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Sample records for motion artifacts caused

  1. Reduction of motion artifacts in electrocardiogram monitoring using an optical sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Pecht, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of electrocardiogram (ECG) monitors can be significantly impaired by motion artifacts, which can trigger false alarms, cause misdiagnoses, and lead to inappropriate treatment decisions. Skin stretch associated with patient motion is the most significant source of motion artifacts in current ECG monitoring. In this study, motion artifacts are adaptively filtered by using skin strain as the reference variable, measured noninvasively using an optical sensor incorporated into an ECG electrode. The results demonstrate that this new device and method can significantly reduce motion induced ECG artifacts in continuous ambulatory ECG monitoring.

  2. 心肌灌注显像中位移伪影的辨析%A discrimination of myocardial tomography artifacts caused by motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石洪成; 陈绍亮; 李文罡; 谷晓云; 朱玮珉; 姚之丰; 刘文官

    2001-01-01

    目的探讨心肌灌注显像时位移伪影的影像学特征,不同轴向、发生位移起始点和帧数与伪影的相关性。方法在心肌显像过程中依次沿x、y和z轴方向,分别在不同起始点、对不同帧数作一定距离的位移。其图像与正常对照比较判断有无伪影。结果作多因素分析。结果轻度位移伪影的特征为:x轴位移表现为下壁突出的结节状热区;y轴位移表现为间隔和侧壁呈对称分布的热区;z轴位移表现为前壁的局部热区;这些表现仅见于短轴像上。重度伪影表现为“三角形"分布的壁内热区以及典型的“双三角形"改变。位移距离相同,方向相反,伪影的“冷"“热"区位置相反。伪影与位移帧数和轴向有关,与起始点无关。结论不同轴向位移伪影各有特征。移动帧数和y轴位移对伪影产生的影响最大。%Objective To detect the image characteristics of the motion artifacts, to determine the relationship among the axis, position and frames of the motion and the resultant image artifacts. Methods A myocardial phantom was filled with the 99TcmO-4 solution. During imaging, the phantom was moved ±5 mm, ±10 mm, ±15 mm, ±20 mm, ±25 mm, ±30 mm and ±50 mm along the x、y and z axis respectively beginning at the different positions covering different ranges sequentially. Every image was compared with normal image and assessed by three experienced observers without knowledge of the phantom motion. The results were analyzed by logistic regression. Results Motion artifact showed a radioactive nodule projecting from inferior wall while moved along x axis, symmetrical “hot" areas showed on septal and lateral wall images while moved along y axis, and nodular hot areas showed in anterior wall while moved along z axis. At last, all the motion artifacts became “double triangular". The “lumpy" and “defect" areas showed oppositely in position while the motion covered the same distance but in

  3. Motion artifact on computed tomography scan suggesting an unstable 3-column spine injury: case report of a "near miss" root cause of unneeded surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Sunny H; Moore, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Polytrauma patients often present with altered mental status, thus making clinical examination challenging. Due to its reliability for detecting traumatic injuries to the spine, computed tomography (CT) is generally the imaging study of choice when the mechanism of injury and/or preliminary exam suggests spinal injury. However, motion artifact may lead to false diagnoses. Case report A 19-year-old intoxicated female involved in a high-speed motor vehicle crash suffered multiple spi...

  4. Reduction of skin stretch induced motion artifacts in electrocardiogram monitoring using adaptive filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Pecht, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    The effectiveness of electrocardiogram (ECG) monitors can be significantly impaired by motion artifacts which can cause misdiagnoses, lead to inappropriate treatment decisions, and trigger false alarms. Skin stretch associated with patient motion is a significant source of motion artifacts in current ECG monitoring. In this study, motion artifacts are adaptively filtered by using skin strain as the reference variable. Skin strain is measured non-invasively using a light emitting diode (LED) and an optical sensor incorporated in an ECG electrode. The results demonstrate that this device and method can significantly reduce skin strain induced ECG artifacts.

  5. Using an injection signal to reduce motion artifacts in capacitive ECG measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serteyn, Aline; Vullings, Rik; Meftah, Mohammed; Bergmans, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Capacitive electrodes are a promising alternative to the conventional adhesive ECG electrodes. They provide more comfort to the patient when integrated in everyday objects (e.g. beds or seats) for long-term monitoring. However, the application of such electrodes is limited by their high sensitivity to motion artifacts. Artifacts caused by variation of the coupling capacitance are studied here. An injection signal is proposed to track these variations in real-time. An adaptive filter then estimates the motion artifact and cancels it from the recorded ECG. The amplitude of the motion artifact is reduced in average by 29 dB in simulation and by 20 dB in a lab environment. Our method has the advantages that it is able to reduce motion artifacts occurring in the frequency band of the ECG and that it does not require knowledge about the measurement system.

  6. Quantification of motion artifact in ECG electrode design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kenneth; Thomas, Chris; McAdams, Eric

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a more accurate and reproducible method of quantifying motion artifact in ECG (electrocardiogram) electrodes to assist in electrode assessment and design. It uses an algorithm developed by Sensor Technology & Devices Ltd. to reliably overcome the variation in results due to differing skin types and other causes of spurious readings such as reproducibility of movements used. The method combines a clear, concise experimental protocol with a software package and DSP algorithm to produce a transferable result for one pair of electrodes that can be used for comparison.

  7. Motion Artifact in the MR imaging of temporomandibular disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamamura, Kiyoharu; Miyajima, Hisashi; Nihei, Yoshinobu; Nemoto, Ryuichi; Ohno, Tomoya [Ohu Univ., Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-09-01

    Recently, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is indispensable for the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Motion Artifacts of MRI occur more frequently than in other conventional methods, because it takes a long time to obtain the images. This paper reported on Motion Artifacts on MRI. MRI studies of 232 temporomandibular joints were performed in 116 patients with TMD by using a 0.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner, with spin echo sequence: protondensity-weighted. And we took MRI slices at opening phase and closing phase. So 232 slices were gathered and we evaluated clinically the incidence of Motion Artifacts, that is to say, double and multiple images and other factors. The 103 slices in 56 patients showed Motion Artifacts. There is no significant difference between sexes. By age group, those in their teens were most frequent, followed by those in their fifties, forties, thirties and twenties. Also the same results were obtained for double image and multiple image. Incidence of Motion Artifact was most frequent at the opening phase. There is no significant difference between double and multiple image. (author)

  8. A frequency domain based rigid motion artifact reduction algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hai; Huang, Xiaojie; Pan, Wenyu; Zhou, Heqin; Feng, Huanqing

    2009-10-01

    During a CT scan, patients' conscious or unconscious motions would result in motion artifacts which undermine the image quality and hamper doctors' accurate diagnosis and therapy. It is desirable to develop a precise motion estimation and artifact reduction method in order to produce high-resolution images. Rigid motion can be decomposed into two components: translational motion and rotational motion. Since considering the rotation and translation simultaneously is very difficult, most former studies on motion artifact reduction ignore rotation. The extended HLCC based method considering the rotation and translation simultaneously relies on a searching algorithm which leads to expensive computing cost. Therefore, a novel method which does not rely on searching is desirable. In this paper, we focus on parallel-beam CT. We first propose a frequency domain based method to estimate rotational motion, which is not affected by translational motion. It realizes the separation of rotation estimation and translation estimation. Then we combine this method with the HLCC based method to construct a new method for general rigid motion called separative estimation and collective correction method. Furthermore, we present numerical simulation results to show the accuracy and robustness of our approach.

  9. MRI中运动伪影分析%Analysis of Motion Artifacts in MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昭波; 李文华; 王立忠; 曹庆选

    2013-01-01

    Objective To eliminate the motion artifact in MRI imaging , and improve the image quality.Method Analysis and classification of the motion artifacts in 5986 cases with MRI imaging in the most recent year in our hospital .Results According to the causes and characteristics, the MRI motion artifacts can be divided into random independent motion artifacts, respiratory motion artifacts, heart beat artifacts, large vascular pulsation artifacts and flow effect artifacts .Conclusions To improve the quality of MRI image and the diagnostic accuracy , it is important to understand and eliminate these motion artifacts .%目的:消除MRI中的运动伪影,改善MRI图像质量。方法总结我院最近一年的5986例 MRI检查图像,把其中有运动伪影的病例归纳分类,进行伪影分析。结果按照MRI运动伪影的成因及特点,可分为:随机自主运动伪影、呼吸运动伪影、心脏搏动伪影、大血管搏动伪影及流动效应伪影五大类。结论正确认识各种运动伪影的特点,应用相应的校正方法,对改善MRI质量,提高诊断准确率有重要意义。

  10. MRI Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Al Nasser Assi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available   "nMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI has become more and more frequently used in medical imaging diagnostic in recent years. Radiologists and technicians working at these systems are relatively often confronted with image artifacts related to the radiowave with strong magnetic in the scanner. Many artifacts may be corrected or modulated through an understanding of their cause. This requires familiarity with scanner design; theory of operation; and image acquisition. The purpose of this review article is to present the most relevant artifacts that arise in MRI scanner, to provide some physical background on the formation of artifacts, and to suggest strategies to reduce or avoid these artifacts. The most frequent artifacts that can occur during MRI scanning are Motion related artifacts; Para-magnetic artifacts; Phase Wrap artifacts; Frequency artifacts; Susceptibility artifacts; Clipping artefact; Chemical Shift artifact and "Zebra" artefact .    "n  

  11. Negligible motion artifacts in scalp electroencephalography (EEG during treadmill walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eNathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent Mobile Brain/Body Imaging (MoBI techniques based on active electrode scalp electroencephalogram (EEG allow the acquisition and real-time analysis of brain dynamics during active unrestrained motor behavior involving whole body movements such as treadmill walking, over-ground walking and other locomotive and non-locomotive tasks. Unfortunately, MoBI protocols are prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts, including motion artifacts that may contaminate the EEG recordings. A few attempts have been made to quantify these artifacts during locomotion tasks but with inconclusive results due in part to methodological pitfalls. In this paper, we investigate the potential contributions of motion artifacts in scalp EEG during treadmill walking at three different speeds (1.5, 3.0, and 4.5 km/h using a wireless 64 channel active EEG system and a wireless inertial sensor attached to the subject’s head. The experimental setup was designed according to good measurement practices using state-of-the-art commercially-available instruments, and the measurements were analyzed using Fourier analysis and wavelet coherence approaches. Contrary to prior claims, the subjects’ motion did not significantly affect their EEG during treadmill walking although precaution should be taken when gait speeds approach 4.5 km/h. Overall, these findings suggest how MoBI methods may be safely deployed in neural, cognitive, and rehabilitation engineering applications.

  12. [Joint correction for motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenchuan; Fang, Sheng; Guo, Hua

    2014-06-01

    Aiming at motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts in multi-shot diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we proposed a joint correction method in this paper to correct the two kinds of artifacts simultaneously without additional acquisition of navigation data and field map. We utilized the proposed method using multi-shot variable density spiral sequence to acquire MRI data and used auto-focusing technique for image deblurring. We also used direct method or iterative method to correct motion induced phase errors in the process of deblurring. In vivo MRI experiments demonstrated that the proposed method could effectively suppress motion artifacts and off-resonance artifacts and achieve images with fine structures. In addition, the scan time was not increased in applying the proposed method.

  13. Flexible Capacitive Electrodes for Minimizing Motion Artifacts in Ambulatory Electrocardiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Su Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes the use of flexible capacitive electrodes for reducing motion artifacts in a wearable electrocardiogram (ECG device. The capacitive electrodes have conductive foam on their surface, a shield, an optimal input bias resistor, and guarding feedback. The electrodes are integrated in a chest belt, and the acquired signals are transmitted wirelessly for ambulatory heart rate monitoring. We experimentally validated the electrode performance with subjects standing and walking on a treadmill at speeds of up to 7 km/h. The results confirmed the highly accurate heart rate detection capacity of the developed system and its feasibility for daily-life ECG monitoring.

  14. Image-based iterative compensation of motion artifacts in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schretter, Colas; Rose, Georg; Bertram, Matthias [Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, 52066 Aachen, Germany and Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Otto-von-Guericke University, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Philips Research Europe, Weisshausstrasse 2, 52066 Aachen (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: This article presents an iterative method for compensation of motion artifacts for slowly rotating computed tomography (CT) systems. Patient's motion introduces inconsistencies among projections and yields severe reconstruction artifacts for free-breathing acquisitions. Streaks and doubling of structures can appear and the resolution is limited by strong blurring. Methods: The rationale of the proposed motion compensation method is to iteratively correct the reconstructed image by first decomposing the perceived motion in projection space, then reconstructing the motion artifacts in image space, and finally subtracting the artifacts from an initial image. The initial image is reconstructed from the acquired data and might contain motion blur artifacts but, nevertheless, is considered as a reference for estimating the reconstruction artifacts. Results: Qualitative and quantitative figures are shown for experiments based on numerically simulated projections of a sequence of clinical images resulting from a respiratory-gated helical CT acquisition. The border of the diaphragm becomes progressively sharper and the contrast improves for small structures in the lungs. Conclusions: The originality of the technique stems from the fact that the patient motion is not explicitly estimated but the motion artifacts are reconstructed in image space. This approach could provide sharp static anatomical images on interventional C-arm systems or on slowly rotating X-ray equipments in radiotherapy.

  15. Targeted principle component analysis: A new motion artifact correction approach for near-infrared spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem A. Yücel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available As near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS broadens its application area to different age and disease groups, motion artifacts in the NIRS signal due to subject movement is becoming an important challenge. Motion artifacts generally produce signal fluctuations that are larger than physiological NIRS signals, thus it is crucial to correct for them before obtaining an estimate of stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses. There are various methods for correction such as principle component analysis (PCA, wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation. Here, we introduce a new approach to motion artifact correction, targeted principle component analysis (tPCA, which incorporates a PCA filter only on the segments of data identified as motion artifacts. It is expected that this will overcome the issues of filtering desired signals that plagues standard PCA filtering of entire data sets. We compared the new approach with the most effective motion artifact correction algorithms on a set of data acquired simultaneously with a collodion-fixed probe (low motion artifact content and a standard Velcro probe (high motion artifact content. Our results show that tPCA gives statistically better results in recovering hemodynamic response function (HRF as compared to wavelet-based filtering and spline interpolation for the Velcro probe. It results in a significant reduction in mean-squared error (MSE and significant enhancement in Pearson's correlation coefficient to the true HRF. The collodion-fixed fiber probe with no motion correction performed better than the Velcro probe corrected for motion artifacts in terms of MSE and Pearson's correlation coefficient. Thus, if the experimental study permits, the use of a collodion-fixed fiber probe may be desirable. If the use of a collodion-fixed probe is not feasible, then we suggest the use of tPCA in the processing of motion artifact contaminated data.

  16. Evaluation of a motion artifacts removal approach on breath-hold cine-magnetic resonance images of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur, Julián.; Simon, Antoine; Schnell, Frédéric; Donal, Erwan; Hernández, Alfredo; Garreau, Mireille

    2013-11-01

    The acquisition of ECG-gated cine magnetic resonance images of the heart is routinely performed in apnea in order to suppress the motion artifacts caused by breathing. However, many factors including the 2D nature of the acquisition and the use of di erent beats to acquire the multiple-view cine images, cause this kind of artifacts to appear. This paper presents the qualitative evaluation of a method aiming to remove motion artifacts in multipleview cine images acquired on patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy diagnosis. The approach uses iconic registration to reduce for in-plane artifacts in long-axis-view image stacks and in-plane and out-of-plane motion artifacts in sort-axis-view image stack. Four similarity measures were evaluated: the normalized correlation, the normalized mutual information, the sum of absolute voxel di erences and the Slomka metric proposed by Slomka et al. The qualitative evaluation assessed the misalignment of di erent anatomical structures of the left ventricle as follows: the misalignment of the interventricular septum and the lateral wall for short-axis-view acquisitions and the misalignment between the short-axis-view image and long-axis-view images. Results showed the correction using the normalized correlation as the most appropriated with an 80% of success.

  17. Induction and separation of motion artifacts in EEG data using a mobile phantom head device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson S.; Schlink, Bryan R.; Hairston, W. David; König, Peter; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Electroencephalography (EEG) can assess brain activity during whole-body motion in humans but head motion can induce artifacts that obfuscate electrocortical signals. Definitive solutions for removing motion artifact from EEG have yet to be found, so creating methods to assess signal processing routines for removing motion artifact are needed. We present a novel method for investigating the influence of head motion on EEG recordings as well as for assessing the efficacy of signal processing approaches intended to remove motion artifact. Approach. We used a phantom head device to mimic electrical properties of the human head with three controlled dipolar sources of electrical activity embedded in the phantom. We induced sinusoidal vertical motions on the phantom head using a custom-built platform and recorded EEG signals with three different acquisition systems while the head was both stationary and in varied motion conditions. Main results. Recordings showed up to 80% reductions in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and up to 3600% increases in the power spectrum as a function of motion amplitude and frequency. Independent component analysis (ICA) successfully isolated the three dipolar sources across all conditions and systems. There was a high correlation (r > 0.85) and marginal increase in the independent components’ (ICs) power spectrum (˜15%) when comparing stationary and motion parameters. The SNR of the IC activation was 400%-700% higher in comparison to the channel data SNR, attenuating the effects of motion on SNR. Significance. Our results suggest that the phantom head and motion platform can be used to assess motion artifact removal algorithms and compare different EEG systems for motion artifact sensitivity. In addition, ICA is effective in isolating target electrocortical events and marginally improving SNR in relation to stationary recordings.

  18. Spatiotemporal filtering of MR-temperature artifacts arising from bowel motion during transurethral MR-HIFU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Alain, E-mail: aschmitt@sri.utoronto.ca [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, 281 Hillmount Road, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Chopra, Rajiv [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canadaand Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390-9061 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Transurethral MR-HIFU is a minimally invasive image-guided treatment for localized prostate cancer that enables precise targeting of tissue within the gland. The treatment is performed within a clinical MRI to obtain real-time MR thermometry used as an active feedback to control the spatial heating pattern in the prostate and to monitor for potential damage to surrounding tissues. This requires that the MR thermometry measurements are an accurate representation of the true tissue temperature. The proton resonance frequency shift thermometry method used is sensitive to tissue motion and changes in the local magnetic susceptibility that can be caused by the motion of air bubbles in the rectum, which can impact the performance of transurethral MR-HIFU in these regions of the gland. Methods: A method is proposed for filtering of temperature artifacts based on the temporal variance of the temperature, using empirical and dynamic positional knowledge of the ultrasonic heating beam, and an estimation of the measurement noise. A two-step correction strategy is introduced which eliminates artifact-detected temperature variations while keeping the noise level low through spatial averaging. Results: The filter has been evaluated by postprocessing data from five human transurethral ultrasound treatments. The two-step correction process led to reduced final temperature standard deviation in the prostate and rectum areas where the artifact was located, without negatively affecting areas distal to the artifact. The performance of the filter was also found to be consistent across all six of the data sets evaluated. The evaluation of the detection criterion parameter M determined that a value of M = 3 achieves a conservative filter with minimal loss of spatial resolution during the process. Conclusions: The filter was able to remove most artifacts due to the presence of moving air bubbles in the rectum during transurethral MR-HIFU. A quantitative estimation of the filter

  19. Motion artifacts in MRI: A complex problem with many partial solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Maxim; Maclaren, Julian; Herbst, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Subject motion during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been problematic since its introduction as a clinical imaging modality. While sensitivity to particle motion or blood flow can be used to provide useful image contrast, bulk motion presents a considerable problem in the majority of clinical applications. It is one of the most frequent sources of artifacts. Over 30 years of research have produced numerous methods to mitigate or correct for motion artifacts, but no single method can be applied in all imaging situations. Instead, a "toolbox" of methods exists, where each tool is suitable for some tasks, but not for others. This article reviews the origins of motion artifacts and presents current mitigation and correction methods. In some imaging situations, the currently available motion correction tools are highly effective; in other cases, appropriate tools still need to be developed. It seems likely that this multifaceted approach will be what eventually solves the motion sensitivity problem in MRI, rather than a single solution that is effective in all situations. This review places a strong emphasis on explaining the physics behind the occurrence of such artifacts, with the aim of aiding artifact detection and mitigation in particular clinical situations.

  20. Beam hardening and motion artifacts in cardiac CT: evaluation and iterative correction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zeyang; Lee, Okkyun; Taguchi, Katsuyuki

    2016-03-01

    For myocardial perfusion CT exams, beam hardening (BH) artifacts may degrade the accuracy of myocardial perfusion defect detection. Meanwhile, cardiac motion may make BH process inconsistent, which makes conventional BH correction (BHC) methods ineffective. The aims of this study were to assess the severity of BH artifacts and motion artifacts and propose a projection-based iterative BHC method which has a potential to handle the motion-induced inconsistency better than conventional methods. In this study, four sets of forward projection data were first acquired using both cylindrical phantoms and cardiac images as objects: (1) with monochromatic x-rays without motion; (2) with polychromatic x-rays without motion; (3) with monochromatic x-rays with motion; and (4) with polychromatic x-rays with motion. From each dataset, images were reconstructed using filtered back projection; for datasets 2 and 4, one of the following BHC methods was also performed: (A) no BHC; (B) BHC that concerns water only; and (C) BHC that takes both water and iodine into account, which is an iterative method we developed in this work. Biases of images were quantified by the mean absolute difference (MAD). The MAD of images with BH artifacts alone (dataset 2, without BHC) was comparable or larger than that of images with motion artifacts alone (dataset 3): In the study of cardiac image, BH artifacts account for over 80% of the total artifacts. The use of BHC was effective: with dataset 4, MAD values were 170 HU with no BHC, 54 HU with water BHC, and 42 HU with the proposed BHC. Qualitative improvements in image quality were also noticeable in reconstructed images.

  1. Transient Severe Motion Artifact Related to Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced Liver MRI: Frequency and Risk Evaluation at a German Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Well, Lennart; Rausch, Vanessa Hanna; Adam, Gerhard; Henes, Frank Oliver; Bannas, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Purpose Varying frequencies (5 - 18 %) of contrast-related transient severe motion (TSM) imaging artifacts during gadoxetate disodium-enhanced arterial phase liver MRI have been reported. Since previous reports originated from the United States and Japan, we aimed to determine the frequency of TSM at a German institution and to correlate it with potential risk factors and previously published results. Materials and Methods Two age- and sex-matched groups were retrospectively selected (gadoxetate disodium n = 89; gadobenate dimeglumine n = 89) from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI examinations in a single center. Respiratory motion-related artifacts in non-enhanced and dynamic phases were assessed independently by two readers blinded to contrast agents on a 4-point scale. Scores of ≥ 3 were considered as severe motion artifacts. Severe motion artifacts in arterial phases were considered as TSM if scores in all other phases were  0.05). Conclusion We revealed a high frequency of TSM after injection of gadoxetate disodium at a German institution, substantiating the importance of a diagnosis-limiting phenomenon that so far has only been reported from the United States and Japan. In accordance with previous studies, we did not identify associated risk factors for TSM. Key Points:  · Gadoxetate disodium causes TSM in a relevant number of patients.. · The frequency of TSM is similar between the USA, Japan and Germany.. · To date, no validated risk factors for TSM could be identified.. Citation Format · Well L, Rausch VH, Adam G et al. Transient Severe Motion Artifact Related to Gadoxetate Disodium-Enhanced Liver MRI: Frequency and Risk Evaluation at a German Institution. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2017; 189: 651 - 660. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Effect of motion artifacts and their correction on near-infrared spectroscopy oscillation data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selb, Juliette; Yücel, Meryem A; Phillip, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy is prone to contamination by motion artifacts (MAs). Motion correction algorithms have previously been proposed and their respective performance compared for evoked rain activation studies. We study instead the effect of MAs on "oscillation" data which...

  3. K-space model of motion artifacts in synthetic transmit aperture ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    and leads to distortions in the image. In order to develop motion compensation and/or velocity estimation algorithms a thorough and intuitive understanding of the nature of motion artifacts is needed. This paper proposes a simple 2D broad band model for STA images, based on the acquisition procedure...... resolution image as a sum of rotated PSFs of a single LRI. The approximation is validated with a Field II simulation. The model predicts and explains the motion artifacts, and gives an intuitive feeling of what would happen for different velocities....

  4. Automated motion artifact removal for intravital microscopy, without a priori information

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    Lee, Sungon; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matthew; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-03-01

    Intravital fluorescence microscopy, through extended penetration depth and imaging resolution, provides the ability to image at cellular and subcellular resolution in live animals, presenting an opportunity for new insights into in vivo biology. Unfortunately, physiological induced motion components due to respiration and cardiac activity are major sources of image artifacts and impose severe limitations on the effective imaging resolution that can be ultimately achieved in vivo. Here we present a novel imaging methodology capable of automatically removing motion artifacts during intravital microscopy imaging of organs and orthotopic tumors. The method is universally applicable to different laser scanning modalities including confocal and multiphoton microscopy, and offers artifact free reconstructions independent of the physiological motion source and imaged organ. The methodology, which is based on raw data acquisition followed by image processing, is here demonstrated for both cardiac and respiratory motion compensation in mice heart, kidney, liver, pancreas and dorsal window chamber.

  5. An automated method for comparing motion artifacts in cine four-dimensional computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guoqiang; Jew, Brian; Hong, Julian C; Johnston, Eric W; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2012-11-08

    The aim of this study is to develop an automated method to objectively compare motion artifacts in two four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) image sets, and identify the one that would appear to human observers with fewer or smaller artifacts. Our proposed method is based on the difference of the normalized correlation coefficients between edge slices at couch transitions, which we hypothesize may be a suitable metric to identify motion artifacts. We evaluated our method using ten pairs of 4D CT image sets that showed subtle differences in artifacts between images in a pair, which were identifiable by human observers. One set of 4D CT images was sorted using breathing traces in which our clinically implemented 4D CT sorting software miscalculated the respiratory phase, which expectedly led to artifacts in the images. The other set of images consisted of the same images; however, these were sorted using the same breathing traces but with corrected phases. Next we calculated the normalized correlation coefficients between edge slices at all couch transitions for all respiratory phases in both image sets to evaluate for motion artifacts. For nine image set pairs, our method identified the 4D CT sets sorted using the breathing traces with the corrected respiratory phase to result in images with fewer or smaller artifacts, whereas for one image pair, no difference was noted. Two observers independently assessed the accuracy of our method. Both observers identified 9 image sets that were sorted using the breathing traces with corrected respiratory phase as having fewer or smaller artifacts. In summary, using the 4D CT data of ten pairs of 4D CT image sets, we have demonstrated proof of principle that our method is able to replicate the results of two human observers in identifying the image set with fewer or smaller artifacts.

  6. The Reduction Of Motion Artifacts In Digital Subtraction Angiography By Geometrical Image Transformation

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    Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Pickens, David R.; Mandava, Venkateswara R.; Grefenstette, John J.

    1988-06-01

    In the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis, radio-opaque dye is injected into the interior of the arteries to make them visible. Because of its increased contrast sensitivity, digital subtraction angiography has the potential for providing diagnostic images of arteries with reduced dye volumes. In the conventional technique, a mask image, acquired before the introduction of the dye, is subtracted from the contrast image, acquired after the dye is introduced, to produce a difference image in which only the dye in the arteries is visible. The usefulness of this technique has been severely limited by the image degradation caused by patient motion during image acquisition. This motion produces artifacts in the difference image that obscure the arteries. One technique for dealing with this problem is to reduce the degradation by means of image registration. The registration is carried out by means of a geometrical transformation of the mask image before subtraction so that it is in registration with the contrast image. This paper describes our technique for determining an optimal transformation. We employ a one-to-one elastic mapping and the Jacobian of that mapping to produce a geometrical image transformation. We choose a parameterized class of such mappings and use a heuristic search algorithm to optimize the parameters to minimize the severity of the motion artifacts. To increase the speed of the optimization process we use a statistical image comparison technique that provides a quick approximate evaluation of each image transformation. We present the experimental results of the application of our registration system to mask-contrast pairs, for images acquired from a specially designed phantom (described in a companion paper), and for clinical images.

  7. Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    NASA Headquarters sent a list of items to KSC that were deemed potential artifacts. These items played arole in the Shuttle Program's development and maintenance. Because these items are national assets, many are of interest to museums, schools, other government entities, etc. upon the Space Shuttle's retirement. The list contains over 500 items. All of these items need to be located, photographed, and catalogued with accompanying specific data that needs to be gathered. Initial research suggests that this is a time, labor, and cost intensive project. The purpose of my project was to focus on 20-60 of these 500 items, gather the necessary data, and compile them in a way that can be added to by other users when/if the project goes into full effect.

  8. A wavelet method for modeling and despiking motion artifacts from resting-state fMRI time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ameera X.; Kundu, Prantik; Rubinov, Mikail; Jones, P. Simon; Vértes, Petra E.; Ersche, Karen D.; Suckling, John; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of in-scanner head movement on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals has long been established as undesirable. These effects have been traditionally corrected by methods such as linear regression of head movement parameters. However, a number of recent independent studies have demonstrated that these techniques are insufficient to remove motion confounds, and that even small movements can spuriously bias estimates of functional connectivity. Here we propose a new data-driven, spatially-adaptive, wavelet-based method for identifying, modeling, and removing non-stationary events in fMRI time series, caused by head movement, without the need for data scrubbing. This method involves the addition of just one extra step, the Wavelet Despike, in standard pre-processing pipelines. With this method, we demonstrate robust removal of a range of different motion artifacts and motion-related biases including distance-dependent connectivity artifacts, at a group and single-subject level, using a range of previously published and new diagnostic measures. The Wavelet Despike is able to accommodate the substantial spatial and temporal heterogeneity of motion artifacts and can consequently remove a range of high and low frequency artifacts from fMRI time series, that may be linearly or non-linearly related to physical movements. Our methods are demonstrated by the analysis of three cohorts of resting-state fMRI data, including two high-motion datasets: a previously published dataset on children (N = 22) and a new dataset on adults with stimulant drug dependence (N = 40). We conclude that there is a real risk of motion-related bias in connectivity analysis of fMRI data, but that this risk is generally manageable, by effective time series denoising strategies designed to attenuate synchronized signal transients induced by abrupt head movements. The Wavelet Despiking software described in this article is freely available for download at www

  9. Correction of motion artifacts in OCT-AFI data collected in airways (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouei, Elham; Lane, Pierre M.; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Lee, Anthony; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.

    2016-03-01

    Abstract: Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides in vivo imaging with near-histologic resolution of tissue morphology. OCT has been successfully employed in clinical practice in non-pulmonary fields of medicine such as ophthalmology and cardiology. Studies suggest that OCT has the potential to be a powerful tool for the detection and localization of malignant and non-malignant pulmonary diseases. The combination of OCT with autofluorescence imaging (AFI) provides valuable information about the structural and metabolic state of tissues. Successful application of OCT or OCT-AFI to the field of pulmonary medicine requires overcoming several challenges. This work address those associated with motion: cardiac cycle, breathing and non-uniform rotation distortion (NURD) artifacts. Mechanically rotated endoscopic probes often suffer from image degradation due to NURD. In addition cardiac and breathing motion artifacts may be present in-vivo that are not seen ex-vivo. These motion artifacts can be problematic in OCT-AFI systems with slower acquisition rates and have been observed to generate identifiable prominent artifacts which make confident interpretation of observed structures (blood vessels, etc) difficult. Understanding and correcting motion artifact could improve the image quality and interpretation. In this work, the motion artifacts in pulmonary OCT-AFI data sets are estimated in both AFI and OCT images using a locally adaptive registration algorithm that can be used to correct/reduce such artifacts. Performance of the algorithm is evaluated on images of a NURD phantom and on in-vivo OCT-AFI datasets of peripheral lung airways.

  10. Motion artifact reduction using hybrid Fourier transform with phase-shifting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Beiwen; Liu, Ziping; Zhang, Song

    2016-08-01

    We propose to combine the Fourier transform profilometry (FTP) and phase-shifting profilometry (PSP) to reduce motion induced artifacts. The proposed method can be divided into three steps: Step 1 is to obtain a temporarily unwrapped absolute phase map of the entire scene using the FTP method, albeit the absolute phase map has motion introduced artifacts; Step 2 is to generate continuous relative phase maps without motion artifacts for each isolated object by spatially unwrapping each isolated phase map retrieved from the FTP method; and Step 3 is to determine the absolute phase map for each isolate region by referring to the temporally unwrapped phase using PSP method. Experimental results demonstrated success of the proposed method for measuring rapidly moving multiple isolated objects.

  11. Elimination of motion and pulsation artifacts using BLADE sequences in shoulder MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavdas, E.; Zaloni, E. [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Greece, Department of Medical Radiological Technologists, Athens (Greece); Vlychou, M.; Vassiou, K.; Fezoulidis, I. [University of Thessaly, Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece); Tsagkalis, A. [IASO Hospital, Department of Orthopedics, Larissa (Greece); Dailiana, Z. [University of Thessaly, Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Larissa (Greece)

    2015-11-15

    To evaluate the ability of proton-density with fat-suppression BLADE (proprietary name for periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction in MR systems from Siemens Healthcare, PDFS BLADE) and turbo inversion recovery magnitude-BLADE (TIRM BLADE) sequences to reduce motion and pulsation artifacts in shoulder magnetic resonance examinations. Forty-one consecutive patients who had been routinely scanned for shoulder examination participated in the study. The following pairs of sequences with and without BLADE were compared: (a) Oblique coronal proton-density sequence with fat saturation of 25 patients and (b) oblique sagittal T2 TIRM-weighed sequence of 20 patients. Qualitative analysis was performed by two experienced radiologists. Image motion and pulsation artifacts were also evaluated. In oblique coronal PDFS BLADE sequences, motion artifacts have been significantly eliminated, even in five cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Similarly, in oblique sagittal T2 TIRM BLADE sequences, image quality has been improved, even in six cases of non-diagnostic value with conventional imaging. Furthermore, flow artifacts have been improved in more than 80% of all the cases. The use of BLADE sequences is recommended in shoulder imaging, especially in uncooperative patients because it effectively eliminates motion and pulsation artifacts. (orig.)

  12. A Channel Rejection Method for Attenuating Motion-Related Artifacts in EEG Recordings during Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson S; Schlink, Bryan R; Hairston, W David; König, Peter; Ferris, Daniel P

    2017-01-01

    Recording scalp electroencephalography (EEG) during human motion can introduce motion artifacts. Repetitive head movements can generate artifact patterns across scalp EEG sensors. There are many methods for identifying and rejecting bad channels and independent components from EEG datasets, but there is a lack of methods dedicated to evaluate specific intra-channel amplitude patterns for identifying motion-related artifacts. In this study, we proposed a template correlation rejection (TCR) as a novel method for identifying and rejecting EEG channels and independent components carrying motion-related artifacts. We recorded EEG data from 10 subjects during treadmill walking. The template correlation rejection method consists of creating templates of amplitude patterns and determining the fraction of total epochs presenting relevant correlation to the template. For EEG channels, the template correlation rejection removed channels presenting the majority of epochs (>75%) correlated to the template, and presenting pronounced amplitude in comparison to all recorded channels. For independent components, the template correlation rejection removed components presenting the majority of epochs correlated to the template. Evaluation of scalp maps and power spectra confirmed low neural content for the rejected components. We found that channels identified for rejection contained ~60% higher delta power, and had spectral properties locked to the gait phases. After rejecting the identified channels and running independent component analysis on the EEG datasets, the proposed method identified 4.3 ± 1.8 independent components (out of 198 ± 12) with substantive motion-related artifacts. These results indicate that template correlation rejection is an effective method for rejecting EEG channels contaminated with motion-related artifact during human locomotion.

  13. A Channel Rejection Method for Attenuating Motion-Related Artifacts in EEG Recordings during Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson S. Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recording scalp electroencephalography (EEG during human motion can introduce motion artifacts. Repetitive head movements can generate artifact patterns across scalp EEG sensors. There are many methods for identifying and rejecting bad channels and independent components from EEG datasets, but there is a lack of methods dedicated to evaluate specific intra-channel amplitude patterns for identifying motion-related artifacts. In this study, we proposed a template correlation rejection (TCR as a novel method for identifying and rejecting EEG channels and independent components carrying motion-related artifacts. We recorded EEG data from 10 subjects during treadmill walking. The template correlation rejection method consists of creating templates of amplitude patterns and determining the fraction of total epochs presenting relevant correlation to the template. For EEG channels, the template correlation rejection removed channels presenting the majority of epochs (>75% correlated to the template, and presenting pronounced amplitude in comparison to all recorded channels. For independent components, the template correlation rejection removed components presenting the majority of epochs correlated to the template. Evaluation of scalp maps and power spectra confirmed low neural content for the rejected components. We found that channels identified for rejection contained ~60% higher delta power, and had spectral properties locked to the gait phases. After rejecting the identified channels and running independent component analysis on the EEG datasets, the proposed method identified 4.3 ± 1.8 independent components (out of 198 ± 12 with substantive motion-related artifacts. These results indicate that template correlation rejection is an effective method for rejecting EEG channels contaminated with motion-related artifact during human locomotion.

  14. Digital tomosynthesis of the thorax - The influence of respiratory motion artifacts on lung nodule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Mok; Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kang, Hee; Song, In-Young; Lee, Eun Joo; Hwang, Hye Sun [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: mj1.chung@samsung.com

    2013-07-15

    Background: Digital tomosynthesis considerably reduces problems created by overlapping anatomy compared with chest X-ray (CXR). However, digital tomosynthesis requires a longer scan time compared with CXR, and thus may be vulnerable to motion artifacts. Purpose: To compare the diagnostic performance of digital tomosynthesis in subjects with and without respiratory motion artifacts. Material and Methods: The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, and the requirement for written informed consent was waived. A total of 46 subjects with imaging containing respiratory motion artifacts were enrolled in this study, 18 of whom were positive and 28 of whom were negative for lung nodules on computed tomography (CT). The control group was comprised of 92 age-matched subjects with imaging devoid of motion artifacts. Of these, 36 were positive and 56 were negative for lung nodules on subsequent CT scan. The size criteria of nodules were 4-0 mm. Three chest radiologists independently evaluated the radiographs and digital tomosynthesis images for the presence of pulmonary nodules. Multireader multicase receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses was used for statistical comparisons. Results: Within the control group, the areas under curve (AUC) for observer performances in detecting lung nodules on digital tomosynthesis was higher than that on CXR (P = 0.017). Within the study group, there were no significant differences in AUCs for observer performances (P = 0.576). Conclusion: When no motion artifacts are present, the detection performance of nodules (4-10 mm) on digital tomosynthesis is significantly better than that on CXR, whereas there is not a significant difference in cases with motion artifacts.

  15. Wireless Accelerometer for Neonatal MRI Motion Artifact Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyn Paley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A wireless accelerometer has been used in conjunction with a dedicated 3T neonatal MRI system installed on a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to measure in-plane rotation which is a common problem with neonatal MRI. Rotational data has been acquired in real-time from phantoms simultaneously with MR images which shows that the wireless accelerometer can be used in close proximity to the MR system. No artifacts were observed on the MR images from the accelerometer or from the MR system on the accelerometer output. Initial attempts to correct the raw data using the measured rotational angles have been performed, but further work will be required to make a robust correction algorithm.

  16. Joint correction of Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact in interleaved diffusion weighted EPI data using a composite two-dimensional phase correction procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) obtained with interleaved echo-planar imaging (EPI) pulse sequence has great potential of characterizing brain tissue properties at high spatial-resolution. However, interleaved EPI based DWI data may be corrupted by various types of aliasing artifacts. First, inconsistencies in k-space data obtained with opposite readout gradient polarities result in Nyquist artifact, which is usually reduced with 1D phase correction in post-processing. When there exist eddy current cross terms (e.g., in oblique-plane EPI), 2D phase correction is needed to effectively reduce Nyquist artifact. Second, minuscule motion induced phase inconsistencies in interleaved DWI scans result in image-domain aliasing artifact, which can be removed with reconstruction procedures that take shot-to-shot phase variations into consideration. In existing interleaved DWI reconstruction procedures, Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion-induced aliasing artifact are typically removed subsequently in two stages. Although the two-stage phase correction generally performs well for non-oblique plane EPI data obtained from well-calibrated system, the residual artifacts may still be pronounced in oblique-plane EPI data or when there exist eddy current cross terms. To address this challenge, here we report a new composite 2D phase correction procedure, which effective removes Nyquist artifact and minuscule motion induced aliasing artifact jointly in a single step. Our experimental results demonstrate that the new 2D phase correction method can much more effectively reduce artifacts in interleaved EPI based DWI data as compared with the existing two-stage artifact correction procedures. The new method robustly enables high-resolution DWI, and should prove highly valuable for clinical uses and research studies of DWI.

  17. Correction of Motion Artifacts for Real-Time Structured Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    pattern strategy with fast phase correlation image registration. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated on motion corrupted data of a real-time structured light system, and it is shown that it improves the quality of surface reconstructions visually and quantitively....

  18. New techniques for motion-artifact-free in vivo cardiac microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio eVinegoni

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Intravital imaging microscopy (i.e. imaging in live animals at microscopic resolution has become an indispensable tool for studying the cellular micro-dynamics in cancer, immunology and neurobiology. High spatial and temporal resolution, combined with large penetration depth and multi-reporter visualization capability make fluorescence intravital microscopy compelling for heart imaging. However, tissue motion caused by cardiac contraction and respiration critically limits its use. As a result, in vitro cell preparations or non-contracting explanted heart models are more commonly employed. Unfortunately, these approaches fall short of understanding the more complex host physiology that may be dynamic and occur over longer periods of time.In this review, we report on novel technologies, which have been recently developed by our group and others, aimed at overcoming motion-induced artifacts and capable of providing in vivo subcellular resolution imaging in the beating mouse heart. The methods are based on mechanical stabilization, image processing algorithms, gated/triggered acquisition schemes or a combination of both. We expect that in the immediate future all these methodologies will have considerable applications in expanding our understanding of the cardiac biology, elucidating cardiomyocyte function and interactions within the organism in vivo, and ultimately improving the treatment of cardiac diseases.

  19. An Unusual Cause of the Ring Artifact on Transaxial CT Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Ashish Kumar; Purandare, Nilendu C; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2016-09-01

    Artifacts and image quality are two sides of the same coin. The ring artifact is scanner-based and caused mainly by either a miscalibrated element or a defective element of a detector row. We describe a rare cause of the ring artifact that appeared on a transaxial CT image because of a loose electronic contact. To our knowledge, this particular cause of the ring artifact has not been described in literature. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. sEMG during Whole-Body Vibration Contains Motion Artifacts and Reflex Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Lienhard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the excessive spikes observed in the surface electromyography (sEMG spectrum recorded during whole-body vibration (WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and/or reflex activity. The occurrence of motion artifacts was tested by electrical recordings of the patella. The involvement of reflex activity was investigated by analyzing the magnitude of the isolated spikes during changes in voluntary background muscle activity. Eighteen physically active volunteers performed static squats while the sEMG was measured of five lower limb muscles during vertical WBV using no load and an additional load of 33 kg. In order to record motion artifacts during WBV, a pair of electrodes was positioned on the patella with several layers of tape between skin and electrodes. Spectral analysis of the patella signal revealed recordings of motion artifacts as high peaks at the vibration frequency (fundamental and marginal peaks at the multiple harmonics were observed. For the sEMG recordings, the root mean square of the spikes increased with increasing additional loads (p < 0.05, and was significantly correlated to the sEMG signal without the spikes of the respective muscle (r range: 0.54 - 0.92, p < 0.05. This finding indicates that reflex activity might be contained in the isolated spikes, as identical behavior has been found for stretch reflex responses evoked during direct vibration. In conclusion, the spikes visible in the sEMG spectrum during WBV exercises contain motion artifacts and possibly reflex activity.

  1. A global metric to detect motion artifacts in optical neuroimaging data (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherafati, Arefeh; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Burns-Yocum, Tracy M.; Culver, Joseph P.

    2017-02-01

    As with other imaging modalities, motion induces artifacts that can significantly corrupt optical neuroimaging data. While multiple methods have been developed for motion detection in individual NIRS measurement channels, the large measurement numbers present in multichannel fNIRS or high-density diffuse optical tomography (HD-DOT) systems, create an opportunity for detection methods that integrate over the entire field of view. Here, we leverage the inherent covariance among multiple NIRS measurements after pre-processing, to quantify motion artifacts by calculating the global variance in the temporal derivative (GV-TD) across all measurements (e.g. from the temporal derivative of each time-course, the method calculates root mean square across all measurements for each time point). This calculation is fast, automated, and identifies motion by incorporating global aspects of data instead of individual channels. To test the performance, we designed an experimental paradigm that intermixed controlled epochs of motion artifact with relatively motion-free epochs during a block design hearing-words language paradigm using a previously described HD-DOT system. We categorized 348 blocks by sorting the blocks based on the maximum of their GV-TD time-courses. Our results show that with a modest thresholding of the data, wherein we keep data with 0.66 of the full data set average GV-TD, we obtain a 50% increase in the signal-to-noise. With noisier data, we expect the performance gains to increase. Further, the impact on resting state functional connectivity may also be more significant. In summary, a censoring threshold based on the GV-TD metric provides a fast and direct way for identifying motion artifacts.

  2. Adaptive comb filtering for motion artifact reduction from PPG with a structure of adaptive lattice IIR notch filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Boreom; Kee, Youngwook; Han, Jonghee; Yi, Won Jin

    2011-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal can provide important information about cardiovascular and respiratory conditions of individuals in a hospital or daily life. However, PPG can be distorted by motion artifacts significantly. Therefore, the reduction of the effects of motion artifacts is very important procedure for monitoring cardio-respiratory system by PPG. There have been many adaptive techniques to reduce motion artifacts from PPG signal including normalized least mean squares (NLMS) method, recursive least squares (RLS) filter, and Kalman filter. In the present study, we propose the adaptive comb filter (ACF) for reducing the effects of motion artifacts from PPG signal. ACF with adaptive lattice infinite impulse response (IIR) notch filter (ALNF) successfully reduced the motion artifacts from the quasi-periodic PPG signal.

  3. Artifacts in magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography caused by dental materials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Klinke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artifacts caused by dental restorations, such as dental crowns, dental fillings and orthodontic appliances, are a common problem in MRI and CT scans of the head and neck. The aim of this in-vitro study was to identify and evaluate the artifacts produced by different dental restoration materials in CT and MRI images. METHODS: Test samples of 44 materials (Metal and Non-Metal commonly used in dental restorations were fabricated and embedded with reference specimens in gelatin moulds. MRI imaging of 1.5T and CT scan were performed on the samples and evaluated in two dimensions. Artifact size and distortions were measured using a digital image analysis software. RESULTS: In MRI, 13 out of 44 materials produced artifacts, while in CT 41 out of 44 materials showed artifacts. Artifacts produced in both MRI and CT images were categorized according to the size of the artifact. SIGNIFICANCE: Metal based restoration materials had strong influence on CT and less artifacts in MRI images. Rare earth elements such as Ytterbium trifluoride found in composites caused artifacts in both MRI and CT. Recognizing these findings would help dental materials manufacturers and developers to produce materials which can cause less artifacts in MRI and CT images.

  4. Including the effect of motion artifacts in noise and performance analysis of dual-energy contrast-enhanced mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allec, N; Abbaszadeh, S; Scott, C C; Lewin, J M; Karim, K S

    2012-12-21

    In contrast-enhanced mammography (CEM), the dual-energy dual-exposure technique, which can leverage existing conventional mammography infrastructure, relies on acquiring the low- and high-energy images using two separate exposures. The finite time between image acquisition leads to motion artifacts in the combined image. Motion artifacts can lead to greater anatomical noise in the combined image due to increased mismatch of the background tissue in the images to be combined, however the impact has not yet been quantified. In this study we investigate a method to include motion artifacts in the dual-energy noise and performance analysis. The motion artifacts are included via an extended cascaded systems model. To validate the model, noise power spectra of a previous dual-energy clinical study are compared to that of the model. The ideal observer detectability is used to quantify the effect of motion artifacts on tumor detectability. It was found that the detectability can be significantly degraded when motion is present (e.g., detectability of 2.5 mm radius tumor decreased by approximately a factor of 2 for translation motion on the order of 1000 μm). The method presented may be used for a more comprehensive theoretical noise and performance analysis and fairer theoretical performance comparison between dual-exposure techniques, where motion artifacts are present, and single-exposure techniques, where low- and high-energy images are acquired simultaneously and motion artifacts are absent.

  5. Reduction of motion artifact in pulse oximetry by smoothed pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yuan-ting

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulse oximeter, a medical device capable of measuring blood oxygen saturation (SpO2, has been shown to be a valuable device for monitoring patients in critical conditions. In order to incorporate the technique into a wearable device which can be used in ambulatory settings, the influence of motion artifacts on the estimated SpO2 must be reduced. This study investigates the use of the smoothed psuedo Wigner-Ville distribution (SPWVD for the reduction of motion artifacts affecting pulse oximetry. Methods The SPWVD approach is compared with two techniques currently used in this field, i.e. the weighted moving average (WMA and the fast Fourier transform (FFT approaches. SpO2 and pulse rate were estimated from a photoplethysmographic (PPG signal recorded when subject is in a resting position as well as in the act of performing four types of motions: horizontal and vertical movements of the hand, and bending and pressing motions of the finger. For each condition, 24 sets of PPG signals collected from 6 subjects, each of 30 seconds, were studied with reference to the PPG signal recorded simultaneously from the subject's other hand, which was stationary at all times. Results and Discussion The SPWVD approach shows significant improvement (p Conclusion The results suggested that the SPWVD approach could potentially be used to reduce motion artifact on wearable pulse oximeters.

  6. Reducing motion artifacts in photoplethysmograms by using relative sensor motion: phantom study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijshoff, R.W.C.G.R.; Mischi, M.; Veen, J.; Van der Lee, A.M.; Aarts, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Currently, photoplethysmograms (PPGs) are mostly used to determine apatient's blood oxygenation and pulse rate. However, PPG morphologyconveys more information about the patient's cardiovascular status.Extracting this information requires measuring clean PPG waveformsthat are free of artifacts. PPGs

  7. Evaluation of artifact reduction in optical coherence tomography angiography with real-time tracking and motion correction technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino, Acner; Zhang, Miao; Gao, Simon S; Hwang, Thomas S; Sharma, Utkarsh; Wilson, David J; Huang, David; Jia, Yali

    2016-10-01

    Artifacts introduced by eye motion in optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) affect the interpretation of images and the quantification of parameters with clinical value. Eradication of such artifacts in OCTA remains a technical challenge. We developed an algorithm that recognizes five different types of motion artifacts and used it to evaluate the performance of three motion removal technologies. On en face maximum projection of flow images, the summed flow signal in each row and column and the correlation between neighboring rows and columns were calculated. Bright line artifacts were recognized by large summed flow signal. Drifts, distorted lines, and stretch artifacts exhibited abnormal correlation values. Residual lines were simultaneously a local maximum of summed flow and a local minimum of correlation. Tracking-assisted scanning integrated with motion correction technology (MCT) demonstrated higher performance than tracking or MCT alone in healthy and diabetic eyes.

  8. Data convolution and combination operation (COCOA) for motion ghost artifacts reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Lin, Wei; Börnert, Peter; Li, Yu; Reykowski, Arne

    2010-07-01

    A novel method, data convolution and combination operation, is introduced for the reduction of ghost artifacts due to motion or flow during data acquisition. Since neighboring k-space data points from different coil elements have strong correlations, a new "synthetic" k-space with dispersed motion artifacts can be generated through convolution for each coil. The corresponding convolution kernel can be self-calibrated using the acquired k-space data. The synthetic and the acquired data sets can be checked for consistency to identify k-space areas that are motion corrupted. Subsequently, these two data sets can be combined appropriately to produce a k-space data set showing a reduced level of motion induced error. If the acquired k-space contains isolated error, the error can be completely eliminated through data convolution and combination operation. If the acquired k-space data contain widespread errors, the application of the convolution also significantly reduces the overall error. Results with simulated and in vivo data demonstrate that this self-calibrated method robustly reduces ghost artifacts due to swallowing, breathing, or blood flow, with a minimum impact on the image signal-to-noise ratio. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Automatic Identification of Motion Artifacts in EHG Recording for Robust Analysis of Uterine Contractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyao Ye-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrohysterography (EHG is a noninvasive technique for monitoring uterine electrical activity. However, the presence of artifacts in the EHG signal may give rise to erroneous interpretations and make it difficult to extract useful information from these recordings. The aim of this work was to develop an automatic system of segmenting EHG recordings that distinguishes between uterine contractions and artifacts. Firstly, the segmentation is performed using an algorithm that generates the TOCO-like signal derived from the EHG and detects windows with significant changes in amplitude. After that, these segments are classified in two groups: artifacted and nonartifacted signals. To develop a classifier, a total of eleven spectral, temporal, and nonlinear features were calculated from EHG signal windows from 12 women in the first stage of labor that had previously been classified by experts. The combination of characteristics that led to the highest degree of accuracy in detecting artifacts was then determined. The results showed that it is possible to obtain automatic detection of motion artifacts in segmented EHG recordings with a precision of 92.2% using only seven features. The proposed algorithm and classifier together compose a useful tool for analyzing EHG signals and would help to promote clinical applications of this technique.

  10. Adaptive retrospective correction of motion artifacts in cranial MRI with multicoil three-dimensional radial acquisitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley G; Velikina, Julia; Block, Walter; Wieben, Oliver; Samsonov, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    Despite reduction in imaging times through improved hardware and rapid acquisition schemes, motion artifacts can compromise image quality in magnetic resonance imaging, especially in three-dimensional imaging with its prolonged scan durations. Direct extension of most state-of-the-art two-dimensional rigid body motion compensation techniques to the three-dimensional case is often challenging or impractical due to a significant increase in sampling requirements. This article introduces a novel motion correction technique that is capable of restoring image quality in motion corrupted two-dimensional and three-dimensional radial acquisitions without a priori assumptions about when motion occurs. The navigating properties of radial acquisitions-corroborated by multiple receiver coils-are exploited to detect actual instances of motion. Pseudorandom projection ordering provides flexibility of reconstructing navigator images from the obtained motion-free variable-width subsets for subsequent estimation of rigid body motion parameters by coregistration. The proposed approach does not require any additional navigators or external motion estimation schemes. The capabilities and limitations of the method are described and demonstrated through simulations and representative volunteer cranial acquisitions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effective Preprocessing Procedures Virtually Eliminate Distance-Dependent Motion Artifacts in Resting State FMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang Joon; Gotts, Stephen J; Reynolds, Richard C; Bandettini, Peter A; Martin, Alex; Cox, Robert W; Saad, Ziad S

    2013-05-21

    Artifactual sources of resting-state (RS) FMRI can originate from head motion, physiology, and hardware. Of these sources, motion has received considerable attention and was found to induce corrupting effects by differentially biasing correlations between regions depending on their distance. Numerous corrective approaches have relied on the identification and censoring of high-motion time points and the use of the brain-wide average time series as a nuisance regressor to which the data are orthogonalized (Global Signal Regression, GSReg). We first replicate the previously reported head-motion bias on correlation coefficients using data generously contributed by Power et al. (2012). We then show that while motion can be the source of artifact in correlations, the distance-dependent bias-taken to be a manifestation of the motion effect on correlation-is exacerbated by the use of GSReg. Put differently, correlation estimates obtained after GSReg are more susceptible to the presence of motion and by extension to the levels of censoring. More generally, the effect of motion on correlation estimates depends on the preprocessing steps leading to the correlation estimate, with certain approaches performing markedly worse than others. For this purpose, we consider various models for RS FMRI preprocessing and show that WMeLOCAL, as subset of the ANATICOR discussed by Jo et al. (2010), denoising approach results in minimal sensitivity to motion and reduces by extension the dependence of correlation results on censoring.

  12. Analysis of tissue changes, measurement system effects, and motion artifacts in echo decorrelation imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooi, Fong Ming; Nagle, Anna; Subramanian, Swetha; Douglas Mast, T

    2015-02-01

    Echo decorrelation imaging, a method for mapping ablation-induced ultrasound echo changes, is analyzed. Local echo decorrelation is shown to approximate the decoherence spectrum of tissue reflectivity. Effects of the ultrasound measurement system, echo signal windowing, electronic noise, and tissue motion on echo decorrelation images are determined theoretically, leading to a method for reduction of motion and noise artifacts. Theoretical analysis is validated by simulations and experiments. Simulated decoherence of the scattering medium was recovered with root-mean-square error less than 10% with accuracy dependent on the correlation window size. Motion-induced decorrelation measured in an ex vivo pubovisceral muscle model showed similar trends to theoretical motion-induced decorrelation for a 2.1 MHz curvilinear array with decorrelation approaching unity for 3-4 mm elevational displacement or 1-1.6 mm range displacement. For in vivo imaging of porcine liver by a 7 MHz linear array, theoretical decorrelation computed using image-based motion estimates correlated significantly with measured decorrelation (r = 0.931, N = 10). Echo decorrelation artifacts incurred during in vivo radiofrequency ablation in the same porcine liver were effectively compensated based on the theoretical echo decorrelation model and measured pre-treatment decorrelation. These results demonstrate the potential of echo decorrelation imaging for quantification of heat-induced changes to the scattering tissue medium during thermal ablation.

  13. Effective Preprocessing Procedures Virtually Eliminate Distance-Dependent Motion Artifacts in Resting State FMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Joon Jo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Artifactual sources of resting-state (RS FMRI can originate from head motion, physiology, and hardware. Of these sources, motion has received considerable attention and was found to induce corrupting effects by differentially biasing correlations between regions depending on their distance. Numerous corrective approaches have relied on the identification and censoring of high-motion time points and the use of the brain-wide average time series as a nuisance regressor to which the data are orthogonalized (Global Signal Regression, GSReg. We replicate the previously reported head-motion bias on correlation coefficients and then show that while motion can be the source of artifact in correlations, the distance-dependent bias is exacerbated by GSReg. Put differently, correlation estimates obtained after GSReg are more susceptible to the presence of motion and by extension to the levels of censoring. More generally, the effect of motion on correlation estimates depends on the preprocessing steps leading to the correlation estimate, with certain approaches performing markedly worse than others. For this purpose, we consider various models for RS FMRI preprocessing and show that the local white matter regressor (WMeLOCAL, a subset of ANATICOR, results in minimal sensitivity to motion and reduces by extension the dependence of correlation results on censoring.

  14. The impact of head movements on EEG and contact impedance: an adaptive filtering solution for motion artifact reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihajlovic, Vojkan; Patki, Shrishail; Grundlehner, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Designing and developing a comfortable and convenient EEG system for daily usage that can provide reliable and robust EEG signal, encompasses a number of challenges. Among them, the most ambitious is the reduction of artifacts due to body movements. This paper studies the effect of head movement artifacts on the EEG signal and on the dry electrode-tissue impedance (ETI), monitored continuously using the imec's wireless EEG headset. We have shown that motion artifacts have huge impact on the EEG spectral content in the frequency range lower than 20 Hz. Coherence and spectral analysis revealed that ETI is not capable of describing disturbances at very low frequencies (below 2 Hz). Therefore, we devised a motion artifact reduction (MAR) method that uses a combination of a band-pass filtering and multi-channel adaptive filtering (AF), suitable for real-time MAR. This method was capable of substantially reducing artifacts produced by head movements.

  15. New motion illusion caused by pictorial motion lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Miura, Kayo

    2008-01-01

    Motion lines (MLs) are a pictorial technique used to represent object movement in a still picture. This study explored how MLs contribute to motion perception. In Experiment 1, we reported the creation of a motion illusion caused by MLs: random displacements of objects with MLs on each frame were perceived as unidirectional global motion along the pictorial motion direction implied by MLs. In Experiment 2, we showed that the illusory global motion in the peripheral visual field captured the perceived motion direction of random displacement of objects without MLs in the central visual field, and confirmed that the results in Experiment 1 did not stem simply from response bias, but resulted from perceptual processing. In Experiment 3, we showed that the spatial arrangement of orientation information rather than ML length is important for the illusory global motion. Our results indicate that the ML effect is based on perceptual processing rather than response bias, and that comparison of neighboring orientation components may underlie the determination of pictorial motion direction with MLs.

