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Sample records for morphologically distinct species

  1. Genome-wide SNP data and morphology support the distinction of two new species of Kovarikia Soleglad, Fet & Graham, 2014 endemic to California (Scorpiones, Vaejovidae

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    Robert W. Bryson Jr.

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Morphologically conserved taxa such as scorpions represent a challenge to delimit. We recently discovered populations of scorpions in the genus Kovarikia Soleglad, Fet & Graham, 2014 on two isolated mountain ranges in southern California. We generated genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data and used Bayes factors species delimitation to compare alternative species delimitation scenarios which variously placed scorpions from the two localities with geographically adjacent species or into separate lineages. We also estimated a time-calibrated phylogeny of Kovarikia and examined and compared the morphology of preserved specimens from across its distribution. Genetic results strongly support the distinction of two new lineages, which we describe and name here. Morphology among the species of Kovarikia was relatively conserved, despite deep genetic divergences, consistent with recent studies of stenotopic scorpions with limited vagility. Phylogeographic structure discovered in several previously described species also suggests additional cryptic species are probably present in the genus.

  2. Genome-wide SNP data and morphology support the distinction of two new species of Kovarikia Soleglad, Fet & Graham, 2014 endemic to California (Scorpiones, Vaejovidae)

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    Bryson, Robert W.; Wood, Dustin A.; Graham, Matthew R.; Soleglad, Michael E.; McCormack, John E.

    2018-01-01

    Morphologically conserved taxa such as scorpions represent a challenge to delimit. We recently discovered populations of scorpions in the genus Kovarikia Soleglad, Fet & Graham, 2014 on two isolated mountain ranges in southern California. We generated genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism data and used Bayes factors species delimitation to compare alternative species delimitation scenarios which variously placed scorpions from the two localities with geographically adjacent species or into separate lineages. We also estimated a time-calibrated phylogeny of Kovarikia and examined and compared the morphology of preserved specimens from across its distribution. Genetic results strongly support the distinction of two new lineages, which we describe and name here. Morphology among the species of Kovarikia was relatively conserved, despite deep genetic divergences, consistent with recent studies of stenotopic scorpions with limited vagility. Phylogeographic structure discovered in several previously described species also suggests additional cryptic species are probably present in the genus.

  3. Possible natural hybridization of two morphologically distinct species of Acropora (Cnidaria, Scleractinia in the Pacific: fertilization and larval survival rates.

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    Naoko Isomura

    Full Text Available Natural hybridization of corals in the Indo-Pacific has been considered rather rare. However, field studies have observed many corals with intermediate interspecific or unusual morphologies. Given that the existence of F1 hybrids with intermediate interspecific morphologies has been proven in the Caribbean, hybrids may also inhabit the Indo-Pacific and occur more frequently than expected. In this study, we focused on two morphologically different species, Acropora florida and A. intermedia, and performed crossing experiments at Akajima Island, Japan. Results showed that these species could hybridize in both directions via eggs and sperm, but that fertilization rates significantly differed according to which species provided eggs. These results are similar to those reported from the Caribbean. Although all embryos developed normally to the planular larval stage, the developmental processes of some hybrid embryos were delayed by approximately 1 h compared with conspecific embryos, suggesting that fertilization occurred 1 h later in interspecific crosses than in intraspecific crosses. More successful hybridization could occur under conditions with low numbers of conspecific colonies. Additionally, a comparison of survival rates between hybrid and intraspecific larvae revealed that intra- and interspecific larvae produced from eggs of A. florida survived for significantly longer than those produced from eggs of A. intermedia. Considering these data, under specific conditions, hybrids can be expected to be produced and survive in nature in the Pacific. Furthermore, we identified one colony with intermediate morphology between A. florida and A. intermedia in the field. This colony was fertilized only by eggs of A. florida, with high fertilization rates, suggesting that this colony would be a hybrid of these two species and might be backcrossed.

  4. A non-toxigenic but morphologically and phylogenetically distinct new species of Pseudo-nitzschia, P. sabit sp. nov. (Bacillariophyceae).

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    Teng, Sing Tung; Lim, Po Teen; Lim, Hong Chang; Rivera-Vilarelle, María; Quijano-Scheggia, Sonia; Takata, Yoshinobu; Quilliam, Michael A; Wolf, Matthias; Bates, Stephen S; Leaw, Chui Pin

    2015-08-01

    A new species of Pseudo-nitzschia (Bacillariophyceae) is described from plankton samples collected from Port Dickson (Malacca Strait, Malaysia) and Manzanillo Bay (Colima, Mexico). The species possesses a distinctive falcate cell valve, from which they form sickle-like colonies in both environmental samples and cultured strains. Detailed observation of frustules under TEM revealed ultrastructure that closely resembles P. decipiens, yet the new species differs by the valve shape and greater ranges of striae and poroid densities. The species is readily distinguished from the curve-shaped P. subcurvata by the presence of a central interspace. The morphological distinction is further supported by phylogenetic discrimination. We sequenced and analyzed the nuclear ribosomal RNA genes in the LSU and the second internal transcribed spacer, including its secondary structure, to infer the phylogenetic relationship of the new species with its closest relatives. The results revealed a distinct lineage of the new species, forming a sister cluster with its related species, P. decipiens and P. galaxiae, but not with P. subcurvata. We examined the domoic acid (DA) production of five cultured strains from Malaysia by Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), but they showed no detectable DA. Here, we present the taxonomic description of the vegetative cells, document the sexual reproduction, and detail the molecular phylogenetics of Pseudo-nitzschia sabit sp. nov. © 2015 Phycological Society of America.

  5. Morphological and Molecular Data Reveal Three Distinct Populations of Indian Wild Rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. Species Complex.

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    Singh, Balwant; Singh, Nisha; Mishra, Shefali; Tripathi, Kabita; Singh, Bikram P; Rai, Vandna; Singh, Ashok K; Singh, Nagendra K

    2018-01-01

    Wild relatives of crops possess adaptive mutations for agronomically important traits, which could play significant role in crop improvement for sustainable agriculture. However, global climate change and human activities pose serious threats to the natural habitats leading to erosion of genetic diversity of wild rice populations. The purpose of this study was to explore and characterize India's huge untapped wild rice diversity in Oryza rufipogon Griff. species complex from a wide range of ecological niches. We made strategic expeditions around diversity hot spots in 64 districts of nine different agro-climatic zones of the country and collected 418 wild rice accessions. Significant variation was observed among the accessions for 46 morphological descriptors, allowing classification into O. nivara, O. rufipogon , and O. sativa f. spontanea morpho-taxonomic groups. Genome-specific pSINE1 markers confirmed all the accessions having AA genome, which were further classified using ecotype-specific pSINE1 markers into annual, perennial, intermediate, and an unknown type. Principal component analysis revealed continuous variation for the morphological traits in each ecotype group. Genetic diversity analysis based on multi-allelic SSR markers clustered these accessions into three major groups and analysis of molecular variance for nine agro-climatic zones showed that 68% of the genetic variation was inherent amongst individuals while only 11% of the variation separated the zones, though there was significant correlation between genetic and spatial distances of the accessions. Model based population structure analysis using genome wide bi-allelic SNP markers revealed three sub-populations designated 'Pro-Indica,' 'Pro-Aus,' and 'Mid-Gangetic,' which showed poor correspondence with the morpho - taxonomic classification or pSINE1 ecotypes. There was Pan-India distribution of the 'Pro-Indica' and 'Pro-Aus' sub-populations across agro-climatic zones, indicating a more

  6. Morphological and Molecular Data Reveal Three Distinct Populations of Indian Wild Rice Oryza rufipogon Griff. Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balwant; Singh, Nisha; Mishra, Shefali; Tripathi, Kabita; Singh, Bikram P.; Rai, Vandna; Singh, Ashok K.; Singh, Nagendra K.

    2018-01-01

    Wild relatives of crops possess adaptive mutations for agronomically important traits, which could play significant role in crop improvement for sustainable agriculture. However, global climate change and human activities pose serious threats to the natural habitats leading to erosion of genetic diversity of wild rice populations. The purpose of this study was to explore and characterize India’s huge untapped wild rice diversity in Oryza rufipogon Griff. species complex from a wide range of ecological niches. We made strategic expeditions around diversity hot spots in 64 districts of nine different agro-climatic zones of the country and collected 418 wild rice accessions. Significant variation was observed among the accessions for 46 morphological descriptors, allowing classification into O. nivara, O. rufipogon, and O. sativa f. spontanea morpho-taxonomic groups. Genome-specific pSINE1 markers confirmed all the accessions having AA genome, which were further classified using ecotype-specific pSINE1 markers into annual, perennial, intermediate, and an unknown type. Principal component analysis revealed continuous variation for the morphological traits in each ecotype group. Genetic diversity analysis based on multi-allelic SSR markers clustered these accessions into three major groups and analysis of molecular variance for nine agro-climatic zones showed that 68% of the genetic variation was inherent amongst individuals while only 11% of the variation separated the zones, though there was significant correlation between genetic and spatial distances of the accessions. Model based population structure analysis using genome wide bi-allelic SNP markers revealed three sub-populations designated ‘Pro-Indica,’ ‘Pro-Aus,’ and ‘Mid-Gangetic,’ which showed poor correspondence with the morpho-taxonomic classification or pSINE1 ecotypes. There was Pan-India distribution of the ‘Pro-Indica’ and ‘Pro-Aus’ sub-populations across agro-climatic zones

  7. Low genetic differentiation among morphologically distinct ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Labeobarbus altianalis and L. bynni bynni are hexaploid cyprinid fishes in the genus Labeobarbus. In the Great Lakes region of Africa, these two large-bodied barbs exhibit considerable morphological variations. Their intraspecific classification, currently based on geographical distribution and morphological variation, is of ...

