse effects on viewers. Some viewers have reported discomfort in watching videos with 3D technology. In this research we performed an experiment showing a movie in 2D and 3D environments to participants. Subjective and objective data are recorded and compared in both conditions. Results from subjective reporting shows that Visually Induced Motion Sickness (VIMS) is significantly higher in 3D condition. For objective measurement, ECG data is recorded to find the Heart Rate Variability (HRV), where the LF/HF ratio, which is the index of sympathetic nerve activity, is analyzed to find the changes in the participants' feelings over time. The average scores of nausea, disorientation and total score of SSQ show that there is a significant difference in the 3D condition from 2D. However, LF/HF ratio is not showing significant difference throughout the experiment.

  18. Role of spin diffusion in current-induced domain wall motion for disordered ferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Akosa, Collins Ashu

    2015-03-12

    Current-induced spin transfer torque and magnetization dynamics in the presence of spin diffusion in disordered magnetic textures is studied theoretically. We demonstrate using tight-binding calculations that weak, spin-conserving impurity scattering dramatically enhances the nonadiabaticity. To further explore this mechanism, a phenomenological drift-diffusion model for incoherent spin transport is investigated. We show that incoherent spin diffusion indeed produces an additional spatially dependent torque of the form ∼∇2[m×(u⋅∇)m]+ξ∇2[(u⋅∇)m], where m is the local magnetization direction, u is the direction of injected current, and ξ is a parameter characterizing the spin dynamics (precession, dephasing, and spin-flip). This torque, which scales as the inverse square of the domain wall width, only weakly enhances the longitudinal velocity of a transverse domain wall but significantly enhances the transverse velocity of vortex walls. The spatial-dependent spin transfer torque uncovered in this study is expected to have significant impact on the current-driven motion of abrupt two-dimensional textures such as vortices, skyrmions, and merons.

  19. Virtual reality body motion induced navigational controllers and their effects on simulator sickness and pathfinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaba, Cassandra N; White, Paul J; Byagowi, Ahmad; Moussavi, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    Virtual reality (VR) navigation is usually constrained by plausible simulator sickness (SS) and intuitive user interaction. The paper reports on the use of four different degrees of body motion induced navigational VR controllers, a TiltChair, omni-directional treadmill, a manual wheelchair joystick (VRNChair), and a joystick in relation to a participant's SS occurrence and a controller's intuitive utilization. Twenty young adult participants utilized all controllers to navigate through the same VR task environment in separate sessions. Throughout the sessions, SS occurrence was measured from a severity score by a standard SS questionnaire and from body sway by a center of pressure path length with eyes opened and closed. SS occurrence did not significantly differ among the controllers. However, time spent in VR significantly contributed to SS occurrence; hence, a few breaks to minimize SS should be interjected throughout a VR task. For all task trials, we recorded the participant's travel trajectories to investigate each controller's intuitive utilization from a computed traversed distance. Shorter traversed distances indicated that participants intuitively utilized the TiltChair with a slower speed; while longer traversed distances indicated participants struggled to utilize the omni-directional treadmill with a unnaturalistic stimulation of gait. Therefore, VR navigation should use technologies best suited for the intended age group that minimizes SS, and produces intuitive interactions for the participants.

  20. Atomic collisions by neutrons-induced charged particles in water, protein and nucleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.

    1976-01-01

    The action of slow charged particles is peculiar in that atomic collisions are commonly invlolved. In atomic collisions, which are rare events when fast particles interact with matter, displacement of atoms and chemical bond-breakage is possible. Sufficiently energetic neutrons generate charged recoil particles in matter. Some of these are slow as compared to orbital electrons, but the energy transferred to such slow particles is generally relatively small. Yet, it contributes significantly to the dose absorbed from 0.1-30 keV neutrons. In tissue all recoils induced by neutrons of less than 30 keV are slow, and above 0.1 keV the absorbed dose due to collisiondominates over that due to capture reactions. The aim of the present paper is to identify those intervals of neutron energy in which atomic collision damage is most probable in living matter. The results of calculations presented here indicate that atomic collisions should be most significant for 0.5-3 keV neutrons. (author)

  1. Distribution of nuclear charge in the proton-induced fission of Th-232

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, B D [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (United States); Foster, J S; Yaffe, L [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1958-09-15

    A great deal of work has been done on the distribution of nuclear mass in the fission process. About the nuclear charge distribution less is known. Data exist on the distribution from the fission of U-235 with thermal neutrons and with 14 Mev neutrons. Data also exist for the fission of uranium by 170 Mev protons, of bismuth by 190 Mev deuterons, and of uranium, thorium and bismuth by 480 Mev protons, and there is fragmentary information from other systems. The present work was undertaken to investigate the changes that occur in the charge distribution from proton-induced fission of Th-232 as the bombarding energy is raised from 8 to 90 Mev, the maximum proton energy of the McGill synchrocyclotron. This energy range is of interest in view of the substantial changes observed in the mass distribution. Also in this interval a change presumably begins in the nature of the initial step in nuclear reactions, from simple compound-nucleus formation, to a mechanism of direct interaction with individual nucleons. Thus at the lower energies studied, excitation of the nuclei at the end of the first step of the reaction will be essentially monochromatic whereas at the higher end of the bombarding-energy range, a broad spectrum of excitation energies will be produced, with corresponding complexity of the reaction products observed. (author)

  2. Electron ejection from solids induced by fast highly-charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiwietz, G. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst. GmbH, Berlin (Germany). Abt. FD; Xiao, G. [Hahn-Meitner-Inst. GmbH, Berlin (Germany). Abt. FD

    1996-02-01

    Total electron-ejection yields and Auger-electron spectra for highly-charged ions interacting with different foil targets have been investigated in this work. New experimental and theoretical data for normal incident 5 MeV/u heavy ions on graphite and polypropylene foils are presented and discussed. These two materials have been selected as model systems representing conductors and insulator targets. Our measured projectile nuclear-charge dependence of the total electron yield from carbon foils clearly deviates from results of some transport models that predict a proportionality with respect to the electronic stopping power of the projectiles. Possible reasons for this deviation are discussed. We have also extended our measurements on cascade-induced C-KLL Auger-electron production. The corresponding results for 5 MeV/u S ions on carbon were obtained with a new method and agree fairly well with previous data. Furthermore, we have performed an experimental and theoretical investigation on the nuclear-track potential in insulators. Comparison of experimental data with theoretical results for N{sup 7+}, Ne{sup 9+}, Ar{sup 16+} and Ni{sup 23+} ions allow for an estimate of the electron/hole pair recombination time at the center of the track in polypropylene. (orig.).

  3. Nanodiamond for hydrogen storage: temperature-dependent hydrogenation and charge-induced dehydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lin; Barnard, Amanda S

    2012-02-21

    Carbon-based hydrogen storage materials are one of hottest research topics in materials science. Although the majority of studies focus on highly porous loosely bound systems, these systems have various limitations including use at elevated temperature. Here we propose, based on computer simulations, that diamond nanoparticles may provide a new promising high temperature candidate with a moderate storage capacity, but good potential for recyclability. The hydrogenation of nanodiamonds is found to be easily achieved, in agreement with experiments, though we find the stability of hydrogenation is dependent on the morphology of nanodiamonds and surrounding environment. Hydrogenation is thermodynamically favourable even at high temperature in pure hydrogen, ammonia, and methane gas reservoirs, whereas water vapour can help to reduce the energy barrier for desorption. The greatest challenge in using this material is the breaking of the strong covalent C-H bonds, and we have identified that the spontaneous release of atomic hydrogen may be achieved through charging of hydrogenated nanodiamonds. If the degree of induced charge is properly controlled, the integrity of the host nanodiamond is maintained, which indicates that an efficient and recyclable approach for hydrogen release may be possible. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  4. Methods of optimising ion beam induced charge collection of polycrystalline silicon photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witham, L.C.G.; Jamieson, D.N.; Bardos, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) is a valuable method for the mapping of charge carrier transport and recombination in silicon solar cells. However performing IBIC analysis of polycrystalline silicon solar cells is problematic in a manner unlike previous uses of IBIC on silicon-based electronic devices. Typical solar cells have a surface area of several square centimeters and a p-n junction thickness of only few microns. This means the cell has a large junction capacitance in the many nanoFarads range which leads to a large amount of noise on the preamplifier inputs which typically swamps the transient IBIC signal. The normal method of improving the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio by biasing the junction is impractical for these cells as the low-quality silicon used leads to a large leakage current across the device. We present several experimental techniques which improve the S/N ratio which when used together should make IBIC analysis of many low crystalline quality devices a viable and reliable procedure. (authors)

  5. A moving target for accelerated charged particle induced X-ray measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chuang, L.S.; Shima, K.; Ebihara, H.; Seki, R.; Mikumo, T.

    1980-01-01

    To attain good reproducibility as well as to enable an absolute determination in the measurement of X-ray fluorescences, resulting from bombardment of a heterogeneous sample by accelerated charged particles, a moving-target mechanism incorporating an electronic remote control system has been devised. The system is designed to scan the whole sample area with a chosen constant linear speed, by a fixed particle beam with a cross-sectional area a small fraction of that of the sample. Using 16 MeV protons and 40 MeV oxygen-ion beams, test runs of this system showed that the attempted objectives are attainable with good accuracies: reproducibility of the data for a given target is better than 3%, the linearity of the calibration curve is in good agreement, within the weighing errors of the standard elements and the uncertainty due to beam current fluctuation, with the expected values, and the results of absolute determinations using both metal foils and heterogeneous powder samples are in good agreement with accepted results using different methods. Detailed accounts of the moving-target system, and the test for reproducibility and linearity are presented. An absolute determination of the quantities related to accelerated charged-particle induced X-ray fluorescence (PIXE) using the moving target is presented for samples in different forms. (orig./HP)

  6. Real-time observation of intersystem crossing induced by charge recombination during bimolecular electron transfer reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2016-09-21

    Real-time probing of intersystem crossing (ISC) and triplet-state formation after photoinduced electron transfer (ET) is a particularly challenging task that can be achieved by time-resolved spectroscopy with broadband capability. Here, we examine the mechanism of charge separation (CS), charge recombination (CR) and ISC of bimolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) between poly[(9,9-di(3,3′-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and dicyanobenzene (DCB) using time-resolved spectroscopy. PET from PFN to DCB is confirmed by monitoring the transient absorption (TA) and infrared spectroscopic signatures for the radical ion pair (DCB─•-PFN+•). In addition, our time-resolved results clearly demonstrate that CS takes place within picoseconds followed by CR within nanoseconds. The ns-TA data exhibit the clear spectroscopic signature of PFN triplet-triplet absorption, induced by the CR of the radical ion pairs (DCB─•-PFN+•). As a result, the triplet state of PFN (3PFN*) forms and subsequently, the ground singlet state is replenished within microseconds. © 2016

  7. Asymmetric flows over symmetric surfaces: capacitive coupling in induced-charge electro-osmosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansuripur, T S [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Pascall, A J; Squires, T M [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)], E-mail: squires@engineering.ucsb.edu

    2009-07-15

    We report curious asymmetric induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flows over a symmetric, planar gate electrode under applied ac electric fields, whereas symmetric, counter-rotating rolls are expected. Furthermore, the asymmetric component of the flow is consistently directed towards the grounded electrode. We propose that capacitive coupling of the gate electrode to the microscope stage-a comparatively large equipotential surface that acts effectively as a ground-is responsible for this symmetry breaking. This stray capacitance drives the formation of a double layer whose zeta potential is proportional to the potential drop from the electrolyte directly above the gate electrode to the external stage. Therefore, the charge in this 'stray' double layer varies in phase with the driving field, resulting in a rectified, steady flow as with standard ICEO. We experimentally vary the stray capacitance, the electric potential of the stage and the location of the gate electrode, and find that the effect on the stray flow is qualitatively consistent with the predictions of the proposed mechanism. In the process, we demonstrate that capacitive coupling offers an additional means of manipulating fluid flow over a polarizable surface.

  8. Asymmetric flows over symmetric surfaces: capacitive coupling in induced-charge electro-osmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansuripur, T S; Pascall, A J; Squires, T M

    2009-01-01

    We report curious asymmetric induced-charge electro-osmotic (ICEO) flows over a symmetric, planar gate electrode under applied ac electric fields, whereas symmetric, counter-rotating rolls are expected. Furthermore, the asymmetric component of the flow is consistently directed towards the grounded electrode. We propose that capacitive coupling of the gate electrode to the microscope stage-a comparatively large equipotential surface that acts effectively as a ground-is responsible for this symmetry breaking. This stray capacitance drives the formation of a double layer whose zeta potential is proportional to the potential drop from the electrolyte directly above the gate electrode to the external stage. Therefore, the charge in this 'stray' double layer varies in phase with the driving field, resulting in a rectified, steady flow as with standard ICEO. We experimentally vary the stray capacitance, the electric potential of the stage and the location of the gate electrode, and find that the effect on the stray flow is qualitatively consistent with the predictions of the proposed mechanism. In the process, we demonstrate that capacitive coupling offers an additional means of manipulating fluid flow over a polarizable surface.

  9. Poisson–Boltzmann theory of the charge-induced adsorption of semi-flexible polyelectrolytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, J.; Khokhlov, A.R.

    2004-01-01

    A model is suggested for the structure of an adsorbed layer of a highly charged semi-flexible polyelectrolyte on a weakly charged surface of opposite charge sign. The adsorbed phase is thin, owing to the effective reversal of the charge sign of the surface upon adsorption, and ordered, owing to the

  10. Cell adhesion monitoring of human induced pluripotent stem cell based on intrinsic molecular charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Haruyo; Sakata, Toshiya

    2014-01-01

    We have shown a simple way for real-time, quantitative, non-invasive, and non-label monitoring of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell adhesion by use of a biologically coupled-gate field effect transistor (bio-FET), which is based on detection of molecular charges at cell membrane. The electrical behavior revealed quantitatively the electrical contacts of integrin-receptor at the cell membrane with RGDS peptide immobilized at the gate sensing surface, because that binding site was based on cationic α chain of integrin. The platform based on the bio-FET would provide substantial information to evaluate cell/material bio-interface and elucidate biding mechanism of adhesion molecules, which could not be interpreted by microscopic observation.

  11. Induced charge electrophoresis of a conducting cylinder in a nonconducting cylindrical pore and its micromotoring application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huicheng; Wong, Teck Neng; Che, Zhizhao

    2016-08-01

    Induced charge electrophoresis of a conducting cylinder suspended in a nonconducting cylindrical pore is theoretically analyzed and a micromotor is proposed that utilizes the cylinder rotation. The cylinder velocities are analytically obtained in the Dirichlet and the Neumann boundary conditions of the electric field on the cylindrical pore. The results show that the cylinder not only translates but also rotates when it is eccentric with respect to the cylindrical pore. The influences of a number of parameters on the cylinder velocities are characterized in detail. The cylinder trajectories show that the cylinder approaches and becomes stationary at certain positions within the cylindrical pore. The proposed micromotor is capable of working under a heavy load with a high rotational velocity when the eccentricity is large and the applied electric field is strong.

  12. Consistent interpretation of neutron-induced charged-particle emission in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermsdorf, D.

    1982-06-01

    Users requesting gas production cross sections for Silicon will be confronted with serious discrepancies taking evaluated data as well as experimental ones. To clarify the accuracies achieved at present in experiments and evaluations in this paper an intercomparison of different evaluated nuclear data files has been carried out resulting in recommendations for improvements of these files. The analysis of the experimental data base also shows contradictory measurements or in most cases a lack of data. So an interpretation of reliable measured data in terms of nuclear reaction theories has been done using statistical and direct reaction mechanism models. This study results in a consistent and comprehensive evaluated data set for neutron-induced charged-particle production in Silicon which will be incorporated in file 2015 of the SOKRATOR library. (author)

  13. Muon-neutrino-induced charged-current cross section without pions: Theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosel, U.; Gallmeister, K.

    2018-04-01

    We calculate the charged-current cross sections obtained at the T2K near detector for νμ-induced events without pions in the final state. The method used is quantum-kinetic transport theory. Results are shown first, as a benchmark, for electron-inclusive cross sections on 12C and 16O to be followed with a detailed comparison with the data measured by the T2K Collaboration on C8H8 and H2O targets. The contribution of 2p2h processes is found to be relevant mostly for backward angles; their theoretical uncertainties are within the experimental uncertainties. Particular emphasis is then put on a discussion of events in which pions are first created but then reabsorbed. Their contribution is found to be essential at forward angles.

  14. R-Matrix Codes for Charged-particle Induced Reactionsin the Resolved Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leeb, Helmut [Technical Univ. of Wien, Vienna (Austria); Dimitriou, Paraskevi [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Thompson, Ian J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A Consultant’s Meeting was held at the IAEA Headquarters, from 5 to 7 December 2016, to discuss the status of R-matrix codes currently used in calculations of charged-particle induced reaction cross sections at low energies. The meeting was a follow-up to the R-matrix Codes meeting held in December 2015, and served the purpose of monitoring progress in: the development of a translation code to enable exchange of input/output parameters between the various codes in different formats, fitting procedures and treatment of uncertainties, the evaluation methodology, and finally dissemination. The details of the presentations and technical discussions, as well as additional actions that were proposed to achieve all the goals of the meeting are summarized in this report.

  15. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Berger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect—an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  16. Auditory Motion Elicits a Visual Motion Aftereffect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Christopher C; Ehrsson, H Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The visual motion aftereffect is a visual illusion in which exposure to continuous motion in one direction leads to a subsequent illusion of visual motion in the opposite direction. Previous findings have been mixed with regard to whether this visual illusion can be induced cross-modally by auditory stimuli. Based on research on multisensory perception demonstrating the profound influence auditory perception can have on the interpretation and perceived motion of visual stimuli, we hypothesized that exposure to auditory stimuli with strong directional motion cues should induce a visual motion aftereffect. Here, we demonstrate that horizontally moving auditory stimuli induced a significant visual motion aftereffect-an effect that was driven primarily by a change in visual motion perception following exposure to leftward moving auditory stimuli. This finding is consistent with the notion that visual and auditory motion perception rely on at least partially overlapping neural substrates.

  17. Electrophysiological correlates of learning-induced modulation of visual motion processing in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Gál

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Training on a visual task leads to increased perceptual and neural responses to visual features that were attended during training as well as decreased responses to neglected distractor features. However, the time course of these attention-based modulations of neural sensitivity for visual features has not been investigated before. Here we measured event related potentials (ERP in response to motion stimuli with different coherence levels before and after training on a speed discrimination task requiring object-based attentional selection of one of the two competing motion stimuli. We found that two peaks on the ERP waveform were modulated by the strength of the coherent motion signal; the response amplitude associated with motion directions that were neglected during training was smaller than the response amplitude associated with motion directions that were attended during training. The first peak of motion coherence-dependent modulation of the ERP responses was at 300 ms after stimulus onset and it was most pronounced over the occipitotemporal cortex. The second peak was around 500 ms and was focused over the parietal cortex. A control experiment suggests that the earlier motion coherence-related response modulation reflects the extraction of the coherent motion signal whereas the later peak might index accumulation and readout of motion signals by parietal decision mechanisms. These findings suggest that attention-based learning affects neural responses both at the sensory and decision processing stages.

  18. Photo-induced charge transfer at heterogeneous interfaces: Dye-sensitized tin disulfide, the theory and the experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzafame, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    The study of photo-induced charge transfer is an endeavor that spans the entire industrial period of man's history. Its great importance demands an ever greater understanding of its underlying principles. The work discussed here attempts to probe elementary aspects of the charge transfer process. Investigations into the theory of charge transfer reactions are made in an attempt to isolate the relevant parameters. An analytical discussion is made of a simple Golden Rule type rate equation to describe the transfer kinetics. Then a quantum simulation is carried out to follow the wavefunction propagation as a test of the applicability of the assumptions made in deriving the simpler rate equation. Investigation of charge transfer at surfaces is bet served by the application of ultrafast optical spectroscopies to probe carrier dynamics. A discussion of the properties of the short pulse laser systems employed is included along with a discussion of the different optical spectroscopies available. These tools are then brought to bear upon dye-sensitized SnS 2 , a model system for the study of charge injection processes. The unique properties of the semiconductor are discussed with respect to the charge transfer process. The unique properties of the semiconductor are discussed with respect to the charge transfer process. The optical experiments performed on the dye/SnS 2 systems elucidate the fundamental carrier dynamics and these dynamics are discussed within the theoretical framework to provide a complete picture of the charge transfer kinetics

  19. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Changyi; Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang; Rubanov, Sergey; Jamieson, David N.

    2015-01-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  20. Hypervelocity dust impact craters on photovoltaic devices imaged by ion beam induced charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Changyi [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Wu, Yiyong; Lv, Gang [National Key Laboratory of Materials Behavior and Evaluation Technology in Space Environments, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Rubanov, Sergey [Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia); Jamieson, David N., E-mail: d.jamieson@unimelb.edu.au [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2015-04-01

    Hypervelocity dust has a speed of greater than 5 km/s and is a significant problem for equipment deployed in space such as satellites because of impacts that damage vulnerable components. Photovoltaic (PV) arrays are especially vulnerable because of their large surface area and the performance can be degraded owing to the disruption of the structure of the junction in the cells making up the array. Satellite PV arrays returned to Earth after service in orbit reveal a large number of craters larger than 5 μm in diameter arising from hypervelocity dust impacts. Extensive prior work has been done on the analysis of the morphology of craters in PV cells to understand the origin of the micrometeoroid that caused the crater and to study the corresponding mechanical damage to the structure of the cell. Generally, about half the craters arise from natural micrometeoroids, about one third from artificial Al-rich debris, probably from solid rocket exhausts, and the remainder from miscellaneous sources both known and unknown. However to date there has not been a microscopic study of the degradation of the electrical characteristics of PV cells exposed to hypervelocity dust impacts. Here we present an ion beam induced charge (IBIC) pilot study by a 2 MeV He microbeam of craters induced on a Hamamatsu PIN diode exposed to artificial hypervelocity Al dust from a dust accelerator. Numerous 5–30 μm diameter craters were identified and the charge collection efficiency of the crater and surrounds mapped with IBIC with bias voltages between 0 and 20 V. At highest bias, it was found the efficiency of the crater had been degraded by about 20% compared to the surrounding material. The speed distribution achieved in the Al dust accelerator was peaked at about 4 km/s compared to 11–68 km/s for dust encountered in low Earth orbit. We are able to extrapolate the charge collection efficiency degradation rate of unbiased cells in space based on our current measurements and the

  1. Quantification of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; de Jong, Rianne; van Hooft, Jeanin E; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is an important geometrical uncertainty in esophageal cancer radiation therapy. The aim of this study was to quantify this motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). Twenty esophageal cancer patients underwent endoscopy-guided marker implantation in the tumor volume and 4DCT acquisition. The 4DCT data were sorted into 10 breathing phases and the end-of-inhalation phase was selected as reference. We quantified for each visible marker (n=60) the motion in each phase and derived the peak-to-peak motion magnitude throughout the breathing cycle. The motion was quantified and analyzed for four different regions and in three orthogonal directions. The median(interquartile range) of the peak-to-peak magnitudes of the respiration-induced marker motion (left-right/anterior-posterior/cranial-caudal) was 1.5(0.5)/1.6(0.5)/2.9(1.4) mm for the proximal esophagus (n=6), 1.5(1.4)/1.4(1.3)/3.7(2.6) mm for the middle esophagus (n=12), 2.6(1.3)/3.3(1.8)/5.4(2.9) mm for the distal esophagus (n=25), and 3.7(2.1)/5.3(1.8)/8.2(3.1) mm for the proximal stomach (n=17). The variations in the results between the three directions, four regions, and patients suggest the need of individualized region-dependent anisotropic internal margins. Therefore, we recommend using markers with 4DCT to patient-specifically adapt the internal target volume (ITV). Without 4DCT, 3DCTs at the end-of-inhalation and end-of-exhalation phases could be alternatively applied for ITV individualization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prolonged asymmetric vestibular stimulation induces opposite, long-term effects on self-motion perception and ocular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettorossi, V E; Panichi, R; Botti, F M; Kyriakareli, A; Ferraresi, A; Faralli, M; Schieppati, M; Bronstein, A M

    2013-04-01

    Self-motion perception and the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) were investigated in healthy subjects during asymmetric whole body yaw plane oscillations while standing on a platform in the dark. Platform oscillation consisted of two half-sinusoidal cycles of the same amplitude (40°) but different duration, featuring a fast (FHC) and a slow half-cycle (SHC). Rotation consisted of four or 20 consecutive cycles to probe adaptation further with the longer duration protocol. Self-motion perception was estimated by subjects tracking with a pointer the remembered position of an earth-fixed visual target. VOR was measured by electro-oculography. The asymmetric stimulation pattern consistently induced a progressive increase of asymmetry in motion perception, whereby the gain of the tracking response gradually increased during FHCs and decreased during SHCs. The effect was observed already during the first few cycles and further increased during 20 cycles, leading to a totally distorted location of the initial straight-ahead. In contrast, after some initial interindividual variability, the gain of the slow phase VOR became symmetric, decreasing for FHCs and increasing for SHCs. These oppositely directed adaptive effects in motion perception and VOR persisted for nearly an hour. Control conditions using prolonged but symmetrical stimuli produced no adaptive effects on either motion perception or VOR. These findings show that prolonged asymmetric activation of the vestibular system leads to opposite patterns of adaptation of self-motion perception and VOR. The results provide strong evidence that semicircular canal inputs are processed centrally by independent mechanisms for perception of body motion and eye movement control. These divergent adaptation mechanisms enhance awareness of movement toward the faster body rotation, while improving the eye stabilizing properties of the VOR.

  3. The use of EEG to measure cerebral changes during computer-based motion-sickness-inducing tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strychacz, Christopher; Viirre, Erik; Wing, Shawn

    2005-05-01

    Motion sickness (MS) is a stressor commonly attributed with causing serious navigational and performance errors. The distinct nature of MS suggests this state may have distinct neural markers distinguishable from other states known to affect performance (e.g., stress, fatigue, sleep deprivation, high workload). This pilot study used new high-resolution electro-encephalograph (EEG) technologies to identify distinct neuronal activation changes that occur during MS. Brain EEG activity was monitored while subjects performed a ball-tracking task and viewed stimuli on a projection screen intended to induce motion sickness/spatial disorientation. Results show the presence of EEG spectral changes in all subjects who developed motion sickness when compared to baseline levels. These changes included: 1) low frequency (1 to 10 Hz) changes that may reflect oculomotor movements rather than intra-cerebral sources; 2) increased spectral power across all frequencies (attributable to increased scalp conductivity related to sweating), 3) local increases of power spectra in the 20-50 Hz range (likely attributable to external muscles on the skull) and; 4) a central posterior (occipital) independent component that shows suppression of a 20 Hz peak in the MS condition when compared to baseline. Further research is necessary to refine neural markers, characterize their origin and physiology, to distinguish between motion sickness and other states and to enable markers to be used for operator state monitoring and the designing of interventions for motion sickness.