  16. Correction of motion artifacts and serial correlations for real-time functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Jeffrey W; Rosso, Andrea L; Sparto, Patrick J; Huppert, Theodore J

    2016-07-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a relatively low-cost, portable, noninvasive neuroimaging technique for measuring task-evoked hemodynamic changes in the brain. Because fNIRS can be applied to a wide range of populations, such as children or infants, and under a variety of study conditions, including those involving physical movement, gait, or balance, fNIRS data are often confounded by motion artifacts. Furthermore, the high sampling rate of fNIRS leads to high temporal autocorrelation due to systemic physiology. These two factors can reduce the sensitivity and specificity of detecting hemodynamic changes. In a previous work, we showed that these factors could be mitigated by autoregressive-based prewhitening followed by the application of an iterative reweighted least squares algorithm offline. This current work extends these same ideas to real-time analysis of brain signals by modifying the linear Kalman filter, resulting in an algorithm for online estimation that is robust to systemic physiology and motion artifacts. We evaluated the performance of the proposed method via simulations of evoked hemodynamics that were added to experimental resting-state data, which provided realistic fNIRS noise. Last, we applied the method post hoc to data from a standing balance task. Overall, the new method showed good agreement with the analogous offline algorithm, in which both methods outperformed ordinary least squares methods.

  17. Quality Control of Structural MRI Images Applied Using FreeSurfer—A Hands-On Workflow to Rate Motion Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhausen, Lea L.; Herting, Megan M.; Buse, Judith; Roessner, Veit; Smolka, Michael N.; Vetter, Nora C.

    2016-01-01

    In structural magnetic resonance imaging motion artifacts are common, especially when not scanning healthy young adults. It has been shown that motion affects the analysis with automated image-processing techniques (e.g., FreeSurfer). This can bias results. Several developmental and adult studies have found reduced volume and thickness of gray matter due to motion artifacts. Thus, quality control is necessary in order to ensure an acceptable level of quality and to define exclusion criteria of images (i.e., determine participants with most severe artifacts). However, information about the quality control workflow and image exclusion procedure is largely lacking in the current literature and the existing rating systems differ. Here, we propose a stringent workflow of quality control steps during and after acquisition of T1-weighted images, which enables researchers dealing with populations that are typically affected by motion artifacts to enhance data quality and maximize sample sizes. As an underlying aim we established a thorough quality control rating system for T1-weighted images and applied it to the analysis of developmental clinical data using the automated processing pipeline FreeSurfer. This hands-on workflow and quality control rating system will aid researchers in minimizing motion artifacts in the final data set, and therefore enhance the quality of structural magnetic resonance imaging studies. PMID:27999528

  18. Quality control of structural MRI images applied using FreeSurfer - a hands-on workflow to rate motion artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Luise Backhausen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In structural magnetic resonance imaging motion artifacts are common, especially when not scanning healthy young adults. It has been shown that motion affects the analysis with automated image-processing techniques (e.g. FreeSurfer. This can bias results. Several developmental and adult studies have found reduced volume and thickness of gray matter due to motion artifacts. Thus, quality control is necessary in order to ensure an acceptable level of quality and to define exclusion criteria of images (i.e. determine participants with most severe artifacts. However, information about the quality control workflow and image exclusion procedure is largely lacking in the current literature and the existing rating systems differ. Here we propose a stringent workflow of quality control steps during and after acquisition of T1-weighted images, which enables researchers dealing with populations that are typically affected by motion artifacts to enhance data quality and maximize sample sizes. As an underlying aim we established a thorough quality control rating system for T1-weighted images and applied it to the analysis of developmental clinical data using the automated processing pipeline FreeSurfer. This hands-on workflow and quality control rating system will aid researchers in minimizing motion artifacts in the final data set, and therefore enhance the quality of structural magnetic resonance imaging studies.

  19. Influences of Motion Artifacts on Three-Dimensional Reconstruction Volume and Conformal Radiotherapy Planning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influences of motion artifacts on three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction volume and conformal radiotherapy planning. Methods: A phantom which can mimic the clip motion of lung tumor along the cranial-caudal direction is constructed by step motor, small ball of polyethylene and potato. Ten different scan protocols were set and CT data of the phantom were acquired by using a commercial GE LightSpeed16 CT scanner. The 3D reconstruction of the CT data was implemented by adopting volume-rendering technology of GE AdvantageSim 6.0 system. The reconstructed volumes of each target in different scan protocols were measured through 3D measuring tools. Thus, relative deviations of the reconstruction volumes between moving targets and static ones were determined. The three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) plans and conformal fields were created and compared for a static/moving target with the WiMRT treatment planning system (TPS). Results:For a static target, there was no obvious difference among the 3D reconstruction volumes when the CT data were acquired with different pitches and slices. The appearance of 3D reconstruction volume and 3D conformal field of a moving target was quite different from that of static one. The maximum relative deviation is nearly 90% for a moving target scanned with different scan protocols. The relative deviations are variable among the different targets, about from -39.8% to 89.5% for a smaller target and from -18.4% to 20.5% for a larger one.Conclusion:The motion artifacts have great effects on 3D-CRT planning and reconstruction volume, which will greatly induce distorted conformal radiation fields and false DVHs for a moving target.

  20. Motion artifact cancellation and outlier rejection for clip-type ppg-based heart rate sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Takunori; Hara, Shinsuke; Okuhata, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hajime; Kawabata, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate sensing can be used to not only understand exercise intensity but also detect life-critical condition during sports activities. To reduce stress during exercise and attach heart rate sensor easily, we developed a clip-type photoplethysmography (PPG)-based heart rate sensor. The sensor can be attached just by hanging it to the waist part of undershorts, and furthermore, it employs the motion artifact (MA) cancellation technique. However, due to its low contact pressure, sudden jumps and drops, which are called "outliers," are often observed in the sensed heart rate, so we also developed a simple outlier rejection technique. By an experiment using five male subjects (4 sets per subject), we confirmed the MA cancellation and outlier rejection capabilities.

  1. Motion artifact removal algorithm by ICA for e-bra: a women ECG measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeokjun; Oh, Sechang; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2013-04-01

    Wearable ECG(ElectroCardioGram) measurement systems have increasingly been developing for people who suffer from CVD(CardioVascular Disease) and have very active lifestyles. Especially, in the case of female CVD patients, several abnormal CVD symptoms are accompanied with CVDs. Therefore, monitoring women's ECG signal is a significant diagnostic method to prevent from sudden heart attack. The E-bra ECG measurement system from our previous work provides more convenient option for women than Holter monitor system. The e-bra system was developed with a motion artifact removal algorithm by using an adaptive filter with LMS(least mean square) and a wandering noise baseline detection algorithm. In this paper, ICA(independent component analysis) algorithms are suggested to remove motion artifact factor for the e-bra system. Firstly, the ICA algorithms are developed with two kinds of statistical theories: Kurtosis, Endropy and evaluated by performing simulations with a ECG signal created by sgolayfilt function of MATLAB, a noise signal including 0.4Hz, 1.1Hz and 1.9Hz, and a weighed vector W estimated by kurtosis or entropy. A correlation value is shown as the degree of similarity between the created ECG signal and the estimated new ECG signal. In the real time E-Bra system, two pseudo signals are extracted by multiplying with a random weighted vector W, the measured ECG signal from E-bra system, and the noise component signal by noise extraction algorithm from our previous work. The suggested ICA algorithm basing on kurtosis or entropy is used to estimate the new ECG signal Y without noise component.

  2. Investigation of the potential causes of partial scan artifacts in dynamic CT myocardial perfusion imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Yinghua; Speidel, Michael; Szczykutowicz, Timothy; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2014-03-01

    In recent years, there have been several findings regarding CT number variations (partial scan artifact or PSA) across time in dynamic myocardial perfusion studies with short scan gated reconstruction. These variations are correlated with the view angle range corresponding to the short scan acquisition for a given cardiac phase, which can vary from one cardiac cycle to another due to the asynchrony between heart rate and gantry rotation speed. In this study, we investigate several potential causes of PSA, including noise, beam hardening and scatter, using numerical simulations. In addition, we investigate partial scan artifact in a single source 64-slice diagnostic CT scanner in vivo data sets, and report its effect on perfusion analysis. Results indicated that among all three factors investigated, scatter can cause obvious partial scan artifact in dynamic myocardial perfusion imaging. Further, scatter is a low frequency phenomenon and is not heavily dependent on the changing contrasts, as both the frequency method and the virtual scan method are effective in reducing partial scan artifact. However, PSA does not necessarily lead to different blood volume maps compared to the full scan, because these maps are usually generated with a curve fitting procedure.

  3. Rapid estimation of 4DCT motion-artifact severity based on 1D breathing-surrogate periodicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Caraveo, Marshall [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Rimner, Andreas; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Yorke, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, leading to an ill-defined tumor volume with large variations for radiotherapy treatment and a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for studying respiratory motion. The authors developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of the corresponding 1D respiratory waveform (1DRW) used for phase binning in 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity. The breathing periodicity index (BPI) was defined as the sum of the largest five Fourier coefficients, ranging from 0 to 1. Distortional motion artifacts (excluding blurring) of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couch positions around the diaphragm were classified in three categories: incomplete, overlapping, and duplicate anatomies. To quantify these artifacts, discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along six directions in three orthogonal views. Artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase and phase-averaged APJ{sup ¯}, defined as motion-artifact severity (MAS), was obtained for each patient. To make MAS independent of patient-specific motion amplitude, two new MAS quantities were defined: MAS{sup D} is normalized to the maximum diaphragmatic displacement and MAS{sup V} is normalized to the mean diaphragmatic velocity (the breathing period was obtained from DFT analysis of 1DRW). Twenty-six patients’ free-breathing 4DCT images and corresponding 1DRW data were studied. Results: Higher APJ values were found around midventilation and full inhalation while the lowest APJ values were around full exhalation. The distribution of MAS is close to Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.2 mm. The BPI among the 26 patients was calculated with a value

  4. Evaluation of ICA-AROMA and alternative strategies for motion artifact removal in resting state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruim, Raimon H R; Mennes, Maarten; Buitelaar, Jan K; Beckmann, Christian F

    2015-05-15

    We proposed ICA-AROMA as a strategy for the removal of motion-related artifacts from fMRI data (Pruim et al., 2015). ICA-AROMA automatically identifies and subsequently removes data-driven derived components that represent motion-related artifacts. Here we present an extensive evaluation of ICA-AROMA by comparing our strategy to a range of alternative strategies for motion-related artifact removal: (i) no secondary motion correction, (ii) extensive nuisance regression utilizing 6 or (iii) 24 realignment parameters, (iv) spike regression (Satterthwaite et al., 2013a), (v) motion scrubbing (Power et al., 2012), (vi) aCompCor (Behzadi et al., 2007; Muschelli et al., 2014), (vii) SOCK (Bhaganagarapu et al., 2013), and (viii) ICA-FIX (Griffanti et al., 2014; Salimi-Khorshidi et al., 2014), without re-training the classifier. Using three different functional connectivity analysis approaches and four different multi-subject resting-state fMRI datasets, we assessed all strategies regarding their potential to remove motion artifacts, ability to preserve signal of interest, and induced loss in temporal degrees of freedom (tDoF). Results demonstrated that ICA-AROMA, spike regression, scrubbing, and ICA-FIX similarly minimized the impact of motion on functional connectivity metrics. However, both ICA-AROMA and ICA-FIX resulted in significantly improved resting-state network reproducibility and decreased loss in tDoF compared to spike regression and scrubbing. In comparison to ICA-FIX, ICA-AROMA yielded improved preservation of signal of interest across all datasets. These results demonstrate that ICA-AROMA is an effective strategy for removing motion-related artifacts from rfMRI data. Our robust and generalizable strategy avoids the need for censoring fMRI data and reduces motion-induced signal variations in fMRI data, while preserving signal of interest and increasing the reproducibility of functional connectivity metrics. In addition, ICA-AROMA preserves the temporal non

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging artifacts caused by brackets of various materials - An in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Deepti Razdan; Rani, M S

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate and compare the artifacts caused by various brackets materials on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Materials and Methods: Six cases were included - one control case, one case each with teeth bonded in the maxillary arch with composite brackets, ceramic brackets, stainless steel brackets, ceramic brackets in the maxillary anterior region and stainless steel brackets in the premolar region, and one case with teeth bonded in the maxillary and mandibular arch wit...

  6. A comb filter based signal processing method to effectively reduce motion artifacts from photoplethysmographic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fulai; Liu, Hongyun; Wang, Weidong

    2015-10-01

    A photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal can provide very useful information about a subject's cardiovascular status. Motion artifacts (MAs), which usually deteriorate the waveform of a PPG signal, severely obstruct its applications in the clinical diagnosis and healthcare area. To reduce the MAs from a PPG signal, in the present study we present a comb filter based signal processing method. Firstly, wavelet de-noising was implemented to preliminarily suppress a part of the MAs. Then, the PPG signal in the time domain was transformed into the frequency domain by a fast Fourier transform (FFT). Thirdly, the PPG signal period was estimated from the frequency domain by tracking the fundamental frequency peak of the PPG signal. Lastly, the MAs were removed by the comb filter which was designed based on the obtained PPG signal period. Experiments with synthetic and real-world datasets were implemented to validate the performance of the method. Results show that the proposed method can effectively restore the PPG signals from the MA corrupted signals. Also, the accuracy of blood oxygen saturation (SpO2), calculated from red and infrared PPG signals, was significantly improved after the MA reduction by the proposed method. Our study demonstrates that the comb filter can effectively reduce the MAs from a PPG signal provided that the PPG signal period is obtained.

  7. [An adaptive scaling hybrid algorithm for reduction of CT artifacts caused by metal objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Luo, Hai; Zhou, He-qin

    2009-03-01

    A new adaptively hybrid filtering algorithm is proposed to reduce the artifacts caused by metal in CT image. Firstly, the method is used to preprocess the projection data of metal region and is reconstruct by filtered back projection (FBP) method. Then the expectation maximization algorithm (EM) is performed on the iterative original metal project data. Finally, a compensating procedure is applied to the reconstructed metal region. The simulation result has demonstrated that the proposed algorithm can remove the metal artifacts and keep the structure information of metal object effectively. It ensures that the tissues around the metal will not be distorted. The method is also computational efficient and effective for the CT images which contains several metal objects.

  8. A particle filter framework for the estimation of heart rate from ECG signals corrupted by motion artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, Viswam; Akkaya, Ilge; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we describe a methodology to probabilistically estimate the R-peak locations of an electrocardiogram (ECG) signal using a particle filter. This is useful for heart rate estimation, which is an important metric for medical diagnostics. Some scenarios require constant in-home monitoring using a wearable device. This poses a particularly challenging environment for heart rate detection, due to the susceptibility of ECG signals to motion artifacts. In this work, we show how the particle filter can effectively track the true R-peak locations amidst the motion artifacts, given appropriate heart rate and R-peak observation models. A particle filter based framework has several advantages due to its freedom from strict assumptions on signal and noise models, as well as its ability to simultaneously track multiple possible heart rate hypotheses. Moreover, the proposed framework is not exclusive to ECG signals and could easily be leveraged for tracking other physiological parameters. We describe the implementation of the particle filter and validate our approach on real ECG data affected by motion artifacts from the MIT-BIH noise stress test database. The average heart rate estimation error is about 5 beats per minute for signal streams contaminated with noisy segments with SNR as low as -6 dB.

  9. A novel machine learning-enabled framework for instantaneous heart rate monitoring from motion-artifact-corrupted electrocardiogram signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingxue; Zhou, Dian; Zeng, Xuan

    2016-11-01

    This paper proposes a novel machine learning-enabled framework to robustly monitor the instantaneous heart rate (IHR) from wrist-electrocardiography (ECG) signals continuously and heavily corrupted by random motion artifacts in wearable applications. The framework includes two stages, i.e. heartbeat identification and refinement, respectively. In the first stage, an adaptive threshold-based auto-segmentation approach is proposed to select out heartbeat candidates, including the real heartbeats and large amounts of motion-artifact-induced interferential spikes. Then twenty-six features are extracted for each candidate in time, spatial, frequency and statistical domains, and evaluated by a spare support vector machine (SVM) to select out ten critical features which can effectively reveal residual heartbeat information. Afterwards, an SVM model, created on the training data using the selected feature set, is applied to find high confident heartbeats from a large number of candidates in the testing data. In the second stage, the SVM classification results are further refined by two steps: (1) a rule-based classifier with two attributes named 'continuity check' and 'locality check' for outlier (false positives) removal, and (2) a heartbeat interpolation strategy for missing-heartbeat (false negatives) recovery. The framework is evaluated on a wrist-ECG dataset acquired by a semi-customized platform and also a public dataset. When the signal-to-noise ratio is as low as  -7 dB, the mean absolute error of the estimated IHR is 1.4 beats per minute (BPM) and the root mean square error is 6.5 BPM. The proposed framework greatly outperforms well-established approaches, demonstrating that it can effectively identify the heartbeats from ECG signals continuously corrupted by intense motion artifacts and robustly estimate the IHR. This study is expected to contribute to robust long-term wearable IHR monitoring for pervasive heart health and fitness management.

  10. An improved framework for confound regression and filtering for control of motion artifact in the preprocessing of resting-state functional connectivity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Elliott, Mark A; Gerraty, Raphael T; Ruparel, Kosha; Loughead, James; Calkins, Monica E; Eickhoff, Simon B; Hakonarson, Hakon; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Wolf, Daniel H

    2013-01-01

    Several recent reports in large, independent samples have demonstrated the influence of motion artifact on resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rsfc-MRI). Standard rsfc-MRI preprocessing typically includes regression of confounding signals and band-pass filtering. However, substantial heterogeneity exists in how these techniques are implemented across studies, and no prior study has examined the effect of differing approaches for the control of motion-induced artifacts. To better understand how in-scanner head motion affects rsfc-MRI data, we describe the spatial, temporal, and spectral characteristics of motion artifacts in a sample of 348 adolescents. Analyses utilize a novel approach for describing head motion on a voxelwise basis. Next, we systematically evaluate the efficacy of a range of confound regression and filtering techniques for the control of motion-induced artifacts. Results reveal that the effectiveness of preprocessing procedures on the control of motion is heterogeneous, and that improved preprocessing provides a substantial benefit beyond typical procedures. These results demonstrate that the effect of motion on rsfc-MRI can be substantially attenuated through improved preprocessing procedures, but not completely removed.

  11. SU-E-J-257: Image Artifacts Caused by Implanted Calypso Beacons in MRI Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amro, H; Chetty, I; Gordon, J; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of Calypso Beacon-transponders in patients can cause artifacts during MRI imaging studies. This could be a problem for post-treatment follow up of cancer patients using MRI studies to evaluate metastasis and for functional imaging studies.This work assesses (1) the volume immediately surrounding the transponders that will not be visualized by the MRI due to the beacons, and (2) the dependence of the non-visualized volume on beacon orientation, and scanning techniques. Methods: Two phantoms were used in this study (1) water filled box, (2) and a 2300 cc block of pork meat. Calypso beacons were implanted in the phantoms both in parallel and perpendicular orientations with respect to the MR scanner magnetic field. MR image series of the phantom were obtained with on a 1.0T high field open MR-SIM with multiple pulse sequences, for example, T1-weighted fast field echo and T2-weighted turbo spin echo. Results: On average, a no-signal region with 2 cm radius and 3 cm length was measured. Image artifacts are more significant when beacons are placed parallel to scanner magnetic field; the no-signal area around the beacon was about 0.5 cm larger in orthogonal orientation. The no-signal region surrounding the beacons slightly varies in dimension for the different pulse sequences. Conclusion: The use of Calypso beacons can prohibit the use of MRI studies in post-treatment assessments, especially in the immediate region surrounding the implanted beacon. A characterization of the MR scanner by identifying the no-signal regions due to implanted beacons is essential. This may render the use of Calypso beacons useful for some cases and give the treating physician a chance to identify those patients prior to beacon implantation.

  12. TU-F-BRB-02: Motion Artifacts and Suppression in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, X. [Siemens (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    The current clinical standard of organ respiratory imaging, 4D-CT, is fundamentally limited by poor soft-tissue contrast and imaging dose. These limitations are potential barriers to beneficial “4D” radiotherapy methods which optimize the target and OAR dose-volume considering breathing motion but rely on a robust motion characterization. Conversely, MRI imparts no known radiation risk and has excellent soft-tissue contrast. MRI-based motion management is therefore highly desirable and holds great promise to improve radiotherapy of moving cancers, particularly in the abdomen. Over the past decade, MRI techniques have improved significantly, making MR-based motion management clinically feasible. For example, cine MRI has high temporal resolution up to 10 f/s and has been used to track and/or characterize tumor motion, study correlation between external and internal motions. New MR technologies, such as 4D-MRI and MRI hybrid treatment machines (i.e. MR-linac or MR-Co60), have been recently developed. These technologies can lead to more accurate target volume determination and more precise radiation dose delivery via direct tumor gating or tracking. Despite all these promises, great challenges exist and the achievable clinical benefit of MRI-based tumor motion management has yet to be fully explored, much less realized. In this proposal, we will review novel MR-based motion management methods and technologies, the state-of-the-art concerning MRI development and clinical application and the barriers to more widespread adoption. Learning Objectives: Discuss the need of MR-based motion management for improving patient care in radiotherapy. Understand MR techniques for motion imaging and tumor motion characterization. Understand the current state of the art and future steps for clinical integration. Henry Ford Health System holds research agreements with Philips Healthcare. Research sponsored in part by a Henry Ford Health System Internal Mentored Grant.

  13. MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0T scanner: motion artifacts and patient acceptability compared with closed bore magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangard, Christopher; Paszek, Jennifer; Berg, Frank; Eyl, Gesa; Kessler, Josef; Lackner, Klaus; Gossmann, Axel

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate motion artifacts and patient acceptability of MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0T scanner. Thirty six claustrophobic patients were enrolled prospectively, 34 of which had previous MR examinations in closed bore magnets. Anxiety and pain during MR examination in an open 1.0T scanner were evaluated by visual analogue scales and various tests. Influence of motion artifacts on image quality was evaluated by two radiologists independently using a five-point scale. Additionally, 36 non-claustrophobic patients delivered a reference value of a non-claustrophobic population for the visual analogue anxiety scale. Termination rate of MR imaging of highly claustrophobic patients decreased from 58.3% (n=21) in closed bore magnets to 8.3% (n=3) in the open scanner (pclaustrophobic patients compared with closed bore magnets. Motion artifacts did not influence image quality.

  14. Motion-related artifacts in structural brain images revealed with independent estimates of in-scanner head motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savalia, Neil K; Agres, Phillip F; Chan, Micaela Y; Feczko, Eric J; Kennedy, Kristen M; Wig, Gagan S

    2017-01-01

    Motion-contaminated T1-weighted (T1w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results in misestimates of brain structure. Because conventional T1w scans are not collected with direct measures of head motion, a practical alternative is needed to identify potential motion-induced bias in measures of brain anatomy. Head movements during functional MRI (fMRI) scanning of 266 healthy adults (20-89 years) were analyzed to reveal stable features of in-scanner head motion. The magnitude of head motion increased with age and exhibited within-participant stability across different fMRI scans. fMRI head motion was then related to measurements of both quality control (QC) and brain anatomy derived from a T1w structural image from the same scan session. A procedure was adopted to "flag" individuals exhibiting excessive head movement during fMRI or poor T1w quality rating. The flagging procedure reliably reduced the influence of head motion on estimates of gray matter thickness across the cortical surface. Moreover, T1w images from flagged participants exhibited reduced estimates of gray matter thickness and volume in comparison to age- and gender-matched samples, resulting in inflated effect sizes in the relationships between regional anatomical measures and age. Gray matter thickness differences were noted in numerous regions previously reported to undergo prominent atrophy with age. Recommendations are provided for mitigating this potential confound, and highlight how the procedure may lead to more accurate measurement and comparison of anatomical features. Hum Brain Mapp 38:472-492, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Artifacts in digital radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Jung Whan [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Shin Gu University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hoi Woun [Dept. of Radiological Technology, Beakseok Culture University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Digital Radiography is a big part of diagnostic radiology. Because uncorrected digital radiography image supported false effect of Patient’s health care. We must be manage the correct digital radiography image. Thus, the artifact images can have effect to make a wrong diagnosis. We report types of occurrence by analyzing the artifacts that occurs in digital radiography system. We had collected the artifacts occurred in digital radiography system of general hospital from 2007 to 2014. The collected data had analyzed and then had categorize as the occurred causes. The artifacts could be categorized by hardware artifacts, software artifacts, operating errors, system artifacts, and others. Hardware artifact from a Ghost artifact that is caused by lag effect occurred most frequently. The others cases are the artifacts caused by RF noise and foreign body in equipments. Software artifacts are many different types of reasons. The uncorrected processing artifacts and the image processing error artifacts occurred most frequently. Exposure data recognize (EDR) error artifacts, the processing error of commissural line, and etc., the software artifacts were caused by various reasons. Operating artifacts were caused when the user did not have the full understanding of the digital medical image system. System artifacts had appeared the error due to DICOM header information and the compression algorithm. The obvious artifacts should be re-examined, and it could result in increasing the exposure dose of the patient. The unclear artifact leads to a wrong diagnosis and added examination. The ability to correctly determine artifact are required. We have to reduce the artifact occurrences by understanding its characteristic and providing sustainable education as well as the maintenance of the equipments.

  16. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, P [University of Texas Health Science Center, UTHSCSA, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G [Technological Education Institute of Athens, Athens, Athens (Greece); Economopoulos, N [General University Hospital ATTIKON, Athens, Athens (Greece); Roka, V [Health Center of Farkadona, Trikala (Greece); Sakkas, G [Center for Research and Technology of Thessaly, Trikala (Greece); Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G [IASO Thessalias Hospital, Larissa (Greece); Statkahis, S [Cancer Therapy and Research Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Papanikolaou, N [University of Texas HSC SA, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved.

  17. Artifacts caused by insufficient contrast medium filling during C-arm cone-beam CT scans: a phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terabe, Mitsuaki; Ichikawa, Hajime; Kato, Toyohiro; Koshida, Kichiro

    2014-01-01

    We investigated artifacts due to late-arriving contrast medium (CM) during C-arm cone-beam computed tomography. We scanned a phantom filled with water or with 100, 50, or 5% v/v concentrations of CM and then virtually produced CM-delayed projection data by partially replacing the projection images. Artifacts as a function of concentration, percentage of filling time, and size and position of the filling area were assessed. In addition, we used an automatic power injector with different injection delays to inject CM during the scans. A decrease in filling times caused by a lag in CM arrival during the scan resulted in a decrease in pixel values, distortion of the filling area, and appearance of streak artifacts. Even a delay of approximately 20% in CM arrival in the total scan time resulted in obvious distortion of the filling area. The distortion and streak artifacts tended to worsen at higher CM concentrations. Use of a minimum CM concentration based on the purpose of the examination and constant filling at the target region are effective for avoiding these artifacts.

  18. An optimized DSP implementation of adaptive filtering and ICA for motion artifact reduction in ambulatory ECG monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berset, Torfinn; Geng, Di; Romero, Iñaki

    2012-01-01

    Noise from motion artifacts is currently one of the main challenges in the field of ambulatory ECG recording. To address this problem, we propose the use of two different approaches. First, an adaptive filter with electrode-skin impedance as a reference signal is described. Secondly, a multi-channel ECG algorithm based on Independent Component Analysis is introduced. Both algorithms have been designed and further optimized for real-time work embedded in a dedicated Digital Signal Processor. We show that both algorithms improve the performance of a beat detection algorithm when applied in high noise conditions. In addition, an efficient way of choosing this methods is suggested with the aim of reduce the overall total system power consumption.

  19. A systematic comparison of motion artifact correction techniques for functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Robert J; Selb, Juliette; Gagnon, Louis

    2012-01-01

    . Principle component analysis, spline interpolation, wavelet analysis, and Kalman filtering approaches are compared to one another and to standard approaches using the accuracy of the recovered, simulated hemodynamic response function (HRF). Each of the four motion correction techniques we tested yields...

  20. Analysis and attenuation of artifacts caused by spatially and temporally correlated noise sources in Green's function estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E. R.; Dou, S.; Lindsey, N.; Chang, J. P.; Biondi, B. C.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Wagner, A. M.; Bjella, K.; Daley, T. M.; Freifeld, B. M.; Robertson, M.; Ulrich, C.; Williams, E. F.

    2016-12-01

    Localized strong sources of noise in an array have been shown to cause artifacts in Green's function estimates obtained via cross-correlation. Their effect is often reduced through the use of cross-coherence. Beyond independent localized sources, temporally or spatially correlated sources of noise frequently occur in practice but violate basic assumptions of much of the theory behind ambient noise Green's function retrieval. These correlated noise sources can occur in urban environments due to transportation infrastructure, or in areas around industrial operations like pumps running at CO2 sequestration sites or oil and gas drilling sites. Better understanding of these artifacts should help us develop and justify methods for their automatic removal from Green's function estimates. We derive expected artifacts in cross-correlations from several distributions of correlated noise sources including point sources that are exact time-lagged repeats of each other and Gaussian-distributed in space and time with covariance that exponentially decays. Assuming the noise distribution stays stationary over time, the artifacts become more coherent as more ambient noise is included in the Green's function estimates. We support our results with simple computational models. We observed these artifacts in Green's function estimates from a 2015 ambient noise study in Fairbanks, AK where a trenched distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) array was deployed to collect ambient noise alongside a road with the goal of developing a permafrost thaw monitoring system. We found that joints in the road repeatedly being hit by cars travelling at roughly the speed limit led to artifacts similar to those expected when several points are time-lagged copies of each other. We also show test results of attenuating the effects of these sources during time-lapse monitoring of an active thaw test in the same location with noise detected by a 2D trenched DAS array.

  1. Prospectively ECG Gated CT pulmonary angiography versus helical ungated CT pulmonary angiography: Impact on cardiac related motion artifacts and patient radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuman, William P., E-mail: wshuman@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Leipsic, Jonathon A., E-mail: JLeipsic@providencehealth.bc.ca [University of British Columbia and St. Paul' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6 (Canada); Busey, Janet M., E-mail: jbonny@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Green, Douglas E., E-mail: dougreen@uw.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Pipavath, Sudhakar N., E-mail: snjp@u.wwashington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hague, Cameron J., E-mail: cjhague@interchange.ubc.ca [University of British Columbia and St. Paul' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z1Y6 (Canada); Koprowicz, Kent M., E-mail: kentk@u.washington.edu [Department of Radiology, 1959 NE Pacific Street, Box 357115, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Objective: To compare prospectively ECG gated CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) with routine helical ungated CTPA for cardiac related motion artifacts and patient radiation dose. Subjects and methods: Twenty patients with signs and symptoms suspicious for pulmonary embolism and who had a heart rate below 85 were scanned with prospectively ECG gated CTPA. These gated exams were matched for several clinical parameters to exams from twenty similar clinical patients scanned with routine ungated helical CTPA. Three blinded independent reviewers subjectively evaluated all exams for overall pulmonary artery enhancement and for several cardiac motion related artifacts, including vessel blurring, intravascular shading, and double line. Reviewers also measured pulmonary artery intravascular density and image noise. Patient radiation dose for each technique was compared. Fourteen clinical prospectively ECG gated CTPA exams from a second institution were evaluated for the same parameters. Results: Prospectively ECG gated CTPA resulted in significantly decreased motion-related image artifact scores in lung segments adjacent to the heart compared to ungated CTPA. Measured image noise was not significantly different between the two types of CTPA exams. Effective dose was 28% less for prospectively ECG gated CTPA (4.9 mSv versus 6.8 mSv, p = 0.02). Similar results were found in the prospectively ECG gated exams from the second institution. Conclusion: Compared to routine helical ungated CTPA, prospectively ECG gated CTPA may result in less cardiac related motion artifact in lung segments adjacent to the heart and significantly less patient radiation dose.

  2. MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0 T scanner: Motion artifacts and patient acceptability compared with closed bore magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bangard, Christopher [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: cbangard@gmx.de; Paszek, Jennifer [Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: jennypaszek@gmx.de; Berg, Frank [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: frank.berg@uk-koeln.de; Eyl, Gesa [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: gesa.eyl@gmx.de; Kessler, Josef [Department of Neurology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: kessler@nf.mpg.de; Lackner, Klaus [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: klaus.lackner@uk-koeln.de; Gossmann, Axel [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Kerpener Str. 62, 50924 Cologne (Germany)], E-mail: axel.gossmann@uni-koeln.de

    2007-10-15

    Objective: To evaluate motion artifacts and patient acceptability of MR imaging of claustrophobic patients in an open 1.0 T scanner. Subjects and methods: Thirty six claustrophobic patients were enrolled prospectively, 34 of which had previous MR examinations in closed bore magnets. Anxiety and pain during MR examination in an open 1.0 T scanner were evaluated by visual analogue scales and various tests. Influence of motion artifacts on image quality was evaluated by two radiologists independently using a five-point scale. Additionally, 36 non-claustrophobic patients delivered a reference value of a non-claustrophobic population for the visual analogue anxiety scale. Results: Termination rate of MR imaging of highly claustrophobic patients decreased from 58.3% (n = 21) in closed bore magnets to 8.3% (n = 3) in the open scanner (p {<=} 0.001). Anxiety during MR examination was reduced from 87.1 {+-} 16.7 (closed magnets) to 30.4 {+-} 30.8 (open magnet) (p {<=} 0.001) on visual analogue scale ranging from 0 to 100. Influence of motion artifacts on image quality was very little (inter-rater reliability r = 0.74; p < 0.01). Conclusions: MR imaging using an open 1.0 T scanner yielded a significantly decreased anxiety and subsequently an improved acceptability in claustrophobic patients compared with closed bore magnets. Motion artifacts did not influence image quality.

  3. Forming Mechanism and Correction of CT Image Artifacts Caused by the Errors of Three System Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We know that three system parameters, a center of X-ray source, an isocenter, and a center of linear detectors, are very difficult to be calibrated in industrial CT system. So there are often the offset of an isocenter and the deflection of linear detectors. When still using the FBP (filtered backprojection algorithm under this condition, CT image artifacts will happen and then can seriously affect test results. In this paper, we give the appearances and forming mechanism of these artifacts and propose the reconstruction algorithm including a deflection angle of linear detectors. The numerical experiments with simulated data have validated that our propose algorithm can correct CT images artifacts without data rebinning.

  4. E-Bra system for women ECG measurement with GPRS communication, Nanosensor, and motion artifact remove algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeokjun; Oh, Sechang; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2012-10-01

    with conductive gel. However, the gel can be dried when taking long time monitoring. The gold nanowire structure electrodes without consideration of uncomfortable usage of gel are attached on beneath the chest position of a brassiere, and the electrodes convert the physical ECG signal to voltage potential signal. The voltage potential ECG signal is converted to digital signal by AD converter included in microprocessor. The converted ECG signal by AD converter is saved on every 1 sec period in the internal RAM in microprocessor. For transmission of the saved data in the internal RAM to a server computer locating at remote area, the system uses the GPRS communication technology, which can develop the wide area network(WAP) without any gateway and repeater. In addition, the transmission system is operated on client mode of GPRS communication. The remote server is installed a program including the functions of displaying and analyzing the transmitted ECG. To display the ECG data, the program is operated with TCP/IP server mode and static IP address, and to analyze the ECG data, the paper suggests motion artifact remove algorithm including adaptive filter with LMS(least mean square), baseline detection algorithm using predictability estimation theory, a filter with moving weighted factor, low pass filter, peak to peak detection, and interpolation.

  5. BLADE technology to eliminate MRI of knee joint motion artifacts%BLADE技术在消除MRI膝关节运动伪影方面的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾勇坚; 郑建刚; 许建兴; 刘良卿; 周鸿雁

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨刀锋伪影校正(BLADE)技术在消除MRI膝关节运动伪影的应用价值.方法 32例膝关节常规MRI检查中出现运动伪影的患者,改用BLADE技术扫描(PD矢状位、T2矢状位),以是否能够清晰显示膝关节结构、半月板及交叉韧带为标准,与常规序列对比评估BLADE技术对消除膝关节运动伪影的应用价值.结果 膝关节常规序列扫描中出现运动伪影,改用BLADE技术扫描后,图像运动伪影消除,图像质量明显改善.结论 BLADE技术对膝关节常规扫描中产生的运动伪影有明显的校正作用,可广泛用于产生运动伪影的膝关节MRI检查中.%Objective To investigate the value of the blade artifact correction (BLADE) technology in eliminating the knee joint motion artifacts in the MR examination. Methods 32 patients with motion artifacts in the knee conventional MR examination were added standard BLADE technology to scan (PD sagittal, T2 sagittal), compared with conventional sequence, assessed the value of the BLADE technology to eliminate motion artifacts of the knee with a standard of clear display of the structure of the knee, meniscus and cruciate ligament. Results Switching to BLADE technology scanning, the image motion artifacts produced in the knee conventional examination was disappeared, and the image quality was improved significantly. Conclusion BLADE technology with significant role in correction the motion artifacts produced in the conventional scanning of the knee can be widely used to produce motion artifacts knee MRI examination.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging artifacts caused by brackets of various materials - An in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepti Razdan

    2012-01-01

    Patients who might require repeated MRI scans, can be treated orthodontically with ceramic/composite/anterior ceramic and posterior stainless steel brackets. When the region of interest is above the orbit or beyond the posterior wall of the pharynx, no demonstrable artifacts were recorded with various types of brackets included in the present study.

  7. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajia Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2, fifth (C5, and sixth (C6 cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior–inferior (Z direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left–right (Y direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation.

  8. 减少头部运动伪影及磁敏感伪影的propller技术应用价值评价%To Reduce the Head Motion Artifact and Magnetic Sensitive Artifacts Propller Technology Application Value Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海博

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨 Propl er 技术对减少头部运动伪影及磁敏感伪影的应用价值。方法我院于2010年3月至2013年对55例磁共振头颅检查时躁动或难以自控的患者,进行常规 FRFSE T2WI 和 Propel er T2WI 轴位扫描;对33例磁敏感伪影明显者行常规扩散加权图像(DWI)和Propel er DWI 扫描。观察并对照分析 FRFSE T2WI 和 Propel er T2WI 以及 DWI 与 Propel er DWI 的图像质量状况。结果通过 T2WI 检查55例,对存在明显运动伪影的患者行 Propel er T2WI 扫描后明显减少或消除了运动伪影,与 T2WI 检查结果相比差异明显,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。DWI 检查33例患者有显著磁敏感伪影,采用 ProDel er DWI 后,与 DWI 检查结果相比差异明显,具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论应用 Propel er 技术能够明显减少或消除 T2WI 及 DWI 上运动伪影及磁敏感伪影,值得推广应用。%Objective To study the Propl er technology to reduce the head motion artifact and the application value of the magnetic sensitive artifact. Methods Our hospital from March 2010 to 2013, 55 cases of MRI head check agitation or patients with difficult to control, for regular FRFSE T2WI and Propel er T2WI axial scanning; 33 cases of magnetic sensitive artifact obvious line of conventional diffusion weighted image (DWI) can and Propel er DWI scan can. Observation and contrast analysis FRFSE T2WI and Propel er T2WI and DWI and Propel er can DWI image quality can. Results Through T2WI check 55 cases of patients with obvious motion artifact line Propel er T2WI scan significantly reduce or eliminate the motion artifacts, clear difference compared with T2WI results, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). DWI examination can 33 patients had significant magnetic sensitive artifacts, adopting ProDeller DWI, can clear difference compared with DWI results can, with statistical significance (P < 0.05). Conclusion Application of Propel er technology

  9. Breast Imaging Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odle, Teresa G

    2015-01-01

    Artifacts appear on breast images for a number of reasons. Radiologic technologists play an important role in identifying artifacts that can help or hinder breast cancer diagnosis and in minimizing artifacts that degrade image quality. This article describes various artifacts that occur in breast imaging, along with their causes. The article focuses on artifacts in mammography, with a heavy emphasis on digital mammography, and on magnetic resonance imaging of the breast. Artifacts in ultrasonography of the breast, digital breast tomosynthesis, and positron emission mammography also are discussed.

  10. An easy ratiometric compensation for the extracellular Ca2+ indicator-caused fluorescence artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukkonen, Jyrki P

    2009-07-15

    Measurement of intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics is one of the most central real-time assays for cellular signaling. Ratiometric methods reduce the need for internal calibration and also effectively compensate for most artifacts when used in imaging. However, ratiometric calculation cannot compensate for extracellularly leaked (and fluorescent) Ca(2+) indicator and will instead indicate erroneous Ca(2+) concentration. This frequently occurs in systems where extracellular indicator is accumulated such as fluorescence spectrophotometers and plate readers. Here I present a method that, for the first time, fully compensates for this phenomenon. The method uses a single-step internal calibration together with a predefined ratiometric calibration protocol.

  11. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics-Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Capps, Arlie G; Kim, Dae Yu; Panorgias, Athanasios; Stevenson, Scott B; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S

    2014-03-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of a retinal image with OCT introduce motion artifacts into the image, complicating analysis and registration. This effect is especially pronounced in high-resolution datasets acquired with AO-OCT instruments. Several retinal tracking systems have been introduced to correct retinal motion during data acquisition. We present a method for correcting motion artifacts in AO-OCT volume data after acquisition using simultaneously captured adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) images. We extract transverse eye motion data from the AO-SLO images, assign a motion adjustment vector to each AO-OCT A-scan, and re-sample from the scattered data back onto a regular grid. The corrected volume data improve the accuracy of quantitative analyses of microscopic structures.

  12. Progress on Developing Adaptive Optics–Optical Coherence Tomography for In Vivo Retinal Imaging: Monitoring and Correction of Eye Motion Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J.; Capps, Arlie G.; Kim, Dae Yu; Panorgias, Athanasios; Stevenson, Scott B.; Hamann, Bernd; Werner, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in retinal image acquisition techniques, including optical coherence tomography (OCT) and scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO), combined with improved performance of adaptive optics (AO) instrumentation, has resulted in improvement in the quality of in vivo images of cellular structures in the human retina. Here, we present a short review of progress on developing AO-OCT instruments. Despite significant progress in imaging speed and resolution, eye movements present during acquisition of a retinal image with OCT introduce motion artifacts into the image, complicating analysis and registration. This effect is especially pronounced in high-resolution datasets acquired with AO-OCT instruments. Several retinal tracking systems have been introduced to correct retinal motion during data acquisition. We present a method for correcting motion artifacts in AO-OCT volume data after acquisition using simultaneously captured adaptive optics-scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) images. We extract transverse eye motion data from the AO-SLO images, assign a motion adjustment vector to each AO-OCT A-scan, and re-sample from the scattered data back onto a regular grid. The corrected volume data improve the accuracy of quantitative analyses of microscopic structures. PMID:25544826

  13. NMR artifacts caused by decoupling of multiple-spin coherences: improved SLAP experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechta, Vratislav; Schraml, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Contrary to common expectations, multiple-spin coherences containing products of proton and heteronucleus operators (e.g. Hu Cx , u = x, y, z) can produce not only sidebands but also noticeable centerband NMR signals of the heteronucleus during acquisition under 1H broadband decoupling. Such centerband signals of low abundant heteronuclei can be sources of relatively strong unexpected artifacts in NMR experiments that aim to detect very weak signals from much less-abundant isotopomers, e.g. 13C-13C ones. These findings lead to a new design of Sign Labeled Polarization Transfer (SLAP) pulse sequence (MSS-SLAP) with improved suppression of centerband peaks that are because of singly, e.g. 13C, labeled molecules (parent peaks). The MSS-SLAP experiment and its MSS-BIRD-SLAP variant are compared with a few older SLAP versions.

  14. Free-breathing high-pitch 80kVp dual-source computed tomography of the pediatric chest: Image quality, presence of motion artifacts and radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodelle, Boris; Fischbach, Constanze; Booz, Christian; Yel, Ibrahim; Frellesen, Claudia; Beeres, Martin; Vogl, Thomas J; Scholtz, Jan-Erik

    2017-04-01

    To investigate image quality, presence of motion artifacts and effects on radiation dose of 80kVp high-pitch dual-source CT (DSCT) in combination with an advanced modeled iterative reconstruction algorithm (ADMIRE) of the pediatric chest compared to single-source CT (SSCT). The study was approved by the institutional review board. Eighty-seven consecutive pediatric patients (mean age 9.1±4.9years) received either free-breathing high-pitch (pitch 3.2) chest 192-slice DSCT (group 1, n=31) or standard-pitch (pitch 1.2) 128-slice SSCT (group 2, n=56) with breathing-instructions by random assignment. Tube settings were similar in both groups with 80 kVp and 74 ref. mAs. Images were reconstructed using FBP for both groups. Additionally, ADMIRE was used in group 1. Effective thorax diameter, image noise, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the pectoralis major muscle and the thoracic aorta were calculated. Motion artifacts were measured as doubling boarders of the diaphragm and the heart. Images were rated by two blinded readers for overall image quality and presence of motion artifacts on 5-point-scales. Size specific dose estimates (SSDE, mGy) and effective dose (ED, mSv) were calculated. Age and effective thorax diameter showed no statistically significant differences in both groups. Image noise and SNR were comparable (p>0.64) for SSCT and DSCT with ADMIRE, while DSCT with FBP showed inferior results (pquality while lowering radiation exposure in free-breathing pediatric patients without sedation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. How MRI Compatible is 'MRI Compatible'? A Systematic Comparison of Artifacts Caused by Biopsy Needles at 3.0 and 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, Tobias, E-mail: tpenzkofer@ukaachen.de [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Peykan, Nilufar [Klinikum Osnabrueck, Roentgen- und Strahlenklinik (Germany); Schmidt, Katja [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Krombach, Gabriele [Justus-Liebig University Giessen, Department of Radiology (Germany); Kuhl, Christiane K. [RWTH Aachen University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to systematically investigate artifacts caused by interventional needles recommended for use in MRI, with focus on field strength, needle/mandrin type, orientation and sequence. Methods: Eight different MRI compatible needles were placed in porcine tissue and examined at 1.5 and 3.0 T with balanced-steady-state-free-precession (B-SSFP) and T1-weighted-spoiled-gradient-echo (T1-SPGR) sequences in different orientations to B{sub 0}. Artifact diameters with regards to the primary, inner, and secondary, outer artifacts were assessed and statistically evaluated. Results: The types and degree of artifacts varied considerably, especially between different mandrin types even for the same needles. Orientation of the needle in the magnetic field was another main contributor to the artifact dimensions. Less important factors were the type of pulse sequence and field strength. Artifacts ranged from 0.7 mm (steel, 0 Degree-Sign , B-SSFP, 3.0 T, inner) to 71.4 mm (nitinol, 90 Degree-Sign , B-SSFP, 1.5 T, outer). Inner artifact diameters in B-SSFP were slightly larger (8.2 {+-} 5.7 mm) than those in T1-SPGR (7.6 {+-} 5.4 mm) and comparable between 1.5 and 3.0 T (e.g., 8.0 vs. 8.4 mm, B-SSFP). Conclusions: Although all were sold as 'MR compatible,' the artifacts differed greatly between needle types, and even more so for different mandrins. The results suggest an empirical approach to the needle choice based on lesion type and approach angle.

  16. CR artifacts causes and countermeasures%计算机X射线摄影系统伪影成因分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩峰

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Through to the CR in imaging, scanning and transmission process of artifact analysis, find out the causes of artifacts, and to explore methods and countermeasures to reduce and eliminate artifacts, improve the quality of CR picture. Methods:Collected between September 2009 and mid-February 2012 CR images of 103 cases with artifacts, through the analysis of the morphology and characteristics of image artifacts on the causes of artifacts. Results:from 103 have artifacts in the image analysis and proof, the photography, scanning and so on ordinary maintenance produces CR image artifacts, most of the artifacts, through the corresponding processing, most of them can reduce and eliminate. Conclusion:As long as technicians and maintenance engineers to strengthen the sense of responsibility, familiar with the working principle of CR equipment and strengthen the ordinary maintenance, CR image artifacts can be avoided and eliminated.%目的:分析计算机X射线摄影(CR)系统在成像、扫描及传输过程中伪影产生的原因,探讨减少和消除伪影的方法和解决对策,以提高CR的照片质量。方法:收集103例CR伪影影像资料,通过图像上伪影的形态和特点分析伪影产生的原因。结果:通过对103幅有伪影的图像进行分析证实,在摄影、扫描及日常的维护保养等方面操作不当均可产生CR图像伪影,但多数伪影通过相应的处理后可以减少和消除。结论:影像技术人员和维修工程师需加强责任心,熟悉CR设备的工作原理,加强对CR设备的日常的维护,可有效避免和消除CR图像伪影。

  17. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed M. A. Salehizadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA. The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1 training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2 test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3 Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability

  18. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M. A.; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  19. A Novel Time-Varying Spectral Filtering Algorithm for Reconstruction of Motion Artifact Corrupted Heart Rate Signals During Intense Physical Activities Using a Wearable Photoplethysmogram Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehizadeh, Seyed M A; Dao, Duy; Bolkhovsky, Jeffrey; Cho, Chae; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2015-12-23

    Accurate estimation of heart rates from photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals during intense physical activity is a very challenging problem. This is because strenuous and high intensity exercise can result in severe motion artifacts in PPG signals, making accurate heart rate (HR) estimation difficult. In this study we investigated a novel technique to accurately reconstruct motion-corrupted PPG signals and HR based on time-varying spectral analysis. The algorithm is called Spectral filter algorithm for Motion Artifacts and heart rate reconstruction (SpaMA). The idea is to calculate the power spectral density of both PPG and accelerometer signals for each time shift of a windowed data segment. By comparing time-varying spectra of PPG and accelerometer data, those frequency peaks resulting from motion artifacts can be distinguished from the PPG spectrum. The SpaMA approach was applied to three different datasets and four types of activities: (1) training datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 12 subjects while performing treadmill exercise from 1 km/h to 15 km/h; (2) test datasets from the 2015 IEEE Signal Process. Cup Database recorded from 11 subjects while performing forearm and upper arm exercise. (3) Chon Lab dataset including 10 min recordings from 10 subjects during treadmill exercise. The ECG signals from all three datasets provided the reference HRs which were used to determine the accuracy of our SpaMA algorithm. The performance of the SpaMA approach was calculated by computing the mean absolute error between the estimated HR from the PPG and the reference HR from the ECG. The average estimation errors using our method on the first, second and third datasets are 0.89, 1.93 and 1.38 beats/min respectively, while the overall error on all 33 subjects is 1.86 beats/min and the performance on only treadmill experiment datasets (22 subjects) is 1.11 beats/min. Moreover, it was found that dynamics of heart rate variability can be

  20. Body MR Imaging: Artifacts, k-Space, and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Susie Y; Seethamraju, Ravi T; Patel, Pritesh; Hahn, Peter F; Kirsch, John E; Guimaraes, Alexander R

    2015-01-01

    Body magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is challenging because of the complex interaction of multiple factors, including motion arising from respiration and bowel peristalsis, susceptibility effects secondary to bowel gas, and the need to cover a large field of view. The combination of these factors makes body MR imaging more prone to artifacts, compared with imaging of other anatomic regions. Understanding the basic MR physics underlying artifacts is crucial to recognizing the trade-offs involved in mitigating artifacts and improving image quality. Artifacts can be classified into three main groups: (a) artifacts related to magnetic field imperfections, including the static magnetic field, the radiofrequency (RF) field, and gradient fields; (b) artifacts related to motion; and (c) artifacts arising from methods used to sample the MR signal. Static magnetic field homogeneity is essential for many MR techniques, such as fat saturation and balanced steady-state free precession. Susceptibility effects become more pronounced at higher field strengths and can be ameliorated by using spin-echo sequences when possible, increasing the receiver bandwidth, and aligning the phase-encoding gradient with the strongest susceptibility gradients, among other strategies. Nonuniformities in the RF transmit field, including dielectric effects, can be minimized by applying dielectric pads or imaging at lower field strength. Motion artifacts can be overcome through respiratory synchronization, alternative k-space sampling schemes, and parallel imaging. Aliasing and truncation artifacts derive from limitations in digital sampling of the MR signal and can be rectified by adjusting the sampling parameters. Understanding the causes of artifacts and their possible solutions will enable practitioners of body MR imaging to meet the challenges of novel pulse sequence design, parallel imaging, and increasing field strength.

  1. Video-EEG Monitoring Artifact: Causes and Strategies%视频脑电监测伪差原因分析及对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏蕤荭; 马全有; 刘麦仙

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the causes of video - EEG monitoring artifacts and propose preventive measures. Methods The video - EEG monitoring results of 563 cases between October 2010 and October 2011 were analyzed. Results Artifacts occurred in 104 out of 563 cases. The causes of artifacts consisted of ECG artifact ( 15 cases, 14.4% ), baseline instability ( 31 cases, 29.8%), body movements ( 33 cases, 31.7%), static artifacts ( 22 cases, 21.2%), and operation artifacts ( 3 cases, 2. 9% ). Conclusion EEG monitoring training for nurses, health education for patients and inspection system can directly improve the accuracy of video EEG monitoring.%目的 总结视频脑电监测过程中出现伪差的原因,并制定相应的干预措施.方法 对2010年10月-2011年10月563例接受视频脑电监测患者的监测结果进行分析.结果 563例中,出现伪差者104例.其中心电伪差15例,占14.4%;基线不稳31例,占29.8%;体动伪差33例,占31.7%;静电伪差22例,占21.2%;操作伪差3例,占2.9%.结论 加强护士视频脑电监测知识培训,强化健康教育,认真落实巡视制度可直接提高视频脑电监测的准确性,为临床诊断治疗提供可靠的依据,同时也使患者避免了不必要的经济损失.

  2. Time-frequency analysis of neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies for selective detection of pulsatile tissues by avoiding probe-motion artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Masayuki; Tabata, Yuki; Izuwaki, Yusuke; Nakamori, Nobuyuki; Kitsunezuka, Yoshiki

    2015-03-01

    In order to detect the pulsatile tissues in neonatal cranial ultrasonic movies by avoiding probe-motion artifact, a time-frequency analysis has been performed in several movie fragments at typical three scenes: (a) a brain-lost, (b) a brain-captured and probe-stabilized, and (c) a brain-captured and probe-swayed ones. The pulsatile tissue, which is a key point of pediatric diagnosis, had successfully detected with an algorithm based on Fourier transform but it had required us to extract the probe-stabilized scene manually by visual observation of the movie. A spatial mean square of echo intensity Etot and a total AC power Ptot over a fan-shape of field of view were evaluated according to a power spectrum of a time-variation of 64 samples of echo intensity at each pixel in each movie fragment split from actual B-mode ultrasonic movies taken at coronal sections of a neonate. The results revealed that (1) significant low Etot was found at the brain-lost scene rather than that at the other scenes, and (2) lower Ptot was found at the probe-stabilized scene rather than the probe-swayed ones. This fact strongly suggests that the Etot and Ptot are promising features for automatic extraction of probe-stabilized scenes. It must lead to detect the pulsatile tissues selectively by avoiding probe-motion artifact and to realize systematic analysis of the whole of our extensive movie archives, which is useful not only for retrospective study of ischemic diseases but also for bedside diagnosis to stabilize the freehand ultrasonic probe.

  3. Motion in images is essential to cause motion sickness symptoms, but not to increase postural sway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubeck, A.J.A.; Bos, J.E.; Stins, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective It is generally assumed that motion in motion images is responsible for increased postural sway as well as for visually induced motion sickness (VIMS). However, this has not yet been tested. To that end, we studied postural sway and VIMS induced by motion and still images. Method

  4. iPhone 4s photoplethysmography: which light color yields the most accurate heart rate and normalized pulse volume using the iPhysioMeter Application in the presence of motion artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Matsumura

    Full Text Available Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR and normalized pulse volume (NPV, which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG, by using a smartphone's embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: -0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r =  -0.29 to 0.03, but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: -0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11. Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue.

  5. iPhone 4s photoplethysmography: which light color yields the most accurate heart rate and normalized pulse volume using the iPhysioMeter Application in the presence of motion artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Kenta; Rolfe, Peter; Lee, Jihyoung; Yamakoshi, Takehiro

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress in information and communication technologies has made it possible to measure heart rate (HR) and normalized pulse volume (NPV), which are important physiological indices, using only a smartphone. This has been achieved with reflection mode photoplethysmography (PPG), by using a smartphone's embedded flash as a light source and the camera as a light sensor. Despite its widespread use, the method of PPG is susceptible to motion artifacts as physical displacements influence photon propagation phenomena and, thereby, the effective optical path length. Further, it is known that the wavelength of light used for PPG influences the photon penetration depth and we therefore hypothesized that influences of motion artifact could be wavelength-dependant. To test this hypothesis, we made measurements in 12 healthy volunteers of HR and NPV derived from reflection mode plethysmograms recorded simultaneously at three different spectral regions (red, green and blue) at the same physical location with a smartphone. We then assessed the accuracy of the HR and NPV measurements under the influence of motion artifacts. The analyses revealed that the accuracy of HR was acceptably high with all three wavelengths (all rs > 0.996, fixed biases: -0.12 to 0.10 beats per minute, proportional biases: r =  -0.29 to 0.03), but that of NPV was the best with green light (r = 0.791, fixed biases: -0.01 arbitrary units, proportional bias: r = 0.11). Moreover, the signal-to-noise ratio obtained with green and blue light PPG was higher than that of red light PPG. These findings suggest that green is the most suitable color for measuring HR and NPV from the reflection mode photoplethysmogram under motion artifact conditions. We conclude that the use of green light PPG could be of particular benefit in ambulatory monitoring where motion artifacts are a significant issue.

  6. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Budde, R.P.; Westers, P.; Mol, B.A. de; Prokop, M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. METHODS

  7. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, P.; Budde, R.P.J.; Westers, P.; de Mol, B.A.J.M.; Prokop, M.

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. A Medtronic Hall ti

  8. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves : quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Symersky, Petr; Budde, Ricardo P. J.; Westers, Paul; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Prokop, Mathias

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. Methods

  9. A Robust Motion Artifact Detection Algorithm for Accurate Detection of Heart Rates from Photoplethysmographic Signals using Time-Frequency Spectral Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Duy; Salehizadeh, S M A; Noj, Yeon; Chong, Jo Woon; Cho, Chae; Mcmanus, Dave; Darling, Chad E; Mendelson, Yitzhak; Chon, Ki H

    2016-10-21

    Motion and noise artifacts (MNAs) impose limits on the usability of the photoplethysmogram (PPG), particularly in the context of ambulatory monitoring. MNAs can distort PPG, causing erroneous estimation of physiological parameters such as heart rate (HR) and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). In this study we present a novel approach, "TifMA," based on using the Time-frequency spectrum of PPG to first detect the MNA-corrupted data and next discard the non-usable part of the corrupted data. The term "non-usable" refers to segments of PPG data from which the HR signal cannot be recovered accurately. Two sequential classification procedures were included in the TifMA algorithm. The first classifier distinguishes between MNA-corrupted and MNA-free PPG data. Once a segment of data is deemed MNA-corrupted, the next classifier determines whether the HR can be recovered from the corrupted segment or not. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used to build a decision boundary for the first classification task using data segments from a training data set. Features from time-frequency spectra of PPG were extracted to build the detection model. Five datasets were considered for evaluating TifMA performance: (1) and (2) were lab-controlled PPG recordings from forehead and finger pulse oximeter sensors with subjects making random movements, (3) and (4) were actual patient PPG recordings from UMass Memorial Medical Center with random free movements and (5) was a lab-controlled PPG recording dataset measured at the forehead while the subjects ran on a treadmill. The first dataset was used to analyze the noise sensitivity of the algorithm. Datasets 2-4 were used to evaluate the MNA detection phase of the algorithm. The results from the first phase of the algorithm (MNA detection) were compared to results from three existing MNA detection algorithms: the Hjorth, kurtosis-Shannon Entropy and time-domain variability-SVM approaches. This last is an approach recently developed

  10. Artifact reduction in HARP strain maps using anisotropic smoothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elmoniem, Khaled Z.; Parthasarathy, Vijay; Prince, Jerry L.