  8. Distinct termination morphologies for vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinten, P; Marshall, P; Lefebvre, J; Finnie, P

    2010-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube forests, including single-walled nanotubes, are imaged optically as they grow in situ from cobalt/alumina catalyst using water-assisted acetylene chemical vapor deposition. Three distinct termination morphologies are identified and investigated optically and via scanning electron microscopy. Quantitative growth dynamics are extracted and show gradual deceleration and sudden termination of growth. The termination morphology is discussed in terms of the balance of forces within the forest. We speculate that sudden termination is a collective effect arising from an imbalance in these forces.

  9. Morphological distinctiveness of Javan Tupaia hypochrysa (Scandentia, Tupaiidae)

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    Sargis, Eric J.; Woodman, Neal; Morningstar, Natalie C.; Reese, Aspen T.; Olson, Link E.

    2013-01-01

    The common treeshrew, Tupaia glis, represents a species complex with a complicated taxonomic history. It is distributed mostly south of the Isthmus of Kra on the Malay Peninsula and surrounding islands. In our recent revision of a portion of this species complex, we did not fully assess the population from Java (T. “glis” hypochrysa) because of our limited sample. Herein, we revisit this taxon using multivariate analyses in comparisons with T. glis, T. chrysogaster of the Mentawai Islands, and T. ferruginea from Sumatra. Analyses of both the manus and skull of Javan T. “glis” hypochrysa show it to be most similar to T. chrysogaster and distinct from both T. glis and T. ferruginea. Yet, the Javan population and T. chrysogaster have different mammae counts, supporting recognition of T. hypochrysa as a distinct species. The change in taxonomic status of T. hypochrysa has conservation implications for both T. glis and this Javan endemic.

  10. Molecular evidence for species-level distinctions in clouded leopards.

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    Buckley-Beason, Valerie A; Johnson, Warren E; Nash, Willliam G; Stanyon, Roscoe; Menninger, Joan C; Driscoll, Carlos A; Howard, JoGayle; Bush, Mitch; Page, John E; Roelke, Melody E; Stone, Gary; Martelli, Paolo P; Wen, Ci; Ling, Lin; Duraisingam, Ratna K; Lam, Phan V; O'Brien, Stephen J

    2006-12-05

    Among the 37 living species of Felidae, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is generally classified as a monotypic genus basal to the Panthera lineage of great cats. This secretive, mid-sized (16-23 kg) carnivore, now severely endangered, is traditionally subdivided into four southeast Asian subspecies (Figure 1A). We used molecular genetic methods to re-evaluate subspecies partitions and to quantify patterns of population genetic variation among 109 clouded leopards of known geographic origin (Figure 1A, Tables S1 ans S2 in the Supplemental Data available online). We found strong phylogeographic monophyly and large genetic distances between N. n. nebulosa (mainland) and N. n. diardi (Borneo; n = 3 individuals) with mtDNA (771 bp), nuclear DNA (3100 bp), and 51 microsatellite loci. Thirty-six fixed mitochondrial and nuclear nucleotide differences and 20 microsatellite loci with nonoverlapping allele-size ranges distinguished N. n. nebulosa from N. n. diardi. Along with fixed subspecies-specific chromosomal differences, this degree of differentiation is equivalent to, or greater than, comparable measures among five recognized Panthera species (lion, tiger, leopard, jaguar, and snow leopard). These distinctions increase the urgency of clouded leopard conservation efforts, and if affirmed by morphological analysis and wider sampling of N. n. diardi in Borneo and Sumatra, would support reclassification of N. n. diardi as a new species (Neofelis diardi).

  11. The resurrection of a species: Sarcocystis bovifelis Heydorn et al., 1975 is distinct from the current Sarcocystis hirsuta in cattle and morphologically indistinguishable from Sarcocystis sinensis in water buffaloes.

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    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    should again be used not only for the species originally described from cattle in Germany but also for morphologically indistinguishable taxa recently reported from cattle under the names S. sinensis and S. rommeli. Because of the morphological similarity between S. bovifelis and S. sinensis, it is likely that cats also act as definitive hosts for S. sinensis. The present paper also gives a thorough review of all research in the 1970s pertaining to S. bovifelis, including its development in cats and cattle; a review of reports of S. bovifelis-like sarcocysts in cattle, water buffaloes and other hosts; and a review of reports of the taxon currently named S. hirsuta in cattle. The usage of the name S. sinensis versus Sarcocystis dubeyi for the S. bovifelis-like taxon in water buffaloes is discussed, and the latter name is found to represent a nomen dubium since the original description concerned a mixture of a S. sinensis- and a Sarcocystis hominis-like species. Based on available transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the three-dimensional configuration of the cyst wall protrusions of S. bovifelis/S. sinensis and the current S. hirsuta has been inferred and is described. The protrusions of S. bovifelis/S. sinensis are shaped like soft plastic tubes, having a cylindrical basal portion and a flattened distal portion, making them prone to fold over. The protrusions of the current S. hirsuta are thin, flattened and flexible rectangular structures (like a soft cover note book), which are attached to the cyst surface with a narrow stalk. The appearance of both types of protrusions in ultrathin sections viewed by TEM is highly dependent on how the sarcocysts and the protrusions themselves have been sectioned.

  12. Discordance between morphological and molecular species boundaries among Caribbean species of the reef sponge Callyspongia.

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    DeBiasse, Melissa B; Hellberg, Michael E

    2015-02-01

    Sponges are among the most species-rich and ecologically important taxa on coral reefs, yet documenting their diversity is difficult due to the simplicity and plasticity of their morphological characters. Genetic attempts to identify species are hampered by the slow rate of mitochondrial sequence evolution characteristic of sponges and some other basal metazoans. Here we determine species boundaries of the Caribbean coral reef sponge genus Callyspongia using a multilocus, model-based approach. Based on sequence data from one mitochondrial (COI), one ribosomal (28S), and two single-copy nuclear protein-coding genes, we found evolutionarily distinct lineages were not concordant with current species designations in Callyspongia. While C. fallax,C. tenerrima, and C. plicifera were reciprocally monophyletic, four taxa with different morphologies (C. armigera,C. longissima,C. eschrichtii, and C. vaginalis) formed a monophyletic group and genetic distances among these taxa overlapped distances within them. A model-based method of species delimitation supported collapsing these four into a single evolutionary lineage. Variation in spicule size among these four taxa was partitioned geographically, not by current species designations, indicating that in Callyspongia, these key taxonomic characters are poor indicators of genetic differentiation. Taken together, our results suggest a complex relationship between morphology and species boundaries in sponges.

  13. Evidence for ontogenetically and morphologically distinct alternative reproductive tactics in the invasive Round Goby Neogobius melanostomus.

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    Bleeker, Katinka; de Jong, Karen; van Kessel, Nils; Hinde, Camilla A; Nagelkerke, Leopold A J

    2017-01-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics are characterized by the occurrence of discrete alternative morphs that differ in behavioural, morphological and physiological traits within the same sex. Although much effort has been made to describe the behaviour, morphology and physiology of such alternative morphs, less effort has been invested investigating how much overlap there is in the characteristics of such morphs in natural populations. We studied random population samples of the invasive Round Goby Neogobius melanostomus from five different localities in the river Rhine system in the Netherlands. We found two morphologically and physiologically distinct male morphs which likely represent alternative reproductive tactics. Almost all mature males under 9.35 cm total length had a gonadosomatic index > 3%, suggestive of a sneaker tactic, while nearly all males above 9.35 cm has a gonadosomatic index of sneaker morphs would be ca. 7.5 times as high as the gonad mass of parental morphs of the same total length after extrapolation. Few (9%) intermediates were found, suggesting that the expression of alternative reproductive tactics is determined before the first breeding season. This contrasts with studies on other goby species, which show evidence of plastic tactics that can be affected by social circumstances. We conclude that it is possible to distinguish two alternative male morphs in the Dutch Round Goby population using morphological measurements alone. Although behavioural observations are needed to provide conclusive evidence, the difference in GSI between these morphs indicates that these morphs reflect alternative reproductive tactics.

  14. Distinct subspecies or phenotypic plasticity? Genetic and morphological differentiation of mountain honey bees in East Africa.

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    Gruber, Karl; Schöning, Caspar; Otte, Marianne; Kinuthia, Wanja; Hasselmann, Martin

    2013-09-01

    Identifying the forces shaping intraspecific phenotypic and genotypic divergence are of key importance in evolutionary biology. Phenotypic divergence may result from local adaptation or, especially in species with strong gene flow, from pronounced phenotypic plasticity. Here, we examine morphological and genetic divergence among populations of the western honey bee Apis mellifera in the topographically heterogeneous East African region. The currently accepted "mountain refugia hypothesis" states that populations living in disjunct montane forests belong to a different lineage than those in savanna habitats surrounding these forests. We obtained microsatellite data, mitochondrial sequences, and morphometric data from worker honey bees collected from feral colonies in three montane forests and corresponding neighboring savanna regions in Kenya. Honey bee colonies from montane forests showed distinct worker morphology compared with colonies in savanna areas. Mitochondrial sequence data did not support the existence of the two currently accepted subspecies. Furthermore, analyses of the microsatellite data with a Bayesian clustering method did not support the existence of two source populations as it would be expected under the mountain refugia scenario. Our findings suggest that phenotypic plasticity rather than distinct ancestry is the leading cause behind the phenotypic divergence observed between montane forest and savanna honey bees. Our study thus corroborates the idea that high gene flow may select for increased plasticity.