  4. Directed motion of spheres induced by unbiased driving forces in viscous fluids beyond the Stokes' law regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Pascual, Jesús

    2018-03-01

    The emergence of directed motion is investigated in a system consisting of a sphere immersed in a viscous fluid and subjected to time-periodic forces of zero average. The directed motion arises from the combined action of a nonlinear drag force and the applied driving forces, in the absence of any periodic substrate potential. Necessary conditions for the existence of such directed motion are obtained and an analytical expression for the average terminal velocity is derived within the adiabatic approximation. Special attention is paid to the case of two mutually perpendicular forces with sinusoidal time dependence, one with twice the period of the other. It is shown that, although neither of these two forces induces directed motion when acting separately, when added together, the resultant force generates directed motion along the direction of the force with the shortest period. The dependence of the average terminal velocity on the system parameters is analyzed numerically and compared with that obtained using the adiabatic approximation. Among other results, it is found that, for appropriate parameter values, the direction of the average terminal velocity can be reversed by varying the forcing strength. Furthermore, certain aspects of the observed phenomenology are explained by means of symmetry arguments.

  5. Effect of vertical ground motion on earthquake-induced derailment of railway vehicles over simply-supported bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhibin; Pei, Shiling; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Hongyan; Qiang, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    The running safety of railway vehicles on bridges can be negatively affected by earthquake events. This phenomenon has traditionally been investigated with only the lateral ground excitation component considered. This paper presented results from a numerical investigation on the contribution of vertical ground motion component to the derailment of vehicles on simply-supported bridges. A full nonlinear wheel-rail contact model was used in the investigation together with the Hertzian contact theory and nonlinear creepage theory, which allows the wheel to jump vertically and separate from the rail. The wheel-rail relative displacement was used as the criterion for derailment events. A total of 18 ground motion records were used in the analysis to account for the uncertainty of ground motions. The results showed that inclusion of vertical ground motion will likely increase the chance of derailment. It is recommended to include vertical ground motion component in earthquake induced derailment analysis to ensure conservative estimations. The derailment event on bridges was found to be more closely related to the deck acceleration rather than the ground acceleration.

  6. Analytic model for surface ground motion with spall induced by underground nuclear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacQueen, D.H.

    1982-04-01

    This report provides a detailed presentation and critique of a model used to characterize the surface ground motion following a contained, spalling underground nuclear explosion intended for calculation of the resulting atmospheric acoustic pulse. Some examples of its use are included. Some discussion of the general approach of ground motion model parameter extraction, not dependent on the specific model, is also presented

  7. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao; Volkan Demir, Hilmi

    2014-01-01

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  8. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Volkan Demir, Hilmi, E-mail: exwsun@ntu.edu.sg, E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org [LUMINOUS Centre of Excellence for Semiconductor Lighting and Displays, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Electronics, Department of Physics, and UNAM-Institute of Material Science and Nanotechnology, Bilkent University, TR-06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2014-06-16

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  9. Protein-induced geometric constraints and charge transfer in bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes in LH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; Alia, A; Schaap, Roland G; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; de Groot, Huub J M; Buda, Francesco

    2008-12-14

    Bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes are ubiquitous in nature and are essential structural motifs supporting the conversion of solar energy into chemically useful compounds in a wide range of photosynthesis processes. A systematic density functional theory study of the NMR chemical shifts for histidine and for bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in the light-harvesting complex II (LH2) is performed using the BLYP functional in combination with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The computed chemical shift patterns are consistent with available experimental data for positive and neutral(tau) (N(tau) protonated) crystalline histidines. The results for the bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in LH2 provide evidence that the protein environment is stabilizing the histidine close to the Mg ion, thereby inducing a large charge transfer of approximately 0.5 electronic equivalent. Due to this protein-induced geometric constraint, the Mg-coordinated histidine in LH2 appears to be in a frustrated state very different from the formal neutral(pi) (N(pi) protonated) form. This finding could be important for the understanding of basic functional mechanisms involved in tuning the electronic properties and exciton coupling in LH2.

  10. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMullan, G., E-mail: gm2@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk; Vinothkumar, K.R.; Henderson, R.

    2015-11-15

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å{sup 2} for every incident 300 keV e{sup −}/Å{sup 2}. The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e{sup −}/Å{sup 2} per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination. - Highlights: • Thon rings can be seen from amorphous ice. • Radiation damage to amorphous ice randomly displaces water molecules. • Each incident 300 keV e{sup −}/Å{sup 2} displaces water molecules on average by ∼1 Å. • Macromolecules embedded in amorphous ice undergo beam induced Brownian motion.

  11. Direct observation of current-induced motion of a 3D vortex domain wall in cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.

    2017-05-08

    The current-induced dynamics of 3D magnetic vortex domain walls in cylindrical Co/Ni nanowires are revealed experimentally using Lorentz microscopy and theoretically using micromagnetic simulations. We demonstrate that a spin-polarized electric current can control the reversible motion of 3D vortex domain walls, which travel with a velocity of a few hundred meters per second. This finding is a key step in establishing fast, high-density memory devices based on vertical arrays of cylindrical magnetic nanowires.

  12. Direct observation of current-induced motion of a 3D vortex domain wall in cylindrical nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Ivanov, Yurii P.; Chuvilin, Andrey; Lopatin, Sergei; Mohammed, Hanan; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2017-01-01

    The current-induced dynamics of 3D magnetic vortex domain walls in cylindrical Co/Ni nanowires are revealed experimentally using Lorentz microscopy and theoretically using micromagnetic simulations. We demonstrate that a spin-polarized electric current can control the reversible motion of 3D vortex domain walls, which travel with a velocity of a few hundred meters per second. This finding is a key step in establishing fast, high-density memory devices based on vertical arrays of cylindrical magnetic nanowires.

  13. Optically induced charge transport in mesoscopic semiconductor systems; Optisch induzierter Ladungstransport in mesoskopischen Halbleitersystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hof, Klaus-Dieter

    2009-07-13

    In the framework of this thesis optoelectronic processes in a to a quantum-dot contact nanostructured heterostructure were studied. In the experiment thereby by means of a laser in a 2DES heterostructure charge carriers were optically induced in the neighbourhood of a quantum-dot contact. Thereafter their effect on the electronic transport through the quantum-dot contact in the sample is studied. In the planely etched samples the purely electronic conductivity measurements indicate with the conductivity stages a one-dimensional subband quantization. The energetic distance of the subband bottoms amounts up to 5 meV. Furthermore the measurement in the magnetic field shows a transition of the subband structure over magnetoelectric bands to the pure Landau quantization. First photoresponse measurement s show under illumination the effect of an unwanted parallel conductivity. This effect can be suppressed by changed sample design and optimized wafer material. By this photoresponse measurements on the free-sttanding bridge samples and planely etched qunatum-dot contact samples. In low-frequency photoresponse measurements in both sample types the effect of an optically induced conductivity change can be identified. A simple model of the optically induced photoconductivity is introduced, which shows in the framework of a numerical simulation a very good agreement with the measurement data and allows the identification of the experimentally determined time constant. By application of for radiofrequencies suited components the experiment can be performed also at higher-frequent modulation of the optical excitation. Thereby it was proved that the effect of the photoinduced conductivity change because of its relatively high time constant generates for excitations in the MHz range a quasi-static conductivity state and the sample conductivity experiences therefore on a fast time scale no change.

  14. Investigating the influence of respiratory motion on the radiation induced bystander effect in modulated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Aidan J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.; O'Sullivan, Joe M.

    2013-12-01

    Respiratory motion introduces complex spatio-temporal variations in the dosimetry of radiotherapy and may contribute towards uncertainties in radiotherapy planning. This study investigates the potential radiobiological implications occurring due to tumour motion in areas of geometric miss in lung cancer radiotherapy. A bespoke phantom and motor-driven platform to replicate respiratory motion and study the consequences on tumour cell survival in vitro was constructed. Human non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines H460 and H1299 were irradiated in modulated radiotherapy configurations in the presence and absence of respiratory motion. Clonogenic survival was calculated for irradiated and shielded regions. Direction of motion, replication of dosimetry by multi-leaf collimator (MLC) manipulation and oscillating lead shielding were investigated to confirm differences in cell survival. Respiratory motion was shown to significantly increase survival for out-of-field regions for H460/H1299 cell lines when compared with static irradiation (p < 0.001). Significantly higher survival was found in the in-field region for the H460 cell line (p < 0.030). Oscillating lead shielding also produced these significant differences. Respiratory motion and oscillatory delivery of radiation dose to human tumour cells has a significant impact on in- and out-of-field survival in the presence of non-uniform irradiation in this in vitro set-up. This may have important radiobiological consequences for modulated radiotherapy in lung cancer.

  15. Exploring the effect of East Antarctic ice mass loss on GIA-induced horizontal bedrock motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konfal, S. A.; Whitehouse, P. L.; Hermans, T.; van der Wal, W.; Wilson, T. J.; Bevis, M. G.; Kendrick, E. C.; Dalziel, I.; Smalley, R., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Ice history inputs used in Antarctic models of GIA include major centers of ice mass loss in West Antarctica. In the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) region spanning the boundary between East and West Antarctica, horizontal crustal motions derived from GPS observations from the Antarctic Network (ANET) component of the Polar Earth Observing Network (POLENET) are towards these West Antarctic ice mass centers, opposite to the pattern of radial crustal motion expected in an unloading scenario. We investigate alternative ice history and earth structure inputs to GIA models in an attempt to reproduce observed crustal motions in the region. The W12 ice history model is altered to create scenarios including ice unloading in the Wilkes Subglacial Basin based on available glaciological records. These altered ice history models, along with the unmodified W12 ice history model, are coupled with 60 radially varying (1D) earth model combinations, including approximations of optimal earth profiles identified in published GIA models. The resulting model-predicted motions utilizing both the modified and unmodified ice history models fit ANET GPS-derived crustal motions in the northern TAM region for a suite of earth model combinations. Further south, where the influence of simulated Wilkes unloading is weakest and West Antarctic unloading is strongest, observed and predicted motions do not agree. The influence of simulated Wilkes ice unloading coupled with laterally heterogeneous earth models is also investigated. The resulting model-predicted motions do not differ significantly between the original W12 and W12 with simulated Wilkes unloading ice histories.

  16. Superluminal motion (review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykin, G. B.; Romanets, E. A.

    2012-06-01

    Prior to the development of Special Relativity, no restrictions were imposed on the velocity of the motion of particles and material bodies, as well as on energy transfer and signal propagation. At the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century, it was shown that a charge that moves at a velocity faster than the speed of light in an optical medium, in particular, in vacuum, gives rise to impact radiation, which later was termed the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation. Shortly after the development of Special Relativity, some researchers considered the possibility of superluminal motion. In 1923, the Soviet physicist L.Ya. Strum suggested the existence of tachyons, which, however, have not been discovered yet. Superluminal motions can occur only for images, e.g., for so-called "light spots," which were considered in 1972 by V.L. Ginzburg and B.M. Bolotovskii. These spots can move with a superluminal phase velocity but are incapable of transferring energy and information. Nevertheless, these light spots may induce quite real generation of microwave radiation in closed waveguides and create the Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation in vacuum. In this work, we consider various paradoxes, illusions, and artifacts associated with superluminal motion.

  17. Enhancement of spin Hall effect induced torques for current-driven magnetic domain wall motion: Inner interface effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bang, Do; Yu, Jiawei; Qiu, Xuepeng; Wang, Yi; Awano, Hiroyuki; Manchon, Aurelien; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetized Tb/Co wires with structure inversion asymmetry and different layered structures. We find that the critical current density to drive domain wall motion strongly depends on the layered structure. The lowest critical current density ∼15MA/cm2 and the highest slope of domain wall velocity curve are obtained for the wire having thin Co sublayers and more inner Tb/Co interfaces, while the largest critical current density ∼26MA/cm2 required to drive domain walls is observed in the Tb-Co alloy magnetic wire. It is found that the Co/Tb interface contributes negligibly to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, while the effective spin-orbit torque strongly depends on the number of Tb/Co inner interfaces (n). An enhancement of the antidamping torques by extrinsic spin Hall effect due to Tb rare-earth impurity-induced skew scattering is suggested to explain the high efficiency of current-induced domain wall motion.

  18. Enhancement of spin Hall effect induced torques for current-driven magnetic domain wall motion: Inner interface effect

    KAUST Repository

    Bang, Do

    2016-05-23

    We investigate the current-induced domain wall motion in perpendicular magnetized Tb/Co wires with structure inversion asymmetry and different layered structures. We find that the critical current density to drive domain wall motion strongly depends on the layered structure. The lowest critical current density ∼15MA/cm2 and the highest slope of domain wall velocity curve are obtained for the wire having thin Co sublayers and more inner Tb/Co interfaces, while the largest critical current density ∼26MA/cm2 required to drive domain walls is observed in the Tb-Co alloy magnetic wire. It is found that the Co/Tb interface contributes negligibly to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, while the effective spin-orbit torque strongly depends on the number of Tb/Co inner interfaces (n). An enhancement of the antidamping torques by extrinsic spin Hall effect due to Tb rare-earth impurity-induced skew scattering is suggested to explain the high efficiency of current-induced domain wall motion.

  19. Anharmonicity of lattice vibrations induced by charged nickel additions in A sup 2 B sup 6 semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Sokolov, V I; Shirokov, E A; Kislov, A N

    2002-01-01

    Paper presents the results of investigations into lattice vibrations induced by nickel impurities charged negatively as to the lattice in ZnSe:Ni, ZnO:Ni, ZnS:Ni, CdS:Ni semiconductors. To investigate into vibrations one applies a sensitive technique of field exciton-oscillation spectroscopy. One observes experimentally oscillating reiterations of the impurity exciton head line including the intensive peaks of combined repetitions up to the 8-th order. The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the model estimations of oscillations of a lattice with a charged impurity centre, as well as, on the ground of calculations for oscillations of monoatomic chain with high anharmonicity. Charged impurity centres are shown to induce new oscillations of lattice - impurity anharmonic modes

  20. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials; Lichtinduzierte Raumladungsfelder zur Strukturierung dielektrischer Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, H A

    2006-11-15

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  1. Charged particle spectra in oxygen-induced reactions at 14. 6 and 60 GeV/Nucleon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamovich, M I; Aggarwal, M M; Arora, R; Alexandrov, Y A; Azimov, S A; Badyal, S K; Basova, E; Bhalla, K B; Bahsin, A; Bhatia, V S; Bomdarenko, R A; Burnett, T H; Cai, X; Chernova, L P; Chernyavski, M M; Dressel, B; Friedlander, E M; Gadzhieva, S I; Ganssauge, E R; Garpman, S; Gerassimov, S G; Gill, A; Grote, J; Gulamov, K G; Gulyamov, V G; Gupta, V K; Hackel, S; Heckman, H H; Jakobsson, B; Judek, B; Katroo, S; Kadyrov, F G; Kallies, H; Karlsson, L; Kaul, G L; Kaur, M; Kharlamov, S P; Kohli, J; Kumar, V; Lal, P; Larionova, V G; Lindstrom, P J; Liu, L S; Lokanathan, S; Lord, J; Lukicheva, N S; Mangotra, L K; Maslennikova, N V; Mitta, I S; Monnand, E; Mookerjee, S; Mueller, C; Nasyrov, S H; Nvtny, V S; Orlova, G I; Otterlund, I; Peresadko, N G; Persson, S; Petrov, N V; Qian, W Y; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Rao, N K; Rhee, J Y; Shaidkhanov, N; Salmanova, N G; Schulz, W; Schussler, F; Shukla, V S; Skelding, D; Soederstroe,

    1989-10-01

    Multiplicity distributions and pseudo-rapidity distributions of charged particles from oxygen-induced nuclear reactions at 14.6 and 60 GeV/nucleon are presented. The data were taken from the EMU{minus}01 emulsion stacks and compared to simulations from the Lund Monte Carlo Model (FRITIOF).

  2. Photoinduced ultrafast charge-order melting: Charge-order inversion and nonthermal effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veenendaal, Michel van

    2016-01-01

    The effect of photoexcitation is studied for a system with checkerboard charge order induced by displacements of ligands around a metal site. The motion of the ligands is treated classically and the electronic charges are simplified to two-level molecular bond charges. The calculations are done for a checkerboard charge-ordered system with about 100 000 ligand oscillators coupled to a fixed-temperature bath. The initial photoexcitation is followed by a rapid decrease in the charge-order parameter within 50–100 femtoseconds while leaving the correlation length almost unchanged. Depending on the fluence, a complete melting of the charge order occurs in less than a picosecond. While for low fluences, the system returns to its original state, for full melting, it recovers to its broken-symmetry state leading to an inversion of the charge order. Finally, for small long-range interactions, recovery can be slow due to domain formation.

  3. Vection is the main contributor to motion sickness induced by visual yaw rotation: Implications for conflict and eye movement theories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne A E Nooij

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of vection (i.e., a visually induced sense of self-motion, optokinetic nystagmus (OKN, and inadvertent head movements in visually induced motion sickness (VIMS, evoked by yaw rotation of the visual surround. These three elements have all been proposed as contributing factors in VIMS, as they can be linked to different motion sickness theories. However, a full understanding of the role of each factor is still lacking because independent manipulation has proven difficult in the past. We adopted an integrative approach to the problem by obtaining measures of potentially relevant parameters in four experimental conditions and subsequently combining them in a linear mixed regression model. To that end, participants were exposed to visual yaw rotation in four separate sessions. Using a full factorial design, the OKN was manipulated by a fixation target (present/absent, and vection strength by introducing a conflict in the motion direction of the central and peripheral field of view (present/absent. In all conditions, head movements were minimized as much as possible. Measured parameters included vection strength, vection variability, OKN slow phase velocity, OKN frequency, the number of inadvertent head movements, and inadvertent head tilt. Results show that VIMS increases with vection strength, but that this relation varies among participants (R2 = 0.48. Regression parameters for vection variability, head and eye movement parameters were not significant. These results may seem to be in line with the Sensory Conflict theory on motion sickness, but we argue that a more detailed definition of the exact nature of the conflict is required to fully appreciate the relationship between vection and VIMS.

  4. Images of paraffin monolayer crystals with perfect contrast: minimization of beam-induced specimen motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, R.M.; McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A.R.; Henderson, R.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of electron microscope images of organic and biological two-dimensional crystals has previously shown that the absolute contrast reached only a fraction of that expected theoretically from the electron diffraction amplitudes. The accepted explanation for this is that irradiation of the specimen causes beam-induced charging or movement, which in turn causes blurring of the image due to image or specimen movement. In this paper, we used three different approaches to try to overcome this image-blurring problem for monolayer crystals of paraffin. Our first approach was to use an extreme form of spotscan imaging, in which a single image was assembled on film by the successive illumination of up to 50,000 spots each of diameter around 7nm. The second approach was to use the Medipix II detector with its zero-noise readout to assemble a time-sliced series of images of the same area in which each frame from a movie with up to 400 frames had an exposure of only 500 electrons. In the third approach, we simply used a much thicker carbon support film to increase the physical strength and conductivity of the support. Surprisingly, the first two methods involving dose fractionation respectively in space or time produced only partial improvements in contrast whereas the third approach produced many virtually perfect images, in which the absolute contrast predicted from the electron diffraction amplitudes was observed in the images. We conclude that it is possible to obtain consistently almost perfect images of beam-sensitive specimens if they are attached to an appropriately strong and conductive support, but great care is needed in practice and the problem of how best to image ice-embedded biological structures in the absence of a strong, conductive support film requires more work. PMID:21185452

  5. Schedule and complex motion of shuttle bus induced by periodic inflow of passengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Naito, Yuichi

    2011-09-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of a bus in the shuttle bus transportation with a periodic inflow. A bus schedule is closely related to the dynamics. We present the modified circle map model for the dynamics of the shuttle bus. The motion of the shuttle bus depends on the loading parameter and the inflow period. The shuttle bus displays the periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic motions with varying both loading parameter and inflow rate.

  6. The role of roughness-induced damping in the oscillatory motion of bilayer graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie; Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto; Johnson, Erin R

    2014-01-01

    A multi-scale theoretical model is presented that is the first to offer quantitative agreement with experimental measurements of self-retraction and oscillation of bilayer graphene. The model integrates density-functional theory calculations of the energetics driving flake retraction and molecular-dynamics simulations capturing the dynamic response of laterally-offset rough surfaces. We demonstrate that nanoscale roughness explains self-retraction motion and propose a recipe for tuning that motion by controlling friction. (paper)

  7. Characterizing spatiotemporal information loss in sparse-sampling-based dynamic MRI for monitoring respiration-induced tumor motion in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Tatsuya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Nofiele, Joris; Yuan, Qing [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Pedrosa, Ivan; Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Sawant, Amit, E-mail: amit.sawant@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Sparse-sampling and reconstruction techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve faster image acquisition speeds, while maintaining adequate spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors investigate the use of one such sequence, broad-use linear acquisition speed-up technique (k-t BLAST) in monitoring tumor motion for thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy and examine the potential trade-off between increased sparsification (to increase imaging speed) and the potential loss of “true” information due to greater reliance on a priori information. Methods: Lung tumor motion trajectories in the superior–inferior direction, previously recorded from ten lung cancer patients, were replayed using a motion phantom module driven by an MRI-compatible motion platform. Eppendorf test tubes filled with water which serve as fiducial markers were placed in the phantom. The modeled rigid and deformable motions were collected in a coronal image slice using balanced fast field echo in conjunction with k-t BLAST. Root mean square (RMS) error was used as a metric of spatial accuracy as measured trajectories were compared to input data. The loss of spatial information was characterized for progressively increasing acceleration factor from 1 to 16; the resultant sampling frequency was increased approximately from 2.5 to 19 Hz when the principal direction of the motion was set along frequency encoding direction. In addition to the phantom study, respiration-induced tumor motions were captured from two patients (kidney tumor and lung tumor) at 13 Hz over 49 s to demonstrate the impact of high speed motion monitoring over multiple breathing cycles. For each subject, the authors compared the tumor centroid trajectory as well as the deformable motion during free breathing. Results: In the rigid and deformable phantom studies, the RMS error of target tracking at the acquisition speed of 19 Hz was approximately 0.3–0

  8. A flatfile of ground motion intensity measurements from induced earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennolet, Steven B.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Thompson, Eric M.; Yeck, William

    2018-01-01

    We have produced a uniformly processed database of orientation-independent (RotD50, RotD100) ground motion intensity measurements containing peak horizontal ground motions (accelerations and velocities) and 5-percent-damped pseudospectral accelerations (0.1–10 s) from more than 3,800 M ≥ 3 earthquakes in Oklahoma and Kansas that occurred between January 2009 and December 2016. Ground motion time series were collected from regional, national, and temporary seismic arrays out to 500 km. We relocated the majority of the earthquake hypocenters using a multiple-event relocation algorithm to produce a set of near-uniformly processed hypocentral locations. Ground motion processing followed standard methods, with the primary objective of reducing the effects of noise on the measurements. Regional wave-propagation features and the high seismicity rate required careful selection of signal windows to ensure that we captured the entire ground motion record and that contaminating signals from extraneous earthquakes did not contribute to the database. Processing was carried out with an automated scheme and resulted in a database comprising more than 174,000 records (https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F73B5X8N). We anticipate that these results will be useful for improved understanding of earthquake ground motions and for seismic hazard applications.

  9. Combined prospective and retrospective correction to reduce motion-induced image misalignment and geometric distortions in EPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Melvyn B; Muraskin, Jordan; Zou, Xiaowei; Thomas, William J; Krueger, Sascha; Aksoy, Murat; Bammer, Roland; Brown, Truman R

    2013-03-01

    Despite rigid-body realignment to compensate for head motion during an echo-planar imaging time-series scan, nonrigid image deformations remain due to changes in the effective shim within the brain as the head moves through the B(0) field. The current work presents a combined prospective/retrospective solution to reduce both rigid and nonrigid components of this motion-related image misalignment. Prospective rigid-body correction, where the scan-plane orientation is dynamically updated to track with the subject's head, is performed using an active marker setup. Retrospective distortion correction is then applied to unwarp the remaining nonrigid image deformations caused by motion-induced field changes. Distortion correction relative to a reference time-frame does not require any additional field mapping scans or models, but rather uses the phase information from the echo-planar imaging time-series itself. This combined method is applied to compensate echo-planar imaging scans of volunteers performing in-plane and through-plane head motions, resulting in increased image stability beyond what either prospective or retrospective rigid-body correction alone can achieve. The combined method is also assessed in a blood oxygen level dependent functional MRI task, resulting in improved Z-score statistics. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Particle emission induced by the interaction of highly charged slow Xe-ions with a SiO2 surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiwietz, G.; Skogvall, B.; Schneider, D.; Clark, M.; DeWitt, D.; McDonald, J.

    1991-01-01

    Sputtering of surface atoms by low energy (a few keV) heavy ions is a commonly used technique in material science and applied physics. In general, sputtering occurs via nuclear energy transfer processes and is determined mainly by the atom-atom interaction potentials. In the energy range of interest these potentials depend only slightly on the charge state of one collision partner if the other is neutral. The development of new ion-sources, however, allows for the use of ions with charged states of q > 50. For these highly charged ions it is conceivable that electronic processes come into play as well. If, for example, the density of charged surface atoms exceeds a certain limit, then particle emission can occur via the electrostatic repulsion of target atoms, the so-called Coulomb explosion. Indications for such electronic effects have been found in a few investigations of ion-induced sputtering Si (q q+ ). However, the order of magnitude of this effect is not clear until now. In this work we present preliminary data on sputtering, ion backscattering, electron and photon emission from SiO 2 surface induced by incident Xe ions of very high charge states (q=30--50). The experiment was performed at the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using a time-of-flight (TOF) ion analyzer-system from the Hahn-Meitner-Institute, Berlin

  11. Field-induced Gap and Quantized Charge Pumping in Nano-helix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Tsinghua U., Beijing; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-02-15

    We propose several novel physical phenomena based on nano-scale helical wires. Applying a static electric field transverse to the helical wire induces a metal to insulator transition, with the band gap determined by the applied voltage. Similar idea can be applied to 'geometrically' constructing one-dimensional systems with arbitrary external potential. With a quadrupolar electrode configuration, the electric field could rotate in the transverse plane, leading to a quantized dc charge current proportional to the frequency of the rotation. Such a device could be used as a new standard for the high precession measurement of the electric current. The inverse effect implies that passing an electric current through a helical wire in the presence of a transverse static electric field can lead to a mechanical rotation of the helix. This effect can be used to construct nano-scale electro-mechanical motors. Finally, our methodology also enables new ways of controlling and measuring the electronic properties of helical biological molecules such as the DNA.

  12. Chaotic micromixer utilizing electro-osmosis and induced charge electro-osmosis in eccentric annulus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Huicheng; Wong, Teck Neng; Marcos; Che, Zhizhao

    2016-01-01

    Efficient mixing is of significant importance in numerous chemical and biomedical applications but difficult to realize rapidly in microgeometries due to the lack of turbulence. We propose to enhance mixing by introducing Lagrangian chaos through electro-osmosis (EO) or induced charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) in an eccentric annulus. The analysis reveals that the created Lagrangian chaos can achieve a homogeneous mixing much more rapidly than either the pure EO or the pure ICEO. Our systematic investigations on the key parameters, ranging from the eccentricity, the alternating time period, the number of flow patterns in one time period, to the specific flow patterns utilized for the Lagrangian chaos creation, present that the Lagrangian chaos is considerably robust. The system can obtain a good mixing effect with wide ranges of eccentricity, alternating time period, and specific flow patterns utilized for the Lagrangian chaos creation as long as the number of flow patterns in one time period is two. As the electric field increases, the time consumption for homogenous mixing is reduced more remarkably for the Lagrangian chaos of the ICEO than that of the EO.