    2006-03-01

    Harmonic phase (HARP) MRI is used to measure myocardial motion and strain from tagged MR images. HARP MRI uses limited number of samples from the spectrum of the tagged images to reconstruct motion and strain. The HARP strain maps, however, suffer from artifacts that limit the accuracy of the computations and degrade the appearance of the strain maps. Causes of these, so called 'zebra', artifacts include image noise, Gibbs ringing, and interference from other Fourier spectral peaks. Computing derivatives of the HARP phase, which are needed to estimate strain, further accentuates these artifacts. Previous methods to reduce these artifacts include 1-D and 2-D nonlinear filtering of the HARP derivatives, and a 2-D linear filtering of unwrapped HARP phase. A common drawback among these methods is the lack of proper segmentation of the myocardium from the blood pool. Because of the lack of segmentation, the noisy phase values from the blood pool enter into the computation in the smoothed strain maps, which causes artifacts. In this work, we propose a smoothing method based on anisotropic diffusion that filters the HARP derivatives strictly within the myocardium without the need for prior segmentation. The information about tissue geometry and the strain distribution is used to restrict the smoothing to within the myocardium, thereby ensuring minimum distortion of the final strain map. Preliminary results demonstrate the ability of anisotropic diffusion for better artifact reduction and lesser strain distortion than the existing methods.

  11. From naive to scientific understanding of motion and its causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascari, Alessandro; Corni, Federico; Ceroni, Gabriele; Fuchs, Hans U.

    2016-05-01

    The difference in the descriptions of motion phenomena made by pupils in the first grades of secondary school and physicists is quite evident. Conceptual metaphors hidden in language suggest that there is continuity between the conceptual structure involved in the description and the interpretation of motion of experts and laypersons. In this paper the presence of such a continuity is shown through a metaphor analysis of linguistic expressions from both groups.

  12. Artifacts in musculoskeletal MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh R; Chin, Michael S M; Peh, Wilfred C G

    2014-02-01

    MR imaging has become an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of a vast number of pathologies and is of foremost importance in the evaluation of spine, joints, and soft tissue structures of the musculoskeletal system. MR imaging is susceptible to various artifacts that may affect the image quality or even simulate pathologies. Some of these artifacts have gained special importance with the use of higher field strength magnets and with the increasing need for MR imaging in postoperative patients, especially those with previous joint replacements or metallic implants. Artifacts may arise from patient motion or could be due to periodic motion, such as vascular and cardiac pulsation. Artifacts could also arise from various protocol errors including saturation, wraparound, truncation, shading, partial volume averaging, and radiofrequency interference artifacts. Susceptibility artifact occurs at interfaces with different magnetic susceptibilities and is of special importance with increasing use of metallic joint replacement prostheses. Magic angle phenomenon is a special type of artifact that occurs in musculoskeletal MR imaging. It is essential to recognize these artifacts and to correct them because they may produce pitfalls in image interpretation.

  13. Mammographic Artifacts on Full-Field Digital Mammography

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Song, ByungJoo; Jung, Haijo

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the incidence of full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) artifacts with three systems at two institutions and compares the artifacts between two detector types and two grid types. A total of 4,440 direct and 4,142 indirect FFDM images were reviewed by two radiologists, and artifacts were classified as patient related, hardware related, and software processing. The overall incidence of FFDM artifacts was 3.4 % (292/8,582). Patient related artifacts (motion artifacts and ...

  14. Hypothesis: Artifacts, Including Spurious Chimeric RNAs with a Short Homologous Sequence, Caused by Consecutive Reverse Transcriptions and Endogenous Random Primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhiyu; Yuan, Chengfu; Zellmer, Lucas; Liu, Siqi; Xu, Ningzhi; Liao, D Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Recent RNA-sequencing technology and associated bioinformatics have led to identification of tens of thousands of putative human chimeric RNAs, i.e. RNAs containing sequences from two different genes, most of which are derived from neighboring genes on the same chromosome. In this essay, we redefine "two neighboring genes" as those producing individual transcripts, and point out two known mechanisms for chimeric RNA formation, i.e. transcription from a fusion gene or trans-splicing of two RNAs. By our definition, most putative RNA chimeras derived from canonically-defined neighboring genes may either be technical artifacts or be cis-splicing products of 5'- or 3'-extended RNA of either partner that is redefined herein as an unannotated gene, whereas trans-splicing events are rare in human cells. Therefore, most authentic chimeric RNAs result from fusion genes, about 1,000 of which have been identified hitherto. We propose a hypothesis of "consecutive reverse transcriptions (RTs)", i.e. another RT reaction following the previous one, for how most spurious chimeric RNAs, especially those containing a short homologous sequence, may be generated during RT, especially in RNA-sequencing wherein RNAs are fragmented. We also point out that RNA samples contain numerous RNA and DNA shreds that can serve as endogenous random primers for RT and ensuing polymerase chain reactions (PCR), creating artifacts in RT-PCR.

  15. The relation between respiratory motion artifact correction and lung standardized uptake value%呼吸运动伪影的校正及其与肺部SUV的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹立杰; 刘晓建; 刘杰; 续蕊; 颜珏

    2014-01-01

    PET/CT在疾病诊断和疗效评价上起着重要作用,但是呼吸运动伪影给病变的诊断及治疗带来困扰,临床有多种方法可以用来对呼吸运动伪影进行校正,其中应用最广泛的是呼吸门控技术.其对呼吸运动伪影校正后可以明显提高肺部病变的最大标准化摄取值,从而提高图像质量及诊断的准确性.%PET/CT is playing an important role in disease diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation.But the respiratory motion artifact may bring trouble in diagnosis and therapy.There are many methods to correct the respiratory motion artifact.Respiratory gated PET/CT is applied most extensively of them.Using respiratory gated PET/CT to correct respiratory motion artifact can increase the maximum standardized uptake value of lung lesion obviously,thereby improving the quality of image and accuracy of diagnosis.

  16. Multidetector CT imaging of mechanical prosthetic heart valves: quantification of artifacts with a pulsatile in-vitro model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symersky, Petr [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Oosterpark 9, P.O box 95500, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Budde, Ricardo P.J. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Westers, Paul [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Department of Biostatistics, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mol, Bas A.J.M. de [Academic Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Technology Eindhoven, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Prokop, Mathias [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) can detect the cause of prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction but is hampered by valve-induced artifacts. We quantified artifacts of four PHV using a pulsatile in-vitro model and assessed the relation to leaflet motion and valve design. A Medtronic Hall tilting disc (MH), and Carbomedics (CM), St Jude (SJM), and ON-X bileaflet valves underwent CT in an in-vitro model using retrospective gating with a 64 detector CT system in stationary and pulsatile conditions. Artifacts and radiopaque component volumes were quantified with thresholds based on surrounding structures and valvular components. Hypodense artifacts volumes (mm{sup 3}) were 1,029 {+-} 147, 535 {+-} 53, 371 {+-} 16, and 366 {+-} 18 for the SJM, MH, CM and ON-X valves (p < 0.001 except for the latter two valves p = 0.43). Hyperdense artifact volumes were 3,546 {+-} 141, 2,387 {+-} 103, 2,003 {+-} 102, and 3,033 {+-} 31 for the SJM, MH, CM and ON-X valve, respectively (all differences p < 0.001). Leaflet motion affected hypodense (F = 41.5, p < 0.001) and hyperdense artifacts (F = 53.7, p < 0.001). Closed and moving leaflets were associated with the least and the most artifacts respectively (p < 0.001, both artifact types). Both valve design and leaflet motion affect PHV-induced artifacts. Best imaging results may be expected for the CM valve during phases in which the leaflets are closed. (orig.)

  17. 计算机X线摄影(CR)胶片中伪影产生的原因及解决办法%Formation Causes and Elimination Methods of Artifacts in CR Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李会超; 孙飞; 丁帅; 侯海潮

    2013-01-01

    目的找出伪影产生的原因并采取相应的解决方法,减除伪影,提高CR影像质量。方法收集显示有伪影的CR胶片243张,分析伪影形成原因并探讨相应的解决方法。结果共找到13种伪影产生原因,如IP不洁产生的伪影、IP自身生成的伪影、荧光物质老化产生的伪影等,且每种伪影的消除方法也已探讨出来。结论针对性的解决方案能够有效减除伪影,提高诊断质量。%Objective To find the formation causes of artifacts and adopt corresponding solutions to eliminate the artifacts in CR iflms so that the image quality can be improved. Methods Collecting 243 CR iflms with artifacts, analyzing the formation causes and discussing the elimination methods of the artifacts. Results 13 kinds of formation causes are found such as artifacts due to the unclean Ip board, artifacts due to IP, artifacts due to lfuorescent material aging and so on. Elimination methods for each of these artifacts are also found. Conclusion Corresponding solutions can eliminate the artifacts effectively to improve the diagnosis quality .

  18. Motion Artifacts of Ascending Aorta:CT Features and Elimination Methods%升主动脉搏动样伪影的螺旋CT表现及其消除措施

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉春; 王建良; 吴志娟; 周伟; 张怀信

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨升主动脉搏动样伪影的单层和多层螺旋CT表现,及其运用心电门控技术进行消除.方法 搜集短期内(<1个月)分别进行单层和多层螺旋CT扫描患者资料50例,观察其主动脉CT图像,分别统计升主动脉搏动样伪影的检出率,及其发生部位、宽度、长度、边界是否清楚及伪影的连续性,并进行对照研究.其中20例同期进行心电门控技术冠状动脉扫描,调取其冠状动脉积分平扫图像观察升主动脉搏动样伪影的显示情况,并进行对照研究.结果 50例患者升主动脉搏动性伪影在单层和多层螺旋CT图像上的显示率分别为74.0%和80.0%,其中假内膜片样伪影显示率均较高,以左前壁和右后壁相对多见.通过统计分析升主动脉搏动性伪影的宽度(t=0.198)、长度(t=1.793)、伪影的边界清晰(X2=0.005)和连续性中断征象(X2=0.956),在单层和多层螺旋CT上差异均无统计学意义(P>0.05).其中20例同期进行多层螺旋CT心电门控技术冠脉平扫,对照其胸部平扫图像,有50%(10/20)的伪影被消除.结论 升主动脉搏动样伪影的单层和多层螺旋CT显示率均较高,差异性不明显,利用心电门控技术可以有效减少伪影的出现.%Objective To analyze helical CT manifestations of motion artifacts of ascending aorta, and to eliminate artifacts with electrocardiographic gating techniques. Methods Fifty patients underwent helical CT (single and multi slice CT ) scan. The detection rate, locations, width, length, boundary and continuity of the artifacts were evaluated by two investigators. On the other hand, 20 patients underwent multi slice helical CT scan using electrocardiographic gating techniques, characteristics of motion artifacts were recorded and compared. Results In 50 patients, the detection rate of motion artifacts on single slice and multi slice helical CT images were 74.0% and 80.0% respectively. among them, false internal flap artifact was

  19. A Hybrid Motion Compensation De-interlacing Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Motion compensation de-interlacing is expected to be better than linear techniques; but all the block-based motion compensation de-interlacing methods cause block artifacts. The algorithm proposed in this paper is concerned with reducing the deficiency of motion-compensated interpolation by using adaptive hybrid de-interlacing methods. A spatio-temporal tensor-based approach is used to get more accurate motion field for de-interlacing. Motion vector is assigned for each position with pixel precision; the block artifact is reduced significantly. To deal with the artifacts introduced by motion-compensation when the motion estimation is incorrect, linear techniques are considered by adaptive weighting. Furthermore, directional filter is adapted to preserve details and the edge discontinuity could be eliminated greatly. Our approach is robust to incorrect motion vector estimation.

  20. Types of diaphragmatic motion during hepatic angiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, T; Kuroda, C; Fujita, M

    1997-01-01

    To determine the types and causes of diaphragmatic motion during hepatic angiography, the authors used transarterial cut-film portography (TAP) to study movement of the diaphragm during breath-holding. Thirty-three TAP sequences were studied, and the patients' diaphragmatic motions were classified into four categories according to the distance their diaphragms moved. Results showed that the diaphragm was stationary in 33% of the TAP studies, while perpetual motion occurred in 15% of the studies, early-phase motion occurred in 12% and late-phase motion occurred in 40%. Ten sequences showed diaphragmatic motion of more than 10 mm, with eight sequences showing caudal motion and two showing cranial motion. This article discusses the cause of diaphragmatic motion during breath-holding for hepatic angiography and presents suggestions to reduce motion artifacts during the exam.

  1. Power as the Cause of Motion and a New Foundation of Classical Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harokopos E.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Laws of motion are derived based on power rather than on force. I show how power extends the law of inertia to include curvilinear motion and I also show that the law of action-reaction can be expressed in terms of the mutual time rate of change of kinetic energies instead of mutual forces. I then compare the laws of motion based on power to Newton’s Laws of Motion and I investigate the relation of power to Leibniz’s notion of vis viva. I also discuss briefly how the metaphysics of power as the cause of motion can be grounded in a modern version of occasionalism for the purpose of establishing an alternative foundation of mechanics. The laws of motion derived in this paper along with the metaphysical foundation proposed come in defense of the hypotheses that time emerges as an ordered progression of now and that gravitation is the effect of energy transfer between an unobservable substance and all matter in the Universe.

  2. Investigation of Acquired Fuel Motion Caused by Ice Roughness in OMEGA Cryogenic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, D.; McKenty, P. W.; Knauer, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    It is expected that DT ice/gas interfaces in cryogenic targets will have a certain level of ice roughness; however, less is known about the possible influence of this roughness on net fuel motion during a target implosion. Measureable nonzero net fuel velocity is typically associated with low- l mode asymmetries. Since ice roughness is mainly characterized by low l modes, this work examines the effect of roughness on fuel motion in OMEGA cryogenic experiments. The measurements of fuel motion are taken using neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) diagnostics, which operate on the principle that emitted neutrons have an additional velocity component caused by the fluid motion from which they are borne. This gives rise to an energy shift of the neutron energy spectra. NTOF measurements will be shown illustrating the overall fuel motion that is systematically seen in OMEGA cryogenic implosions but not seen in warm target implosions. Results from 2-D DRACO simulations, which include low l-mode ice roughness, will be presented and the predicted acquired fuel motion will be compared to experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  3. Artifacts as Conventional Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Deborah R.; Callanan, Maureen A.

    2007-01-01

    What underlies children's understanding of artifacts? Studies suggest that beginning around age 7, people reason about artifacts in terms of the inventor's purpose--termed "the design stance." Our two studies emphasize another component of artifact understanding--the cultural nature of artifacts--by demonstrating people's sensitivity to an…

  4. Ultrasound Artifacts - Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bönhof, J A

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of artifacts is essential for the competent use of ultrasound. Artifacts are method-based and should be differentiated from image errors of another genesis. They are logical and occur because the conditions required for image generation do not fully correspond to the reality. Artifacts occur due to disregard of the true dimensions of sound lobes (slice-thickness artifacts and bow artifacts, range ambiguities) and due to different types of mirroring with different appearances. There are also comet-tail-like artifacts such as comet-tail and ring-down artifacts.

  5. Artifacts in three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faletra, Francesco Fulvio; Ramamurthi, Alamelu; Dequarti, Maria Cristina; Leo, Laura Anna; Moccetti, Tiziano; Pandian, Natesa

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is subject to the same types of artifacts encountered on two-dimensional TEE. However, when displayed in a 3D format, some of the artifacts appear more "realistic," whereas others are unique to image acquisition and postprocessing. Three-dimensional TEE is increasingly used in the setting of percutaneous catheter-based interventions and ablation procedures, and 3D artifacts caused by the metallic components of catheters and devices are particularly frequent. Knowledge of these artifacts is of paramount relevance to avoid misinterpretation of 3D images. Although artifacts and pitfalls on two-dimensional echocardiography are well described and classified, a systematic description of artifacts in 3D transesophageal echocardiographic images and how they affect 3D imaging is still absent. The aim of this review is to describe the most relevant artifacts on 3D TEE, with particular emphasis on those occurring during percutaneous interventions for structural heart disease and ablation procedures.

  6. PET/CT Artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Blodgett, Todd M.; Mehta, Ajeet S.; Mehta, Amar S.; Laymon, Charles M; Carney, Jonathan; Townsend, David W.

    2011-01-01

    There are several artifacts encountered in PET/CT imaging, including attenuation correction (AC) artifacts associated with using CT for attenuation correction. Several artifacts can mimic a 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) avid malignant lesions and therefore recognition of these artifacts is clinically relevant. Our goal was to identify and characterize these artifacts and also discuss some protocol variables that may affect image quality in PET/CT.

  7. Dynamics in artifact ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2012-01-01

    We increasingly interact with multiple interactive artifacts with overlapping capabilities during our daily activities. It has previously been shown that the use of an interactive artifact cannot be understood in isolation, but artifacts must be understood as part of an artifact ecology, where ar...... in artifact ecologies cannot be understood as static, instead they evolve dynamically over time. We provide activity theory-based concepts to explain these dynamics....

  8. Mesoscale hybrid calibration artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Hy D.; Claudet, Andre A.; Oliver, Andrew D.

    2010-09-07

    A mesoscale calibration artifact, also called a hybrid artifact, suitable for hybrid dimensional measurement and the method for make the artifact. The hybrid artifact has structural characteristics that make it suitable for dimensional measurement in both vision-based systems and touch-probe-based systems. The hybrid artifact employs the intersection of bulk-micromachined planes to fabricate edges that are sharp to the nanometer level and intersecting planes with crystal-lattice-defined angles.

  9. Can origin of the 2400-year cycle of solar activity be caused by solar inertial motion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Charvátová

    Full Text Available A solar activity cycle of about 2400 years has until now been of uncertain origin. Recent results indicate it is caused by solar inertial motion. First we describe the 178.7-year basic cycle of solar motion. The longer cycle, over an 8000 year interval, is found to average 2402.2 years. This corresponds to the Jupiter/Heliocentre/Barycentre alignments (9.8855 × 243. Within each cycle an exceptional segment of 370 years has been found characterized by a looping pattern by a trefoil or quasitrefoil geometry. Solar activity, evidenced by 14C tree-ring proxies, shows the same pattern. Solar motion is computable in advance, so this provides a basis for future predictive assessments. The next 370-year segment will occur between AD 2240 and 2610.

    Key words: Solar physics (celestial mechanics

  10. Theory of physical libration of the Moon caused by a liquid core: Cassini's motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkin, Yu. V.

    2016-07-01

    This is the first part of a study to develop a modern theory of physical libration of the Moon caused by a liquid core. We use a special approach to studying Moon's rotation relying on Poincaré's planetary model and special forms of equations of motion in Andoyer and Poincaré variables. We construct expansions of the force function of the problem (the second harmonic of the selenopotential) in Andoyer and Poincaré variables for a high-precision description of disturbed orbital motion of the Moon. We investigate the main regularities in lunar rotational motion taken as a body with a solid nonspherical mantle and an ellipsoidal liquid core. The motion of the ideal liquid of the core is simple according to Poincaré. The Cassini laws can be dinamically interpreted for the motion of a synchronous satellite with a liquid core. The Cassini angle (the inclination of the rotation axis relative to the normal to the ecliptic plane) determined by us is very consistent with its determinations from laser observations.

  11. Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Take the mystery out of motion. Our resource gives you everything you need to teach young scientists about motion. Students will learn about linear, accelerating, rotating and oscillating motion, and how these relate to everyday life - and even the solar system. Measuring and graphing motion is easy, and the concepts of speed, velocity and acceleration are clearly explained. Reading passages, comprehension questions, color mini posters and lots of hands-on activities all help teach and reinforce key concepts. Vocabulary and language are simplified in our resource to make them accessible to str

  12. Widespread ground motion distribution caused by rupture directivity during the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koketsu, Kazuki; Miyake, Hiroe; Guo, Yujia; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Masuda, Tetsu; Davuluri, Srinagesh; Bhattarai, Mukunda; Adhikari, Lok Bijaya; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2016-06-23

    The ground motion and damage caused by the 2015 Gorkha, Nepal earthquake can be characterized by their widespread distributions to the east. Evidence from strong ground motions, regional acceleration duration, and teleseismic waveforms indicate that rupture directivity contributed significantly to these distributions. This phenomenon has been thought to occur only if a strike-slip or dip-slip rupture propagates to a site in the along-strike or updip direction, respectively. However, even though the earthquake was a dip-slip faulting event and its source fault strike was nearly eastward, evidence for rupture directivity is found in the eastward direction. Here, we explore the reasons for this apparent inconsistency by performing a joint source inversion of seismic and geodetic datasets, and conducting ground motion simulations. The results indicate that the earthquake occurred on the underthrusting Indian lithosphere, with a low dip angle, and that the fault rupture propagated in the along-strike direction at a velocity just slightly below the S-wave velocity. This low dip angle and fast rupture velocity produced rupture directivity in the along-strike direction, which caused widespread ground motion distribution and significant damage extending far eastwards, from central Nepal to Mount Everest.

  13. Reverse glacier motion during iceberg calving and the cause of glacial earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, T.; Nettles, M.; Selmes, N.; Cathles, M.; Burton, J. C.; James, T.; Edwards, S.; Martin, I.; O'Farrell, T.; Aspey, R. A.; Rutt, I. C.; Bauge, T.

    2015-12-01

    About half Greenland's mass loss results from iceberg calving, but the physical mechanisms of calving are poorly known and in situobservations are sparse. Glacial earthquakes, globally detectable seismic events, are associated with calving and are occurring at increasing numbers of outlet glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica. However, the processes causing them have not been clear. We installed a wireless network of on-ice GPS sensors at the calving margin of Helheim Glacier for 55 days during summer 2013. The glacier is a major SE Greenland tidewater outlet and during our observations retreated ~1.5 km in a series of calving events. Our GPS sensors captured glacier motion with cm-level accuracy at locations very close to the calving front with a high temporal sampling rate. Calving causes a minutes-long reversal of the glacier's horizontal flow and a downward deflection of its terminus seen on multiple GPS sensors. Each major calving event is associated with a glacial earthquake. For example, a glacial earthquake / calving event on day 206 produced an iceberg of volume 0.36 km3and aspect ratio 0.23. A GPS sensor close to the front showed a pre-earthquake speed of 29 m/day. Immediately prior to the earthquake centroid time, the sensor reversed its direction and moved upglacier at ~40 m/day and downward 10 cm. The reversed motion was sustained for ~200 s and was followed by downglacier rebound and upward movement. The reverse motion of the glacier results from the horizontal force caused by iceberg capsize and acceleration away from the front. We use analog laboratory experiments to demonstrate that the downward motion results from hydrodynamic pressure drop behind the capsizing berg, which also causes an upward force on the solid Earth. We show that these horizontal and vertical forces are the source of glacial earthquakes. Proper interpretation of the earthquake events should allow remote sensing of calving processes at the margins of Greenland and Antarctic

  14. Artifacts in digital images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorre, J. J.; Gillespie, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Three kinds of artifacts unique to digital images are illustrated, namely aliasing caused by undersampling, interference phenomena caused by improper display of images, and harmonic overtones caused by quantization of amplitudes. Special attention is given to undersampling when the sample size and interval are the same. It is noted that this situation is important because it is typical of solid-state cameras. Quantization of image data of necessity introduces energy at harmonic overtones of the image spectrum. This energy is aliased if the frequency of the overtones is greater than 0.5 cycle/pixel. It cannot be selectively removed from the image through filtering, and the best way to suppress it is to maximize the amplification of the sensor before digital encoding.

  15. Dental material artifacts on MR images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, D B; Holshouser, B A; Engstrom, H I; Tjan, A H; Christiansen, E L; Catelli, W F

    1988-03-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the head and neck is becoming an important aid in evaluating pathologic conditions of the brain, midface, and pharynx. Certain dental materials cause artifacts during MR imaging of the lower midface. These artifacts can obscure the normal anatomy. This study describes the degree of artifact production caused by various materials commonly used in dental restorations. Of the materials tested, those causing artifacts were made of stainless steel, such as orthodontic bands used for braces, and pins or posts that are commonly drilled into teeth to provide structure or stability before filling. Materials used as temporary or permanent fillings or crowns--such as amalgam, gold alloy, aluminum, microfilled resin, and polyvinyl acrylics--did not cause artifacts in the images.

  16. Evaluation of the susceptibility artifacts and tissue injury caused by implanted microchips in dogs on 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Miyoko; Ono, Shin; Kayanuma, Hideki; Honnami, Muneki; Muto, Makoto; Une, Yumi

    2010-05-01

    Performing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with a metallic implant raises concern over the potential complications, including susceptibility artifacts, implant migration, and heat injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate these complications in dogs with implanted microchips by evaluating MR images and the histopathological changes after 1.5 Tesla (T) MRI. Five dogs underwent microchip implantation in the cervicothoracic area. One month later, the area was imaged using 1.5T MRI in three dogs. The microchips were removed surgically together with the surrounding tissue in all dogs. There was significant signal loss and image distortion over a wide range around the area where the microchip was implanted. This change was consistent with susceptibility artifacts, which rendered the affected area including the spinal cord undiagnostic. The artifact was more extensive in T2*-weighted images (gradient-echo) and less extensive in proton density-weighted images (fast spin-echo with short echo time). Histopathologically, all microchips were well-encapsulated with granulation tissue, and there were no evidence of migration of microchips. Cell debris and a moderate number of degenerated cells with fibrin were seen in the inner layer of the granulation tissue in each dog that underwent MRI. These changes were very subtle and did not seem to be clinically significant. The results of this study suggest that, in 1.5T MRI, susceptibility artifacts produced by implanted microchips can be marked, although the dogs with implants appeared to be scanned safely.

  17. Residual polar motion caused by coseismic and interseismic deformations from 1900 to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambiotti, G.; Wang, X.; Sabadini, R.; Yuen, D. A.

    2016-05-01

    We challenge the perspective that seismicity could contribute to polar motion by arguing quantitatively that, in first approximation and on the average, interseismic deformations can compensate for it. This point is important because what we must simulate and observe in Earth Orientation Parameter time-series over intermediate timescales of decades or centuries is the residual polar motion resulting from the two opposing processes of coseismic and interseismic deformations. In this framework, we first simulate the polar motion caused by only coseismic deformations during the longest period available of instrumental seismicity, from 1900 to present, using both the CMT and ISC-GEM catalogues. The instrumental seismicity covering a little longer than one century does not represent yet the average seismicity that we should expect on the long term. Indeed, although the simulation shows a tendency to move the Earth rotation pole towards 133°E at the average rate of 16.5 mm yr-1, this trend is still sensitive to individual megathrust earthquakes, particularly to the 1960 Chile and 1964 Alaska earthquakes. In order to further investigate this issue, we develop a global seismicity model (GSM) that is independent from any earthquake catalogue and that describes the average seismicity along plate boundaries on the long term by combining information about present-day plate kinematics with the Anderson theory of faulting, the seismic moment conservation principle and a few other assumptions. Within this framework, we obtain a secular polar motion of 8 mm yr-1 towards 112.5°E that is comparable with that estimated from 1900 to present using the earthquake catalogues, although smaller by a factor of 2 in amplitude and different by 20° in direction. Afterwards, in order to reconcile the idea of a secular polar motion caused by earthquakes with our simplest understanding of the seismic cycle, we adapt the GSM in order to account for interseismic deformations and we use it to

  18. Reduction of metal artifacts caused by multiple metallic ob jects in computed tomography%多金属物体CT图像的金属伪影校正

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏星; 闫镔; 张峰; 李永丽; 席晓琦; 李磊

    2014-01-01

    High-attenuation objects like metals will result in metal artifacts in computed tomography images. Compared with single metallic object, artifacts due to multiple and large-scaled metallic objects is more complicated in representation and have much worse effects on reconstructed image. State-of-the-art metal artifacts reduction for multiple metal objects based on interpolation method cannot solve the beam hardening inside the metals, and can easily make mistakes in segmentation and interpolation. Aiming at reduction of multiple metallic objects, this paper simulates the production of the artifacts and proposes a metal artifacts reduction method based on projections correction. In this method, metal regions are firstly segmented directly from projection domain, and then a correction model is established for projections in metal regions. Finally, correction is made by adjusting parameters of the model. The optimal solution of the parameters is achieved by NM-simplex method that makes the gray entropy of the reconstructed image minimum. The simulation results and obtained data show that the present method significantly improves metal artifact due to multiple metallic objects and provides a better image quality than that obtained using interpolation.%针对多金属伪影的校正问题,本文通过仿真实验分析了多金属伪影的成因,并提出了一种基于投影校正的多金属伪影校正方法。该方法首先直接从投影域分割出金属区域,然后建立对金属区域投影值的校正模型,最后通过调整模型参数达到校正目的。模型以重建图像的灰度熵为目标函数,采用单纯形法迭代求解使熵最小时的校正参数。仿真和实际数据的实验结果表明,本文算法对多金属伪影的校正起到了良好的效果,且校正后的图像质量优于插值校正法。

  19. Evaluation of Audio Compression Artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Herrera Martinez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with subjective evaluation of audio-coding systems. From this evaluation, it is found that, depending on the type of signal and the algorithm of the audio-coding system, different types of audible errors arise. These errors are called coding artifacts. Although three kinds of artifacts are perceivable in the auditory domain, the author proposes that in the coding domain there is only one common cause for the appearance of the artifact, inefficient tracking of transient-stochastic signals. For this purpose, state-of-the art audio coding systems use a wide range of signal processing techniques, including application of the wavelet transform, which is described here. 

  20. Mammographic artifacts on full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Jeong; Kim, Sung Hun; Kang, Bong Joo; Choi, Byung Gil; Song, ByungJoo; Jung, Haijo

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the incidence of full-field digital mammographic (FFDM) artifacts with three systems at two institutions and compares the artifacts between two detector types and two grid types. A total of 4,440 direct and 4,142 indirect FFDM images were reviewed by two radiologists, and artifacts were classified as patient related, hardware related, and software processing. The overall incidence of FFDM artifacts was 3.4% (292/8,582). Patient related artifacts (motion artifacts and skin line artifacts) were the most commonly detected types (1.7%). Underexposure among hardware related artifacts and high-density artifacts among software processing artifacts also were common (0.7 and 0.5%, respectively). These artifacts, specific to digital mammography, were more common with the direct detector type and the crossed air grid type than with the indirect type and linear grid type (p artifacts on FFDM were patient related, which might be controlled by the instruction of a patient and technologist. Underexposure and high-density artifacts were more common with direct detector and crossed air type of grid.

  1. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  2. MR成像参数对口腔金属材料伪影作用的实验研究%Metallic Artifacts Caused by Dental Materials in MR imaging: Effects of Imaging Parameters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娟; 李长福

    2013-01-01

    目的:比较GRE、SE和FSE序列中,不同序列参数对口腔金属材料伪影的影响.方法:选择口腔常用钛合金和金合金材料分别制成标准冠模型,在1.5T的场强中进行梯度回波序列(gradient recalled echo,GRE)、自旋回波序列(spin echo,SE)和快速自旋回波序列(fast spin echo,FSE)成像.调节成像参数回波时间(echo time,TE)、带宽(bandwidth,BW)、视野(field of view,FOV)和矩阵(matrix),测量各模型的伪影面积,统计学处理采用方差分析和t检验.结果:GRE和SE序列中,伪影面积随TE改变而改变,差别有统计学意义(P<0.05),TE延长,伪影增加;GRE和FSE序列中,FOV减小,伪影降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);增加SE、FSE序列带宽值,伪影减小(P<0.05);而矩阵增加时,仅GRE序列中的钛合金伪影减小,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论:调节成像参数可以在一定程度上控制金属伪影的影响:减小TE和FOV,增加BW和矩阵,有利于减小金属伪影.但同时也发现,各成像序列对不同参数的敏感程度也不一致.%Objective: To determine the optimal MR-imaging parameters for minimization of metallic artifacts caused by dental materials. Methods: Titanium and golden alloy made experimental phantoms were imaged with a 1. 5T scanner using 3 sequences including gradient recalled echo(GRE), spin echo(SE) and fast spin echo(FSE). Echo time(TE) , bandwidth(BW), field of view(FOV) and matrix varied. Artifact area was measured for each phantom and sequence. Analysis of variance and t- test was done. Results: Artifact area increased significantly (P <0. 05) when TE became longer in GRE and SE sequences. Decreases in artifact area correlated with a reduction of FOV in GRE and FSE sequences (P<0. 05). When we increased BW in SE and FSE sequences, artifact area decreased (P<0. 05). But with increase of matrix, only artifact caused by titanium alloy became significantly smaller in GRE sequence (P<0. 05). Conclusion: Except for

  3. 口腔用金属材料的磁共振伪影的检测%Primary Observation by Measuring Magnetic Resonance Artifacts Caused by Metallic Dental Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解春; 俞立英; 周艺; 林江

    2001-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the existence and extent of magnetic resonance(MR) artifacts caused by frequently used metallic dental materials and to compare the influence of different MRI sequences on artifacts. Methods A total of 22 kinds and 25 metallic dental samples were tested with 1.5 T MR imager and gradient-echo sequence. Spin-echo and fast spin-echo were added to parts of these samples. Results Of all the 25 metallic dental samples, 11 including gold, amalgam, and silver point did not produce artifact. Titanium alloy and porcelain product fused in metal had mild artifacts. Whereas the remaining 12 samples such as the retention pin and pivot pin showed severe artifacts. Artifacts produced by retention pin, nickel chromium crown and so on were less severe on fast spin-echo. Conclusions Attention should be paid to some of the metallic dental materials, which could cause severe MR artifacts and image degradation, when undergoing face,jaw and head MR examination. Artifacts can be alleviated by using proper metallic materials or choosing proper imaging sequence and parameters.%目的检测口腔内常用金属材料在磁共振检查时是否产生伪影和伪影的严重程度;并比较不同检查序列 对伪影的影响。方法对22种25件口腔内常用金属材料做了磁共振成像测试,磁共振仪磁感应强度为1.5 T,所 用序列是梯度回波,部分材料加做自旋回波和快速自旋回波。结果铸金片、银汞合金、银尖等11件试样无伪影; 钛合金和金属烤瓷成品有轻度伪影;牙用固位钉、椿钉12件试样有严重伪影。牙用固位钉、镍铬合金冠等材料在 快速自旋回波图像上伪影减轻。结论部分口腔内金属材料会引起严重伪影,影响图像质量,所以在做口腔颌面 部和脑部磁共振成像时,须引起重视。通过合理选择金属材料,合理选择成像序列和参数可以减轻伪影。

  4. Automatic Identification of Artifact-Related Independent Components for Artifact Removal in EEG Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan; Nathan, Viswam; Jafari, Roozbeh

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity produced by the firing of neurons within the brain. These activities can be decoded by signal processing techniques. However, EEG recordings are always contaminated with artifacts which hinder the decoding process. Therefore, identifying and removing artifacts is an important step. Researchers often clean EEG recordings with assistance from independent component analysis (ICA), since it can decompose EEG recordings into a number of artifact-related and event-related potential (ERP)-related independent components. However, existing ICA-based artifact identification strategies mostly restrict themselves to a subset of artifacts, e.g., identifying eye movement artifacts only, and have not been shown to reliably identify artifacts caused by nonbiological origins like high-impedance electrodes. In this paper, we propose an automatic algorithm for the identification of general artifacts. The proposed algorithm consists of two parts: 1) an event-related feature-based clustering algorithm used to identify artifacts which have physiological origins; and 2) the electrode-scalp impedance information employed for identifying nonbiological artifacts. The results on EEG data collected from ten subjects show that our algorithm can effectively detect, separate, and remove both physiological and nonbiological artifacts. Qualitative evaluation of the reconstructed EEG signals demonstrates that our proposed method can effectively enhance the signal quality, especially the quality of ERPs, even for those that barely display ERPs in the raw EEG. The performance results also show that our proposed method can effectively identify artifacts and subsequently enhance the classification accuracies compared to four commonly used automatic artifact removal methods.

  5. On the motion of dayside auroras caused by a solar wind pressure pulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kozlovsky

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Global ultraviolet auroral images from the IMAGE satellite were used to investigate the dynamics of the dayside auroral oval responding to a sudden impulse (SI in the solar wind pressure. At the same time, the TV all-sky camera and the EISCAT radar on Svalbard (in the pre-noon sector allowed for detailed investigation of the auroral forms and the ionospheric plasma flow. After the SI, new discrete auroral forms appeared in the poleward part of the auroral oval so that the middle of the dayside oval moved poleward from about 70° to about 73° of the AACGM latitude. This poleward shift first occurred in the 15 MLT sector, then similar shifts were observed in the MLT sectors located more westerly, and eventually the shift was seen in the 6 MLT sector. Thus, the auroral disturbance "propagated" westward (from 15 MLT to 6 MLT at an apparent speed of the order of 7km/s. This motion of the middle of the auroral oval was caused by the redistribution of the luminosity within the oval and was not associated with the corresponding motion of the poleward boundary of the oval. The SI was followed by an increase in the northward plasma convection velocity. Individual auroral forms showed poleward progressions with velocities close to the velocity of the northward plasma convection. The observations indicate firstly a pressure disturbance propagation through the magnetosphere at a velocity of the order of 200km/s which is essentially slower than the velocity of the fast Alfvén (magnetosonic wave, and secondly a potential (curl-free electric field generation behind the front of the propagating disturbance, causing the motion of the auroras. We suggest a physical explanation for the slow propagation of the disturbance through the magnetosphere and a model for the electric field generation. Predictions of the model are supported by the global convection maps produced by the SuperDARN HF radars. Finally, the interchange instability and the eigenmode toroidal

  6. Artifacts in musculoskeletal ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taljanovic, Mihra S; Melville, David M; Scalcione, Luke R; Gimber, Lana H; Lorenz, Eileen J; Witte, Russell S

    2014-02-01

    During the past 2 decades, high-resolution ultrasonography (US) has been increasingly utilized in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal trauma and diseases with results comparable with MR imaging. US has an advantage over other cross-sectional modalities in many circumstances due to its superior spatial resolution and ability to allow dynamic assessment. When performing musculoskeletal US, the examiner has to be knowledgeable in the complex anatomy of the musculoskeletal system and US imaging technique. Additionally, he or she must be familiar with several common imaging artifacts in musculoskeletal US that may be mistaken for pathology, as well as several artifacts that frequently accompany pathologic conditions. These artifacts may occur with both B-mode gray-scale and Doppler imaging. In this article, we discuss common artifacts seen in musculoskeletal US and techniques to avoid or minimize these artifacts during clinical US examinations.

  7. Motion in radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korreman, Stine Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This review considers the management of motion in photon radiation therapy. An overview is given of magnitudes and variability of motion of various structures and organs, and how the motion affects images by producing artifacts and blurring. Imaging of motion is described, including 4DCT and 4DPET...

  8. Artifacts and pitfalls of high-resolution CT scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, F J; Chu, W K; Anderson, J C; Dobry, C A

    1985-01-01

    Artifacts on CT images have been observed since the introduction of CT scanners. Some artifacts have been corrected with the improvement of technology and better understanding of the image formation and reconstruction algorithms. Some artifacts, however, are still observable in state-of-the-art high-resolution scans. Many investigations on CT artifacts have been reported. Some artifacts are obvious and some are similar to patterns commonly associated with pathological conditions. The present report summarizes some of the causes of artifacts and presents some artifacts that mimic pathology on clinical scans of the head and spine. It is the intention of this report to bring these artifacts and potential pitfalls to the attention of the radiologists so that misinterpretation can be avoided.

  9. REDUCTION OF GROUND MOTION INTENSITY CAUSED BY BLASTING ON STONE QUARRIES"HERCEGOVAC" AND "MAX-STOJA"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Petrov

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available Ground motion intensity caused by deep-hole blasting on the stone quarries »Hercegovac« and »Max-Stoja« was determined by measuring of ground vibrations magnitudes and by interpretation of measuring results under world damage criteria for structures. Reduction of ground motion intensity was realized on the basis of calculation of permissible charge quantity per ignition level (the paper is published in Croatian.

  10. Artifacts and essentialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Susan A

    2013-09-01

    Psychological essentialism is an intuitive folk belief positing that certain categories have a non-obvious inner "essence" that gives rise to observable features. Although this belief most commonly characterizes natural kind categories, I argue that psychological essentialism can also be extended in important ways to artifact concepts. Specifically, concepts of individual artifacts include the non-obvious feature of object history, which is evident when making judgments regarding authenticity and ownership. Classic examples include famous works of art (e.g., the Mona Lisa is authentic because of its provenance), but ordinary artifacts likewise receive value from their history (e.g., a worn and tattered blanket may have special value if it was one's childhood possession). Moreover, in some cases, object history may be thought to have causal effects on individual artifacts, much as an animal essence has causal effects. I review empirical support for these claims and consider the implications for both artifact concepts and essentialism. This perspective suggests that artifact concepts cannot be contained in a theoretical framework that focuses exclusively on similarity or even function. Furthermore, although there are significant differences between essentialism of natural kinds and essentialism of artifact individuals, the commonalities suggest that psychological essentialism may not derive from folk biology but instead may reflect more domain-general perspectives on the world.

  11. Pitfalls in Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging: Causes and Their Classifications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-ran Li; Jia-he Tian; Hui Wang; Zi-qian Chen; Chun-lei Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the pitfalls in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging and classify them according to the principles of their generation. Methods We summarized retrospectively the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDP) PET/CT imaging pitfalls through reviewing the PET/CT images of 872 patients. The pitfalls were divided into artifacts and infrequent physiological uptake, and the artifacts were further classified according to their causes. Meanwhile, we calculated the incidences of various pitfalls. Whether the PET/CT pitfalls influenced the diagnostic decision was analyzed. The appearances of pitfalls in PET were also described. Results Pitfalls could be found in PET/CT images of 684 (78.4%) patients. Artifacts were found in 664 (76.15%) patients, and could be classified into self-factor artifacts and equipment- or technology- related artifacts. Among self-factor artifacts, respiratory motion (57.5%), postprandial or hyperglycemia artifacts (2.41%), and metal or high density matter artifacts (1.38%) were frequent. As for equipment- or technology-related factors, injection point outleakage or radiotracer contamination (13.88%) and truncation artifacts (1.83%) were most common ones. Infrequent physiological FDG uptakes, including fatty uptake, endometrial uptake, and bilateral breast feeding period uptake, were found in 20 (2.29%) patients. Among all pitfalls, the artifacts in 92 (13.4%) patients and infrequent physiological uptakes in 6 (0.88%) patients affected the diagnostic results. Artifact images in PET could be described as hot or cold area and the images of infrequent physiological uptake were always shown as hot area. Conclusions The incidence of pitfall in PET/CT imaging was high and the causes of pitfalls are various. Among all causes that artifacts generated, respiratory motion is the most common. Some pitfalls may disturb clinical physicians' decision, so it is important to recognize artifacts and physiological uptake, and

  12. Voting strategy for artifact reduction in digital breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Moore, Richard H; Kopans, Daniel B

    2006-07-01

    Artifacts are observed in digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) reconstructions due to the small number of projections and the narrow angular range that are typically employed in tomosynthesis imaging. In this work, we investigate the reconstruction artifacts that are caused by high-attenuation features in breast and develop several artifact reduction methods based on a "voting strategy." The voting strategy identifies the projection(s) that would introduce artifacts to a voxel and rejects the projection(s) when reconstructing the voxel. Four approaches to the voting strategy were compared, including projection segmentation, maximum contribution deduction, one-step classification, and iterative classification. The projection segmentation method, based on segmentation of high-attenuation features from the projections, effectively reduces artifacts caused by metal and large calcifications that can be reliably detected and segmented from projections. The other three methods are based on the observation that contributions from artifact-inducing projections have higher value than those from normal projections. These methods attempt to identify the projection(s) that would cause artifacts by comparing contributions from different projections. Among the three methods, the iterative classification method provides the best artifact reduction; however, it can generate many false positive classifications that degrade the image quality. The maximum contribution deduction method and one-step classification method both reduce artifacts well from small calcifications, although the performance of artifact reduction is slightly better with the one-step classification. The combination of one-step classification and projection segmentation removes artifacts from both large and small calcifications.

  13. Range of motion caused by design of the total hip prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrlin, K.; Selvik, G.; Pettersson, H.; Lidgren, L.

    In a clinical material of total hip prostheses, a study was performed of the range of femoral motion until impingement occurred between the neck of the femoral stem and the rim of the acetabular socket. The results were compared with the physiologic range of motion, and the clinically relevant motion restriction was measured. Restriction was most common in flexion. There was a correlation between the prosthetic design and the restriction due to impingement.

  14. Body MRI artifacts in clinical practice: a physicist's and radiologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Martin J; Mitchell, Donald G

    2013-08-01

    The high information content of MRI exams brings with it unintended effects, which we call artifacts. The purpose of this review is to promote understanding of these artifacts, so they can be prevented or properly interpreted to optimize diagnostic effectiveness. We begin by addressing static magnetic field uniformity, which is essential for many techniques, such as fat saturation. Eddy currents, resulting from imperfect gradient pulses, are especially problematic for new techniques that depend on high performance gradient switching. Nonuniformity of the transmit radiofrequency system constitutes another source of artifacts, which are increasingly important as magnetic field strength increases. Defects in the receive portion of the radiofrequency system have become a more complex source of problems as the number of radiofrequency coils, and the sophistication of the analysis of their received signals, has increased. Unwanted signals and noise spikes have many causes, often manifesting as zipper or banding artifacts. These image alterations become particularly severe and complex when they are combined with aliasing effects. Aliasing is one of several phenomena addressed in our final section, on artifacts that derive from encoding the MR signals to produce images, also including those related to parallel imaging, chemical shift, motion, and image subtraction.

  15. Artifacts in diagnostic ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Hindi A; Peterson C; Barr RG

    2013-01-01

    Ammar Hindi,1 Cynthia Peterson,2 Richard G Barr3,41Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; 2Department of Allied Health, Kent State University, Salem, OH, USA; 3Department of Radiology, Northeastern Ohio Medical University, Rootstown, OH, USA; 4Radiology Consultants, Youngstown, OH, USAAbstract: Ultrasound artifacts are encountered daily in clinical practice and may be a source of confusion on interpretation. Some artifacts arise secondary to improper...

  16. Power as the Cause of Motion and a New Foundation of Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Harokopos E.

    2005-01-01

    Laws of motion are derived based on power rather than on force. I show how power extends the law of inertia to include curvilinear motion and I also show that the law of action-reaction can be expressed in terms of the mutual time rate of change of kinetic energies instead of mutual forces. I then compare the laws of motion based on power to Newton’s Laws of Motion and I investigate the relation of power to Leibniz’s notion of vis viva. I also discuss briefly how the metaphysics of power a...

  17. Transient mathematical model for the axial annular fluid flow caused by drillpipe motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Hudson F.; Ramalho, Vanessa A.O.; Negrao, Cezar O.R.; Junqueira, Silvio L.M. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. Academico de Mecanica. Lab. de Ciencias Termicas]. E-mails: hudsonhfk@yahoo.com.br; vanessinha123@gmail.com; negrao@utfpr.edu.br; silvio@utfpr.edu.br; Martins, Andre Leibsohn [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES). Tecnologia de Engenharia de Pocos (TEP)]. E-mail: aleibsohn@petrobras.com.br

    2008-07-01

    The axial movement of drill pipes is a common operation in oil well drilling. This motion displaces the drilling fluid and causes pressure changes in the borehole. The descending pipe movement increases the pressure at the bottomhole (surge) and its extraction reduces it (swab). If the bottomhole pressure overcomes the formation fracture pressure, circulation loss may take place. On the other hand, if the pressure within the well is smaller than the pore pressure, kicks can occur. In order to maintain the bottomhole pressure within the formation fracture and pore pressures, the drill pipe must be moved slowly and therefore, the task becomes quite time consuming. The current work presents a mathematical model to predict surge and swab pressures in annular spaces. The approach is based on conservation equations of mass and momentum. The fluid flow is considered laminar, one-dimensional, compressible, isothermal and transient. The fluid is regarded as Newtonian with constant compressibility. The viscous effect is lumped and the concept of friction factor is applied. The governing differential equations are non-linear and therefore, they are solved numerically by the finite volume method. A sensitivity analysis of the flow parameters is carried out. For instance, the pressure wave propagation is observed for low compressibility fluids. Pressure oscillation is observed for low aspect ratio ratios. (author)

  18. Main Cause of the Poloidal Plasma Motion Inside a Magnetic Cloud Inferred from Multiple-Spacecraft Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ake; Wang, Yuming; Chi, Yutian; Liu, Jiajia; Shen, Chenglong; Liu, Rui

    2017-04-01

    Although the dynamical evolution of magnetic clouds (MCs) has been one of the foci of interplanetary physics for decades, only few studies focus on the internal properties of large-scale MCs. Recent work by Wang et al. ( J. Geophys. Res. 120, 1543, 2015) suggested the existence of the poloidal plasma motion in MCs. However, the main cause of this motion is not clear. In order to find it, we identify and reconstruct the MC observed by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)-A, Wind, and STEREO-B spacecraft during 19 - 20 November 2007 with the aid of the velocity-modified cylindrical force-free flux-rope model. We analyze the plasma velocity in the plane perpendicular to the MC axis. It is found that there was evident poloidal motion at Wind and STEREO-B, but this was not clear at STEREO-A, which suggests a local cause rather than a global cause for the poloidal plasma motion inside the MC. The rotational directions of the solar wind and MC plasma at the two sides of the MC boundary are found to be consistent, and the values of the rotational speeds of the solar wind and MC plasma at the three spacecraft show a rough correlation. All of these results illustrate that the interaction with ambient solar wind through viscosity might be one of the local causes of the poloidal motion. Additionally, we propose another possible local cause: the existence of a pressure gradient in the MC. The significant difference in the total pressure at the three spacecraft suggests that this speculation is perhaps correct.

  19. Facts in artifacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P R Bindhu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Examination of microscopic sections of animal tissues reveals facts which are not always related to its normal histology or pathology. Processing of tissue specimens consists of lengthy procedures from the stage of surgical removal to the stained and mounted microscopic sections. Defects are common in tissue sections as a result of faulty procedures. These defects are referred to as artifacts. They lead to misinterpretation of histopathological diagnosis but at times they throw limelight into diagnosis. This paper attempts to put together all the facts regarding the various artifacts that are encountered in histopathology.

  20. Controlling Modelling Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    as the high-level model, so that they can be directly compared. There are two key ideas in our approach — a temporal abstraction, where we only look at the state of the system at certain observable points in time, and a spatial abstraction, where we project onto a smaller state space that summarises...... artifacts that were inadvertently introduced. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to reason about modelling artifacts, given a detailed model and a highlevel (more abstract) model of the same system. By a series of automated abstraction steps, we lift the detailed model to the same state space...

  1. Efficient passive pitching motion caused by elastic deformation in flexible flapping wing MAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trong; Truong, Tien; Yeo, Khoon Seng; Lim, Tee Tai

    2015-11-01

    Computational and experimental models which mimic Hawkmoth wings were constructed to investigate the effects of wing flexibility. The wing actuation mechanism is minimal with only one degree of freedom in sweeping motion with neither active pitching nor elevation. Despite the simplicity of the imparted motion, the wing models in both computations and experiments delivered convincing deformation features such as wing twisting and camber which closely resembles the ones observed in real Hawkmoth wings. The generated aerodynamic forces are remarkable both in magnitude and efficiency. The study hence reveals that a complicated actuation mechanism might not be required to produce the sophisticated and efficient motion of insect wings, which in fact could be the result of collective elastic deformation thanks to their highly optimized structure mainly comprised of well-organized veins and membranes.

  2. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST...

  3. The Information Systems Artifact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatterjee, Surtirtha; Xiao, Xiao; Elbanna, Amany

    2017-01-01

    Passionate debates regarding the defining characteristic of the “IT artifact” continue. Such debates, and also the lack of explicit consideration of the “information” element in the IT artifact, motivate us to propose a revised conception, drawing upon concepts from General Systems Theory (GST...

  4. Quantification and clinical relevance of head motion during computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Arne; Schicho, Kurt; Kainberger, Franz; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Grampp, Stephan; Ewers, Rolf

    2003-11-01

    To quantify the 3-dimensional translation and rotation components of head motion during computed tomography and to analyze the influence of such motion on perceptible artifacts and distortion of volume image data sets. Using high-precision optoelectronic motion-capture technology, changes in patient head position during axial CT scanning were registered in 20 cases and 2 phantoms with a spatial relative resolution better than 0.003 cm. Statistical analysis was performed on a base of 6-dimensional measurement-vectors, each with 3 translation and 3 rotation values. Because of the recording frequency of the tracking system, more than 80000 values were included in a statistical analysis. All 20 patients had head motion during the CT scanning, with only 4 of 20 patients showing perceptible motion artifacts. The frequency, the extent, and the direction of the movements did not correlate with either the observations made by the radiologic staff or with the patient's subjective estimation of comfort. Translation movements of the head during CT accounted for a maximum of 0.5 cm and rotations of more than 2 degrees without perceptible motion artifacts. The extent of positional changes of the head was found to correlate with the duration of scanning (Pearson's correlation coefficient: 0.647 for translation shifts, 0.453 for rotation shifts). The mean direction of head motion could be characterized predominantly as a rotation around the longitudinal axis of the body (xy plane) at a significance level of 0.01. Computed tomography evaluations of the head performed without rigid fixation suffer a spatial distortion of the volume image data sets, caused by interimage motion. The absence of motion artifacts is not correlated with the absence of motion.

  5. Study on Motion Artifact Reduction Based on Periodic Component Analysis Using ECG as a Case%基于周期元分析的运动伪迹消除方法——以心电信号为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向馗; 罗乔; 陈静

    2012-01-01

    Motion artifacts are a main interference source of ambulatory physiology signals. The interference in wearable detection systems is more serious because of using dry electrodes. On account of the instantaneity in motion artifacts and periodicity in physiological signal,we presented a new method based on periodic component analysis for motion artifact reduction. The single channel signal is transformed into multi-channel signal with multi resolution a-nalysis,and then periodic component analysis can help us to separate the normal physiological signal from motion artifacts. A case study in electrocardiogram (ECG) demonstrates that periodic component analysis is better than the empirical mode decomposition and adaptive filtering methods. Periodic component analysis as a time domain method can discriminate the signal with frequency aliasing,and recover the ECG waveform feature corrupted. This method can be easily extended to other physiological signal processing.%运动伪迹是动态生理信号的主要干扰源,而在穿戴式检测系统中,由于干电极的使用,干扰更为严重.本文根据运动伪迹的时域瞬态性和生理信号固有周期性的特点,研究了一种基于周期元分析的运动伪迹抑制方法.该方法首先运用多分辨率分解将单通道信号转化为多通道信号,再实施周期元分析.然后以实测心电(ECG)信号为例,与基于经验模态分解和自适应滤波的消除方法进行分析比较,发现周期元分析的优势明显,可更有效地分离正常生理信号和运动伪迹.作为一种时域分析方法,周期元分析可实现频谱混叠信号的分离,对受污染ECG信号的波形特征实现有效复原,并可推广到其他生理信号的处理中.

  6. Artifact versus arrhythmia in pseudo-polymorphic tachycardia; case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed V

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaseem Ahmed, Anish Patel, Abhishek Sharma, Dennis Bloomfield Department of Medicine, Richmond University Medical Center, Staten Island, NY, USA Abstract: We present the case of a young male patient in sinus rhythm whose electrocardiogram (ECG was initially misinterpreted as ventricular tachycardia. Electrocardiographic artifact appearing to be ventricular tachycardia commonly occurs and ECG criteria have been described to aid in the discrimination between artifact and true arrhythmia. There are many causes of artifacts and prompt recognition is important to prevent unnecessary interventions. Keywords: artifact, ventricular tachycardia, pseudo-ventricular tachycardia, notch sign, sinus sign

  7. CT metal artifact reduction by soft inequality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukalina, Marina; Nikolaev, Dmitry; Sokolov, Valerii; Ingacheva, Anastasiya; Buzmakov, Alexey; Prun, Victor

    2015-12-01

    The artifacts (known as metal-like artifacts) arising from incorrect reconstruction may obscure or simulate pathology in medical applications, hide or mimic cracks and cavities in the scanned objects in industrial tomographic scans. One of the main reasons caused such artifacts is photon starvation on the rays which go through highly absorbing regions. We indroduce a way to suppress such artifacts in the reconstructions using soft penalty mimicing linear inequalities on the photon starved rays. An efficient algorithm to use such information is provided and the effect of those inequalities on the reconstruction quality is studied.

  8. Controlling Modelling Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Michael James Andrew; Nielson, Flemming; Nielson, Hanne Riis

    2011-01-01

    the possible configurations of the system (for example, by counting the number of components in a certain state). We motivate our methodology with a case study of the LMAC protocol for wireless sensor networks. In particular, we investigate the accuracy of a recently proposed high-level model of LMAC......When analysing the performance of a complex system, we typically build abstract models that are small enough to analyse, but still capture the relevant details of the system. But it is difficult to know whether the model accurately describes the real system, or if its behaviour is due to modelling...... artifacts that were inadvertently introduced. In this paper, we propose a novel methodology to reason about modelling artifacts, given a detailed model and a highlevel (more abstract) model of the same system. By a series of automated abstraction steps, we lift the detailed model to the same state space...

  9. Small Artifacts - Big Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Kristian

    2005-01-01

    The computer IC is the heart of the information and telecommunication technology. It is a tiny artifact, but with incredible organizing powers. We use this physical artifact as the location for studying central problems of the knowledge economy. First, the paper describes the history of chip design...... and the emergence of the technological community involved in designing and manufacturing computer chips. The community is structured in a way that reflects the underlying physical nature silicon and the numerous other materials and chemicals involved. But it also reflects the human agency of defining new projects...... instrument. It is found that technological progress is not hindered, but rather aided by the use of imperfect principles, abstractions and representations of reality. The power of such imperfections is discussed and generalized....

  10. Metrological multispherical freeform artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blobel, Gernot; Wiegmann, Axel; Siepmann, Jens; Schulz, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Precisely known artifacts are required to characterize the accuracy of asphere and freeform measuring instruments. To this end the best knowledge of the surface characteristics in conjunction with a low measurement uncertainty are necessary. Because this is a challenging task for typical freeform surfaces used in optical systems, the concept of "metrological" artifacts is introduced. We have developed a multispherical freeform artifact for performance tests of tactile touch probe and contact-free optical measuring systems. The measurement accuracy of the complete form and the deviation from calibrated spherical sections can thus be determined. The radius calibration of multiple spherical sections is performed with an extended radius measuring procedure by interferometry. Evaluated surface forms of different measuring methods and the radii determined can be compared to each other. In this study, a multispherical freeform specimen made of copper, with two differing radii, has been measured by two optical measuring methods, a full field measuring tilted-wave interferometer and a high accuracy cylinder coordinate measuring machine with an optical probe. The surface form measurements are evaluated and compared, and the radii determined are compared to the results of a radius measurement bench.

  11. Artifacts of Functional Electrical Stimulation on Electromyograph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Ren-quan; ZHANG Ding-guo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate different factors of the artifact in surface electromyography (EMG) signal caused by functional electrical stimulation (FES). The factors investigated include the size of stimulation electrode pads, the amplitude, frequency, and pulse width of the stimulation waveform and the detecting electrode points. We calculate the root mean square (RMS) of EMG signal to analyze the effect of these factors on the M-wave properties. The results indicate that the M-wave mainly depends on the stimulation amplitude and the distribution of detecting electrodes, but not on the other factors. This study can assist the reduction of artifact and the selection of detecting electrode points.