  15. Delimitating cryptic species in the Gracilaria domingensis complex (Gracilariaceae, Rhodophyta) using molecular and morphological data.

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    Lyra, Goia de M; Gurgel, C Frederico D; Costa, Emmanuelle da S; de Jesus, Priscila B; Oliveira, Mariana C; Oliveira, Eurico C; Davis, Charles C; Nunes, José Marcos de Castro

    2016-12-01

    Species in the genus Gracilaria that display conspicuously flattened vegetative morphologies are a taxonomically challenging group of marine benthic red algae. This is a result of their species richness, morphological similarity, and broad phenotypic plasticity. Within this group, the Gracilaria domingensis complex is one of the most common, conspicuous, and morphologically variable species along the tropical western Atlantic Ocean. Previous research has identified that members of this complex belong to two distantly related clades. However, despite this increased phylogentic resolution, species delimitations within each of these clades remain unclear. Our study assessed the species diversity within this difficult complex using morphological and molecular data from three genetic markers (cox1, UPA, and rbcL). We additionally applied six single-marker species delimitation methods (SDM: ABGD, GMYCs, GMYCm, SPN, bPTP, and PTP) to rbcL, which were largely in agreement regarding species delimitation. These results, combined with our analysis of morphology, indicate that the G. domingensis complex includes seven distinct species, each of which are not all most closely related: G. cervicornis; a ressurected G. ferox; G. apiculata subsp. apiculata; a new species, Gracilaria baiana sp. nov.; G. intermedia subsp. intermedia; G. venezuelensis; and G. domingensis sensu stricto, which includes the later heterotypic synonym, G. yoneshigueana. Our study demonstrates the value of multipronged strategies, including the use of both molecular and morphological approaches, to decipher cryptic species of red algae. © 2016 Phycological Society of America.

  16. Evidence for ontogenetically and morphologically distinct alternative reproductive tactics in the invasive Round Goby Neogobius melanostomus.

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    Katinka Bleeker

    Full Text Available Alternative reproductive tactics are characterized by the occurrence of discrete alternative morphs that differ in behavioural, morphological and physiological traits within the same sex. Although much effort has been made to describe the behaviour, morphology and physiology of such alternative morphs, less effort has been invested investigating how much overlap there is in the characteristics of such morphs in natural populations. We studied random population samples of the invasive Round Goby Neogobius melanostomus from five different localities in the river Rhine system in the Netherlands. We found two morphologically and physiologically distinct male morphs which likely represent alternative reproductive tactics. Almost all mature males under 9.35 cm total length had a gonadosomatic index > 3%, suggestive of a sneaker tactic, while nearly all males above 9.35 cm has a gonadosomatic index of < 3%, suggestive of a parental tactic. Cheek size and eye diameter alone were sufficient to distinguish the two morphs. Gonads had a different relationship with size in the two morphs, indicating separate growth trajectories. The gonad mass of sneaker morphs would be ca. 7.5 times as high as the gonad mass of parental morphs of the same total length after extrapolation. Few (9% intermediates were found, suggesting that the expression of alternative reproductive tactics is determined before the first breeding season. This contrasts with studies on other goby species, which show evidence of plastic tactics that can be affected by social circumstances. We conclude that it is possible to distinguish two alternative male morphs in the Dutch Round Goby population using morphological measurements alone. Although behavioural observations are needed to provide conclusive evidence, the difference in GSI between these morphs indicates that these morphs reflect alternative reproductive tactics.

  17. Morphological characterisation of two endemic species of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed no morphological variation on qualitative characteristics of leaf, growth habit and stem length. The coefficient of variations (CV) and standard deviations (SD) for all qualitative traits were zero. Boll length was positively correlated to boll weight with a factor of 0.355. Leaf length was inversely correlated to ...

  18. Skin mechanics and morphology of two species of Pachydactylus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The southern African species Pachydactylus namaquensis is one of only a few mainland species of geckos that exhibits the escape strategy of regional integumentary loss. The skin morphology and mechanics of this species were compared to the same parameters in lhe sympatric congener P. bibronii. The tensile strength ...

  19. Morphological and biological features of seedlings of some Trifolium species

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    Valentina A. Kalinkina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The author conducted morphological and biological characteristics of seedlings of six species belonging to three sections: Lupinaster(T. lupinasterL, T. pacificumBobr, T. eximium Steph. Ex. DC., Chronosemium(T. campestre Schreb. and Trifolium (T. arvenseL., T. pratense L. of the genus Trifolium. Dimensional and qualitative morphological characteristics of the main structural elements of the seedlings of these species are represented in the article.

  20. Genetic, Ecological and Morphological Distinctness of the Blue Mussels Mytilus trossulus Gould and M. edulis L. in the White Sea.

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    Marina Katolikova

    Full Text Available Two blue mussel lineages of Pliocene origin, Mytilus edulis (ME and M. trossulus (MT, co-occur and hybridize in several regions on the shores of the North Atlantic. The two species were distinguished from each other by molecular methods in the 1980s, and a large amount of comparative data on them has been accumulated since that time. However, while ME and MT are now routinely distinguished by various genetic markers, they tend to be overlooked in ecological studies since morphological characters for taxonomic identification have been lacking, and no consistent habitat differences between lineages have been reported. Surveying a recently discovered area of ME and MT co-occurrence in the White Sea and employing a set of allozyme markers for identification, we address the issue whether ME and MT are true biological species with distinct ecological characteristics or just virtual genetic entities with no matching morphological and ecological identities. We find that: (1 in the White Sea, the occurrence of MT is largely concentrated in harbors, in line with observations from other subarctic regions of Europe; (2 mixed populations of ME and MT are always dominated by purebred individuals, animals classified as hybrids constituting only ca. 18%; (3 in terms of shell morphology, 80% of MT bear a distinct uninterrupted dark prismatic strip under the ligament while 97% of ME lack this character; (4 at sites of sympatry MT is more common on algal substrates while ME mostly lives directly on the bottom. This segregation by the substrate may contribute to maintaining reproductive isolation and decreasing competition between taxa. We conclude that while ME and MT are not fully reproductively isolated, they do represent clearly distinguishable biological, ecological and morphological entities in the White Sea. It remains to be documented whether the observed morphological and ecological differences are of a local character, or whether they have simply been

  1. Genetic Diversity in Passiflora Species Assessed by Morphological and ITS Sequence Analysis

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    Shiamala Devi Ramaiya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used morphological characterization and phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of nuclear ribosomal DNA to investigate the phylogeny of Passiflora species. The samples were collected from various regions of East Malaysia, and discriminant function analysis based on linear combinations of morphological variables was used to classify the Passiflora species. The biplots generated five distinct groups discriminated by morphological variables. The group consisted of cultivars of P. edulis with high levels of genetic similarity; in contrast, P. foetida was highly divergent from other species in the morphological biplots. The final dataset of aligned sequences from nine studied Passiflora accessions and 30 other individuals obtained from GenBank database (NCBI yielded one most parsimonious tree with two strongly supported clades. Maximum parsimony (MP tree showed the phylogenetic relationships within this subgenus Passiflora support the classification at the series level. The constructed phylogenic tree also confirmed the divergence of P. foetida from all other species and the closeness of wild and cultivated species. The phylogenetic relationships were consistent with results of morphological assessments. The results of this study indicate that ITS region analysis represents a useful tool for evaluating genetic diversity in Passiflora at the species level.

  2. Morphology of the achene in species of the genus Scleria P. Berg (Cyperaceae) present in Costa Rica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza Morales, Lindsay Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The morphological characteristics and external morphology of the fruits from species of Scleria present in Costa Rica are analyzed and described, using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. A taxonomic key is elaborated to allow easy identification and differentiation of distinct species. A dichotomous key is made with the help of Delta-key program to distinguish 21 species of Scleria, taking into consideration the morphology of the achene. A dendrogram is performed with the species of Scleria using only the morphological characters of its achenes, through the statistical program Past 2.12 Paleontological Statistic. 15 achenes were analyzed by species obtained from specimens of the herbarium of the Universidad de Costa Rica, Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad, Herbario Nacional and Organizacion para Estudios Tropicales. Digital photographs were taken of the full view of achene, the detail of the surface and inferior of fruit. The hypogynium and the cupola have been the morphological structures most important of Scleria in the country [es

  3. Cephalosporium maydis is a distinct species in the Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amgad A; Leslie, John F

    2004-01-01

    Cephalosporium maydis is an important plant pathogen whose phylogenetic position relative to other fungi has not been established clearly. We compared strains of C. maydis, strains from several other plant-pathogenic Cephalosporium spp. and several possible relatives within the Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex, to which C. maydis has been suggested to belong based on previous preliminary DNA sequence analyses. DNA sequences of the nuclear genes encoding the rDNA ITS region, β-tubulin, histone H3, and MAT-2 support the hypothesis that C. maydis is a distinct taxon within the Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex. Based on amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) profiles, C. maydis also is distinct from the other tested species of Cephalosporium, Phialophora sensu lato and members of Gaeumannomyces-Harpophora species complex, which supports its classification as Harpophora maydis. Oligonucleotide primers for H. maydis were developed that can be used in a PCR diagnostic protocol to rapidly and reliably detect and identify this pathogen. These diagnostic PCR primers will aid the detection of H. maydis in diseased maize because this fungus can be difficult to detect and isolate, and the movement of authentic cultures may be limited by quarantine restrictions.