  13. Chaotic micromixer utilizing electro-osmosis and induced charge electro-osmosis in eccentric annulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Huicheng; Wong, Teck Neng, E-mail: mtnwong@ntu.edu.sg; Marcos [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Che, Zhizhao [State Key Laboratory of Engines, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Efficient mixing is of significant importance in numerous chemical and biomedical applications but difficult to realize rapidly in microgeometries due to the lack of turbulence. We propose to enhance mixing by introducing Lagrangian chaos through electro-osmosis (EO) or induced charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) in an eccentric annulus. The analysis reveals that the created Lagrangian chaos can achieve a homogeneous mixing much more rapidly than either the pure EO or the pure ICEO. Our systematic investigations on the key parameters, ranging from the eccentricity, the alternating time period, the number of flow patterns in one time period, to the specific flow patterns utilized for the Lagrangian chaos creation, present that the Lagrangian chaos is considerably robust. The system can obtain a good mixing effect with wide ranges of eccentricity, alternating time period, and specific flow patterns utilized for the Lagrangian chaos creation as long as the number of flow patterns in one time period is two. As the electric field increases, the time consumption for homogenous mixing is reduced more remarkably for the Lagrangian chaos of the ICEO than that of the EO.

  14. Transverse Space-Charge Field-Induced Plasma Dynamics for Ultraintense Electron-Beam Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tarkeshian

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Similarly to laser or x-ray beams, the interaction of sufficiently intense particle beams with neutral gases will result in the creation of plasma. In contrast to photon-based ionization, the strong unipolar field of a particle beam can generate a plasma where the electron population receives a large initial momentum kick and escapes, leaving behind unshielded ions. Measuring the properties of the ensuing Coulomb exploding ions—such as their kinetic energy distribution, yield, and spatial distribution—can provide information about the peak electric fields that are achieved in the electron beams. Particle-in-cell simulations and analytical models are presented for high-brightness electron beams of a few femtoseconds or even hundreds of attoseconds, and transverse beam sizes on the micron scale, as generated by today’s free electron lasers. Different density regimes for the utilization as a potential diagnostics are explored, and the fundamental differences in plasma dynamical behavior for e-beam or photon-based ionization are highlighted. By measuring the dynamics of field-induced ions for different gas and beam densities, a lower bound on the beam charge density can be obtained in a single shot and in a noninvasive way. The exponential dependency of the ionization yield on the beam properties can provide unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution, at the submicrometer and subfemtosecond scales, respectively, offering a practical and powerful approach to characterizing beams from accelerators at the frontiers of performance.

  15. Bystander-induced apoptosis and premature differentiation in primary urothelial explants after charged particle microbeam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, O.V.; Folkard, M.; Mothersill, C.; Prise, K.M.; Michael, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    The ureter primary explant technique was developed to study bystander effects under in vivo like conditions where stem and differentiated cells are present. Irradiation was performed with a 3 He 2+ charged particle microbeam available at the Gray Cancer Institute, with high (∼2 μm) precision. Tissue sections from porcine ureters were pre-irradiated with the microbeam at a single location with 10 3 He 2+ particles (5 MeV; LET 70 keV.μm -1 ). After irradiation, the tissue section was incubated for 7 days, thus allowing the explant outgrowth to form. Total cellular damage (total fraction of micronucleated and apoptotic cells) was measured according to morphological criteria. Apoptosis was also assessed using a 3'-OH DNA end-labelling technique. Premature differentiation was estimated using antibodies to uroplakin III, a specific marker of terminal urothelial differentiation. Results of our experiments demonstrated a significant bystander-induced differentiation and a less significant increase in apoptotic and micronucleated cells. A hypothesis based on the protective nature of the bystander effect is proposed. (author)

  16. A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Robert H. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the first comprehensive measurement of neutrino-induced charged-current neutral pion production (CCπ0) off a nuclear target. The Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (MiniBooNE) and Booster Neutrino Beam (BNB) are discussed in detail. MiniBooNE is a high-statistics (~ 1, 000, 000 interactions) low-energy (Evϵ 2 0.5 - 2.0 GeV) neutrino experiment located at Fermilab. The method for selecting and reconstructing CCπ0 events is presented. The π0 and μ- are fully reconstructed in the final state allowing for the measurement of, among other things, the neutrino energy. The total observable CCπ0 cross-section is presented as a function of neutrino energy, along with five differential cross-sections in terms of the final state kinematics and Q2. The results are combined to yield a flux-averaged total cross-section of <σ>Φ = (9.2 ± 0.3stat. ± 1.5syst.) × 10-39 cm2/CH2 at energy 965 MeV. These measurements will aid future neutrino experiments with the prediction of their neutrino interaction rates.

  17. The fall of charged particles under gravity: a study of experimental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, T.W.; Rossi, F.; Moorhead, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    There are currently several proposals to study the motion of antiprotons, negative hydrogen ions, positrons and electrons under gravity. The motions of such charged particles are affected by residual gas, radiation, electric and magnetic fields, as well as gravity. The electric fields are particularly sensitive to the state of the 'shielding' container. In this paper the physics of these extraneous influences on the motion of charged particles under gravity is reviewed. The effects considered include: residual gas scattering, wall potentials due to patches, stress, thermal gradients, contamination states, and image-charge induced dissipation. 51 refs., 6 figs

  18. Motions and Hull-Induced Bridging-Structure Loads for a Small Waterplane Area, Twin-Hulled, Attack Aircraft Carrier in Waves

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Harry D; Gerzina, David M

    1973-01-01

    ... small waterplane area, twin-hulled, attack aircraft carrier in waves. Motions of the model were measured, together with the forces and moments induced by the hulls on the cross structure spanning the two hulls...

  19. Persistent photoconductivity due to trapping of induced charges in Sn/ZnO thin film based UV photodetector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Harish Kumar; Sreenivas, K.; Gupta, Vinay

    2010-01-01

    Photoconductivity relaxation in rf magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films integrated with ultrathin tin metal overlayer is investigated. Charge carriers induced at the ZnO-metal interface by the tin metal overlayer compensates the surface lying trap centers and leads to the enhanced photoresponse. On termination of ultraviolet radiation, recombination of the photoexcited electrons with the valence band holes leaves the excess carriers deeply trapped at the recombination center and holds the dark conductivity level at a higher value. Equilibrium between the recombination centers and valence band, due to trapped charges, eventually stimulates the persistent photoconductivity in the Sn/ZnO photodetectors.

  20. Persistent photoconductivity due to trapping of induced charges in Sn/ZnO thin film based UV photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Harish Kumar; Sreenivas, K.; Gupta, Vinay

    2010-05-01

    Photoconductivity relaxation in rf magnetron sputtered ZnO thin films integrated with ultrathin tin metal overlayer is investigated. Charge carriers induced at the ZnO-metal interface by the tin metal overlayer compensates the surface lying trap centers and leads to the enhanced photoresponse. On termination of ultraviolet radiation, recombination of the photoexcited electrons with the valence band holes leaves the excess carriers deeply trapped at the recombination center and holds the dark conductivity level at a higher value. Equilibrium between the recombination centers and valence band, due to trapped charges, eventually stimulates the persistent photoconductivity in the Sn/ZnO photodetectors.

  1. Charging of Dust Grains in a Nuclear-Induced Plasma at High Pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Filippov, A. V.

    2001-01-01

    The process of dust-grain charging in plasmas produced by radioactive decay products or spontaneous fission fragments in air and xenon at high pressures is studied numerically in the hydrodynamic approximation. It is shown that, at sufficiently high rates of gas ionization, the dust grains in air are charged by electrons rather than ions, so that the grain charge in air is comparable to that in electropositive gases. The results of numerical calculations based on a complete model agree well with the experimental data. The time evolution of the grain charge is investigated, and the characteristic time scales on which the grains acquire an electric charge are established. The validity of approximate theories of dust-grain charging in electropositive and electronegative gases at high pressures is examined

  2. Modeling neutrino-induced charged pion production on water at T2K kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulos, A.; González-Jiménez, R.; Niewczas, K.; Sobczyk, J.; Jachowicz, N.

    2018-05-01

    Pion production is a significant component of the signal in accelerator-based neutrino experiments. Over the last years, the MiniBooNE, T2K, and MINERvA collaborations have reported a substantial amount of data on (anti)neutrino-induced pion production on the nucleus. However, a comprehensive and consistent description of the whole data set is still missing. We aim at improving the current understanding of neutrino-induced pion production on the nucleus. To this end, the comparison of experimental data with theoretical predictions, preferably based on microscopic models, is essential to disentangle the different reaction mechanisms involved in the process. To describe single-pion production, we use a hybrid model that combines low- and a high-energy approaches. The low-energy model contains resonances and background terms. At high invariant masses, a high-energy model based on a Regge approach is employed. The model is implemented in the nucleus using the relativistic plane wave impulse approximation (RPWIA). We present a comparison of the hybrid-RPWIA and low-energy model with the recent neutrino-induced charged-current 1 π+ -production cross section on water reported by T2K. In order to judge the impact of final-state interactions (FSI), we confront our results with those of the nuwro Monte Carlo generator. The hybrid-RPWIA model and nuwro results compare favorably to the data, albeit that FSI are not included in the former. The need of a high-energy model at T2K kinematics is made clear. These results complement our previous work [Phys. Rev. D 97, 013004 (2018), 10.1103/PhysRevD.97.013004], in which we compared the models to the MINERvA and MiniBooNE 1 π+ data. The hybrid-RPWIA model tends to overpredict both the T2K and MINERvA data in kinematic regions where the largest suppression due to FSI is expected and agrees remarkably well with the data in other kinematic regions. On the contrary, the MiniBooNE data are underpredicted over the whole kinematic range.

  3. 6% magnetic-field-induced strain by twin-boundary motion in ferromagnetic Ni-Mn-Ga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, S. J.; Marioni, M.; Allen, S. M.; O'Handley, R. C.; Lograsso, T. A.

    2000-01-01

    Field-induced strains of 6% are reported in ferromagnetic Ni-Mn-Ga martensites at room temperature. The strains are the result of twin boundary motion driven largely by the Zeeman energy difference across the twin boundary. The strain measured parallel to the applied magnetic field is negative in the sample/field geometry used here. The strain saturates in fields of order 400 kA/m and is blocked by a compressive stress of order 2 MPa applied orthogonal to the magnetic field. The strain versus field curves exhibit appreciable hysteresis associated with the motion of the twin boundaries. A simple model accounts quantitatively for the dependence of strain on magnetic field and external stress using as input parameters only measured quantities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  4. Images of paraffin monolayer crystals with perfect contrast: Minimization of beam-induced specimen motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.; McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A.R.; Henderson, R.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of electron microscope images of organic and biological two-dimensional crystals has previously shown that the absolute contrast reached only a fraction of that expected theoretically from the electron diffraction amplitudes. The accepted explanation for this is that irradiation of the specimen causes beam-induced charging or movement, which in turn causes blurring of the image due to image or specimen movement. In this paper, we used three different approaches to try to overcome this image-blurring problem in monolayer crystals of paraffin. Our first approach was to use an extreme form of spotscan imaging, in which a single image was assembled on film by the successive illumination of up to 50,000 spots, each of a diameter of around 7 nm. The second approach was to use the Medipix II detector with its zero-noise readout to assemble a time-sliced series of images of the same area in which each frame from a movie with up to 400 frames had an exposure of only 500 electrons. In the third approach, we simply used a much thicker carbon support film to increase the physical strength and conductivity of the support. Surprisingly, the first two methods involving dose fractionation in space or time produced only partial improvements in contrast whereas the third approach produced many virtually perfect images, where the absolute contrast predicted from the electron diffraction amplitudes was observed in the images. We conclude that it is possible to obtain consistently almost perfect images of beam-sensitive specimens if they are attached to an appropriately strong and conductive support; however great care is needed in practice and the problem remains of how to best image ice-embedded biological structures in the absence of a strong, conductive support film. -- Research Highlights: →Three ideas were tested to improve the contrast of images of an organic specimen. →High-resolution images of paraffin on thick carbon films can have perfect contrast

  5. Images of paraffin monolayer crystals with perfect contrast: Minimization of beam-induced specimen motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McMullan, G.; Faruqi, A.R. [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom); Henderson, R., E-mail: rh15@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk [MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 0QH (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-15

    Quantitative analysis of electron microscope images of organic and biological two-dimensional crystals has previously shown that the absolute contrast reached only a fraction of that expected theoretically from the electron diffraction amplitudes. The accepted explanation for this is that irradiation of the specimen causes beam-induced charging or movement, which in turn causes blurring of the image due to image or specimen movement. In this paper, we used three different approaches to try to overcome this image-blurring problem in monolayer crystals of paraffin. Our first approach was to use an extreme form of spotscan imaging, in which a single image was assembled on film by the successive illumination of up to 50,000 spots, each of a diameter of around 7 nm. The second approach was to use the Medipix II detector with its zero-noise readout to assemble a time-sliced series of images of the same area in which each frame from a movie with up to 400 frames had an exposure of only 500 electrons. In the third approach, we simply used a much thicker carbon support film to increase the physical strength and conductivity of the support. Surprisingly, the first two methods involving dose fractionation in space or time produced only partial improvements in contrast whereas the third approach produced many virtually perfect images, where the absolute contrast predicted from the electron diffraction amplitudes was observed in the images. We conclude that it is possible to obtain consistently almost perfect images of beam-sensitive specimens if they are attached to an appropriately strong and conductive support; however great care is needed in practice and the problem remains of how to best image ice-embedded biological structures in the absence of a strong, conductive support film. -- Research Highlights: {yields}Three ideas were tested to improve the contrast of images of an organic specimen. {yields}High-resolution images of paraffin on thick carbon films can have perfect

  6. A margin model to account for respiration-induced tumour motion and its variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolens, Catherine; Webb, Steve; Evans, Phil M; Shirato, H; Nishioka, K

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce the sensitivity of radiotherapy treatments to organ motion, compensation methods are being investigated such as gating of treatment delivery, tracking of tumour position, 4D scanning and planning of the treatment, etc. An outstanding problem that would occur with all these methods is the assumption that breathing motion is reproducible throughout the planning and delivery process of treatment. This is obviously not a realistic assumption and is one that will introduce errors. A dynamic internal margin model (DIM) is presented that is designed to follow the tumour trajectory and account for the variability in respiratory motion. The model statistically describes the variation of the breathing cycle over time, i.e. the uncertainty in motion amplitude and phase reproducibility, in a polar coordinate system from which margins can be derived. This allows accounting for an additional gating window parameter for gated treatment delivery as well as minimizing the area of normal tissue irradiated. The model was illustrated with abdominal motion for a patient with liver cancer and tested with internal 3D lung tumour trajectories. The results confirm that the respiratory phases around exhale are most reproducible and have the smallest variation in motion amplitude and phase (approximately 2 mm). More importantly, the margin area covering normal tissue is significantly reduced by using trajectory-specific margins (as opposed to conventional margins) as the angular component is by far the largest contributor to the margin area. The statistical approach to margin calculation, in addition, offers the possibility for advanced online verification and updating of breathing variation as more data become available

  7. Analysis of target volume motion followed by induced abdominal compression in tomotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jeong Hun; Jung, Geon A; Jung, Won Seok; Jo, Jung Young; Kim, Gi Chul; Choi, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the changes of the motion of abdominal cavity between interfraction and intrafraction by using abdominal compression for reducing abdominal motion. 60 MVCT images were obtained before and after tomotherapy from 10 prostate cancer patients over the whole radiotherapy period. Shift values ( X -lateral Y -longitudinal Z -vertical and Roll ) were measured and from it, the correlation of between interfraction set up change and intrafraction target motion was analyzed when applying abdominal compression. The motion changes of interfraction were X- average 0.65±2.32mm, Y-average 1.41±4.83mm, Z-average 0.73± 0.52mm and Roll-average 0.96±0.21mm. The motion changes of intrafraction were X-average 0.15±0.44mm, Y-average 0.13 ±0.44mm, Z-average 0.24±0.64mm and Roll- average 0.1±0.9mm. The average PTV maximum dose difference was minimum for 10% phase and maximum for 70% phase. The average Spain cord maximum dose difference was minimum for 0% phase and maximum for 50% phase. The average difference of V 20 , V 10 , V 5 of Lung show bo certain trend. Abdominal compression can minimize the motion of internal organs and patients. So it is considered to be able to get more ideal dose volume without damage of normal structures from generating margin in small in producing PTV

  8. Bunch motion in the presence of the self-induced voltage due to a reactive impedance with RF off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaposhnikova, E [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    1996-08-01

    Analytic self-consistent solutions have been found for the nonlinear Vlasov equation describing different types of behaviour with time of an intense bunch under the influence of voltage induced due to a reactive part of broad band impedance. The problem is solved for the particular type of the initial distribution function in longitudinal phase space which is elliptic and corresponds to parabolic line density. This paper is devoted to the consideration of the effects in the machine with RF off. In this case the induced voltage is changing with time and can significantly affect bunch motion. The same method applied in the case with RF on allows the time dependent effects of potential well distortion to be analysed. Numerical estimations for the CERN SPS show that effect of induced voltage is important for beam manipulations with RF off. Measurements of the change in the rate of debunching with intensity can be used to estimate the value of the reactive impedance. (author)

  9. Poisson-Boltzmann theory of the charge-induced adsorption of semi-flexible polyelectrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubbink, Job; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2004-03-15

    A model is suggested for the structure of an adsorbed layer of a highly charged semi-flexible polyelectrolyte on a weakly charged surface of opposite charge sign. The adsorbed phase is thin, owing to the effective reversal of the charge sign of the surface upon adsorption, and ordered, owing to the high surface density of polyelectrolyte strands caused by the generally strong binding between polyelectrolyte and surface. The Poisson-Boltzmann equation for the electrostatic interaction between the array of adsorbed polyelectrolytes and the charged surface is solved for a cylindrical geometry, both numerically, using a finite element method, and analytically within the weak curvature limit under the assumption of excess monovalent salt. For small separations, repulsive surface polarization and counterion osmotic pressure effects dominate over the electrostatic attraction and the resulting electrostatic interaction curve shows a minimum at nonzero separations on the Angstrom scale. The equilibrium density of the adsorbed phase is obtained by minimizing the total free energy under the condition of equality of chemical potential and osmotic pressure of the polyelectrolyte in solution and in the adsorbed phase. For a wide range of ionic conditions and charge densities of the charged surface, the interstrand separation as predicted by the Poisson-Boltzmann model and the analytical theory closely agree. For low to moderate charge densities of the adsorbing surface, the interstrand spacing decreases as a function of the charge density of the charged surface. Above about 0.1 M excess monovalent salt, it is only weakly dependent on the ionic strength. At high charge densities of the adsorbing surface, the interstrand spacing increases with increasing ionic strength, in line with the experiments by Fang and Yang [J. Phys. Chem. B 101, 441 (1997)]. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Auditory motion capturing ambiguous visual motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen eAlink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is demonstrated that moving sounds have an effect on the direction in which one sees visual stimuli move. During the main experiment sounds were presented consecutively at four speaker locations inducing left- or rightwards auditory apparent motion. On the path of auditory apparent motion, visual apparent motion stimuli were presented with a high degree of directional ambiguity. The main outcome of this experiment is that our participants perceived visual apparent motion stimuli that were ambiguous (equally likely to be perceived as moving left- or rightwards more often as moving in the same direction than in the opposite direction of auditory apparent motion. During the control experiment we replicated this finding and found no effect of sound motion direction on eye movements. This indicates that auditory motion can capture our visual motion percept when visual motion direction is insufficiently determinate without affecting eye movements.

  11. Decoupled pelvis adjustment to induce lumbar motion: A technique that controls low back load in sitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, P.; Reenalda, Jasper; Veltink, Petrus H.; Koopman, Hubertus F.J.M.

    Static sitting in confined settings have been associated with low back pain in sedentary occupations such as office works and car driving. To prevent lumbar discomfort in prolonged static sitting, periodic motion of the lumbar spine is needed. Because the pelvis forms the basis for lumbar spine

  12. The Effect of Perceptual Load on Attention-Induced Motion Blindness: The Efficiency of Selective Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Julia L.; Milders, Maarten M.; Sahraie, Arash; Niedeggen, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Recent visual marking studies have shown that the carry-over of distractor inhibition can impair the ability of singletons to capture attention if the singleton and distractors share features. The current study extends this finding to first-order motion targets and distractors, clearly separated in time by a visual cue (the letter X). Target…

  13. Measuring Motion-Induced B0-Fluctuations in the Brain Using Field Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Hanson, Lars G.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluctuations of the background magnetic field (B0) due to body and breathing motion can lead to significant artifacts in brain imaging at ultrahigh field. Corrections based on real-time sensing using external field probes show great potential. This study evaluates different aspects of fi...

  14. Study of single pion production in antineutrino induced charged current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolognese, Teresa.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented on the exclusive charged current antineutrino production of one pion using the data of the Gargamelle propane experiment at CERN PS. The isospin structure of the charged weak current is studied as well as the energy dependence of the total cross section for π - antineutrino production, which is compared with the prediction of Adler's model [fr

  15. The effect of impurity scattering on the thermally induced charge imbalance in a clean superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, J.B.; Smith, H.; Ono, Y.A.; Pethick, C.J.

    1980-01-01

    The charge imbalance generated in a current-carrying clean superconductor by a temperature gradient is calculated, assuming that non-magnetic or magnetic impurities are the only source of scattering. The charge imbalance is obtained from exact solutions of the quasiparticle Boltzmann equation, valid at any temperature and superfluid velocity. (author)

  16. Surface motion induced by nuclear explosions beneath Pahute Mesa. Part I. Halfbreak, Greeley, Scotch, Boxcar events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, W.R.

    1976-10-01

    Results of surface motion studies conducted by Sandia Laboratories during seven underground nuclear explosions detonated beneath Pahute Mesa, Areas 19 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, between 1966 and 1973 are reported. The report is divided into two parts of which this, Part I, includes (1) descriptions of the Pahute Mesa geological environment and of the purposes and instrumentation used in these programs (Chapter 1), and (2) description of four events, the data derived from each, and analysis of these data. These Part I events are HALFBEAK (Chapter 2), GREELEY (Chapter 3), SCOTCH (Chapter 4), and BOXCAR (Chapter 5) for all of which a nominally radial array of gage stations yielded data as a function of distance primarily, although in a few cases data were derived from stations at widely separated azimuths from the explosion. Results of the analysis indicate that average propagation velocity through the geologic column between the explosions and mesa surface was about 8800 ft/sec and that for horizontal distances greater than shot depth, refraction occurred within rhyolite flows with characteristic velocity of about 12,300 ft/sec. There is evidence which suggests possible deeper refraction at a velocity between 18,000 and 21,000 ft/sec. Only the verticle motion peaks follow a pattern amenable to regression analysis because geometrical effects influence horizontal motion amplitudes differently as horizontal distances increase. Particle velocities vary roughly as the inverse square of slant or radial range with exponent values ranging from -3.9 to -1.3. Displacements follow a similar pattern with exponents ranging from about -6 to -2. Displacement profiles at various times during the motion and displacement hodographs in the vertical-radial plane aid in understanding several local phenomena implied by individual motion records

  17. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyion-induced aggregation of oppositely charged liposomes and charged colloidal particles: the many facets of complex formation in low-density colloidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cametti, C

    2008-10-01

    This review focusses on recent developments in the experimental study of polyion-induced charged colloidal particle aggregation, with particular emphasis on the formation of cationic liposome clusters induced by the addition of anionic adsorbing polyions. These structures can be considered, under certain points of view, a new class of colloidal systems, with intriguing properties that opens interesting and promising new opportunities in various biotechnological applications. Lipidic structures of different morphologies and different structural complexities interacting with oppositely charged polyions give rise to a rich variety of self-assembled structures that present various orders of hierarchy in the sense that, starting from a basic level, for example a lipid bilayer, they arrange themselves into superstructures as, for example, multilamellar stacks or liquid-crystalline structures. These structures can be roughly divided into two classes according to the fact that the elementary structure, involved in building a more complex one, keeps or does not keeps its basic arrangement. To the first one, belong those aggregates composed by single structures that maintain their integrity, for example, lipidic vesicles assembled together by an appropriate external agent. The second one encompasses structures that do not resemble the ones of the original objects which form them, but, conversely, derive from a deep restructuring and rearrangement process, where the original morphology of the initial constitutive elements is completely lost. In this review, I will only briefly touch on higher level hierarchy structures and I will focus on the assembling processes involving preformed lipid bilayer vesicles that organize themselves into clusters, the process being induced by the adsorption of oppositely charged polyions. The scientific interest in polyion-induced liposome aggregates is two-fold. On the one hand, in soft-matter physics, they represent an interesting colloidal

  19. Hydrogen bond strengthening induces fluorescence quenching of PRODAN derivative by turning on twisted intramolecular charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonggang; Li, Donglin; Li, Chaozheng; Liu, YuFang; Jiang, Kai

    2017-12-01

    Researchers have proposed different effective mechanisms of hydrogen bonding (HB) on the fluorescence of 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and its derivatives. Herein, excited state transition and dynamics analysis confirm that the fluorescence of PD (a derivative of PRODAN with ethyl replaced by 3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropan) emits from the planar intramolecular charge transfer (PICT) state rather than twist ICT (TICT) state, because the fluorescence emission and surface hopping from the TICT state to the twist ground (T-S0) state is energy forbidden. Nevertheless, the strengthening of intramolecular-HB (intra-HB) and intermolecular-HB (inter-HB) of PD-(methanol)2 smooth the pathway of surface hopping from TICT to T-S0 state and the external conversion going to planar ground state by decreasing the energy difference of the two states. This smoothing changes the fluorescence state of PD-(methanol)2 to the TICT state in which fluorescence emission does not occur but surface hopping, leading to the partial fluorescence quenching of PD in methanol solvent. This conclusion is different from previous related reports. Moreover, the inter-HB strengthening of PD-methanol in PICT state induces the cleavage of intra-HB and a fluorescence red-shift of 54 nm compared to PD. This red-shift increases to 66 nm for PD-(methanol)2 for the strengthening of the one intra-HB and two inter-HBs. The dipole moments of PD-methanol and PD-(methanol)2 respectively increase about 10.3D and 8.1D in PICT state compared to PD. The synergistic effect of intra-HB and inter-HB induces partial quenching of PD in methanol solvent by turning on the TICT state and fluorescence red-shift. This work gives a reasonable description on the fluorescence red-shift and partial quenching of PD in methanol solvent, which will bring insight into the study of spectroscopic properties of molecules owning better spectral characteristics.

  20. Aerosol charging state at an urban site: new analytical approach and implications for ion-induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gagné

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The charging state of aerosol populations was determined using an Ion-DMPS in Helsinki, Finland between December 2008 and February 2010. We extrapolated the charging state and calculated the ion-induced nucleation fraction to be around 1.3 % ± 0.4 % at 2 nm and 1.3 % ± 0.5 % at 1.5 nm, on average. We present a new method to retrieve the average charging state for a new particle formation event, at a given size and polarity. We improve the uncertainty assessment and fitting technique used previously with an Ion-DMPS. We also use a new theoretical framework that allows for different concentrations of small ions for different polarities (polarity asymmetry. We extrapolate the ion-induced fraction using polarity symmetry and asymmetry. Finally, a method to calculate the growth rates from the behaviour of the charging state as a function of the particle diameter using polarity symmetry and asymmetry is presented and used on a selection of new particle formation events.