  12. Pathological trunk motion during walking in children with amyoplasia: is it caused by muscular weakness or joint contractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Harald; Dussa, Chakravarthy U; Multerer, Christel; Döderlein, Leonhard

    2013-11-01

    The aim was to investigate the causes for pathological trunk movements during gait in children with Amyoplasia. Eighteen children with Amyoplasia were compared with 18 typically developed children. Three-dimensional motions of pelvis, thorax and spine during gait were analyzed. Excessive trunk movements were defined as being above 4 standard deviations of those of typically developed children. Clinical examination of active strength and passive range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle joints were correlated to the parameter that showed the greatest prevalence of pathological trunk motion. The greatest prevalence of 56% was seen for thorax obliquity range during walking. The spine angles showed the lowest deviations from typically developed children. Significant correlations (pthorax obliquity range and clinical parameters were found for passive hip extension, hip flexion, hip abduction and active hip extension, hip flexion and ankle dorsiflexion strength. The highest correlation coefficients were found for passive hip flexion and active hip flexion strength of rho=-0.73 and rho=-0.69 respectively. Excessive thorax obliquity during gait in children with Amyoplasia could be mainly caused by reduced strength and mobility of the hip. Therefore both mobility and strength of the hip are equally important and should be increased in the therapy to improve gait in children with Amyoplasia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. What causes the facing-the-viewer bias in biological motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weech, Séamas; McAdam, Matthew; Kenny, Sophie; Troje, Nikolaus F

    2014-10-13

    Orthographically projected biological motion point-light displays are generally ambiguous with respect to their orientation in depth, yet observers consistently prefer the facing-the-viewer interpretation. There has been discussion as to whether this bias can be attributed to the social relevance of biological motion stimuli or relates to local, low-level stimulus properties. In the present study we address this question. In Experiment 1, we compared the facing-the-viewer bias produced by a series of four stick figures and three human silhouettes that differed in posture, gender, and the presence versus absence of walking motion. Using a paradigm in which we asked observers to indicate the spinning direction of these figures, we found no bias when participants observed silhouettes, whereas a pronounced degree of bias was elicited by most stick figures. We hypothesized that the ambiguous surface normals on the lines and dots that comprise stick figures are prone to a visual bias that assumes surfaces to be convex. The local surface orientations of the occluding contours of silhouettes are unambiguous, and as such the convexity bias does not apply. In Experiment 2, we tested the role of local features in ambiguous surface perception by adding dots to the elbows and knees of silhouettes. We found biases consistent with the facing directions implied by a convex body surface. The results unify a number of findings regarding the facing-the-viewer bias. We conclude that the facing-the-viewer bias is established at the level of surface reconstruction from local image features rather than on a semantic level.

  14. Post-Newtonian limitations on measurement of the PPN parameters caused by motion of gravitating bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2008-01-01

    We derive explicit Lorentz-invariant solution of the Einstein and null geodesic equations for data processing of the time delay and ranging experiments in gravitational field of moving gravitating bodies of the solar system - the Sun and major planets. We discuss general-relativistic interpretation of these experiments and the limitations imposed by motion of the massive bodies on measurement of the parameters 'gamma', 'beta' and 'delta' of the parameterized post-Newtonian formalism. We also comment on two recent gravitational experiments - the Cassini measurement of 'gamma' and VLBI measurement of the speed of gravity.

  15. Real-time eye motion compensation for OCT imaging with tracking SLO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vienola, Kari V.; Braaf, Boy; Sheehy, Christy K.; Yang, Qiang; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Arathorn, David W.; de Boer, Johannes F.; Roorda, Austin

    2012-01-01

    Fixational eye movements remain a major cause of artifacts in optical coherence tomography (OCT) images despite the increases in acquisition speeds. One approach to eliminate the eye motion is to stabilize the ophthalmic imaging system in real-time. This paper describes and quantifies the performance of a tracking OCT system, which combines a phase-stabilized optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) system and an eye tracking scanning laser ophthalmoscope (TSLO). We show that active eye tracking minimizes artifacts caused by eye drift and micro saccades. The remaining tracking lock failures caused by blinks and large saccades generate a trigger signal which signals the OCT system to rescan corrupted B-scans. Residual motion artifacts in the OCT B-scans are reduced to 0.32 minutes of arc (~1.6 µm) in an in vivo human eye enabling acquisition of high quality images from the optic nerve head and lamina cribrosa pore structure. PMID:23162731

  16. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system. PMID:26601039

  17. An Additive Manufacturing Test Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, Shawn; Slotwinski, John; Cooke, April; Jurrens, Kevin; Donmez, M Alkan

    2014-01-01

    A test artifact, intended for standardization, is proposed for the purpose of evaluating the performance of additive manufacturing (AM) systems. A thorough analysis of previously proposed AM test artifacts as well as experience with machining test artifacts have inspired the design of the proposed test artifact. This new artifact is designed to provide a characterization of the capabilities and limitations of an AM system, as well as to allow system improvement by linking specific errors measured in the test artifact to specific sources in the AM system. The proposed test artifact has been built in multiple materials using multiple AM technologies. The results of several of the builds are discussed, demonstrating how the measurement results can be used to characterize and improve a specific AM system.

  18. The Human-Artifact Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne; Klokmose, Clemens Nylandsted

    2011-01-01

    Although devices of all shapes and sizes currently dominate the technological landscape, human–computer interaction (HCI) as a field is not yet theoretically equipped to match this reality. In this article we develop the human–artifact model, which has its roots in activity theoretical HCI....... By reinterpreting the activity theoretical foundation, we present a framework that helps addressing the analysis of individual interactive artifacts while embracing that they are part of a larger ecology of artifacts. We show how the human–artifact model helps structuring the understanding of an artifact's action......-possibilities in relation to the artifact ecology surrounding it. Essential to the model is that it provides four interconnected levels of analysis and addresses the possibilities and problems at these four levels. Artifacts and their use are constantly developing, and we address development in, and of, use. The framework...

  19. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  20. Analyses of surface motions caused by the magnitude 9.0 2004 Sumatra earthquake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Gudmundsson, Ó.

    The Sumatra, Indonesia, earthquake on December 26th was one of the most devastating earthquakes in history. With a magnitude of Mw = 9.0 it is the forth largest earthquake recorded since 1900. It occurred about one hundred kilometers off the west coast of northern Sumatra, where the relatively thin...... of years. The result was a devastating tsunami hitting coastlines across the Indian Ocean killing more than 225,000 people in Sri Lanka, India, Indonesia, Thailand and Malaysia. An earthquake of this magnitude is expected to involve a displacement on the fault on the order of 10 meters. But, what...... was the actual amplitude of the surface motions that triggered the tsunami? This can be constrained using the amplitudes of elastic waves radiated from the earthquake, or by direct measurements of deformation. Here we present estimates of the deformation based on continuous Global Positioning System (GPS...

  1. Current accumulation at an asymmetric 3D null point caused by generic shearing motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsgaard, K.; Pontin, D. I.

    2011-10-01

    Context. Here we investigate the dynamical evolution of the reconnection process at an initially linear 3D null point that is stressed by a localised shear motion across the spine axis. The difference to previous investigations is that the fan plane is not rotationally symmetric and this allows for different behaviours depending on the alignment of the fan plane relative to the imposed driver direction. Aims: The aim is to show how the current accumulation and the associated reconnection process at the non-axisymmetric null depends on the relative orientation between the driver imposed stress across the spine axis of the null and the main eigenvector direction in the fan plane. Methods: The time evolution of the 3D null point is investigated solving the 3D non-ideal MHD equations numerically in a Cartesian box. The magnetic field is frozen to the boundaries and the boundary velocity is only non-zero where the imposed driving for stressing the system is applied. Results: The current accumulation is found to be along the direction of the fan eigenvector associated with the smallest eigenvalue until the direction of the driver is almost parallel to this eigenvector. When the driving velocity is parallel to the weak eigenvector and has an impulsive temporal profile the null only has a weak collapse forming only a weak current layer. However, when the null point is stressed continuously boundary effects dominates the current accumulation. Conclusions: There is a clear relation between the orientation of the current concentration and the direction of the fan eigenvector corresponding to the small eigenvalue. This shows that the structure of the magnetic field is the most important in determining where current is going to accumulate when a single 3D null point is perturbed by a simple shear motion across the spine axis. As the angle between the driving direction and the strong eigenvector direction increases, the current that accumulates at the null becomes progressively

  2. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motions: Computer program description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrarca, J. R.; Harrison, B. A.; Redman, M. C.; Rowe, W. S.

    1979-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to calculate unsteady loadings caused by motions of lifting surfaces with leading edge and trailing edge controls based on the subsonic kernel function approach. The pressure singularities at hinge line and side edges were extracted analytically as a preliminary step to solving the integral equation of collocation. The program calculates generalized aerodynamic forces for user supplied deflection modes. Optional intermediate output includes pressure at an array of points, and sectional generalized forces. From one to six controls on the half span can be accomodated.

  3. Procedure of evaluating parameters of inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults for ground motion prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Dianshu; Dan, Kazuo; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a procedure of evaluating fault parameters of asperity models for predicting strong ground motions from inland earthquakes caused by long strike-slip faults. In order to obtain averaged dynamic stress drops, we adopted the formula obtained by dynamic fault rupturing simulations for surface faults of the length from 15 to 100 km, because the formula of the averaged static stress drops for circular cracks, commonly adopted in existing procedures, cannot be applied to surface faults or long faults. The averaged dynamic stress drops were estimated to be 3.4 MPa over the entire fault and 12.2 MPa on the asperities, from the data of 10 earthquakes in Japan and 13 earthquakes in other countries. The procedure has a significant feature that the average slip on the seismic faults longer than about 80 km is constant, about 300 cm. In order to validate our proposed procedure, we made a model for a 141 km long strike-slip fault by our proposed procedure for strike-slip faults, predicted ground motions, and showed that the resultant motions agreed well with the records of the 1999 Kocaeli, Turkey, earthquake (Mw 7.6) and with the peak ground accelerations and peak ground velocities by the GMPE of Si and Midorikawa (1999).

  4. Rupture Process of the 2003 Bam, Iran, Earthquake: Did Shallow Asperities on a Fresh Fault Cause Extreme Ground Motions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, H.; Koketsu, K.; Mostafaei, H.

    2004-12-01

    The Bam, Iran, earthquake on December 26, 2003 caused heavy damage to the city of Bam including the historic heritage of Arg-e-Bam. This Mw6.5 earthquake rupture created fresh faults 5 km westward away from the Bam fault. The Bam strong-motion station recorded 992 gal in the UD component and two directivity pulses in the horizontal components with a dominant frequency of 1 Hz. We inferred the rupture process of the 2003 Bam earthquake from strong motion data observed by BHRC, together with teleseismic data to constrain global features of the source. Waveform inversions using teleseismic data (e.g. Yamanaka, 2003; Yagi, 2003) have suggested the existence of a shallow asperity. Nakamura et al. (2004) estimated aftershock distribution with vertical dipping that superimposed the fresh faults, not the Bam fault. They proposed fault planes consisting N-S alignment with northward branches beneath the city of Bam. Our preliminary analyses show that two directivity pulses are created by northward rupture near the hypocenter and north-eastward rupture beneath the city. Recent earthquakes occurred on immature faults with shallow asperities have also generated localized extreme-strong motions (e.g., 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu, Japan, with Mw6.1; 2000 Tottori, Japan, with Mw6.6). Larger fracture energy is expected for shallow asperities on immature faults than those on mature faults. For example, the 2000 Tottori earthquake has several times larger fracture energy than expected by the scaling between seismic moment and fracture energy. When considering the energy budget, are radiated energy from the immature faults enough to generate the extreme ground motions? Detailed source process inversions might be able to answer this question.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts due to metallic foreign bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Silke; Adams, William H; Narak, Jill; Thomas, William B

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility artifacts due to metallic foreign bodies may interfere with interpretation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies. Additionally, migration of metallic objects may pose a risk to patients undergoing MR imaging. Our purpose was to investigate prevalence, underlying cause, and diagnostic implications of susceptibility artifacts in small animal MR imaging and report associated adverse effects. MR imaging studies performed in dogs and cats between April 2008 and March 2010 were evaluated retrospectively for the presence of susceptibility artifacts associated with metallic foreign bodies. Studies were performed using a 1.0 T scanner. Severity of artifacts was graded as 0 (no interference with area of interest), 1 (extension of artifact to area of interest without impairment of diagnostic quality), 2 (impairment of diagnostic quality but diagnosis still possible), or 3 (severe involvement of area of interest resulting in nondiagnostic study). Medical records were evaluated retrospectively to identify adverse effects. Susceptibility artifacts were present in 99/754 (13.1%) of MR imaging studies and were most common in examinations of the brachial plexus, thorax, and cervical spine. Artifacts were caused by identification microchips, ballistic fragments, skin staples/suture material, hemoclips, an ameroid constrictor, and surgical hardware. Three studies were nondiagnostic due to the susceptibility artifact. Adverse effects were not documented.

  6. Metal and calcification artifact reduction for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Julia; Jerebko, Anna; Ritschl, Ludwig; Mertelmeier, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Tomosynthesis images of the breast suffer from artifacts caused by the presence of highly absorbing materials. These can be either induced by metal objects like needles or clips inserted during biopsy devices, or larger calcifications inside the examined breast. Mainly two different kinds of artifacts appear after the filtered backprojection procedure. The first type is undershooting artifacts near edges of high-contrast objects caused by the filtering step. The second type is out-of-plane (ripple) artifacts that appear even in slices where the metal object or macrocalcifications does not exist. Due to the limited angular range of tomosynthesis systems, overlapping structures have high influence on neighboring regions. To overcome these problems, a segmentation of artifact introducing objects is performed on the projection images. Both projection versions, with and without high-contrast objects are filtered independently to avoid undershootings. During backprojection a decision is made for each reconstructed voxel, if it is artifact or high-contrast object. This is based on a mask image, gained from the segmentation of high-contrast objects. This procedure avoids undershooting artifacts and additionally reduces out-of-plane ripple. Results are demonstrated for different kinds of artifact inducing objects and calcifications.

  7. Research of artifacts and compensation technology in high-field strength abdominal MRI%高场强腹部MRI伪影及补偿技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    窦社伟; 连建敏; 闫峰山; 史大鹏; 管民

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the cause and solution of the artifacts of abdominal imaging in high-field strength MRI scanning.Methods The artifacts from 112 cases of abdominal MR scanning were analyzed the cause,and were compensated by different techniques.Results High-field strength MRI scanning revealed respiratory motion artifacts in 43 cases,vascular pulsation artifacts in 12,chemical shift artifacts in 12,plait artifacts in 18,magnetic susceptibility artifacts in 20 and machine artifacts in 7.The artifacts in 98 cases were eliminated or reduced by adjusting respiratory gating parameters,using abdominal binder,respiratory retraining,adding saturated band upon or below scanning field,adopting fat suppression technique,enlarging field of view,adopting over sampling technique,removing metal foreign body,and adopting PROPELLER technology.Conclusion To correct the scanning parameters and methods based on the causes of artifacts can reduce the artifacts in abdominal MRI and improve the quality of MR images.%目的 探讨腹部高场强MRI检查伪影产生的原因及解决方法.方法 行高场强腹部MRI检查图像有不同程度伪影的112例患者,分析其伪影产生原因,并采用不同技术进行补偿.结果 112患者中呼吸运动伪影43例,血管搏动伪影12例,化学位移伪影12例,卷褶伪影18例,磁敏感伪影20例,设备伪影7例,经调整呼吸门控、腹部施加腹带、再次呼吸训练、扫描视野上下施加预饱和带、应用脂肪抑制技术、增加视野、应用过采样技术、去除金属异物、应用螺旋桨扫描技术等方法,98例伪影消失或减轻.结论 针对伪影产生原因改变扫描参数或扫描方法,可减少腹部高场强MRI图像的伪影,提高图像质量.

  8. Current accumulation at an asymmetric 3D null point caused by generic shearing motions

    CERN Document Server

    Galsgaard, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    Context. We investigate the dynamical evolution of the reconnection process at an initially linear 3D null point that is stressed by a localised shear motion across the spine axis. The fan plane is not rotationally symmetric and this allows for different behaviours depending on the alignment of the fan plane relative to the imposed driver direction. Aims. The aim is to show how the current accumulation and the associated reconnection process depends on the relative orientation between the driver imposed stress across the spine axis of the null and the main eigenvector direction in the fan plane. Methods. The time evolution of the 3D null point is investigated solving the 3D non-ideal MHD equations numerically in a Cartesian box. The magnetic field is frozen to the boundaries and the boundary velocity is only non-zero where the imposed driving is for stressing the system is applied. Results. The current accumulation is found to be along the direction of the fan eigenvector associated with the smallest eigenval...

  9. Artifacts and image degradation in MRI. Application to the exploration of the motor system. Les artefacts et la degradation de l'image en I. R. M. Application a l'exploration de l'appareil locomoteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagey, N.; Duvauferier, R.; Lucas, C.; Korvin, B. de; Bernard, A.M.; Ramee, A. (Centre Hospitalier Regional Fontenoy, 35 - Rennes (FR))

    1989-01-01

    MRI is a relatively new examination technique. The basic semiology is now well known, but MRI artifacts still deserve description, since they may degrade the images or produce appearances leading to misinterpretation. This text will deal with the major artifacts caused by metallic bodies, chemical shift, motion, aliasing and partial volume. A number of causes of image degradation will then be studied, including signal decay as well as calibration and centering problems. This article has an essentially practical goal since it points out the misleading images and, more importantly, the ways of avoiding these pitfalls.

  10. Improved lumen visualization in metallic vascular implants by reducing RF artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartels, LW; Bakker, CJG; Viergever, MA

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a method is proposed for MRI of the lumen of metallic vascular implants, like stents or vena cava filters. The method is based on the reduction of artifacts caused by flow, susceptibility, and RIF eddy currents. Whereas both flow artifacts and susceptibility artifacts are well underst

  11. Strong ground motion inferred from liquefaction caused by the 1811-1812 New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Noce, Thomas E.; Bennett, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Peak ground accelerations (PGAs) in the epicentral region of the 1811–1812 New Madrid, Missouri, earthquakes are inferred from liquefaction to have been no greater than ∼0.35g. PGA is inferred in an 11,380  km2 area in the Lower Mississippi Valley in Arkansas and Missouri where liquefaction was extensive in 1811–1812. PGA was inferred by applying liquefaction probability curves, which were originally developed for liquefaction hazard mapping, to detailed maps of liquefaction by Obermeier (1989). The low PGA is inferred because both a shallow (1.5 m deep) water table and a large moment magnitude (M 7.7) earthquake were assumed in the analysis. If a deep (5.0 m) water table and a small magnitude (M 6.8) earthquake are assumed, the maximum inferred PGA is 1.10g. Both inferred PGA values are based on an assumed and poorly constrained correction for sand aging. If an aging correction is not assumed, then the inferred PGA is no greater than 0.22g. A low PGA value may be explained by nonlinear site response. Soils in the study area have an averageVS30 of 220±15  m/s. A low inferred PGA is consistent with PGA values estimated from ground‐motion prediction equations that have been proposed for the New Madrid seismic zone when these estimates are corrected for nonlinear soil site effects. This application of liquefaction probability curves demonstrates their potential usefulness in paleoseismology.

  12. From Ecological Sounding Artifacts Towards Sonic Artifact Ecologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erkut, Cumhur; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    The discipline of sonic interaction design has been focused on the interaction between a single user and an artifact. This strongly limits one of the fundamental aspects of music as a social and interactive experience. In this paper we propose sonic artifact ecologies as a mean to examine...

  13. Spherical artifacts on ferrograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    In the past, hollow spheres detected on ferrograms have been interpreted as being due to fretting, abrasion, cavitation erosion, and fatigue-related processes. Here it is reported that such spheres were found to result from the fact that a routine grinding operation on a steel plate was carried out about 20 feet away from the ferrograph. A similar grinding operation was performed on a piece of low carbon steel a few feet from the ferrograph, and after a few minutes of grinding, the resulting ferrogram contained thousands of particles of which more than 90% were spherical. Because of the widespread occurrence of ordinary grinding operations, it seems prudent that those utilizing the ferrograph be cognizant of this type of artifact.

  14. Archaeology, Artifacts, and Cosmochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, L. M. V.

    2017-06-01

    PSRD covers research that ascertains the content, formation, and evolution of our Solar System and planetary systems in general. Our archives are full of sample-based studies of extraterrestrial materials that relate to the building of planets, moons, and minor bodies. Rarely do we cover the cosmochemistry of artifacts, but the importance of cosmochemistry is abundantly clear in this story of artisan iron beads of archaeological significance and the quest to find the source meteorite. Twenty-two meteoritic iron beads, recovered from mounds in Havana, Illinois of the Hopewell people and culture, have been identified as pieces of the Anoka iron meteorite, according to work by Timothy McCoy (National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution), Amy Marquardt (undergraduate intern at the NMNH/SI and now at the University of Colorado at Boulder), John Wasson (UCLA), Richard Ash (University of Maryland), and Edward Vicenzi (SI).

  15. Sound as artifact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Jeffrey L.

    A distinguishing feature of the discipline of archaeology is its reliance upon sensory dependant investigation. As perceived by all of the senses, the felt environment is a unique area of archaeological knowledge. It is generally accepted that the emergence of industrial processes in the recent past has been accompanied by unprecedented sonic extremes. The work of environmental historians has provided ample evidence that the introduction of much of this unwanted sound, or "noise" was an area of contestation. More recent research in the history of sound has called for more nuanced distinctions than the noisy/quiet dichotomy. Acoustic archaeology tends to focus upon a reconstruction of sound producing instruments and spaces with a primary goal of ascertaining intentionality. Most archaeoacoustic research is focused on learning more about the sonic world of people within prehistoric timeframes while some research has been done on historic sites. In this thesis, by way of a meditation on industrial sound and the physical remains of the Quincy Mining Company blacksmith shop (Hancock, MI) in particular, I argue for an acceptance and inclusion of sound as artifact in and of itself. I am introducing the concept of an individual sound-form, or sonifact , as a reproducible, repeatable, representable physical entity, created by tangible, perhaps even visible, host-artifacts. A sonifact is a sound that endures through time, with negligible variability. Through the piecing together of historical and archaeological evidence, in this thesis I present a plausible sonifactual assemblage at the blacksmith shop in April 1916 as it may have been experienced by an individual traversing the vicinity on foot: an 'historic soundwalk.' The sensory apprehension of abandoned industrial sites is multi-faceted. In this thesis I hope to make the case for an acceptance of sound as a primary heritage value when thinking about the industrial past, and also for an increased awareness and acceptance

  16. Detecting cause of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty by patient-specific four-dimensional motion analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Hidenobu; Sugano, Nobuhiko; Yonenobu, Kazuo; Tsuda, Kosuke; Hattori, Maki; Suzuki, Naoki

    2013-02-01

    Dislocation is a major complication after total hip arthroplasty. Prosthesis impingement is considered to be an important cause of dislocation because impingement marks are more frequently found on retrieved cups or liners in patients who have undergone revision surgery because of dislocation (80%-94%) than in those who have undergone reoperation for other reasons (51%-56%). However, it remains a question whether impingement marks are the cause of dislocation or are instead its result. To clarify the issue, it is necessary to confirm noninvasively whether the point of impingement matches the patient's hip position when dislocation occurs. Using four-dimensional patient-specific analysis, we recorded prosthesis impingement in 10 hips with instability after primary total hip arthroplasty when the patients reproduced the dislocation-causing motion. We found prosthesis impingement to be related to at least instability in 6 of 10 hips with dislocation after primary total hip arthroplasty and in 4 of 4 hips that underwent revision surgery for recurrent dislocation. All impingements occurred between the anterior wall of the liner and the stem neck in posterior dislocation and between the posterior wall of the liner and the stem neck in anterior dislocation. Revision surgery in 1 of those 4 hips revealed 2 impingement marks on the retrieved liner that closely matched the prosthesis impingement point and the dislocation pathway of the metal head on the liner that were detected earlier during motion analysis. Prosthesis impingement is an important factor in dislocation after total hip arthroplasty. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Camera artifacts in IUE spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegman, O. W.; Crenshaw, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    This study of emission line mimicking features in the IUE cameras has produced an atlas of artifiacts in high-dispersion images with an accompanying table of prominent artifacts and a table of prominent artifacts in the raw images along with a medium image of the sky background for each IUE camera.

  18. Teaching World Cultures through Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, James E.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching world cultures in the middle-level geography classroom presents challenges both because of the complexity of culture and because of the characteristics of students of this age. One effective way to teach about a culture is through the use of cultural artifacts. This article discusses how to collect and use cultural artifacts in the…

  19. Intention, History, and Artifact Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Claims that people determine whether something is a member of a given artifact kind by inferring that it was successfully created with the intention that it belong to that kind. Discusses function-based and intentional-historical accounts of artifact concepts. Concludes that a rich set of inferential capacities is needed to constitute a theory of…

  20. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motions: Analysis and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, W. S.; Sebastian, J. D.; Petrarca, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Results of theoretical and numerical investigations conducted to develop economical computing procedures were applied to an existing computer program that predicts unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by leading and trailing edge control surface motions in subsonic compressible flow. Large reductions in computing costs were achieved by removing the spanwise singularity of the downwash integrand and evaluating its effect separately in closed form. Additional reductions were obtained by modifying the incremental pressure term that account for downwash singularities at control surface edges. Accuracy of theoretical predictions of unsteady loading at high reduced frequencies was increased by applying new pressure expressions that exactly satisified the high frequency boundary conditions of an oscillating control surface. Comparative computer result indicated that the revised procedures provide more accurate predictions of unsteady loadings as well as providing reduction of 50 to 80 percent in computer usage costs.

  1. Reduction of computer usage costs in predicting unsteady aerodynamic loadings caused by control surface motion. Addendum to computer program description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, W. S.; Petrarca, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Changes to be made that provide increased accuracy and increased user flexibility in prediction of unsteady loadings caused by control surface motions are described. Analysis flexibility is increased by reducing the restrictions on the location of the downwash stations relative to the leading edge and the edges of the control surface boundaries. Analysis accuracy is increased in predicting unsteady loading for high Mach number analysis conditions through use of additional chordwise downwash stations. User guideline are presented to enlarge analysis capabilities of unusual wing control surface configurations. Comparative results indicate that the revised procedures provide accurate predictions of unsteady loadings as well as providing reductions of 40 to 75 percent in computer usage cost required by previous versions of this program.

  2. Rolling Shutter Motion Deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2015-06-07

    Although motion blur and rolling shutter deformations are closely coupled artifacts in images taken with CMOS image sensors, the two phenomena have so far mostly been treated separately, with deblurring algorithms being unable to handle rolling shutter wobble, and rolling shutter algorithms being incapable of dealing with motion blur. We propose an approach that delivers sharp and undis torted output given a single rolling shutter motion blurred image. The key to achieving this is a global modeling of the camera motion trajectory, which enables each scanline of the image to be deblurred with the corresponding motion segment. We show the results of the proposed framework through experiments on synthetic and real data.

  3. 镍铬合金桩核冠模型在不同MR序列伪影的比较研究%Comparative study of MR artifacts of different sequences caused by Ni Cr alloy post core crown model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雅静; 张惠英; 李晖

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨不同MR扫描序列中镍铬合金桩核冠模型的伪影大小。方法选取临床常用的镍铬合金制成左下6标准桩核冠模型,将其固定于水模中。应用西门子1.5 T MR扫描仪,采用头线圈对水模进行扫描,同时应用头部常用的扫描序列(SE T1WI、TSE T2WI、FLAIR、T2*WI、DWI)进行横断面扫描,观察每个成像序列中伪影面积最大的层面并测量其面积,每个数据均测量3次。应用SAS V8统计学软件对结果进行分析。结果镍铬合金在DWI序列产生的伪影最大,与其他序列的伪影比较,差异有统计学意义(P0.05)。结论不同序列金属伪影不同,DWI伪影最大,T2*WI次之,然后是T2WI,T1WI和FLAIR伪影最小。%Objective To explore the size of artifacts of Ni Cr alloy post core crown model in different MR sequences. Methods The six standard in the lower left of Ni-Cr alloy post core crown model was made and fixed in water model. Water model was scanned by 1.5 T MR using head coil.The sequence were SE T1WI,TSE T2WI,FLAIR,T2*WI,DWI. The section of the largest artifacts was observed and its area was measured.Each data were measured for 3 times,and the result was analysed by statistical software of SAS V8. Results The artifacts areas in DWI sequence was the largest, compared with other artifacts in sequence,the difference was significant (P0.05). Conclusion The artifacts size is different in different sequence.The artifacts is biggest in DWI sequence,the second is T2*WI,then the T2WI,the arti-facts is smallest in T1WI and FLAIR sequence.

  4. A POCS-Based Algorithm for Blocking Artifacts Reduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yi-hong; CHENG Guo-hua; YU Song-yu

    2006-01-01

    An algorithm for blocking artifacts reduction in DCT domain for block-based image coding was developed. The algorithm is based on the projection onto convex set (POCS) theory. Due to the fact that the DCT characteristics of shifted blocks are different caused by the blocking artifacts, a novel smoothness constraint set and the corresponding projection operator were proposed to reduce the blocking artifacts by discarding the undesired high frequency coefficients in the shifted DCT blocks. The experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the conventional algorithms in terms of objective quality, subjective quality, and convergence property.

  5. Turquoise Artifact from Teotihuacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, Michael W.; Harbottle, Garman; Weigand, Phil C.

    1999-07-01

    Turquoise artifacts appeared sporadically in Mesoamerica as early as the Formative period (Merry de Morales 1987:100, Figure 8.4; Weigand 1989:43). Most occurrences, however, postdate the collapse of Teotihuacan. In the Late Classic and Postclassic periods increasing quantities are found, often in the form of elaborate mosaics, in a wide variety of contexts in central, west and northwest Mexico. Neutron activation analysis has determined that much of this turquoise derives from sources in the southwestern United States (Weigand et al. 1977; Harbottle and Weigand 1992; Weigand and Harbottle 1993). Teotihuacan played a major role in Mesoamerica during the Terminal Formative and Early-Middle Classic periods. It was the dominant power in central Mexico from about the time of Christ to its collapse at about A.D. 650 (Millon 1988, 1992; Cowgill 1996). Throughout this period goods flowed into Teotihuacan from many parts of the Mesoamerican world. Despite this widespread economic interaction, only two pieces of turquoise have been recovered in the city. In the following pages, the context and implications of one of these finds will be examined.

  6. The Study on the Adaptive Filtering Method for Eliminating the Motion Artifact in Pulse Oximetry Measurement%脉搏血氧饱和度检测中自适应滤波消除 运动伪差的方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张虹; 孙卫新; 金捷

    2001-01-01

    Objective  The method of eliminating the motion artif ac t in the pulse oximetry measurement was studied in order to improve the performa nce character of the pulse oximeter. Methods  The noise paramete r was constructed by using light beat in the pulse oximetry system and the LMS(Lea st Mean Square) adaptive filter was used to eliminate the effect of motion artif act. Results  The algorithm of eliminating the motion artifact i n the pulse oximeter was developed. It can successfully extract the normal Photopl ethysmographic signal from the motion artifact in calculating oxygen saturation. Conclusion  This calculating method is simple and can be proces se d in real time, and its result is reliable. It establishes the fundament for fur ther decreasing the noise of pulse oximeter.%目的 研究脉搏血氧饱和度检测系统中运动伪差的消除方法, 以提高脉搏血氧仪检测性能。方法 通过脉搏血氧仪中的双光束构造噪声 参考信号,利用最小均方自适应滤波法消除运动伪差干扰的影响。结果  建立了脉搏血氧饱和度检测中消除运动伪差的计算方法,可成功地从运动伪差中提取正常光 电容积脉搏波信号作为计算氧饱和度的依据。结论 该计算方法简单,可 用于实时处理,且测量结果可靠,为进一步抑制脉搏血氧仪噪声奠定了基础。

  7. Investigating media artifacts with children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    The dissertation’s aim is to explore the everyday relevance media artifacts have for young children. It discusses and further develops analytical concepts that are committed to taking the children’s perspectives on possibilities and limitations of such artifacts seriously. These conceptual...... developments are rooted in the author’s participation in a daycare practice in Berlin, Germany. The daycare’s situational approach precisely attempted to draw on the children’s everyday life experiences so as to engage in problem-oriented learning projects, on media artifacts and beyond....

  8. Are Movement Artifacts in Magnetic Resonance Imaging a Real Problem?-A Narrative Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havsteen, Inger; Ohlhues, Anders; Madsen, Kristoffer H

    2017-01-01

    Movement artifacts compromise image quality and may interfere with interpretation, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications with low signal-to-noise ratio such as functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging, and when imaging small lesions. High image resolution has high sensitiv......Movement artifacts compromise image quality and may interfere with interpretation, especially in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications with low signal-to-noise ratio such as functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging, and when imaging small lesions. High image resolution has high...... sensitivity to motion artifacts and often prolongs scan time that again aggravates movement artifacts. During the scan fast imaging techniques and sequences, optimal receiver coils, careful patient positioning, and instruction may minimize movement artifacts. Physiological noise sources are motion from...

  9. Cytological artifacts masquerading interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahay, Khushboo; Mehendiratta, Monica; Rehani, Shweta; Kumra, Madhumani; Sharma, Rashi; Kardam, Priyanka

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cytological artifacts are important to learn because an error in routine laboratory practice can bring out an erroneous result. Aims: The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of delayed fixation and morphological discrepancies created by deliberate addition of extraneous factors on the interpretation and/or diagnosis of an oral cytosmear. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was carried out using papanicolaou and hematoxylin and eosin-stained oral smears, 6 each from 66 volunteer dental students with deliberate variation in fixation delay timings, with and without changes in temperature, undue pressure while smear making and intentional addition of contaminants. The fixation delay at room temperature was carried out at an interval of every 30 minutes, 1 day and 1 week and was continued till the end of 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month, respectively. The temperature variations included 60 to 70°C and 3 to 4°C. Results: Light microscopically, the effect of delayed fixation at room temperature appeared first on cytoplasm followed by nucleus within the first 2 hours and on the 4th day, respectively, till complete cytoplasmic degeneration on the 23rd day. However, delayed fixation at variable temperature brought faster degenerative changes at higher temperature than lower temperature. Effect of extraneous factors revealed some interesting facts. Conclusions: In order to justify a cytosmear interpretation, a cytologist must be well acquainted with delayed fixation-induced cellular changes and microscopic appearances of common contaminants so as to implicate better prognosis and therapy. PMID:24648667

  10. Isolating gait-related movement artifacts in electroencephalography during human walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline, Julia E.; Huang, Helen J.; Snyder, Kristine L.; Ferris, Daniel P.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. High-density electroencephelography (EEG) can provide an insight into human brain function during real-world activities with walking. Some recent studies have used EEG to characterize brain activity during walking, but the relative contributions of movement artifact and electrocortical activity have been difficult to quantify. We aimed to characterize movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes at a range of walking speeds and to test the efficacy of artifact removal methods. We also quantified the similarity between movement artifact recorded by EEG electrodes and a head-mounted accelerometer. Approach. We used a novel experimental method to isolate and record movement artifact with EEG electrodes during walking. We blocked electrophysiological signals using a nonconductive layer (silicone swim cap) and simulated an electrically conductive scalp on top of the swim cap using a wig coated with conductive gel. We recorded motion artifact EEG data from nine young human subjects walking on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4 to 1.6 m s-1. We then tested artifact removal methods including moving average and wavelet-based techniques. Main results. Movement artifact recorded with EEG electrodes varied considerably, across speed, subject, and electrode location. The movement artifact measured with EEG electrodes did not correlate well with head acceleration. All of the tested artifact removal methods attenuated low-frequency noise but did not completely remove movement artifact. The spectral power fluctuations in the movement artifact data resembled data from some previously published studies of EEG during walking. Significance. Our results suggest that EEG data recorded during walking likely contains substantial movement artifact that: cannot be explained by head accelerations; varies across speed, subject, and channel; and cannot be removed using traditional signal processing methods. Future studies should focus on more sophisticated methods for removal of EEG

  11. A particle accelerator probes artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Dran, J C; Salomon, J

    2002-01-01

    The AGLAE system is made up of a 2 mega volts electrostatic accelerator and of 3 irradiation lines: one leads to a vacuum enclosure in which targets are irradiated and the 2 others lines are designed to irradiate targets under an air or helium atmosphere. The AGLAE system is located in the premises of the Louvre museum in Paris and is devoted to the study of cultural objects through ion beam analysis (IBA). 4 techniques are used: -) proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) -) proton-induced gamma ray (PIGE) -) Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (NRS) and -) nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). A decisive progress has permitted the direct analysis of artifacts without sampling. The object itself is set just a few millimeters away from the exit window of the beam in an air or helium atmosphere. The exit window must be resistant enough to bear the atmospheric pressure and the damages caused by the proton beam but must be thin enough to not deteriorate the quality of the beam. By using a 10 sup - sup 7 m thick exit w...

  12. An observer model for quantifying panning artifacts in digital pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Lanciault, Christian; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    Typically, pathologists pan from one region of a slide to another, choosing areas of interest for closer inspection. Due to finite frame rate and imperfect zero-order hold reconstruction (i.e., the non-zero time to reach the target brightness after a change in pixel drive), panning in whole slide images (WSI) cause visual artifacts. It is important to study the impact of such artifacts since research suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., Histopathology 2015). In this paper, we explain what types of medical information may be harmed by panning artifacts, propose a method to simulate panning artifacts, and design an observer model to predict the impact of panning artifacts on typical human observers' performance in basic diagnostically relevant visual tasks. The proposed observer model is based on derivation of perceived object border maps from luminance and chrominance information and may be tuned to account for visual acuity of the human observer to be modeled. Our results suggest that increasing the contrast (e.g., using a wide gamut display) with a slow response panel may not mitigate the panning artifacts which mostly affect visual tasks involving spatial discrimination of objects (e.g., normal vs abnormal structure, cell type and spatial relationships between them, and low-power nuclear morphology), and that the panning artifacts worsen with increasing panning speed. The proposed methods may be used as building blocks in an automatic WSI quality assessment framework.

  13. 英语使移构式认知研究%On Cognition of English Caused-Motion Constructions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐春艳

    2015-01-01

    Goldberg proposed that the arguments of the verb and caused-motion constructions must fuse if the verb is allowed by them,but Goldberg’s approach has not been able to give a fully accurate ac-count of the principles that allow or block lexical-construction fusion.This paper will address it by speciali-zing the sementics of verbs and the cognitive method of high-level metaphor and metonymy in the frame of LCM which developed by Ruiz de Mendoza.%Goldberg 认为,动词要想进入使移构式,其论元结构必须与构式的题元结构相融。但是,Goldberg 的理论对动词准入构式的动因还缺乏令人信服的解释。根据 Ruiz de Mendoza 提出的词汇构式模型(Lexical Construction Model)框架,细化动词的语义特征以及高层隐喻和转喻的认知操作,有助于阐释动词准入使移构式的动因。

  14. An apparent-motion confound causes the negative exogenous cuing effect at SOAs with larger numbers of target locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peii; Mordkoff, J Toby

    2012-01-01

    Salient but irrelevant stimuli seem to cause an automatic orienting of covert attention, facilitating the detection of targets at the cued location for a brief period of time. However, this finding is highly dependent on the number of possible target locations, at least when the simple detection of targets is all that the task requires. Whereas small numbers of possible target locations (e.g., 2 or 3) produce the well-known advantage in response time for valid cue trials (i.e., a positive cuing effect), larger numbers of possible target locations (e.g., 6 or 8) produce a negative cuing effect. If not explained in terms of a nonattentional mechanism, this latter finding raises serious questions about the standard interpretation of positive cuing effects. The present experiment tested a particular nonattentional mechanism: that a confound between target presence and apparent motion, which occurs only on invalid cue trials, is responsible for negative cuing effect. We reduced or eliminated this confound by the use of a new type of catch trial and eliminated the negative cuing effect with large numbers of target locations.

  15. A Contrastive Analysis on Artifact Degree Caused by Oral Metal Crown with Four Sequences of 1. 5 T Magnetic Reso-nance Imaging%四种序列1.5 T磁共振成像口腔金属冠引起伪影程度的对比

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高岚; 廉云敏; 崔彩霞; 肖铁朋; 陈磊

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe and evaluate the metallic artifacts caused by dental metal crowns with four se-quences of magnetic resonance imaging in T2*/GRE,T2W/IR,T2W/FSE and T1W/SE. Methods Crowns made from four different materials( Co-Gr,Ni-Gr,Ti alloy and Pure-Ti)were included in this study. The experimental animal was a ripe crossbreed dog and the crowns were fabricated for its upper right second premolar. Each mental crown was examined by a head MRI(1. 5 T)scan with four sequences of T2*/GRE,T2W/IR,T2W/FSE and T1W/SE,respectively. The existence and ex-tent of the artifacts were assessed and compared. Results All metal crowns produced artifacts. The sequence T2*/GRE exhibited significantly wider artifact than the others(P<0. 05). For any of the test alloy crown,artifacts were seen on more MRI slices in the sequence T2*/GRE than in other three sequences which produced similar artifact presentation(P<0. 05). Conclusion A-nalysis of the artifact size and artifact-related imaging slices demonstrated that among all the four sequences,T2*/GRE has the strongest influence while the other three sequences contributed equally to artifact generation.%目的:探讨在有金属冠存在的情况下,1.5 T磁共振成像T2*/梯度回波序列( GRE)、T2W/反转恢复自旋回波(IR)、T2W/快速自旋回波序列(FSE)、T1W/自旋回波序列(SE)4种序列产生伪影的程度。方法给实验犬依次佩戴钴铬合金、镍铬合金、低钛合金、纯钛金属4种金属冠,按序进行4种序列常规1.5 T磁共振成像的颅脑扫描,分别测量4种序列在4种金属冠存在下所产生伪影的最大面积并计数金属伪影涉及图像的层数,对测量结果进行统计分析。结果各金属冠在1.5 T磁共振成像4种序列均产生了伪影。4种序列钴铬合金、镍铬合金、低钛合金、纯钛金属伪影最大面积比较,差异有统计学意义( P<0.05);其中T2W/IR组、T2W/FSE组、T1W/SE组较T2*/GRE

  16. Artifact detection in electrodermal activity using sparse recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Malia; Palumbo, Richard Vincent; Urbaneja, Alberto; Akcakaya, Murat; Huang, Jeannie; Kleckner, Ian R.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Quigley, Karen S.; Sejdic, Ervin; Goodwin, Matthew S.

    2017-05-01

    Electrodermal Activity (EDA) - a peripheral index of sympathetic nervous system activity - is a primary measure used in psychophysiology. EDA is widely accepted as an indicator of physiological arousal, and it has been shown to reveal when psychologically novel events occur. Traditionally, EDA data is collected in controlled laboratory experiments. However, recent developments in wireless biosensing have led to an increase in out-of-lab studies. This transition to ambulatory data collection has introduced challenges. In particular, artifacts such as wearer motion, changes in temperature, and electrical interference can be misidentified as true EDA responses. The inability to distinguish artifact from signal hinders analyses of ambulatory EDA data. Though manual procedures for identifying and removing EDA artifacts exist, they are time consuming - which is problematic for the types of longitudinal data sets represented in modern ambulatory studies. This manuscript presents a novel technique to automatically identify and remove artifacts in EDA data using curve fitting and sparse recovery methods. Our method was evaluated using labeled data to determine the accuracy of artifact identification. Procedures, results, conclusions, and future directions are presented.

  17. An efficient content-adaptive motion-compensated 3-D DWT with enhanced spatial and temporal scalability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrseresht, Nagita; Taubman, David

    2006-06-01

    We propose a novel, content adaptive method for motion-compensated three-dimensional wavelet transformation (MC 3-D DWT) of video. The proposed method overcomes problems of ghosting and nonaligned aliasing artifacts which can arise in regions of motion model failure, when the video is reconstructed at reduced temporal or spatial resolutions. Previous MC 3-D DWT structures either take the form of MC temporal DWT followed by a spatial transform ("t+2D"), or perform the spatial transform first ("2D + t"), limiting the spatial frequencies which can be jointly compensated in the temporal transform, and hence limiting the compression efficiency. When the motion model fails, the "t + 2D" structure causes nonaligned aliasing artifacts in reduced spatial resolution sequences. Essentially, the proposed transform continuously adapts itself between the "t + 2D" and "2D + t" structures, based on information available within the compressed bit stream. Ghosting artifacts may also appear in reduced frame-rate sequences due to temporal low-pass filtering along invalid motion trajectories. To avoid the ghosting artifacts, we continuously select between different low-pass temporal filters, based on the estimated accuracy of the motion model. Experimental results indicate that the proposed adaptive transform preserves high compression efficiency while substantially improving the quality of reduced spatial and temporal resolution sequences.

  18. Thematic knowledge, artifact concepts, and the left posterior temporal lobe: Where action and object semantics converge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalénine, Solène; Buxbaum, Laurel J

    2016-09-01

    Converging evidence supports the existence of functionally and neuroanatomically distinct taxonomic (similarity-based; e.g., hammer-screwdriver) and thematic (event-based; e.g., hammer-nail) semantic systems. Processing of thematic relations between objects has been shown to selectively recruit the left posterior temporoparietal cortex. Similar posterior regions have also been shown to be critical for knowledge of relationships between actions and manipulable human-made objects (artifacts). Based on the hypothesis that thematic relationships for artifacts rely, at least in part, on action relationships, we assessed the prediction that the same regions of the left posterior temporoparietal cortex would be critical for conceptual processing of artifact-related actions and thematic relations for artifacts. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated processing of taxonomic and thematic relations for artifacts and natural objects as well as artifact action knowledge (gesture recognition) abilities in a large sample of 48 stroke patients with a range of lesion foci in the left hemisphere. Like control participants, patients identified thematic relations faster than taxonomic relations for artifacts, whereas they identified taxonomic relations faster than thematic relations for natural objects. Moreover, response times (RTs) for identifying thematic relations for artifacts selectively predicted performance in gesture recognition. Whole brain Voxel-based Lesion-Symptom Mapping (VLSM) analyses and Region of Interest (ROI) regression analyses further demonstrated that lesions to the left posterior temporal cortex, overlapping with LTO and visual motion area hMT+, were associated both with relatively slower RTs in identifying thematic relations for artifacts and poorer artifact action knowledge in patients. These findings provide novel insights into the functional role of left posterior temporal cortex in thematic knowledge, and suggest that the close association between thematic

  19. Sonographic twinkling artifact for renal calculus detection: correlation with CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Kappil, Mariam; Weadock, William J; Rubin, Jonathan M; Platt, Joel F; DiPietro, Michael A; Bude, Ronald O

    2011-06-01

    To retrospectively correlate sonographic color Doppler twinkling artifact within the kidneys with unenhanced computed tomography (CT) in the detection of nephrolithiasis. Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective HIPAA-complaint investigation, and the informed consent requirement was waived. Sonographic imaging reports describing the presence of renal twinkling artifact between January 2008 and September 2009 were identified. Subjects who did not undergo unenhanced abdominal CT within 2 weeks after sonography were excluded. Ultrasound examinations were reviewed by three radiologists working together, and presence, number, location, and size of renal twinkling artifacts were documented by consensus opinion. Sonographic findings were correlated with unenhanced CT (5-mm section width, no overlap) for nephrolithiasis and other causes of twinkling artifact. The number, location, and size of renal calculi at CT were documented. The presence of sonographic renal twinkling artifact, in general, had a 78% (95% confidence interval: 0.66, 0.90) positive predictive value for nephrolithiasis anywhere in the kidneys at CT. The true-positive rate of twinkling artifact for confirmed calculi at CT was 49% (73 of 148 twinkling foci), while the false-positive rate was 51% (75 of 148 twinkling foci). The overall sensitivity of twinkling artifact for the detection of specific individual renal calculi observed at CT was 55% (95% confidence interval: 0.47, 0.64). While renal twinkling artifact is commonly associated with nephrolithiasis, this finding is relatively insensitive in routine clinical practice and has a high false-positive rate when 5-mm unenhanced CT images are used as the reference standard. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11102128/-/DC1. RSNA, 2011

  20. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  1. Motion-compensated non-contact detection of heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-12-01

    A new non-contact heart rate detection method based on the dual-wavelength technique is proposed and demonstrated experimentally. It is a well-known fact that the differences in the circuits of two detection modules result in different responses of two modules for motion artifacts. This poses a great challenge to compensate the motion artifacts during measurements. In order to circumvent this problem, we have proposed the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter. Comparing with the time-domain adaptive filter and independent component analysis, the amplitude spectrum and phase spectrum adaptive filter can suppress the interference caused by the two circuit differences and effectively compensate the motion artifacts. To make the device is much compact and portable, a photoelectric probe is designed. The measurement distance is from several centimeters up to several meters. Moreover, the data obtained by using this non-contact detection system is compared with those of the conventional finger blood volume pulse (BVP) sensor by simultaneously measuring the heart rate of the subject. The data obtained from the proposed non-contact system are consistent and comparable with that of the BVP sensor.

  2. Text Signals Influence Team Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clariana, Roy B.; Rysavy, Monica D.; Taricani, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory quasi-experimental investigation describes the influence of text signals on team visual map artifacts. In two course sections, four-member teams were given one of two print-based text passage versions on the course-related topic "Social influence in groups" downloaded from Wikipedia; this text had two paragraphs, each…

  3. Toddlers View Artifact Function Normatively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casler, Krista; Terziyan, Treysi; Greene, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    When children use objects like adults, are they simply tracking regularities in others' object use, or are they demonstrating a normatively defined awareness that there are right and wrong ways to act? This study provides the first evidence for the latter possibility. Young 2- and 3-year-olds (n = 32) learned functions of 6 artifacts, both…

  4. Technical artifacts: An integrated perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgo, S.; Franssen, M.P.M.; Garbacz, P.; Kitamura, Y.; Mizoguchi, R.; Vermaas, P.E.

    2014-01-01

    Humans are always interested in distinguishing natural and artificial entities although there is no sharp demarcation between the two categories. Surprisingly, things do not improve when the second type of entities is restricted to the arguably more constrained realm of physical technical artifacts.

  5. Modeling Software Processes and Artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Klaas; Bosch, Jan; Mitchell, Stuart

    1997-01-01

    The workshop on Modeling Software Processes and Artifacts explored the application of object technology in process modeling. After the introduction and the invited lecture, a number of participants presented their position papers. First, an overview is given on some background work, and the aims, as

  6. Metal artifact reduction method using metal streaks image subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pua, Rizza D.; Cho, Seung Ryong [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    Many studies have been dedicated for metal artifact reduction (MAR); however, the methods are successful to varying degrees depending on situations. Sinogram in-painting, filtering, iterative method are some of the major categories of MAR. Each has its own merits and weaknesses. A combination of these methods or hybrid methods have also been developed to make use of the different benefits of two techniques and minimize the unfavorable results. Our method focuses on the in-paitning approach and a hybrid MAR described by Xia et al. Although in-painting scheme is an effective technique in reducing the primary metal artifacts, a major drawback is the reintroduction of new artifacts that can be caused by an inaccurate interpolation process. Furthermore, combining the segmented metal image to the corrected nonmetal image in the final step of a conventional inpainting approach causes an issue of incorrect metal pixel values. Our proposed method begins with a sinogram in-painting approach and ends with an image-based metal artifact reduction scheme. This work provides a simple, yet effective solution for reducing metal artifacts and acquiring the original metal pixel information. The proposed method demonstrated its effectiveness in a simulation setting. The proposed method showed image quality that is comparable to the standard MAR; however, quantitatively more accurate than the standard MAR.

  7. Artifacts by dental materials on magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Hyun Sook; Choi, Deuk Lin; Kim, Ki Jung [Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Won Hyuck [Korea University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-05-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proved to be a valuable method for evaluation of the head and neck. Unfortunately, metallic devices associated with certain dental fillings and appliances often cause variable artifacts that can obscure normal or pathologic conditions on MR and computed tomography. In this work, we assessed the MR appearance of dental prosthetic materials in vitro and in vivo including precious alloys, nonprecions alloys, resin, amalgam and titanium alloy. For in vivo studies, these materials were placed in healthy volunteer's mouths and then images were assessed. Analysis of the appearance of shape and extent of artifact, and observed influence of these artifacts on the image interpretation at 0.2 Tesla permanent type MR scanner were valuated. Material used as temporary or permanent filling of crowns such as amalgam, precious alloy and, microfilled resin did not cause artifact on the image. The size of the artifact produced by the nonprecious alloys was influenced by the ferromagnetism of the object and the volume prosthesis, and was related to the scanning sequence. Nonprecious alloys produced minimal local signal distortion, where precious alloys, and dental resin had no effect on the MR images in vivo. These results were mainly from a low field strength MR scanner used in this study.

  8. Local collective motion analysis for multi-probe dynamic imaging and microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Manas; Mason, Thomas G.

    2016-08-01

    Dynamical artifacts, such as mechanical drift, advection, and hydrodynamic flow, can adversely affect multi-probe dynamic imaging and passive particle-tracking microrheology experiments. Alternatively, active driving by molecular motors can cause interesting non-Brownian motion of probes in local regions. Existing drift-correction techniques, which require large ensembles of probes or fast temporal sampling, are inadequate for handling complex spatio-temporal drifts and non-Brownian motion of localized domains containing relatively few probes. Here, we report an analytical method based on local collective motion (LCM) analysis of as few as two probes for detecting the presence of non-Brownian motion and for accurately eliminating it to reveal the underlying Brownian motion. By calculating an ensemble-average, time-dependent, LCM mean square displacement (MSD) of two or more localized probes and comparing this MSD to constituent single-probe MSDs, we can identify temporal regimes during which either thermal or athermal motion dominates. Single-probe motion, when referenced relative to the moving frame attached to the multi-probe LCM trajectory, provides a true Brownian MSD after scaling by an appropriate correction factor that depends on the number of probes used in LCM analysis. We show that LCM analysis can be used to correct many different dynamical artifacts, including spatially varying drifts, gradient flows, cell motion, time-dependent drift, and temporally varying oscillatory advection, thereby offering a significant improvement over existing approaches.

  9. Ring artifacts removal via spatial sparse representation in cone beam CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan; Li, Guang; Sun, Yi; Luo, Shouhua

    2016-03-01

    This paper is about the ring artifacts removal method in cone beam CT. Cone beam CT images often suffer from disturbance of ring artifacts which caused by the non-uniform responses of the elements in detectors. Conventional ring artifacts removal methods focus on the correlation of the elements and the ring artifacts' structural characteristics in either sinogram domain or cross-section image. The challenge in the conventional methods is how to distinguish the artifacts from the intrinsic structures; hence they often give rise to the blurred image results due to over processing. In this paper, we investigate the characteristics of the ring artifacts in spatial space, different from the continuous essence of 3D texture feature of the scanned objects, the ring artifacts are displayed discontinuously in spatial space, specifically along z-axis. Thus we can easily recognize the ring artifacts in spatial space than in cross-section. As a result, we choose dictionary representation for ring artifacts removal due to its high sensitivity to structural information. We verified our theory both in spatial space and coronal-section, the experimental results demonstrate that our methods can remove the artifacts efficiently while maintaining image details.

  10. SU-E-I-38: Improved Metal Artifact Correction Using Adaptive Dual Energy Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, X; Elder, E; Roper, J; Dhabaan, A [Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Methods: The empirical dual energy calibration (EDEC) method corrects for beam-hardening artifacts, but shows limited performance on metal artifact correction. In this work, we propose an adaptive dual energy calibration (ADEC) method to correct for metal artifacts. Results: Highly attenuating copper rods cause severe streaking artifacts on standard CT images. EDEC improves the image quality, but cannot eliminate the streaking artifacts. Compared to EDEC, the proposed ADEC method further reduces the streaking resulting from metallic inserts and beam-hardening effects and obtains material decomposition images with significantly improved accuracy. Conclusion: We propose an adaptive dual energy calibration method to correct for metal artifacts. ADEC is evaluated with the Shepp-Logan phantom, and shows superior metal artifact correction performance. In the future, we will further evaluate the performance of the proposed method with phantom and patient data.

  11. Motion Correction of Multi-b-value Diffusion-weighted Imaging in the Liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Yousef; Do, Richard K. G.; Shukla-Dave, Amita; Deasy, Joseph O.; Lu, Yonggang; Akin, Oguz

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Motion artifacts are a significant source of error in the acquisition and quantification of parameters from multi-b-value diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). The objective of this article is to present a reliable method to reduce motion-related artifacts during free-breathing at higher b-values when signal levels are low. Materials and Methods Twelve patients referred for magnetic resonance imaging of the liver underwent a clinical magnetic resonance imaging examination of the abdominal region that included DWI. Conventional single-shot spin-echo echo planar imaging acquisitions of the liver during free breathing were repeated in a “time-resolved” manner during a single acquisition to obtain data for multi-b-value analysis, alternating between low and high b-values. Image registration using a normalized mutual information similarity measure was used to correct for spatial misalignment of diffusion-weighted volumes caused by motion. Registration error was estimated indirectly by comparing the normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) values of data fitted to the biexponential intra-voxel incoherent motion model before and after motion correction. Regions of interest (ROIs) were selected in the liver close to the surface of the liver and close to internal structures such as large bile ducts and blood vessels. Results For the 12 patient datasets, the mean NRMSE value for the motion-corrected ROIs (0.38 ± 0.16) was significantly lower than the mean NRMSE values for the non–motion-corrected ROIs (0.41 ± 0.13) (P < .05). In cases where there was substantial respiratory motion during the acquisition, visual inspection verified that the algorithm markedly improved alignment of the liver contours between frames. Conclusions The proposed method addresses motion-related artifacts to increase robustness in multi-b-value acquisitions. PMID:22963726

  12. Withanolide artifacts formed in methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cong-Mei; Zhang, Huaping; Gallagher, Robert J; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2013-11-22

    Methanol solutions of the main withanolides (6-8) naturally present in Physalis longifolia yielded five artificial withanolides (1-5), including three new compounds (1-3). Withanolides 1 and 2 were identified as intramolecular Michael addition derivatives, while withanolides 3-5 were the result of intermolecular Michael addition. A comprehensive literature investigation was conducted to identify potential withanolide Michael addition artifacts isolated from Solanaceous species to date.

  13. A standardized evaluation of artifacts from metallic compounds during fast MR imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murakami, Shumei; Verdonschot, Rinus G; Kataoka, Miyoshi

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Metallic compounds present in the oral and maxillofacial regions (OMR) cause large artifacts during MR scanning. We quantitatively assessed these artifacts embedded within a phantom according to standards set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). MATERIALS AND METHO...

  14. Automatic Artifact Removal from Electroencephalogram Data Based on A Priori Artifact Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG is susceptible to various nonneural physiological artifacts. Automatic artifact removal from EEG data remains a key challenge for extracting relevant information from brain activities. To adapt to variable subjects and EEG acquisition environments, this paper presents an automatic online artifact removal method based on a priori artifact information. The combination of discrete wavelet transform and independent component analysis (ICA, wavelet-ICA, was utilized to separate artifact components. The artifact components were then automatically identified using a priori artifact information, which was acquired in advance. Subsequently, signal reconstruction without artifact components was performed to obtain artifact-free signals. The results showed that, using this automatic online artifact removal method, there were statistical significant improvements of the classification accuracies in both two experiments, namely, motor imagery and emotion recognition.

  15. Automated filtering of intrinsic movement artifacts during two-photon intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Soulet

    Full Text Available In vivo imaging using two-photon microscopy is an essential tool to explore the dynamic of physiological events deep within biological tissues for short or extended periods of time. The new capabilities offered by this technology (e.g. high tissue penetrance, low toxicity have opened a whole new era of investigations in modern biomedical research. However, the potential of using this promising technique in tissues of living animals is greatly limited by the intrinsic irregular movements that are caused by cardiac and respiratory cycles and muscular and vascular tone. Here, we show real-time imaging of the brain, spinal cord, sciatic nerve and myenteric plexus of living mice using a new automated program, named Intravital_Microscopy_Toolbox, that removes frames corrupted with motion artifacts from time-lapse videos. Our approach involves generating a dissimilarity score against precalculated reference frames in a specific reference channel, thus allowing the gating of distorted, out-of-focus or translated frames. Since the algorithm detects the uneven peaks of image distortion caused by irregular animal movements, the macro allows a fast and efficient filtering of the image sequence. In addition, extra features have been implemented in the macro, such as XY registration, channel subtraction, extended field of view with maximum intensity projection, noise reduction with average intensity projections, and automated timestamp and scale bar overlay. Thus, the Intravital_Microscopy_Toolbox macro for ImageJ provides convenient tools for biologists who are performing in vivo two-photon imaging in tissues prone to motion artifacts.

  16. Elimination of artifacts in interline charge-coupled device imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turko, B. T.; Yates, G. J.