  4. Efficient distinction of invasive aquatic plant species from non-invasive related species using DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanzadeh, R; Esselink, G; Kodde, L P; Duistermaat, H; van Valkenburg, J L C H; Marashi, S H; Smulders, M J M; van de Wiel, C C M

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are regarded as threats to global biodiversity. Among invasive aliens, a number of plant species belonging to the genera Myriophyllum, Ludwigia and Cabomba, and to the Hydrocharitaceae family pose a particular ecological threat to water bodies. Therefore, one would try to prevent them from entering a country. However, many related species are commercially traded, and distinguishing invasive from non-invasive species based on morphology alone is often difficult for plants in a vegetative stage. In this regard, DNA barcoding could become a good alternative. In this study, 242 samples belonging to 26 species from 10 genera of aquatic plants were assessed using the chloroplast loci trnH-psbA, matK and rbcL. Despite testing a large number of primer sets and several PCR protocols, the matK locus could not be amplified or sequenced reliably and therefore was left out of the analysis. Using the other two loci, eight invasive species could be distinguished from their respective related species, a ninth one failed to produce sequences of sufficient quality. Based on the criteria of universal application, high sequence divergence and level of species discrimination, the trnH-psbA noncoding spacer was the best performing barcode in the aquatic plant species studied. Thus, DNA barcoding may be helpful with enforcing a ban on trade of such invasive species, such as is already in place in the Netherlands. This will become even more so once DNA barcoding would be turned into machinery routinely operable by a nonspecialist in botany and molecular genetics. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Wing pattern morphology of three closely related Melitaea (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae species reveals highly inaccurate external morphology-based species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Jugovic

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Wing morphology of the three closely related species of Melitaea – M. athalia (Rottemburg, 1775, M. aurelia (Nickerl, 1850 and M. britomartis Assmann, 1847 – co-occurring in the Balkans (SE Europe was investigated in detail through visual inspection, morphometric analysis and multivariate statistical analysis. Results are compared to recent phylogenetic studies, searching for concordant patterns and discrepancies between the two approaches. The morphology of the genitalic structures is also compared with the results of the other two approaches. The main conclusions are as follows: (1 small albeit significant differences in wing morphology exist among the three species and (2 while the structure of male genitalia and phylogenetic position of the three species are concordant, they are (3 in discordance with the wing morphology. The present study represents another example where identification based on external morphology would lead to highly unreliable determinations, hence identification based on phylogenetic studies and/or genitalia is strongly recommended not only for the three studied species but also more broadly within the genus. Furthermore, we show that some of the characters generally used in the identification of these three Melitaea species should be avoided in future.

  6. New contribution to the species-rich genus Euplotes: Morphology, ontogeny and systematic position of two species (Ciliophora; Euplotia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ying; Fan, Yangbo; Luo, Xiaotian; El-Serehy, Hamed A; Bourland, William; Chen, Xiangrui

    2018-06-01

    The morphology, ontogeny and phylogeny of two Euplotes species, E. estuarinus sp. nov. and a population of E. platystoma Dragesco and Dragesco-Kernéis, 1986, both collected from tropical brackish waters in south China, were investigated based on living morphology, ciliary pattern and molecular data. Euplotes estuarinus sp. nov. is small (about 60 × 40 μm in vivo), has a dargyrome of the double-eurystomus type, and the transverse cirri are arranged in two groups, with two left and three right ones. The original description of the poorly known species, E. platystoma, is brief, and the species was never investigated using live observation and molecular methods Hence, we provided a detailed redescription. Some stages of their morphogenesis were observed which proceed in the same pattern as in their congeners. The new species E. estuarinus sp. nov. clusters with E. curdsi, differing only by 1 bp in their SSU rRNA gene sequences, which is likely due to the recent speciation event and the limited resolution of the SSU rRNA gene at species level in this group as the two species are clearly morphologically distinct. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. GEITLERINEMA SPECIES (OSCILLATORIALES, CYANOBACTERIA) REVEALED BY CELLULAR MORPHOLOGY, ULTRASTRUCTURE, AND DNA SEQUENCING(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Carmo Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria; Do Nascimento Moura, Ariadne; De Oliveira, Mariana Cabral; Sidnei Massola, Nelson

    2009-06-01

    Geitlerinema amphibium (C. Agardh ex Gomont) Anagn. and G. unigranulatum (Rama N. Singh) Komárek et M. T. P. Azevedo are morphologically close species with characteristics frequently overlapping. Ten strains of Geitlerinema (six of G. amphibium and four of G. unigranulatum) were analyzed by DNA sequencing and transmission electronic and optical microscopy. Among the investigated strains, the two species were not separated with respect to cellular dimensions, and cellular width was the most varying characteristic. The number and localization of granules, as well as other ultrastructural characteristics, did not provide a means to discriminate between the two species. The two species were not separated either by geography or environment. These results were further corroborated by the analysis of the cpcB-cpcA intergenic spacer (PC-IGS) sequences. Given the fact that morphology is very uniform, plus the coexistence of these populations in the same habitat, it would be nearly impossible to distinguish between them in nature. On the other hand, two of the analyzed strains were distinct from all others based on the PC-IGS sequences, in spite of their morphological similarity. PC-IGS sequences indicate that these two strains could be a different species of Geitlerinema. Using morphology, cell ultrastructure, and PC-IGS sequences, it is not possible to distinguish G. amphibium and G. unigranulatum. Therefore, they should be treated as one species, G. unigranulatum as a synonym of G. amphibium. © 2009 Phycological Society of America.

  8. Wing pattern morphology of three closely related Melitaea (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae) species reveals highly inaccurate external morphology-based species identification

    OpenAIRE

    Jugovic,Jure; Koren,Toni

    2014-01-01

    Wing morphology of the three closely related species of Melitaea – M. athalia (Rottemburg, 1775), M. aurelia (Nickerl, 1850) and M. britomartis Assmann, 1847 – co-occurring in the Balkans (SE Europe) was investigated in detail through visual inspection, morphometric analysis and multivariate statistical analysis. Results are compared to recent phylogenetic studies, searching for concordant patterns and discrepancies between the two approaches. The morphology of the genitalic structures is als...

  9. Morphological similarity and ecological overlap in two rotifer species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabaldón, Carmen; Montero-Pau, Javier; Serra, Manuel; Carmona, María José

    2013-01-01

    Co-occurrence of cryptic species raises theoretically relevant questions regarding their coexistence and ecological similarity. Given their great morphological similitude and close phylogenetic relationship (i.e., niche retention), these species will have similar ecological requirements and are expected to have strong competitive interactions. This raises the problem of finding the mechanisms that may explain the coexistence of cryptic species and challenges the conventional view of coexistence based on niche differentiation. The cryptic species complex of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis is an excellent model to study these questions and to test hypotheses regarding ecological differentiation. Rotifer species within this complex are filtering zooplankters commonly found inhabiting the same ponds across the Iberian Peninsula and exhibit an extremely similar morphology-some of them being even virtually identical. Here, we explore whether subtle differences in body size and morphology translate into ecological differentiation by comparing two extremely morphologically similar species belonging to this complex: B. plicatilis and B. manjavacas. We focus on three key ecological features related to body size: (1) functional response, expressed by clearance rates; (2) tolerance to starvation, measured by growth and reproduction; and (3) vulnerability to copepod predation, measured by the number of preyed upon neonates. No major differences between B. plicatilis and B. manjavacas were found in the response to these features. Our results demonstrate the existence of a substantial niche overlap, suggesting that the subtle size differences between these two cryptic species are not sufficient to explain their coexistence. This lack of evidence for ecological differentiation in the studied biotic niche features is in agreement with the phylogenetic limiting similarity hypothesis but requires a mechanistic explanation of the coexistence of these species not based on

  10. Morphological similarity and ecological overlap in two rotifer species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Gabaldón

    Full Text Available Co-occurrence of cryptic species raises theoretically relevant questions regarding their coexistence and ecological similarity. Given their great morphological similitude and close phylogenetic relationship (i.e., niche retention, these species will have similar ecological requirements and are expected to have strong competitive interactions. This raises the problem of finding the mechanisms that may explain the coexistence of cryptic species and challenges the conventional view of coexistence based on niche differentiation. The cryptic species complex of the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis is an excellent model to study these questions and to test hypotheses regarding ecological differentiation. Rotifer species within this complex are filtering zooplankters commonly found inhabiting the same ponds across the Iberian Peninsula and exhibit an extremely similar morphology-some of them being even virtually identical. Here, we explore whether subtle differences in body size and morphology translate into ecological differentiation by comparing two extremely morphologically similar species belonging to this complex: B. plicatilis and B. manjavacas. We focus on three key ecological features related to body size: (1 functional response, expressed by clearance rates; (2 tolerance to starvation, measured by growth and reproduction; and (3 vulnerability to copepod predation, measured by the number of preyed upon neonates. No major differences between B. plicatilis and B. manjavacas were found in the response to these features. Our results demonstrate the existence of a substantial niche overlap, suggesting that the subtle size differences between these two cryptic species are not sufficient to explain their coexistence. This lack of evidence for ecological differentiation in the studied biotic niche features is in agreement with the phylogenetic limiting similarity hypothesis but requires a mechanistic explanation of the coexistence of these species not