  1. Field penetration induced charge redistribution effects on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes - a first-principle study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-W.; Lee, M.-H.; Clark, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of field penetration induced charge redistribution on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been studied by the first-principle calculations. It is found that the carbon nanotube becomes polarized under external electric field leading to a charge redistribution. The resulting band bending induced by field penetration into the nanotube tip surface can further reduce the effective workfunction of the carbon nanotubes. The magnitude of the redistributed charge ΔQ is found to be nearly linear to the applied external field strength. In addition, we found that the capped (9, 0) zigzag nanotube demonstrates better field emission properties than the capped (5, 5) armchair nanotube due to the fact that the charge redistribution of π electrons along the zigzag-like tube axis is easier than for the armchair-like tube. The density of states (DOS) of the capped region of the nanotube is found to be enhanced with a value 30% higher than that of the sidewall part for the capped (5, 5) nanotube and 40% for the capped (9, 0) nanotube under an electric field of 0.33 V/A. Such enhancements of the DOS at the carbon nanotube tip show that electrons near the Fermi level will emit more easily due to the change of the surface band structure resulting from the field penetration in a high field

  2. Multi-Hazard Analysis for the Estimation of Ground Motion Induced by Landslides and Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Rubén; Koudogbo, Fifame; Ardizzone, Francesca; Mondini, Alessandro; Bignami, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors allow obtaining all-day all-weather terrain complex reflectivity images which can be processed by means of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) for the monitoring of displacement episodes with extremely high accuracy. In the work presented, different PSI strategies to measure ground surface displacements for multi-scale multi-hazard mapping are proposed in the context of landslides and tectonic applications. This work is developed in the framework of ESA General Studies Programme (GSP). The present project, called Multi Scale and Multi Hazard Mapping Space based Solutions (MEMpHIS), investigates new Earth Observation (EO) methods and new Information and Communications Technology (ICT) solutions to improve the understanding and management of disasters, with special focus on Disaster Risk Reduction rather than Rapid Mapping. In this paper, the results of the investigation on the key processing steps for measuring large-scale ground surface displacements (like the ones originated by plate tectonics or active faults) as well as local displacements at high resolution (like the ones related with active slopes) will be presented. The core of the proposed approaches is based on the Stable Point Network (SPN) algorithm, which is the advanced PSI processing chain developed by ALTAMIRA INFORMATION. Regarding tectonic applications, the accurate displacement estimation over large-scale areas characterized by low magnitude motion gradients (3-5 mm/year), such as the ones induced by inter-seismic or Earth tidal effects, still remains an open issue. In this context, a low-resolution approach based in the integration of differential phase increments of velocity and topographic error (obtained through the fitting of a linear model adjustment function to data) will be evaluated. Data from the default mode of Sentinel-1, the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode, will be considered for this application. Regarding landslides

  3. Effect of body biasing on single-event induced charge collection in deep N-well technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Yi; Hu Jian-Guo; Tan Hong-Zhou; Qin Jun-Rui

    2015-01-01

    As the device size decreases, the soft error induced by space ions is becoming a great concern for the reliability of integrated circuits (ICs). At present, the body biasing technique is widely used in highly scaled technologies. In the paper, using the three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation, we analyze the effect of the body biasing on the single-event charge collection in deep N-well technology. Our simulation results show that the body biasing mainly affects the behavior of the source, and the effect of body biasing on the charge collection for the nMOSFET and pMOSFET is quite different. For the nMOSFET, the RBB will increase the charge collection, while the FBB will reduce the charge collection. For the pMOSFET, the effect of RBB on the SET pulse width is small, while the FBB has an adverse effect. Moreover, the differenceof the effect of body biasing on the charge collection is compared in deep N-well and twin well. (paper)

  4. p-n Junction Dynamics Induced in a Graphene Channel by Ferroelectric-Domain Motion in the Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurchak, Anatolii I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU), Kiev (Ukraine); Eliseev, Eugene A. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU), Kiev (Ukraine); Kalinin, Sergei V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Strikha, Maksym V. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU), Kiev (Ukraine); Taras Shevchenko Kyiv National Univ., Kyiv (Ukraine); Morozovska, Anna N. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU), Kiev (Ukraine)

    2017-08-30

    The p - n junction dynamics induced in a graphene channel by stripe-domain nucleation, motion, and reversal in a ferroelectric substrate is explored using a self-consistent approach based on Landau-Ginzburg-Devonshire phenomenology combined with classical electrostatics. Relatively low gate voltages are required to induce the hysteresis of ferroelectric polarization and graphene charge in response to the periodic gate voltage. Pronounced nonlinear hysteresis of graphene conductance with a wide memory window corresponds to high amplitudes of gate voltage. Also, we reveal the extrinsic size effect in the dependence of the graphene-channel conductivity on its length. We predict that the top-gate–dielectric-layer–graphene-channel–ferroelectric-substrate nanostructure considered here can be a promising candidate for the fabrication of the next generation of modulators and rectifiers based on the graphene p - n junctions.

  5. Light charged particle production induced by fast neutrons (En=25-65 MeV) on 209Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeymackers, Erwin; Slypen, Isabelle; Benck, Sylvie; Meulders, Jean-Pierre; Nica, Ninel; Corcalciuc, Valentin

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental set-up and data reduction procedures regarding the measurement of double-differential cross sections for light charged particle production in fast neutron induced reactions (n, px), (n, dx), (n, tx) and (n, αx) on bismuth in the incident neutron energy range 25-65 MeV and at laboratory angles from 20deg to 160deg. preliminary double-differential and energy-differential cross sections for hydrogen isotopes are presented. (author)

  6. Direct observation of X-ray induced atomic motion using scanning tunneling microscope combined with synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Tanaka, Takehiro; Takagi, Yasumasa; Hosokawa, Hiromasa; Notsu, Hiroshi; Ohzeki, Gozo; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Kohmura, Yoshiki; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Yuji; Kikuta, Seishi; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-04-01

    X-ray induced atomic motion on a Ge(111)-c(2 x 8) clean surface at room temperature was directly observed with atomic resolution using a synchrotron radiation (SR)-based scanning tunneling microscope (STM) system under ultra high vacuum condition. The atomic motion was visualized as a tracking image by developing a method to merge the STM images before and after X-ray irradiation. Using the tracking image, the atomic mobility was found to be strongly affected by defects on the surface, but was not dependent on the incident X-ray energy, although it was clearly dependent on the photon density. The atomic motion can be attributed to surface diffusion, which might not be due to core-excitation accompanied with electronic transition, but a thermal effect by X-ray irradiation. The crystal surface structure was possible to break even at a lower photon density than the conventionally known barrier. These results can alert X-ray studies in the near future about sample damage during measurements, while suggesting the possibility of new applications. Also the obtained results show a new availability of the in-situ SR-STM system.

  7. Internal electric fields of electrolytic solutions induced by space-charge polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Atsushi

    2006-10-01

    The dielectric dispersion of electrolytic solutions prepared using chlorobenzene as a solvent and tetrabutylammonium tetraphenylborate as a solute is analyzed in terms of space-charge polarization in order to derive the ionic constants, and the Stokes radius obtained is discussed in comparison with the values that have been measured by conductometry. A homogeneous internal electric field is assumed for simplicity in the analysis of the space-charge polarization. The justification of the approximation by the homogeneous field is discussed from two points of view: one is the accuracy of the Stokes radius value observed and the other is the effect of bound charges on electrodes in which they level the highly inhomogeneous field, which has been believed in the past. In order to investigate the actual electric field, numerical calculations based on the Poisson equation are carried out by considering the influence of the bound charges. The variation of the number of bound charges with time is clarified by determining the relaxation function of the dielectric constant attributed to the space-charge polarization. Finally, a technique based on a two-field approximation, where homogeneous and hyperbolic fields are independently applied in relevant frequency ranges, is introduced to analyze the space-charge polarization of the electrolytic solutions, and further improvement of the accuracy in the determination of the Stokes radius is achieved.

  8. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kada, W., E-mail: kada.wataru@gunma-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Onoda, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Shikata, S. [Kwansei Gakuin Univ., 2-1, Gakuen, Mita, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan); Makino, T.; Koka, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Hanaizumi, O. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  9. Charge-fluctuation-induced heating of dust particles in a plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaulina, O S; Khrapak, S A; Nefedov, A P; Petrov, O F

    1999-11-01

    Random charge fluctuations are always present in dusty plasmas due to the discrete nature of currents charging the dust particle. These fluctuations can be a reason for the heating of the dust particle system. Such unexpected heating leading to the melting of the dust crystals was observed recently in several experiments. In this paper we show by analytical evaluations and numerical simulation that charge fluctuations provide an effective source of energy and can heat the dust particles up to several eV, in conditions close to experimental ones.

  10. Contribution of charge-transfer processes to ion-induced electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesler, M.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1996-01-01

    Charge changing events of ions moving inside metals are shown to contribute significantly to electron emission in the intermediate velocity regime via electrons coming from projectile ionization. Inclusion of equilibrium charge state fractions, together with two-electron Auger processes and resonant-coherent electron loss from the projectile, results in reasonable agreement with previous calculations for frozen protons, though a significant part of the emission is now interpreted in terms of charge exchange. The quantal character of the surface barrier transmission is shown to play an important role. The theory compares well with experimental observations for H projectiles. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. Schedule and complex motion of shuttle bus induced by periodic inflow of passengers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Naito, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of a bus in the shuttle bus transportation with a periodic inflow. A bus schedule is closely related to the dynamics. We present the modified circle map model for the dynamics of the shuttle bus. The motion of the shuttle bus depends on the loading parameter and the inflow period. The shuttle bus displays the periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic motions with varying both loading parameter and inflow rate. -- Highlights: → We studied the dynamic behavior of a bus in the shuttle bus transportation. → We presented the modified circle map model for the bus schedule. → We clarified the dependence of the tour time on both loading parameter and inflow period.

  12. Exciton induced directed motion of unconstrained atoms in an ultracold gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, K.; Wüster, S.; Rost, J. M.

    2017-03-01

    We demonstrate that through localised Rydberg excitation in a three-dimensional cold atom cloud atomic motion can be rendered directed and nearly confined to a plane, without spatial constraints for the motion of individual atoms. This enables creation and observation of non-adiabatic electronic Rydberg dynamics in atoms accelerated by dipole-dipole interactions under natural conditions. Using the full l = 0, 1 m=0,+/- 1 angular momentum state space, our simulations show that conical intersection crossings are clearly evident, both in atomic position information and excited state spectra of the Rydberg system. Hence, flexible Rydberg aggregates suggest themselves for probing quantum chemical effects in experiments on length scales much inflated as compared to a standard molecular situation.

  13. Changes in sitting posture induce multiplanar changes in chest wall shape and motion with breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda-Joy; Chang, Angela T; Coppieters, Michel W; Hodges, Paul W

    2010-03-31

    This study examined the effect of sitting posture on regional chest wall shape in three dimensions, chest wall motion (measured with electromagnetic motion analysis system), and relative contributions of the ribcage and abdomen to tidal volume (%RC/V(t)) (measured with inductance plethysmography) in 7 healthy volunteers. In seven seated postures, increased dead space breathing automatically increased V(t) (to 1.5 V(t)) to match volume between conditions and study the effects of posture independent of volume changes. %RC/V(t) (pplane changes in sitting posture alter three-dimensional ribcage configuration and chest wall kinematics during breathing, while maintaining constant respiratory function. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A comparison of colour, shape, and flash induced illusory line motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Jeff P

    2017-04-01

    When a bar suddenly appears between two boxes, the bar will appear to shoot away from the box that matches it in colour or in shape-a phenomenon referred to as attribute priming of illusory line motion (ILM; colour ILM and shape ILM, respectively). If the two boxes are identical, ILM will still occur away from a box if it changes luminance shortly before the presentation of the bar ( flash ILM). This flash condition has been suggested to produce the illusory motion due to the formation of an attentional gradient surrounding the flashed location. However, colour ILM and shape ILM cannot be explained by an attentional gradient as there is no way for attention to select the matching box prior to the presentation of the bar. These findings challenge the attentional gradient explanation for ILM, but only if it is assumed that ILM arises for the same underlying reason. Two experiments are presented that address the question of whether or not flash ILM is the same as colour ILM or shape ILM. The results suggest that while colour ILM and shape ILM reflect a common illusion, flash ILM arises for a different reason. Therefore, the attentional gradient explanation for flash ILM is not refuted by the occurrence of colour ILM or shape ILM, which may reflect transformational apparent motion (TAM).

  15. Langevin dynamics of conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Gorria, C.; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2009-01-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations in the conformational dynamics of a single closed filament is studied. It is shown that, due to the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom, initially circular chains may undergo transformation to polygonal shape.......The role of thermal fluctuations in the conformational dynamics of a single closed filament is studied. It is shown that, due to the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom, initially circular chains may undergo transformation to polygonal shape....

  16. Analyzing heavy-ion-induced charge collection in Si devices by three-dimensional simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodd, P.E.

    1994-01-01

    Properties of charge collection in Si devices in response to single-ion bombardment have been studied using transient three-dimensional drift-diffusion simulation. In unloaded Si diodes, the funnel effect is particularly strong in lightly-doped materials for high-density strikes such as 100 MeV Fe, and essentially all charge collection is by funnel-assisted drift. This drift collection may occur at time scales as late as several nanoseconds, much later than is traditionally associated with drift. For more heavily-doped materials or lower-density strikes, such as 5-MeV α-particles, drift and diffusion play more equal roles. In epitaxial structures the funnel is truncated by the heavily-doped substrate, collapses quickly, and a great deal of charge is collected at late times by diffusion. Charge collection in Si circuitry is influenced by the circuit external to the struck device. Loading effects on charge collection were studied using passive external circuit elements as well as by mixed-mode simulation, which allows modeling of active external circuitry. Simulations indicate that the funnel can be significantly affected by the inclusion of passive loads, while active loads may prevent any direct charge collection by funneling. Finally, the use of three-dimensional device simulators is presented as a method of analyzing results obtained from focused ion microbeam experiments

  17. Current-induced domain wall motion in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} nanowires with low depinning fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, Gregory; Loerincz, Andreas; Krzyk, Stephen; Moehrke, Philipp; Bedau, Daniel; Boulle, Olivier; Rhensius, Jan; Klaeui, Mathias [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstrasse 10, D-78457 (Germany); Heyderman, Laura J [Laboratory for Micro- and Nanotechnology, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Cho, Young Jin; Seo, Sunae, E-mail: gregory.malinowski@uni-konstanz.d [Samsung Electronics, San 14-1 Nongseo-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-03

    In this paper, we report on domain wall (DW) motion induced by current pulses at variable temperature in 900 nm wide and 25 nm thick Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} wires with low pinning fields. By using Ar ion milling to pattern our wires rather than the conventional lift-off technique, a depinning field as low as {approx}2-3 Oe at room temperature is obtained. Comparison with previous results acquired on similar wires with much higher pinning shows that the critical current density scales with the depinning field, leading to a critical current density of {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 11} A m{sup -2} at 250 K. Moreover, when a current pulse with a current density larger than the critical current density is injected, the DW is not necessarily depinned but it can undergo a modification of its spin structure which hinders current-induced DW motion. Hence, reliable propagation of the DW requires an accurate adjustment of the pulsed current density.

  18. Microscale solution manipulation using photopolymerized hydrogel membranes and induced charge electroosmosis micropumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paustian, Joel Scott

    Microfluidic technology is playing an ever-expanding role in advanced chemical and biological devices, with diverse applications including medical diagnostics, high throughput research tools, chemical or biological detection, separations, and controlled particle fabrication. Even so, local (microscale) modification of solution properties within microchannels, such as pressure, solute concentration, and voltage remains a challenge, and improved spatiotemporal control would greatly enhance the capabilities of microfluidics. This thesis demonstrates and characterizes two microfluidic tools to enhance local solution control. I first describe a microfluidic pump that uses an electrokinetic effect, Induced-Charge Electroosmosis (ICEO), to generate pressure on-chip. In ICEO, steady flows are driven by AC fields along metal-electrolyte interfaces. I design and microfabricate a pump that exploits this effect to generate on-chip pressures. The ICEO pump is used to drive flow along a microchannel, and the pressure is measured as a function of voltage, frequency, and electrolyte composition. This is the first demonstration of chip-scale flows driven by ICEO, which opens the possibility for ICEO pumping in self-contained microfluidic devices. Next, I demonstrate a method to create thin local membranes between microchannels, which enables local diffusive delivery of solute. These ``Hydrogel Membrane Microwindows'' are made by photopolymerizing a hydrogel which serves as a local ``window'' for solute diffusion and electromigration between channels, but remains a barrier to flow. I demonstrate three novel experimental capabilities enabled by the hydrogel membranes: local concentration gradients, local electric currents, and rapid diffusive composition changes. I conclude by applying the hydrogel membranes to study solvophoresis, the migration of particles in solvent gradients. Solvent gradients are present in many chemical processes, but migration of particles within these

  19. Simple motion correction strategy reduces respiratory-induced motion artifacts for k-t accelerated and compressed-sensing cardiovascular magnetic resonance perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruixi; Huang, Wei; Yang, Yang; Chen, Xiao; Weller, Daniel S; Kramer, Christopher M; Kozerke, Sebastian; Salerno, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) stress perfusion imaging provides important diagnostic and prognostic information in coronary artery disease (CAD). Current clinical sequences have limited temporal and/or spatial resolution, and incomplete heart coverage. Techniques such as k-t principal component analysis (PCA) or k-t sparcity and low rank structure (SLR), which rely on the high degree of spatiotemporal correlation in first-pass perfusion data, can significantly accelerate image acquisition mitigating these problems. However, in the presence of respiratory motion, these techniques can suffer from significant degradation of image quality. A number of techniques based on non-rigid registration have been developed. However, to first approximation, breathing motion predominantly results in rigid motion of the heart. To this end, a simple robust motion correction strategy is proposed for k-t accelerated and compressed sensing (CS) perfusion imaging. A simple respiratory motion compensation (MC) strategy for k-t accelerated and compressed-sensing CMR perfusion imaging to selectively correct respiratory motion of the heart was implemented based on linear k-space phase shifts derived from rigid motion registration of a region-of-interest (ROI) encompassing the heart. A variable density Poisson disk acquisition strategy was used to minimize coherent aliasing in the presence of respiratory motion, and images were reconstructed using k-t PCA and k-t SLR with or without motion correction. The strategy was evaluated in a CMR-extended cardiac torso digital (XCAT) phantom and in prospectively acquired first-pass perfusion studies in 12 subjects undergoing clinically ordered CMR studies. Phantom studies were assessed using the Structural Similarity Index (SSIM) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE). In patient studies, image quality was scored in a blinded fashion by two experienced cardiologists. In the phantom experiments, images reconstructed with the MC strategy had higher

  20. Crossover from band-like to thermally activated charge transport in organic transistors due to strain-induced traps

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Yaochuan

    2017-08-02

    The temperature dependence of the charge-carrier mobility provides essential insight into the charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors. Such knowledge imparts critical understanding of the electrical properties of these materials, leading to better design of high-performance materials for consumer applications. Here, we present experimental results that suggest that the inhomogeneous strain induced in organic semiconductor layers by the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of the consecutive device layers of field-effect transistors generates trapping states that localize charge carriers. We observe a universal scaling between the activation energy of the transistors and the interfacial thermal expansion mismatch, in which band-like transport is observed for similar CTEs, and activated transport otherwise. Our results provide evidence that a high-quality semiconductor layer is necessary, but not sufficient, to obtain efficient charge-carrier transport in devices, and underline the importance of holistic device design to achieve the intrinsic performance limits of a given organic semiconductor. We go on to show that insertion of an ultrathin CTE buffer layer mitigates this problem and can help achieve band-like transport on a wide range of substrate platforms.

  1. Crossover from band-like to thermally activated charge transport in organic transistors due to strain-induced traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yaochuan; Diemer, Peter J; Niazi, Muhammad R; Hallani, Rawad K; Jarolimek, Karol; Day, Cynthia S; Risko, Chad; Anthony, John E; Amassian, Aram; Jurchescu, Oana D

    2017-08-15

    The temperature dependence of the charge-carrier mobility provides essential insight into the charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors. Such knowledge imparts critical understanding of the electrical properties of these materials, leading to better design of high-performance materials for consumer applications. Here, we present experimental results that suggest that the inhomogeneous strain induced in organic semiconductor layers by the mismatch between the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of the consecutive device layers of field-effect transistors generates trapping states that localize charge carriers. We observe a universal scaling between the activation energy of the transistors and the interfacial thermal expansion mismatch, in which band-like transport is observed for similar CTEs, and activated transport otherwise. Our results provide evidence that a high-quality semiconductor layer is necessary, but not sufficient, to obtain efficient charge-carrier transport in devices, and underline the importance of holistic device design to achieve the intrinsic performance limits of a given organic semiconductor. We go on to show that insertion of an ultrathin CTE buffer layer mitigates this problem and can help achieve band-like transport on a wide range of substrate platforms.

  2. Characterization and correction of charge-induced pixel shifts in DECam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruen, D.; Bernstein, G. M.; Jarvis, M.; Rowe, B.; Vikram, V.; Plazas, A. A.; Seitz, S.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of charges in CCDs with the already accumulated charge distribution causes both a flux dependence of the point-spread function (an increase of observed size with flux, also known as the brighter/fatter effect) and pixel-to-pixel correlations of the {Poissonian} noise in flat fields. We describe these effects in the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) with charge dependent shifts of effective pixel borders, i.e. the Antilogus et al. (2014) model, which we fit to measurements of flat-field {Poissonian} noise correlations. The latter fall off approximately as a power-law r(-)(2.5) with pixel separation r, are isotropic except for an asymmetry in the direct neighbors along rows and columns, are stable in time, and are weakly dependent on wavelength. They show variations from chip to chip at the 20% level that correlate with the silicon resistivity. The charge shifts predicted by the model cause biased shape measurements, primarily due to their effect on bright stars, at levels exceeding weak lensing science requirements. We measure the flux dependence of star images and show that the effect can be mitigated by applying the reverse charge shifts at the pixel level during image processing. Differences in stellar size, however, remain significant due to residuals at larger distance from the centroid.

  3. Excitation Functions for Charged Particle Induced Reactions in Light Elements at Low Projectile Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, J.; Brune, D.

    1973-01-01

    The present chapter has been formulated with the aim of making it useful in various fields of nuclear applications with emphasis on charged particle activation analysis. Activation analysis of light elements using charged particles has proved to be an important tool in solving various problems in analytical chemistry, e g those associated with metal surfaces. Scientists desiring to evaluate the distribution of light elements in the surface of various matrices using charged particle reactions require accurate data on cross sections in the MeV-region. A knowledge of cross section data and yield-functions is of great interest in many applied fields involving work with charged particles, such as radiological protection and health physics, material research, semiconductor material investigations and corrosion chemistry. The authors therefore decided to collect a limited number of data which find use in these fields. Although the compilation is far from being complete, it is expected to be of assistance in devising measurements of charged particle reactions in Van de Graaff or other low energy accelerators

  4. Properties of a radiation-induced charge multiplication region in epitaxial silicon diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, Jörn; Fretwurst, Eckhart; Klanner, Robert; Lindström, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Charge multiplication (CM) in p$^+$n epitaxial silicon pad diodes of 75, 100 and 150 $\\upmu$m thickness at high voltages after proton irradiation with 1 MeV neutron equivalent fluences in the order of $10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ was studied as an option to overcome the strong trapping of charge carriers in the innermost tracking region of future Super-LHC detectors. Charge collection efficiency (CCE) measurements using the Transient Current Technique (TCT) with radiation of different penetration (670, 830, 1060 nm laser light and $\\alpha$-particles with optional absorbers) were used to locate the CM region close to the p$^+$-implantation. The dependence of CM on material, thickness of the epitaxial layer, annealing and temperature was studied. The collected charge in the CM regime was found to be proportional to the deposited charge, uniform over the diode area and stable over a period of several days. Randomly occurring micro discharges at high voltages turned out to be the largest challenge for operation of the dio...

  5. Excitation Functions for Charged Particle Induced Reactions in Light Elements at Low Projectile Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzen, J; Brune, D

    1973-07-01

    The present chapter has been formulated with the aim of making it useful in various fields of nuclear applications with emphasis on charged particle activation analysis. Activation analysis of light elements using charged particles has proved to be an important tool in solving various problems in analytical chemistry, e g those associated with metal surfaces. Scientists desiring to evaluate the distribution of light elements in the surface of various matrices using charged particle reactions require accurate data on cross sections in the MeV-region. A knowledge of cross section data and yield-functions is of great interest in many applied fields involving work with charged particles, such as radiological protection and health physics, material research, semiconductor material investigations and corrosion chemistry. The authors therefore decided to collect a limited number of data which find use in these fields. Although the compilation is far from being complete, it is expected to be of assistance in devising measurements of charged particle reactions in Van de Graaff or other low energy accelerators

  6. Pump laser-induced space-charge effects in HHG-driven time- and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oloff, L.-P., E-mail: oloff@physik.uni-kiel.de; Hanff, K.; Stange, A.; Rohde, G.; Diekmann, F.; Bauer, M.; Rossnagel, K., E-mail: rossnagel@physik.uni-kiel.de [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-06-14

    With the advent of ultrashort-pulsed extreme ultraviolet sources, such as free-electron lasers or high-harmonic-generation (HHG) sources, a new research field for photoelectron spectroscopy has opened up in terms of femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The impact of the high peak brilliance of these novel sources on photoemission spectra, so-called vacuum space-charge effects caused by the Coulomb interaction among the photoemitted probe electrons, has been studied extensively. However, possible distortions of the energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons caused by the low photon energy pump pulse due to the nonlinear emission of electrons have not been studied in detail yet. Here, we systematically investigate these pump laser-induced space-charge effects in a HHG-based experiment for the test case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Specifically, we determine how the key parameters of the pump pulse—the excitation density, wavelength, spot size, and emitted electron energy distribution—affect the measured time-dependent energy and momentum distributions of the probe photoelectrons. The results are well reproduced by a simple mean-field model, which could open a path for the correction of pump laser-induced space-charge effects and thus toward probing ultrafast electron dynamics in strongly excited materials.