    1991-10-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) of interline transfer design are especially useful in imaging at high frame rates. However, their sensitivity to ionization radiation and the reduced effective opacity for vertical charge transfer registers cause undesired image artifacts. Random white spots from the radiation and "ghost" images (or smear) generated in the registers may severely impair the image quality. An electronic method of eliminating these artificats is described. Special sequences of pulses clock the CCD, quickly dumping the unwanted charge. The fast readout of images, cleared of artifacts, follows immediately.

  17. Ratiometric artifact reduction in low power reflective photoplethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, J A C; Guang-Zhong Yang

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents effective signal-processing techniques for the compensation of motion artifacts and ambient light offsets in a reflective photoplethysmography sensor suitable for wearable applications. A ratiometric comparison of infrared (IR) and red absorption characteristics cancels out noise that is multiplicative in nature and amplitude modulation of pulsatile absorption signals enables rejection of additive noise. A low-power, discrete-time pulse-oximeter platform is used to capture IR and red photoplethysmograms so that the data used for analysis have noise levels representative of what a true body sensor network device would experience. The proposed artifact rejection algorithm is designed for real-time implementation with a low-power microcontroller while being robust enough to compensate for varying levels in ambient light as well as reducing the effects of motion-induced artifacts. The performance of the system is illustrated by its ability to extract a typical plethysmogram heart-rate waveform since the sensor is subjected to a range of physical disturbances.

  18. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N; Hansen, Adam E; Keller, Sune H;

    2015-01-01

    substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET...... images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. RESULTS: The MR-based volume of the susceptibility......% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility artifact on the MR-AC attenuation map. CONCLUSIONS: Metallic dental work may cause severe MR signal voids. The resulting PET...

  19. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Hansen, Adam E.; Keller, Sune

    2015-01-01

    substituted with soft tissue information. Our inpainting algorithm delineates the outer contour of signal voids breaching the anatomical volume using the non-attenuation-corrected PET image and classifies the inner air regions based on an aligned template of likely dental artifact areas. The reconstructed PET...... images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. RESULTS: The MR-based volume of the susceptibility......% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility artifact on the MR-AC attenuation map. CONCLUSIONS: Metallic dental work may cause severe MR signal voids. The resulting PET...

  20. 常用口腔金属和陶瓷材料在不同场强磁共振上伪影的实验研究%Measurement of MRI Artifacts Caused by Common Metallic Dental Materials and Common Ceramic Dental Materials on Dif-ferent Field-strength Mmagnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘湘清; 黄坚钢

    2014-01-01

    Objective]To measure and compare the MRI artifacts caused by common metal ic dental materials and common ceramic dental materials on different field-strength magnets.[Methods] A total of 3 common metal ic dental materials and 2 common ceramic dental materials were tested with 0.35T, 1.5T and 3.0T MR imagers. The artifact areas on these 3 different field-strength magnets were measured and statistical y compared. [Results]Zirconia in three field magnetic resonance(NMR) in T1 and T2 as no artifacts, casting porcelain, metal al oy, nickel chromium al oy and CoCr-al oy in three fields magnetic resonance(NMR) in T1 and T2 as al can produce different degree of artifacts, and artifacts area increased in turn. Cobalt chromium al oy and nickel chromium al oy measurements on the high side, the cobalt chromium al oy than other four kinds of materials on the high side( P<0.05),high nickel-chromium al oy was precious metal al oy, casting porcelain( P<0.05). [Conclusions]Commonly used metal ic dental materials could cause MR artifacts and image degradation. Compared with that on 0.35T, the artifact was increased on 1.5T magnet. Compared with that on 1.5T, the artifact was increased on 3.0T magnet.%[目的]通过对5种口腔常用金属和陶瓷材料在3种场强磁共振成像设备上以T1、T2序列进行扫描、观察、比较其伪影情况,为临床提供指导。[方法]依据标准模型的左上中切牙为牙体标准,用5种金属和陶瓷材料分别制作内冠,作为本次研究的试件。分别在0.35T、1.5T和3.0T磁共振成像设备上进行扫描,得到T1和T2像。依据有关标准和测量面积来分析比较伪影情况。[结果]氧化锆在3种场强磁共振的T1、T2像中均无伪影,铸瓷、贵金属合金、镍铬合金与钴铬合金在3种场强磁共振的T1、T2像中均可产生不同程度的伪影,且伪影面积依次增大。钴铬合金和镍铬合金测定值偏高,其中钴铬合金较其他4种材料偏高(P﹤0.05

  1. Evaluation of MRI artifacts at 3 Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Kirin; Shellock, Frank G

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla for 38 commonly used cosmetics. Thirty-eight cosmetics (16, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 10, eye shadows; 1, lip gloss; 1, body lotion; 1, body glitter, and 1, hair loss concealer) underwent evaluation for MRI artifacts at 3-Tesla. The cosmetics were applied a copper-sulfate-filled, phantom and initially assessed using a "screening" gradient echo (GRE) pulse sequence. Of the 38 different cosmetics, 14 (37%) exhibited artifacts. For these 14 cosmetics, additional characterization of artifacts was performed using a GRE pulse sequence. A qualitative scale was applied to characterize the artifact size. Artifacts were observed, as follows: 2, nail polishes; 5, eyeliners; 3, mascaras; 3, eye shadows; 1, hair loss concealer. Artifact size ranged from small (eye shadow) to very large (hair loss concealer) and tended to be associated with the presence of iron oxide or other metal-based ingredient. Commonly used cosmetics caused artifacts that may create issues if the area of interest is the same as where the cosmetic was applied or if its presence was unknown, thus, potentially causing it to be construed as pathology. Therefore, these findings have important implications for patients referred for MRI examinations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The unsteady flow of a third-grade fluid caused by the periodic motion of an infinite wall with transpiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdulhameed

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the unidirectional flow of an incompressible electrically conducting third-grade fluid past a vertical transpiration wall through a porous medium with time-dependent periodic motion is presented. The nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed to ordinary differential equation by means of symmetry reductions. The reduced equation is then solved analytically for steady-state and time-dependent transient parts. The time series of the transient flow velocity for different pertinent parameters are examined through plots. During the course of computation, it was observed that the time-dependent transient and steady-state solutions agree very well at large value of time when the ratio is related to fluid parameters γ∗γ>1.

  3. Cleaning MEG artifacts using external cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, I; Abeles, M

    2013-07-15

    Using EEG, ECoG, MEG, and microelectrodes to record brain activity is prone to multiple artifacts. The main power line (mains line), video equipment, mechanical vibrations and activities outside the brain are the most common sources of artifacts. MEG amplitudes are low, and even small artifacts distort recordings. In this study, we show how these artifacts can be efficiently removed by recording external cues during MEG recordings. These external cues are subsequently used to register the precise times or spectra of the artifacts. The results indicate that these procedures preserve both the spectra and the time domain wave-shapes of the neuromagnetic signal, while successfully reducing the contribution of the artifacts to the target signals without reducing the rank of the data.

  4. Closed-Loop Control of Myoelectric Prostheses With Electrotactile Feedback: Influence of Stimulation Artifact and Blanking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Cornelia; Dosen, Strahinja; Amsuess, Sebastian; Farina, Dario

    2015-09-01

    Electrocutaneous stimulation is a promising approach to provide sensory feedback to amputees, and thus close the loop in upper limb prosthetic systems. However, the stimulation introduces artifacts in the recorded electromyographic (EMG) signals, which may be detrimental for the control of myoelectric prostheses. In this study, artifact blanking with three data segmentation approaches was investigated as a simple method to restore the performance of pattern recognition in prosthesis control (eight motions) when EMG signals are corrupted by stimulation artifacts. The methods were tested over a range of stimulation conditions and using four feature sets, comprising both time and frequency domain features. The results demonstrated that when stimulation artifacts were present, the classification performance improved with blanking in all tested conditions. In some cases, the classification performance with blanking was at the level of the benchmark (artifact-free data). The greatest pulse duration and frequency that allowed a full performance recovery were 400 μs and 150 Hz, respectively. These results show that artifact blanking can be used as a practical solution to eliminate the negative influence of the stimulation artifact on EMG pattern classification in a broad range of conditions, thus allowing to close the loop in myoelectric prostheses using electrotactile feedback.

  5. TU-F-CAMPUS-J-04: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction Technique for the Radiation Therapy Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K; Kuo, H; Ritter, J; Shen, J; Basavatia, A; Yaparpalvi, R; Kalnicki, S [Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Tome, W [Montefiore Medical Center, ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of using a metal artifact reduction technique in depleting metal artifact and its application in improving dose calculation in External Radiation Therapy Planning. Methods: CIRS electron density phantom was scanned with and without steel drill bits placed in some plug holes. Meta artifact reduction software with Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) was used to remove metal artifacts for scanned image with metal. Hounsfield units of electron density plugs from artifact free reference image and MDT processed images were compared. To test the dose calculation improvement after the MDT processed images, clinically approved head and neck plan with manual dental artifact correction was tested. Patient images were exported and processed with MDT and plan was recalculated with new MDT image without manual correction. Dose profiles near the metal artifacts were compared. Results: The MDT used in this study effectively reduced the metal artifact caused by beam hardening and scatter. The windmill around the metal drill was greatly improved with smooth rounded view. Difference of the mean HU in each density plug between reference and MDT images were less than 10 HU in most of the plugs. Dose difference between original plan and MDT images were minimal. Conclusion: Most metal artifact reduction methods were developed for diagnostic improvement purpose. Hence Hounsfield unit accuracy was not rigorously tested before. In our test, MDT effectively eliminated metal artifacts with good HU reproduciblity. However, it can introduce new mild artifacts so the MDT images should be checked with original images.

  6. Metal artifacts in computed tomography for radiation therapy planning: dosimetric effects and impact of metal artifact reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giantsoudi, Drosoula; De Man, Bruno; Verburg, Joost; Trofimov, Alexei; Jin, Yannan; Wang, Ge; Gjesteby, Lars; Paganetti, Harald

    2017-04-01

    A significant and increasing number of patients receiving radiation therapy present with metal objects close to, or even within, the treatment area, resulting in artifacts in computed tomography (CT) imaging, which is the most commonly used imaging method for treatment planning in radiation therapy. In the presence of metal implants, such as dental fillings in treatment of head-and-neck tumors, spinal stabilization implants in spinal or paraspinal treatment or hip replacements in prostate cancer treatments, the extreme photon absorption by the metal object leads to prominent image artifacts. Although current CT scanners include a series of correction steps for beam hardening, scattered radiation and noisy measurements, when metal implants exist within or close to the treatment area, these corrections do not suffice. CT metal artifacts affect negatively the treatment planning of radiation therapy either by causing difficulties to delineate the target volume or by reducing the dose calculation accuracy. Various metal artifact reduction (MAR) methods have been explored in terms of improvement of organ delineation and dose calculation in radiation therapy treatment planning, depending on the type of radiation treatment and location of the metal implant and treatment site. Including a brief description of the available CT MAR methods that have been applied in radiation therapy, this article attempts to provide a comprehensive review on the dosimetric effect of the presence of CT metal artifacts in treatment planning, as reported in the literature, and the potential improvement suggested by different MAR approaches. The impact of artifacts on the treatment planning and delivery accuracy is discussed in the context of different modalities, such as photon external beam, brachytherapy and particle therapy, as well as by type and location of metal implants.

  7. 非铁磁性口腔金属材料磁共振成像伪影的实验研究%Exp erimental research on magneit c resonance imaging artifacts caused by non-ferroma gnetic dental metallic matre ials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩武; 潘小波; 郝楠; 彭利辉; 钟爱喜; 刘光雪

    2015-01-01

    as control.All samples were imaged by means of MRI apparatus with three sequences,T1-weighted fast spin-echo(FSE-T1WI),T2-weighted fast spin-echo(FSE-T2WI) and T2-weighted gradient-echo(GRE-T2WI). MRI artifact sizes of different metal materials and three sequences were measured.Results Artifact size showed significant differences among different metal materials and different sequences.The artifact size of amalgams,Ag-Pd alloy,Au-Pd alloy or gold alloy was not significantly different from that of control group in FSE-T1WI sequence(P>0.05),while the artifact sizes of Ag-Pd alloy,Au-Pd alloy,titanium alloy and pure titanium were significantly larger in FSE-T2WI and GRE-T2WI sequence compared with the controls(P<0.05).Pure titanium and titanium alloy showed significantly larger artifact sizes in the three sequences compared with the controls(P<0.01).Conclusion MR image quality of precious metal alloys is affected by the sequence used and the alloy compositions,and also has relations with the gold content.Pure titanium and its alloys pose a problem with respect to causing MRI artifacts in different sequences.FSE-T2 WI and GRE-T2 WI sequence have more effects on the MRI artifact sizes of different alloys compared with FSE-T1 WI sequence.

  8. Psycho-physiological effects of visual artifacts by stereoscopic display systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyun; Yoshitake, Junki; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Kawai, Takashi; Yamada, Osamu; Iguchi, Akihiko

    2011-03-01

    The methods available for delivering stereoscopic (3D) display using glasses can be classified as time-multiplexing and spatial-multiplexing. With both methods, intrinsic visual artifacts result from the generation of the 3D image pair on a flat panel display device. In the case of the time-multiplexing method, an observer perceives three artifacts: flicker, the Mach-Dvorak effect, and a phantom array. These only occur under certain conditions, with flicker appearing in any conditions, the Mach-Dvorak effect during smooth pursuit eye movements (SPM), and a phantom array during saccadic eye movements (saccade). With spatial-multiplexing, the artifacts are temporal-parallax (due to the interlaced video signal), binocular rivalry, and reduced spatial resolution. These artifacts are considered one of the major impediments to the safety and comfort of 3D display users. In this study, the implications of the artifacts for the safety and comfort are evaluated by examining the psychological changes they cause through subjective symptoms of fatigue and the depth sensation. Physiological changes are also measured as objective responses based on analysis of heart and brain activation by visual artifacts. Further, to understand the characteristics of each artifact and the combined effects of the artifacts, four experimental conditions are developed and tested. The results show that perception of artifacts differs according to the visual environment and the display method. Furthermore visual fatigue and the depth sensation are influenced by the individual characteristics of each artifact. Similarly, heart rate variability and regional cerebral oxygenation changes by perception of artifacts in conditions.

  9. Evidence of Solar Flare Triggering due to Loop-Loop Interaction Caused by Footpoint Shear-Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pankaj; Somov, B V; Manoharan, P K; Erdelyi, R; Uddin, Wahab

    2010-01-01

    We analyze multi-wavelength data of a M7.9/1N class solar flare which occurred on 27 April, 2006 from AR NOAA 10875. GOES soft X-ray images provide the most likely signature of two interacting loops and their reconnection, which triggers the solar flare. TRACE 195 A images also reveal the loop-loop interaction and the formation of `X' points with converging motion (~30 km/s) at the reconnection site in-between this interacting loop system. This provides the evidence of progressive reconnection and flare maximization at the interaction site in the active region. The absence of type III radio burst during this time period indicates no opening of magnetic field lines during the flare energy release, which implies only the change of field lines connectivity/orientation during the loop-loop interaction and reconnection process. The Ondrejov dynamic radio spectrum shows an intense decimetric (DCIM) radio burst (2.5--4.5 GHz, duration ~3 min) during flare initiation, which reveals the signature of particle accelerat...

  10. Artifacts in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography measurements in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asrani, Sanjay; Essaid, Luma; Alder, Brian D; Santiago-Turla, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    IMPORTANCE Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) has an integral role in the diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma. Understanding the types of artifacts commonly seen in the imaging of patients being evaluated for glaucoma will help physicians better implement these data in the care of patients. OBJECTIVES To determine the frequency and distribution of SD-OCT imaging artifacts in patients being evaluated for glaucoma and to provide examples of common artifacts. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A retrospective cross-sectional study design was used to examine SD-OCT images (using Spectralis SD-OCT) of 277 consecutive patients who had a diagnosis of glaucoma of any stage or had suspected glaucoma. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macular thickness scans were included. For each scan, the final printout and the source images that generated the final printout were examined. If present, artifacts were classified as evident on the final printout or not and were categorized as to the primary source of the artifact (eg, ocular pathologic features or technician errors). Examples of common artifacts are provided. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The presence of imaging artifacts. RESULTS In 277 consecutive patients, 131 macular thickness scans were obtained, and 277 RNFL scans were obtained. Of the macular thickness scans, 37 (28.2%; 95% CI, 20.8%-36.1%) had imaging artifacts. Six of these artifacts were not obvious on the final printout. Of the RNFL scans, 55 (19.9%; 95% CI, 15.2%-24.6%) contained artifacts. Seven of these artifacts were not evident on the final printout. The most common cause of artifacts for macular thickness and RNFL scans was ocular pathologic features, primarily the presence of an epiretinal membrane. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE It is likely that SD-OCT-related imaging artifacts occur in 15.2% to 36.1% of scans obtained in patients being evaluated for glaucoma. Some of these artifacts may not be evident on the final printout. Physicians should

  11. Independent component analysis of gait-related movement artifact recorded using EEG electrodes during treadmill walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Lynne Snyder

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There has been a recent surge in the use of electroencephalography (EEG as a tool for mobile brain imaging due to its portability and fine time resolution. When EEG is combined with independent component analysis (ICA and source localization techniques, it can model electrocortical activity as arising from temporally independent signals located in spatially distinct cortical areas. However, for mobile tasks, it is not clear how movement artifacts influence ICA and source localization. We devised a novel method to collect pure movement artifact data (devoid of any electrophysiological signals with a 256-channel EEG system. We first blocked true electrocortical activity using a silicone swim cap. Over the silicone layer, we placed a simulated scalp with electrical properties similar to real human scalp. We collected EEG movement artifact signals from ten healthy, young subjects wearing this setup as they walked on a treadmill at speeds from 0.4-1.6 m/s. We performed ICA and dipole fitting on the EEG movement artifact data to quantify how accurately these methods would identify the artifact signals as non-neural. ICA and dipole fitting accurately localized 99% of the independent components in non-neural locations or lacked dipolar characteristics. The remaining 1% of sources had locations within the brain volume and low residual variances, but had topographical maps, power spectra, time courses, and event related spectral perturbations typical of non-neural sources. Caution should be exercised when interpreting ICA for data that includes semi-periodic artifacts including artifact arising from human walking. Alternative methods are needed for the identification and separation of movement artifact in mobile EEG signals, especially methods that can be performed in real time. Separating true brain signals from motion artifact could clear the way for EEG brain computer interfaces for assistance during mobile activities, such as walking.

  12. Evaluating an artifact in design science research

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Herselman, M

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available as the artifact which was evaluated. This example from practice can contribute towards an enhanced understanding of the evaluation of DSR artifacts and the contribution of program theory during both the ex ante and ex post part of the development....

  13. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...

  14. The Many Faces of Computational Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Harper, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Building on data from fieldwork at a medical department, this paper focuses on the varied nature of computational artifacts in practice. It shows that medical practice relies on multiple heterogeneous computational artifacts that form complex constellations. In the hospital studied...... the computational artifacts are both coordinative, image-generating, and intended for the control of nuclear-physical and chemical processes. Furthermore, the paper entails a critique of the notion of ‘computer support’, for not capturing the diverse constitutive powers of computer technology; its types if you will....... The paper is a step towards establishing a lexicon of computational artifacts in practice. It is a call for a wider effort to systematically conceptualise the multiple and specifiable ways in which computational artifacts may be part of work activities. This is for the benefit of design and our...

  15. A method for quantitative assessment of artifacts in EEG, and an empirical study of artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappel, Simon L; Looney, David; Mandic, Danilo P; Kidmose, Preben

    2014-01-01

    Wearable EEG systems for continuous brain monitoring is an emergent technology that involves significant technical challenges. Some of these are related to the fact that these systems operate in conditions that are far less controllable with respect to interference and artifacts than is the case for conventional systems. Quantitative assessment of artifacts provides a mean for optimization with respect to electrode technology, electrode location, electronic instrumentation and system design. To this end, we propose an artifact assessment method and evaluate it over an empirical study of 3 subjects and 5 different types of artifacts. The study showed consistent results across subjects and artifacts.

  16. Silicon bulk micromachined hybrid dimensional artifact.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudet, Andre A.; Tran, Hy D.; Bauer, Todd Marks; Shilling, Katherine Meghan; Oliver, Andrew David

    2010-03-01

    A mesoscale dimensional artifact based on silicon bulk micromachining fabrication has been developed and manufactured with the intention of evaluating the artifact both on a high precision coordinate measuring machine (CMM) and video-probe based measuring systems. This hybrid artifact has features that can be located by both a touch probe and a video probe system with a k=2 uncertainty of 0.4 {micro}m, more than twice as good as a glass reference artifact. We also present evidence that this uncertainty could be lowered to as little as 50 nm (k=2). While video-probe based systems are commonly used to inspect mesoscale mechanical components, a video-probe system's certified accuracy is generally much worse than its repeatability. To solve this problem, an artifact has been developed which can be calibrated using a commercially available high-accuracy tactile system and then be used to calibrate typical production vision-based measurement systems. This allows for error mapping to a higher degree of accuracy than is possible with a glass reference artifact. Details of the designed features and manufacturing process of the hybrid dimensional artifact are given and a comparison of the designed features to the measured features of the manufactured artifact is presented and discussed. Measurement results from vision and touch probe systems are compared and evaluated to determine the capability of the manufactured artifact to serve as a calibration tool for video-probe systems. An uncertainty analysis for calibration of the artifact using a CMM is presented.

  17. Method for eliminating artifacts in CCD imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turko, B. T.; Yates, G. J.

    1990-06-01

    An electronic method for eliminating artifacts in a video camera employing a charge coupled device (CCD) as an image sensor is presented. The method comprises the step of initializing the camera prior to normal readout. The method includes a first dump cycle period for transferring radiation generated charge into the horizontal register. This occurs while the decaying image on the phosphor being imaged is being integrated in the photosites, and a second dump cycle period, occurring after the phosphor image has decayed, for rapidly dumping unwanted smear charge which has been generated in the vertical registers. Image charge is then transferred from the photosites and to the vertical registers and readout in conventional fashion. The inventive method allows the video camera to be used in environments having high ionizing radiation content, and to capture images of events of very short duration and occurring either within or outside the normal visual wavelength spectrum. Resultant images are free from ghost, smear, and smear phenomena caused by insufficient opacity of the registers, and are also free from random damage caused by ionization charges which exceed the charge limit capacity of the photosites.

  18. Collective cargo hauling by a bundle of parallel microtubules: bi-directional motion caused by load-dependent polymerization and depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanti, Dipanwita; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2015-01-01

    A microtubule (MT) is a hollow tube of approximately 25 nm diameter. The two ends of the tube are dissimilar and are designated as ‘plus’ and ‘minus’ ends. Motivated by the collective push and pull exerted by a bundle of MTs during chromosome segregation in a living cell, we have developed here a much simplified theoretical model of a bundle of parallel dynamic MTs. The plus-end of all the MTs in the bundle is permanently attached to a movable ‘wall’ by a device whose detailed structure is not treated explicitly in our model. The only requirement is that the device allows polymerization and depolymerization of each MT at the plus-end. In spite of the absence of external force and direct lateral interactions between the MTs, the group of polymerizing MTs attached to the wall create a load force against the group of depolymerizing MTs and vice versa; the load against a group is shared equally by the members of that group. Such indirect interactions among the MTs give rise to the rich variety of possible states of collective dynamics that we have identified by computer simulations of the model in different parameter regimes. The bi-directional motion of the cargo, caused by the load-dependence of the polymerization kinetics, is a ‘proof-of-principle’ that the bi-directional motion of chromosomes before cell division does not necessarily need active participation of motor proteins.

  19. Metal artifact reduction in MRI-based cervical cancer intracavitary brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Yuan James; Zoberi, Jacqueline E.; Kadbi, Mo; Grigsby, Perry W.; Cammin, Jochen; Mackey, Stacie L.; Garcia-Ramirez, Jose; Goddu, S. Murty; Schwarz, Julie K.; Gach, H. Michael

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an increasingly important role in brachytherapy planning for cervical cancer. Yet, metal tandem, ovoid intracavitary applicators, and fiducial markers used in brachytherapy cause magnetic susceptibility artifacts in standard MRI. These artifacts may impact the accuracy of brachytherapy treatment and the evaluation of tumor response by misrepresenting the size and location of the metal implant, and distorting the surrounding anatomy and tissue. Metal artifact reduction sequences (MARS) with high bandwidth RF selective excitations and turbo spin-echo readouts were developed for MRI of orthopedic implants. In this study, metal artifact reduction was applied to brachytherapy of cervical cancer using the orthopedic metal artifact reduction (O-MAR) sequence. O-MAR combined MARS features with view angle tilting and slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) to minimize in-plane and through-plane susceptibility artifacts. O-MAR improved visualization of the tandem tip on T2 and proton density weighted (PDW) imaging in phantoms and accurately represented the diameter of the tandem. In a pilot group of cervical cancer patients (N  =  7), O-MAR significantly minimized the blooming artifact at the tip of the tandem in PDW MRI. There was no significant difference observed in artifact reduction between the weak (5 kHz, 7 z-phase encodes) and medium (10 kHz, 13 z-phase encodes) SEMAC settings. However, the weak setting allowed a significantly shorter acquisition time than the medium setting. O-MAR also reduced susceptibility artifacts associated with metal fiducial markers so that they appeared on MRI at their true dimensions.

  20. How measurement artifacts affect cerebral autoregulation outcomes: A technical note on transfer function analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meel-van den Abeelen, Aisha S S; de Jong, Daan L K; Lagro, Joep; Panerai, Ronney B; Claassen, Jurgen A H R

    2016-05-01

    Cerebral autoregulation (CA) is the mechanism that aims to maintain adequate cerebral perfusion during changes in blood pressure (BP). Transfer function analysis (TFA), the most reported method in literature to quantify CA, shows large between-study variability in outcomes. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of measurement artifacts in this variation. Specifically, the role of distortion in the BP and/or CBFV measurementon TFA outcomes was investigated. The influence of three types of artifacts on TFA outcomes was studied: loss of signal, motion artifacts, and baseline drifts. TFA metrics of signals without the simulated artifacts were compared with those of signals with artifacts. TFA outcomes scattered highly when more than 10% of BP signal or over 8% of the CBFV signal was lost, or when measurements contained one or more artifacts resulting from head movement. Furthermore, baseline drift affected interpretation of TFA outcomes when the power in the BP signal was 5 times the power in the LF band. In conclusion, loss of signal in BP and loss in CBFV, affects interpretation of TFA outcomes. Therefore, it is vital to validate signal quality to the defined standards before interpreting TFA outcomes.

  1. Iceland hotspot track in southeast Greenland causes huge present-day vertical viscoelastic motion of the bedrock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Sasgen, Ingo; Bevis, Michael; van Dam, Tonie; Wahr, John; Bamber, Jonathan; Wouters, Bert; Helm, Veit; Willis, Michael; Csatho, Beata; Knudsen, Per; Kuipers Munneke, Peter; Kjær, Kurt

    2016-04-01

    The process of Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) represents the ongoing response of the solid Earth to past ice mass loss that occurred following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~21 ka B.P.). The magnitude of the GIA uplift depends on the temporal history of the ice load and is highly sensitive to variations in upper mantle viscosity. Greenland GIA is thought to be well contained and due to relative high viscosity, influence of more recent changes e.g. since the Little Ice Age have minor present-day effect (GIA. We identify an unexpected GIA anomaly of ~12 mm/yr in southeast Greenland, which we interpret as linked to a zone of warmer upper mantle caused by the Iceland hotspot track that would reduce the viscosity and produce greater viscoelastic uplift due to recent ice mass changes. We reconsider the evolution of the Greenland ice sheet since LGM and estimate a total ice mass loss equivalent to sea level rise of 4.9 m since LGM. Our observations suggest southeast and northwest Greenland, subject to present-day major ice loss, also contributed by significantly more mass loss on millennia scale than previously estimated.

  2. Visual quality beyond artifact visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redi, Judith A.

    2013-03-01

    The Electronic imaging community has devoted a lot of effort to the development of technologies that can predict the visual quality of images and videos, as a basis for the delivery of optimal visual quality to the user. These systems have been based for the most part on a visibility-centric approach, assuming the more artifacts are visible, the higher is the annoyance they provoke, the lower the visual quality. Despite the remarkable results achieved with this approach, recently a number of studies suggested that the visibility-centric approach to visual quality might have limitations, and that other factors might influence the overall quality impression of an image or video, depending on cognitive and affective mechanisms that work on top of perception. In particular, interest in the visual content, engagement and context of usage have been found to impact on the overall quality impression of the image/video. In this paper, we review these studies and explore the impact that affective and cognitive processes have on the visual quality. In addition, as a case study, we present the results of an experiment investigating on the impact of aesthetic appeal on visual quality, and we show that users tend to be more demanding in terms of visual quality judging beautiful images.

  3. CT Image Artifacts with Corresponding Elimination Methods%CT图像伪影及其解决方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵传军; 王烈伟

    2014-01-01

    本文列举了常见的几种CT图像伪影,分析了其产生的原因及解决方案,旨在为临床科室提供避免伪影以得到高质量CT图像的有效方法。%This paper introduces several kinds of CT image artifacts and analyzes the causes of these artifacts. Then this paper gives corresponding elimination methods of these artifacts in order to provide effective methods for clinical departments to avoid artifacts and then get CT images with high quality.

  4. Image Quality of the 3 Dimensional Phase-Contrast Technique in an Intracranial Magnetic Resonance Angiography with Artifacts Caused by Orthodontic Devices: A Comparison with 3 Dimensional Time-of-Flight Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Seong Jin; Kim, Young Soo; Hong, Hyun Sook [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-15

    To evaluate the degree of image distortion caused by orthodontic devices during a intracranial magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), and to determine the effectiveness of the 3 dimensional phase-contrast (3D PC). Subjects were divided into group A (n = 20) wearing a home-made orthodontic device, and group B (n = 10) with an actual orthodontic device. A 3.0T MR scanner was used, applying 3D time-of-flight (TOF) and 3D PC. Two board-certified radiologists evaluated images independently based on a four point scale classifying segments of the circle of Willis. Magnetic susceptibility variations and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on maximum intensity projection images were measured. In group A, scores of the 3D TOF and 3D PC were 2.84 {+-} 0.1 vs. 2.88 {+-} 0.1 (before) and 1.8 {+-} 0.4 vs 2.83 {+-} 0.1 (after wearing device), respectively. In group B, the scores of 3D TOF and 3D PC were 1.86 {+-} 0.43 and 2.81 {+-} 0.15 (p = 0.005), respectively. Magnetic susceptibility variations showed meaningful results after wearing the device (p = 0.0001). CNRs of the 3D PC before and after wearing device were 142.9 {+-} 6.6 vs. 140.8 {+-} 7.2 (p = 0.7507), respectively. In the 3D TOF, CNRs were 324.8 {+-} 25.4 vs. 466.3 {+-} 41.7 (p = 0.0001). The 3D PC may be a solution method for distorted images by magnetic susceptibility in the intracranial MRA compared with 3D TOF.

  5. In vivo demonstration of reflection artifact reduction in photoacoustic imaging using synthetic aperture photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuniyil Ajith Singh, M.; Jaeger, M.; Frenz, M.; Steenbergen, W.

    2016-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a critical problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. High light fluence beneath the probe results in photoacoustic transients, which propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures. These reflection artifact

  6. Purification and Concentration of PCR Products Leads to Increased Signal intensities with Fewer Allelic Drop-Outs and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maria Irlund Pedersen, Line; Stangegaard, Michael; Mogensen, Helle Smidt;

    2011-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis of amplified DNA isolated from trace evidence samples occasionally results in inadequate STR-profiles due to artifacts caused by e.g. primers and dNTPs. Removal of artifacts by purification and subsequent concentration of the PCR products may increase the sensitivity...

  7. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approac...

  8. Regulator Artifacts in Uniform Matter for Chiral Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Dyhdalo, A; Hebeler, K; Tews, I

    2016-01-01

    Regulator functions applied to two- and three-nucleon forces are a necessary ingredient in many-body calculations based on chiral effective field theory interactions. These interactions have been developed recently with a variety of different cutoff forms, including regulating both the momentum transfer (local) and the relative momentum (nonlocal). While in principle any regulator that suppresses high momentum modes can be employed, in practice artifacts are inevitable in current power counting schemes. Artifacts from particular regulators may cause significant distortions of the physics or may affect many-body convergence rates, so understanding their nature is important. Here we characterize the differences between cutoff effects using uniform matter at Hartree-Fock and second-order in the interaction as a testbed. This provides a clean laboratory to isolate phase-space effects of various regulators on both two- and three-nucleon interactions. We test the normal-ordering approximation for three-nucleon forc...

  9. Dental artifacts in the head and neck region:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Hansen, Adam E.; Keller, Sune;

    2015-01-01

    images were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regions of interests in reference regions. The volume of the artifacts and the computed relative differences in mean and max standardized uptake value (SUV) between the two PET images are reported. RESULTS: The MR-based volume of the susceptibility......-induced signal voids on the MR-AC attenuation maps was between 1.6 and 520.8 mL. The corresponding/resulting bias of the reconstructed tracer distribution was localized mainly in the area of the signal void. The mean and maximum SUVs averaged across all patients increased after inpainting by 52% (± 11%) and 28......% (± 11%), respectively, in the corrected region. SUV underestimation decreased with the distance to the signal void and correlated with the volume of the susceptibility artifact on the MR-AC attenuation map. CONCLUSIONS: Metallic dental work may cause severe MR signal voids. The resulting PET...

  10. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  11. The Ambivalent Ontology of Digital Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kallinikos, Jannis; Aaltonen, Aleksi; Marton, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Digital artifacts are embedded in wider and constantly shifting ecosystems such that they become increasingly editable, interactive, reprogrammable, and distributable. This state of flux and constant transfiguration renders the value and utility of these artifacts contingent on shifting webs...... of functional relations with other artifacts across specific contexts and organizations. By the same token, it apportions control over the development and use of these artifacts over a range of dispersed stakeholders and makes their management a complex technical and social undertaking. These ideas...... are illustrated with reference to (1) provenance and authenticity of digital documents within the overall context of archiving and social memory and (2) the content dynamics occasioned by the findability of content mediated by Internet search engines. We conclude that the steady change and transfiguration...

  12. A novel neural network with Non-Recursive IIR Filters on EEG Artifacts Elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Ryota; Ohshiro, Masakuni; Nishimura, Toshihiro; Tsubai, Masayoshi

    2005-01-01

    The artifacts caused by various factors, EOG (electrooculogram), blink and EMG (electromyogram), in EEG (Electroencephalogram) signals increase the difficulty in analyzing them. In addition, EEG signals containing artifacts often cannot be used in analyzing them. So, it is useful and indispensable to eliminate the artifacts from EEG signals. In this paper, a neural network with non-recursive IIR (Infinite Impulse Response) filters are used to eliminate the artifacts from EEG signals. The proposed method is a new approach that is respect to slotting a non-recursive IIR filter into individual neurons of a neural network. First of all, in order to investigate the usefulness of the proposed method in eliminating the artifacts from EEG signals, we apply it to the artificial EEG signals that are weakly stationary process. As the result, the artifacts can be eliminated from EEG signals almost exactly using the proposed method, and it is suggested the proposed method should be useful in eliminating the artifacts from EEG signals.

  13. Preliminary organizational culture scale focused on artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavia, Tomas

    2006-12-01

    In this preliminary study, an Organizational Culture Scale was developed to assess cultural artifacts according to Schein's typology (1985). It includes a set of cultural artifacts to measure the extent to which an organization is more or less traditional. A total of 249 managers from a range of different companies responded to the items. Preliminary analysis yielded a one-dimensional scale with 14 items with high internal consistency and homogeneity.

  14. Preliminary organizational culture scale focused on artifacts

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavia, Tomas

    2006-01-01

    In this preliminary study, an organizational culture scale was developed to assess cultural artifacts according to Schein´s typology (1985). It includes a set of cultural artifacts to measure the extent to which an organization is more or less traditional. A total of 249 managers from a range of different companies responded to the items. Preliminary analysis yielded a one-dimensional scale with 14 items with high internal consistency and homogeneity.

  15. A robust adaptive denoising framework for real-time artifact removal in scalp EEG measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilicarslan, Atilla; Grossman, Robert G.; Contreras-Vidal, Jose Luis

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Non-invasive measurement of human neural activity based on the scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) allows for the development of biomedical devices that interface with the nervous system for scientific, diagnostic, therapeutic, or restorative purposes. However, EEG recordings are often considered as prone to physiological and non-physiological artifacts of different types and frequency characteristics. Among them, ocular artifacts and signal drifts represent major sources of EEG contamination, particularly in real-time closed-loop brain-machine interface (BMI) applications, which require effective handling of these artifacts across sessions and in natural settings. Approach. We extend the usage of a robust adaptive noise cancelling (ANC) scheme ({H}∞ filtering) for removal of eye blinks, eye motions, amplitude drifts and recording biases simultaneously. We also characterize the volume conduction, by estimating the signal propagation levels across all EEG scalp recording areas due to ocular artifact generators. We find that the amplitude and spatial distribution of ocular artifacts vary greatly depending on the electrode location. Therefore, fixed filtering parameters for all recording areas would naturally hinder the true overall performance of an ANC scheme for artifact removal. We treat each electrode as a separate sub-system to be filtered, and without the loss of generality, they are assumed to be uncorrelated and uncoupled. Main results. Our results show over 95-99.9% correlation between the raw and processed signals at non-ocular artifact regions, and depending on the contamination profile, 40-70% correlation when ocular artifacts are dominant. We also compare our results with the offline independent component analysis and artifact subspace reconstruction methods, and show that some local quantities are handled better by our sample-adaptive real-time framework. Decoding performance is also compared with multi-day experimental data from 2 subjects

  16. Clean HMBC: Suppression of strong-coupling induced artifacts in HMBC spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtz, Peter; Permi, Perttu; Nielsen, Niels Chr.;

    2008-01-01

    A new experiment, clean HMBC, is introduced for suppression of strong-coupling induced artifacts in HMBC spectra. The culprits of these artifacts are an inherent shortcoming of low-pass J filters in the presence of strong coupling and the 1H p pulse in the middle of the evolution period aimed...... at suppressing evolution under heteronuclear J couplings and 1H chemical shifts. A p pulse causes coherence transfer in strongly coupled spin systems and, as is well known in e.g., homonuclear J spectra, this leads to peaks that would not be there in the absence of strong coupling. Similar artifacts occur...... protons, such as carbohydrates, and the new technique is demonstrated on D-mannose. Finally, a fundamental difference between HMBC and H2BC explains why strong-coupling artifacts are much less of a problem in the latter type of spectra....

  17. Reconstructing design, explaining artifacts: philosophical reflections on the design and explanation of technical artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ridder, G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Philosophers of science have by and large neglected technology. In this book, I have tried to do something about this lacuna by analyzing a few aspects of technical artifacts from a philosophical angle. The project was part of the research program "The Dual Nature of Technical Artifacts" based at De

  18. In vivo demonstration of reflection artifact reduction in photoacoustic imaging using synthetic aperture photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2016-08-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities are a critical problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. High light fluence beneath the probe results in photoacoustic transients, which propagate into the tissue and reflect back from echogenic structures. These reflection artifacts cause problems in image interpretation and significantly impact the contrast and imaging depth. We recently proposed a method called PAFUSion (Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to identify such reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. In its initial version, PAFUSion mimics the inward-travelling wavefield from small blood vessel-like PA sources by applying ultrasound pulses focused towards these sources, and thus provides a way to identify the resulting reflection artifacts. In this work, we demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on human volunteers. In view of the spatially distributed PA sources that are found in clinical applications, we implemented an improved version of PAFUSion where photoacoustic signals are backpropagated to imitate the inward travelling wavefield and thus the reflection artifacts. The backpropagation is performed in a synthetic way based on the pulse-echo acquisitions after transmission on each single element of the transducer array. The results provide a direct confirmation that reflection artifacts are prominent in clinical epi-photoacoustic imaging, and that PAFUSion can strongly reduce these artifacts to improve deep-tissue photoacoustic imaging.

  19. MPEG recompression detection based on block artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weiqi; Wu, Min; Huang, Jiwu

    2008-02-01

    With sophisticated video editing technologies, it is becoming increasingly easy to tamper digital video without leaving visual clues. One of the common tampering operations on video is to remove some frames and then re-encode the resulting video. In this paper, we propose a new method for detecting this type of tampering by exploring the temporal patterns of the block artifacts in video sequences. We show that MPEG compression introduces different block artifacts into various types of frames and that the strength of the block artifacts as a function over time has a regular pattern for a given group of pictures (GOP) structure. When some frames are removed from an MPEG video file and the file is then recompressed, the block artifacts introduced by the previous compression would remain and affect the average of block artifact strength of the recompressed one in such a way that depends on the number of deleted frames and the type of GOP used previously. We propose a feature curve to reveal the compression history of an MPEG video file with a given GOP structure, and use it as evidence to detect tampering. Experimental results evaluated on common video benchmark clips demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  20. Mediating Artifact in Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Bodil

    2015-07-01

    This article focuses on teacher professional development (TPD) in natural science through the 5E model as mediating artifact. The study was conducted in an upper secondary school, grounded in a school-based intervention research project. My contribution to the field of research on TPD is founded on the hypothesis that teachers would be best facilitated to make their practice more inquiry based if they are provided with a mediating artifact. In this study the artifact is a model 5E, which is a conceptual way of thinking, to help teachers reflect on their practice. The aim is to encourage teachers to make changes themselves, by applying extended use of inquiry into their practice. This mediated artifact could thus be used across different national contexts. The main research question is; how can the 5E model as a mediating artifact enhance TPD? The article addresses the processes of the use of the 5E model and its influence on teachers' perception of the model. This is in order for teachers to conceptualize their goals related to inquiry and scientific thinking, and to solve the problems involved in achieving those goals in their own contexts. The study concludes that, after the intervention, the teachers' approaches and strategies demonstrate greater emphasis on learning.

  1. High-Resolution Multi-Shot Spiral Diffusion Tensor Imaging with Inherent Correction of Motion-Induced Phase Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and compare three novel reconstruction methods designed to inherently correct for motion-induced phase errors in multi-shot spiral diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) without requiring a variable-density spiral trajectory or a navigator echo. Theory and Methods The first method simply averages magnitude images reconstructed with sensitivity encoding (SENSE) from each shot, whereas the second and third methods rely on SENSE to estimate the motion-induced phase error for each shot, and subsequently use either a direct phase subtraction or an iterative conjugate gradient (CG) algorithm, respectively, to correct for the resulting artifacts. Numerical simulations and in vivo experiments on healthy volunteers were performed to assess the performance of these methods. Results The first two methods suffer from a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) or from residual artifacts in the reconstructed diffusion-weighted images and fractional anisotropy maps. In contrast, the third method provides high-quality, high-resolution DTI results, revealing fine anatomical details such as a radial diffusion anisotropy in cortical gray matter. Conclusion The proposed SENSE+CG method can inherently and effectively correct for phase errors, signal loss, and aliasing artifacts caused by both rigid and nonrigid motion in multi-shot spiral DTI, without increasing the scan time or reducing the SNR. PMID:23450457

  2. Artifact-reduced two-dimensional cine steady state free precession for myocardial blood- oxygen-level-dependent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangzhi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A; Liu, Ying; Tang, Richard; Klein, Rachel; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Li, Debiao; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2010-04-01

    To minimize image artifacts in long TR cardiac phase-resolved steady state free precession (SSFP) based blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Nine healthy dogs (four male, five female, 20-25 kg) were studied in a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner to investigate the effect of temporal resolution, readout bandwidth, and motion compensation on long repetition time (TR) SSFP images. Breath-held 2D SSFP cine sequences with various temporal resolutions (10-204 ms), bandwidths (239-930 Hz/pixel), with and without first-order motion compensation were prescribed in the basal, mid-ventricular, and apical along the short axis. Preliminary myocardial BOLD studies in dogs with controllable coronary stenosis were performed to assess the benefits of artifact-reduction strategies. Shortening the readout time by means of increasing readout bandwidth had no observable reduction in image artifacts. However, increasing the temporal resolution in the presence of first-order motion compensation led to significant reduction in image artifacts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that BOLD signal changes can be reliably detected throughout the cardiac cycle. Artifact-reduction methods used in this study provide significant improvement in image quality compared with conventional long TR SSFP BOLD MRI. It is envisioned that the methods proposed here may enable reliable detection of myocardial oxygenation changes throughout the cardiac cycle with long TR SSFP-based myocardial BOLD MRI. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. A Language of Objects and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    This is a conceptual inquiry about materiality. It gives an introductory overview to the vocabulary of materiality in a chosen selection of theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objects as it is used within practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. The examined intellec......This is a conceptual inquiry about materiality. It gives an introductory overview to the vocabulary of materiality in a chosen selection of theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objects as it is used within practice-based approaches to organizational knowing. The examined...... intellectual traditions are interpretive-cultural approaches; activity theory; and sociology of translation. Similarities and differences are presented in the way these three distinct intellectual traditions conceptualize the array of material objects and artifacts which are central in the tales of practice...

  4. A short discussion on artifact creating conditions using multibeam bathymetric systems in a highly reflecting and smooth bottom

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.

    Using multibeam system, artifact creating conditions are dominant when functioning in highly reflective and flat bottom areas. This simulation study manifests the causes responsible for creating such conditions which influence seafloor...

  5. Retinal vessel extraction by means of motion contrast, matched filter and combined corner-edge detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Xia, Mingliang; Xuan, Li

    2014-05-01

    The microvasculature network of retina plays an important role in understanding of the retinal function and diagnosis of many diseases. Although it is possible to noninvasively acquire diffraction-limited resolution retinal images at microscopic cellular level, noises and other structures still make it difficult for diagnosis. In this paper, a new vessel extraction method is introduced. First, we use motion contrast method to trace the motion of the blood components and get the main vessel contour. Second, an improved matched filter method is applied to extract the vessel contour while the single-side edges are eliminated. Then, the combined corner/edge detector is adopted to eliminate the elongated fragments caused by the motion artifacts. Finally, we use mathematical morphology method to dilate the edges of vessels acquired in last step and obtain the exact contour of the vessels. The contrast of the vessels is significantly enhanced and the noises as well as other structures are effectively eliminated.

  6. Gold-wire artifacts on diagnostic radiographs: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keestra, Johan Anton Jochum; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Quirynen, Marc [Dept. of Oral Health Sciences, KU Leuven and Dentistry, University Hospitals, KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-03-15

    This report described a case in which diagnostic radiographs showed irregular dense radiopaque strings and curved lines in the head and neck area. These artifacts could lead to misinterpretation since they may obscure anatomical structures and/or mask critical structures/pathologies. A more detailed history of the patient indicated that these strings originated from a facelift procedure in which a gold-wire technique was used. Considering that such intervention may cause a radiodiagnostic burden, it should be included in the anamnesis prior to radiography.

  7. Studying the Creation of Design Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher J.; Hevner, Ala n R.; Weber, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    and information systems represents a highly interconnected locus in which both the generative processes of building design artifacts and articulating constructs used to evaluate their quality take place. We address this interconnectedness with an extended process-oriented research design enabling multi......-modal neurophysiological data analyses. We posit that our research will provide more comprehensive assessments of the efficacy of design processes and the evaluation of the qualities of the resulting design artifacts.......As software and information systems (IS) increase in functional sophistication, perceptions of IS quality are changing. Moving beyond issues of performance efficiency, essential qualities such as fitness for purpose, sustainability, and overall effectiveness become more complex. Creating software...

  8. Automated EEG artifact elimination by applying machine learning algorithms to ICA-based features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radüntz, Thea; Scouten, Jon; Hochmuth, Olaf; Meffert, Beate

    2017-08-01

    Objective. Biological and non-biological artifacts cause severe problems when dealing with electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a widely used method for eliminating various artifacts from recordings. However, evaluating and classifying the calculated independent components (IC) as artifact or EEG is not fully automated at present. Approach. In this study, we propose a new approach for automated artifact elimination, which applies machine learning algorithms to ICA-based features. Main results. We compared the performance of our classifiers with the visual classification results given by experts. The best result with an accuracy rate of 95% was achieved using features obtained by range filtering of the topoplots and IC power spectra combined with an artificial neural network. Significance. Compared with the existing automated solutions, our proposed method is not limited to specific types of artifacts, electrode configurations, or number of EEG channels. The main advantages of the proposed method is that it provides an automatic, reliable, real-time capable, and practical tool, which avoids the need for the time-consuming manual selection of ICs during artifact removal.

  9. Metal artifact reduction using a patch-based reconstruction for digital breast tomosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Lucas R.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Vieira, Marcelo A. C.

    2017-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is rapidly emerging as the main clinical tool for breast cancer screening. Although several reconstruction methods for DBT are described by the literature, one common issue is the interplane artifacts caused by out-of-focus features. For breasts containing highly attenuating features, such as surgical clips and large calcifications, the artifacts are even more apparent and can limit the detection and characterization of lesions by the radiologist. In this work, we propose a novel method of combining backprojected data into tomographic slices using a patch-based approach, commonly used in denoising. Preliminary tests were performed on a geometry phantom and on an anthropomorphic phantom containing metal inserts. The reconstructed images were compared to a commercial reconstruction solution. Qualitative assessment of the reconstructed images provides evidence that the proposed method reduces artifacts while maintaining low noise levels. Objective assessment supports the visual findings. The artifact spread function shows that the proposed method is capable of suppressing artifacts generated by highly attenuating features. The signal difference to noise ratio shows that the noise levels of the proposed and commercial methods are comparable, even though the commercial method applies post-processing filtering steps, which were not implemented on the proposed method. Thus, the proposed method can produce tomosynthesis reconstructions with reduced artifacts and low noise levels.

  10. The Tromsø Study: artifacts in forearm bone densitometry--prevalence and effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, G K; Tollan, A; Magnus, J H; Søgaard, A J; Ringberg, T; Fønnebø, V

    1999-01-01

    Suboptimal performance of bone densitometer, operator and/or subject may cause artifacts of consequence both for individual patient management and research. The prevalence and effects of such artifacts are largely unknown in densitometry. A cross-sectional population-based study was carried out of artifacts in forearm bone densitometry with single X-ray Absorptiometry (SXA) of the nondominant hand (distal and ultradistal site). After the screening, all scans were reviewed for artifact detection and reanalysis. The effect on the bone mineral density (BMD) result was found by comparing artifactual scans with a reanalyzed version or with normal repeat scans. All women aged 50-74 years, all men aged 55-74 years and 5-10% samples of other age groups aged >/=25 years attending the fourth Tromso health study were invited to have bone densitometry. The response rate from the background population was 80% (n = 7948). Fourteen percent of subjects had a movement artifact at either the distal or ultradistal site. The individual BMD variation was twice as large in scans with a movement artifact (0.94%) compared with normal scans (0.58%) (p = 0.0027). The radial endplate was inaccurately detected in 74% of the scans. Reanalysis of these scans led to a mean 3.8% decrease in the BMD value and an increase in the prevalence of osteoporosis of 10%. Artifacts were thus common, and their effects were clinically relevant in forearm bone densitometry. Artifacts and their effects need to be characterized in other bone densitometry settings also.

  11. Mirror Image Video Artifact: An Under-Reported Digital Video-EEG Artifact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Michael A; Levis, William H; Bhatt, Amar B

    2017-01-01

    Synchronous video recording can be helpful in EEG recordings, especially in recognition of seizures and in rejection of artifacts. However, video recordings themselves are also subject to the risk of contamination by artifacts. We report a unique case in which a digital video artifact was identified, occurring during synchronous video-EEG recording, albeit independently of the EEG tracing itself. A synchronous digital video-EEG recording was performed on a 67-year-old male who presented in focal motor status epilepticus. During the initial review of the data, right-sided abnormalities on EEG apparently corresponded with (ipsilateral) right arm motor activity on video, suggesting a nonsensical anatomical localization. However, review of the patient's chart and discussion with the EEG technologist led to the recognition that the video data recorded a mirror image of the true findings of left arm motor activity. Review of the software settings led to the discovery that the video recording was inverted along the vertical axis, leading to mirror image video artifact. Recognition of this video artifact allowed for accurate interpretation of the study-that right hemispheric EEG abnormalities correlated appropriately with (contralateral) left arm twitching. Effective communication between the EEG reading physician, the treating team, and the EEG technologist is critical for recognition of such artifacts, for proper EEG interpretation, and for appropriate patient management. Mirror image video artifact affirms that bedside evaluation, astute technologists, and attentive EEG reading physicians remain important, even in the presence of video recording.

  12. SU-C-206-03: Metal Artifact Reduction in X-Ray Computed Tomography Based On Local Anatomical Similarity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, X; Yang, X; Rosenfield, J; Elder, E; Dhabaan, A [Emory University, Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Metal implants such as orthopedic hardware and dental fillings cause severe bright and dark streaking in reconstructed CT images. These artifacts decrease image contrast and degrade HU accuracy, leading to inaccuracies in target delineation and dose calculation. Additionally, such artifacts negatively impact patient set-up in image guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, we propose a novel method for metal artifact reduction which utilizes the anatomical similarity between neighboring CT slices. Methods: Neighboring CT slices show similar anatomy. Based on this anatomical similarity, the proposed method replaces corrupted CT pixels with pixels from adjacent, artifact-free slices. A gamma map, which is the weighted summation of relative HU error and distance error, is calculated for each pixel in the artifact-corrupted CT image. The minimum value in each pixel’s gamma map is used to identify a pixel from the adjacent CT slice to replace the corresponding artifact-corrupted pixel. This replacement only occurs if the minimum value in a particular pixel’s gamma map is larger than a threshold. The proposed method was evaluated with clinical images. Results: Highly attenuating dental fillings and hip implants cause severe streaking artifacts on CT images. The proposed method eliminates the dark and bright streaking and improves the implant delineation and visibility. In particular, the image non-uniformity in the central region of interest was reduced from 1.88 and 1.01 to 0.28 and 0.35, respectively. Further, the mean CT HU error was reduced from 328 HU and 460 HU to 60 HU and 36 HU, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed metal artifact reduction method replaces corrupted image pixels with pixels from neighboring slices that are free of metal artifacts. This method proved capable of suppressing streaking artifacts, improving HU accuracy and image detectability.

  13. Classifying Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzen, Carl; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Presents a series of activities that utilizes a leveling device to classify constant and accelerated motion. Applies this classification system to uniform circular motion and motion produced by gravitational force. (MDH)

  14. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...... is viewed through its design in terms of descriptions, models, prototypes etc. At the knowledge level the selected artifact is viewed through ontologies, categories and various types of relevant knowledge. The model is based on description...

  15. Conceptual Model of Artifacts for Design Science Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    We present a conceptual model of design science research artifacts. The model views an artifact at three levels. At the artifact level a selected artifact is viewed as a combination of material and immaterial aspects and a set of representations hereof. At the design level the selected artifact...... is viewed through its design in terms of descriptions, models, prototypes etc. At the knowledge level the selected artifact is viewed through ontologies, categories and various types of relevant knowledge. The model is based on description...

  16. A Social Language of Objects and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svabo, Connie

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an inquiry about design. It gives an introductory overview of the vocabulary of 'materiality', which is used by a chosen selection of social theories. The paper shows a language of artifacts and objjects as it is used within practice-based approaches to knowing in organization  ...

  17. On the reduction of hypercubic lattice artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    De Soto, F

    2007-01-01

    This note presents a comparative study of various options to reduce the errors coming from the discretization of a Quantum Field Theory in a lattice with hypercubic symmetry. We show that it is possible to perform an extrapolation towards the continuum which is able to eliminate systematically the artifacts which break the O(4) symmetry.

  18. Artifacts reduction in VIR/Dawn data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrozzo, F. G.; Raponi, A.; De Sanctis, M. C.; Ammannito, E.; Giardino, M.; D'Aversa, E.; Fonte, S.; Tosi, F.

    2016-12-01

    Remote sensing images are generally affected by different types of noise that degrade the quality of the spectral data (i.e., stripes and spikes). Hyperspectral images returned by a Visible and InfraRed (VIR) spectrometer onboard the NASA Dawn mission exhibit residual systematic artifacts. VIR is an imaging spectrometer coupling high spectral and spatial resolutions in the visible and infrared spectral domain (0.25-5.0 μm). VIR data present one type of noise that may mask or distort real features (i.e., spikes and stripes), which may lead to misinterpretation of the surface composition. This paper presents a technique for the minimization of artifacts in VIR data that include a new instrument response function combining ground and in-flight radiometric measurements, correction of spectral spikes, odd-even band effects, systematic vertical stripes, high-frequency noise, and comparison with ground telescopic spectra of Vesta and Ceres. We developed a correction of artifacts in a two steps process: creation of the artifacts matrix and application of the same matrix to the VIR dataset. In the approach presented here, a polynomial function is used to fit the high frequency variations. After applying these corrections, the resulting spectra show improvements of the quality of the data. The new calibrated data enhance the significance of results from the spectral analysis of Vesta and Ceres.

  19. Kinematic artifacts in prestack depth migration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolk, C.C.; Symes, W.W.

    2004-01-01

    Strong refraction of waves in the migration velocity model introduces kinematic artifacts¿coherent events not corresponding to actual reflectors¿into the image volumes produced by prestack depth migration applied to individual data bins. Because individual bins are migrated independently, the migrat

  20. A constructivist approach to artifact development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skytte, Hans

    2008-01-01

    . The main result of the study shows that the concepts used (identity, image, organizational field etc.) to analyze the companies construct of the concepts, are linked in recursive patterns. This means that a company's artifact development takes place in recursive patterns consisting of concepts, meanings...

  1. Information Design for Visualizing History Museum Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Lai, Tingsheng; Yasuda, Takami; Yokoi, Shigeki

    2011-01-01

    In the past few years, museum visualization systems have become a hot topic that attracts many researchers' interests. Several systems provide Web services for browsing museum collections through the Web. In this paper, we proposed an intelligent museum system for history museum artifacts, and described a study in which we enable access to China…

  2. Moving metal artifact reduction in cone-beam CT scans with implanted cylindrical gold markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toftegaard, Jakob, E-mail: jaktofte@rm.dk; Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben S.; Poulsen, Per R. [Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Seghers, Dieter; Huber, Michael; Brehm, Marcus [Varian Medical Systems, Imaging Laboratory GmbH, Baden-Daettwil 5405 (Switzerland); Elstrøm, Ulrik V. [Department of Medical Physics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Implanted gold markers for image-guided radiotherapy lead to streaking artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans. Several methods for metal artifact reduction (MAR) have been published, but they all fail in scans with large motion. Here the authors propose and investigate a method for automatic moving metal artifact reduction (MMAR) in CBCT scans with cylindrical gold markers. Methods: The MMAR CBCT reconstruction method has six steps. (1) Automatic segmentation of the cylindrical markers in the CBCT projections. (2) Removal of each marker in the projections by replacing the pixels within a masked area with interpolated values. (3) Reconstruction of a marker-free CBCT volume from the manipulated CBCT projections. (4) Reconstruction of a standard CBCT volume with metal artifacts from the original CBCT projections. (5) Estimation of the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory during CBCT acquisition for each marker based on the segmentation in Step 1, and identification of the smallest ellipsoidal volume that encompasses 95% of the visited 3D positions. (6) Generation of the final MMAR CBCT reconstruction from the marker-free CBCT volume of Step 3 by replacing the voxels in the 95% ellipsoid with the corresponding voxels of the standard CBCT volume of Step 4. The MMAR reconstruction was performed retrospectively using a half-fan CBCT scan for 29 consecutive stereotactic body radiation therapy patients with 2–3 gold markers implanted in the liver. The metal artifacts of the MMAR reconstructions were scored and compared with a standard MAR reconstruction by counting the streaks and by calculating the standard deviation of the Hounsfield units in a region around each marker. Results: The markers were found with the same autosegmentation settings in 27 CBCT scans, while two scans needed slightly changed settings to find all markers automatically in Step 1 of the MMAR method. MMAR resulted in 15 scans with no streaking artifacts, 11 scans with 1–4 streaks, and 3 scans

  3. Real-Time Motion Correction for High-Resolution Larynx Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Joëlle K.; Santos, Juan M.; Damrose, Edward J.; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Nishimura, Dwight G.