  11. Two distinct Epichloë species symbiotic with Achnatherum inebrians, drunken horse grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Li, Xiuzhang; Li, Chunjie; Swoboda, Ginger A; Young, Carolyn A; Sugawara, Koya; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Schardl, Christopher L

    2015-01-01

    Achnatherum inebrians, colloquially known as drunken horse grass, is associated with livestock toxicity in northern China. Epichloë gansuensis (Eg) was described from endophyte isolates from A. inebrians in Sunan County, Gansu Province, whereas a morphologically distinct variety, E. gansuensis var. inebrians (Ei), was described based on two isolates from A. inebrians seeds collected in Urumqi County, Xinjiang Province. Genome sequencing and alkaloid analyses also distinguish these taxa; the Ei isolates produce neurotropic lysergic acid amides (ergot alkaloids), and an Eg isolate produces paxilline (an indole-diterpene alkaloid). To better elucidate the taxonomic diversity of Epichloë spp. symbiotic with A. inebrians, we surveyed eight populations in Xinjiang, Gansu and Inner Mongolia provinces of China and analyzed their genotypes by multiplex PCR for alkaloid biosynthesis genes and mating-type genes. Genotypes consistent with Ei were present in all eight populations, of which they dominated seven. The Ei isolates were all mating type A and tested positive for the ergot alkaloid gene, dmaW. In contrast Eg isolates were all mating type B and had the indole-diterpene gene, idtG. The genome was sequenced from an Ei isolate from seeds collected in Xiahe County, Gansu, and compared to that of the varietal ex type isolate from Urumqi. Alkaloid genes and four different housekeeping genes were nearly identical between the two sequenced Ei isolates and were distinct from a sequenced Eg isolate. Phylogenetic analysis placed Ei, Eg and Epichloë sibirica into respective subclades of a clade that emanated from the base of the Epichloë phylogeny. Given its chemotypic, genotypic, morphological and phylogenetic distinctiveness, its widespread occurrence in rangelands of northern China, and its importance in livestock toxicity, we propose raising Ei to species rank as Epichloë inebrians. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  12. Incongruence between morphotypes and genetically delimited species in the coral genus Stylophora: phenotypic plasticity, morphological convergence, morphological stasis or interspecific hybridization?

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    Flot Jean-François

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Morphological data suggest that, unlike most other groups of marine organisms, scleractinian corals of the genus Stylophora are more diverse in the western Indian Ocean and in the Red Sea than in the central Indo-Pacific. However, the morphology of corals is often a poor predictor of their actual biodiversity: hence, we conducted a genetic survey of Stylophora corals collected in Madagascar, Okinawa, the Philippines and New Caledonia in an attempt to find out the true number of species in these various locations. Results A molecular phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial ORF and putative control region concurs with a haploweb analysis of nuclear ITS2 sequences in delimiting three species among our dataset: species A and B are found in Madagascar whereas species C occurs in Okinawa, the Philippines and New Caledonia. Comparison of ITS1 sequences from these three species with data available online suggests that species C is also found on the Great Barrier Reef, in Malaysia, in the South China Sea and in Taiwan, and that a distinct species D occurs in the Red Sea. Shallow-water morphs of species A correspond to the morphological description of Stylophora madagascarensis, species B presents the morphology of Stylophora mordax, whereas species C comprises various morphotypes including Stylophora pistillata and Stylophora mordax. Conclusions Genetic analysis of the coral genus Stylophora reveals species boundaries that are not congruent with morphological traits. Of the four hypotheses that may explain such discrepancy (phenotypic plasticity, morphological stasis, morphological convergence, and interspecific hybridization, the first two appear likely to play a role but the fourth one is rejected since mitochondrial and nuclear markers yield congruent species delimitations. The position of the root in our molecular phylogenies suggests that the center of origin of Stylophora is located in the western Indian Ocean, which probably

  13. Morphological distinction between estuarine polychaetes: Laeonereis culveri and L. nota (Phyllodocida: Nereididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jesus-Flores, Citlalli; Salazar-González, S Alejandro; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2016-03-01

    The family Nereididae includes more than 500 polychaete species described worldwide, and includes species common in many benthic environments, but some other species may tolerate freshwater or can even thrive in humid substrates in tropical forests. In estuarine environments, nereidid polychaetes can be abundant and relevant as a food source for resident or migratory birds. Laeonereis culveri (Webster, 1879) is a common estuarine species found in tropical and subtropical Atlantic American shores and was described from New Jersey; its median and posterior parapodia have upper notopodial ligules usually longer than the lower ones, and the latter are parallel to the notaciculae throughout the body. L. culveri distribution is from Connecticut to central Argentina; however, this wide distribution might be due to the inclusion of several other species as junior synonyms, despite that some morphological differences were found between them. One of such species is L. nota (Treadwell, 1941), that was described from Texas; its parapodia have notopodial ligules of about the same size, and the lower ones are oblique to the notaciculae. In order to clarify the differences between these two species, and to define which inhabits the Northwestern Caribbean region, topotype materials from these two species and specimens from Chetumal Bay were collected, and their morphological features were compared. Our results indicated that L. culveri and L. nota are different species and that the latter is found in Chetumal Bay. On the basis of mature specimens, L. culveri is hereby restricted to the Northern Gulf of Mexico and Northwestern Atlantic Ocean, and L. nota are reinstated and its distribution extends from Texas, in the Gulf of Mexico to Chetumal Bay, in the Northwestern Caribbean Sea. A key to identify all species in Laeonereis Hartman (1945) is also included.

  14. DNA barcoding and morphological studies reveal two new species of waxcap mushrooms (Hygrophoraceae in Britain

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    Antony Ainsworth

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rigorous diagnostics and documentation of fungal species are fundamental to their conservation. During the course of a species-level study of UK waxcap (Hygrophoraceae diversity, two previously unrecognized species were discovered. We describe Gliophorus europerplexus sp. nov. and G. reginae sp. nov., respectively orange–brown and purple–pink waxcap mushrooms, from nutrient-poor grasslands in Britain. Both share some morphological features with specimens assigned to Gliophorus (=Hygrocybe psittacinus. However, analysis of sequences of the nuclear ITS DNA barcode region from these and related taxa confirms the phylogenetic distinctness of these lineages. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the holotype of Hygrophorus perplexus, a North American species morphologically resembling G. europerplexus, is phylogenetically divergent from all our collections. It is likely that further collections of G. europerplexus will be revealed by sequencing European material currently filed under G. perplexus and its synonyms. However, two such collections in the Kew fungarium yielded sequences that clustered together but were divergent from those of G. europerplexus, G. perplexus and G. psittacinus and may represent a further novel taxon. By contrast, G. reginae is morphologically distinct and can usually be recognized in the field by its purplish viscid pileus and relatively stout, flexuose, pale stipe. It is named to commemorate the diamond jubilee of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in 2012 and the 60th anniversary of her coronation in 2013.

  15. 76 FR 14883 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Distinct Population Segments of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ...-XZ58 Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Distinct Population Segments of..., published a proposed rule to list the Beringia and Okhotsk Distinct Population Segments (DPSs) of the... published a proposed rule to list the Beringia and Okhotsk Distinct Population Segments (DPSs) of the...

  16. Molecular Evidence for Species-Level Distinctions in Clouded Leopards

    OpenAIRE

    Buckley-Beason, Valerie A.; Johnson, Warren E.; Nash, Willliam G.; Stanyon, Roscoe; Menninger, Joan C.; Driscoll, Carlos A.; Howard, JoGayle; Bush, Mitch; Page, John E.; Roelke, Melody E.; Stone, Gary; Martelli, Paolo P.; Wen, Ci; Ling, Lin; Duraisingam, Ratna K.

    2006-01-01

    Among the 37 living species of Felidae, the clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) is generally classified as a monotypic genus basal to the Panthera lineage of great cats [1–5]. This secretive, mid-sized (16–23 kg) carnivore, now severely endangered, is traditionally subdivided into four southeast Asian subspecies (Figure 1A) [4–8]. We used molecular genetic methods to re-evaluate subspecies partitions and to quantify patterns of population genetic variation among 109 clouded leopards of known ...

  17. Distribution of Plasmids in Distinct Leptospira Pathogenic Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanzhuo; Zhuang, Xuran; Zhong, Yi; Zhang, Cuicai; Zhang, Yan; Zeng, Lingbing; Zhu, Yongzhang; He, Ping; Dong, Ke; Pal, Utpal; Guo, Xiaokui; Qin, Jinhong

    2015-11-01

    Leptospirosis, caused by pathogenic Leptospira, is a worldwide zoonotic infection. The genus Leptospira includes at least 21 species clustered into three groups--pathogens, non-pathogens, and intermediates--based on 16S rRNA phylogeny. Research on Leptospira is difficult due to slow growth and poor transformability of the pathogens. Recent identification of extrachromosomal elements besides the two chromosomes in L. interrogans has provided new insight into genome complexity of the genus Leptospira. The large size, low copy number, and high similarity of the sequence of these extrachromosomal elements with the chromosomes present challenges in isolating and detecting them without careful genome assembly. In this study, two extrachromosomal elements were identified in L. borgpetersenii serovar Ballum strain 56604 through whole genome assembly combined with S1 nuclease digestion following pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (S1-PFGE) analysis. Further, extrachromosomal elements in additional 15 Chinese epidemic strains of Leptospira, comprising L. borgpetersenii, L. weilii, and L. interrogans, were successfully separated and identified, independent of genome sequence data. Southern blot hybridization with extrachromosomal element-specific probes, designated as lcp1, lcp2 and lcp3-rep, further confirmed their occurrences as extrachromosomal elements. In total, 24 plasmids were detected in 13 out of 15 tested strains, among which 11 can hybridize with the lcp1-rep probe and 11 with the lcp2-rep probe, whereas two can hybridize with the lcp3-rep probe. None of them are likely to be species-specific. Blastp search of the lcp1, lcp2, and lcp3-rep genes with a nonredundant protein database of Leptospira species genomes showed that their homologous sequences are widely distributed among clades of pathogens but not non-pathogens or intermediates. These results suggest that the plasmids are widely distributed in Leptospira species, and further elucidation of their biological

  18. Comparative Morphological Characterization of Proceratophrys Bigibbosa Species from Southern Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva Ahmann, F.; Evseev, I. G.; Lingnau, R.; Ievsieieva, I.; Assis, J. T. de; Alves, H. D. L.