  7. Fragmentation study of isolated and nano-solvated biomolecules induced by collision with multiply charged ions and neutral particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernigaud, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns a gas phase study of the fragmentation of bio-molecular systems induced by slow collisions with multiply charged ions (in the keV-region), alkali atoms and rare gases. The main objective was to study the physical processes involved in the dissociation of highly electronically excited systems. In order to elucidate the intrinsic properties of certain biomolecules (porphyrins and amino acids) we have performed experiments in the gas phase with isolated systems. The obtained results demonstrate the high stability of porphyrins after electron removal and attachment. Furthermore, a dependence of the fragmentation pattern produced by multiply charged ions on the isomeric structure of the alanine molecule has been shown. In a second part of the thesis, a strong influence of the environment of the biomolecule on the fragmentation channels, their modification and their new opening, has been clearly proven. This phenomenon occurs in the presence of other surrounding biomolecules (clusters of nucleobases) as well as for molecules of a solvent (molecules of water, methanol and acetonitrile) in which the biomolecule is embedded. In order to extend these studies to larger systems, a new experimental set-up, based on an electro-spray ion source combined with a quadrupole mass filter has been developed. Due to the successful tests and proposed improvements of the device future experiments will become available concerning the fragmentation of large charged and solvated bio-molecular systems induced by collision processes. (author) [fr

  8. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  9. Beam-induced motion correction for sub-megadalton cryo-EM particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheres, Sjors Hw

    2014-08-13

    In electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM), the electron beam that is used for imaging also causes the sample to move. This motion blurs the images and limits the resolution attainable by single-particle analysis. In a previous Research article (Bai et al., 2013) we showed that correcting for this motion by processing movies from fast direct-electron detectors allowed structure determination to near-atomic resolution from 35,000 ribosome particles. In this Research advance article, we show that an improved movie processing algorithm is applicable to a much wider range of specimens. The new algorithm estimates straight movement tracks by considering multiple particles that are close to each other in the field of view, and models the fall-off of high-resolution information content by radiation damage in a dose-dependent manner. Application of the new algorithm to four data sets illustrates its potential for significantly improving cryo-EM structures, even for particles that are smaller than 200 kDa. Copyright © 2014, Scheres.

  10. Proton exchange in acid–base complexes induced by reaction coordinates with heavy atom motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, Saman; Taghikhani, Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Proton exchange in acid–base complexes is studied. ► The structures, binding energies, and normal mode vibrations are calculated. ► Transition state structures of proton exchange mechanism are determined. ► In the complexes studied, the reaction coordinate involves heavy atom rocking. ► The reaction coordinate is not simply localized in the proton movements. - Abstract: We extend previous work on nitric acid–ammonia and nitric acid–alkylamine complexes to illustrate that proton exchange reaction coordinates involve the rocking motion of the base moiety in many double hydrogen-bonded gas phase strong acid–strong base complexes. The complexes studied involve the biologically and atmospherically relevant glycine, formic, acetic, propionic, and sulfuric acids with ammonia/alkylamine bases. In these complexes, the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies associated with the proton exchange transition states are −1 . This contrasts with widely studied proton exchange reactions between symmetric carboxylic acid dimers or asymmetric DNA base pair and their analogs where the reaction coordinate is localized in proton motions and the magnitude of the imaginary frequencies for the transition states are >1100 cm −1 . Calculations on complexes of these acids with water are performed for comparison. Variations of normal vibration modes along the reaction coordinate in the complexes are described.

  11. Comparison of the ion induced charge collection in Si epilayer and SOI devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Toshio; Mori, Hidenobu; Laird, Jamie Stuart; Onoda, Shinobu; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    2003-01-01

    It is known that the single-event phenomena (SEP) are the malfunction of micro electronics devices caused by the impact of an energetic heavy ion. Improving the tolerance of devices to the SEP requires a better understanding of basic charge collection mechanisms on the timescales of the order of picoseconds. In order to better elucidate these mechanisms, we measure the fast transient current resulting from heavy ion strikes with a fast sampling data collection system and a heavy ion microbeam line at JAERI. In this paper we report on differences in both the transient current and charge collection from 15 MeV carbon ions on silicon-on-insulator, Si epilayer and bulk p + n junction diodes and charge transportation under MeV ion injection is discussed

  12. Emission of high-energy charged particles at 00 in Ne-induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borcea, C.; Gierlik, E.; Kalinin, A.M.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Oganessia, Yu.Ts.; Pawlat, T.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E.; Ryakhlyuk, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    Inclusive energy spectra have been measured for light charged particles emitted in the bombardment of 232 Th, 181 Ta, sup(nat)Ti and 12 C targets by 22 Ne ions at 178 MeV and sup(nat)Ti target by 20 Ne ions at 196 MeV. The reaction products were analysed and detected by means of a ΔE-E telescope placed in the focal plane of a magnetic spectrometer located at an angle of 0 deg with respect to the beam direction. In all the reactions studied light charged particles with an energy close to the respective calculated kinematic limit for a two-body exit channel are produced with relatively great probability. The results obtained make it possible to draw some conclusions about the reaction mechanism involving the emission of light charged particles

  13. Charge migration induced by attosecond pulses in bio-relevant molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegari, Francesca; Castrovilli, Mattea C; Nisoli, Mauro; Trabattoni, Andrea; Palacios, Alicia; Ayuso, David; Martín, Fernando; Greenwood, Jason B; Decleva, Piero

    2016-01-01

    After sudden ionization of a large molecule, the positive charge can migrate throughout the system on a sub-femtosecond time scale, purely guided by electronic coherences. The possibility to actively explore the role of the electron dynamics in the photo-chemistry of bio-relevant molecules is of fundamental interest for understanding, and perhaps ultimately controlling, the processes leading to damage, mutation and, more generally, to the alteration of the biological functions of the macromolecule. Attosecond laser sources can provide the extreme time resolution required to follow this ultrafast charge flow. In this review we will present recent advances in attosecond molecular science: after a brief description of the results obtained for small molecules, recent experimental and theoretical findings on charge migration in bio-relevant molecules will be discussed. (topical review)

  14. Model of electric field-induced charge disordering in praseodymium manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapinskas, S.; Tornau, E.E.; Semiconductor Physics Inst., Vilnius

    2001-01-01

    We propose a model for an electric field-driven transition from the ordered NaCl-type phase to the disordered phase. Such a transition might be a prototype of charge disordering transition observed in Pr 1-c Ca c MnO 3 . We assume the lattice-gas model and hopping conductivity of charge carriers. The solution of this model, performed by the Monte Carlo method, demonstrates that considerably high electric field can disorder well-ordered phases. The comparison with the data for charge disordering in Pr 1-c Ca c MnO 3 shows that required fields are much too high. We analyze the obtained results trying to determine a possible scenario for conductivity in Pr 1-c Ca c MnO 3 . (orig.)

  15. Orbit-Attitude Changes of Objects in Near Earth Space Induced by Natural Charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-02

    Program Manager Technical Advisor, Spacecraft Component Technology //SIGNED// JOHN BEAUCHEMIN Chief Engineer, Spacecraft Technology Division...istration (NASA) and the US Air Force to investigate the effects of charging and develop technologies to mitigate the same. Accumulated charges may...e2 [ Sesin f +T (1+ ecos f ) ] (217a) de dt = √ 1− e2 na [ S sin f +T (cos f + cosE) ] (217b) di dt = r cos(ω + f ) na2 √ 1− e2 W (217c) dΩ dt = r sin

  16. Higher-order geodesic deviation for charged particles and resonance induced by gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari-Fard, M.; Hasani, S. N.

    We generalize the higher-order geodesic deviation for the structure-less test particles to the higher-order geodesic deviation equations of the charged particles [R. Kerner, J. W. van Holten and R. Colistete Jr., Class. Quantum Grav. 18 (2001) 4725]. By solving these equations for charged particles moving in a constant magnetic field in the spacetime of a gravitational wave, we show for both cases when the gravitational wave is parallel and perpendicular to the constant magnetic field, a magnetic resonance appears at wg = Ω. This feature might be useful to detect the gravitational wave with high frequencies.

  17. Charge-exchange-induced formation of hollow atoms in high-intensity laser-produced plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosmej, F.B. [TU-Darmstadt, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Magunov, A.I.; Skobelev, I.Yu. [Multicharged Ions Spectra Data Center of VNIIFTRI, Mendeleevo (Russian Federation); Auguste, T.; D' Oliveira, P.; Hulin, S.; Monot, P. [Commissariat a lEnergie Atomique DSM/DRECAM/SPAM, Gif-Sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Andreev, N.E.; Chegotov, M.V.; Veisman, M.E. [High Energy Density Research Centre, Institute of High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-03-14

    For the first time registration of high-resolution soft x-ray emission and atomic data calculations of hollow-atom dielectronic satellite spectra of highly charged nitrogen have been performed. Double-electron charge-exchange processes from excited states are proposed for the formation of autoionizing levels nln'l' in high-intensity laser-produced plasmas, when field-ionized ions penetrate into the residual gas. Good agreement is found between theory and experiment. Plasma spectroscopy with hollow ions is proposed and a temperature diagnostic for laser-produced plasmas in the long-lasting recombining regime is developed. (author). Letter-to-the-editor.

  18. Charge generation and trapping in bisphenol-A-polycarbonate/N-isopropylcarbazole mixture: A study by electron bombardment-induced conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, S.; Caraballo, D.

    2007-01-01

    Electron bombardment-induced conductivity measurements were carried out on cast films of N-isopropylcarbazole (NIPC) dispersed into an amorphous matrix of bisphenol-A-polycarbonate. The charge generation was studied by estimating the hole yield (g), the fraction of charge escaping recombination, as a function of electric field and concentration of NIPC at room temperature. The hole yield, besides increasing by increasing the content of NIPC, was observed to increase with the electric field in the manner predicted by the Onsager theory of geminate recombination. Deep trapping levels were studied by filling under electron bombardment and observing transients. The deep traps were neutral in nature with a concentration on the order of 8.0x10 14 cm -3 , which was low enough not to degrade transport under normal conditions

  19. Low to High Spin-State Transition Induced by Charge Ordering in Antiferromagnetic YBaCo2O5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, T.; Woodward, P. M.; Karen, P.; Hunter, B. A.; Henning, P.; Moodenbaugh, A. R.

    2000-01-01

    The oxygen-deficient double perovskite YBaCo 2 O 5 , containing corner-linked CoO 5 square pyramids as principal building units, undergoes a paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic spin ordering at 330 K. This is accompanied by a tetragonal to orthorhombic distortion. Below 220 K orbital ordering and long-range Co 2+ /Co 3+ charge ordering occur as well as a change in the Co 2+ spin state from low to high spin. This transition is shown to be very sensitive to the oxygen content of the sample. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a spin-state transition induced by long-range orbital and charge ordering. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  20. Device intended for measurement of induced trapped charge in insulating materials under electron irradiation in a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belkorissat, R; Benramdane, N; Jbara, O; Rondot, S; Hadjadj, A; Belhaj, M

    2013-01-01

    A device for simultaneously measuring two currents (i.e. leakage and displacement currents) induced in insulating materials under electron irradiation has been built. The device, suitably mounted on the sample holder of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), allows a wider investigation of charging and discharging phenomena that take place in any type of insulator during its electron irradiation and to determine accurately the corresponding time constants. The measurement of displacement current is based on the principle of the image charge due to the electrostatic influence phenomena. We are reporting the basic concept and test results of the device that we have built using, among others, the finite element method for its calibration. This last method takes into account the specimen chamber geometry, the geometry of the device and the physical properties of the sample. In order to show the possibilities of the designed device, various applications under different experimental conditions are explored. (paper)

  1. Evaluation of adaptation to visually induced motion sickness based on the maximum cross-correlation between pulse transmission time and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiba Shigeru

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computer graphics and virtual reality techniques are useful to develop automatic and effective rehabilitation systems. However, a kind of virtual environment including unstable visual images presented to wide field screen or a head mounted display tends to induce motion sickness. The motion sickness induced in using a rehabilitation system not only inhibits effective training but also may harm patients' health. There are few studies that have objectively evaluated the effects of the repetitive exposures to these stimuli on humans. The purpose of this study is to investigate the adaptation to visually induced motion sickness by physiological data. Methods An experiment was carried out in which the same video image was presented to human subjects three times. We evaluated changes of the intensity of motion sickness they suffered from by a subjective score and the physiological index ρmax, which is defined as the maximum cross-correlation coefficient between heart rate and pulse wave transmission time and is considered to reflect the autonomic nervous activity. Results The results showed adaptation to visually-induced motion sickness by the repetitive presentation of the same image both in the subjective and the objective indices. However, there were some subjects whose intensity of sickness increased. Thus, it was possible to know the part in the video image which related to motion sickness by analyzing changes in ρmax with time. Conclusion The physiological index, ρmax, will be a good index for assessing the adaptation process to visually induced motion sickness and may be useful in checking the safety of rehabilitation systems with new image technologies.

  2. Exercise induced effects on muscle function and range of motion in patients with hip osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bieler, Theresa; Siersma, Volkert; Magnusson, S Peter

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Patients with hip osteoarthritis have impairments in muscle function (muscle strength and power) and hip range of motion (ROM), and it is commonly believed that effective clinical management of osteoarthritis should address these impairments to reduce pain and disability......-two patients were randomized to either 4 months of physiotherapist-supervised, moderate, progressive, strength training (n = 50), physiotherapist-supervised NW (n = 50), or unsupervised HBE (n = 52). Maximal isometric hip and thigh muscle strength and leg extensor power and active hip ROM were assessed...... at baseline 2, 4, and 12 months. RESULTS: Intention-to-treat-analyses did not show any significant between-group differences for improvements in muscle strength and power or ROM at any time points. Short-term significant (p

  3. Influence of temperature on current-induced domain wall motion and its Walker breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Lvchao; Hu, Jingguo; Su, Yuanchang; Zhu, Jinrong

    2016-01-01

    The current-driven domain wall propagation along a thin ferromagnetic strip with thermal field is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. The results show that the velocity of domain wall is almost independent of temperature until Walker breakdown happened. However the thermal field can suppress Walker breakdown and makes domain wall move faster. Further analysis indicates that the thermal field tends to keep the out-of-plane magnetic moment of the domain wall stay in high value, which can promote domain wall motion and suppress the Walker breakdown by breaking the period of domain wall transformation. - Highlights: • Influences of temperature on the displacement and the velocity of DW are shown. • The suppression of Walker breakdown by temperature is given. • The reason for suppressing Walker breakdown is analyzed. • The breaking transformation period of Walker breakdown by temperature is given.

  4. Detecting free-mass common-mode motion induced by incident gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Michael Edmund; Suzuki, Toshikazu; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    1999-05-01

    In this paper we show that information on both the differential and common mode free-mass response to a gravitational wave can provide important information on discriminating the direction of the gravitational wave source and between different theories of gravitation. The conventional Michelson interferometer scheme only measures the differential free-mass response. By changing the orientation of the beam splitter, it is possible to configure the detector so it is sensitive to the common-mode of the free-mass motion. The proposed interferometer is an adaptation of the Fox-Smith interferometer. A major limitation to the new scheme is its enhanced sensitivity to laser frequency fluctuations over the conventional, and we propose a method of cancelling these fluctuations. The configuration could be used in parallel to the conventional differential detection scheme with a significant sensitivity and bandwidth.

  5. Temperature effect on protection diode for plasma-process induced charging damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Zhichun; Scarpa, A.; Smits, Sander M.; Kuper, F.G.; Salm, Cora

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the leakage current of different drain-well diodes for plasma-charging protection has been simulated at high temperature. The simulation shows that the high ambient temperature, especially during plasma deposition process, enormously enhances the efficacy of the protection diodes in

  6. Metallicity at interphase boundaries due to polar catastrophe induced by charge density discontinuity

    KAUST Repository

    Albar, Arwa; Tahini, Hassan Ali; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2018-01-01

    the electronic states at stoichiometric SnO/SnO2 (110) interphase boundaries. In this system, one would not expect polar catastrophe to have a role according to state-of-the-art theory because the interface lacks formal charge discontinuity. However, we observe

  7. Conformational transformations induced by the charge-curvature interaction at finite temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Gorria, Carlos; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    2008-01-01

    The role of thermal fluctuations on the conformational dynamics of a single closed filament is studied. It is shown that, due to the interaction between charges and bending degrees of freedom, initially circular aggregates may undergo transformation to polygonal shape. The transition occurs both...

  8. Photon induced non-linear quantized double layer charging in quaternary semiconducting quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Vishnu; Ananthoju, Balakrishna; Mohapatra, Jeotikanta; Aslam, M

    2018-03-15

    Room temperature quantized double layer charging was observed in 2 nm Cu 2 ZnSnS 4 (CZTS) quantum dots. In addition to this we observed a distinct non-linearity in the quantized double layer charging arising from UV light modulation of double layer. UV light irradiation resulted in a 26% increase in the integral capacitance at the semiconductor-dielectric (CZTS-oleylamine) interface of the quantum dot without any change in its core size suggesting that the cause be photocapacitive. The increasing charge separation at the semiconductor-dielectric interface due to highly stable and mobile photogenerated carriers cause larger electrostatic forces between the quantum dot and electrolyte leading to an enhanced double layer. This idea was supported by a decrease in the differential capacitance possible due to an enhanced double layer. Furthermore the UV illumination enhanced double layer gives us an AC excitation dependent differential double layer capacitance which confirms that the charging process is non-linear. This ultimately illustrates the utility of a colloidal quantum dot-electrolyte interface as a non-linear photocapacitor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Charge exchange induced X-ray transitions of hollow ions in laser field ionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosmej, F.B.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.A.; Magunov, A.I.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Auguste, T.; D'Oliveira, P.; Hulin, S.; Monot, P.

    2000-01-01

    Double electron charge exchange is proposed for the formation of hollow He-like ions when laser field ionized nuclei penetrate into the residual gas. Using transitions from different configurations in hollow ions a method for the determination of the electron temperature in the long lasting recombination phase is developed

  10. Plasma-induced evolution behavior of space-charge-limited current for multiple-needle cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Limin; Liu Lie; Zhang Jun; Wen Jianchun; Liu Yonggui; Wan Hong

    2009-01-01

    Properties of the plasma and beam flow produced by tufted carbon fiber cathodes in a diode powered by a ∼500 kV, ∼400 ns pulse are investigated. Under electric fields of 230-260 kV cm -1 , the electron current density was in the range 210-280 A cm -2 , and particularly at the diode gap of 20 mm, a maximum beam power density of about 120 MW cm -2 was obtained. It was found that space-charge-limited current exhibited an evolution behavior as the accelerating pulse proceeded. There exists a direct relation between the movement of plasma within the diode and the evolution of space-charge-limited current. Initially in the accelerating pulse, the application of strong electric fields caused the emission sites to explode, forming cathode flares or plasma spots, and in this stage the space-charge-limited current was approximately described by a multiple-needle cathode model. As the pulse proceeded, these plasma spots merged and expanded towards the anode, thus increasing the emission area and shortening the diode gap, and the corresponding space-charge-limited current followed a planar cathode model. Finally, the space-charge-limited current is developed from a unipolar flow into a bipolar flow as a result of the appearance of anode plasma. In spite of the nonuniform distribution of cathode plasma, the cross-sectional uniformity of the extracted electron beam is satisfactory. The plasma expansion within the diode is found to be a major factor in the diode perveance growth and instability. These results show that these types of cathodes can offer promising applications for high-power microwave tubes.

  11. Size-Induced Segregation in the Stepwise Microhydration of Hydantoin and Its Role in Proton-Induced Charge Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Florent; Bacchus-Montabonel, Marie-Christine

    2018-01-01

    Recent photochemistry experiments provided evidence for the formation of hydantoin by irradiation of interstellar ice analogues. The significance of these results and the importance of hydantoin in prebiotic chemistry and polypeptide synthesis motivate the present theoretical investigation, in which we analyzed the effects of stepwise hydration on the electronic and thermodynamical properties of the structure of microhydrated hydantoin using a variety of computational approaches. We generally find microhydration to proceed around the hydantoin heterocycle until 5 water molecules are reached, at which stage hydration becomes segregated with a water cluster forming aside the heterocycle. The reactivity of microhydrated hydantoin caused by an impinging proton was evaluated through charge transfer collision cross sections for microhydrated compounds but also for hydantoin on icy grains modeled using a cluster approach mimicking the true hexagonal ice surface. The effects of hydration on charge transfer efficiency are mostly significant when few water molecules are present, and they progressively weaken and stabilize in larger clusters. On the ice substrate, charge transfer essentially contributes to a global increase in the cross sections.

  12. Assessment of statistical uncertainty in the quantitative analysis of solid samples in motion using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabalin, L.M.; Gonzalez, A. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Ruiz, J. [Department of Applied Physics I, University of Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain); Laserna, J.J., E-mail: laserna@uma.e [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Malaga, E-29071 Malaga (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Statistical uncertainty in the quantitative analysis of solid samples in motion by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been assessed. For this purpose, a LIBS demonstrator was designed and constructed in our laboratory. The LIBS system consisted of a laboratory-scale conveyor belt, a compact optical module and a Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm. The speed of the conveyor belt was variable and could be adjusted up to a maximum speed of 2 m s{sup -1}. Statistical uncertainty in the analytical measurements was estimated in terms of precision (reproducibility and repeatability) and accuracy. The results obtained by LIBS on shredded scrap samples under real conditions have demonstrated that the analytical precision and accuracy of LIBS is dependent on the sample geometry, position on the conveyor belt and surface cleanliness. Flat, relatively clean scrap samples exhibited acceptable reproducibility and repeatability; by contrast, samples with an irregular shape or a dirty surface exhibited a poor relative standard deviation.

  13. Measurements with magnetic field in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using the motional Stark effect with laser induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The motional Stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (MSE-LIF) has been installed and tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. The MSE-LIF diagnostic will be capable of measuring radially resolved profiles of magnetic field magnitude or pitch angle in NSTX plasmas. The system includes a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam and a laser which excites the n = 2 to n = 3 transition. A viewing system has been implemented which will support up to 38 channels from the plasma edge to past the magnetic axis. First measurements of MSE-LIF signals in the presence of small applied magnetic fields in neutral gas are reported.

  14. Measurements with magnetic field in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using the motional Stark effect with laser induced fluorescence diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, E. L.; Levinton, F. M.

    2013-04-01

    The motional Stark effect with laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic (MSE-LIF) has been installed and tested on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. The MSE-LIF diagnostic will be capable of measuring radially resolved profiles of magnetic field magnitude or pitch angle in NSTX plasmas. The system includes a diagnostic neutral hydrogen beam and a laser which excites the n = 2 to n = 3 transition. A viewing system has been implemented which will support up to 38 channels from the plasma edge to past the magnetic axis. First measurements of MSE-LIF signals in the presence of small applied magnetic fields in neutral gas are reported.

  15. Assessment of statistical uncertainty in the quantitative analysis of solid samples in motion using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabalín, L. M.; González, A.; Ruiz, J.; Laserna, J. J.

    2010-08-01

    Statistical uncertainty in the quantitative analysis of solid samples in motion by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been assessed. For this purpose, a LIBS demonstrator was designed and constructed in our laboratory. The LIBS system consisted of a laboratory-scale conveyor belt, a compact optical module and a Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm. The speed of the conveyor belt was variable and could be adjusted up to a maximum speed of 2 m s - 1 . Statistical uncertainty in the analytical measurements was estimated in terms of precision (reproducibility and repeatability) and accuracy. The results obtained by LIBS on shredded scrap samples under real conditions have demonstrated that the analytical precision and accuracy of LIBS is dependent on the sample geometry, position on the conveyor belt and surface cleanliness. Flat, relatively clean scrap samples exhibited acceptable reproducibility and repeatability; by contrast, samples with an irregular shape or a dirty surface exhibited a poor relative standard deviation.

  16. Assessment of statistical uncertainty in the quantitative analysis of solid samples in motion using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabalin, L.M.; Gonzalez, A.; Ruiz, J.; Laserna, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Statistical uncertainty in the quantitative analysis of solid samples in motion by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been assessed. For this purpose, a LIBS demonstrator was designed and constructed in our laboratory. The LIBS system consisted of a laboratory-scale conveyor belt, a compact optical module and a Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm. The speed of the conveyor belt was variable and could be adjusted up to a maximum speed of 2 m s -1 . Statistical uncertainty in the analytical measurements was estimated in terms of precision (reproducibility and repeatability) and accuracy. The results obtained by LIBS on shredded scrap samples under real conditions have demonstrated that the analytical precision and accuracy of LIBS is dependent on the sample geometry, position on the conveyor belt and surface cleanliness. Flat, relatively clean scrap samples exhibited acceptable reproducibility and repeatability; by contrast, samples with an irregular shape or a dirty surface exhibited a poor relative standard deviation.

  17. Acute ECG changes and chest pain induced by neck motion in patients with cervical hernia--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, N; Bilge, M; Eryonucu, B; Cirak, B

    2000-10-01

    We report two cases of acute cervical angina and ECG changes induced by anteflexion of the head. Cervical angina is defined as chest pain that resembles true cardiac angina but originates from cervical discopathy with nerve root compression. In these patients, Prinzmetal's angina, valvular heart disease, congenital heart disease, left ventricular aneurysm, and cardiomyopathy were excluded. After all, the patient's chest pain was reproduced by anteflexion of head, at this time, their ECGs showed nonspecific ST-T changes in the inferior and anterior leads different from the basal ECG. ECG changes returned to normal when the patient's neck moved to the neutral position. To our knowledge, these are the first cases of cervical angina associated with acute ECG changes by neck motion.

  18. The interaction between liquid motion and mass transfer induced by single rising bubble via PIV/LIE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Kenjo; Yamamoto, Manabu; Sone, Daiji; Saito, Takayuki

    2009-01-01

    Deep understanding of gas-liquid two phase flows is essential for safe operation and high efficiency of nuclear reactors, chemical reactors and so on. In this study, we focus on the process of mass transfer induced by a single rising bubble. The mass transfer process of a zigzag ascending single bubble is investigated via LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) and PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry). From these results, we discuss the relationship between the mass transfer and the surrounding liquid motion of the single bubble. We examined single CO 2 -bubbles of 2-3 mm in equivalent diameter, which shows zigzagging motion in rest water. To directly visualize the dynamic mass transfer of CO 2 from the bubble surface to the surrounding liquid, HPTS (8-hydroxypyrene-1, 3, 6-trisulfonic acid) was used as a fluorescent substance for LIF. From LIF results, it was observed that the CO 2 -rich regions were spread by advective flow in the rest water as horseshoe-like vortices. From LIF results combined with the PIV results, it was observed that the horseshoe-like vortices were transported by the fast upward flow (buoyancy driven flow). Especially, in the case of a larger-diameter bubble with large shape oscillations, the high turbulence intensity (in a strict sense, fluctuation intensity of the liquid-phase velocity) was observed. The CO 2 -rich regions spread over a wide range by the strong flow. As a result, it is considered that the high turbulence intensity which was caused by the shape oscillations enhances the mass transportation from the bubble to the surrounding liquid. (author)

  19. An analysis of respiratory induced kidney motion on four-dimensional computed tomography and its implications for stereotactic kidney radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Pham, Daniel; Gill, Suki; Bressel, Mathias; Dang, Kim; Devereux, Thomas; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad

    2013-01-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is an emerging treatment modality for primary renal cell carcinoma. To account for respiratory-induced target motion, an internal target volume (ITV) concept is often used in treatment planning of SABR. The purpose of this study is to assess patterns of kidney motion and investigate potential surrogates of kidney displacement with the view of ITV verification during treatment. Datasets from 71 consecutive patients with free breathing four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) planning scans were included in this study. The displacement of the left and right hemi-diaphragm, liver dome and abdominal wall were measured and tested for correlation with the displacement of the both kidneys and patient breathing frequency. Nine patients were excluded due to severe banding artifact. Of 62 evaluable patients, the median age was 68 years, with 41 male patients and 21 female patients. The mean (range) of the maximum, minimum and average breathing frequency throughout the 4DCTs were 20.1 (11–38), 15.1 (9–24) and 17.3 (9–27.5) breaths per minute, respectively. The mean (interquartile range) displacement of the left and right kidneys was 0.74 cm (0.45-0.98 cm) and 0.75 cm (0.49-0.97) respectively. The amplitude of liver-dome motion was correlated with right kidney displacement (r=0.52, p<0.001), but not with left kidney displacement (p=0.796). There was a statistically significant correlation between the magnitude of right kidney displacement and that of abdominal displacement (r=0.36, p=0.004), but not the left kidney (r=0.24, p=0.056). Hemi-diaphragm displacements were correlated with kidney displacements respectively, with a weaker correlation for the left kidney/left diaphragm (r=0.45, [95% CI 0.22 to 0.63], p=<0.001) than for the right kidney/right diaphragm (r=0.57, [95% CI 0.37 to 0.72], p=<0.001). For the majority of patients, maximal left and right kidney displacement is subcentimeter in magnitude. The magnitude of

  20. Laser-Induced Motion of a Nanofluid in a Micro-Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran X. Phuoc

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Since a photon carries both energy and momentum, when it interacts with a particle, photon-particle energy and momentum transfer occur, resulting in mechanical forces acting on the particle. In this paper we report our theoretical study on the use of a laser beam to manipulate and control the flow of nanofluids in a micro-channel. We calculate the velocity induced by a laser beam for TiO2, Fe2O3, Al2O3 MgO, and SiO2 nanoparticles with water as the base fluid. The particle diameter is 50 nm and the laser beam is a 4 W continuous beam of 6 mm diameter and 532 nm wavelength. The results indicate that, as the particle moves, a significant volume of the surrounding water (up to about 8 particle diameters away from the particle surface is disturbed and dragged along with the moving particle. The results also show the effect of the particle refractive index on the particle velocity and the induced volume flow rate. The velocity and the volume flowrate induced by the TiO2 nanoparticle (refractive index n = 2.82 are about 0.552 mm/s and 9.86 fL, respectively, while those induced by SiO2 (n = 1.46 are only about 7.569 μm/s and 0.135, respectively.