    2012-01-01

    Motion—both rigid-body and non-rigid—is the main limitation to in vivo, high-resolution larynx imaging. In this work, a new real-time motion compensation algorithm is introduced. Navigator data are processed in real-time to compute the displacement information, and projections are corrected using phase-modulation in k-space. Upon automatic feedback, the system immediately reacquires the data most heavily corrupted by non-rigid motion, i.e., the data whose corresponding projections could not be properly corrected. This algorithm overcomes the shortcomings of the so-called Diminishing Variance Algorithm (DVA) by combining it with navigator-based rigid-body motion correction. Because rigid-body motion correction is performed first, continual bulk motion no longer impedes nor prevents the convergence of the algorithm. Phantom experiments show that the algorithm properly corrects for translations and reacquires data corrupted by non-rigid motion. Larynx imaging was performed on healthy volunteers, and substantial reduction of motion artifacts caused by bulk shift, swallowing, and coughing was achieved. PMID:21695722

  4. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  5. DR静态平板去除错层伪影的研究%Research on Elimination of Truncation Artifacts with Digital Radiography Static Flat Panel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王克枢

    2016-01-01

    This paper researched the occasional truncation artifacts during the application of Shimadzu D-vision digital radiography (DR) photographic system. Through analysis of features of abnormal image and design features of the DR equipment, the research found out that truncation artifacts were directly caused by premature movement of the flat panel detector. Based on the finding, the research proposed a resolution plan in which a flat panel detector delay return control circuit was added. Clinical results showed that the flat panel detector delay return control circuit integrated with D-vision DR photographic system could eliminate truncation artifacts caused by flat panel detector motion and improve DR image quality without decreasing examination efficiency, which allowed the design to be used in the improvement of related equipments.%本文对岛津D-vision平板摄影透视系统偶发的图像错层伪影现象进行了研究,通过对异常图像和设备自身设计特点进行分析,发现曝光后平板的过早运动是导致图像伪影的直接原因,基于此提出了加配平板延时返回控制电路的解决方案。改进后结果表明,在平板摄影透视系统加装平板延时返回功能后,图像错层现象消失,DR摄影图像质量得到提升,且改进不会影响检查效率,可应用推广至相关设备的改进。

  6. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  7. Cardiac motion compensation and resolution modeling in simultaneous PET-MR: a cardiac lesion detection study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petibon, Y.; Ouyang, J.; Zhu, X.; Huang, C.; Reese, T. G.; Chun, S. Y.; Li, Q.; El Fakhri, G.

    2013-04-01

    Cardiac motion and partial volume effects (PVE) are two of the main causes of image degradation in cardiac PET. Motion generates artifacts and blurring while PVE lead to erroneous myocardial activity measurements. Newly available simultaneous PET-MR scanners offer new possibilities in cardiac imaging as MRI can assess wall contractility while collecting PET perfusion data. In this perspective, we develop a list-mode iterative reconstruction framework incorporating both tagged-MR derived non-rigid myocardial wall motion and position dependent detector point spread function (PSF) directly into the PET system matrix. In this manner, our algorithm performs both motion ‘deblurring’ and PSF deconvolution while reconstructing images with all available PET counts. The proposed methods are evaluated in a beating non-rigid cardiac phantom whose hot myocardial compartment contains small transmural and non-transmural cold defects. In order to accelerate imaging time, we investigate collecting full and half k-space tagged MR data to obtain tagged volumes that are registered using non-rigid B-spline registration to yield wall motion information. Our experimental results show that tagged-MR based motion correction yielded an improvement in defect/myocardium contrast recovery of 34-206% as compared to motion uncorrected studies. Likewise, lesion detectability improved by respectively 115-136% and 62-235% with MR-based motion compensation as compared to gating and no motion correction and made it possible to distinguish non-transmural from transmural defects, which has clinical significance given the inherent limitations of current single modality imaging in identifying the amount of residual ischemia. The incorporation of PSF modeling within the framework of MR-based motion compensation significantly improved defect/myocardium contrast recovery (5.1-8.5%, p defect detectability (39-56%, p < 0.01). No statistical difference was found in PET contrast and lesion detectability

  8. 磁共振图像伪影的产生机理及其解决办法的研究%Magnetic Resonance Imaging Artifact Generating Mechanism and Solution Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘海滨; 张蔚

    2011-01-01

    Objective To study the magnetic resonance imaging artifact emergence mechanism, this paper discusses the disposal of MRI artifacts solution. Methods A retrospective analysis of 87 cases of Hitachi 0.3 T, GE sl.5 T, GE MRI scanner T 3.0 image artifacts. Results Common artifacts of magnetic resonance mainly have: RF artifact, gradient artifact, motion artifact, and chemical shift artifact, wrap artifact and metal artifacts. Conclusion Understanding reasons of magnetic resonance imaging artifact, finding solutions, are important to improve image quality and increase diagnosis rate.%目的 研究磁共振成像伪影产生的机理,探讨磁共振伪影处理的解决办法.方法 回顾性分析了87例日立0.3T、GE 1.5T、GE 3.0T磁共振扫描仪的图像伪影.结果 磁共振常见的儿种伪影主要有:射频伪影、梯度伪影、运动伪影、化学位移伪影、卷摺伪影及金属伪影.结论 了解磁共振图像伪影的产生原因,寻找解决办法,对改善图像质量,提高诊断率具有重要意义.

  9. Five-dimensional motion compensation for respiratory and cardiac motion with cone-beam CT of the thorax region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Hahn, Andreas; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2016-03-01

    We propose an adapted method of our previously published five-dimensional (5D) motion compensation (MoCo) algorithm1, developed for micro-CT imaging of small animals, to provide for the first time motion artifact-free 5D cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from a conventional flat detector-based CBCT scan of clinical patients. Image quality of retrospectively respiratory- and cardiac-gated volumes from flat detector CBCT scans is deteriorated by severe sparse projection artifacts. These artifacts further complicate motion estimation, as it is required for MoCo image reconstruction. For high quality 5D CBCT images at the same x-ray dose and the same number of projections as todays 3D CBCT we developed a double MoCo approach based on motion vector fields (MVFs) for respiratory and cardiac motion. In a first step our already published four-dimensional (4D) artifact-specific cyclic motion-compensation (acMoCo) approach is applied to compensate for the respiratory patient motion. With this information a cyclic phase-gated deformable heart registration algorithm is applied to the respiratory motion-compensated 4D CBCT data, thus resulting in cardiac MVFs. We apply these MVFs on double-gated images and thereby respiratory and cardiac motion-compensated 5D CBCT images are obtained. Our 5D MoCo approach processing patient data acquired with the TrueBeam 4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). Our double MoCo approach turned out to be very efficient and removed nearly all streak artifacts due to making use of 100% of the projection data for each reconstructed frame. The 5D MoCo patient data show fine details and no motion blurring, even in regions close to the heart where motion is fastest.

  10. Smoking Artifacts as Indicators of Homophily, Attraction, and Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickson, Mark, III; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a study of the influence of smoking artifacts on the perceptions of a source's homophily, interpersonal attraction, and credibility. Significant differences were found based upon the type of smoking artifact used and the sex of the subject. (JMF)

  11. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kuchenbecker@dkfz.de; Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU), Erlangen 91054 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    implant. For each case, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was assessed. Results: In the simulation, the pseudo-monochromatic images yielded acceptable artifact reduction results. However, the CNR in the artifact-reduced images was more than 60% lower than in the original polychromatic images. In contrast, the raw data-based material decomposition did not significantly reduce the CNR in the virtual monochromatic images. Regarding the patient data with beam hardening artifacts and with metal artifacts from small implants the pseudo-monochromatic method was able to reduce the artifacts, again with the downside of a significant CNR reduction. More intense metal artifacts, e.g., as those caused by an artificial hip joint, could not be suppressed. Conclusions: Pseudo-monochromatic imaging is able to reduce beam hardening, scatter, and metal artifacts in some cases but it cannot remove them. In all cases, the CNR is significantly reduced, thereby rendering the method questionable, unless special post processing algorithms are implemented to restore the high CNR from the original images (e.g., by using a frequency split technique). Raw data-based dual energy decomposition methods should be preferred, in particular, because the CNR penalty is almost negligible.

  12. Teaching and Learning the Nature of Technical Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederik, Ineke; Sonneveld, Wim; de Vries, Marc J.

    2011-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifacts that can be used for educational purposes.…

  13. Connecting Student and Subject Matter: The Cultural Artifact Discussion Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Sanders, Alane K.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a class activity where students work in dyads to select an artifact related to a course topic and, using this artifact, develop discussion questions to engage their classmates. This cultural artifact assignment is intended to, in part, answer John Dewey's call to cultivate connections between subject matter and life…

  14. Reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF) for EEG artifact reduction in simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyrl, David; Krausz, Gunther; Koschutnig, Karl; Edlinger, Günter; Müller-Putz, Gernot R.

    2017-04-01

    Objective. Simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) combines advantages of both methods, namely high temporal resolution of EEG and high spatial resolution of fMRI. However, EEG quality is limited due to severe artifacts caused by fMRI scanners. Approach. To improve EEG data quality substantially, we introduce methods that use a reusable reference layer EEG cap prototype in combination with adaptive filtering. The first method, reference layer adaptive filtering (RLAF), uses adaptive filtering with reference layer artifact data to optimize artifact subtraction from EEG. In the second method, multi band reference layer adaptive filtering (MBRLAF), adaptive filtering is performed on bandwidth limited sub-bands of the EEG and the reference channels. Main results. The results suggests that RLAF outperforms the baseline method, average artifact subtraction, in all settings and also its direct predecessor, reference layer artifact subtraction (RLAS), in lower (mean-square voltage reduction and power reduction of EEG provided that physiological EEG components such as occipital EEG alpha power and visual evoked potentials (VEP) are preserved. We demonstrate that both, RLAF and MBRLAF, improve VEP quality. For that, we calculate the mean-squared-distance of single trial VEP to the mean VEP and estimate single trial VEP classification accuracies. We found that the average mean-squared-distance is lowest and the average classification accuracy is highest after MBLAF. RLAF was second best. Significance. In conclusion, the results suggests that RLAF and MBRLAF are potentially very effective in improving EEG quality of simultaneous EEG-fMRI. Highlights We present a new and reusable reference layer cap prototype for simultaneous EEG-fMRI We introduce new algorithms for reducing EEG artifacts due to simultaneous fMRI The algorithms combine a reference layer and adaptive filtering Several evaluation criteria suggest superior

  15. Supporting Knowledge Transfer through Decomposable Reasoning Artifacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pike, William A.; May, Richard A.; Turner, Alan E.

    2007-01-03

    Technology to support knowledge transfer and cooperative inquiry must offer its users the ability to effectively interpret knowledge structures produced by collaborators. Communicating the reasoning processes that underlie a finding is one method for enhancing interpretation, and can result in more effective evaluation and application of shared knowledge. In knowledge management tools, interpretation is aided by creating knowledge artifacts that can expose their provenance to scrutiny and that can be transformed into diverse representations that suit their consumers’ perspectives and preferences. We outline the information management needs of inquiring communities characterized by hypothesis generation tasks, and propose a model for communication, based in theories of hermeneutics, semiotics, and abduction, in which knowledge structures can be decomposed into the lower-level reasoning artifacts that produced them. We then present a proof-of-concept implementation for an environment to support the capture and communication of analytic products, with emphasis on the domain of intelligence analysis.

  16. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  17. [Hybrid interpolation for CT metal artifact reducing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-e; Li, Chan-juan; Chen, Wu-fan

    2009-01-01

    Numerous interpolation-based methods have been described for reducing metal artifacts in CT images, but due to the limit of the interpolation methods, interpolation alone often fails to meet the clinical demands. In this paper, we describe the use of quartic polynomial interpolation in reconstruction of the images of the metal implant followed by linear interpolation to eliminate the streaks. The two interpolation methods are combined according to their given weights to achieve good results.

  18. Panning artifacts in digital pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanaki, Ali R. N.; Lanciault, Christian; Espig, Kathryn S.; Xthona, Albert; Kimpe, Tom R. L.

    2017-03-01

    In making a pathologic diagnosis, a pathologist uses cognitive processes: perception, attention, memory, and search (Pena and Andrade-Filho, 2009). Typically, this involves focus while panning from one region of a slide to another, using either a microscope in a traditional workflow or software program and display in a digital pathology workflow (DICOM Standard Committee, 2010). We theorize that during panning operation, the pathologist receives information important to diagnosis efficiency and/or correctness. As compared to an optical microscope, panning in a digital pathology image involves some visual artifacts due to the following: (i) the frame rate is finite; (ii) time varying visual signals are reconstructed using imperfect zero-order hold. Specifically, after pixel's digital drive is changed, it takes time for a pixel to emit the expected amount of light. Previous work suggests that 49% of navigation is conducted in low-power/overview with digital pathology (Molin et al., 2015), but the influence of display factors has not been measured. We conducted a reader study to establish a relationship between display frame rate, panel response time, and threshold panning speed (above which the artifacts become noticeable). Our results suggest visual tasks that involve tissue structure are more impacted by the simulated panning artifacts than those that only involve color (e.g., staining intensity estimation), and that the panning artifacts versus normalized panning speed has a peak behavior which is surprising and may change for a diagnostic task. This is work in progress and our final findings should be considered in designing future digital pathology systems.

  19. Sampling Artifacts from Conductive Silicone Tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timko, Michael T.; Yu, Zhenhong; Kroll, Jesse; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Miake-Lye, Richard C.; Onasch, Timothy B.; Liscinsky, David; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Destaillats, Hugo; Holder, Amara L.; Smith, Jared D.; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2009-05-15

    We report evidence that carbon impregnated conductive silicone tubing used in aerosol sampling systems can introduce two types of experimental artifacts: 1) silicon tubing dynamically absorbs carbon dioxide gas, requiring greater than 5 minutes to reach equilibrium and 2) silicone tubing emits organic contaminants containing siloxane that adsorb onto particles traveling through it and onto downstream quartz fiber filters. The consequence can be substantial for engine exhaust measurements as both artifacts directly impact calculations of particulate mass-based emission indices. The emission of contaminants from the silicone tubing can result in overestimation of organic particle mass concentrations based on real-time aerosol mass spectrometry and the off-line thermal analysis of quartz filters. The adsorption of siloxane contaminants can affect the surface properties of aerosol particles; we observed a marked reduction in the water-affinity of soot particles passed through conductive silicone tubing. These combined observations suggest that the silicone tubing artifacts may have wide consequence for the aerosol community and should, therefore, be used with caution. Gentle heating, physical and chemical properties of the particle carriers, exposure to solvents, and tubing age may influence siloxane uptake. The amount of contamination is expected to increase as the tubing surface area increases and as the particle surface area increases. The effect is observed at ambient temperature and enhanced by mild heating (<100 oC). Further evaluation is warranted.

  20. Clough-Tocher interpolation of virtual sinogram in a Delaunay triangulated grid for metal artifact reduction of PET/CT images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdoli, M.; de Long, J. R.; Pruim, J.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Zaidi, H.

    2011-01-01

    Metallic implants, such as hip implants, are known to induce streaking artifacts in CT images which can cause over/underestimation of the activity uptake in CT-based attenuation corrected PET images. Hence, metal artifact reduction (MAR) of CT images is essential in order to obtain accurate quantifi

  1. Motion Estimation and Correction in Photoacoustic Tomographic Reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Julianne

    2016-01-01

    Motion, e.g., due to patient movement or improper device calibration, is inevitable in many imaging modalities such as photoacoustic tomography (PAT) by a rotating system and can lead to undesirable motion artifacts in image reconstructions, if ignored. In this paper, we establish a hybrid-type model for PAT that incorporates motion in the model. We first introduce an approximate continuous model and establish two uniqueness results for simple parameterized motion models. Then we formulate the discrete problem of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction as a separable nonlinear least squares problem and describe an automatic approach to detect and eliminate motion artifacts during the reconstruction process. Numerical examples validate our methods.

  2. Towards Semi-Automatic Artifact Rejection for the Improvement of Alzheimer’s Disease Screening from EEG Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Jordi Solé-Casals; François-Benoît Vialatte

    2015-01-01

    A large number of studies have analyzed measurable changes that Alzheimer’s disease causes on electroencephalography (EEG). Despite being easily reproducible, those markers have limited sensitivity, which reduces the interest of EEG as a screening tool for this pathology. This is for a large part due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of EEG signals: EEG recordings are indeed usually corrupted by spurious extra-cerebral artifacts. These artifacts are responsible for a consequent degradation of...

  3. Reduction of blooming artifacts in cardiac CT images by blind deconvolution and anisotropic diffusion filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Amor, Angélica M.; Navarro-Navia, Cristian A.; Cadena-Bonfanti, Alberto J.; Contreras-Ortiz, Sonia H.

    2015-12-01

    Even though CT is an imaging technique that offers high quality images, limitations on its spatial resolution cause blurring in small objects with high contrast. This phenomenon is known as blooming artifact and affects cardiac images with small calcifications and stents. This paper describes an approach to reduce the blooming artifact and improve resolution in cardiac images using blind deconvolution and anisotropic diffusion filtering. Deconvolution increases resolution but reduces signal-to-noise ratio, and the anisotropic diffusion filter counteracts this effect without affecting the edges in the image.

  4. Racial IQ Differences among Transracial Adoptees: Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Some academic publications infer from studies of transracial adoptees’ IQs that East Asian adoptees raised in the West by Whites have higher IQs than Western Whites, and that White adoptees raised by Whites have higher IQs than Black adoptees raised by Whites. Those publications suggest that this is because genetic differences give East Asians a higher mean IQ than Whites, and Whites a higher mean IQ than Blacks. This paper proposes a parsimonious alternative explanation: the apparent IQ advantage of East Asian adoptees is an artifact caused by ignoring the Flynn effect and adoption’s beneficial effect on IQ, and most of the IQ disadvantage of Black adoptees disappears when one allows for attrition in the Minnesota Transracial Adoption Study, and acknowledges the results of other studies. Diagnosing these artifacts suggests a nil hypothesis: East Asian, White, and Black adoptees raised in the same environment would have similar IQs, hinting at a minimal role for genes in racial IQ differences.

  5. 3D视频的质量损伤类型分析%Study on Stereoscopic Artifacts of 3D Video

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲熠; 张远; 李中海

    2013-01-01

    首先介绍了3D视频通信系统和人类视觉系统,然后通过结构、颜色、运动和深度的4个视觉子系统,分析每个通信模块中各类立体质量损伤的现象、成因和解决办法.立体损伤与设备、表示方式、编解码算法以及主观感知等多重因素有关,了解质量损伤的类型有助于质量评价工作的进行,进而对系统的其他环节做出优化.%Firstly,3D video communication system and human visual system are described in this paper.The stereoscopic artifacts which occur during delivery of 3D video are discussed.Causes and solutions of stereoscopic artifacts in each communication module through four visual subsystems of structure,color,motion and depth are further studied.Stereo injury is associated with equipment,the multiple factors,encoding and decoding algorithm and the subjective perception.Understanding the type of quality damage is helpful to quality evaluation work,and can make the optimization of other parts of the system.

  6. Characterization of Artifacts produced by gel displacement on non-invasive Brain-Machine Interfaces during ambulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro eCosta

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available So far, Brain-Machine Interfaces (BMIs have been mainly used to study brain potentials during movement-free conditions. Recently, due to the emerging concern of improving rehabilitation therapies, these systems are also being used during gait experiments. Under this new condition, the evaluation of motion artifacts has become a critical point to assure the validity of the results obtained. Due to the high signal to noise ratio provided, the use of wet electrodes is a widely accepted technic to acquire electroencephalographic (EEG signals. To perform these recordings it is necessary to apply a conductive gel between the scalp and the electrodes. This work is focused on the study of gel displacements produced during ambulation and how they affect the amplitude of EEG signals. Data recorded during three ambulation conditions (gait training and one movement-free condition (BMI motor imagery task are compared to perform this study.Two phenomenons, manifested as unusual increases of the signals' amplitude, have been identified and characterized during this work. Results suggest that they are caused by abrupt changes on the conductivity between the electrode and the scalp due to gel displacement produced during ambulation and head movements. These artifacts significantly increase the Power Spectral Density (PSD of EEG recordings at all frequencies from 5 to 90 Hz, corresponding to the main bandwidth of electrocortical potentials. They should be taken into consideration before performing EEG recordings in order to asses the correct gel allocation and to avoid the use of electrodes on certain scalp areas depending on the experimental conditions.

  7. Constructing Carbon Fiber Motion-Detection Loops for Simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, David F; Masterton, Richard A J; Archer, John S; Fleming, Steven W; Warren, Aaron E L; Jackson, Graeme D

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant impediments to high-quality EEG recorded in an MRI scanner is subject motion. Availability of motion artifact sensors can substantially improve the quality of the recorded EEG. In the study of epilepsy, it can also dramatically increase the confidence that one has in discriminating true epileptiform activity from artifact. This is due both to the reduction in artifact and the ability to visually inspect the motion sensor signals when reading the EEG, revealing whether or not head motion is present. We have previously described the use of carbon fiber loops for detecting and correcting artifact in EEG acquired simultaneously with MRI. The loops, attached to the subject's head, are electrically insulated from the scalp. They provide a simple and direct measure of specific artifact that is contaminating the EEG, including both subject motion and residual artifact arising from magnetic field gradients applied during MRI. Our previous implementation was used together with a custom-built EEG-fMRI system that differs substantially from current commercially available EEG-fMRI systems. The present technical note extends this work, describing in more detail how to construct the carbon fiber motion-detection loops, and how to interface them with a commercially available simultaneous EEG-fMRI system. We hope that the information provided may help those wishing to utilize a motion-detection/correction solution to improve the quality of EEG recorded within an MRI scanner.

  8. Using independent component analysis to remove artifacts in visual cortex responses elicited by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yiliang; Cao, Pengjia; Sun, Jingjing; Wang, Jing; Li, Liming; Ren, Qiushi; Chen, Yao; Chai, Xinyu

    2012-04-01

    In visual prosthesis research, electrically evoked potentials (EEPs) can be elicited by one or more biphasic current pulses delivered to the optic nerve (ON) through penetrating electrodes. Multi-channel EEPs recorded from the visual cortex usually contain large stimulus artifacts caused by instantaneous electrotonic current spread through the brain tissue. These stimulus artifacts contaminate the EEP waveform and often make subsequent analysis of the underlying neural responses difficult. This is particularly serious when investigating EEPs in response to electrical stimulation with long duration and multi-pulses. We applied independent component analysis (ICA) to remove these electrical stimulation-induced artifacts during the development of a visual prosthesis. Multi-channel signals were recorded from visual cortices of five rabbits in response to ON electrical stimulation with various stimulus parameters. ON action potentials were then blocked by lidocaine in order to acquire cortical potentials only including stimulus artifacts. Correlation analysis of reconstructed artifacts by ICA and artifacts recorded after blocking the ON indicates successful removal of artifacts from electrical stimulation by the ICA method. This technique has potential applications in studies designed to optimize the electrical stimulation parameters used by visual prostheses.

  9. A model for filtered backprojection reconstruction artifacts due to time-varying attenuation values in perfusion C-arm CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Dennerlein, Frank; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Boese, Jan; Fahrig, Rebecca; Hornegger, Joachim

    2011-06-01

    Filtered backprojection is the basis for many CT reconstruction tasks. It assumes constant attenuation values of the object during the acquisition of the projection data. Reconstruction artifacts can arise if this assumption is violated. For example, contrast flow in perfusion imaging with C-arm CT systems, which have acquisition times of several seconds per C-arm rotation, can cause this violation. In this paper, we derived and validated a novel spatio-temporal model to describe these kinds of artifacts. The model separates the temporal dynamics due to contrast flow from the scan and reconstruction parameters. We introduced derivative-weighted point spread functions to describe the spatial spread of the artifacts. The model allows prediction of reconstruction artifacts for given temporal dynamics of the attenuation values. Furthermore, it can be used to systematically investigate the influence of different reconstruction parameters on the artifacts. We have shown that with optimized redundancy weighting function parameters the spatial spread of the artifacts around a typical arterial vessel can be reduced by about 70%. Finally, an inversion of our model could be used as the basis for novel dynamic reconstruction algorithms that further minimize these artifacts.

  10. A model for filtered backprojection reconstruction artifacts due to time-varying attenuation values in perfusion C-arm CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fieselmann, Andreas; Hornegger, Joachim [Department of Computer Science, Pattern Recognition Lab, Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Martensstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Dennerlein, Frank; Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Boese, Jan [Siemens AG, Healthcare Sector, Angiography and Interventional X-Ray Systems, Siemensstr. 1, 91301 Forchheim (Germany); Fahrig, Rebecca, E-mail: andreas.fieselmann@informatik.uni-erlangen.de [Department of Radiology, Lucas MRS Center, Stanford University, 1201 Welch Road, Palo Alto, CA 94305 (United States)

    2011-06-21

    Filtered backprojection is the basis for many CT reconstruction tasks. It assumes constant attenuation values of the object during the acquisition of the projection data. Reconstruction artifacts can arise if this assumption is violated. For example, contrast flow in perfusion imaging with C-arm CT systems, which have acquisition times of several seconds per C-arm rotation, can cause this violation. In this paper, we derived and validated a novel spatio-temporal model to describe these kinds of artifacts. The model separates the temporal dynamics due to contrast flow from the scan and reconstruction parameters. We introduced derivative-weighted point spread functions to describe the spatial spread of the artifacts. The model allows prediction of reconstruction artifacts for given temporal dynamics of the attenuation values. Furthermore, it can be used to systematically investigate the influence of different reconstruction parameters on the artifacts. We have shown that with optimized redundancy weighting function parameters the spatial spread of the artifacts around a typical arterial vessel can be reduced by about 70%. Finally, an inversion of our model could be used as the basis for novel dynamic reconstruction algorithms that further minimize these artifacts.

  11. Photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound (PAFUSion for identifying reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithun Kuniyil Ajith Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of acoustic inhomogeneities and resulting reflection artifacts is an important problem in reflection-mode photoacoustic imaging. Absorption of light by skin and superficial optical absorbers will generate photoacoustic transients, which traverse into the tissue and get reflected from structures having different acoustic impedance. These reflected photoacoustic signals, when reconstructed, may appear in the region of interest, which causes difficulties in image interpretation. We propose a novel method to identify and potentially eliminate reflection artifacts in photoacoustic images using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound [PAFUSion]. Our method uses focused ultrasound pulses to mimic the wave field produced by photoacoustic sources and thus provides a way to identify reflection artifacts in clinical combined photoacoustic and pulse-echo ultrasound. Simulation and phantom results are presented to demonstrate the validity and impact of this method. Results show that PAFUSion can identify reflections in photoacoustic images and thus envisages potential for improving photoacoustic imaging of acoustically inhomogeneous tissue.

  12. Development of neck filters for reducing artifact in cervical bone SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikkawa, Nobutada; Kimura, Shigeo [Kyoto Minami Hospital (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    In cervical bone scintillation SPECT studies using triple energy window (TEW) and ordered subject-expection maximization (OS-EM) methods, we have observed an artifact that may interfere with evaluation of the image; higher accumulation in cervical vertebra compared with in the head and thoracic vertebra. As the neck is smaller in diameter than in the thorax and head, gamma ray absorption is lower. In addition, as the distance between the neck and the detector is greater, scattered gamma rays are increased, interfering with imaging and causing artifact. To overcome these problems, we have developed special absorbers (neck filter) to make the relative absorption level of the neck comparable to that of the head and thorax and have employed these cervical filters in bone scintillation SPECT studies in combination with TEW scatter correction and OS-EM method. Our results showed that artifacts were significantly reduced and satisfactory images were obtained. (author)

  13. Detection and Removal of Artifacts in Astronomical Images

    CERN Document Server

    Desai, Shantanu; Bertin, Emmanuel; Kummel, Martin; Wetzstein, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical images from optical photometric surveys are typically contaminated with transient artifacts such as cosmic rays, satellite trails and scattered light. We have developed and tested an algorithm that removes these artifacts using a deep, artifact free, static sky coadd image built up through the median combination of point spread function (PSF) homogenized, overlapping single epoch images. Transient artifacts are detected and masked in each single epoch image through comparison with an artifact free, PSF-matched simulated image that is constructed using the PSF-corrected, model fitting catalog from the artifact free coadd image together with the position variable PSF model of the single epoch image. This approach works well not only for cleaning single epoch images with worse seeing than the PSF homogenized coadd, but also the traditionally much more challenging problem of cleaning single epoch images with better seeing. In addition to masking transient artifacts, we have developed an interpolation...

  14. Photoacoustic reflection artifact reduction using photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound: comparison between plane-wave and element-by-element synthetic backpropagation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mithun Kuniyil Ajith; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2017-01-01

    Reflection artifacts caused by acoustic inhomogeneities constitute a major problem in epi-mode biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Photoacoustic transients from the skin and superficial optical absorbers traverse into the tissue and reflect off echogenic structures to generate reflection artifacts. These artifacts cause difficulties in the interpretation of images and reduce contrast and imaging depth. We recently developed a method called PAFUSion (photoacoustic-guided focused ultrasound) to circumvent the problem of reflection artifacts in photoacoustic imaging. We already demonstrated that the photoacoustic signals can be backpropagated using synthetic aperture pulse-echo data for identifying and reducing reflection artifacts in vivo. In this work, we propose an alternative variant of PAFUSion in which synthetic backpropagation of photoacoustic signals is based on multi-angled plane-wave ultrasound measurements. We implemented plane-wave and synthetic aperture PAFUSion in a handheld ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging system and demonstrate reduction of reflection artifacts in phantoms and in vivo measurements on a human finger using both approaches. Our results suggest that, while both approaches are equivalent in terms of artifact reduction efficiency, plane-wave PAFUSion requires less pulse echo acquisitions when the skin absorption is the main cause of reflection artifacts. PMID:28736669

  15. Avoiding monocular artifacts in clinical stereotests presented on column-interleaved digital stereoscopic displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Pedraza, Ignacio; Vancleef, Kathleen; Read, Jenny C A

    2016-11-01

    New forms of stereoscopic 3-D technology offer vision scientists new opportunities for research, but also come with distinct problems. Here we consider autostereo displays where the two eyes' images are spatially interleaved in alternating columns of pixels and no glasses or special optics are required. Column-interleaved displays produce an excellent stereoscopic effect, but subtle changes in the angle of view can increase cross talk or even interchange the left and right eyes' images. This creates several challenges to the presentation of cyclopean stereograms (containing structure which is only detectable by binocular vision). We discuss the potential artifacts, including one that is unique to column-interleaved displays, whereby scene elements such as dots in a random-dot stereogram appear wider or narrower depending on the sign of their disparity. We derive an algorithm for creating stimuli which are free from this artifact. We show that this and other artifacts can be avoided by (a) using a task which is robust to disparity-sign inversion-for example, a disparity-detection rather than discrimination task-(b) using our proposed algorithm to ensure that parallax is applied symmetrically on the column-interleaved display, and (c) using a dynamic stimulus to avoid monocular artifacts from motion parallax. In order to test our recommendations, we performed two experiments using a stereoacuity task implemented with a parallax-barrier tablet. Our results confirm that these recommendations eliminate the artifacts. We believe that these recommendations will be useful to vision scientists interested in running stereo psychophysics experiments using parallax-barrier and other column-interleaved digital displays.

  16. Metal artifact suppression in megavoltage computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, L. John; Rogers, Myron; Salomons, Greg; Kerr, Andrew

    2005-04-01

    There has been considerable interest in megavoltage CT (MVCT) imaging associated with the development of image guided radiation therapy. It is clear that MVCT can provide good image quality for patient setup verification with soft tissue contrast much better than noted in conventional megavoltage portal imaging. In addition, it has been observed that MVCT images exhibit considerably reduced artifacts surrounding metal implants (e.g., surgical clips, hip implants, dental fillings) compared to conventional diagnostic CT images (kVCT). When encountered, these artifacts greatly limit the usefulness of kVCT images, and a variety of solutions have been proposed to remove the artifacts, but these have met with only partial success. In this paper, we investigate the potential for CT imaging in regions surrounding metal implants using high-energy photons from a Cobalt-60 source and from a 4 MV linear accelerator. MVCT and kVCT images of contrast phantoms and a phantom containing a hip prosthesis are compared and analysed. We show that MVCT scans provide good fidelity for CT number quantification in the high-density regions of the images, and in the regions immediately adjacent to the metal implants. They also provide structural details within the high-density inserts and implants. Calculations will show that practical clinical MVCT imaging, able to detect 3% contrast objects, should be achievable with doses of about 2.5cGy. This suggests that MVCT not only has a role in radiotherapy treatment planning and guidance, but may also be indicated for surgical guidance and follow-up in regions where metal implants cannot be avoided.

  17. Accessing Cultural Artifacts Through Digital Companions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehm, Matthias; Jensen, Martin Lynge

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study that explores how the introduction of a digital companion agent for a museum exploration game changes children’s engagement with the presented artworks. To this end, a mobile application was developed featuring a monster agent that has eaten the artworks, which the chi...... the children had now to find in the museum. Results show that in comparison to the paper-based version of the exploration game, children engaged in more interactions with the actual cultural artifacts and showed a significantly higher retention rate for details of the involved artworks....

  18. Hair product artifact in magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenji, Sneha; Wilman, Alan H; Mah, Dennell; Seres, Peter; Genge, Angela; Kalra, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    The presence of metallic compounds in facial cosmetics and permanent tattoos may affect the quality of magnetic resonance imaging. We report a case study describing a signal artifact due to the use of a leave-on powdered hair dye. On reviewing the ingredients of the product, it was found to contain several metallic compounds. In lieu of this observation, we suggest that MRI centers include the use of metal- or mineral-based facial cosmetics or hair products in their screening protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Motion blur filtering: A statistical approach for extracting confinement forces and diffusivity from a single blurred trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Christopher P.

    2016-05-01

    Single particle tracking (SPT) can aid in understanding a variety of complex spatiotemporal processes. However, quantifying diffusivity and confinement forces from individual live cell trajectories is complicated by inter- and intratrajectory kinetic heterogeneity, thermal fluctuations, and (experimentally resolvable) statistical temporal dependence inherent to the underlying molecule's time correlated confined dynamics experienced in the cell. The problem is further complicated by experimental artifacts such as localization uncertainty and motion blur. The latter is caused by the tagged molecule emitting photons at different spatial positions during the exposure time of a single frame. The aforementioned experimental artifacts induce spurious time correlations in measured SPT time series that obscure the information of interest (e.g., confinement forces and diffusivity). We develop a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) technique that decouples the above noise sources and systematically treats temporal correlation via time series methods. This ultimately permits a reliable algorithm for extracting diffusivity and effective forces in confined or unconfined environments. We illustrate how our approach avoids complications inherent to mean square displacement or autocorrelation techniques. Our algorithm modifies the established Kalman filter (which does not handle motion blur artifacts) to provide a likelihood based time series estimation procedure. The result extends A. J. Berglund's motion blur model [Phys. Rev. E 82, 011917 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.011917] to handle confined dynamics. The approach can also systematically utilize (possibly time dependent) localization uncertainty estimates afforded by image analysis if available. This technique, which explicitly treats confinement and motion blur within a time domain MLE framework, uses an exact likelihood (time domain methods facilitate analyzing nonstationary signals). Our estimator is demonstrated to be

  20. Feasibility of monitoring patient motion with opposed stereo infrared cameras during supine medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard D.; McNamara, Joseph E.; Terlecki, George; King, Michael A.

    2006-10-01

    Patient motion during single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) acquisition causes inconsistent projection data and reconstruction artifacts which can significantly affect diagnostic accuracy. We have investigated use of the Polaris stereo infrared motion-tracking system to track 6-Degrees-of-Freedom (6-DOF) motion of spherical reflectors (markers) on stretchy bands about the patient's chest and abdomen during cardiac SPECT imaging. The marker position information, obtained by opposed stereo infrared-camera systems, requires processing to correctly record tracked markers, and map Polaris co-ordinate data into the SPECT co-ordinate system. One stereo camera views the markers from the patient's head direction, and the other from the patient's foot direction. The need for opposed cameras is to overcome anatomical and geometrical limitations which sometimes prevent all markers from being seen by a single stereo camera. Both sets of marker data are required to compute rotational and translational 6-DOF motion of the patient which ultimately will be used for SPECT patient-motion corrections. The processing utilizes an algorithm involving least-squares fitting, to each other, of two 3-D point sets using singular value decomposition (SVD) resulting in the rotation matrix and translation of the rigid body centroid. We have previously demonstrated the ability to monitor multiple markers for twelve patients viewing from the foot end, and employed a neural network to separate the periodic respiratory motion component of marker motion from aperiodic body motion. We plan to initiate routine 6-DOF tracking of patient motion during SPECT imaging in the future, and are herein evaluating the feasibility of employing opposed stereo cameras.

  1. Motion-Compensated Compression of Dynamic Voxelized Point Clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Queiroz, Ricardo L; Chou, Philip A

    2017-05-24

    Dynamic point clouds are a potential new frontier in visual communication systems. A few articles have addressed the compression of point clouds, but very few references exist on exploring temporal redundancies. This paper presents a novel motion-compensated approach to encoding dynamic voxelized point clouds at low bit rates. A simple coder breaks the voxelized point cloud at each frame into blocks of voxels. Each block is either encoded in intra-frame mode or is replaced by a motion-compensated version of a block in the previous frame. The decision is optimized in a rate-distortion sense. In this way, both the geometry and the color are encoded with distortion, allowing for reduced bit-rates. In-loop filtering is employed to minimize compression artifacts caused by distortion in the geometry information. Simulations reveal that this simple motion compensated coder can efficiently extend the compression range of dynamic voxelized point clouds to rates below what intra-frame coding alone can accommodate, trading rate for geometry accuracy.

  2. Streaking Artifact Reduction for Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping of Sources with Large Dynamic Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongjiang; Dibb, Russell; Zhou, Yan; Sun, Yawen; Xu, Jianrong; Wang, Nian; Liu, Chunlei

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a novel MRI technique for measuring tissue magnetic susceptibility in 3D. While there are numerous algorithms developed to solve this ill-posed inverse problem, estimating susceptibility maps with a wide range of values is still problematic. In cases such as large veins, contrast agent uptake, and intracranial hemorrhages, extreme susceptibility values in focal areas cause severe streaking artifacts. To enable the reduction of these artifacts while preserving subtle susceptibility contrast, a two-level QSM reconstruction algorithm (STAR-QSM) was developed in this study by tuning a regularization parameter to automatically reconstruct both large and small susceptibility values. Compared to current state-of-the-art QSM methods such as iLSQR, STAR-QSM significantly reduced streaking artifacts while preserving sharp boundaries for blood vessels of mouse brains in vivo and fine anatomical details of high resolution mouse brains ex vivo. Brain image data from patients with cerebral hematoma and multiple sclerosis further illustrated the superiority of this method in reducing streaking artifacts caused by large susceptibility sources while maintaining sharp anatomical details. STAR-QSM is implemented in STI Suite, a comprehensive shareware for susceptibility imaging and quantification. PMID:26313885

  3. Recognizing scientific artifacts in biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Tudor; Hassanzadeh, Hamed; Hunter, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Today's search engines and digital libraries offer little or no support for discovering those scientific artifacts (hypotheses, supporting/contradicting statements, or findings) that form the core of scientific written communication. Consequently, we currently have no means of identifying central themes within a domain or to detect gaps between accepted knowledge and newly emerging knowledge as a means for tracking the evolution of hypotheses from incipient phases to maturity or decline. We present a hybrid Machine Learning approach using an ensemble of four classifiers, for recognizing scientific artifacts (ie, hypotheses, background, motivation, objectives, and findings) within biomedical research publications, as a precursory step to the general goal of automatically creating argumentative discourse networks that span across multiple publications. The performance achieved by the classifiers ranges from 15.30% to 78.39%, subject to the target class. The set of features used for classification has led to promising results. Furthermore, their use strictly in a local, publication scope, ie, without aggregating corpus-wide statistics, increases the versatility of the ensemble of classifiers and enables its direct applicability without the necessity of re-training.

  4. Single authentication: exposing weighted splining artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciptasari, Rimba W.

    2016-05-01

    A common form of manipulation is to combine parts of the image fragment into another different image either to remove or blend the objects. Inspired by this situation, we propose a single authentication technique for detecting traces of weighted average splining technique. In this paper, we assume that image composite could be created by joining two images so that the edge between them is imperceptible. The weighted average technique is constructed from overlapped images so that it is possible to compute the gray level value of points within a transition zone. This approach works on the assumption that although splining process leaves the transition zone smoothly. They may, nevertheless, alter the underlying statistics of an image. In other words, it introduces specific correlation into the image. The proposed idea dealing with identifying these correlations is to generate an original model of both weighting function, left and right functions, as references to their synthetic models. The overall process of the authentication is divided into two main stages, which are pixel predictive coding and weighting function estimation. In the former stage, the set of intensity pairs {Il,Ir} is computed by exploiting pixel extrapolation technique. The least-squares estimation method is then employed to yield the weighted coefficients. We show the efficacy of the proposed scheme on revealing the splining artifacts. We believe that this is the first work that exposes the image splining artifact as evidence of digital tampering.

  5. Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T.; Chung, N. T.; Mukherjee, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Adaptive Vehicle Make (AVM) program is a portfolio of programs, managed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). It was established to revolutionize how DoD designs, verifies, and manufactures complex defense systems and vehicles. The Component, Context, and Manufacturing Model Library (C2M2L; pronounced "camel") seeks to develop domain-specific models needed to enable design, verification, and fabrication of the Fast Adaptable Next-Generation (FANG) infantry fighting vehicle using in its overall infrastructure. Terrain models are being developed to represent the surface/fluid that an amphibious infantry fighting vehicle would traverse, ranging from paved road surfaces to rocky, mountainous terrain, slope, discrete obstacles, mud, sand snow, and water fording. Context models are being developed to provide additional data for environmental factors, such as: humidity, wind speed, particulate presence and character, solar radiation, cloud cover, precipitation, and more. The Ontological System for Context Artifacts and Resources (OSCAR) designed and developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is semantic web data system that enables context artifacts to be registered and searched according to their meaning, rather than indexed according to their syntactic structure alone (as in the case for traditional search engines). The system leverages heavily on the Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies to model physical terrain environment and context model characteristics. In this talk, we focus on the application of the SWEET ontologies and the design of the OSCAR system architecture.

  6. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  7. Fractional motions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliazar, Iddo I., E-mail: eliazar@post.tau.ac.il [Holon Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 305, Holon 58102 (Israel); Shlesinger, Michael F., E-mail: mike.shlesinger@navy.mil [Office of Naval Research, Code 30, 875 N. Randolph St., Arlington, VA 22203 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Brownian motion is the archetypal model for random transport processes in science and engineering. Brownian motion displays neither wild fluctuations (the “Noah effect”), nor long-range correlations (the “Joseph effect”). The quintessential model for processes displaying the Noah effect is Lévy motion, the quintessential model for processes displaying the Joseph effect is fractional Brownian motion, and the prototypical model for processes displaying both the Noah and Joseph effects is fractional Lévy motion. In this paper we review these four random-motion models–henceforth termed “fractional motions” –via a unified physical setting that is based on Langevin’s equation, the Einstein–Smoluchowski paradigm, and stochastic scaling limits. The unified setting explains the universal macroscopic emergence of fractional motions, and predicts–according to microscopic-level details–which of the four fractional motions will emerge on the macroscopic level. The statistical properties of fractional motions are classified and parametrized by two exponents—a “Noah exponent” governing their fluctuations, and a “Joseph exponent” governing their dispersions and correlations. This self-contained review provides a concise and cohesive introduction to fractional motions.

  8. Contrast Reversal of Topography Artifacts in a Transmission SNOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi; WANG Shu-Feng; ZHANG Jia-Sen; GONG Qi-Huang

    2005-01-01

    @@ We demonstrate the contrast reversal behaviour of topography artifacts by changing the diameter of the collection diaphragm in a transmission scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). This originates from the change of the approach curves. Such contrast reversal phenomenon is used to distinguish the artifact signal from the true optical signal of the SNOM image. We also show that continuously changing the diaphragm to a proper diameter can greatly reduce topography artifacts.

  9. Interactive inverse kinematics for human motion estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Nørregård, Morten Pol; Hauberg, Søren; Lapuyade, Jerome

    2009-01-01

    We present an application of a fast interactive inverse kinematics method as a dimensionality reduction for monocular human motion estimation. The inverse kinematics solver deals efficiently and robustly with box constraints and does not suffer from shaking artifacts. The presented motion...... estimation system uses a single camera to estimate the motion of a human. The results show that inverse kinematics can significantly speed up the estimation process, while retaining a quality comparable to a full pose motion estimation system. Our novelty lies primarily in use of inverse kinematics...... to significantly speed up the particle filtering. It should be stressed that the observation part of the system has not been our focus, and as such is described only from a sense of completeness. With our approach it is possible to construct a robust and computationally efficient system for human motion estimation....

  10. Contrast artifacts in tapping tip atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyhle, Anders; Sørensen, Alexis Hammer; Zandbergen, Julie Bjerring;

    1998-01-01

    When recording images with an atomic force microscope using the resonant vibrating cantilever mode, surprising strange results are often achieved. Typical artifacts are strange contours, unexpected height shifts, and sudden changes of the apparent resolution in the acquired images. Such artifacts...... interaction. The oscillating cantilever will be in a specific swing mode according to which type of interaction is dominating, and it is the switching between these modes that is responsible for a range of artifacts observed during image acquisition. This includes the artifact often referred to as "contrast...

  11. Automatic identification of artifacts in electrodermal activity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sara; Jaques, Natasha; Chen, Weixuan; Fedor, Szymon; Sano, Akane; Picard, Rosalind

    2015-01-01

    Recently, wearable devices have allowed for long term, ambulatory measurement of electrodermal activity (EDA). Despite the fact that ambulatory recording can be noisy, and recording artifacts can easily be mistaken for a physiological response during analysis, to date there is no automatic method for detecting artifacts. This paper describes the development of a machine learning algorithm for automatically detecting EDA artifacts, and provides an empirical evaluation of classification performance. We have encoded our results into a freely available web-based tool for artifact and peak detection.

  12. Picking Up Artifacts: Storyboarding as a Gateway to Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Shahtab; Branham, Stacy M.; Cairco, Lauren; McCrickard, D. Scott; Harrison, Steve

    Storyboarding offers designers the opportunity to illustrate a visual narrative of use. Because designers often refer to past ideas, we argue storyboards can be constructed by reusing shared artifacts. We present a study in which we explore how designers reuse artifacts consisting of images and rationale during storyboard construction. We find images can aid in accessing rationale and that connections among features aid in deciding what to reuse, creating new artifacts, and constructing. Based on requirements derived from our findings, we present a storyboarding tool, PIC-UP, to facilitate artifact sharing and reuse and evaluate its use in an exploratory study. We conclude with remarks on facilitating reuse and future work.

  13. Discriminative Ocular Artifact Correction for Feature Learning in EEG Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyang; Guan, Cuntai; Zhang, Haihong; Ang, Kai Keng

    2016-11-16

    Electrooculogram (EOG) artifact contamination is a common critical issue in general electroencephalogram (EEG) studies as well as in brain computer interface (BCI) research. It is especially challenging when dedicated EOG channels are unavailable or when there are very few EEG channels available for ICA-based ocular artifact removal. It is even more challenging to avoid loss of the signal of interest during the artifact correction process, where the signal of interest can be multiple magnitudes weaker than the artifact. To address these issues, we propose a novel discriminative ocular artifact correction approach for feature learning in EEG analysis.Without extra ocular movement measurements, the artifact is extracted from raw EEG data, which is totally automatic and requires no visual inspection of artifacts. Then, artifact correction is optimized jointly with feature extraction by maximizing oscillatory correlations between trials from the same class and minimizing them between trials from different classes. We evaluate this approach on a real world EEG data set comprising 68 subjects performing cognitive tasks. The results showed that the approach is capable of not only suppressing the artifact components but also improving the discriminative power of a classifier with statistical significance. We also demonstrate that the proposed method addresses the confounding issues induced by ocular movements in cognitive EEG study.

  14. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M. Warren

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Photoplethysmographic (PPG waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA, limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data.

  15. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kristen M; Harvey, Joshua R; Chon, Ki H; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-03-07

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data.

  16. Improving Pulse Rate Measurements during Random Motion Using a Wearable Multichannel Reflectance Photoplethysmograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kristen M.; Harvey, Joshua R.; Chon, Ki H.; Mendelson, Yitzhak

    2016-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) waveforms are used to acquire pulse rate (PR) measurements from pulsatile arterial blood volume. PPG waveforms are highly susceptible to motion artifacts (MA), limiting the implementation of PR measurements in mobile physiological monitoring devices. Previous studies have shown that multichannel photoplethysmograms can successfully acquire diverse signal information during simple, repetitive motion, leading to differences in motion tolerance across channels. In this paper, we investigate the performance of a custom-built multichannel forehead-mounted photoplethysmographic sensor under a variety of intense motion artifacts. We introduce an advanced multichannel template-matching algorithm that chooses the channel with the least motion artifact to calculate PR for each time instant. We show that for a wide variety of random motion, channels respond differently to motion artifacts, and the multichannel estimate outperforms single-channel estimates in terms of motion tolerance, signal quality, and PR errors. We have acquired 31 data sets consisting of PPG waveforms corrupted by random motion and show that the accuracy of PR measurements achieved was increased by up to 2.7 bpm when the multichannel-switching algorithm was compared to individual channels. The percentage of PR measurements with error ≤ 5 bpm during motion increased by 18.9% when the multichannel switching algorithm was compared to the mean PR from all channels. Moreover, our algorithm enables automatic selection of the best signal fidelity channel at each time point among the multichannel PPG data. PMID:26959034

  17. Characterized Fault Model of Scenario Earthquake Caused by the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line Fault Zone in Central Japan and Strong Ground Motion Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Dan, K.; Irikura, K.; Furumura, M.

    2001-12-01

    Based on the existing ideas on characterizing complex fault rupture process, we constructed four different characterized fault models for predicting strong motions from the most likely scenario earthquake along the active fault zone of the Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line in central Japan. The Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion in Japanese government (2001) estimated that the earthquake (8 +/- 0.5) has the total fault length of 112 km with four segments. We assumed that the characterized fault model consisted of two regions: asperity and background (Somerville et al., 1999; Irikura, 2000; Dan et al., 2000). The main differences in the four fault models were 1) how to determine a seismic moment Mo from a fault rupture area S, 2) number of asperities N, 3) how to determine a stress parameter σ , and 4) fmax. We calculated broadband strong motions at three stations near the fault by a hybrid method of the semi-empirical and theoretical approaches. A comparison between the results from the hybrid method and those from empirical attenuation relations showed that the hybrid method using the characterized fault model could evaluate near-fault rupture directivity effects more reliably than the empirical attenuation relations. We also discussed the characterized fault models and the strong motion characteristics. The Mo extrapolated from the empirical Mo-S relation by Somerville et al. (1999) was a half of that determined from the mean value of the Wells and Coppersmith (1994) data. The latter Mo was consistent with that for the 1891 Nobi, Japan, earthquake whose fault length was almost the same as the length of the target earthquake. In addition, the fault model using the latter Mo produced a slip amount of about 6 m on the largest asperity, which was consistent with the displacement of 6 m to 9 m per event obtained from a trench survey. High-frequency strong motions were greatly influenced by the σ for the asperities (188 bars, 246 bars, 108 bars, and 134

  18. Artifact mitigation of ptychography integrated with on-the-fly scanning probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Yan, Hanfei; Ge, Mingyuan; Öztürk, Hande; Nazaretski, Evgeny; Robinson, Ian K.; Chu, Yong S.

    2017-07-01

    We report our experiences with conducting ptychography simultaneously with the X-ray fluorescence measurement using the on-the-fly mode for efficient multi-modality imaging. We demonstrate that the periodic artifact inherent to the raster scan pattern can be mitigated using a sufficiently fine scan step size to provide an overlap ratio of >70%. This allows us to obtain transmitted phase contrast images with enhanced spatial resolution from ptychography while maintaining the fluorescence imaging with continuous-motion scans on pixelated grids. This capability will greatly improve the competence and throughput of scanning probe X-ray microscopy.

  19. SU-E-T-520: Investigation of the Impact of Respiratory Motion On Spine SAbR Dose Distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, R; Ding, C; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Spine SRS/SAbR treatment plans typically require very steep dose gradients to meet spinal cord constraints and it is crucial that the dose distribution be accurate. However, these plans are typically calculated on helical free-breathing CT scans, which often contain motion artifacts. While the spine itself doesn’t exhibit very much intra-fraction motion, tissues around the spine, particularly the liver, do move with respiration. We investigated the dosimetric effect of liver motion on dose distributions calculated on helical free-breathing CT scans for spine SAbR delivered to the T and L spine. Methods We took 5 spine SAbR plans and used density overrides to simulate an average reconstruction CT image set, which would more closely represent the patient anatomy during treatment. The value used for the density override was 0.66 g/cc. All patients were planned using our standard beam arrangement, which consists of 13 coplanar step and shoot IMRT beams. The original plan was recalculated with the same MU on the “average” scan and target coverage and spinal cord dose were compared to the original plan. Results The average changes in minimum PTV dose, PTV coverage, max cord dose and volume of cord receiving 10 Gy were 0.6%, 0.8%, 0.3% and 4.4% (0.012 cc), respectively. Conclusion SAbR spine plans are surprisingly robust relative to surrounding organ motion due to respiration. Motion artifacts in helical planning CT scans do not cause clinically significant differences when these plans are re-calculated on pseudo-average CT reconstructions. This is likely due to the beam arrangement used because only three beams pass through the liver and only one beam passes completely through the density override. The effect of the respiratory motion on VMAT plans for spine SAbR is being evaluated.

  20. 口腔金属修复材料对磁共振图像和锥形束CT图像伪影的影响%The Artifacts on MR imaging and Cone Beam CT Caused by Dental Metallic Restorative Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武婧; 李文晋

    2016-01-01

    The MR imaging and cone beam computed tomography radiographic inspection techniques have had an increasing applications in the field of oral medicine.The metallic materials commonly used in dental restoration can produce different degree of artifacts on the CBCT and MRI images,which interfere the clinical diagnosis.This article is made to have a summary for the research of the relationship between artifacts on the CBCT and MRI images and dental metallic restorative materials in recent years ,which is aimed to be convenient to be the guider in clinical work.%磁共振成像(Magnetic Resonance Imaging,MRI)与锥形束计算机体层成像(Cone Beam Computed Tomography,CBCT )影像学检查技术在口腔医学领域的应用日趋增加。金属材料在口腔修复中的应用占有不可或缺的地位,但其在CBCT与MRI图像上产生不同程度的伪影,对临床诊断造成干扰。本文就近年来针对金属修复材料在CBCT与MRI伪影的相关研究进行总结与简述,便于口腔临床工作应用提供参考。

  1. Investigation of a potential HCHO measurement artifact from ISOPOOH

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Jason M.; Rivera-Rios, Jean C.; Crounse, John D.; Praske, Eric; Kim, Michelle J.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Keutsch, Frank N.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-09-01

    Recent laboratory experiments have shown that a first generation isoprene oxidation product, ISOPOOH, can decompose to methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) on instrument surfaces, leading to overestimates of MVK and MACR concentrations. Formaldehyde (HCHO) was suggested as a decomposition co-product, raising concern that in situ HCHO measurements may also be affected by an ISOPOOH interference. The HCHO measurement artifact from ISOPOOH for the NASA In Situ Airborne Formaldehyde instrument (ISAF) was investigated for the two major ISOPOOH isomers, (1,2)-ISOPOOH and (4,3)-ISOPOOH, under dry and humid conditions. The dry conversion of ISOPOOH to HCHO was 3 ± 2 % and 6 ± 4 % for (1,2)-ISOPOOH and (4,3)-ISOPOOH, respectively. Under humid (relative humidity of 40-60 %) conditions, conversion to HCHO was 6 ± 4 % for (1,2)-ISOPOOH and 10 ± 5 % for (4,3)-ISOPOOH. The measurement artifact caused by conversion of ISOPOOH to HCHO in the ISAF instrument was estimated for data obtained on the 6 September 2013 flight of the Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) campaign. Prompt ISOPOOH conversion to HCHO was the source of < 4 % of the observed HCHO, including in the high-isoprene boundary layer. Time-delayed conversion, where previous exposure to ISOPOOH affects measured HCHO later in the flight, was conservatively estimated to be < 10 % of observed HCHO, and is significant only when high ISOPOOH sampling periods immediately precede periods of low HCHO.

  2. Medical image of the week: polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartell J

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 54 year-old man with a past medical history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, low back pain, and paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia presented to the sleep laboratory for evaluation of sleep disordered breathing. Pertinent medications include fluoxetine, ambien, and clonazepam. His Epworth sleepiness score was 18. He had a total sleep time of 12 min. On the night of his sleep study, the patient was restless and repeatedly changed positions in bed. Figures 1 and 2 show the artifact determined to be lead displacement of O1M2 after the patient shifted in bed, inadvertently removing one of his scalp electrodes. The sine waves are 60 Hz in frequency. Once the problem was identified, the lead was quickly replaced to its proper position.

  3. An extension to artifact-free projection overlaps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jianyu, E-mail: jianyulin@hotmail.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In multipinhole single photon emission computed tomography, the overlapping of projections has been used to increase sensitivity. Avoiding artifacts in the reconstructed image associated with projection overlaps (multiplexing) is a critical issue. In our previous report, two types of artifact-free projection overlaps, i.e., projection overlaps that do not lead to artifacts in the reconstructed image, were formally defined and proved, and were validated via simulations. In this work, a new proposition is introduced to extend the previously defined type-II artifact-free projection overlaps so that a broader range of artifact-free overlaps is accommodated. One practical purpose of the new extension is to design a baffle window multipinhole system with artifact-free projection overlaps. Methods: First, the extended type-II artifact-free overlap was theoretically defined and proved. The new proposition accommodates the situation where the extended type-II artifact-free projection overlaps can be produced with incorrectly reconstructed portions in the reconstructed image. Next, to validate the theory, the extended-type-II artifact-free overlaps were employed in designing the multiplexing multipinhole spiral orbit imaging systems with a baffle window. Numerical validations were performed via simulations, where the corresponding 1-pinhole nonmultiplexing reconstruction results were used as the benchmark for artifact-free reconstructions. The mean square error (MSE) was the metric used for comparisons of noise-free reconstructed images. Noisy reconstructions were also performed as part of the validations. Results: Simulation results show that for noise-free reconstructions, the MSEs of the reconstructed images of the artifact-free multiplexing systems are very similar to those of the corresponding 1-pinhole systems. No artifacts were observed in the reconstructed images. Therefore, the testing results for artifact-free multiplexing systems designed using the

  4. Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heußer, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.heusser@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Brehm, Marcus [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ritschl, Ludwig [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustraße 31, 90451 Nürnberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, Friedrich–Alexander–University (FAU) of Erlangen–Nürnberg, Henkestraße 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

  5. An algorithm for efficient metal artifact reductions in permanent seed implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Chen; Verhaegen, Frank; Laurendeau, Denis; Enger, Shirin A.; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO), GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht 6201 BN (Netherlands) and Oncology Department, Montreal General Hospital, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Departement de Genie Electrique et Genie Informatique, Laboratoire de Vision et Systemes Numeriques, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Co circumflex te du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie, Universite Laval, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, 11 Cote du Palais, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada) and Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d' Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In permanent seed implants, 60 to more than 100 small metal capsules are inserted in the prostate, creating artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) from small objects such as brachytherapy seeds for clinical applications. Methods: The approach for MAR is based on the interpolation of missing projections by directly using raw helical CT data (sinogram). First, an initial image is reconstructed from the raw CT data. Then, the metal objects segmented from the reconstructed image are reprojected back into the sinogram space to produce a metal-only sinogram. The Steger method is used to determine precisely the position and edges of the seed traces in the raw CT data. By combining the use of Steger detection and reprojections, the missing projections are detected and replaced by interpolation of non-missing neighboring projections. Results: In both phantom experiments and patient studies, the missing projections have been detected successfully and the artifacts caused by metallic objects have been substantially reduced. The performance of the algorithm has been quantified by comparing the uniformity between the uncorrected and the corrected phantom images. The results of the artifact reduction algorithm are indistinguishable from the true background value. Conclusions: An efficient algorithm for MAR in seed brachytherapy was developed. The test results obtained using raw helical CT data for both phantom and clinical cases have demonstrated that the proposed MAR method is capable of accurately detecting and correcting artifacts caused by a large number of very small metal objects (seeds) in sinogram space. This should enable a more accurate use of advanced brachytherapy dose calculations, such as Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Motion management in positron emission tomography/computed tomography for radiation treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinardi, Valentino; Picchio, Maria; Di Muzio, Nadia; Gilardi, Maria Carla

    2012-09-01

    Hybrid positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scanners combine, in a unique gantry, 2 of the most important diagnostic imaging systems, a CT and a PET tomograph, enabling anatomical (CT) and functional (PET) studies to be performed in a single study session. Furthermore, as the 2 scanners use the same spatial coordinate system, the reconstructed CT and PET images are spatially co-registered, allowing an accurate localization of the functional signal over the corresponding anatomical structure. This peculiarity of the hybrid PET/CT system results in improved tumor characterization for oncological applications, and more recently, it was found to be also useful for target volume definition (TVD) and treatment planning in radiotherapy (RT) applications. In fact, the use of combined PET/CT information has been shown to improve the RT treatment plan when compared with that obtained by a CT alone. A limiting factor to the accuracy of TVD by PET/CT is organ and tumor motion, which is mainly due to patient respiration. In fact, respiratory motion has a degrading effect on PET/CT image quality, and this is also critical for TVD, as it can lead to possible tumor missing or undertreatment. Thus, the management of respiratory motion is becoming an increasingly essential component in RT treatment planning; indeed, it has been recognized that the use of personalized motion information can improve TVD and, consequently, permit increased tumor dosage while sparing surrounding healthy tissues and organs at risk. This review describes the methods used for motion management in PET/CT for radiation treatment planning. The article covers the following: (1) problems caused by organ and lesion motion owing to respiration, and the artifacts generated on CT, PET, and PET/CT images; (2) data acquisition and processing techniques used to manage respiratory motion in PET/CT studies; and (3) the use of personalized motion information for TVD and radiation treatment planning.