    2011-01-01

    The Proceratophrys bigibbosa species group is characterized by the presence of post ocular swellings and absence of hornlike palpebral appendages. A new member of this group was described recently from southern Brazil: Proceratophrys brauni. Its body size is between the smaller Proceratophrys avelinoi and the larger Proceratophrys bigibbosa species, both living in the same region. As the external appearance of these three members of the group is very similar to each other, it is interesting to discover a specific morphological categorization through internal characteristics, such as the cranium's proportions. In this paper, we report the preliminary results for comparative cranium's morphological characterization of Proceratophrys bigibbosa species from Brazil using the X-ray computed Microtomography technique through Skyscan 1174 system. Five samples of each three species, i.e. fifteen samples in total, were scanned. The data have been obtained were reconstructed and analyzed using Skyscan software. The reconstructed images were used to create a 3D head model and measure the cranium's proportions. The main results are that some visible differences in the cranium's proportions were observed, however a more detailed study is necessary to separate the species' characteristics from the individual variations. (Author)

  19. Discordance between morphological and molecular species boundaries among Caribbean species of the reef sponge Callyspongia

    OpenAIRE

    DeBiasse, Melissa B; Hellberg, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Sponges are among the most species-rich and ecologically important taxa on coral reefs, yet documenting their diversity is difficult due to the simplicity and plasticity of their morphological characters. Genetic attempts to identify species are hampered by the slow rate of mitochondrial sequence evolution characteristic of sponges and some other basal metazoans. Here we determine species boundaries of the Caribbean coral reef sponge genus Callyspongia using a multilocus, model-based approach...

  20. Biophysical subsets of embryonic stem cells display distinct phenotypic and morphological signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Bongiorno

    Full Text Available The highly proliferative and pluripotent characteristics of embryonic stem cells engender great promise for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, but the rapid identification and isolation of target cell phenotypes remains challenging. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to characterize cell mechanics as a function of differentiation and to employ differences in cell stiffness to select population subsets with distinct mechanical, morphological, and biological properties. Biomechanical analysis with atomic force microscopy revealed that embryonic stem cells stiffened within one day of differentiation induced by leukemia inhibitory factor removal, with a lagging but pronounced change from spherical to spindle-shaped cell morphology. A microfluidic device was then employed to sort a differentially labeled mixture of pluripotent and differentiating cells based on stiffness, resulting in pluripotent cell enrichment in the soft device outlet. Furthermore, sorting an unlabeled population of partially differentiated cells produced a subset of "soft" cells that was enriched for the pluripotent phenotype, as assessed by post-sort characterization of cell mechanics, morphology, and gene expression. The results of this study indicate that intrinsic cell mechanical properties might serve as a basis for efficient, high-throughput, and label-free isolation of pluripotent stem cells, which will facilitate a greater biological understanding of pluripotency and advance the potential of pluripotent stem cell differentiated progeny as cell sources for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  1. Effects of Salt Stress on Three Ecologically Distinct Plantago Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hassan, Mohamad; Pacurar, Andrea; López-Gresa, María P; Donat-Torres, María P; Llinares, Josep V; Boscaiu, Monica; Vicente, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies on the responses to salt stress of taxonomically related taxa should help to elucidate relevant mechanisms of stress tolerance in plants. We have applied this strategy to three Plantago species adapted to different natural habitats, P. crassifolia and P. coronopus-both halophytes-and P. major, considered as salt-sensitive since it is never found in natural saline habitats. Growth inhibition measurements in controlled salt treatments indicated, however, that P. major is quite resistant to salt stress, although less than its halophytic congeners. The contents of monovalent ions and specific osmolytes were determined in plant leaves after four-week salt treatments. Salt-treated plants of the three taxa accumulated Na+ and Cl- in response to increasing external NaCl concentrations, to a lesser extent in P. major than in the halophytes; the latter species also showed higher ion contents in the non-stressed plants. In the halophytes, K+ concentration decreased at moderate salinity levels, to increase again under high salt conditions, whereas in P. major K+ contents were reduced only above 400 mM NaCl. Sorbitol contents augmented in all plants, roughly in parallel with increasing salinity, but the relative increments and the absolute values reached did not differ much in the three taxa. On the contrary, a strong (relative) accumulation of proline in response to high salt concentrations (600-800 mM NaCl) was observed in the halophytes, but not in P. major. These results indicate that the responses to salt stress triggered specifically in the halophytes, and therefore the most relevant for tolerance in the genus Plantago are: a higher efficiency in the transport of toxic ions to the leaves, the capacity to use inorganic ions as osmotica, even under low salinity conditions, and the activation, in response to very high salt concentrations, of proline accumulation and K+ transport to the leaves of the plants.

  2. Species delimitation and morphological divergence in the scorpion Centruroides vittatus (Say, 1821: insights from phylogeography.

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    Tsunemi Yamashita

    Full Text Available Scorpion systematics and taxonomy have recently shown a need for revision, partially due to insights from molecular techniques. Scorpion taxonomy has been difficult with morphological characters as disagreement exists among researchers with character choice for adequate species delimitation in taxonomic studies. Within the family Buthidae, species identification and delimitation is particularly difficult due to the morphological similarity among species and extensive intraspecific morphological diversity. The genus Centruroides in the western hemisphere is a prime example of the difficulty in untangling the taxonomic complexity within buthid scorpions. In this paper, we present phylogeographic, Ecological Niche Modeling, and morphometric analyses to further understand how population diversification may have produced morphological diversity in Centruroides vittatus (Say, 1821. We show that C. vittatus populations in the Big Bend and Trans-Pecos region of Texas, USA are phylogeographically distinct and may predate the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM. In addition, we suggest the extended isolation of Big Bend region populations may have created the C. vittatus variant once known as C. pantheriensis.

  3. Are Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) distinct species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzidimitriou, Evangelia; Simonato, Mauro; Watson, Gillian W; Martinez-Sañudo, Isabel; Tanaka, Hirotaka; Zhao, Jing; Pellizzari, Giuseppina

    2016-03-24

    Among the Nearctic species of Phenacoccus (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), Phenacoccus solani Ferris and P. defectus Ferris are morphologically similar and it can be difficult to separate them on the basis of microscopic morphological characters of the adult female alone. In order to resolve their identity, a canonical variates morphological analysis of 199 specimens from different geographical origins and host plants and a molecular analysis of the COI and 28S genes were performed. The morphological analysis supported synonymy of the two species, as although the type specimens of the "species" are widely separated from each other in the canonical variates plot, they are all part of a continuous range of variation. The molecular analysis showed that P. solani and P. defectus are grouped in the same clade. On the basis of the morphological and molecular analyses, P. defectus is synonymized under the senior name P. solani, syn. n.

  4. Trichomes morphology in petals of some Acanthaceae species.

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    Muhammad Amirul Aiman Ahmad Juhari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary taxonomic study was carried out on seven Acanthaceae species namely as Andrographis paniculata, Pseuderanthemum graciliflorum, P. carruthersii,  Asystasia gangetica ssp. micrantha, Ruellia repens, Justicia comata and J. betonica. The study was undertaken to    investigate the morphology of trichomes present on the surfaces of flower petal. The variations found in this study are in their types and density. Based on observation, two forms of trichomes are present in all species studies which are glandular and non-glandular trichomes. There are seven types of trichomes found in this study. Trichomes types are shown to have systematic significance that can be used to differentiate and identify certain Acanthaceae species studied. 

  5. The inadequacy of morphology for species and genus delineation in microbial eukaryotes: an example from the parabasalian termite symbiont coronympha.