  1. Assessing Respiration-Induced Tumor Motion and Internal Target Volume Using Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography for Radiotherapy of Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H. Helen; Balter, Peter; Tutt, Teresa; Choi, Bum; Zhang, Joy; Wang, Catherine; Chi, Melinda; Luo Dershan; Pan Tinsu; Hunjan, Sandeep; Starkschall, George; Rosen, Isaac; Prado, Karl; Liao Zhongxing; Chang, Joe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe; Dong Lei

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess three-dimensional tumor motion caused by respiration and internal target volume (ITV) for radiotherapy of lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Respiration-induced tumor motion was analyzed for 166 tumors from 152 lung cancer patients, 57.2% of whom had Stage III or IV non-small-cell lung cancer. All patients underwent four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) during normal breathing before treatment. The expiratory phase of 4DCT images was used as the reference set to delineate gross tumor volume (GTV). Gross tumor volumes on other respiratory phases and resulting ITVs were determined using rigid-body registration of 4DCT images. The association of GTV motion with various clinical and anatomic factors was analyzed statistically. Results: The proportions of tumors that moved >0.5 cm along the superior-inferior (SI), lateral, and anterior-posterior (AP) axes during normal breathing were 39.2%, 1.8%, and 5.4%, respectively. For 95% of the tumors, the magnitude of motion was less than 1.34 cm, 0.40 cm, and 0.59 cm along the SI, lateral, and AP directions. The principal component of tumor motion was in the SI direction, with only 10.8% of tumors moving >1.0 cm. The tumor motion was found to be associated with diaphragm motion, the SI tumor location in the lung, size of the GTV, and disease T stage. Conclusions: Lung tumor motion is primarily driven by diaphragm motion. The motion of locally advanced lung tumors is unlikely to exceed 1.0 cm during quiet normal breathing except for small lesions located in the lower half of the lung

  2. Respiration-correlated spiral CT: A method of measuring respiratory-induced anatomic motion for radiation treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, E.C.; Mageras, G.S.; Yorke, E.; Ling, C.C.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a method for generating CT images at multiple respiratory phases with a single spiral CT scan, referred to as respiratory-correlated spiral CT (RCCT). RCCT relies on a respiration wave form supplied by an external patient monitor. During acquisition this wave form is recorded along with the initiation time of the CT scan, so as to 'time stamp' each reconstructed slice with the phase of the respiratory cycle. By selecting the appropriate slices, a full CT image set is generated at several phases, typically 7-11 per cycle. The CT parameters are chosen to optimize the temporal resolution while minimizing the spatial gap between slices at successive respiratory cycles. Using a pitch of 0.5, a gantry rotation period of 1.5 s, and a 180 degree sign reconstruction algorithm results in ∼5 mm slice spacing at a given phase for typical respiration periods, and a respiratory motion within each slice that is acceptably small, particularly near end expiration or end inspiration where gated radiotherapy is to occur. We have performed validation measurements on a phantom with a moving sphere designed to simulate respiration-induced tumor motion. RCCT scans of the phantom at respiratory periods of 4, 5, and 6 s show good agreement of the sphere's motion with that observed under fluoroscopic imaging. The positional deviations in the sphere's centroid between RCCT and fluoroscopy are 1.1±0.9 mm in the transaxial direction (average over all scans at all phases ±1 s.d.) and 1.2±1.0 mm in the longitudinal direction. Reconstructed volumes match those expected on the basis of stationary-phantom scans to within 5% in all cases. The surface distortions of the reconstructed sphere, as quantified by deviations from a mathematical reference sphere, are similar to those from a stationary phantom scan and are correlated with the speed of the phantom. A RCCT scan of the phantom undergoing irregular motion, demonstrates that successful reconstruction can be achieved even with

  3. Pressure-induced charge ordering of LiV2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, K.; Hidaka, H.; Kotegawa, H.; Kobayashi, T.C.; Shimizu, K.; Harima, H.; Fujiwara, K.; Miyoshi, K.; Takeuchi, J.; Ohishi, Y.; Adachi, T.; Takata, M.; Nishibori, E.; Sakata, M.; Watanuki, T.; Shimomura, O.

    2005-01-01

    The powder X-ray diffraction experiments of LiV 2 O 4 have been performed at low temperature and high pressure using synchrotron radiation. In the isothermal experiment at 10K, the cubic-rhombohedral phase transition corresponding to the metal-insulator transition is found at around 13GPa. This transition seems to be due to charge ordering of V ions on the analogy of the metal-insulator transition in AlV 2 O 4

  4. Electromagnetically-induced nuclear-charge pickup observed in ultra-relativistic Pb collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheidenberger, C.; Aumann, T.; Pshenichnov, I.A.; Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow

    2002-01-01

    A strong increase of inclusive nuclear-charge pickup cross sections, forming 83 Bi from 158 A GeV 82 Pb ions, is observed in comparison to similar measurements at 10.6 A GeV. From the dependence of these cross sections on target atomic number, this increase is attributed to the electromagnetic process of pion production by equivalent photons. The observed cross sections can be reproduced quantitatively using the recently developed RELDIS code. (orig.)

  5. Identification and spectrometry of charged particles produced in reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellem, C.; Perroud, J.P.; Loude, J.F.

    1975-01-01

    A counter telescope consisting of gas proportional counters, a thin semiconductor detector and a thick one has been built and used for the study of the angular differential cross sections of (n, charged particles) reactions induced by 14 MeV neutrons. Detection of the α-particles emitted in the neutron production reaction 3 H(d,n) 4 He gives a time reference for the measurement of the time of flight of the charged particles and allows a precise monitoring of the intensity of the neutron beam. High energy protons, deuterons and tritons are identified by their energy losses in the thin semiconductor detector and in the thick one and by their time of flight. Low energy protons, deuterons, tritons and all α-particles stop in the thin semiconductor detector and are identified by their energy losses in this detector and in one gas proportional counter as well as by their time of flight. It is possible to identify and to measure the energy of all charged particles in the energy range of 2 to 15 MeV: a very low background results from the use of the time of flight. (Auth.)

  6. Transmutation prospect of long-lived nuclear waste induced by high-charge electron beam from laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. L.; Xu, Z. Y.; Luo, W.; Lu, H. Y.; Zhu, Z. C.; Yan, X. Q.

    2017-09-01

    Photo-transmutation of long-lived nuclear waste induced by a high-charge relativistic electron beam (e-beam) from a laser plasma accelerator is demonstrated. A collimated relativistic e-beam with a high charge of approximately 100 nC is produced from high-intensity laser interaction with near-critical-density (NCD) plasma. Such e-beam impinges on a high-Z convertor and then radiates energetic bremsstrahlung photons with flux approaching 1011 per laser shot. Taking a long-lived radionuclide 126Sn as an example, the resulting transmutation reaction yield is the order of 109 per laser shot, which is two orders of magnitude higher than obtained from previous studies. It is found that at lower densities, a tightly focused laser irradiating relatively longer NCD plasmas can effectively enhance the transmutation efficiency. Furthermore, the photo-transmutation is generalized by considering mixed-nuclide waste samples, which suggests that the laser-accelerated high-charge e-beam could be an efficient tool to transmute long-lived nuclear waste.

  7. The adsorption-desorption transition of double-stranded DNA interacting with an oppositely charged dendrimer induced by multivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yangwei; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Yaoyang; Deng, Zhenyu; Zhang, Linxi

    2014-05-28

    The adsorption-desorption transition of DNA in DNA-dendrimer solutions is observed when high-valence anions, such as hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions. In the DNA-dendrimer solutions with low-valence anions, dendrimers bind tightly with the V-shaped double-stranded DNA. When high-valence anions, such as pentavalent or hexavalent anions, are added to the DNA-dendrimer solutions, the double-stranded DNA chains can be stretched straightly and the dendrimers are released from the double-stranded DNA chains. In fact, adding high-valence anions to the solutions can change the charge spatial distribution in the DNA-dendrimer solutions, and weaken the electrostatic interactions between the positively charged dendrimers and the oppositely charged DNA chains. Adsorption-desorption transition of DNA is induced by the overcharging of dendrimers. This investigation is capable of helping us understand how to control effectively the release of DNA in gene/drug delivery because an effective gene delivery for dendrimers includes non-covalent DNA-dendrimer binding and the effective release of DNA in gene therapy.

  8. In vitro cellular transformation induced by charged particles of defined LET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hei, T.K.; Hall, E.J.; Komatsu, K.; Goldhagen, P.

    1985-01-01

    Cytotoxicity and neoplastic transformation were scored in the C/sub 3/H 10T1/2 cell system following irradiation with protons, deuterons and helium-3 ions of defined LET in the track segment mode. The charged particles were accelerated at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at the Nevis Laboratories of Columbia University and provided a range of LET values from 10 to 175 keV/μm. Exponential phase cultures of C3H 10T1/2 cells, growing on a thin mylar surface were irradiated with charged particles of various LET values and subsequently replated onto commercial plastic petri dishes. The cultures were incubated for six weeks at which time they were fixed, stained and type II and III scored as transformants. Over the range of LET values studied thus far, it was found that as the LET of the charged particles increased, the shoulder of the survival curves decreased and approached an exponential function of dose at LET values of 100 keV/μm and above. The transformation incidence, likewise, showed a direct correlation with LET over the dose ranges examined

  9. Novel probe of charge symmetry breaking: Deuteron-induced deuteron breakup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, C.R.; Felsher, P.D.; Tornow, W.; Roberts, M.L.; Hanly, J.M.; Weisel, G.J.; Al Ohali, M.; Walter, R.L.; Slaus, I.; Lambert, J.M.; Treado, P.A.; Mertens, G.

    1993-01-01

    The present paper identifies unique symmetry properties of the rvec d+d→d+p+n breakup reaction that make it an excellent probe for studying charge-symmetry breaking. Measurements were made for two configurations of the ejected particles in the breakup reaction to obtain values of the spin observables A y , A yy , and A zz . These observables are compared for the mirror reactions 2 H(rvec d,dp)n and 2 H(rvec d,dn)p for the two angle pairs (θ d ,φ d ,θ N ,φ N )=(17.0 degree,0 degree,17.0 degree,180 degree) and (17.0 degree,0 degree,34.5 degree,180 degree) for an incident deutron energy of 12 MeV. In addition, spin observables for the 2 H(rvec d,pn)d reaction at θ p =θ n and φ p =φ n +180 degree are shown to provide a particularly good test of charge symmetry. Our A y , A yy , and A zz data for the 2 H(rvec d,pn)d reaction at (θ p ,φ p ,θ n ,φ n )=(17.0 degree,0 degree,17.0 degree,180 degree) are used to illustrate this latter point. Of the ten charge-symmetric sets of observables measured, two were found to differ by 2.5 standard deviations

  10. Selecting ground-motion models developed for induced seismicity in geothermal areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Benjamin; Douglas, John

    2013-11-01

    We present a case study of the ranking and weighting of ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) for seismic hazard assessment of enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs). The study region is Cooper Basin (Australia), where a hot-fractured-rock project was established in 2002. We test the applicability of 36 GMPEs based on stochastic simulations previously proposed for use at EGSs. Each GMPE has a set of corresponding model parameters describing stress drop, regional and local (near-surface) attenuation. To select suitable GMPEs for Cooper Basin from the full set, we applied two methods. In the first, seismograms recorded on the local monitoring network were spectrally analysed to determine characteristic stress and attenuation parameters. In a second approach, residual analysis using the log-likelihood (LLH) method was used to directly compare recorded and predicted short-period response spectral accelerations. The resulting ranking was consistent with the models selected based on spectral analysis, with the advantage that a transparent weighting approach was available using the LLH method. Region-specific estimates of variability were computed, with significantly lower values observed compared to previous studies of small earthquakes. This was consistent with the limited range of stress drops and attenuation observed from the spectral analysis.

  11. Photo-induced charge-transfer phase transition of rubidium manganese hexacyanoferrate in ferromagnetic and paramagnetic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokoro, Hiroko; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2007-01-01

    A charge transfer phase transition with thermal hysteresis loop is observed in a series of rubidium manganese hexacyanoferrates, RbMn[Fe(China) 6 ] (1), Rb 0.88 Mn[Fe(China) 6 ] 0.96 .0.6H 2 O (2), and Rb 0.97 Mn[Fe(China) 6 ] 0.99 .0.2H 2 O (3). This phase transition is accompanied by a structural change from cubic (F4-bar 3m) to tetragonal (I4-bar m2). Its high-temperature (HT) and low-temperature (LT) phases are composed of Mn II (S=2/5)NC-Fe III (S=1/2) and Mn III (S=2)-NC-Fe II (S=0), respectively. The phase transition is caused by a metal-to-metal charge transfer from Mn II to Fe III and a Jahn-Teller distortion of the produced Mn III ion. At the ferromagnetic state in LT phase of 2, the photo-induced phase transition is observed, i.e., magnetization is quenched by the irradiation with only one shot of laser pulse. This phenomenon is caused by a photo-induced phase transition from the LT phase to the HT phase. In 3, optical switching between LT and HT phases at room temperature in paramagnetic region is observed

  12. Assessment of space proton radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency in the CCD204 for the Euclid space observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gow, J P D; Murray, N J; Holland, A D; Hall, D J; Cropper, M; Burt, D; Hopkinson, G; Duvet, L

    2012-01-01

    Euclid is a medium class European Space Agency mission candidate for launch in 2019 with a primary goal to study the dark universe using the weak lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillations techniques. Weak lensing depends on accurate shape measurements of distant galaxies. Therefore it is beneficial that the effects of radiation-induced charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) in the Euclid CCDs over the course of the 5 year mission at L2 are understood. This will allow, through experimental analysis and modelling techniques, the effects of radiation induced CTI on shape to be decoupled from those of mass inhomogeneities along the line-of-sight. This paper discusses a selection of work from the study that has been undertaken using the e2v CCD204 as part of the initial proton radiation damage assessment for Euclid. The experimental arrangement and procedure are described followed by the results obtained, thereby allowing recommendations to be made on the CCD operating temperature, to provide an insight into CTI effects using an optical background, to assess the benefits of using charge injection on CTI recovery and the effect of the use of two different methods of serial clocking on serial CTI. This work will form the basis of a comparison with a p-channel CCD204 fabricated using the same mask set as the n-channel equivalent. A custom CCD has been designed, based on this work and discussions between e2v technologies plc. and the Euclid consortium, and designated the CCD273.

  13. Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and neuropeptides in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damelio, F.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid and the neuropeptides substance P and Met-enkephalin in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV), and lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactive (GAD-IR) terminals and fibers were observed in the AP and particularly in the ASP. A gradual decrease in the density of terminals was seen towards the solitary complex. The DMNV revealed irregularly scattered GAD-IR terminals within the neuropil or closely surrounding neuronal cell bodies. The LVN, particularly the dorsal division, showed numerous axon terminals which were mostly localize around large neurons and their proximal dendrites. Substance P immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed high density in the solitary complex, in particular within the lateral division. The ASP showed medium to low density of SP-IR fibers and terminals. The AP exhibited a small number of fibers and terminals irregularly distributed. The DMNV revealed a high density of SP-IR terminals and fibers that were mainly concentrated in the periphery. Very few terminals were detected in the LVN. Met-enkephalin immunoreactive (Met-Enk-IR) fibers and terminals showed high density and uniform distribution in the DMNV. Scattered terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, and NTS (particularly the lateral division). The very few fibers were observed in the LVN surrounded the neuronal cell bodies. The present report is part of a study designed to investigate the interaction between neuropeptides and conventional neurotransmitters under conditions producing motion sickness and in the process of sensory-motor adaptation.

  14. Theoretical princi les of constructing the equations of motion for a spin color-charged particle in gauge and fermion fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Yu. A.; Shishmarev, A. A.

    2010-11-01

    Based on the most general principles of materiality, gauge, and re-parameterized invariance, the problem of constructing an action describing the dynamics of a classical color-charged particle moving in external non-Abelian gauge and fermion fields is considered. The case of a linear Lagrangian dependence on the external fermion fields is discussed. Within the framework of the description of the color degree of freedom of the particle with half-integer spin by the Grassmann color charges, a new concept of the Grassmann color source of the particle being a fermion analog of the conventional color current is introduced.

  15. Bunch motion in the presence of the self-induced voltage due to a reactive impedance; 1, RF off

    CERN Document Server

    Shaposhnikova, Elena

    1995-01-01

    Analytic self-consistent solutions have been found for the nonlinear Vlasov equation describing different types of behaviour with time of an intense bunch under the influence of voltage induced due to a reactive part of broad band impedance. The problem is solved for the particular type of the initial distribution function in longitudinal phase space which is elliptic and corresponds to parabolic line density. The first part of the paper is devoted to the consideration of the effects in the machine with RF off. In this case induced voltage is changing with time and, as in the case with RF on, can have a significant effect on bunch motion. Numerical estimations for the SPS show that this effect can be important for manipulations with beam at 26GeV. Measurements of the change in the rate of debunching with intensity can also be used to estimate the value of the impedance. The same method is applied in the second part of the paper to analyse time dependent effects of potential well distortion when RF is on.

  16. Laser-Induced Motion of a Nanofluid in a Micro-Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Tran X. Phuoc; Mehrdad Massoudi; Ping Wang

    2016-01-01

    Since a photon carries both energy and momentum, when it interacts with a particle, photon-particle energy and momentum transfer occur, resulting in mechanical forces acting on the particle. In this paper we report our theoretical study on the use of a laser beam to manipulate and control the flow of nanofluids in a micro-channel. We calculate the velocity induced by a laser beam for TiO2, Fe2O3, Al2O3 MgO, and SiO2 nanoparticles with water as the base fluid. The particle diameter is 50 nm an...

  17. Prompt muon-induced fission: A probe for nuclear friction in large-amplitude collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberacker, V.E.; Umar, A.S.; Wells, J.C.; Strayer, M.R.; Maruhn, J.A.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    Excited muonic atoms in the actinide region may induce prompt fission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the excitation energy of the muonic atom is transferred to the nucleus. The authors solve the time dependent Dirac equation for the muonic spinor wave function in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus on a 3-dimensional lattice and demonstrate that the muon attachment probability to the light fission fragment is a measure of the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point

  18. Neutron-induced charged-particle emission studies below 100 MeV at WNR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haight, R.C.; Lee, T.M.; Sterbenz, S.M. [and others

    1994-07-01

    Charged-particles produced by neutron bombardment of selected targets with Z=5 through 53 have been studied for neutron energies from 1 MeV to about 100 MeV using the spallation neutron source at WNR/LAMPF. Particle detection with energy measurement and particle identification is accomplished by two-element {Delta}E-E counters, three-element {Delta}E{sub l}-{Delta}E{sub 2}-E counters or with pulse-shape discrimination using scintillators directly in the neutron beam. The experimental techniques for these measurements are described and comparisons made among the different approaches. This presentation introduces five papers contributed to this conference.

  19. Neutron-induced charged-particle emission studies below 100 MeV at WNR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haight, R.C.; Lee, T.M.; Sterbenz, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Charged-particles produced by neutron bombardment of selected targets with Z=5 through 53 have been studied for neutron energies from 1 MeV to about 100 MeV using the spallation neutron source at WNR/LAMPF. Particle detection with energy measurement and particle identification is accomplished by two-element ΔE-E counters, three-element ΔE l -ΔE 2 -E counters or with pulse-shape discrimination using scintillators directly in the neutron beam. The experimental techniques for these measurements are described and comparisons made among the different approaches. This presentation introduces five papers contributed to this conference

  20. Interpretation of electron beam induced charging of oxide layers in a transistor studied using electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ubaldi, F; Pozzi, G; Kasama, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    Off-axis electron holography has been used to characterize a linear array of transistors, which was prepared for examination in cross-sectional geometry in the transmission electron microscope using focused ion beam milling. In reconstructed phase images, regions of silicon oxide that are located...... into account the mean inner potential of the specimen and the perturbed vacuum reference wave. The simulations suggest that the oxide layers contain a uniform volume density of positive charge and that the elliptical contours result from the combined effect of the electrostatic potential in the specimen...

  1. Rf and space-charge induced emittances in laser-driven rf guns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Chen, Yu-Jiuan.

    1988-10-01

    Laser-driven rf electron guns are potential sources of high-current, low-emittance, short bunch-length electron beams, which are required for many advanced accelerator applications, such as free-electron lasers and injectors for high-energy machines. In such guns the design of which was pioneered at Los Alamos National Laboratory and which is currently being developed at several other laboratories, a high-power laser beam illuminates a photo-cathode surface placed on an end wall of an rf cavity. The main advantages of this type of gun are that the time structure of the electron beam is controlled by the laser, eliminating the need for bunchers, and that the electric field in rf cavities can be made very strong, so that the effects due to space-charge repulsion can be minimized. In this paper, we present an approximate but simple analysis for the transverse and longitudinal emittances in rf guns that takes into account both the time variation of the rf field and the space-charge effect. The results are compared and found to agree well with those from simulation. 7 refs., 6 figs

  2. A gate-induced switch in zigzag graphene nanoribbons and charging effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheraghchi, Hosein; Esmailzade, Hanyieh

    2010-01-01

    Using the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, we investigate nonlinear transport and charging effects of gated graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with an even number of zigzag chains. We find a negative differential resistance (NDR) over a wide range of gate voltages with an on/off ratio ∼ 10 6 for narrow enough ribbons. This NDR originates from the parity selection rule and also prohibition of transport between discontinuous energy bands. Since the external field is well screened close to the contacts, the NDR is robust against the electrostatic potential. However, for voltages higher than the NDR threshold, due to charge transfer through the edges of the zigzag GNR (ZGNR), screening is reduced such that the external potential can penetrate inside the ribbon giving rise to smaller values of off-current. Furthermore, the on/off ratio of the current depends on the aspect ratio of the length/width and also edge impurity. Moreover, the on/off ratio displays a power law behavior as a function of ribbon length.

  3. Irradiation effects induced by multiply charged heavy ions on astrophysical materials such as crystals and ices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlinay, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The solar system and the interstellar medium are permanently exposed to radiations such as solar wind and cosmic rays. The interaction between energetic particles and astrophysical materials (ices, silicates and carbon-based materials) plays an important role in several astrophysical phenomena. Laboratory experiments correlated to observational data may allow a better understanding of these phenomena. The aim of this thesis was to study the effect of slow and fast heavy ions on lithium fluoride and on astrophysical materials such as ices and silicates. We focused on the sputtering phenomenon. The present study was performed with a time of flight imaging technique (XY-TOF-SIMS) at the CIMAP-GANIL laboratory. The major fraction of secondary ions is found to be emitted in the form of clusters. Several parameters affect sputtering: the stopping power regime, the thickness of the target, the incident angle and, for low highly charged ions, the projectile charge. Our laboratory simulations exhibit the possibility that sputtered particles contribute to the formation of Mercury's and Jupiter's moons exosphere. (author)

  4. A comparison of atom and ion induced SSIMS - evidence for a charge induced damage effect in insulator materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, A.; Berg, J.A. van den; Vickerman, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    A static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SSIMS) study of two very low conductivity materials, polystyrene and niobium pentoxide, using on the one hand a primary ion beam with electron neutralisation, and on the other, atom bombardment, shows that whilst the initial spectra obtained were quite similar, subsequent damage effects were much greater under ion impact conditions. For an equivalent flux density the half-life of the polystyrene surface structure was four times longer under atom bombardment. Significant reduction of the niobium surface was observed under ion bombardment whereas an equivalent atom flux had little apparent effect on the surface oxidation state. These data suggest that the requirement to dissipate the charge delivered to the sample by the primary ion beam contributes significantly to the damage mechanisms in electrically insulating materials. (author)

  5. Respiration-induced motion of the kidneys in whole abdominal radiotherapy: implications for treatment planning and late toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.R.; Huq, M.S.; Corn, B.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Whole abdominal radiotherapy (WAR) has potential utility in the management of several malignancies. The limited radiation tolerance of the kidneys is an important consideration in the design of WAR fields. Although renal blocking is standard for WAR, few guidelines exist in the literature to factor respiration-induced kidney motion into the design of these blocks. Methods: Radiographs were obtained to measure kidney excursion under forced respiratory conditions in eight patients (14 visualized kidneys). Intravenous contrast was administered and AP films were obtained at maximum inspiration and expiration. Renal excursion was measured relative to a horizontal reference line at the bottom of the L3 vertebral body. The kidney position on the actual treatment simulation film was also determined using this technique. Treatment isodose distributions through the kidneys were obtained for a sample patient using phantom measurements and two blocking schemes: AP/PA and PA only. These provided quantification of the actual dose received by the kidney in a typical WAR treatment. Results: In the worst case scenario, the left kidney block required an additional 10 mm above and 15 mm below the renal silhouette on the simulation film in order to account for all phases of respiration. The corresponding values for the right kidney were 2 mm and 19 mm, respectively. The dose received by the kidney under the center of the block was 20% of prescribed using AP/PA blocks and 50% of prescribed using PA blocks only. However, portions of 'blocked' kidney received up to 90% of the prescribed dose with either technique. Conclusions: Although kidney motion under forced respiratory conditions is not representative of typical treatment conditions, the data highlight the possibility of renal movement during treatment. This is particularly important in light of the significant dose (20 to 50%) delivered to the kidney under the center of the kidney block in typical treatments. Given the

  6. Charged-particle induced radiation damage of a HPGe gamma-ray detector during spaceflight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Larry G. [Computer Sciences Corporation, Science Programs, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Starr, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Department of Physics, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Brueckner, Johannes [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Boynton, William V. [University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bailey, S.H. [University of Arizona, Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Trombka, J.I. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    1999-02-11

    The Mars Observer spacecraft was launched on September 26, 1992 with a planned arrival at Mars after an 11-month cruise. Among the scientific instruments carried on the spacecraft was a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) experiment to measure the composition of Mars. The GRS used a passively cooled high-purity germanium detector for measurements in the 0.2-10 MeV region. The sensor was a closed-end co-axial detector, 5.5 cm diameter by 5.5 cm long, and had an efficiency along its axis of 28% at 1332 keV relative to a standard NaI(Tl) detector. The sensor was surrounded by a thin (0.5 cm) plastic charged-particle shield. This was the first planetary mission to use a cooled Ge detector. It was expected that the long duration in space of three years would cause an increase in the energy resolution of the detector due to radiation damage and could affect the expected science return of the GRS. Shortly before arrival, on August 21, 1993, contact was lost with the spacecraft following the pressurization of the propellent tank for the orbital-insertion rocket motor. During much of the cruise to Mars, the GRS was actively collecting background data. The instrument provided over 1200 h of data collection during periods of both quiescent sun and solar flares. From the charged particle interactions in the shield, the total number of cosmic ray hits on the detector could be determined. The average cosmic ray flux at the MO GRS was about 2.5 cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The estimated fluence of charged particles during cruise was about 10{sup 8} particles cm{sup -2} with 31% of these occurring during a single solar proton event of approximately 10 days duration. During cruise, the detector energy resolution determined from a background gamma-ray at 1312 keV degraded from 2.4 keV full-width at half-maximum shortly after launch to 6.4 keV 11 months later. This result agrees well with measurements from ground-based accelerator irradiations (at 1.5 GeV) on a similar size detector.