  7. Determining patient 6-degrees-of-freedom motion from stereo infrared cameras during supine medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Richard D.; Feng, Bing; Shazeeb, Mohammed S.; King, Michael A.

    2006-03-01

    Patient motion during SPECT acquisition causes inconsistent projection data and reconstruction artifacts which can significantly affect the diagnostic accuracy of SPECT. The tracking of motion by infrared monitoring spherical reflectors (markers) on the patient's surface can provide 6-Degrees-of-Freedom (6-DOF) motion information capable of providing clinically robust correction. Object rigid-body motion can be described by 3 translational DOF and 3 rotational DOF. Polaris marker position information obtained by stereo infrared cameras requires algorithmic processing to correctly record the tracked markers, and to calibrate and map Polaris co-ordinate data into the SPECT co-ordinate system. Marker data then requires processing to determine the rotational and translational 6-DOF motion to ultimately be used for SPECT image corrections. This processing utilizes an algorithm involving least-squares fitting, to each other, of two 3-D point sets using singular value decomposition (SVD) resulting in the rotation matrix and translation of the rigid body centroid. We have demonstrated the ability to monitor 12 clinical patients as well as 7 markers on 2 elastic belts worn by a volunteer while intentionally moving, and determined the 3 axis Euclidian rotation angles and centroid translations. An anthropomorphic phantom with Tc-99m added to the heart, liver, and body was simultaneously SPECT imaged and motion tracked using 4 rigidly mounted markers. The determined rotation matrix and translation information was used to correct the image resulting in virtually identical "no motion" and "corrected" images. We plan to initiate routine 6-DOF tracking of patient motion during SPECT imaging in the future.

  8. CT Metal Artifact Reduction Method Based on Improved Image Segmentation and Sinogram In-Painting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The streak artifacts caused by metal implants degrade the image quality and limit the applications of CT imaging. The standard method used to reduce these metallic artifacts often consists of interpolating the missing projection data but the result is often a loss of image quality with additional artifacts in the whole image. This paper proposes a new strategy based on a three-stage process: (1 the application of a large-scale non local means filter (LS-NLM to suppress the noise and enhance the original CT image, (2 the segmentation of metal artifacts and metallic objects using a mutual information maximized segmentation algorithm (MIMS, (3 a modified exemplar-based in-painting technique to restore the corrupted projection data in sinogram. The final corrected image is then obtained by merging the segmented metallic object image with the filtered back-projection (FBP reconstructed image from the in-painted sinogram. Quantitative and qualitative experiments have been conducted on both a simulated phantom and clinical CT images and a comparative study has been led with Bal's algorithm that proposed a similar segmentation-based method.

  9. A Comparison of the Amounts of Artifacts Produced by Five Cements in Cone-Beam CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshfeghi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Bidimensional radiographic methods, including periapical, occlusal, panoramic, and cephalometric radiographs, are widely used in dentistry. However, the superimposition of adjacent structures and consequent loss of anatomic details may occur. Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate the artifacts produced by different cements with different densities using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT. Materials and Methods Samples of five cements with different densities including glass ionomers (or GI, from ChemFil Rock and Fuji IX, mineral trioxide aggregates (MTA, zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE, TempBond and a control sample (polyester were scanned by CBCT device and analyzed using OnDemand 3D application software. The amount of artifacts was measured by ∆ gray scale value (∆GSV, which was achieved by subtracting the gray level of the samples from the control group. Results According to the mean GSV of the five different materials, the majority of artifacts produced were as follows: TempBond > ZOE > MTA > GI (ChemFil Dentsply > GI (GC, Fuji ΙX. Conclusions The type of materials can influence the obtained GSV. Different materials cause various amounts of artifacts due to differences in density and atomic number.

  10. Kindergarten Children's Perceptions of "Anthropomorphic Artifacts" with Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Asi; Mioduser, David

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, children from a kindergarten in central Israel have been exposed to learning experiences in technology as part of the implementation of a curriculum based on technological thinking, including topics related to behaving-adaptive-artifacts (e.g., robots). This study aims to unveil children's stance towards behaving artifacts:…

  11. 78 FR 4878 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council... Artifacts Domestic Indemnity Panel. The purpose of the meeting is for panel review, discussion,...

  12. 76 FR 25378 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory; Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities Arts and Artifacts...) notice is hereby given that a meeting of the Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel of the Federal Council...

  13. Implementing a Smart Method to Eliminate Artifacts of Vital Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javadpour A.1

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Electroencephalography (EEG has vital and significant applications in different medical fields and is used for the primary evaluation of neurological disorders. Hence, having easy access to suitable and useful signal is very important. Artifacts are undesirable confusions which are generally originated from inevitable human activities such as heartbeat, blinking of eyes and facial muscle activities while receiving EEG signal. It can bring about deformation in these waves though. Objective: The objective of this study was to find a suitable solution to eliminate the artifacts of Vital Signals. Methods: In this study, wavelet transform technique was used. This method is compared with threshold level. The threshold intensity is efficiently crucial because it should not remove the original signal instead of artifacts, and does not hold artifact signal instead of original ones. In this project, we seek to find and implement the algorithm with the ability to automatically remove the artifacts in EEG signals. For this purpose, the use of adaptive filtering methods such as wavelet analysis is appropriate. Finally, we observed that Functional Link Neural Network (FLN performance is better than ANFIS and RBFN to remove such artifacts. Results: We offer an intelligent method for removing artifacts from vital signals in neurological disorders. Conclusion: The proposed method can obtain more accurate results by removing artifacts of vital signals and can be useful in the early diagnosis of neurological and cardiovascular disorders

  14. Teaching and learning the nature of technical artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frederik, I.; Sonneveld, W.; De Vries, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Artifacts are probably our most obvious everyday encounter with technology. Therefore, a good understanding of the nature of technical artifacts is a relevant part of technological literacy. In this article we draw from the philosophy of technology to develop a conceptualization of technical artifac

  15. Incidental ferumoxytol artifacts in clinical brain MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowser, Bruce A.; Campeau, Norbert G.; Carr, Carrie M.; Diehn, Felix E.; McDonald, Jennifer S.; Miller, Gary M.; Kaufmann, Timothy J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Ferumoxytol (Feraheme) is a parenteral therapy approved for treatment of iron deficiency anemia. The product insert for ferumoxytol states that it may affect the diagnostic ability of MRI for up to 3 months. However, the expected effects may not be commonly recognized among clinical neuroradiologists. Our purpose is to describe the artifacts we have seen at our institution during routine clinical practice. We reviewed the patients at our institution that had brain MRI performed within 90 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. The imaging was reviewed for specific findings, including diffusion-weighted imaging vascular susceptibility artifact, gradient-echo echo-planar T2*-weighted vascular susceptibility artifact, SWI/SWAN vascular susceptibility artifact, hypointense vascular signal on T2-weighted images, pre-gadolinium contrast vascular enhancement on magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE) imaging, and effects on post-gadolinium contrast T1 imaging. Multiple artifacts were observed in patients having a brain MRI within 3 days of receiving intravenous ferumoxytol. These included susceptibility artifact on DWI, GRE, and SWAN/SWI imaging, pre-gadolinium contrast increased vascular signal on MPRAGE imaging, and decreased expected enhancement on post-gadolinium contrast T1-weighted imaging. Ferumoxytol can create imaging artifacts which complicate clinical interpretation when brain MRI is performed within 3 days of administration. Recognition of the constellation of artifacts produced by ferumoxytol is important in order to obviate additional unnecessary examinations and mitigate errors in interpretation. (orig.)

  16. Naturalistic Experience and the Early Use of Symbolic Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troseth, Georgene L.; Casey, Amy M.; Lawver, Kelly A.; Walker, Joan M. T.; Cole, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Experience with a variety of symbolic artifacts has been proposed as a mechanism underlying symbolic development. In this study, the parents of 120 2-year-old children who participated in symbolic object retrieval tasks completed a questionnaire regarding their children's naturalistic experience with symbolic artifacts and activities. In separate…

  17. Comparison of ring artifact removal methods using flat panel detector based CT images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Soo Y

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ring artifacts are the concentric rings superimposed on the tomographic images often caused by the defective and insufficient calibrated detector elements as well as by the damaged scintillator crystals of the flat panel detector. It may be also generated by objects attenuating X-rays very differently in different projection direction. Ring artifact reduction techniques so far reported in the literature can be broadly classified into two groups. One category of the approaches is based on the sinogram processing also known as the pre-processing techniques and the other category of techniques perform processing on the 2-D reconstructed images, recognized as the post-processing techniques in the literature. The strength and weakness of these categories of approaches are yet to be explored from a common platform. Method In this paper, a comparative study of the two categories of ring artifact reduction techniques basically designed for the multi-slice CT instruments is presented from a common platform. For comparison, two representative algorithms from each of the two categories are selected from the published literature. A very recently reported state-of-the-art sinogram domain ring artifact correction method that classifies the ring artifacts according to their strength and then corrects the artifacts using class adaptive correction schemes is also included in this comparative study. The first sinogram domain correction method uses a wavelet based technique to detect the corrupted pixels and then using a simple linear interpolation technique estimates the responses of the bad pixels. The second sinogram based correction method performs all the filtering operations in the transform domain, i.e., in the wavelet and Fourier domain. On the other hand, the two post-processing based correction techniques actually operate on the polar transform domain of the reconstructed CT images. The first method extracts the ring artifact template

  18. New Blocking Artifacts Reduction Method Based on Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Min; YI Qing-ming

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that a block discrete cosine transform compressed image exhibits visually annoying blocking artifacts at low-bit-rate. A new post-processing deblocking algorithm in wavelet domain is proposed. The algorithm exploits blocking-artifact features shown in wavelet domain. The energy of blocking artifacts is concentrated into some lines to form annoying visual effects after wavelet transform. The aim of reducing blocking artifacts is to capture excessive energy on the block boundary effectively and reduce it below the visual scope. Adaptive operators for different subbands are computed based on the wavelet coefficients. The operators are made adaptive to different images and characteristics of blocking artifacts. Experimental results show that the proposed method can significantly improve the visual quality and also increase the peak signal-noise-ratio(PSNR) in the output image.

  19. Distributed Cognition and Distributed Morality: Agency, Artifacts and Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heersmink, Richard

    2017-04-01

    There are various philosophical approaches and theories describing the intimate relation people have to artifacts. In this paper, I explore the relation between two such theories, namely distributed cognition and distributed morality theory. I point out a number of similarities and differences in these views regarding the ontological status they attribute to artifacts and the larger systems they are part of. Having evaluated and compared these views, I continue by focussing on the way cognitive artifacts are used in moral practice. I specifically conceptualise how such artifacts (a) scaffold and extend moral reasoning and decision-making processes, (b) have a certain moral status which is contingent on their cognitive status, and (c) whether responsibility can be attributed to distributed systems. This paper is primarily written for those interested in the intersection of cognitive and moral theory as it relates to artifacts, but also for those independently interested in philosophical debates in extended and distributed cognition and ethics of (cognitive) technology.

  20. Investigation of the Saturation Pulse Artifact in Non-Enhanced MR Angiography of the Lower Extremity Arteries at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Fischer, Anja; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.; Orzada, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    When performing non-enhanced time-of-flight MR angiography of the lower extremity arteries at 7 T with cardiac triggering, the acquisition time is a crucial consideration. Therefore, in previous studies, saturation RF pulses were applied only every second TR. In the axial source images a slight artifact with an appearance similar to aliasing could be observed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of this artifact. The reason for the artifact is supposed to be related to the two effective TRs during acquisition caused by the sparsely applied saturation RF pulse. Several sequence variants were simulated and implemented within the sequence source code to examine this hypothesis. An adaptation of the excitation flip angles for each TR as well as a correction factor for the k-space data was calculated. Additionally, a different ordering of the k-space data during acquisition was implemented as well as the combination of the latter with the k-space correction factor. The observations from the simulations were verified using both a static and a flow phantom and, finally, in a healthy volunteer using the same measurement setup as in previous volunteer and patient studies. Of all implemented techniques, only the reordering of the k-space was capable of suppressing the artifact almost completely at the cost of creating a ringing artifact. The phantom measurements showed the same results as the simulations and could thus confirm the hypothesis regarding the origin of the artifact. This was additionally verified in the healthy volunteer. The origin of the artifact could be confirmed to be the periodic signal variation caused by two effective TRs during acquisition. PMID:25785837

  1. Artifact rejection of distortion product otoacoustic emissions measured after sound exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Karen; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda;

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study [3] distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were measured both before and after a moderate sound exposure, which caused a reduction of DPOAE levels. After the exposure DPOAEs had often levels below the noise floor. In the present paper it is discussed, whether....... It is concluded, that the most appropriate artifact rejection method for the purpose of the present study is to reject data only, if they are below the noise floor both before and after the exposure....

  2. Reducing multiplexing artifacts in multi-pinhole SPECT with a stacked silicon-germanium system: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lindsay C; Shokouhi, Sepideh; Peterson, Todd E

    2014-12-01

    In pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), multi-pinhole collimators can increase sensitivity but may lead to projection overlap, or multiplexing, which can cause image artifacts. In this work, we explore whether a stacked-detector configuration with a germanium and a silicon detector, used with 123I (27-32, 159 keV), where little multiplexing occurs in the Si projections, can reduce image artifacts caused by highly-multiplexed Ge projections. Simulations are first used to determine a reconstruction method that combines the Si and Ge projections to maximize image quality. Next, simulations of different pinhole configurations (varying projection multiplexing) in conjunction with digital phantoms are used to examine whether additional Si projections mitigate artifacts from the multiplexing in the Ge projections. Reconstructed images using both Si and Ge data are compared to those using Ge data alone. Normalized mean-square error and normalized standard deviation provide a quantitative evaluation of reconstructed images' error and noise, respectively, and are used to evaluate the impact of the additional nonmultiplexed data on image quality. For a qualitative comparison, the differential point response function is used to examine multiplexing artifacts. Results show that in cases of highly-multiplexed Ge projections, the addition of low-multiplexed Si projections helps to reduce image artifacts both quantitatively and qualitatively.

  3. A Shape-Adjusted Tridimensional Reconstruction of Cultural Heritage Artifacts Using a Miniature Quadrotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Théo Louiset

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The innovative automated 3D modeling procedure presented here was used to reconstruct a Cultural Heritage (CH object by means of an unmanned aerial vehicle. Using a motion capture system, a small low-cost quadrotor equipped with a miniature low-resolution Raspberry Pi camera module was accurately controlled in the closed loop mode and made to follow a trajectory around the artifact. A two-stage process ensured the accuracy of the 3D reconstruction process. The images taken during the first circular trajectory were used to draw the artifact’s shape. The second trajectory was smartly and autonomously adjusted to match the artifact’s shape, then it provides new pictures taken close to the artifact and, thus, greatly improves the final 3D reconstruction in terms of the completeness, accuracy and quickness, in particular where the artifact’s shape is complex. The results obtained here using close-range photogrammetric methods show that the process of automated 3D model reconstruction based on a robotized quadrotor using a motion capture system is a realistic approach, which could provide a suitable new digital conservation tool in the cultural heritage field.

  4. Artificial neural network for suppression of banding artifacts in balanced steady-state free precession MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Hwan; Park, Sung-Hong

    2017-04-01

    The balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) MR sequence is frequently used in clinics, but is sensitive to off-resonance effects, which can cause banding artifacts. Often multiple bSSFP datasets are acquired at different phase cycling (PC) angles and then combined in a special way for banding artifact suppression. Many strategies of combining the datasets have been suggested for banding artifact suppression, but there are still limitations in their performance, especially when the number of phase-cycled bSSFP datasets is small. The purpose of this study is to develop a learning-based model to combine the multiple phase-cycled bSSFP datasets for better banding artifact suppression. Multilayer perceptron (MLP) is a feedforward artificial neural network consisting of three layers of input, hidden, and output layers. MLP models were trained by input bSSFP datasets acquired from human brain and knee at 3T, which were separately performed for two and four PC angles. Banding-free bSSFP images were generated by maximum-intensity projection (MIP) of 8 or 12 phase-cycled datasets and were used as targets for training the output layer. The trained MLP models were applied to another brain and knee datasets acquired with different scan parameters and also to multiple phase-cycled bSSFP functional MRI datasets acquired on rat brain at 9.4T, in comparison with the conventional MIP method. Simulations were also performed to validate the MLP approach. Both the simulations and human experiments demonstrated that MLP suppressed banding artifacts significantly, superior to MIP in both banding artifact suppression and SNR efficiency. MLP demonstrated superior performance over MIP for the 9.4T fMRI data as well, which was not used for training the models, while visually preserving the fMRI maps very well. Artificial neural network is a promising technique for combining multiple phase-cycled bSSFP datasets for banding artifact suppression.

  5. Searching for alien artifacts on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P. C. W.; Wagner, R. V.

    2013-08-01

    The Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) has a low probability of success, but it would have a high impact if successful. Therefore it makes sense to widen the search as much as possible within the confines of the modest budget and limited resources currently available. To date, SETI has been dominated by the paradigm of seeking deliberately beamed radio messages. However, indirect evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence could come from any incontrovertible signatures of non-human technology. Existing searchable databases from astronomy, biology, earth and planetary sciences all offer low-cost opportunities to seek a footprint of extraterrestrial technology. In this paper we take as a case study one particular new and rapidly-expanding database: the photographic mapping of the Moon's surface by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) to 0.5 m resolution. Although there is only a tiny probability that alien technology would have left traces on the moon in the form of an artifact or surface modification of lunar features, this location has the virtue of being close, and of preserving traces for an immense duration. Systematic scrutiny of the LRO photographic images is being routinely conducted anyway for planetary science purposes, and this program could readily be expanded and outsourced at little extra cost to accommodate SETI goals, after the fashion of the SETI@home and Galaxy Zoo projects.

  6. The specific contribution of object's origin on artifacts categorization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yuhao; WANG Zhe; FU Xiaolan

    2006-01-01

    Gelman and Bloom found that adults and children's object naming was sensitive to how an object was created (man-made or not), but they did not reveal on which specific level of conceptual system this effect was. Using a free-naming task and a force-choice task, two experiments were conducted to test a hypothesis that this effect was specifically on domain level ("artifact/non-artifact" distinction). In Experiment 1, participants were asked to name shortly-depicted objects, rate their confidence, and report their reasons for each naming response. Results showed that most of the naming responses in "man-made" condition were in artifact domain, and most in "natural" condition were in non-artifact domain, although in both conditions names were very divergent on basic level. In Experiment 2, another group of participants were asked to choose one from two names (one in artifact domain and the other in non-artifact domain) to match the same shortly-depicted objects presented in the first experiment. Results of Experiment 1 on domain level were replicated in Experiment 2. These convergent findings supported the hypothesis that the effect of object's origin is specifically on domain level of conceptual system of objects. Reasons explicitly reported for naming responses in Experiment 1 suggested that participants might automatically infer objects' functions in "man-made" condition but not in "natural" condition.Here the function-based hypothesis of artifacts classification is discussed.

  7. Towards discrimination of infarcts from artifacts in DWI scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Varsha; Prakash, K.N.B.; Nowinski, Wieslaw L. [Technology and Research, Biomedical Imaging Lab, Agency for Science, Singapore (Singapore)

    2008-04-15

    Accurate and rapid quantification of infarcts from DWI scans is critical in acute ischemic stroke. Acquisition artifacts lead to hyperintense regions in DWI MR scans resulting in false positives. Discriminating infarcts and artifacts helps in reducing infarct segmentation errors. An algorithm based on two-dimensional symmetry of artifacts about the midsagittal plane and three-dimensional spatial coherence of infarct regions is proposed to characterize and separate infarcts from artifacts. The two dimensional symmetry is quantified by propagating Poisson errors in the intensity space of each pixel, and distant and spatially incoherent regions in a volume are considered as artifacts. The combination of two criteria enhances the confidence in the decision whether a hyperintense region is an infarct or artifact. The validity of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated using 51 cases. The improvement in results is demonstrated in three situations: (1) automatic infarct slice identification resulting in an average increase in (specificity, Dice Statistical Index (DSI)) by (15.2%, 6.9%) while the sensitivity decrease is by only 1.5% and (2) automatic infarct segmentation using two different algorithms: first resulting in an average DSI increase by 7.6% and second by 5.1%. On a matlab platform, the processing time is < 1 s. The proposed algorithm is useful as a fast post-processing tool to reduce artifacts in infarct processing applications. (orig.)

  8. Adiabatic Low-Pass J Filters for Artifact Suppression in Heteronuclear NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Sebastian; Benie, Andrew J; Duus, Jens Øllgaard

    2009-01-01

    NMR artifact purging: Modern NMR experiments depend on efficient coherence transfer pathways for their sensitivity and on suppression of undesired pathways leading to artifacts for their spectral clarity. A novel robust adiabatic element suppresses hard-to-get-at artifacts.......NMR artifact purging: Modern NMR experiments depend on efficient coherence transfer pathways for their sensitivity and on suppression of undesired pathways leading to artifacts for their spectral clarity. A novel robust adiabatic element suppresses hard-to-get-at artifacts....

  9. Initial observations using a novel "cine" magnetic resonance imaging technique to detect changes in abdominal motion caused by encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Benjamin; Summers, Angela; Fenner, John; Gillott, Richard; Hutchinson, Charles E; Spencer, Paul A; Wilkie, Martin; Hurst, Helen; Herrick, Sarah; Brenchley, Paul; Augustine, Titus; Bardhan, Karna D

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is an uncommon complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD), with high mortality and morbidity. The peritoneum thickens, dysfunctions, and forms a cocoon that progressively "strangulates" the small intestine, causing malnutrition, ischemia, and infarction. There is as yet no reliable noninvasive means of diagnosis, but recent developments in image analysis of cine magnetic resonance imaging for the recognition of adhesions offers a way forward. We used this protocol before surgery in 3 patients with suspected EPS. Image analysis revealed patterns of abdominal movement that were markedly different from the patterns in healthy volunteers. The volunteers showed marked movement throughout the abdomen; in contrast, movement in EPS patients was restricted to just below the diaphragm. This clear difference provides early "proof of principle" of the approach that we have developed.

  10. CUDA accelerated method for motion correction in MR PROPELLER imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chaolu; Yang, Jingzhu; Zhao, Dazhe; Liu, Jiren

    2013-10-01

    In PROPELLER, raw data are collected in N strips, each locating at the center of k-space and consisting of Mx sampling points in frequency encoding direction and L lines in phase encoding direction. Phase correction, rotation correction, and translation correction are used to remove artifacts caused by physiological motion and physical movement, but their time complexities reach O(Mx×Mx×L×N), O(N×RA×Mx×L×(Mx×L+RN×RN)), and O(N×(RN×RN+Mx×L)) where RN×RN is the coordinate space each strip gridded onto and RA denotes the rotation range. A CUDA accelerated method is proposed in this paper to improve their performances. Although our method is implemented on a general PC with Geforce 8800GT and Intel Core(TM)2 E6550 2.33GHz, it can directly run on more modern GPUs and achieve a greater speedup ratio without being changed. Experiments demonstrate that (1) our CUDA accelerated phase correction achieves exactly the same result with the non-accelerated implementation, (2) the results of our CUDA accelerated rotation correction and translation correction have only slight differences with those of their non-accelerated implementation, (3) images reconstructed from the motion correction results of CUDA accelerated methods proposed in this paper satisfy the clinical requirements, and (4) the speed up ratio is close to 6.5.

  11. Artifacts in Radar Imaging of Moving Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    leads to the wrong object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a moving target’s physical location varies throughout the imaging...Imaging, Synthetic Aperture Radar, Bistatic Radar, Multistatic Radar, Moving Targets, Backprojection 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 133 16. PRICE CODE 17...broadening and range errors were introduced by target motion. This leads to incorrect object localization and defocusing on the image. For SAR , a

  12. Analysis of Image Processing Related Artifacts in MRI%MRI中图像处理相关伪影分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王昭波; 李文华; 王立忠; 曹庆选

    2013-01-01

    目的:消除MRI中的图像处理相关伪影,改善MRI图像质量。方法总结我院最近一年的5632例MRI检查图像,把其中有图像处理相关伪影的病例归纳分类,进行伪影分析。结果按照MRI图像处理相关伪影的成因及特点,可分为:卷褶伪影、化学位移伪影、截断伪影、部分容积效应、鬼影( ghost)五大类。结论正确认识各种图像处理相关伪影的特点,应用相应的校正方法,对改善MRI质量,提高诊断准确率有重要意义。%Objective To eliminate the Image processing related artifacts in MRI imaging , and improve the image quality .Method Analysis and classification of the Image processing related artifacts in 5632 cases with MRI imaging in the most recent year in our hospital .Results According to the causes and characteristics, the MRI Image processing related artifacts can be divided into tucked artifacts , chemical shift artifact, truncation artifacts, partial volume effect and ghost.Conclusions To improve the quality of MRI image and the diagnostic accuracy , it is important to understand and eliminate these Image processing related artifacts .

  13. Development of a new metal artifact reduction algorithm by using an edge preserving method for CBCT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Juhye; Nam, Haewon; Lee, Rena

    2015-07-01

    CT (computed tomography) images, metal materials such as tooth supplements or surgical clips can cause metal artifact and degrade image quality. In severe cases, this may lead to misdiagnosis. In this research, we developed a new MAR (metal artifact reduction) algorithm by using an edge preserving filter and the MATLAB program (Mathworks, version R2012a). The proposed algorithm consists of 6 steps: image reconstruction from projection data, metal segmentation, forward projection, interpolation, applied edge preserving smoothing filter, and new image reconstruction. For an evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we obtained both numerical simulation data and data for a Rando phantom. In the numerical simulation data, four metal regions were added into the Shepp Logan phantom for metal artifacts. The projection data of the metal-inserted Rando phantom were obtained by using a prototype CBCT scanner manufactured by medical engineering and medical physics (MEMP) laboratory research group in medical science at Ewha Womans University. After these had been adopted the proposed algorithm was performed, and the result were compared with the original image (with metal artifact without correction) and with a corrected image based on linear interpolation. Both visual and quantitative evaluations were done. Compared with the original image with metal artifacts and with the image corrected by using linear interpolation, both the numerical and the experimental phantom data demonstrated that the proposed algorithm reduced the metal artifact. In conclusion, the evaluation in this research showed that the proposed algorithm outperformed the interpolation based MAR algorithm. If an optimization and a stability evaluation of the proposed algorithm can be performed, the developed algorithm is expected to be an effective tool for eliminating metal artifacts even in commercial CT systems.

  14. Artifacts interfering with interpretation of cone beam computed tomography images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makins, Scott R

    2014-07-01

    Artifacts in radiographic imaging are discrepancies between the reconstructed visual image and the content of the subject. In radiographic imaging, this means the grayscale values in the image do not accurately reflect the attenuation values of the subject. Structures may also appear that do not exist in the subject. Whatever the source or appearance of image artifacts, their presence degrades the accuracy of the image in relation to the true characteristics of the subject. One should therefore be aware of the presence of artifacts and be familiar with their characteristic appearances in order to enhance the extraction of diagnostic information.

  15. Towards a concept of community artifact ecology in HCI?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Korsgaard, Henrik

    or workplaces do. This has implications on understanding how to research and design HCI for communities but also on refining the ecological perspective in HCI. We look in particular at examples from preliminary research on a local self-organised urban community and discuss what existing concepts in the ecology......In this paper we introduce the concept of community artifact ecology. We argue that taking a community perspective on the concept of artifact ecologies is relevant in HCI because communities are also dealing with multitudes of artifacts, in ways di↵erent that individuals, organizations...... literature are relevant to consider and how they change with the community perspective....

  16. Motion vector field upsampling for improved 4D cone-beam CT motion compensation of the thorax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Sebastian; Rank, Christopher M.; Brehm, Marcus; Paysan, Pascal; Seghers, Dieter; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2017-03-01

    To improve the accuracy of motion vector fields (MVFs) required for respiratory motion compensated (MoCo) CT image reconstruction without increasing the computational complexity of the MVF estimation approach, we propose a MVF upsampling method that is able to reduce the motion blurring in reconstructed 4D images. While respiratory gating improves the temporal resolution, it leads to sparse view sampling artifacts. MoCo image reconstruction has the potential to remove all motion artifacts while simultaneously making use of 100% of the rawdata. However the MVF accuracy is still below the temporal resolution of the CBCT data acquisition. Increasing the number of motion bins would increase reconstruction time and amplify sparse view artifacts, but not necessarily the accuracy of MVF. Therefore we propose a new method to upsample estimated MVFs and use those for MoCo. To estimate the MVFs, a modified version of the Demons algorithm is used. Our proposed method is able to interpolate the original MVFs up to a factor that each projection has its own individual MVF. To validate the method we use an artificially deformed clinical CT scan, with a breathing pattern of a real patient, and patient data acquired with a TrueBeamTM4D CBCT system (Varian Medical Systems). We evaluate our method for different numbers of respiratory bins, each again with different upsampling factors. Employing our upsampling method, motion blurring in the reconstructed 4D images, induced by irregular breathing and the limited temporal resolution of phase-correlated images, is substantially reduced.

  17. Motion texture using symmetric property and graphcut algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jian-bing; JIN Xiao-gang; ZHOU Chuan; ZHAO Han-li

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a novel motion texture approach is presented for synthesizing long character motion (e.g., kungfu) that is similar to the original short input motion. First, a new motion with repeated frames is genterated by exploiting the symmetric properties of the frames and reversing the motion sequence playback in a given motion sequence. Then, the order of the above motion sequence is rearranged by putting the start and the end frames together. The graphcut algorithm is used to seamlessly synthesize the transition between the start and the end frames, which is noted as graphcut-based motion-texton. Finally, we utilize the motion-textons to synthesize long motion texture, which can be patched together like the image texture synthesis method using graphcut algorithm, and automatically form a long motion texture endlessly. Our approach is demonstrated by synthesizing the long kungfu motion texture without visual artifacts, together with post-processing including our new developed graphcut-based motion blending and Poisson-based motion smoothing techniques.

  18. Repurposing video recordings for structure motion estimations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaloo, Ali; Lattanzi, David

    2016-04-01

    Video monitoring of public spaces is becoming increasingly ubiquitous, particularly near essential structures and facilities. During any hazard event that dynamically excites a structure, such as an earthquake or hurricane, proximal video cameras may inadvertently capture the motion time-history of the structure during the event. If this dynamic time-history could be extracted from the repurposed video recording it would become a valuable forensic analysis tool for engineers performing post-disaster structural evaluations. The difficulty is that almost all potential video cameras are not installed to monitor structure motions, leading to camera perspective distortions and other associated challenges. This paper presents a method for extracting structure motions from videos using a combination of computer vision techniques. Images from a video recording are first reprojected into synthetic images that eliminate perspective distortion, using as-built knowledge of a structure for calibration. The motion of the camera itself during an event is also considered. Optical flow, a technique for tracking per-pixel motion, is then applied to these synthetic images to estimate the building motion. The developed method was validated using the experimental records of the NEESHub earthquake database. The results indicate that the technique is capable of estimating structural motions, particularly the frequency content of the response. Further work will evaluate variants and alternatives to the optical flow algorithm, as well as study the impact of video encoding artifacts on motion estimates.

  19. Artifact Diamond Its Allure And Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Max N.

    1989-01-01

    While the preponderance of the mechanical, optical, and electronic properties of natural diamond have been known for over a decade, only recently has artifact diamond in technologically useful form factors become an exciting possibility. The advent of sacrificial, lattice matched crystalline substrates provides the basis not only for semiconducting applications of diamond, but for optical mirrors, lenses, and windows as well. As a semiconductor, diamond has the highest resistivity, the highest saturated electron velocity, the highest thermal conductivity, the lowest dielectric constant, the highest dielectric strength, the greatest hardness, the largest bandgap and the smallest lattice constant of any material. It also has electron and hole mobilities greater than those of silicon. Its figure of merit as a microwave power amplifier is unexcelled and exceeds that of silicon by a multiplier of 8200. For integrated circuit potential, its thermal conductivity, saturated velocity, and dielectric constant also place it in the premier position (32 times that of silicon, 46 times that of GaAs). Although not verified, its radiation hardness should also be unmatched. Aside from its brilliant sparkle as a gemstone, there has been little use of diamond in the field of optics. Processing of the diamond surface now appears to be as simple as that of any other material --albeit with different techniques. In fact, it may be possible to etch diamond far more controllably (at economically viable rates) than any other material as the product of the etch is gaseous and the etched trough is self-cleaning. Other properties of diamond make it an ideal optical material. Among them are its unmatched thermal conductivity, its extremely low absorption loss above 228 nanometers, and unmatched Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, tensile strength, hardness, thermal shock, and modulus of elasticity. If the recently-found mechanisms by which erbium impurities in III-V junctions can be made to "lase

  20. Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trent, Bruce C.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the “cosine correction” term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or “knot-point spline definition,” that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

  1. Suppression of MRI Truncation Artifacts Using Total Variation Constrained Data Extrapolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Tobias Block

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The finite sampling of k-space in MRI causes spurious image artifacts, known as Gibbs ringing, which result from signal truncation at the border of k-space. The effect is especially visible for acquisitions at low resolution and commonly reduced by filtering at the expense of image blurring. The present work demonstrates that the simple assumption of a piecewise-constant object can be exploited to extrapolate the data in k-space beyond the measured part. The method allows for a significant reduction of truncation artifacts without compromising resolution. The assumption translates into a total variation minimization problem, which can be solved with a nonlinear optimization algorithm. In the presence of substantial noise, a modified approach offers edge-preserving denoising by allowing for slight deviations from the measured data in addition to supplementing data. The effectiveness of these methods is demonstrated with simulations as well as experimental data for a phantom and human brain in vivo.

  2. Search for continuous gravitational waves: improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    CERN Document Server

    Keitel, David; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2013-01-01

    The standard multi-detector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances (lines). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on det...

  3. How Do Artifact Models Help Direct SPI Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Richardson, Ita

    2015-01-01

    To overcome shortcomings associated with software process improvement (SPI), we previously recommended that process engineers focus on the artifacts to be developed in SPI projects. These artifacts should define desired outcomes, rather than specific methods. During this prior research, we...... developed a model for Artifact-based Software Process Improvement & Management (ArSPI). We are now carrying out studies to confirm our claims that ArSPI will provide benefits such as quality assurance. In this paper, we report on an experimental setting in which we developed and analyzed a strategy to use...... artifact models to direct process model improvement. We analyzed a process specification, the realized model, and the generated electronic process guide. We used ArSPI v0.9 as our process model and the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) as an external reference to provide a set of overall...

  4. Cultural Artifact Detection in Long Wave Infrared Imagery.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dylan Zachary [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Craven, Julia M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramon, Eric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Detection of cultural artifacts from airborne remotely sensed data is an important task in the context of on-site inspections. Airborne artifact detection can reduce the size of the search area the ground based inspection team must visit, thereby improving the efficiency of the inspection process. This report details two algorithms for detection of cultural artifacts in aerial long wave infrared imagery. The first algorithm creates an explicit model for cultural artifacts, and finds data that fits the model. The second algorithm creates a model of the background and finds data that does not fit the model. Both algorithms are applied to orthomosaic imagery generated as part of the MSFE13 data collection campaign under the spectral technology evaluation project.

  5. Information Content Across Types of Nurse Cognitive Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaz, Jacquelyn W; Doig, Alexa K; Cloyes, Kristin G; Staggers, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Acute care nurses commonly use personalized cognitive artifacts to organize information during a shift. The purpose of this content analysis is to compare information content across three formats of cognitive artifacts used by acute care nurses in a medical oncology unit: hand-made free-form, preprinted skeleton, and EHR-generated. Information contained in free-form and skeleton artifacts is more tailored to specific patient context than the NSR. Free-form and skeleton artifacts provide a space for synthesizing information to construct a "story of the patient" that is missing in the NSR. Future design of standardized handoff tools will need to take these differences into account for successful adoption by acute care nurses, including tailoring of information by patient, not just unit type, and allowing a space for nurses to construct a narrative describing the patients "story."

  6. THE DISABLED AND ART: SELECTED ARTIFACTS OF GHANAIAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    made into the artifacts of six (6) selected disabled artists in Ashanti Region. Description of ten ... 2010 Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST). Journal of Science and .... pation and women empowerment. There is no.

  7. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune;

    2015-01-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected...... to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the non-attenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical...... air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed...

  8. Automatic correction of dental artifacts in PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Claes N.; Andersen, Flemming L.; Keller, Sune

    2015-01-01

    A challenge when using current magnetic resonance (MR)-based attenuation correction in positron emission tomography/MR imaging (PET/MRI) is that the MRIs can have a signal void around the dental fillings that is segmented as artificial air-regions in the attenuation map. For artifacts connected...... to the background, we propose an extension to an existing active contour algorithm to delineate the outer contour using the non-attenuation corrected PET image and the original attenuation map. We propose a combination of two different methods for differentiating the artifacts within the body from the anatomical...... air-regions by first using a template of artifact regions, and second, representing the artifact regions with a combination of active shape models and k-nearest-neighbors. The accuracy of the combined method has been evaluated using 25 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET/MR patients. Results showed...

  9. Metal artifact reduction based on the combined prior image

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yanbo

    2014-01-01

    Metallic implants introduce severe artifacts in CT images, which degrades the image quality. It is an effective method to reduce metal artifacts by replacing the metal affected projection with the forward projection of a prior image. How to find a good prior image is the key of this class methods, and numerous algorithms have been proposed to address this issue recently. In this work, by using image mutual correlation, pixels in the original reconstructed image or linear interpolation corrected image, which are less affected by artifacts, are selected to build a combined image. Thereafter, a better prior image is generated from the combined image by using tissue classification. The results of three patients' CT images show that the proposed method can reduce metal artifacts remarkably.

  10. Purification and Concentration of PCR Products Leads to Increased Signal intensities with Fewer Allelic Drop-Outs and Artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maria Irlund Pedersen, Line; Stangegaard, Michael; Mogensen, Helle Smidt

    2011-01-01

    Capillary electrophoresis of amplified DNA isolated from trace evidence samples occasionally results in inadequate STR-profiles due to artifacts caused by e.g. primers and dNTPs. Removal of artifacts by purification and subsequent concentration of the PCR products may increase the sensitivity...... and the quality of the DNA profiles without re-amplification of the sample. We have validated and implemented an automated method to purify and 2-fold concentrate PCR products resulting in allelic peaks with higher intensity (a median height across all loci from 130 to 404 RFU), fewer allelic dropouts...... and a reduced number of artifacts compared to both an increase in injection time and increase in the number of amplification cycles....

  11. Visibility and artifacts of gold fiducial markers used for image guided radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer on MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurney-Champion, Oliver J., E-mail: o.j.gurney-champion@amc.uva.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lens, Eelco; Horst, Astrid van der; Houweling, Antonetta C.; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klaassen, Remy [Department of Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam, The Netherlands and Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hooft, Jeanin E. van [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap; Nederveen, Aart J. [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105 AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: In radiation therapy of pancreatic cancer, tumor alignment prior to each treatment fraction is improved when intratumoral gold fiducial markers (from here onwards: markers), which are visible on computed tomography (CT) and cone beam CT, are used. Visibility of these markers on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) might improve image registration between CT and magnetic resonance (MR) images for tumor delineation purposes. However, concomitant image artifacts induced by markers are undesirable. The extent of visibility and artifact size depend on MRI-sequence parameters. The authors’ goal was to determine for various markers their potential to be visible and to generate artifacts, using measures that are independent of the MRI-sequence parameters. Methods: The authors selected ten different markers suitable for endoscopic placement in the pancreas and placed them into a phantom. The markers varied in diameter (0.28–0.6 mm), shape, and iron content (0%–0.5%). For each marker, the authors calculated T{sub 2}{sup ∗}-maps and ΔB{sub 0}-maps using MRI measurements. A decrease in relaxation time T{sub 2}{sup ∗} can cause signal voids, associated with visibility, while a change in the magnetic field B{sub 0} can cause signal shifts, which are associated with artifacts. These shifts inhibit accurate tumor delineation. As a measure for potential visibility, the authors used the volume of low T{sub 2}{sup ∗}, i.e., the volume for which T{sub 2}{sup ∗} differed from the background by >15 ms. As a measure for potential artifacts, the authors used the volume for which |ΔB{sub 0}| > 9.4 × 10{sup −8} T (4 Hz). To test whether there is a correlation between visibility and artifact size, the authors calculated the Spearman’s correlation coefficient (R{sub s}) between the volume of low T{sub 2}{sup ∗} and the volume of high |ΔB{sub 0}|. The authors compared the maps with images obtained using a clinical MR-sequence. Finally, for the best visible marker

  12. A new interpretation of distortion artifacts in sweep measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torras Rosell, Antoni; Jacobsen, Finn

    2011-01-01

    The characterization of acoustical spaces by means of impulse response measurements is often biased by the nonlinear behavior of the loudspeaker used to excite the system under test. In this context the distortion immunity provided by the sweep technique has been investigated. The results show th...... that the sweep method can reject a significant amount of distortion artifacts but, in contrast to what is claimed in the literature, it cannot exclude all distortion artifacts from the causal part of the estimated impulse response....

  13. Mitigation of artifacts in rtm with migration kernel decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Ge

    2012-01-01

    The migration kernel for reverse-time migration (RTM) can be decomposed into four component kernels using Born scattering and migration theory. Each component kernel has a unique physical interpretation and can be interpreted differently. In this paper, we present a generalized diffraction-stack migration approach for reducing RTM artifacts via decomposition of migration kernel. The decomposition leads to an improved understanding of migration artifacts and, therefore, presents us with opportunities for improving the quality of RTM images.

  14. Situating Creative Artifacts in Art and Design Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nithikul Nimkulrat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to discuss the position of art and design artifacts, and their creation, in a practice-led research process.  Two creative productions and exhibitions featuring my textile artifacts were intentionally carried out in order to tackle a specific research problem, and these will be examined here as case studies.  These cases cover the production and exhibition of two sets of artworks, named Seeing Paper and Paper World, that were created as part of my completed doctoral research entitled Paperness: Expressive Material inTextile Art from an Artist’s Viewpoint. The study examined the relationship between a physical material and artistic expression in textile art and design.  Both cases exemplify the roles of creative productions and artifacts situated in the process of inquiry.  Throughout a practice-led research process, art and design artifacts can serve as inputs into knowledge production and as outputs for knowledge communication.  As inputs, both art productions and artifacts can be the starting point of a research project from which the research question is formulated.  They can also provide data for analysis from which knowledge is constructed.  Asoutputs, artifacts can indicate whether the research problem requires reformulation, demonstrate the experiential knowledge of the creative process, and strengthen the findings articulated in the written output.  Creative practice in a research context can contribute to generating or enhancing the knowledge which is embedded in the practice and embodied by the practitioner.  This knowledge or insight can be obtained from the artist creating the artifact, the artifact created, the process of making it, and the culture in which it is produced and viewed or used, all taking place at different stages of a research process.

  15. A methodology for validating artifact removal techniques for physiological signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Kevin T; Ayaz, Hasan; Ward, Tomás E; Izzetoglu, Meltem; McLoone, Seán F; Onaral, Banu

    2012-09-01

    Artifact removal from physiological signals is an essential component of the biosignal processing pipeline. The need for powerful and robust methods for this process has become particularly acute as healthcare technology deployment undergoes transition from the current hospital-centric setting toward a wearable and ubiquitous monitoring environment. Currently, determining the relative efficacy and performance of the multiple artifact removal techniques available on real world data can be problematic, due to incomplete information on the uncorrupted desired signal. The majority of techniques are presently evaluated using simulated data, and therefore, the quality of the conclusions is contingent on the fidelity of the model used. Consequently, in the biomedical signal processing community, there is considerable focus on the generation and validation of appropriate signal models for use in artifact suppression. Most approaches rely on mathematical models which capture suitable approximations to the signal dynamics or underlying physiology and, therefore, introduce some uncertainty to subsequent predictions of algorithm performance. This paper describes a more empirical approach to the modeling of the desired signal that we demonstrate for functional brain monitoring tasks which allows for the procurement of a "ground truth" signal which is highly correlated to a true desired signal that has been contaminated with artifacts. The availability of this "ground truth," together with the corrupted signal, can then aid in determining the efficacy of selected artifact removal techniques. A number of commonly implemented artifact removal techniques were evaluated using the described methodology to validate the proposed novel test platform.

  16. A hybrid intelligence approach to artifact recognition in digital publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Riveros, J. Fernando; Santos Villalobos, Hector J.

    2006-02-01

    The system presented integrates rule-based and case-based reasoning for artifact recognition in Digital Publishing. In Variable Data Printing (VDP) human proofing could result prohibitive since a job could contain millions of different instances that may contain two types of artifacts: 1) evident defects, like a text overflow or overlapping 2) style-dependent artifacts, subtle defects that show as inconsistencies with regard to the original job design. We designed a Knowledge-Based Artifact Recognition tool for document segmentation, layout understanding, artifact detection, and document design quality assessment. Document evaluation is constrained by reference to one instance of the VDP job proofed by a human expert against the remaining instances. Fundamental rules of document design are used in the rule-based component for document segmentation and layout understanding. Ambiguities in the design principles not covered by the rule-based system are analyzed by case-based reasoning, using the Nearest Neighbor Algorithm, where features from previous jobs are used to detect artifacts and inconsistencies within the document layout. We used a subset of XSL-FO and assembled a set of 44 document samples. The system detected all the job layout changes, while obtaining an overall average accuracy of 84.56%, with the highest accuracy of 92.82%, for overlapping and the lowest, 66.7%, for the lack-of-white-space.

  17. Artifact removal in physiological signals--practices and possibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Kevin T; Ward, Tomás E; McLoone, Seán F

    2012-05-01

    The combination of reducing birth rate and increasing life expectancy continues to drive the demographic shift toward an aging population. This, in turn, places an ever-increasing burden on healthcare due to the increasing prevalence of patients with chronic illnesses and the reducing income-generating population base needed to sustain them. The need to urgently address this healthcare "time bomb" has accelerated the growth in ubiquitous, pervasive, distributed healthcare technologies. The current move from hospital-centric healthcare toward in-home health assessment is aimed at alleviating the burden on healthcare professionals, the health care system and caregivers. This shift will also further increase the comfort for the patient. Advances in signal acquisition, data storage and communication provide for the collection of reliable and useful in-home physiological data. Artifacts, arising from environmental, experimental and physiological factors, degrade signal quality and render the affected part of the signal useless. The magnitude and frequency of these artifacts significantly increases when data collection is moved from the clinic into the home. Signal processing advances have brought about significant improvement in artifact removal over the past few years. This paper reviews the physiological signals most likely to be recorded in the home, documenting the artifacts which occur most frequently and which have the largest degrading effect. A detailed analysis of current artifact removal techniques will then be presented. An evaluation of the advantages and disadvantages of each of the proposed artifact detection and removal techniques, with particular application to the personal healthcare domain, is provided.

  18. Artifact-Based Transformation of IBM Global Financing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tian; Cohn, David; Flatgard, Adrian; Hahn, Sandy; Linehan, Mark; Nandi, Prabir; Nigam, Anil; Pinel, Florian; Vergo, John; Wu, Frederick Y.

    IBM Global Financing (IGF) is transforming its business using the Business Artifact Method, an innovative business process modeling technique that identifies key business artifacts and traces their life cycles as they are processed by the business. IGF is a complex, global business operation with many business design challenges. The Business Artifact Method is a fundamental shift in how to conceptualize, design and implement business operations. The Business Artifact Method was extended to solve the problem of designing a global standard for a complex, end-to-end process while supporting local geographic variations. Prior to employing the Business Artifact method, process decomposition, Lean and Six Sigma methods were each employed on different parts of the financing operation. Although they provided critical input to the final operational model, they proved insufficient for designing a complete, integrated, standard operation. The artifact method resulted in a business operations model that was at the right level of granularity for the problem at hand. A fully functional rapid prototype was created early in the engagement, which facilitated an improved understanding of the redesigned operations model. The resulting business operations model is being used as the basis for all aspects of business transformation in IBM Global Financing.

  19. Inference and coherence in causal-based artifact categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puebla, Guillermo; Chaigneau, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    In four experiments, we tested conditions under which artifact concepts support inference and coherence in causal categorization. In all four experiments, participants categorized scenarios in which we systematically varied information about artifacts' associated design history, physical structure, user intention, user action and functional outcome, and where each property could be specified as intact, compromised or not observed. Consistently across experiments, when participants received complete information (i.e., when all properties were observed), they categorized based on individual properties and did not show evidence of using coherence to categorize. In contrast, when the state of some property was not observed, participants gave evidence of using available information to infer the state of the unobserved property, which increased the value of the available information for categorization. Our data offers answers to longstanding questions regarding artifact categorization, such as whether there are underlying causal models for artifacts, which properties are part of them, whether design history is an artifact's causal essence, and whether physical appearance or functional outcome is the most central artifact property.

  20. Detection of eye blink artifacts from single prefrontal channel electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won-Du; Cha, Ho-Seung; Kim, Kiwoong; Im, Chang-Hwan

    2016-02-01

    Eye blinks are one of the most influential artifact sources in electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from frontal channels, and thereby detecting and rejecting eye blink artifacts is regarded as an essential procedure for improving the quality of EEG data. In this paper, a novel method to detect eye blink artifacts from a single-channel frontal EEG signal was proposed by combining digital filters with a rule-based decision system, and its performance was validated using an EEG dataset recorded from 24 healthy participants. The proposed method has two main advantages over the conventional methods. First, it uses single-channel EEG data without the need for electrooculogram references. Therefore, this method could be particularly useful in brain-computer interface applications using headband-type wearable EEG devices with a few frontal EEG channels. Second, this method could estimate the ranges of eye blink artifacts accurately. Our experimental results demonstrated that the artifact range estimated using our method was more accurate than that from the conventional methods, and thus, the overall accuracy of detecting epochs contaminated by eye blink artifacts was markedly increased as compared to conventional methods. The MATLAB package of our library source codes and sample data, named Eyeblink Master, is open for free download.

  1. Hybrid Motion Graphs for Character Animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalouache Saida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many works in the literature have improved the performance of motion graphs for synthesis the humanlike results in limited domains that necessity few constraints like dance, navigation in small game like environments or in games by the gesture of feedback on a snowboard tutorial. The humanlike cannot exist in an environment without interacting with the world surrounding them; the naturalness of the entire motion extremely depends on the animation of the walking character, the chosen path and the interaction motions. Addressing exact position of end-effectors is the main disadvantage of motion graphs which cause less importance expended to the search for motions with no collision in complex environments or manipulating motions. This fact motivates this approach which is the proposition of an hybrid motion graphs taking advantages of motion graphs to synthesis a natural locomotion and overcoming their limitations in synthesis manipulation motions by combined it with an inverse kinematic method for synthesis the upper-body motions.

  2. Prospective motion correction improves diagnostic utility of pediatric MRI scans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuperman, Joshua M.; Ahmadi, Mazyar E.; Erhart, Matthew J.; White, Nathan S.; Roddey, J.C. [University of California, San Diego, Multimodal Imaging Laboratory, La Jolla, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, La Jolla, CA (United States); Brown, Timothy T. [University of California, San Diego, Multimodal Imaging Laboratory, La Jolla, CA (United States); Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Rochester, MN (United States); Shankaranarayanan, Ajit; Han, Eric T. [Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rettmann, Dan [University of California, San Diego, Department of Neurosciences, La Jolla, CA (United States); Dale, Anders M. [University of California, San Diego, Multimodal Imaging Laboratory, La Jolla, CA (United States); University of California, San Diego, Department of Radiology, La Jolla, CA (United States); Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2011-12-15

    A new technique for prospectively correcting head motion (called PROMO) during acquisition of high-resolution MRI scans has been developed to reduce motion artifacts. To evaluate the efficacy of PROMO, four T1-weighted image volumes (two with PROMO enabled, two uncorrected) were acquired for each of nine children. A radiologist, blind to whether PROMO was used, rated image quality and artifacts on all sagittal slices of every volume. These ratings were significantly better in scans collected with PROMO relative to those collected without PROMO (Mann-Whitney U test, P < 0.0001). The use of PROMO, especially in motion-prone patients, should improve the accuracy of measurements made for clinical care and research, and potentially reduce the need for sedation in children. (orig.)

  3. Universal artifacts affect the branching of phylogenetic trees, not universal scaling laws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian R Altaba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The superficial resemblance of phylogenetic trees to other branching structures allows searching for macroevolutionary patterns. However, such trees are just statistical inferences of particular historical events. Recent meta-analyses report finding regularities in the branching pattern of phylogenetic trees. But is this supported by evidence, or are such regularities just methodological artifacts? If so, is there any signal in a phylogeny? METHODOLOGY: In order to evaluate the impact of polytomies and imbalance on tree shape, the distribution of all binary and polytomic trees of up to 7 taxa was assessed in tree-shape space. The relationship between the proportion of outgroups and the amount of imbalance introduced with them was assessed applying four different tree-building methods to 100 combinations from a set of 10 ingroup and 9 outgroup species, and performing covariance analyses. The relevance of this analysis was explored taking 61 published phylogenies, based on nucleic acid sequences and involving various taxa, taxonomic levels, and tree-building methods. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All methods of phylogenetic inference are quite sensitive to the artifacts introduced by outgroups. However, published phylogenies appear to be subject to a rather effective, albeit rather intuitive control against such artifacts. The data and methods used to build phylogenetic trees are varied, so any meta-analysis is subject to pitfalls due to their uneven intrinsic merits, which translate into artifacts in tree shape. The binary branching pattern is an imposition of methods, and seldom reflects true relationships in intraspecific analyses, yielding artifactual polytomies in short trees. Above the species level, the departure of real trees from simplistic random models is caused at least by two natural factors--uneven speciation and extinction rates; and artifacts such as choice of taxa included in the analysis, and imbalance introduced by outgroups

  4. Metal-related artifacts in instrumented spine. Techniques for reducing artifacts in CT and MRI: state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Stradiotti, P.; Curti, A.; G. Castellazzi; Zerbi, A.

    2009-01-01

    The projectional nature of radiogram limits its amount of information about the instrumented spine. MRI and CT imaging can be more helpful, using cross-sectional view. However, the presence of metal-related artifacts at both conventional CT and MRI imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and disease. We reviewed the literature about overcoming artifacts from metallic orthopaedic implants at high-field strength MRI imaging and multi-detector CT. The evolution of multichannel CT has made available...

  5. Motion compensation for cone-beam CT using Fourier consistency conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, M.; Xia, Y.; Aichinger, W.; Mentl, K.; Unberath, M.; Aichert, A.; Riess, C.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.; Maier, A.

    2017-09-01

    In cone-beam CT, involuntary patient motion and inaccurate or irreproducible scanner motion substantially degrades image quality. To avoid artifacts this motion needs to be estimated and compensated during image reconstruction. In previous work we showed that Fourier consistency conditions (FCC) can be used in fan-beam CT to estimate motion in the sinogram domain. This work extends the FCC to 3\\text{D} cone-beam CT. We derive an efficient cost function to compensate for 3\\text{D} motion using 2\\text{D} detector translations. The extended FCC method have been tested with five translational motion patterns, using a challenging numerical phantom. We evaluated the root-mean-square-error and the structural-similarity-index between motion corrected and motion-free reconstructions. Additionally, we computed the mean-absolute-difference (MAD) between the estimated and the ground-truth motion. The practical applicability of the method is demonstrated by application to respiratory motion estimation in rotational angiography, but also to motion correction for weight-bearing imaging of knees. Where the latter makes use of a specifically modified FCC version which is robust to axial truncation. The results show a great reduction of motion artifacts. Accurate estimation results were achieved with a maximum MAD value of 708 μm and 1184 μm for motion along the vertical and horizontal detector direction, respectively. The image quality of reconstructions obtained with the proposed method is close to that of motion corrected reconstructions based on the ground-truth motion. Simulations using noise-free and noisy data demonstrate that FCC are robust to noise. Even high-frequency motion was accurately estimated leading to a considerable reduction of streaking artifacts. The method is purely image-based and therefore independent of any auxiliary data.

  6. A quantitative assessment of heart phantom motion and its effect on myocardial perfusion SPECT images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In order to study the image characteristics of motion artifacts and todetermine the relations of motion artifacts with varied motion types, and the inag-ing timings, frames, distances and directions during SPECT acquisition, a myocardialphantom filled with pertechnetate solution was used to simulate the patient motion.In nonreturning pattern, the simulation motion was timed at the 0°, -45° and -90°positions during the rotation of the detector over a 180° arc from +45° right antcrioroblique to -135° left posterior oblique. Simulation motion was performed by movingthe phantom +5mm, ±-10mm and +20mm along X- (from left to right), Y- (fromhead to caudal) and Z-axis (from back to ventral) respectively. In returning patternthe acquired 30 projections were divided into three equal parts. The simulation motionwas timed at the middle 1-7 projections of each part and performed by moving thephantom +5, ±10, ±15, ±20, ±25, ±30 and ±50 mm along X-, Y- and Z-axis respec-tively. Each image was compared with normal image and assessed by three experiencedobservers without knowledge of the phantom motion. Logistic regression analysis wasused to determine the relationship of motion artifacts with the affecting factors. Nosignificant artifacts can be found when the phantom was moved slightly, no matterwhich motion pattern, direction and timing were taken. The characteristics of motionartifacts showed a radioactive marker dot in inferior wall firstly when the phantomwas moved along X-axis. Septal and lateral wall became "hot" symmetrically whenthe phantom was moved along Y-axis. And nodular hot could be found in anteriorwall when the phantom was moved along Z-axis. At last the "lumpy" and "defect"areas existed alternately and formed a triangle respectively. The presence of motionartifacts was related to motion directions, distance and affected frames, but was in-dependent of motion timing. The characteristics of motion artifacts could be foundwhen the phantom was moved

  7. Metal-related artifacts in instrumented spine. Techniques for reducing artifacts in CT and MRI: state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stradiotti, P; Curti, A; Castellazzi, G; Zerbi, A

    2009-06-01

    The projectional nature of radiogram limits its amount of information about the instrumented spine. MRI and CT imaging can be more helpful, using cross-sectional view. However, the presence of metal-related artifacts at both conventional CT and MRI imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and disease. We reviewed the literature about overcoming artifacts from metallic orthopaedic implants at high-field strength MRI imaging and multi-detector CT. The evolution of multichannel CT has made available new techniques that can help minimizing the severe beam-hardening artifacts. The presence of artifacts at CT from metal hardware is related to image reconstruction algorithm (filter), tube current (in mA), X-ray kilovolt peak, pitch, hardware composition, geometry (shape), and location. MRI imaging has been used safely in patients with orthopaedic metallic implants because most of these implants do not have ferromagnetic properties and have been fixed into position. However, on MRI imaging metallic implants may produce geometric distortion, the so-called susceptibility artifact. In conclusion, although 140 kV and high milliamperage second exposures are recommended for imaging patients with hardware, caution should always be exercised, particularly in children, young adults, and patients undergoing multiple examinations. MRI artifacts can be minimized by positioning optimally and correctly the examined anatomy part with metallic implants in the magnet and by choosing fast spin-echo sequences, and in some cases also STIR sequences, with an anterior to posterior frequency-encoding direction and the smallest voxel size.