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    James T Harper

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: For the majority of microbial eukaryotes (protists, algae, there is no clearly superior species concept that is consistently applied. In the absence of a practical biological species concept, most species and genus level delineations have historically been based on morphology, which may lead to an underestimate of the diversity of microbial eukaryotes. Indeed, a growing body of molecular evidence, such as barcoding surveys, is beginning to support the conclusion that significant cryptic species diversity exists. This underestimate of diversity appears to be due to a combination of using morphology as the sole basis for assessing diversity and our inability to culture the vast majority of microbial life. Here we have used molecular markers to assess the species delineations in two related but morphologically distinct genera of uncultivated symbionts found in the hindgut of termites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using single-cell isolation and environmental PCR, we have used a barcoding approach to characterize the diversity of Coronympha and Metacoronympha symbionts in four species of Incisitermes termites, which were also examined using scanning electron microscopy and light microcopy. Despite the fact that these genera are significantly different in morphological complexity and structural organisation, we find they are two life history stages of the same species. At the same time, we show that the symbionts from different termite hosts show an equal or greater level of sequence diversity than do the hosts, despite the fact that the symbionts are all classified as one species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The morphological information used to describe the diversity of these microbial symbionts is misleading at both the genus and species levels, and led to an underestimate of species level diversity as well as an overestimate of genus level diversity. The genus 'Metacoronympha' is invalid and appears to be a life history stage of

  6. Historical abundance and morphology of Didymosphenia species in Naknek Lake, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pite, D.P.; Lane, K.A.; Hermann, A.K.; Spaulding, S.A.; Finney, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1980s, nuisance blooms of Didymosphenia geminata (Lyngbye) M. Schmidt have been documented in sites that are warmer and more mesotrophic than historical records indicate. While the invasion of D. geminata in New Zealand is well documented, it is less clear whether nuisance blooms in North America are a new phenomenon. In order to test the hypothesis that D. geminata blooms have increased in recent years, we examined the historical record of this species in sediments of Naknek Lake, in Katmai National Park, Alaska. Chronological control was established by relating the presence of two ash layers to known volcanic eruptions. We identified two species of Didymosphenia within the sediment record: D. geminata and D. clavaherculis (Ehrenberg) Metzeltin et Lange-Bertalot. This is the first published record of D. clavaherculis in North America. We found no statistically significant change in the numerical presence of D. geminata or D. clavaherculis, as a group, in Naknek Lake between the years 1218 and 2003. While there has been no sudden, or recent, increase in abundance of Didymosphenia in Naknek Lake, morphological features of D. geminata populations in Naknek Lake are distinct compared to morphological features of D. geminata in streams containing nuisance blooms from sites in North America and New Zealand. Variance in the morphology of Didymosphenia cells may help determine relationships between distinct sub-populations and establish the history of habitat invasion.

  7. A distinctive new frog species (Anura, Mantellidae supports the biogeographic linkage of two montane rainforest massifs in northern Madagascar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Scherz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new species of the genus Gephyromantis, subgenus GephyromantisVatomantis (Mantellidae, Mantellinae, from moderately high elevation (1164–1394 m a.s.l. on the Marojejy, Sorata, and Andravory Massifs in northern Madagascar. The new species, Gephyromantis (Vatomantis lomorina sp. n. is highly distinct from all other species, and was immediately recognisable as an undescribed taxon upon its discovery. It is characterised by a granular, mottled black and green skin, reddish eyes, paired subgular vocal sacs of partly white colour, bulbous femoral glands present only in males and consisting of three large granules, white ventral spotting, and a unique, amplitude-modulated advertisement call consisting of a series of 24–29 rapid, quiet notes at a dominant frequency of 5124–5512 Hz. Genetically the species is also strongly distinct from its congeners, with uncorrected pairwise distances ≥10 % in a fragment of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene to all other nominal Gephyromantis species. A molecular phylogeny based on 16S sequences places it in a clade with species of the subgenera Laurentomantis and Vatomantis, and we assign it to the latter subgenus based on its morphological resemblance to members of Vatomantis. We discuss the biogeography of reptiles and amphibians across the massifs of northern Madagascar, the evidence for a strong link between Marojejy and Sorata, and the role of elevation in determining community sharing across this landscape.

  8. Comparative Evolution of Morphological Regulatory Functions in Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Erika; Vipulanandan, Geethanjali; Childers, Delma S.

    2013-01-01

    Morphological transitions play an important role in virulence and virulence-related processes in a wide variety of pathogenic fungi, including the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. While environmental signals, transcriptional regulators, and target genes associated with C. albicans morphogenesis are well-characterized, considerably little is known about morphological regulatory mechanisms and the extent to which they are evolutionarily conserved in less pathogenic and less filamentous non-albicans Candida species (NACS). We have identified specific optimal filament-inducing conditions for three NACS (C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii), which are very limited, suggesting that these species may be adapted for niche-specific filamentation in the host. Only a subset of evolutionarily conserved C. albicans filament-specific target genes were induced upon filamentation in C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii. One of the genes showing conserved expression was UME6, a key filament-specific regulator of C. albicans hyphal development. Constitutive high-level expression of UME6 was sufficient to drive increased filamentation as well as biofilm formation and partly restore conserved filament-specific gene expression in both C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis, suggesting that evolutionary differences in filamentation ability among pathogenic Candida species may be partially attributed to alterations in the expression level of a conserved filamentous growth machinery. In contrast to UME6, NRG1, an important repressor of C. albicans filamentation, showed only a partly conserved role in controlling NACS filamentation. Overall, our results suggest that C. albicans morphological regulatory functions are partially conserved in NACS and have evolved to respond to more specific sets of host environmental cues. PMID:23913541

  9. Delimiting Species Boundaries within a Paraphyletic Species Complex: Insights from Morphological, Genetic, and Molecular Data on Paramecium sonneborni (Paramecium aurelia species complex, Ciliophora, Protozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyboś, Ewa; Tarcz, Sebastian; Rautian, Maria; Sawka, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    The demarcation of boundaries between protist species is often problematic because of the absence of a uniform species definition, the abundance of cryptic diversity, and the occurrence of convergent morphology. The ciliates belonging to the Paramecium aurelia complex, consisting of 15 species, are a good model for such systematic and evolutionary studies. One member of the complex is P. sonneborni, previously known only from one stand in Texas (USA), but recently found in two new sampling sites in Cyprus (creeks running to Salt Lake and Oroklini Lake near Larnaca). The studied Paramecium sonneborni strains (from the USA and Cyprus) reveal low viability in the F1 and F2 generations of interstrain hybrids and may be an example of ongoing allopatric speciation. Despite its molecular distinctiveness, we postulate that P. sonneborni should remain in the P. aurelia complex, making it a paraphyletic taxon. Morphological studies have revealed that some features of the nuclear apparatus of P. sonneborni correspond to the P. aurelia spp. complex, while others are similar to P. jenningsi and P. schewiakoffi. The observed discordance indicates rapid splitting of the P. aurelia-P. jenningsi-P. schewiakoffi group, in which genetic, morphological, and molecular boundaries between species are not congruent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Epinotia cinereana (Haworth, 1811) bona sp., a Holarctic tortricid distinct from E. nisella (Clerck, 1759) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae: Eucosmini) as evidenced by DNA barcodes, morphology and life history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutanen, Marko; Aarvik, Leif; Landry, Jean-Francois

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcodes of European tortricid moths identified as Epinotia nisella (Clerck, 1759) were found to comprise two genetically distinct clusters. These coincided with E. nisella and E. cinereana (Haworth, 1811) (sp. rev.), the latter having been considered a synonym of the former for several decades....... Comparing these DNA barcodes with those of North American Epinotia showed that both species are Holarctic. The North American Proteopteryx criddleana Kearfott, 1907 is a new junior synonym of E. cinereana (syn. nov.). The two species also show distinct differences in male and female genitalia. North...... American populations of both species show moderate differences in barcodes from their respective European populations but there are no morphological differences correlated with the intraspecific barcode clusters. Tortrix petrana Hübner, 1813 is considered as a junior synonym of E. cinereana (syn. rev...

  11. Morphological and Genotypic Variations among the Species of the Subgenus Adlerius (Diptera: Psychodidae, Phlebotomus) in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahraei-Ramazani, Alireza; Kumar, Dinesh; Mirhendi, Hossein; Sundar, Shyam; Mishra, Rajnikan; Moin-Vaziri, Vahideh; Soleimani, Hassan; Shirzadi, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Reza; Hanafi-Bojd, Ahmad Ali; Shahraky, Sodabe Hamedi; Yaghoobi-Ershadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-06-01

    Female sand flies of subgenus Adlerius are considered as probable vectors of visceral leishmaniasis in Iran. The objective of this study was to determine the morphological and genotypic variations in the populations of this subgenus in the country. Sand flies collected using sticky traps from 17 provinces during 2008-2010. The morphometric measurements were conducted with an Ocular Micrometer. Data was analyzed by SPSS. The Cytb gene was used to estimate population genetic diversity and identify the female specimens. UPGMA phenetic tree was used for DNA haplotypes of Cytb gene. Six species of subgenus Adlerius identified from which one species, P. (Adlerius) kabulensis, is new record. The identification key is provided for males. Results revealed the molecular systematic in the species of subgenus Adlerius and determine the relationship of three females of P. comatus, P. balcanicus and P. halepensis. The positions of three females and the males in the UPGMA tree are correct and the similarities among them confirm our results. The branches of each species are not genetically distinct which justify the overlapping morphological characters among them. Molecular sequencing of Cytb-mtDNA haplotypes can be used for female identification for different species of subgenus Adlerius in Iran.

  12. Morphological and Genotypic Variations among the Species of the Subgenus Adlerius (Diptera: Psychodidae, Phlebotomus in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Zahraei-Ramazani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Female sand flies of subgenus Adlerius are considered as probable vectors of visceral leishmaniasis in Iran. The objective of this study was to determine the morphological and genotypic variations in the populations of this subgenus in the country.Methods: Sand flies collected using sticky traps from 17 provinces during 2008–2010. The morphometric measurements were conducted with an Ocular Micrometer. Data was analyzed by SPSS. The Cytb gene was used to estimate population genetic diversity and identify the female specimens. UPGMA phenetic tree was used for DNA haplotypes of Cytb gene.Results: Six species of subgenus Adlerius identified from which one species, P. (Adlerius kabulensis, is new record. The identification key is provided for males. Results revealed the molecular systematic in the species of subgenus Adlerius and determine the relationship of three females of P. comatus, P. balcanicus and P. halepensis.Conclusion: The positions of three females and the males in the UPGMA tree are correct and the similarities among them confirm our results. The branches of each species are not genetically distinct which justify the overlapping morphological characters among them. Molecular sequencing of Cytb-mtDNA haplotypes can be used for female identification for different species of subgenus Adlerius in Iran.