  7. Water-induced charge transport in tablets of microcrystalline cellulose of varying density: dielectric spectroscopy and transient current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, Martin; Alderborn, Goeran; Stroemme, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Room temperature dielectric frequency response data taken over 13 decades in frequency on microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) tablets of varying density are presented. The frequency response shows on three different processes: the first one is a high-frequency relaxation process whose magnitude increases and reaches a plateau as the tablet density increases. This process is associated with orientational motions of local chain segments via glycosidic bonds. The second relaxation process, related to the presence of water in the MCC matrix, is insensitive to changes in tablet density. At lower frequencies, dc-like imperfect charge transport dominates the dielectric spectrum. The dc conductivity was found to decrease with increasing tablet density and increase exponentially with increasing humidity. Transient current measurements indicated that two different ionic species, protons and OH - ions, lied behind the observed conductivity. At ambient humidity of 22%, only one in a billion of the water molecules present in the tablet matrix participated in long range dc conduction. The diffusion coefficient of the protons and OH - ions were found to be of the order of 10 -9 cm 2 /s, which is the same as for small salt building ions in MCC. This shows that ionic drugs leaving a tablet matrix may diffuse in the same manner as the constituent ions of water and, thus, elucidates the necessity to understand the water transport properties of excipient materials to be able to tailor the drug release process from pharmaceutical tablets

  8. First online real-time evaluation of motion-induced 4D dose errors during radiotherapy delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravkilde, Thomas; Skouboe, Simon; Hansen, Rune

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: In radiotherapy, dose deficits caused by tumor motion often far outweigh the discrepancies typically allowed in plan-specific quality assurance (QA). Yet, tumor motion is not usually included in present QA. We here present a novel method for online treatment verification by real......-time motion-including 4D dose reconstruction and dose evaluation and demonstrate its use during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) delivery with and without MLC tracking. METHODS: Five volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were delivered with and without MLC tracking to a motion stage carrying...... a Delta4 dosimeter. The VMAT plans have previously been used for (non-tracking) liver SBRT with intra-treatment tumor motion recorded by kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring (KIM). The motion stage reproduced the KIM-measured tumor motions in 3D while optical monitoring guided the MLC tracking. Linac...

  9. Particle-based simulation of charge transport in discrete-charge nano-scale systems: the electrostatic problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Claudio; Gillespie, Dirk; Eisenberg, Robert S; Fiegna, Claudio

    2012-02-16

    The fast and accurate computation of the electric forces that drive the motion of charged particles at the nanometer scale represents a computational challenge. For this kind of system, where the discrete nature of the charges cannot be neglected, boundary element methods (BEM) represent a better approach than finite differences/finite elements methods. In this article, we compare two different BEM approaches to a canonical electrostatic problem in a three-dimensional space with inhomogeneous dielectrics, emphasizing their suitability for particle-based simulations: the iterative method proposed by Hoyles et al. and the Induced Charge Computation introduced by Boda et al.

  10. Laser-induced charge transfer in the CH/sup 6 +/ quasimolecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errea, L.F.; Mendez, L.; Riera, A.

    1985-05-15

    The charge transfer cross section is calculated for C/sup 6 +/+CH(1s) collisions, through photon assisted 5gsigma--6hsigma, 5gsigma--4fsigma, 5gsigma--4f..pi.., and 5gsigma--4dsigma transitions. The theory developed by Copeland and Tang, and ourselves, is employed, and the validity of the approximations used is tested. The four processes considered have widely different characteristics with regards to the laser wavelength needed, the collision dynamics and the applicability of back-of-the-envelope estimates based on the Landau--Zener approximation. We point out the relevance of those processes to the impurity diagnostics of magnetically confined fusion plasmas and to the development of short wavelength lasers.

  11. Helium ion beam induced electron emission from insulating silicon nitride films under charging conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Anikeva, A. E.; Vyvenko, O. F.

    2018-06-01

    Secondary electron emission from thin silicon nitride films of different thicknesses on silicon excited by helium ions with energies from 15 to 35 keV was investigated in the helium ion microscope. Secondary electron yield measured with Everhart-Thornley detector decreased with the irradiation time because of the charging of insulating films tending to zero or reaching a non-zero value for relatively thick or thin films, respectively. The finiteness of secondary electron yield value, which was found to be proportional to electronic energy losses of the helium ion in silicon substrate, can be explained by the electron emission excited from the substrate by the helium ions. The method of measurement of secondary electron energy distribution from insulators was suggested, and secondary electron energy distribution from silicon nitride was obtained.

  12. Verification of nuclear data for DT neutron induced charged-particle emission reaction of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Murata, I.; Ochiai, K.; Kubota, N.; Miyamaru, H.; Takagi, S.; Shido, S.; Konno, C.; Nishitani, T.

    2007-01-01

    Double-differential cross-section (DDX) for emitted charged particles is necessary to estimate material damage, gas production and nuclear heating in a fusion reactor. Detailed measurements of the cross-sections for beryllium, carbon and fluorine, which are among the composition materials of expected fusion blankets and first walls, were carried out with a charged-particle spectrometer using a pencil-beam DT neutron source. As verification of the cross-sections evaluated in three nuclear libraries (JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI and JEFF-3.1), our measured data were compared with the data evaluated in the libraries. From the comparison, the following problems were pointed out: Beryllium: Remarkable differences in energy and angular distribution for α-particles were observed between the measured data and the libraries. The estimated total cross-section for α-particle production well agreed with the libraries. Carbon: There was a discrepancy of about 20% between JENDL-3.3 and ENDF/B-VI (JEFF-3.1) for α-particle production cross-section, and no DDX for α-particles is given in the libraries. Our obtained total cross-section for α-particle production was rather consistent with ENDF/B-VI (JEFF-3.1), and the value evaluated in JENDL-3.3 seemed too large. Fluorine: The remarkable differences for DDX of protons and α-particles were observed between the obtained result and JENDL-3.3, although detailed DDX was stored only in JENDL. The obtained total cross-sections mostly supported the evaluation of ENDF/B-VI (JEFF-3.1)

  13. Motion of Passive Scalar by Elasticity-Induced Instability in Curved Microchannel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bin Li

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presented a direct numerical simulation (DNS study on the elasticity-induced irregular flow, passive mixing, and scalar evolution in the curvilinear microchannel. The mixing enhancement was achieved at vanishingly low-Reynolds-number chaotic flow raised by elastic instabilities. Along with the mixing process, the passive scalar transportation carried by the flow was greatly affected by the flow structure and the underlying interaction between microstructures of viscoelastic fluid and flow structure itself. The simulations are conducted for a wide range of viscoelasticity. As the elastic effect exceeds the critical value, the flow tends to a chaotic state, while the evolution of scalar gets strong and fast, showing excellent agreement with experimental results. For the temporal changing of scalar gradients, they vary rapidly in the form of isosurfaces, with the shape of “rolls” in the bulk and evolving into “threads” near the wall. That indicates that the flow fields should be related to the deformation of viscoelastic micromolecules. The probability distribution function analysis between micromolecular deformation and flow field deformation shows that the main direction of molecular stretching is perpendicular to the main direction of flow field deformation. It implies they are weakly correlated, due to the confinement of channel wall.

  14. Charging effects during focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Sanne K.; van Dorp, Willem F.; De Hosson, Jeff Th. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on focused electron beam induced deposition of silicon oxide. Silicon oxide pillars are written using 2, 4, 6, 8, 10-pentamethyl-cyclopenta-siloxane (PMCPS) as precursor. It is observed that branching of the pillar occurs above a minimum pillar height. The branching is

  15. Depletion-induced instability in protein-DNA mixtures: Influence of protein charge and size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2006-01-01

    While there is abundant experimental and theoretical work on polymer-induced DNA condensation, it is still unclear whether globular proteins can condense linear DNA or not. We develop a simple analytical approximation for the depletion attraction between rodlike segments of semiflexible

  16. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, D; De Freitas, U; De Mello, E R Bezerra

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  17. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, D; De Freitas, U; De Mello, E R Bezerra, E-mail: denis.barros@ifpb.edu.br, E-mail: umbelino@fisica.ufpb.br, E-mail: emello@fisica.ufpb.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da ParaIba, 58.800-970, Sousa, PB (Brazil)

    2011-03-21

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  18. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Denis; Freitas, Umbelino; Mello, Eugenio Bezerra de [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia da Paraiba (IFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal da Paraiba (IFPB), PB (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Global monopoles are heavy spherically symmetric topological objects which may have been formed by the vacuum phase transition in the early universe after Planck time. Although the global monopole was first introduced by Sokolov and Starobinsky, its gravitational effects have been analyzed by Barriola and Vilenkin. We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopoles core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ball-point pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole. (author)

  19. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Denis; Freitas, Umbelino; Mello, Eugenio Bezerra de

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Global monopoles are heavy spherically symmetric topological objects which may have been formed by the vacuum phase transition in the early universe after Planck time. Although the global monopole was first introduced by Sokolov and Starobinsky, its gravitational effects have been analyzed by Barriola and Vilenkin. We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopoles core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ball-point pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole. (author)

  20. Ultrafast dynamics in CeTe{sub 3} near the pressure-induced charge-density-wave transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauch, Jonas; Obergfell, Manuel [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Schaefer, Hanjo [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Demsar, Jure [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology (Germany); Institute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz (Germany); Giraldo, Paula; Fisher, Ian R. [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials and Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University (United States); Pashkin, Alexej [Department of Physics and Center for Applied Photonics, University of Konstanz (Germany); Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy is an efficient tool for studying ultrafast dynamics in strongly correlated electronic systems, in particular, compounds with a charge-density-wave (CDW) order. Application of external pressure often leads to a suppression of a CDW state due to an impairment of the Fermi surface nesting. We combine time-resolved optical spectroscopy and diamond anvil cell technology to study electron and lattice dynamics in tri-telluride compound CeTe{sub 3}. Around pressures of 4 GPa we observe a gradual vanishing of the relaxation process related to the recombination of the photoexcited quasiparticles. The coherent oscillations of the phonon modes coupled to the CDW order parameter demonstrate even more dramatic suppression with increasing pressure. These observations clearly indicate a transition into the metallic state of CeTe{sub 3} induced by the external pressure.

  1. Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the subtraction of linear dipole in the CMB maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi

    2013-01-01

    y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete subtraction of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, additional temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be subtracted from the final y-type maps, if desired

  2. Coincidence charged-current neutrino-induced deuteron disintegration for 2H2 16O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Orden, J. W.; Donnelly, T. W.; Moreno, O.

    2017-12-01

    Semi-inclusive charge-changing neutrino reactions on targets of heavy water are investigated with the goal of determining the relative contributions to the total cross section of deuterium and oxygen in kinematics chosen to emphasize the former. The study is undertaken for conditions where the typical neutrino beam energies are in the few GeV region, and hence relativistic modeling is essential. For this, the previous relativistic approach for the deuteron is employed, together with a spectral function approach for the case of oxygen. Upon optimizing the kinematics of the final-state particles assumed to be detected (typically a muon and a proton) it is shown that the oxygen contribution to the total cross section is suppressed by roughly an order of magnitude compared with the deuterium cross section, thereby confirming that CC ν studies of heavy water can effectively yield the cross sections for deuterium, with acceptable backgrounds from oxygen. This opens the possibility of using deuterium to determine the incident neutrino flux distribution, to have it serve as a target for which the nuclear structure issues are minimal, and possibly to use deuterium to provide improved knowledge of specific aspects of hadronic structure, such as to explore the momentum transfer dependence of the isovector axial-vector form factor of the nucleon.

  3. Charge separation in photoinitiated electron transfer reactions induced by a polyelectrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerstein, D.; Rabani, J.; Matheson, M.S.; Meisel, D.

    1978-01-01

    When uncharged molecules quench the luminescence of Ru(bpy) 3 /sup 2+*/ by electron transfer to the quencher, the addition of poly(vinyl sulfate) (PVS) may, through its potential field, affect the rate of quenching, enhance the net separated charge yield, and slow the back reaction of the separated photoredox products. In all such cases that we have studied the quenching rate in the presence of PVS was reduced to about 60% of the rate measured in the absence of PVS. For two neutral species, iron(III) nitrilotriacetate (FeNTA) and cobalt(III) acetylacetonate (Co(acac) 3 ), photoreduction of the quencher was observed, and the redox yield escaping geminate recombination was substantially increased by added PVS. In the case of FeNTA the rate of the bulk back reaction was not changed appreciably by the presence of PVS owing to the rapid neutralization of Fe(NTA) - by protonation. For Co(acac) 3 the rate of the bulk back reaction was decreased by several orders of magnitude and the back reaction was shown to occur via the enolate form of the ligand which is released to the bulk solution. 4 figures, 4 tables

  4. Charging induced emission of neutral atoms from NaCl nanocube corners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceresoli, Davide; Zykova-Timan, Tatyana; Tosatti, Erio

    2008-01-01

    Detachment of neutral cations/anions from solid alkali halides can in principle be provoked by donating/subtracting electrons to the surface of alkali halide crystals, but generally constitutes a very endothermic process. However, the amount of energy required for emission is smaller for atoms located in less favorable positions, such as surface steps and kinks. For a corner ion in an alkali halide cube the binding is the weakest, so it should be easier to remove that atom, once it is neutralized. We carried out first principles density functional calculations and simulations of neutral and charged NaCl nanocubes, to establish the energetics of extraction of neutralized corner ions. Following hole donation (electron removal) we find that detachment of neutral Cl corner atoms will require a limited energy of about 0.8 eV. Conversely, following the donation of an excess electron to the cube, a neutral Na atom is extractable from the corner at the lower cost of about 0.6 eV. Since the cube electron affinity level (close to that a NaCl(100) surface state, which we also determine) is estimated to lie about 1.8 eV below vacuum, the overall energy balance upon donation to the nanocube of a zero-energy electron from vacuum will be exothermic. The atomic and electronic structure of the NaCl(100) surface, and of the nanocube Na and Cl corner vacancies are obtained and analyzed as a byproduct

  5. The inside-out supercapacitor: induced charge storage in reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Samuel T; Akbari, Abozar; Chakraborty Banerjee, Parama; Neild, Adrian; Majumder, Mainak

    2016-11-30

    Iontronic circuits are built using components which are analogous to those used in electronic circuits, however they involve the movement of ions in an electrolyte rather than electrons in a metal or semiconductor. Developments in these circuits' performance have led to applications in biological sensing, interfacing and drug delivery. While transistors, diodes and elementary logic circuits have been demonstrated for ionic circuits if more complex circuits are to be realized, the precident set by electrical circuits suggests that a component which is analogous to an electrical capacitor is required. Herein, an ionic supercapacitor is reported, our experiments show that charge may be stored in a conductive porous reduced graphene oxide film that is contacted by two isolated aqueous solutions and that this concept extends to an arbitrary polarizable sample. Parametric studies indicate that the conductivity and porosity of this film play important roles in the resultant device's performance. This ionic capacitor has a specific capacitance of 8.6 F cm -3 at 1 mV s -1 and demonstrates the ability to filter and smooth signals in an electrolyte at a variety of low frequencies. The device has the same interfaces as a supercapacitor but their arrangement is changed, hence the name inside-out supercapacitor.

  6. light charged particles induced nuclear reaction on some medium weight nuclei for particles applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsena, B.M.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    The radioisotopes of indium, cadmium and tin have many practical and medical applications. Their standard routes for production are proton or deuteron induced reactions on natural or enriched cadmium or tin. The production via 3 He induced reactions on natural or enriched cadmium was rarely discussed. In this study 3 He induced reactions on natural cadmium were measured utilizing the stacked-foil technique. The primary incident beam energy was 27 MeV extracted from the MGC- 20E cyclotron, Debrecen, Hungary.the exciatation functions for the reactions n atCd( 3 He,x) 115g,111m Cd, 117m,g,116m,115m,114m,113m,111g,110m,g,109g,108g,107g In and 117m,113,111,110 Sn were evaluated. The data were compared with the available literature data.Different theoretical nuclear reaction models were also used to predict the cross sections for those reactions. The used models were ALICE-IPPE, TALYS-1.2 and EMPIRE-03. The experimental data were compared also to the theoretical model calculations. The theoretical models did not describe most of the experimental results.The isomeric cross section ratios for the isomeric pairs 117m,g In and 110m,g In were calculated. The isomeric cross section ratio depends on the spins of the states of the interested isomeric pair. The calculated isomeric ratios helped to identify the mechanisms of the reactions involved.The integral yields for some medically relevant isotopes were calculated using the excitation function curves

  7. Motion model for a charged particle in a plasma during the interaction of an electromagnetic pulse elliptically polarized propagating in the direction of a static and homogeneous magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez R, F.; Ondarza R, R.

    2004-01-01

    An analytic model is presented for the description of the motion of a charged particle in the interaction of an elliptically electromagnetic pulse polarized propagating along a static and homogeneous external magnetic field in a plasma starting from the force equation. The method allows to express the solution in terms of the invariant phase, obtaining differential equations for the trajectory of the accelerated particle by means of an electromagnetic pulse of arbitrary and modulated width by an encircling Gaussian. The numerical solutions reported in this work can find varied applications, for example in the physics of the interaction laser-plasma, in the acceleration of particles, in hot plasma and in radioactive effects. (Author)

  8. Using measurements of the aerosol charging state in determination of the particle growth rate and the proportion of ion-induced nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leppä

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fraction of charged nucleation mode particles as a function of particle diameter depends on the particle growth rate and the proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation. In this study we have tested the applicability of recent data analysis methods to determine the growth rate and the proportion of ion-induced nucleation from the measured charged fractions. For this purpose we have conducted a series of aerosol dynamic simulations covering a wide range of atmospheric conditions. The growth rate and initial fraction of charged particles were estimated from simulated data using these methods and compared with the values obtained directly from the simulations. We found that the data analysis methods used in this study should not be used when the nuclei growth rate is less than ~3 nm h−1, or when charged particles grow much more rapidly than neutral ones. Furthermore, we found that the difference in removal rates of neutral and charged particles should be taken into account when estimating the proportion of ion-induced nucleation. Neglecting the higher removal rate of charged particles compared with that of neutral ones could result in an underestimation of the proportion of ion-induced nucleation by up to a factor of 2. This underestimation is further increased if charged particles grow more rapidly than neutral ones. We also provided a simple way of assessing whether these methods are suitable for analyzing data measured under specific conditions. The assessment procedure was illustrated using a few examples of actual measurement sites with a more detailed examination of the typical conditions observed at the SMEAR II station in Hyytiälä, Finland.

  9. Induced luminescence by charged particles on gaseous, liquid and solid argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Torres, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    A spectral and a kinetic study of the scintillation induced by β and α particles in gaseous, liquid and solid argon have been made in the wavelength region comprised between 1100 and 3000A. The radiative lifetimes and some spectroscopic parameters of the lowest dimer states ( 1 Σ + sub(u) and 3 Σ + sub(u)) have been determined: tau 0 ( 1 Σ + sub(u)) = 4.2ns; tau 0 ( 3 Σ + sub(u)) = 3.1μs; ΔE( 1 Σ + sub(u)- 3 Σ + sub(u)) = 52 meV; hω = 230 cm -1 . A non radiative de-excitation rate of the 3 Σ + sub(u) state has been measured: approximately 2x10 -17 cm 3 s -1 . By applying an electric field the contribution of the electron-ion recombination mechanism to the gaseous argon scintillation is studied. For condensed argon, the dependence of the ratio between the fluorescence and the phosphorescence intensities on the ionisation power of the impinging particle is verified. The continuum which extends from 1600 to 2900A and that is present only in the gas phase spectra, is ascribed to the radiative de-excitation of molecular ions. A time resolved study of the luminescence of high pressure (1-15atm) argon excited by a pulsed electric discharge has also been performed and is compared with that of the scintillation induced by nuclear particles [fr

  10. Differential multi-electron emission induced by swift highly charged gold ions penetrating carbon foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothard, H.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kollmus, H.; Mann, R.; Hagmann, S.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2007-05-01

    First results on swift heavy ion induced electron emission from solids obtained with a reaction microscope are presented. This advanced technique, which is successfully used since quite some time to study electron ejection in ion-atom collisions, combines the measurement of the time-of-flight of electrons with imaging techniques. A combination of electric and magnetic fields guides the ejected electrons onto a position sensitive detector, which is capable to accept multiple hits. From position and time-of-flight measurement the full differential emission characteristics of up to 10 electrons per single incoming ion can be extracted. As a first example, we show energy spectra, angular distributions and the multiplicity distribution of electrons from impact of Au24+ (11 MeV/u) on a thin carbon foil (28 μg/cm2).

  11. Differential multi-electron emission induced by swift highly charged gold ions penetrating carbon foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothard, H.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J.; Kollmus, H.; Mann, R.; Hagmann, S.; Zouros, T.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    First results on swift heavy ion induced electron emission from solids obtained with a reaction microscope are presented. This advanced technique, which is successfully used since quite some time to study electron ejection in ion-atom collisions, combines the measurement of the time-of-flight of electrons with imaging techniques. A combination of electric and magnetic fields guides the ejected electrons onto a position sensitive detector, which is capable to accept multiple hits. From position and time-of-flight measurement the full differential emission characteristics of up to 10 electrons per single incoming ion can be extracted. As a first example, we show energy spectra, angular distributions and the multiplicity distribution of electrons from impact of Au 24+ (11 MeV/u) on a thin carbon foil (28 μg/cm 2 )

  12. Hexagonal boron nitride and graphene in-plane heterostructures: An experimentally feasible approach to charge-induced switchable CO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xin; Tahini, Hassan A.; Smith, Sean C., E-mail: sean.smith@unsw.edu.au

    2016-10-20

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) has been proposed as a sorbent material for charge-induced switchable CO{sub 2} capture. However, h-BN is a wide-gap semiconductor, hindering injection of the requisite charge. Here, we employ first-principle calculations to support the proposal that in-plane h-BN/graphene (P-BN/G) heterostructures, consisting of alternating strips of h-BN and graphene, may provide an experimentally feasible material platform for voltage-induced charging of h-BN strips to realize switchable CO{sub 2} capture. Our results show that a significant amount of injected negative charges are distributed onto h-BN strips of P-BN/G, such that CO{sub 2} capture/release can be simply controlled by switching on/off the charge states of P-BN/G system. At saturation CO{sub 2} capture coverage, the negatively charged P-BN/G heterostructures achieve CO{sub 2} capture capacities up to 2.27 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}, which is twice that which can be achieved on stacked h-BN/graphene (S-BN/G) nanosheets.

  13. Possible charge analogues of spin transfer torques in bulk superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate, Ion

    2014-03-01

    Spin transfer torques (STT) occur when electric currents travel through inhomogeneously magnetized systems and are important for the motion of magnetic textures such as domain walls. Since superconductors are easy-plane ferromagnets in particle-hole (charge) space, it is natural to ask whether any charge duals of STT phenomena exist therein. We find that the superconducting analogue of the adiabatic STT vanishes in a bulk superconductor with a momentum-independent order parameter, while the superconducting counterpart of the nonadiabatic STT does not vanish. This nonvanishing superconducting torque is induced by heat (rather than charge) currents and acts on the charge (rather than spin) degree of freedom. It can become significant in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, where it generates a net quasiparticle charge and alters the dispersion and linewidth of low-frequency collective modes. This work has been financially supported by Canada's NSERC.

  14. Scan direction induced charging dynamics and the application for detection of gate to S/D shorts in logic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ming; Tian, Qing; Wu, Kevin; Zhao, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Gate to source/drain (S/D) short is the most common and detrimental failure mechanism for advanced process technology development in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor-Field-Effect-Transistor (MOSFET) device manufacturing. Especially for sub-1Xnm nodes, MOSFET device is more vulnerable to gate-S/D shorts due to the aggressive scaling. The detection of this kind of electrical short defect is always challenging for in-line electron beam inspection (EBI), especially new shorting mechanisms on atomic scale due to new material/process flow implementation. The second challenge comes from the characterization of the shorts including identification of the exact shorting location. In this paper, we demonstrate unique scan direction induced charging dynamics (SDCD) phenomenon which stems from the transistor level response from EBI scan at post metal contact chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) layers. We found that SDCD effect is exceptionally useful for gate-S/D short induced voltage contrast (VC) defect detection, especially for identification of shorting locations. The unique SDCD effect signatures of gate-S/D shorts can be used as fingerprint for ground true shorting defect detection. Correlation with other characterization methods on the same defective location from EBI scan shows consistent results from various shorting mechanism. A practical work flow to implement the application of SDCD effect for in-line EBI monitor of critical gate-S/D short defects is also proposed, together with examples of successful application use cases which mostly focus on static random-access memory (SRAM) array regions. Although the capability of gate-S/D short detection as well as expected device response is limited to passing transistors and pull-down transistors due to the design restriction from standard 6-cell SRAM structure, SDCD effect is proven to be very effective for gate-S/D short induced VC defect detection as well as yield learning for advanced technology development.

  15. Crossover from band-like to thermally activated charge transport in organic transistors due to strain-induced traps

    KAUST Repository

    Mei, Yaochuan; Diemer, Peter J.; Niazi, Muhammad Rizwan; Hallani, Rawad K.; Jarolimek, Karol; Day, Cynthia S.; Risko, Chad; Anthony, John E.; Amassian, Aram; Jurchescu, Oana D.