  8. Motion correction for improving the accuracy of dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Jed D.; Yin, Zhye; Xiong, Guanglei; Mittal, Priya; Dunham, Simon; Elmore, Kimberly; Edic, Peter M.; Min, James K.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death globally [1]. Modern cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is highly effective at identifying and assessing coronary blockages associated with CAD. The diagnostic value of this anatomical information can be substantially increased in combination with a non-invasive, low-dose, correlative, quantitative measure of blood supply to the myocardium. While CT perfusion has shown promise of providing such indications of ischemia, artifacts due to motion, beam hardening, and other factors confound clinical findings and can limit quantitative accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of applying a novel motion correction algorithm to correct for motion in the myocardium. This motion compensation algorithm (originally designed to correct for the motion of the coronary arteries in order to improve CCTA images) has been shown to provide substantial improvements in both overall image quality and diagnostic accuracy of CCTA. We have adapted this technique for application beyond the coronary arteries and present an assessment of its impact on image quality and quantitative accuracy within the context of dual-energy CT perfusion imaging. We conclude that motion correction is a promising technique that can help foster the routine clinical use of dual-energy CT perfusion. When combined, the anatomical information of CCTA and the hemodynamic information from dual-energy CT perfusion should facilitate better clinical decisions about which patients would benefit from treatments such as stent placement, drug therapy, or surgery and help other patients avoid the risks and costs associated with unnecessary, invasive, diagnostic coronary angiography procedures.

  9. Comparison of motion correction techniques applied to functional near-infrared spectroscopy data from children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao-Su; Arredondo, Maria M.; Gomba, Megan; Confer, Nicole; DaSilva, Alexandre F.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Shalinsky, Mark; Kovelman, Ioulia

    2015-12-01

    Motion artifacts are the most significant sources of noise in the context of pediatric brain imaging designs and data analyses, especially in applications of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), in which it can completely affect the quality of the data acquired. Different methods have been developed to correct motion artifacts in fNIRS data, but the relative effectiveness of these methods for data from child and infant subjects (which is often found to be significantly noisier than adult data) remains largely unexplored. The issue is further complicated by the heterogeneity of fNIRS data artifacts. We compared the efficacy of the six most prevalent motion artifact correction techniques with fNIRS data acquired from children participating in a language acquisition task, including wavelet, spline interpolation, principal component analysis, moving average (MA), correlation-based signal improvement, and combination of wavelet and MA. The evaluation of five predefined metrics suggests that the MA and wavelet methods yield the best outcomes. These findings elucidate the varied nature of fNIRS data artifacts and the efficacy of artifact correction methods with pediatric populations, as well as help inform both the theory and practice of optical brain imaging analysis.

  10. Model for the calculation of transient hydraulics caused by the valve motion in water supply pipe line%泵阀动作给水管线水力瞬变计算模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖宗蓉

    2016-01-01

    Hydraulic transient (water hammer)refers to the dynamic change of flow and pres-sure in hydraulic system,which comes from the fact that transient increase of water pressure in the pipes would cause pressure waves and transmit it in sound velocity.In this paper,hydraulic transi-ent was analyzed through rigid water hammer model and flexible water hammer model.Simplified finite difference equation was adopted to build a characteristics-method mathematical model for hy-draulic transient and set up boundary conditions for pump motions and valve motions.Characteris-tic method equation and boundary conditions equation were used to get the transient of water hammer waves in pipelines so as to solve the problems of water hammer in complicated pipeline sys-tem and boundary conditions.%由于管道内压力瞬间升高,压力波在管道内以声速传递,导致水力系统流量和压力动态变化,即产生水力瞬变(水锤),通过刚性水锤模型和弹性水锤模型分析给水管线水力瞬变,采用简化的有限差分方程,建立特征线法水力瞬变数学模型,并建立了泵、阀动作的边界条件,可借助于特征线方程和边界条件方程,求解管线内水锤波的暂态,以解决复杂的管路系统和边界条件的水锤问题。

  11. Towards Semi-Automatic Artifact Rejection for the Improvement of Alzheimer's Disease Screening from EEG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé-Casals, Jordi; Vialatte, François-Benoît

    2015-07-23

    A large number of studies have analyzed measurable changes that Alzheimer's disease causes on electroencephalography (EEG). Despite being easily reproducible, those markers have limited sensitivity, which reduces the interest of EEG as a screening tool for this pathology. This is for a large part due to the poor signal-to-noise ratio of EEG signals: EEG recordings are indeed usually corrupted by spurious extra-cerebral artifacts. These artifacts are responsible for a consequent degradation of the signal quality. We investigate the possibility to automatically clean a database of EEG recordings taken from patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and healthy age-matched controls. We present here an investigation of commonly used markers of EEG artifacts: kurtosis, sample entropy, zero-crossing rate and fractal dimension. We investigate the reliability of the markers, by comparison with human labeling of sources. Our results show significant differences with the sample entropy marker. We present a strategy for semi-automatic cleaning based on blind source separation, which may improve the specificity of Alzheimer screening using EEG signals.

  12. Stripe artifact elimination based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform for light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Zang, Yali; Dong, Di; Zhang, Liwen; Fang, Mengjie; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Stripe artifacts, caused by high-absorption or high-scattering structures in the illumination light path, are a common drawback in both unidirectional and multidirectional light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), significantly deteriorating image quality. To circumvent this problem, we present an effective multidirectional stripe remover (MDSR) method based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT), which can be used for both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. In MDSR, a fast Fourier transform (FFT) filter is designed in the NSCT domain to shrink the stripe components and eliminate the noise. Benefiting from the properties of being multiscale and multidirectional, MDSR succeeds in eliminating stripe artifacts in both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. To validate the method, MDSR has been tested on images from a custom-made unidirectional LSFM system and a commercial multidirectional LSFM system, clearly demonstrating that MDSR effectively removes most of the stripe artifacts. Moreover, we performed a comparative experiment with the variational stationary noise remover and the wavelet-FFT methods and quantitatively analyzed the results with a peak signal-to-noise ratio, showing an improved noise removal when using the MDSR method.

  13. Optimization-based image reconstruction with artifact reduction in C-arm CBCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Dan; Langan, David A.; Solomon, Stephen B.; Zhang, Zheng; Chen, Buxin; Lai, Hao; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan

    2016-10-01

    We investigate an optimization-based reconstruction, with an emphasis on image-artifact reduction, from data collected in C-arm cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) employed in image-guided interventional procedures. In the study, an image to be reconstructed is formulated as a solution to a convex optimization program in which a weighted data divergence is minimized subject to a constraint on the image total variation (TV); a data-derivative fidelity is introduced in the program specifically for effectively suppressing dominant, low-frequency data artifact caused by, e.g. data truncation; and the Chambolle-Pock (CP) algorithm is tailored to reconstruct an image through solving the program. Like any other reconstructions, the optimization-based reconstruction considered depends upon numerous parameters. We elucidate the parameters, illustrate their determination, and demonstrate their impact on the reconstruction. The optimization-based reconstruction, when applied to data collected from swine and patient subjects, yields images with visibly reduced artifacts in contrast to the reference reconstruction, and it also appears to exhibit a high degree of robustness against distinctively different anatomies of imaged subjects and scanning conditions of clinical significance. Knowledge and insights gained in the study may be exploited for aiding in the design of practical reconstructions of truly clinical-application utility.

  14. Region-Based Fractional Wavelet Transform Using Post Processing Artifact Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jassim M. Abdul-Jabbar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet-based algorithms are increasingly used in the source coding of remote sensing, satellite and other geospatial imagery. At the same time, wavelet-based coding applications are also increased in robust communication and network transmission of images. Although wireless multimedia sensors are widely used to deliver multimedia content due to the availability of inexpensive CMOS cameras, their computational and memory resources are still typically very limited. It is known that allowing a low-cost camera sensor node with limited RAM size to perform a multi-level wavelet transform, will in return limit the size of the acquired image. Recently, fractional wavelet filter technique became an interesting solution to reduce communication energy and wireless bandwidth, for resource-constrained devices (e.g. digital cameras. The reduction in the required memory in these fractional wavelet transforms is achieved at the expense of the image quality. In this paper, an adaptive fractional artifacts reduction approach is proposed for efficient filtering operations according to the desired compromise between the effectiveness of artifact reduction and algorithm simplicity using some local image features to reduce boundaries artifacts caused by fractional wavelet. Applying such technique on different types of images with different sizes using CDF 9/7 wavelet filters results in a good performance.

  15. Characterization of ultrasound elevation beamwidth artifacts for prostate brachytherapy needle insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peikari, Mohammad; Chen, Thomas Kuriran; Lasso, Anras; Heffter, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor; Burdette, Everette C. [Laboratory for Percutaneous Surgery (Perk), School of Computing, Queen' s University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Acoustic MedSystems, 208 Burwash Avenue, Savoy, Illinois 61874 (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound elevation beamwidth leads to image artifacts and uncertainties in localizing objects (such as a surgical needle) in ultrasound images. The authors examined the clinical significance of errors caused by elevation beamwidth artifacts and imaging parameters in needle insertion procedures. Methods: Beveled prostate brachytherapy needles were inserted through all holes of a grid template under real-time transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The needle tip position as indicated by the TRUS image was compared to their observed physical location. A new device was developed to measure the ultrasound elevation beamwidth. Results: Imaging parameters of the TRUS scanner have direct impact on the localization error ranging from 0.5 up to 4 mm. The smallest localization error was observed laterally close to the center of the grid template and axially within the beam's focal zone. Largest localization error occurs laterally around both sides of the grid template and axially within the beam's far field. The authors also found that the localization errors vary with both lateral and elevation offsets. Conclusions: The authors found properly adjusting the TRUS imaging settings to lower the ultrasound gain and power effectively minimized the appearance of elevation beamwidth artifacts and in turn reduced the localization errors of the needle tip.

  16. Accelerated acquisition of tagged MRI for cardiac motion correction in simultaneous PET-MR: Phantom and patient studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chuan, E-mail: chuan.huang@stonybrookmedicine.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Departments of Radiology, Psychiatry, Stony Brook Medicine, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States); Petibon, Yoann [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Ouyang, Jinsong; El Fakhri, Georges [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Sciences, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Reese, Timothy G. [Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 and Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129 (United States); Ahlman, Mark A.; Bluemke, David A. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Degradation of image quality caused by cardiac and respiratory motions hampers the diagnostic quality of cardiac PET. It has been shown that improved diagnostic accuracy of myocardial defect can be achieved by tagged MR (tMR) based PET motion correction using simultaneous PET-MR. However, one major hurdle for the adoption of tMR-based PET motion correction in the PET-MR routine is the long acquisition time needed for the collection of fully sampled tMR data. In this work, the authors propose an accelerated tMR acquisition strategy using parallel imaging and/or compressed sensing and assess the impact on the tMR-based motion corrected PET using phantom and patient data. Methods: Fully sampled tMR data were acquired simultaneously with PET list-mode data on two simultaneous PET-MR scanners for a cardiac phantom and a patient. Parallel imaging and compressed sensing were retrospectively performed by GRAPPA and kt-FOCUSS algorithms with various acceleration factors. Motion fields were estimated using nonrigid B-spline image registration from both the accelerated and fully sampled tMR images. The motion fields were incorporated into a motion corrected ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm with motion-dependent attenuation correction. Results: Although tMR acceleration introduced image artifacts into the tMR images for both phantom and patient data, motion corrected PET images yielded similar image quality as those obtained using the fully sampled tMR images for low to moderate acceleration factors (<4). Quantitative analysis of myocardial defect contrast over ten independent noise realizations showed similar results. It was further observed that although the image quality of the motion corrected PET images deteriorates for high acceleration factors, the images were still superior to the images reconstructed without motion correction. Conclusions: Accelerated tMR images obtained with more than 4 times acceleration can still provide

  17. Constraining earthquake source inversions with GPS data: 1. Resolution-based removal of artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M.T.; Custodio, S.; Archuleta, R.J.; Carlson, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present a resolution analysis of an inversion of GPS data from the 2004 Mw 6.0 Parkfield earthquake. This earthquake was recorded at thirteen 1-Hz GPS receivers, which provides for a truly coseismic data set that can be used to infer the static slip field. We find that the resolution of our inverted slip model is poor at depth and near the edges of the modeled fault plane that are far from GPS receivers. The spatial heterogeneity of the model resolution in the static field inversion leads to artifacts in poorly resolved areas of the fault plane. These artifacts look qualitatively similar to asperities commonly seen in the final slip models of earthquake source inversions, but in this inversion they are caused by a surplus of free parameters. The location of the artifacts depends on the station geometry and the assumed velocity structure. We demonstrate that a nonuniform gridding of model parameters on the fault can remove these artifacts from the inversion. We generate a nonuniform grid with a grid spacing that matches the local resolution length on the fault and show that it outperforms uniform grids, which either generate spurious structure in poorly resolved regions or lose recoverable information in well-resolved areas of the fault. In a synthetic test, the nonuniform grid correctly averages slip in poorly resolved areas of the fault while recovering small-scale structure near the surface. Finally, we present an inversion of the Parkfield GPS data set on the nonuniform grid and analyze the errors in the final model. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. A novel forward projection-based metal artifact reduction method for flat-detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Beister, Marcel; Kalender, Willi A

    2009-11-07

    Metallic implants generate streak-like artifacts in flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) reconstructed volumetric images. This study presents a novel method for reducing these disturbing artifacts by inserting discarded information into the original rawdata using a three-step correction procedure and working directly with each detector element. Computation times are minimized by completely implementing the correction process on graphics processing units (GPUs). First, the original volume is corrected using a three-dimensional interpolation scheme in the rawdata domain, followed by a second reconstruction. This metal artifact-reduced volume is then segmented into three materials, i.e. air, soft-tissue and bone, using a threshold-based algorithm. Subsequently, a forward projection of the obtained tissue-class model substitutes the missing or corrupted attenuation values directly for each flat detector element that contains attenuation values corresponding to metal parts, followed by a final reconstruction. Experiments using tissue-equivalent phantoms showed a significant reduction of metal artifacts (deviations of CT values after correction compared to measurements without metallic inserts reduced typically to below 20 HU, differences in image noise to below 5 HU) caused by the implants and no significant resolution losses even in areas close to the inserts. To cover a variety of different cases, cadaver measurements and clinical images in the knee, head and spine region were used to investigate the effectiveness and applicability of our method. A comparison to a three-dimensional interpolation correction showed that the new approach outperformed interpolation schemes. Correction times are minimized, and initial and corrected images are made available at almost the same time (12.7 s for the initial reconstruction, 46.2 s for the final corrected image compared to 114.1 s and 355.1 s on central processing units (CPUs)).

  19. A novel forward projection-based metal artifact reduction method for flat-detector computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prell, Daniel; Kyriakou, Yiannis; Beister, Marcel; Kalender, Willi A.

    2009-11-01

    Metallic implants generate streak-like artifacts in flat-detector computed tomography (FD-CT) reconstructed volumetric images. This study presents a novel method for reducing these disturbing artifacts by inserting discarded information into the original rawdata using a three-step correction procedure and working directly with each detector element. Computation times are minimized by completely implementing the correction process on graphics processing units (GPUs). First, the original volume is corrected using a three-dimensional interpolation scheme in the rawdata domain, followed by a second reconstruction. This metal artifact-reduced volume is then segmented into three materials, i.e. air, soft-tissue and bone, using a threshold-based algorithm. Subsequently, a forward projection of the obtained tissue-class model substitutes the missing or corrupted attenuation values directly for each flat detector element that contains attenuation values corresponding to metal parts, followed by a final reconstruction. Experiments using tissue-equivalent phantoms showed a significant reduction of metal artifacts (deviations of CT values after correction compared to measurements without metallic inserts reduced typically to below 20 HU, differences in image noise to below 5 HU) caused by the implants and no significant resolution losses even in areas close to the inserts. To cover a variety of different cases, cadaver measurements and clinical images in the knee, head and spine region were used to investigate the effectiveness and applicability of our method. A comparison to a three-dimensional interpolation correction showed that the new approach outperformed interpolation schemes. Correction times are minimized, and initial and corrected images are made available at almost the same time (12.7 s for the initial reconstruction, 46.2 s for the final corrected image compared to 114.1 s and 355.1 s on central processing units (CPUs)).

  20. Motion Sickness Induced by Optokinetic Drums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Bles, W.

    2004-01-01

    Motion sickness is not only elicited by certain kinds of self-motion, but also by motion of a visual scene. In case of the latter, optokinetic drums are often used and a visual-vestibular conflict is assumed to cause the sickness. When the rotation axis is Earth vertical however, different studies s

  1. Evaluation of motion and its effect on brain magnetic resonance image quality in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afacan, Onur; Erem, Burak; Roby, Diona P.; Prabhu, Sanjay P.; Warfield, Simon K. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Roth, Noam; Roth, Amir [Robin Medical Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Motion artifacts pose significant problems for the acquisition of MR images in pediatric populations. To evaluate temporal motion metrics in MRI scanners and their effect on image quality in pediatric populations in neuroimaging studies. We report results from a large pediatric brain imaging study that shows the effect of motion on MRI quality. We measured motion metrics in 82 pediatric patients, mean age 13.4 years, in a T1-weighted brain MRI scan. As a result of technical difficulties, 5 scans were not included in the subsequent analyses. A radiologist graded the images using a 4-point scale ranging from clinically non-diagnostic because of motion artifacts to no motion artifacts. We used these grades to correlate motion parameters such as maximum motion, mean displacement from a reference point, and motion-free time with image quality. Our results show that both motion-free time (as a ratio of total scan time) and average displacement from a position at a fixed time (when the center of k-space was acquired) were highly correlated with image quality, whereas maximum displacement was not as good a predictor. Among the 77 patients whose motion was measured successfully, 17 had average displacements of greater than 0.5 mm, and 11 of those (14.3%) resulted in non-diagnostic images. Similarly, 14 patients (18.2%) had less than 90% motion-free time, which also resulted in non-diagnostic images. We report results from a large pediatric study to show how children and young adults move in the MRI scanner and the effect that this motion has on image quality. The results will help the motion-correction community in better understanding motion patterns in pediatric populations and how these patterns affect MR image quality. (orig.)

  2. Physiologic variants, benign processes, and artifacts from 106 canine and feline FDG-PET/computed tomography scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Elissa; Loeber, Samantha; Kraft, Susan

    2014-01-01

    18F-Fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) is an emerging diagnostic imaging modality in veterinary medicine; however, little published information is available on physiologic variants, benign processes, and artifacts. The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the number of occurrences of non-neoplastic disease-related FDG-PET/CT lesions in a group of dogs and cats. Archived FDG-PET/CT scans were retrieved and interpreted based on a consensus opinion of two board-certified veterinary radiologists. Non-neoplastic disease-related lesions were categorized as physiologic variant, benign activity, or equipment/technology related artifact. If the exact cause of hypermetabolic areas could not be determined, lesions were put into an indeterminate category. A total of 106 canine and feline FDG-PET/CT scans were included in the study. In 104 of the 106 scans, a total of 718 occurrences of physiologic variant, areas of incidental benign activity, and artifacts were identified. Twenty-two of 23 feline scans and 82 of 83 canine scans had at least one artifact. Previously unreported areas of increased radiopharmaceutical uptake included foci associated with the canine gall bladder, linear uptake along the canine mandible, and focal uptake in the gastrointestinal tract. Benign activity was often seen and related to healing, inflammation, and indwelling implants. Artifacts were most often related to injection or misregistration. Further experience in recognizing the common veterinary FDG physiologic variation, incidental radiopharmaceutical uptake, and artifacts is important to avoid misinterpretation and false-positive diagnoses.

  3. Fast washout of thallium-201 from area of myocardial infarction: possible artifact of background subtraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.A.; Benoit, L.; Clements, J.P.; Wackers, F.J.

    1987-06-01

    A recent report described a pattern of reverse redistribution on poststreptokinase /sup 201/Tl studies which was believed to be due to rapid washout of /sup 201/Tl from the infarct area related to reperfusion of the infarct vessel. We have also observed the phenomenon of rapid washout of /sup 201/Tl from the area of infarction in the absence of thrombolytic therapy. This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that rapid washout of /sup 201/Tl from an area of infarction is an artifact of background subtraction usually employed in analysis of washout. A total of 61 patients with previous myocardial infarction who underwent cardiac catheterization and exercise /sup 201/Tl imaging were examined. Thallium-201 images were analyzed using a validated quantitative method employing interpolative background correction. Abnormally increased /sup 201/Tl washout was noted in 11 infarct segments in 10 (18%) patients. Infarct segments with rapid washout had significantly less initial uptake, and more severe associated wall motion abnormalities than infarct segments with normal washout. When quantitative analysis was repeated without background subtraction, no segments with rapid washout were observed. A phantom model was constructed to further test our hypothesis. The frequency of observed rapid washout was directly related to the severity of the initial defect and was entirely dependent upon utilizing background correction during the quantitative analysis. Our study suggests that rapid washout of /sup 201/Tl in an area of previous infarction reflects an artifact of background subtraction involved with standard quantitative analysis.

  4. A Low Cost Metal-Free Vascular Access Mini-Port for Artifact Free Imaging and Repeated Injections in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Fiebig

    Full Text Available Small injection ports for mice are increasingly used for drug testing or when administering contrast agents. Commercially available mini-ports are expensive single-use items that cause imaging-artifacts. We developed and tested an artifact-free, low-cost, vascular access mini-port (VAMP for mice.Leakage testing of the VAMP was conducted with high speed bolus injections of different contrast agents. VAMP-induced artifacts were assessed using a micro-CT and a small animal MRI (9.4T scanner ex vivo. Repeated contrast administration was performed in vivo.With the VAMP there was no evidence of leakage with repeated punctures, high speed bolus contrast injections, and drawing of blood samples. In contrast to the tested commercially available ports, the VAMP did not cause artifacts with MRI or CT imaging.The VAMP is an alternative to commercially available mini-ports and has useful applications in animal research involving imaging procedures and contrast agent testing.

  5. Combined Electrocardiography- and Respiratory-Triggered CT of the Lung to Reduce Respiratory Misregistration Artifacts between Imaging Slabs in Free-Breathing Children: Initial Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Allmendinger, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Cardiac and respiratory motion artifacts degrade the image quality of lung CT in free-breathing children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of combined electrocardiography (ECG) and respiratory triggering on respiratory misregistration artifacts on lung CT in free-breathing children. In total, 15 children (median age 19 months, range 6 months-8 years; 7 boys), who underwent free-breathing ECG-triggered lung CT with and without respiratory-triggering were included. A pressure-sensing belt of a respiratory gating system was used to obtain the respiratory signal. The degree of respiratory misregistration artifacts between imaging slabs was graded on a 4-point scale (1, excellent image quality) on coronal and sagittal images and compared between ECG-triggered lung CT studies with and without respiratory triggering. A p value < 0.05 was considered significant. Lung CT with combined ECG and respiratory triggering showed significantly less respiratory misregistration artifacts than lung CT with ECG triggering only (1.1 ± 0.4 vs. 2.2 ± 1.0, p = 0.003). Additional respiratory-triggering reduces respiratory misregistration artifacts on ECG-triggered lung CT in free-breathing children.

  6. Removing speech artifacts from electroencephalographic recordings during overt picture naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Camillo; Medaglia, Maria Teresa; Krott, Andrea

    2015-01-15

    A number of electroencephalography (EEG) studies have investigated the time course of brain activation during overt word production. The interpretation of their results is complicated by the fact that articulatory movements may mask the cognitive components of interest. The first aim of the present study was to investigate when speech artifacts occur during word production planning and what effects they have on the spatio-temporal neural activation pattern. The second aim was to propose a new method that strongly attenuates speech artifacts during overt picture naming and to compare it with existing methods. EEG and surface electromyograms (EMGs) of the lips were recorded while participants overtly named pictures in a picture-word interference paradigm. The comparison of the raw data with lip EMG and the comparison of source localizations of raw and corrected EEG data showed that speech artifacts occurred mainly from ~400 ms post-stimulus onset, but some earlier artifacts mean that they occur much earlier than hitherto assumed. We compared previously used methods of speech artifacts removal (SAR) with a new method, which is based on Independent Component Analysis (SAR-ICA). Our new method clearly outperformed other methods. In contrast to other methods, there was only a weak correlation between the lip EMG and the corrected data by SAR-ICA. Also, only the data corrected with our method showed activation of cerebral sources consistent with meta-analyses of word production.

  7. Search for continuous gravitational waves: Improving robustness versus instrumental artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keitel, David; Prix, Reinhard; Papa, Maria Alessandra; Leaci, Paola; Siddiqi, Maham

    2014-03-01

    The standard multidetector F-statistic for continuous gravitational waves is susceptible to false alarms from instrumental artifacts, for example monochromatic sinusoidal disturbances ("lines"). This vulnerability to line artifacts arises because the F-statistic compares the signal hypothesis to a Gaussian-noise hypothesis, and hence is triggered by anything that resembles the signal hypothesis more than Gaussian noise. Various ad-hoc veto methods to deal with such line artifacts have been proposed and used in the past. Here we develop a Bayesian framework that includes an explicit alternative hypothesis to model disturbed data. We introduce a simple line model that defines lines as signal candidates appearing only in one detector. This allows us to explicitly compute the odds between the signal hypothesis and an extended noise hypothesis, resulting in a new detection statistic that is more robust to instrumental artifacts. We present and discuss results from Monte-Carlo tests on both simulated data and on detector data from the fifth LIGO science run. We find that the line-robust statistic retains the detection power of the standard F-statistic in Gaussian noise. In the presence of line artifacts it is more sensitive, even compared to the popular F-statistic consistency veto, over which it improves by as much as a factor of two in detectable signal strength.

  8. Metal artifact reduction in CT via ray profile correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), metal implants increase the inconsistencies between the measured data and the linear assumption made by the analytical CT reconstruction algorithm. The inconsistencies appear in the form of dark and bright bands and streaks in the reconstructed image, collectively called metal artifacts. The standard method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) replaces the inconsistent data with the interpolated data. However, sinogram interpolation not only introduces new artifacts but it also suffers from the loss of detail near the implanted metals. With the help of a prior image that is usually estimated from the metal artifact-degraded image via computer vision techniques, improvements are feasible but still no MAR method exists that is widely accepted and utilized. We propose a technique that utilizes a prior image from a CT scan taken of the patient before implanting the metal objects. Hence there is a sufficient amount of structural similarity to cover the loss of detail around the metal implants. Using the prior scan and a segmentation or model of the metal implant our method then replaces sinogram interpolation with ray profile matching and estimation which yields much more reliable data estimates for the affected sinogram regions. As preliminary work, we built a new MAR framework on fan-beam geometry and tested it to remove simulated metal artifacts on a thorax phantom. The comparison with two representative sinogram correction based MAR methods shows very promising results.

  9. Image Degradation in Microscopic Images: Avoidance, Artifacts, and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roels, Joris; Aelterman, Jan; De Vylder, Jonas; Lippens, Saskia; Luong, Hiêp Q; Guérin, Christopher J; Philips, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The goal of modern microscopy is to acquire high-quality image based data sets. A typical microscopy workflow is set up in order to address a specific biological question and involves different steps. The first step is to precisely define the biological question, in order to properly come to an experimental design for sample preparation and image acquisition. A better object representation allows biological users to draw more reliable scientific conclusions. Image restoration can manipulate the acquired data in an effort to reduce the impact of artifacts (spurious results) due to physical and technical limitations, resulting in a better representation of the object of interest. However, precise usage of these algorithms is necessary so as to avoid further artifacts that might influence the data analysis and bias the conclusions. It is essential to understand image acquisition, and how it introduces artifacts and degradations in the acquired data, so that their effects on subsequent analysis can be minimized. This paper provides an overview of the fundamental artifacts and degradations that affect many micrographs. We describe why artifacts appear, in what sense they impact overall image quality, and how to mitigate them by first improving the acquisition parameters and then applying proper image restoration techniques.

  10. Respiratory motion reduction in PET/CT using abdominal compression for lung cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzung-Chi Huang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Respiratory motion causes substantial artifacts in reconstructed PET images when using helical CT as the attenuation map in PET/CT imaging. In this study, we aimed to reduce the respiratory artifacts in PET/CT images of patients with lung tumors using an abdominal compression device. METHODS: Twelve patients with lung cancer located in the middle or lower lobe of the lung were recruited. The patients were injected with 370 MBq of 18F-FDG. During PET, the patients assumed two bed positions for 1.5 min/bed. After conducting free-breathing imaging, we obtained images of the patients with abdominal compression by applying the same setup used in the free-breathing scan. The differences in the standardized uptake value (SUVmax, SUVmean, tumor volume, and the centroid of the tumors between PET and various CT schemes were measured. RESULTS: The SUVmax and SUVmean derived from PET/CT imaging using an abdominal compression device increased for all the lesions, compared with those obtained using the conventional approach. The percentage increases were 18.1% ±14% and 17% ±16.8% for SUVmax and SUVmean, respectively. PET/CT imaging combined with abdominal compression generally reduced the tumor mismatch between CT and the corresponding attenuation corrected PET images, with an average decrease of 1.9±1.7 mm over all the cases. CONCLUSIONS: PET/CT imaging combined with abdominal compression reduces respiratory artifacts and PET/CT misregistration, and enhances quantitative SUV in tumor. Abdominal compression is easy to set up and is an effective method used in PET/CT imaging for clinical oncology, especially in the thoracic region.

  11. An efficient method to enhance the readability of historical handwritten artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Ramakant; Shekhawat, Pradeep Singh; Jangir, Ramesh; Saini, Sanjay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Historical handwritten letters, manuscripts, old books, paintings and similar artifacts are extremely valuable heritage and of historical importance. During a course of time these are subjected to various degradation factors which reduce their visual quality and degrade state. To preserve these for future generation their digitization is the best suitable method. Converting these into digital format will enhance their state in terms of visual quality. Using various image processing and analysis techniques their state and quality can be enhanced which will help us to restore them and preserve them and analyze them to explore valuable information of the past. This paper is based on combining different image processing techniques like de-noising the images and making them smoother, de-blurring the motion blur effects and reducing the intensity levels to reduce the memory consumption.

  12. Creation of 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model actual patient non-rigid body motion as determined from MRI and position tracking studies of volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, C. M.; Konik, A.; Dasari, P. K. R.; Segars, P.; Zheng, S.; Johnson, K. L.; Dey, J.; King, M. A.

    2011-03-01

    Patient motion can cause artifacts, which can lead to difficulty in interpretation. The purpose of this study is to create 3D digital anthropomorphic phantoms which model the location of the structures of the chest and upper abdomen of human volunteers undergoing a series of clinically relevant motions. The 3D anatomy is modeled using the XCAT phantom and based on MRI studies. The NURBS surfaces of the XCAT are interactively adapted to fit the MRI studies. A detailed XCAT phantom is first developed from an EKG triggered Navigator acquisition composed of sagittal slices with a 3 x 3 x 3 mm voxel dimension. Rigid body motion states are then acquired at breath-hold as sagittal slices partially covering the thorax, centered on the heart, with 9 mm gaps between them. For non-rigid body motion requiring greater sampling, modified Navigator sequences covering the entire thorax with 3 mm gaps between slices are obtained. The structures of the initial XCAT are then adapted to fit these different motion states. Simultaneous to MRI imaging the positions of multiple reflective markers on stretchy bands about the volunteer's chest and abdomen are optically tracked in 3D via stereo imaging. These phantoms with combined position tracking will be used to investigate both imaging-data-driven and motion-tracking strategies to estimate and correct for patient motion. Our initial application will be to cardiacperfusion SPECT imaging where the XCAT phantoms will be used to create patient activity and attenuation distributions for each volunteer with corresponding motion tracking data from the markers on the body-surface. Monte Carlo methods will then be used to simulate SPECT acquisitions, which will be used to evaluate various motion estimation and correction strategies.

  13. Correction of ring artifacts in X-ray tomographic images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyckegaard, Allan; Johnson, G.; Tafforeau, P.

    2011-01-01

    Ring artifacts are systematic intensity distortions located on concentric circles in reconstructed tomographic X-ray images. When using X-ray tomography to study for instance low-contrast grain boundaries in metals it is crucial to correct for the ring artifacts in the images as they may have...... the same intensity level as the grain boundaries and thus make it impossible to perform grain segmentation. This paper describes an implementation of a method for correcting the ring artifacts in tomographic X-ray images of simple objects such as metal samples where the object and the background...... are separable. The method is implemented in Matlab, it works with very little user interaction and may run in parallel on a cluster if applied to a whole stack of images. The strength and robustness of the method implemented will be demonstrated on three tomographic X-ray data sets: a mono-phase β...

  14. Medical image of the week: DBS polysomnogram artifact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shetty S,

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 79-year-old man with known Parkinson’s disease and status post deep brain stimulator (DBS implantation underwent an overnight polysomnogram for clinical suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea. Artifact was seen on the polysomnogram recording (Figures 1 & 2. Patient-related electrical artifacts may be seen from devices such as pacemakers, deep brain stimulators and vagal nerve simulators. Abrupt discontinuation of DBS is associated with a high likelihood of worsening of symptoms in patients with Parkinson’s disease (1. Patients with DBS are most commonly programmed in monopolar mode. Bipolar configuration, forms a short electrical dipole that affects a relatively smaller volume of tissue and generates far less artifact, suggesting that this may be an effective option in a Parkinsonian patient with indications for polysomnography (2.

  15. A patient-specific scatter artifacts correction method

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Wei; Niu, Kai; Schafer, Sebastian; Royalty, Kevin; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a fast and patient-specific scatter artifact correction method for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) used in image-guided interventional procedures. Due to increased irradiated volume of interest in CBCT imaging, scatter radiation has increased dramatically compared to 2D imaging, leading to a degradation of image quality. In this study, we propose a scatter artifact correction strategy using an analytical convolution-based model whose free parameters are estimated using a rough estimation of scatter profiles from the acquired cone-beam projections. It was evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations with both monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray sources. The results demonstrated that the proposed method significantly reduced the scatter-induced shading artifacts and recovered CT numbers.

  16. Evaporation in motion

    CERN Document Server

    Machrafi, Hatim; Colinet, Pierre; Dauby, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This work presents fluid dynamics videos obtained via numerical (CFD) calculations using ComSol (finite elements method) software, showing the evaporation of HFE7100 (3M company refrigerant) into a nitrogen gas flow along the liquid interface. The overall temperature evolution and liquid motion, which is caused by surface-tension (Marangoni) and buoyancy (Rayleigh) instability mechanisms, are shown as well. Flow behavior in the liquid caused by the aforementioned instability mechanisms can be nicely seen. Finally, these observations are made for three liquid thicknesses in order to appreciate the qualitative influence of confinement.

  17. EEG artifact removal—state-of-the-art and guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urigüen, Jose Antonio; Garcia-Zapirain, Begoña

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents an extensive review on the artifact removal algorithms used to remove the main sources of interference encountered in the electroencephalogram (EEG), specifically ocular, muscular and cardiac artifacts. We first introduce background knowledge on the characteristics of EEG activity, of the artifacts and of the EEG measurement model. Then, we present algorithms commonly employed in the literature and describe their key features. Lastly, principally on the basis of the results provided by various researchers, but also supported by our own experience, we compare the state-of-the-art methods in terms of reported performance, and provide guidelines on how to choose a suitable artifact removal algorithm for a given scenario. With this review we have concluded that, without prior knowledge of the recorded EEG signal or the contaminants, the safest approach is to correct the measured EEG using independent component analysis—to be precise, an algorithm based on second-order statistics such as second-order blind identification (SOBI). Other effective alternatives include extended information maximization (InfoMax) and an adaptive mixture of independent component analyzers (AMICA), based on higher order statistics. All of these algorithms have proved particularly effective with simulations and, more importantly, with data collected in controlled recording conditions. Moreover, whenever prior knowledge is available, then a constrained form of the chosen method should be used in order to incorporate such additional information. Finally, since which algorithm is the best performing is highly dependent on the type of the EEG signal, the artifacts and the signal to contaminant ratio, we believe that the optimal method for removing artifacts from the EEG consists in combining more than one algorithm to correct the signal using multiple processing stages, even though this is an option largely unexplored by researchers in the area.

  18. Markerless motion tracking of awake animals in positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyme, Andre; Se, Stephen; Meikle, Steven; Angelis, Georgios; Ryder, Will; Popovic, Kata; Yatigammana, Dylan; Fulton, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Noninvasive functional imaging of awake, unrestrained small animals using motion-compensation removes the need for anesthetics and enables an animal's behavioral response to stimuli or administered drugs to be studied concurrently with imaging. While the feasibility of motion-compensated radiotracer imaging of awake rodents using marker-based optical motion tracking has been shown, markerless motion tracking would avoid the risk of marker detachment, streamline the experimental workflow, and potentially provide more accurate pose estimates over a greater range of motion. We have developed a stereoscopic tracking system which relies on native features on the head to estimate motion. Features are detected and matched across multiple camera views to accumulate a database of head landmarks and pose is estimated based on 3D-2D registration of the landmarks to features in each image. Pose estimates of a taxidermal rat head phantom undergoing realistic rat head motion via robot control had a root mean square error of 0.15 and 1.8 mm using markerless and marker-based motion tracking, respectively. Markerless motion tracking also led to an appreciable reduction in motion artifacts in motion-compensated positron emission tomography imaging of a live, unanesthetized rat. The results suggest that further improvements in live subjects are likely if nonrigid features are discriminated robustly and excluded from the pose estimation process.

  19. Ring artifacts correction in compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Paleo, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel approach to handle ring artifacts correction in compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction. The correction is part of the reconstruction process, which differs from classical sinogram pre-processing and image post-processing techniques. The principle of compressed sensing tomographic reconstruction is presented. Then, we show that the ring artifacts correction can be integrated in the reconstruction problem formalism. We provide numerical results for both simulated and real data. This technique is included in the PyHST2 code which is used at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility for tomographic reconstruction.

  20. Resources, co-evolution and artifacts theory in CSCW

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Mark S; Erickson, Thomas; Kellogg, Wendy A

    2007-01-01

    A topic of significant interest to the CSCW, IT and IS communities is the issue of how software and other technical systems come to be adopted and used. We know from considerable research that people use systems in many ways, and that the process of incorporating them in their everyday activities can require a great deal of effort. One way of understanding adoption and use is by considering artifacts as resources in people's environments. ""Resources, Co-Evolution and Artifacts: Theory in CSCW"" looks at how resources get created, adopted, modified, and die, by using a number of theoretical an

  1. Inter-deriving Semantic Artifacts for Object-Oriented Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danvy, Olivier; Johannsen, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    We present a new abstract machine for Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects. What is special about this semantic artifact (i.e., man-made construct) is that is mechanically corresponds to both the reduction semantics (i.e., small-step operational semantics) and the natural semantics (i...... actual substitutions, we then represent object methods as closures and in the same inter-derivational spirit, we present three new semantic artifacts: a reduction semantics for a version of Abadi and Cardelli's untyped calculus of objects with explicit substitutions, an environment-based abstract machine...

  2. EEG Artifact Removal Using a Wavelet Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Anh T.; Musson, John; Li, Jiang; McKenzie, Frederick; Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Richey, Carl; Schnell, Tom

    2011-01-01

    !n this paper we developed a wavelet neural network. (WNN) algorithm for Electroencephalogram (EEG) artifact removal without electrooculographic (EOG) recordings. The algorithm combines the universal approximation characteristics of neural network and the time/frequency property of wavelet. We. compared the WNN algorithm with .the ICA technique ,and a wavelet thresholding method, which was realized by using the Stein's unbiased risk estimate (SURE) with an adaptive gradient-based optimal threshold. Experimental results on a driving test data set show that WNN can remove EEG artifacts effectively without diminishing useful EEG information even for very noisy data.

  3. Towards the Paperless Office : Ecology of artifacts at work

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Stepping one step closer to the paperless office by looking into existing technologies. Looking at the whole ecology of digital artifacts of users. Only by understanding how people use paper, how they relate to their digital ecology of artifacts, and what makes them adopt new products can we hope to get one step closer to the paperless office. There has been an extreme growth in mobile devices the last couple of year, and there have been a couple of new platforms emerging in the mobil...

  4. Mascara and eyelining tattoos: MRI artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, R A; Saint-Louis, L A; Haik, B G; McCord, C D; Taveras, J L

    1989-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is very useful in the evaluation of ocular and orbital disease. Heavy metal particles, used in the pigment base of mascara and eyelining tattoos, have a paramagnetic effect that causes alteration of the local magnetic field in adjacent tissues. These changes in normal signal result in distortion of the globes. In some cases, the distortion may mimic actual ocular disease such as a ciliary body melanoma or cyst.

  5. Dosimetric impact of image artifact from a wide-bore CT scanner in radiotherapy treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Vincent; Podgorsak, Matthew B.; Tran, Tuan-Anh; Malhotra, Harish K.; Wang, Iris Z. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York 14263 and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14214 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    average CT number changes of up to -49 HU. Wider distribution (i.e., standard deviation) of the HU values was seen when the phantom was placed at more than 2.8 cm beyond the 50 cm sFOV. Anthropomorphic phantom studies with several standard beam configurations show that body contour distortion causes tumor dose calculation reduction of 3.0 and 1.9% for 6 and 23 MV x-rays, respectively, when not accounting for tissue heterogeneities during dose computation. When heterogeneity correction is used in planning, the competing effects of the body contour distortion and the CT number distortion cause a smaller error in tumor dose calculation. Less than 0.9% error in calculated dose was observed in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans. Conclusions: The image artifacts from eFOV reconstruction alter the CT numbers and body contours of the imaged objects, which has the potential to produce inaccuracies in dose calculations during radiotherapy treatment planning. The radiation therapy team should be aware of these image artifacts and their effects on target dose calculations during CT simulation as well as treatment planning.

  6. Review of Metal Artifacts Correction Methods on X-ray Computed Tomography%X-CT金属伪影校正方法综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李庆亮; 闫镔; 孙红胜; 李磊; 张峰

    2011-01-01

    X-CT成像系统中,当被检测物体中含有金属等高密度物质时,对投影数据重建后,重建图像中将出现放射状伪影或带状伪影.这些伪影严重影响了图像的质量,给人们的判断带来极大困难.金属伪影的校正已成为CT技术中的研究难点和热点.本文阐述了金属伪影产生的原因,就近些年出现的金属伪影校正方法进行归纳总结,并对金属伪影校正方法研究的前景进行讨论.%In the system of CT imaging, for the objects with high density metal, CT images reconstructed by the standard filtered-back-projection (FBP) algorithm generate significant streak artifacts. These artifacts seriously influence image quality and bring huge difficulties for judgment. Correction method of metal artifacts has become the hot and difficult issue of CT technique. The paper formulates the cause of metal artifacts, and sums up the correction methods of metal artifacts developed this year, at last, discusses the investigative foreground of correction methods of metal artifacts.

  7. Intravascular optical coherence tomography light scattering artifacts: merry-go-rounding, blooming, and ghost struts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, J. Jacob; Halaney, David L.; Elahi, Sahar; Ho, Derek; Wang, Tianyi; Ouyang, Yongjian; Dijkstra, Jouke; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2014-12-01

    We sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying two common intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) artifacts that occur when imaging metallic stents: "merry-go-rounding" (MGR), which is an increase in strut arc length (SAL), and "blooming," which is an increase in the strut reflection thickness (blooming thickness). Due to uncontrollable variables that occur in vivo, we performed an in vitro assessment of MGR and blooming in stented vessel phantoms. Using Xience V and Driver stents, we examined the effects of catheter offset, intimal strut coverage, and residual blood on SAL and blooming thickness in IV-OCT images. Catheter offset and strut coverage both caused minor MGR, while the greatest MGR effect resulted from light scattering by residual blood in the vessel lumen, with 1% hematocrit (Hct) causing a more than fourfold increase in SAL compared with saline (pResidual blood also resulted in blooming, with blooming thickness more than doubling when imaged in 0.5% Hct compared with saline (presidual blood in the imaging field, is the predominant cause of MGR. Light scattering also results in blooming, and a newly described artifact, three-dimensional-MGR, which results in "ghost struts" in B-scans.

  8. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatebe, Ken, E-mail: Ken.Tatebe@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Ramsay, Elizabeth; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Mougenot, Charles [Philips Healthcare, 281 Hillmount Road, Markham, Ontario L6C 2S3 (Canada); Bronskill, Michael [Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada); Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N3M5 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G2M9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. Methods: The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Results: Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Conclusions: Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device

  9. Influence of geometric and material properties on artifacts generated by interventional MRI devices: Relevance to PRF-shift thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebe, Ken; Ramsay, Elizabeth; Mougenot, Charles; Kazem, Mohammad; Peikari, Hamed; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is capable of providing valuable real-time feedback during medical procedures, partly due to the excellent soft-tissue contrast available. Several technical hurdles still exist to seamless integration of medical devices with MRI due to incompatibility of most conventional devices with this imaging modality. In this study, the effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field caused by the magnetization of medical devices was examined using finite element analysis modeling. As an example, the influence of the geometric and material characteristics of a transurethral high-intensity ultrasound applicator on temperature measurements using proton resonance frequency (PRF)-shift thermometry was investigated. The effect of local perturbations in the magnetic field, caused by the magnetization of medical device components, was examined using finite element analysis modeling. The thermometry artifact generated by a transurethral ultrasound applicator was simulated, and these results were validated against analytic models and scans of an applicator in a phantom. Several parameters were then varied to identify which most strongly impacted the level of simulated thermometry artifact, which varies as the applicator moves over the course of an ablative high-intensity ultrasound treatment. Key design parameters identified as having a strong influence on the magnitude of thermometry artifact included the susceptibility of materials and their volume. The location of components was also important, particularly when positioned to maximize symmetry of the device. Finally, the location of component edges and the inclination of the device relative to the magnetic field were also found to be important factors. Previous design strategies to minimize thermometry artifact were validated, and novel design strategies were identified that substantially reduce PRF-shift thermometry artifacts for a variety of device orientations. These new strategies are being

  10. Image-based compensation for involuntary motion in weight-bearing C-arm cone-beam CT scanning of knees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unberath, Mathias; Choi, Jang-Hwan; Berger, Martin; Maier, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-03-01

    We previously introduced four fiducial marker-based strategies to compensate for involuntary knee-joint motion during weight-bearing C-arm CT scanning of the lower body. 2D methods showed significant reduction of motion- related artifacts, but 3D methods worked best. However, previous methods led to increased examination times and patient discomfort caused by the marker attachment process. Moreover, sub-optimal marker placement may lead to decreased marker detectability and therefore unstable motion estimates. In order to reduce overall patient discomfort, we developed a new image-based 2D projection shifting method. A C-arm cone-beam CT system was used to acquire projection images of five healthy volunteers at various flexion angles. Projection matrices for the horizontal scanning trajectory were calibrated using the Siemens standard PDS-2 phantom. The initial reconstruction was forward projected using maximum-intensity projections (MIP), yielding an estimate of a static scan. This estimate was then used to obtain the 2D projection shifts via registration. For the scan with the most motion, the proposed method reproduced the marker-based results with a mean error of 2.90 mm +/- 1.43 mm (compared to a mean error of 4.10 mm +/- 3.03 mm in the uncorrected case). Bone contour surrounding modeling clay layer was improved. The proposed method is a first step towards automatic image-based, marker-free motion-compensation.

  11. Anti-scatter grid artifact elimination for high resolution x-ray imaging CMOS detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, R.; Singh, V.; Jain, A.; Bednarek, D. R.; Rudin, S.

    2015-03-01

    Higher resolution in dynamic radiological imaging such as angiography is increasingly being demanded by clinicians; however, when standard anti-scatter grids are used with such new high resolution detectors, grid-line artifacts become more apparent resulting in increased structured noise that may overcome the contrast signal improvement benefits of the scatter-reducing grid. Although grid-lines may in theory be eliminated by dividing the image of a patient taken with the grid by a flat-field image taken with the grid obtained prior to the clinical image, unless the remaining additive scatter contribution is subtracted in real-time from the dynamic clinical image sequence before the division by the reference image, severe grid-line artifacts may remain. To investigate grid-line elimination, a stationary Smit Röntgen X-ray grid (line density: 70 lines/cm, grid ratio 13:1) was used with both a 75 micron-pixel CMOS detector and a standard 194 micron-pixel flat panel detector (FPD) to image an artery block insert placed in a modified uniform frontal head phantom for a 20 x 20cm FOV (approximately). Contrast and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured with and without scatter subtraction prior to grid-line correction. The fixed pattern noise caused by the grid was substantially higher for the CMOS detector compared to the FPD and caused a severe reduction of CNR. However, when the scatter subtraction corrective method was used, the removal of the fixed pattern noise (grid artifacts) became evident resulting in images with improved CNR.

  12. Motion Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  13. Communication in the Digital City and Artifact Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryssanov, Victor V.; Okabe, Masayuki; Kakusho, Koh; Minoh, Michihiko

    This paper proposes a theoretical basis for the design and analysis of distributed information systems. A quantitative criterion is defined to estimate the efficiency of computer-mediated communication, and to monitor artifact lives as well. The theoretical concepts are discussed in a context of an example related to car use and servicing.

  14. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  15. Tracing the Paths of Moving Artifacts in Youth Media Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Damiana

    2010-01-01

    Using a theoretical grounding in social semiotics, chronotopes, and social spaces with youth, I will discuss how identities are made possible and expressed in the interplay between the different parts of the youth video production process as youth artifacts as they move through time and space. The majority of my data is what I have come to term…

  16. Science Teachers Sharing Artifacts from Practice like Students’ Tablet Productions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2013-01-01

    to support the success of integrating technology. Experiences from a large-scale, long-term TPD project for primary and secondary science teachers supporting the teachers in trying out innovative practices and new ICT tools in own classes, and in sharing artifacts from these trials in teacher networks...

  17. Determination of the temperature artifact during ultrasound hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, F M

    1990-01-01

    Temperature artifacts produced by very small uncoated thermocouples during ultrasonic heating are evaluated by backward extrapolation of the linear portion of the temperature rise curve or by backward extrapolation of the exponential portion of the temperature decay curve. The accuracy of these techniques for larger clinically used thermocouples is investigated by use of a two-dimensional model of the bioheat equation which simulates the transfer of heat radially from a probe 1 mm in diameter. The accuracy of these techniques is found to depend upon the perfusion rate. In the absence of perfusion, both extrapolation techniques underestimate the artifact by nearly 40%. Extrapolation of the temperature rise curve is very sensitive to the perfusion rate and this technique results in errors exceeding 100% when the perfusion rate is high. Extrapolation of the temperature decay curve produces more consistent results. Over a blood flow range of 0-100 ml/100 g per min, the artifact is underestimated by an amount that varies from approximately 40% to 30% respectively. Thus, the artifact can be determined to within 5% by this technique by increasing the extrapolated value by 35%.

  18. Classification of independent components of EEG into multiple artifact classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Laura; Andersen, Tobias; Mørup, Morten

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aim to automatically identify multiple artifact types in EEG. We used multinomial regression to classify independent components of EEG data, selecting from 65 spatial, spectral, and temporal features of independent components using forward selection. The classifier identified...

  19. Ballistocardiogram artifacts in simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderperren, K.; Ramautar, J.R.; Novitskiy, N.; de Vos, M.; Mennes, M.; Vanrumste, B.; Stiers, P.; van den Bergh, B.; Wagemans, J.; Lagae, L.; Sunaert, S.; Van Huffel, S.

    2007-01-01

    Vanderperren, K., Ramautar, J., Novitskiy, N., De Vos, M., Mennes, M., Vanrumste, B., Stiers, P., Van den Bergh, B., Wagemans, J., Lagae, L., Sunaert, S., Van Huffel, S. (2007). Ballistocardiogram artifacts in simultaneous EEG-fMRI acquisitions. International Journal of Bioelectromagnetism, 9 (3), 1

  20. 77 FR 40914 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-11

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: Pursuant to section 10(a)(2) of...

  1. 77 FR 64146 - Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Arts and Artifacts Indemnity Panel Advisory Committee AGENCY: Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, National Endowment for the Humanities. ACTION: Notice of meeting... hereby given that the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities will hold a meeting of the Arts...

  2. Artifact suppression and analysis of brain activities with electroencephalography signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Md. Rashed-Al-Mahfuz; Md. Rabiul Islam; Keikichi Hirose; Md. Khademul Islam Molla

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface is a communication system that connects the brain with computer (or other devices) but is not dependent on the normal output of the brain (i.e., peripheral nerve and muscle). Electro-oculogram is a dominant artifact which has a significant negative influence on further analysis of real electroencephalography data. This paper presented a data adaptive technique for artifact suppression and brain wave extraction from electroencephalography signals to detect regional brain activities. Empirical mode decomposition based adaptive thresholding approach was employed here to suppress the electro-oculogram artifact. Fractional Gaussian noise was used to determine the threshold level derived from the analysis data without any training. The purified electroencephalography signal was composed of the brain waves also called rhythmic components which represent the brain activities. The rhythmic components were extracted from each electroencephalography channel using adaptive wiener filter with the original scale. The regional brain activities were mapped on the basis of the spatial distribution of rhythmic components, and the results showed that different regions of the brain are activated in response to different stimuli. This research analyzed the activities of a single rhythmic component, alpha with respect to different motor imaginations. The experimental results showed that the proposed method is very efficient in artifact suppression and identifying individual motor imagery based on the activities of alpha component.

  3. Design of educational artifacts as support to learning process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Adson Eduardo; Vasconcelos, Flávio Henrique

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify utilization schemes developed by students and teachers in their interaction with educational workstations in the electronic measurement and instrumentation laboratory at the Department of Electrical Engineering in the Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Brazil. After that, these schemes were used to design a new workstation. For this, it was important to bear in mind that the mentioned artifacts contain two key characteristics: (1) one from the designers themselves, resulting from their experience and their technical knowledge of what they are designing and (2) the experience from users and the means through which they take advantage of and develop these artifacts, in turn rendering them appropriate to perform the proposed task - the utilization schemes developed in the process of mediation between the user and the artifact. The satisfactory fusion of these two points makes these artifacts a functional unit - the instruments. This research aims to demonstrate that identifying the utilization schemes by taking advantage of user experience and incorporating this within the design, facilitates its appropriation and, consequently, its efficiency as an instrument of learning.

  4. Is the New Item Priority Effect an Experimental Artifact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Thomas

    This research was directed at determining whether the new item priority (NIP) effect in free recall was a result of an experimental artifact produced by the joint action of the serial position effect and the randomization of items over trials, or a consequence of a strategy of recalling newer items before older ones. In the experiment, subjects…

  5. Artifacts as Stories: Understanding Families, Digital Literacies, and Storied Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha

    2016-01-01

    This column focuses on the interactions during family and group conversation circles that not only helped participants talk about personal, emotional, and social issues in their digital stories but also helped them make sense of artifacts and the meanings that stories carry in shared spaces and practices. This work adds to the bourgeoning…

  6. Investigating 3d Reconstruction Methods for Small Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evgenikou, V.; Georgopoulos, A.

    2015-02-01

    Small artifacts have always been a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling. They usually present severe difficulties for their 3D reconstruction. Lately, the demand for the production of 3D models of small artifacts, especially in the cultural heritage domain, has dramatically increased. As with many cases, there are no specifications and standards for this task. This paper investigates the efficiency of several mainly low cost methods for 3D model production of such small artifacts. Moreover, the material, the color and the surface complexity of these objects id also investigated. Both image based and laser scanning methods have been considered as alternative data acquisition methods. The evaluation has been confined to the 3D meshes, as texture depends on the imaging properties, which are not investigated in this project. The resulting meshes have been compared to each other for their completeness, and accuracy. It is hoped that the outcomes of this investigation will be useful to researchers who are planning to embark into mass production of 3D models of small artifacts.

  7. INVESTIGATING 3D RECONSTRUCTION METHODS FOR SMALL ARTIFACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Evgenikou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small artifacts have always been a real challenge when it comes to 3D modelling. They usually present severe difficulties for their 3D reconstruction. Lately, the demand for the production of 3D models of small artifacts, especially in the cultural heritage domain, has dramatically increased. As with many cases, there are no specifications and standards for this task. This paper investigates the efficiency of several mainly low cost methods for 3D model production of such small artifacts. Moreover, the material, the color and the surface complexity of these objects id also investigated. Both image based and laser scanning methods have been considered as alternative data acquisition methods. The evaluation has been confined to the 3D meshes, as texture depends on the imaging properties, which are not investigated in this project. The resulting meshes have been compared to each other for their completeness, and accuracy. It is hoped that the outcomes of this investigation will be useful to researchers who are planning to embark into mass production of 3D models of small artifacts.

  8. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwencke, M.; Smolders, L.A.; Bergknut, N.; Gustas, P.; Meij, B.P.; Hazewinkel, H.A.W.

    2012-01-01

    Vet Surg. 2012 Oct;41(7):829-37. doi: 10.1111/j.1532-950X.2012.01021.x. Soft tissue artifact in canine kinematic gait analysis. Schwencke M, Smolders LA, Bergknut N, Gustås P, Meij BP, Hazewinkel HA. Source Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals,, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrech

  9. Coevolution of variability models and related software artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos, Leonardo; Teixeira, Leopoldo; Dinztner, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    models coevolve with other artifact types, we study a large and complex real-world variant-rich software system: the Linux kernel. Specifically, we extract variability-coevolution patterns capturing changes in the variability model of the Linux kernel with subsequent changes in Makefiles and C source...

  10. Artifacts as Theories: Convergence through User-Centered Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Andrew

    1995-01-01

    Discussion of information system design proposes the artifact as theory perspective and suggests that information system design is best tackled by user-centered theories and methods. Topics include the software development process, human-computer interaction, and implications for information science. (LRW)

  11. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  12. Range Condition and ML-EM Checkerboard Artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jiangsheng; Wang, Jing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2007-10-01

    The expectation maximization (EM) algorithm for the maximum likelihood (ML) image reconstruction criterion generates severe checkerboard artifacts in the presence of noise. A classical remedy is to impose an a priori constraint for a penalized ML or maximum a posteriori probability solution. The penalty reduces the checkerboard artifacts and also introduces uncertainty because a priori information is usually unknown in clinic. Recent theoretical investigation reveals that the noise can be divided into two components: one is called null-space noise and the other is range-space noise. The null-space noise can be numerically estimated using filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm. By the FBP algorithm, the null-space noise annihilates in the reconstruction while the range-space noise propagates into the reconstructed image. The aim of this work is to investigate the relation between the null-space noise and the checkerboard artifacts in the ML-EM reconstruction from noisy projection data. Our study suggests that removing the null-space noise from the projection data could improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the projection data and, therefore, reduce the checkerboard artifacts in the ML-EM reconstructed images. This study reveals an in-depth understanding of the different noise propagations in analytical and iterative image reconstructions, which may be useful to single photon emission computed tomography, where the noise has been a major factor for image degradation. The reduction of the ML-EM checkerboard artifacts by removing the null-space noise avoids the uncertainty of using a priori penalty.