    2017-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the charge-carrier mobility provides essential insight into the charge transport mechanisms in organic semiconductors. Such knowledge imparts critical understanding of the electrical properties of these materials

  16. Heat transfer analysis on peristaltically induced motion of particle-fluid suspension with variable viscosity: Clot blood model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, M M; Zeeshan, A; Ellahi, R

    2016-12-01

    In this article, heat transfer analysis on clot blood model of the particle-fluid suspension through a non-uniform annulus has been investigated. The blood propagating along the whole length of the annulus was induced by peristaltic motion. The effects of variable viscosity and slip condition are also taken into account. The governing flow problem is modeled using lubrication approach by taking the assumption of long wavelength and creeping flow regime. The resulting equation for fluid phase and particle phase is solved analytically and closed form solutions are obtained. The physical impact of all the emerging parameters is discussed mathematically and graphically. Particularly, we considered the effects of particle volume fraction, slip parameter, the maximum height of clot, viscosity parameter, average volume flow rate, Prandtl number, Eckert number and fluid parameter on temperature profile, pressure rise and friction forces for outer and inner tube. Numerical computations have been used to determine the behavior of pressure rise and friction along the whole length of the annulus. The present study is also presented for an endoscope as a special case of our study. It is observed that greater influence of clot tends to rise the pressure rise significantly. It is also found that temperature profile increases due to the enhancement in Prandtl number, Eckert number, and fluid parameter. The present study reveals that friction forces for outer tube have higher magnitude as compared to the friction forces for an inner tube. In fact, the results for present study can also be reduced to the Newtonian fluid by taking ζ → ∞. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Charged particle induced delayed X-rays (DEX) for the analysis of intermediate and heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, A. E.; Erasmus, C. S.; Andeweg, A. H.; Sellschop, J. P. F.; Annegarn, H. J.; Dunn, J.

    1988-12-01

    The emission of K X-rays from proton-rich and metastable radionuclides, following proton activation of the stable isotopes of the elements of interest, has not been widely used as a means of analysis. The thrust of this paper proposes a nuclear technique using delayed X-rays for the analysis of low concentrations of intermediate and heavy elements. The method is similar to the delayed gamma-ray technique. Proton bombardment induces mainly (p, n) reactions whereas the delayed X-rays originate largely from e --capture and isomeric transition. Samples of rare earth and platinum group elements (PGE), in the form of compacted powders, were irradiated with an 11 MeV proton beam and delayed X-rays detected with a 100 mm 2 Ge detector. Single element spectra for a range of rare earths and PGEs are presented. Analytical conditions are demonstrated for Pd in the range 0.1-5%. Spectra from actual geological samples of a PGE ore, preconcentrated by fire-assay, and monazite are presented. All six platinum group elements are visible and interference-free in a single spectrum, a marked advance on other nuclear techniques for these elements, including PIXE and neutron activation analysis (NAA).

  18. Neutrino-induced charged-current reaction rates for r-process nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Langanke, K

    2001-01-01

    Neutrino-induced reactions play an important role during and after the r-process if it occurs in an environment with extreme neutrino fluxes, as in the neutrino-driven wind model or neutron star mergers. The neutrino reactions can excite the daughter nucleus above the neutron threshold, which is quite low for r-process nuclei. Thus the daughter nucleus will decay by emission of one or several neutrons. We have calculated the relevant total (nu sub e , e sup -) cross sections as well as the partial neutron spallation cross sections for r-process nuclei with neutron numbers N=41-135 and proton numbers Z=21-82. The supernova neutrino spectrum is described by a Fermi-Dirac distribution with various temperature parameters between T=2.8 MeV and T=10 MeV and with the degeneracy parameters alpha=0 and alpha=3. Our calculations of the nuclear response are based on the random phase approximation and consider allowed as well as forbidden transitions.

  19. An In Vitro Comparative Study of Intracanal Fluid Motion and Wall Shear Stress Induced by Ultrasonic and Polymer Rotary Finishing Files in a Simulated Root Canal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Koch, Jon; Borg, John; Mattson, Abby; Olsen, Kris; Bahcall, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study compared the flow pattern and shear stress of an irrigant induced by ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file activation in an acrylic root canal model. Flow visualization analysis was performed using an acrylic canal filled with a mixture of distilled water and rheoscopic fluid. The ultrasonic and polymer rotary finishing file were separately tested in the canal and activated in a static position and in a cyclical axial motion (up and down). Particle moveme...

  20. Trace determination of heavy metal concentrations in fauna, flora and salt samples from Black Sea waters by charged particles - induced X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badica, T.; Ciortea, C.; Dima, S.; Petrovici, A.; Popescu, I.; Serbanescu, O.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were performed on Black Sea pollution by charged particles induced X-rays spectra analysis, using alpha and 16 O beams. Fauna, flora and salt samples were analysed. We found some of the concentrations of pollutant elements to be below the accepted levels. (author)

  1. Study of uranium dioxyde sputtering induced by multicharged heavy ions at low and very low kinetic energy: projectile charge effect; Etude de la pulverisation du dioxyde d'uranium induite par des ions lourds multicharges de basse et tres basse energie cinetique; effet de la charge du projectile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haranger, F

    2003-12-01

    Ion beam irradiation of a solid can lead to the emission of neutral or ionized atoms, molecules or clusters from the surface. This comes as a result of the atomic motion in the vicinity of the surface, induced by the transfer of the projectile energy. Then, the study of the sputtering process appears as a means to get a better understanding of the excited matter state around the projectile trajectory. In the case of slow multicharged ions, a strong electronic excitation can be achieved by the projectile neutralization above the solid surface and / or its deexcitation below the surface. Parallel to this, the slowing down of such ions is essentially related to elastic collision with the target atoms. The study of the effect of the initial charge state of slow multicharged ions, in the sputtering process, has been carried out by measuring the absolute angular distributions of emission of uranium atoms from a uranium dioxide surface. The experiments have been performed in two steps. First, the emitted particles are collected onto a substrate during irradiation. Secondly, the surface of the collectors is analyzed by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). This method allows the characterization of the emission of neutrals, which are the vast majority of the sputtered particles. The results obtained provide an access to the evolution of the sputtering process as a function of xenon projectile ions charge state. The measurements have been performed over a wide kinetic energy range, from 81 down to 1.5 keV. This allowed a clear separation of the contribution of the kinetic energy and initial projectile charge state to the sputtering phenomenon. (author)

  2. Compensation of Wave-Induced Motion and Force Phenomena for Ship-Based High Performance Robotic and Human Amplifying Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Love, LJL

    2003-09-24

    The decrease in manpower and increase in material handling needs on many Naval vessels provides the motivation to explore the modeling and control of Naval robotic and robotic assistive devices. This report addresses the design, modeling, control and analysis of position and force controlled robotic systems operating on the deck of a moving ship. First we provide background information that quantifies the motion of the ship, both in terms of frequency and amplitude. We then formulate the motion of the ship in terms of homogeneous transforms. This transformation provides a link between the motion of the ship and the base of a manipulator. We model the kinematics of a manipulator as a serial extension of the ship motion. We then show how to use these transforms to formulate the kinetic and potential energy of a general, multi-degree of freedom manipulator moving on a ship. As a demonstration, we consider two examples: a one degree-of-freedom system experiencing three sea states operating in a plane to verify the methodology and a 3 degree of freedom system experiencing all six degrees of ship motion to illustrate the ease of computation and complexity of the solution. The first series of simulations explore the impact wave motion has on tracking performance of a position controlled robot. We provide a preliminary comparison between conventional linear control and Repetitive Learning Control (RLC) and show how fixed time delay RLC breaks down due to the varying nature wave disturbance frequency. Next, we explore the impact wave motion disturbances have on Human Amplification Technology (HAT). We begin with a description of the traditional HAT control methodology. Simulations show that the motion of the base of the robot, due to ship motion, generates disturbances forces reflected to the operator that significantly degrade the positioning accuracy and resolution at higher sea states. As with position-controlled manipulators, augmenting the control with a Repetitive

  3. Interfractional variability of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion quantified using fiducial markers and four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Peng; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; van Wieringen, Niek; Bel, Arjan; Alderliesten, Tanja

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the interfractional variability of respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion using fiducial markers and four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D-CBCT) and assess if a 4D-CT is sufficient for predicting the motion during the treatment. Twenty-four patients with 63 markers visible in the retrospectively reconstructed 4D-CBCTs were included. For each marker, we calculated the amplitude and trajectory of the respiration-induced motion. Possible time trends of the amplitude over the treatment course and the interfractional variability of amplitudes and trajectory shapes were assessed. Further, the amplitudes measured in the 4D-CT were compared to those in the 4D-CBCTs. The amplitude was largest in the cranial-caudal direction of the distal esophagus (mean: 7.1mm) and proximal stomach (mean: 7.8mm). No time trend was observed in the amplitude over the treatment course. The interfractional variability of amplitudes and trajectory shapes was limited (mean: ≤1.4mm). Moreover, small and insignificant deviation was found between the amplitudes quantified in the 4D-CT and in the 4D-CBCT (mean absolute difference: ≤1.0mm). The limited interfractional variability of amplitudes and trajectory shapes and small amplitude difference between 4D-CT-based and 4D-CBCT-based measurements imply that a single 4D-CT would be sufficient for predicting the respiration-induced esophageal tumor motion during the treatment course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. MOSFET Electric-Charge Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Paul A., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Charged-particle probe compact and consumes little power. Proposed modification enables metal oxide/semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to act as detector of static electric charges or energetic charged particles. Thickened gate insulation acts as control structure. During measurements metal gate allowed to "float" to potential of charge accumulated in insulation. Stack of modified MOSFET'S constitutes detector of energetic charged particles. Each gate "floats" to potential induced by charged-particle beam penetrating its layer.

  5. Facile synthesis of bismuth oxyhalide nanosheet films with distinct conduction type and photo-induced charge carrier behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huimin; He, Weiwei; Zhang, Beibei; Yao, Lei; Yang, Xiaokai; Zheng, Zhi

    2018-05-01

    A modified successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method was developed to fabricate 2D ordered BiOX (X = CI, Br, I) nanosheet array films on FTO substrates at room temperature. The formation of BiOX films were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The semiconductor surface states determine the type of semiconductor. Although BiOCI, BiOBr and BiOI belong to the bismuth oxyhalide semiconductor family and possess similar crystal and electronic structures, they show different conductivity types due to their respective surface states. Mott-Schottky curve results demonstrate that the BiOCl and BiOI nanosheet arrays display n-type semiconductor properties, while the BiOBr films exhibit p-type semiconductor properties. Assisted by surface photovoltage (SPV) and transient photovoltage (TPV) techniques, the photoinduced charge transfer dynamics on the surface/interface of the BiOX/FTO nanosheet films were systematically and comparatively investigated. As revealed by the results, both the separation and transfer dynamics of the photo-induced carrier are influenced by film thickness.

  6. Light-induced EPR study of charge transfer in P3HT/bis-PCBM bulk heterojunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor I. Krinichnyi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Radical pairs, polarons and fullerene anion radicals photoinduced by photons with energy of 1.98 – 2.73 eV in bulk heterojunctions formed by poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT with bis(1-[3-(methoxycarbonylpropyl]-1-phenyl-[6.6]C62 (bis-PCBM fullerene derivative have been studied by direct light-induced EPR (LEPR method in a wide temperature range. A part of photoinduced polarons are pinned in trap sites which number and depth are governed by an ordering of the polymer/fullerene system and energy of initiating photons. It was shown that dynamics and recombination of mobile polarons and counter fullerene anion radicals are governed by their exchange- and multi-trap assisted diffusion. Relaxation and dynamics parameters of both the charge carriers were determined separately by the steady-state saturation method. These parameters are governed by structure and conformation of the carriers’ microenvironment as well as by the energy of irradiating photons. Longitudinal diffusion of polarons was shown to depend on lattice phonons of crystalline domains embedded into an amorphous polymer matrix. The energy barrier required for polaron interchain hopping is higher than that its intrachain diffusion. Pseudorotation of fullerene derivatives in a polymer matrix was shown to follow the activation Pike model.

  7. Enhancement of plasmon-induced charge separation efficiency by coupling silver nanocubes with a thin gold film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyoshi, Kazutaka; Saito, Koichiro; Tatsuma, Tetsu

    2016-10-01

    Plasmon-induced charge separation (PICS), in which an energetic electron is injected from a plasmonic nanoparticle (NP) to a semiconductor on contact, is often inhibited by a protecting agent adsorbed on the NP. We addressed this issue for an Ag nanocube-TiO2 system by coating it with a thin Au layer or by inserting the Au layer between the nanocubes (NCs) and TiO2. Both of the electrodes exhibit much higher photocurrents due to PICS than the electrodes without the Au film or the Ag NCs. These photocurrent enhancements can be explained in terms of PICS with accelerated electron transfer, in which electron injection from the Ag NCs or Ag@Au core-shell NCs to TiO2 is promoted by the Au film, or PICS enhanced by a nanoantenna effect, in which the electron injection from the Au film to TiO2 is enhanced by optical near field generated by the Ag NC.

  8. Current induced domain wall motion and tilting in Pt/Co/Ta structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the presence of the Dyzaloshinskii–Moriya interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jijun; Li, Dong; Cui, Baoshan; Guo, Xiaobin; Wu, Kai; Zhang, Xu; Wang, Yupei; Mao, Jian; Zuo, Yalu; Xi, Li

    2018-04-01

    Current induced domain wall motion (CIDWM) was studied in Pt/Co/Ta structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and the Dyzaloshinskii–Moriya interaction (DMI) by the spin-orbit torque (SOT). We measured the strength of DMI and SOT efficiency in Pt/Co/Ta with the variation of the thickness of Ta using a current induced hysteresis loop shift method. The results indicate that the DMI stabilizes a chiral Néel-type domain wall (DW), and the DW motion can be driven by the enhanced large SOT generated from Pt and Ta with opposite signs of spin Hall angle in Pt/Co/Ta stacks. The CIDWM velocity, which is 104 times larger than the field driven DW velocity, obeys a creep law, and reaches around tens of meters per second with current density of ~106 A cm‑2. We also found that the Joule heating accompanied with current also accelerates the DW motion. Meanwhile, a domain wall tilting was observed, which increases with current density increasing. These results can be explained by the spin Hall effect generated from both heavy metals Pt and Ta, inherent DMI, and the current accompanying Joule heating effect. Our results could provide some new designing prospects to move multiple DWs by SOT for achieving racetrack memories.

  9. Aeroelastic impact of above-rated wave-induced structural motions on the near-wake stability of a floating offshore wind turbine rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Steven; Jaworski, Justin

    2017-11-01

    The impact of above-rated wave-induced motions on the stability of floating offshore wind turbine near-wakes is studied numerically. The rotor near-wake is generated using a lifting-line free vortex wake method, which is strongly coupled to a finite element solver for kinematically nonlinear blade deformations. A synthetic time series of relatively high-amplitude/high-frequency representative of above-rated conditions of the NREL 5MW referece wind turbine is imposed on the rotor structure. To evaluate the impact of these above-rated conditions, a linear stability analysis is first performed on the near wake generated by a fixed-tower wind turbine configuration at above-rated inflow conditions. The platform motion is then introduced via synthetic time series, and a stability analysis is performed on the wake generated by the floating offshore wind turbine at the same above-rated inflow conditions. The stability trends (disturbance modes versus the divergence rate of vortex structures) of the two analyses are compared to identify the impact that above-rated wave-induced structural motions have on the stability of the floating offshore wind turbine wake.

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B. I. Ligand-induced changes in the protein motions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H. J.; Frimurer, T.M.; Andersen, J.N.

    1999-01-01

    Activity of enzymes, such as protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), is often associated with structural changes in the enzyme, resulting in selective and stereospecific reactions with the substrate. To investigate the effect of a substrate on the motions occurring in PTPs, we have performed...... molecular dynamics simulations of PTP1B and PTP1B complexed with a high-affinity peptide DADEpYL, where pY stands for phosphorylated tyrosine. The peptide sequence is derived from the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR(988-993)). Simulations were performed in water for 1 ns, and the concerted motions...... in the protein were analyzed using the essential dynamics technique. Our results indicate that the predominately internal motions in PTP1B occur in a subspace of only a few degrees of freedom. Upon substrate binding, the flexibility of the protein is reduced by similar to 10%. The largest effect is found...

  11. Measurement and simulation of the effects of ion-induced defects on ion beam-induced charge (IBIC) measurements in Si schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hearne, S.M.; Lay, M.D.H.; Jamieson, D.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Ion Beam Induced Charge (IBIC) technique is a very sensitive tool for investigating the electronic properties of semiconductor materials and devices. However, obtaining quantitative information from IBIC experiments requires an accurate model of the materials properties. The interaction of high energy ions with crystalline materials is known to create point defects within the crystal. A significant proportion of defects introduced by the interaction of the ion with the crystal are electrically active and are therefore an important consideration when undertaking an IBIC experiment. The goal of this work is to investigate the possibility of including the relevant defect parameters in computer simulations of the IBIC experiment implemented using Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) software. We will present the results from an IBIC study on Si Schottky diodes using 1 MeV alphas. A reduction of greater than 50% in the detected IBIC signal was observed for fluences greater than 5x10 10 He + /cm 2 . The trap parameters following ion irradiation were determined experimentally using DLTS. Comparisons between the experimental IBIC results and TCAD simulations will be discussed

  12. Using finite-difference waveform modeling to better understand rupture kinematics and path effects in ground motion modeling: an induced seismicity case study at the Groningen Gas field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurek, B.; Burnett, W. A.; deMartin, B.

    2017-12-01

    Ground motion models (GMMs) have historically been used as input in the development of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) and as an engineering tool to assess risk in building design. Generally these equations are developed from empirical analysis of observations that come from fairly complete catalogs of seismic events. One of the challenges when doing a PSHA analysis in a region where earthquakes are anthropogenically induced is that the catalog of observations is not complete enough to come up with a set of equations to cover all expected outcomes. For example, PSHA analysis at the Groningen gas field, an area of known induced seismicity, requires estimates of ground motions from tremors up to a maximum magnitude of 6.5 ML. Of the roughly 1300 recordable earthquakes the maximum observed magnitude to date has been 3.6ML. This paper is part of a broader study where we use a deterministic finite-difference wave-form modeling tool to compliment the traditional development of GMMs. Of particular interest is the sensitivity of the GMM's to uncertainty in the rupture process and how this scales to larger magnitude events that have not been observed. A kinematic fault rupture model is introduced to our waveform simulations to test the sensitivity of the GMMs to variability in the fault rupture process that is physically consistent with observations. These tests will aid in constraining the degree of variability in modeled ground motions due to a realistic range of fault parameters and properties. From this study it is our conclusion that in order to properly capture the uncertainty of the GMMs with magnitude up-scaling one needs to address the impact of uncertainty in the near field (risk. Further, by investigating and constraining the range of fault rupture scenarios and earthquake magnitudes on ground motion models, hazard and risk analysis in regions with incomplete earthquake catalogs, such as the Groningen gas field, can be better understood.

  13. Charged fluids with symmetries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is possible to introduce many types of symmetries on the manifold which restrict the ... metric tensor field and generate constants of the motion along null geodesics .... In this analysis we have studied the role of symmetries for charged perfect ...

  14. Charged rotating black holes on a 3-brane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, A.N.; Guemruekcueoglu, A.E.

    2005-01-01

    We study exact stationary and axisymmetric solutions describing charged rotating black holes localized on a 3-brane in the Randall-Sundrum braneworld. The charges of the black holes are considered to be of two types, the first being an induced tidal charge that appears as an imprint of nonlocal gravitational effects from the bulk space and the second is a usual electric charge arising due to a Maxwell field trapped on the brane. We assume a special ansatz for the metric on the brane taking it to be of the Kerr-Schild form and show that the Kerr-Newman solution of ordinary general relativity in which the electric charge is superseded by a tidal charge satisfies a closed system of the effective gravitational field equations on the brane. It turns out that the negative tidal charge may provide a mechanism for spinning up the black hole so that its rotation parameter exceeds its mass. This is not allowed in the framework of general relativity. We also find a new solution that represents a rotating black hole on the brane carrying both charges. We show that for a rapid enough rotation the combined influence of the rotational dynamics and the local bulk effects of the 'squared' energy-momentum tensor on the brane distort the horizon structure of the black hole in such a way that it can be thought of as composed of nonuniformly rotating null circles with growing radii from the equatorial plane to the poles. We finally study the geodesic motion of test particles in the equatorial plane of a rotating black hole with tidal charge. We show that the effects of negative tidal charge tend to increase the horizon radius, as well as the radii of the limiting photon orbit, the innermost bound and the innermost stable circular orbits for both direct and retrograde motions of the particles

  15. Oleate induces KATP channel-dependent hyperpolarization in mouse hypothalamic glucose-excited neurons without altering cellular energy charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadak, Selma; Beall, Craig; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Soutar, Marc P M; McCrimmon, Rory J; Ashford, Michael L J

    2017-03-27

    The unsaturated fatty acid, oleate exhibits anorexigenic properties reducing food intake and hepatic glucose output. However, its mechanism of action in the hypothalamus has not been fully determined. This study investigated the effects of oleate and glucose on GT1-7 mouse hypothalamic cells (a model of glucose-excited (GE) neurons) and mouse arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons. Whole-cell and perforated patch-clamp recordings, immunoblotting and cell energy status measures were used to investigate oleate- and glucose-sensing properties of mouse hypothalamic neurons. Oleate or lowered glucose concentration caused hyperpolarization and inhibition of firing of GT1-7 cells by the activation of ATP-sensitive K + channels (K ATP ). This effect of oleate was not dependent on fatty acid oxidation or raised AMP-activated protein kinase activity or prevented by the presence of the UCP2 inhibitor genipin. Oleate did not alter intracellular calcium, indicating that CD36/fatty acid translocase may not play a role. However, oleate activation of K ATP may require ATP metabolism. The short-chain fatty acid octanoate was unable to replicate the actions of oleate on GT1-7 cells. Although oleate decreased GT1-7 cell mitochondrial membrane potential there was no change in total cellular ATP or ATP/ADP ratios. Perforated patch and whole-cell recordings from mouse hypothalamic slices demonstrated that oleate hyperpolarized a subpopulation of ARC GE neurons by K ATP activation. Additionally, in a separate small population of ARC neurons, oleate application or lowered glucose concentration caused membrane depolarization. In conclusion, oleate induces K ATP- dependent hyperpolarization and inhibition of firing of a subgroup of GE hypothalamic neurons without altering cellular energy charge. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of K, L vacancies production mechanisms by X spectrometry in the interaction induced by a few MeV/A charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andriamonje, S.

    1982-01-01

    The analysis of different mechanisms producing electronic inner shell vacancies in ion atom collisions at a few MeV/A charged is presented. The mutual influence of nuclear and atomic excitation in the ionization probability has been discussed. The 106 Cd(p,p') 106 Cd reaction (Ep=10 MeV) has been particularly investigated from this point. The investigation is followed up by the description of the theoretical and experimental methods which permit the determination of the total and/or differential X rays production cross section for different interaction. The gold sub-shell L 1 , L 2 , L 3 ionization probability has been studied in the Au(H + ,H + )Au reaction at Ep=1 MeV. In the second part of the manuscript we investigate in detail the influence of the charge exchange process on inner shell vacancy production. The N 2 , Ar, Kr targets have been produced by a system jet gas and bombarded by 0.8 28 Si 14+ ions at E=125 MeV. The cross section for the capture of an electron in K shell, L shell and total charge exchange have been measured and compared to the CDW theory (Continuum Distorted Wave). In the CDW validity domain the experimental and theoretical results are a good agreement. In the collisions induced by H + , ionization is found to be the main excitation process. On the contrary, in collisions induced by 28 Si 14+ charge exchange is dominant compared to ionization [fr

  17. Motion in images is essential to cause motion sickness symptoms, but not to increase postural sway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubeck, A.J.A.; Bos, J.E.; Stins, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective It is generally assumed that motion in motion images is responsible for increased postural sway as well as for visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). However, this has not yet been tested. To that end, we studied postural sway and VIMS induced by motion and still images. Method

  18. Relativistic motion of charged particles in the interaction of short pulses of intense laser light with plasma; Movimiento relativista de particulas cargadas en la interaccion de pulsos cortos de luz laser intensa con plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez R, F

    2004-07-01

    In the chapter 1 we show the foundations of the special relativity in the frame of the classical mechanics and we develop the necessary theory for the theoretical description of the relativistic dynamics of charged particles in the interaction with electromagnetic fields. It will see that starting from the energy conservation principle is derived the Einstein's law that establishes the relationship among this and the mass. Later on, it will take the action of a charged particle in a given radiation field and in the one which only we will take two parts, the action of the free particle and the one that defines the interaction of this with the field. The equations of motion of a charge in an electromagnetic field come given by the Lagrange equations, being obtained an expression for the force, well-known as Lorentz force, which consists of two terms, the first of them is the force that the electric field E exercises on the particle; which doesn't depend on the charge speed and is oriented in the direction of the field, the second term represents the force that exercises the magnetic field B and that it is proportional to the charge speed, being perpendicular to the direction of it. In the chapter 2 an integration method of the Hamilton-Jacobi for the case of a pulse is that allows to found analytical forms for the moment, the energy and the charge position is developed with detail. We will present, also, a discussion of the classical theory of the relativistic dynamic of free electrons. They are also obtained, invariant quantities like the phase, before the frame of the reference inertial changes, well-known as Lorentz invariants of the system. In this part it is considered to the electron in the laboratory frame (frame in which the particle is initially in repose regarding the observer), of which the speed and the acceleration quadrivectors can be calculated. We demonstrate that the {eta} phase is a Lorentz invariant. It is shown, also that the proper time

  19. Charge transfer, lattice distortion, and quantum confinement effects in Pd, Cu, and Pd-Cu nanoparticles; size and alloying induced modifications in binding energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengar, Saurabh K.; Mehta, B. R.; Gupta, Govind

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, effect of size and alloying on the core and valence band shifts of Pd, Cu, and Pd-Cu alloy nanoparticles has been studied. It has been shown that the sign and magnitude of the binding energy shifts is determined by the contributions of different effects; with quantum confinement and lattice distortion effects overlapping for size induced shifts in case of core levels and lattice distortion and charge transfer effects overlapping for alloying induced shifts at smaller sizes. These results are important for understanding gas molecule-solid surface interaction in metal and alloy nanoparticles in terms of valance band positions.

  20. Analysis on Flow Induced Motion of Cylinders with Different Cross Sections and the Potential Capacity of Energy Transference from the Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijian Lian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy in flow induced motion (FIM was harnessed in recent years. In this study, the energy transfer ratio was derived to estimate the energy transference from the flow to the FIM. Then the FIM characteristics and energy transference of cylinders with different cross sections were experimentally investigated. The main findings are listed as follows. (a Circular cylinders and diamond prisms both present a self-limited motion. The maximum amplitude ratio of circular cylinder is around 1~1.2 which is higher than that of diamond prism (0.4~0.5. (b Triangle prisms and right square prisms present a self-unlimited motion. For triangle prism, amplitude ratio increases over 1.8; for right square prisms, amplitude ratio reaches 1.2. (c The maximum transfer ratios of circular cylinder and triangle prism are 80% and 57%, respectively, which are much higher than those of other prisms, indicating that circular cylinder and triangle prism have better performances in energy transference. (d The transfer ratio is strongly dependent on the damping and mass; higher damping or mass will promote a higher transfer ratio. (e Beyond the critical transfer ratios, amplitude variation coefficients are around 10%~30% resulting in a better performance in stationarity.