  13. Allopatric origin of cryptic butterfly species that were discovered feeding on distinct host plants in sympatry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McBride, L.C.; Velzen, van R.; Larsen, T.B.

    2009-01-01

    Surveys of tropical insects are increasingly uncovering cryptic species ¿ morphologically similar yet reproductively isolated taxa once thought to comprise a single interbreeding entity. The vast majority of such species are described from a single location. This leaves us with little information on

  14. Morphology of primary feathers in two falcon species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honisch, B.; Bleckmann, H.; Schmitz, H.; Schmitz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Primary feathers allow birds to fly; however, morphology and material properties of theses feathers vary in different bird species. We therefore analysed both morphology and material properties of primary feathers in two raptor species, the peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) which is the fastest vertical flyer known, and the kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoindentation. The program AutoCAD was used for the computation of the moments of inertia. The reduced E-modulus of the cortex of the rachis of the first, fifth, and tenth primary were measured at proximal (10% of total rachis length), central (50%) and distal (75%) cross-sections. In all cross sections the kestrel showed higher E-moduli than the peregrine falcon (values varied between 6.7 and 9.1 GPa). In the primaries, values increased from proximal to central but decreased distally. Looking at the hardness, the kestrel had higher values than the peregrine falcon yet again. The main differences occurred in the first primary. Values ranged between 0.17 and 0.4 GPa. SEM studies revealed that the tenth primary was more stable in the peregrine falcon, featuring more hamuli than the kestrel at all analysed positions and longer hamuli at the distal positions. The higher moments of inertia found in the peregrine falcon caused a much higher bending stiffness in this species. Values were 4.4 to 9.1 times larger in the peregrine falcon than in the kestrel. Because the given structures are responsible for the stability of the feather face it seems that the feathers of F. peregrinus are more robust than those of F. tinnunculus. Even when considering the higher body mass of the peregrine falcon compared to the kestrel (3.4 times), the determined stability of the feather compensates for this problem.

  15. Overexpression of cypin alters dendrite morphology, single neuron activity, and network properties via distinct mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Ana R.; O'Neill, Kate M.; Swiatkowski, Przemyslaw; Patel, Mihir V.; Firestein, Bonnie L.

    2018-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the effect that overexpression of cytosolic PSD-95 interactor (cypin), a regulator of synaptic PSD-95 protein localization and a core regulator of dendrite branching, exerts on the electrical activity of rat hippocampal neurons and networks. Approach. We cultured rat hippocampal neurons and used lipid-mediated transfection and lentiviral gene transfer to achieve high levels of cypin or cypin mutant (cypinΔPDZ PSD-95 non-binding) expression cellularly and network-wide, respectively. Main results. Our analysis revealed that although overexpression of cypin and cypinΔPDZ increase dendrite numbers and decrease spine density, cypin and cypinΔPDZ distinctly regulate neuronal activity. At the single cell level, cypin promotes decreases in bursting activity while cypinΔPDZ reduces sEPSC frequency and further decreases bursting compared to cypin. At the network level, by using the Fano factor as a measure of spike count variability, cypin overexpression results in an increase in variability of spike count, and this effect is abolished when cypin cannot bind PSD-95. This variability is also dependent on baseline activity levels and on mean spike rate over time. Finally, our spike sorting data show that overexpression of cypin results in a more complex distribution of spike waveforms and that binding to PSD-95 is essential for this complexity. Significance. Our data suggest that dendrite morphology does not play a major role in cypin action on electrical activity.

  16. Evidence for migratory spawning behavior by morphologically distinct Cisco (Coregonus artedi) from a small inland lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Alexander J.; Weidel, Brian C.; Leneker, Mellisa; Solomon, Christopher T.

    2017-01-01

    Conservation and management of rare fishes relies on managers having the most informed understanding of the underlying ecology of the species under investigation. Cisco (Coregonus artedi), a species of conservation concern, is a cold-water pelagic fish that is notoriously variable in morphometry and life history. Published reports indicate, at spawning time, Cisco in great lakes may migrate into or through large rivers, whereas those in small lakes move inshore. Nonetheless, during a sampling trip to Follensby Pond, a 393 ha lake in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, we observed gravid Cisco swimming over an outlet sill from a narrow shallow stream and into the lake. We opportunistically dip-netted a small subsample of 11 individuals entering the lake from the stream (three female, eight male) and compared them to fish captured between 2013 and 2015 with gillnets in the lake. Stream-captured Cisco were considerably larger than lake-captured individuals at a given age, had significantly larger asymptotic length, and were present only as mature individuals between age of 3 and age 5. These results could suggest either Cisco are migrating from a nearby lake to spawn in Follensby Pond, or that a distinct morphotype of Cisco from Follensby Pond migrates out to the stream and then back in at spawning time. Our results appear to complement a handful of other cases in which Cisco spawning migrations have been documented and to provide the first evidence for such behavior in a small inland lake.

  17. Measuring and evaluating morphological asymmetry in fish: distinct lateral dimorphism in the jaws of scale-eating cichlids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Hiroki; Yasugi, Masaki; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Takahashi, Satoshi; Hori, Michio

    2013-11-01

    The left-right asymmetry of scale-eating Tanganyikan cichlids is described as a unilateral topographical shift of the quadratomandibular joints. This morphological laterality has a genetic basis and has therefore been used as a model for studying negative frequency-dependent selection and the resulting oscillation in frequencies of two genotypes, lefty and righty, in a population. This study aims were to confirm this laterality in Perissodus microlepis Boulenger and P. straeleni (Poll) and evaluate an appropriate method for measuring and testing the asymmetry. Left-right differences in the height of the mandible posterior ends (HMPE) and the angle between the neurocranium and vertebrae of P. microlepis and P. straeleni were measured on skeletal specimens. Snout-bending angle was also measured using a dorsal image of the same individuals following a previous method. To define which distribution model, fluctuating asymmetry (FA), directional asymmetry (DA), or antisymmetry (AS), best fit to the lateral asymmetry of the traits, we provided an R package, IASD. As a result, HMPE and neurocranium-vertebrae angle of both species were best fitted to AS, suggesting that P. microlepis and P. straeleni showed a distinct dimorphism in these traits, although snout-bending angle of P. microlepis was best fitted to FA. Measurement error was low for HMPE comparing the snout-bending angle in P. microlepis, indicating that measuring HMPE is a more accurate method. The scale-eating tribe Perissodini showed distinct antisymmetry in the jaw skeleton and neurocranium-vertebrae angle, and this laterality remains a valid marker for further evolutionary studies.

  18. Morphological and molecular identification of phytophthora species from maple trees in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milenković Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the study performed with aims to determine the presence and diversity of Phytophthora species on maple trees in Serbia. Due to high aggressiveness and their multicyclic nature, presence of these pathogens is posing significant threat to forestry and biodiversity. In total, 29 samples of water, soil and tissues were taken from 10 different localities, and six different maple hosts were tested. After the isolation tests, 17 samples from five different maple hosts were positive for the presence of Phytophthora spp., and 31 isolates were obtained. After the detailed morphological and physiological classification, four distinct groups of isolates were separated. DNA was extracted from selected representative isolates and molecular identification with sequencing of ITS region was performed. Used ITS4 and ITS6 primers successfully amplified the genomic DNA of chosen isolates and morphological identification of obtained isolates was confirmed after the sequencing. Four different Phytophthora species were detected, including P. cactorum, P. gonapodyides, P. plurivora and P. lacustris. The most common isolated species was homothallic, and with very variable and semipapillate sporangia, P. plurivora with 22 obtained isolates. This is the first report of P. plurivora and P. gonapodyides on A. campestre, P. plurivora and P. lacustris on Acer heldreichii and first report of P. lacustris on A. pseudoplatanus and A. tataricum in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 37008

  19. Morphological responses of crop and weed species of different growth forms to ultraviolet-B radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, P.W.; Flint, S.D.; Caldwell, M.M.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation (280-320 nanometers) on the morphology of 12 common dicot and monocot crop or weed species was examined to determine whether any common responses could be found that might, in turn, be useful in predicting possible changes in competitive balance under solar UV-B enhancement. Under glasshouse conditions, UV-B exposure (simulating a 20% reduction in stratospheric ozone at Logan, Utah) was found to reduce leaf blade and internode lengths and increase leaf and axillary shoot production in several species. Overall, the directions of these trends were similar in the majority of species that exhibited a significant response. These morphological changes occurred without any significant reduction in total shoot dry matter production. There was no clear distinction in the response of crops and weeds, though monocots were found to be generally more responsive than dicots. Previous work in dense canopies has shown that the photomorphogenetic effects of UV-B alter leaf placement and thereby influence competition for light. Our results suggest that, under these conditions, changes in competitive balance resulting from increased UV-B might be expected more frequently when monocots are involved in mixtures, rather than mixtures of only dicots

  20. Morphological evidence uncovers a new species of Goniurosaurus (Squamata: Eublepharidae) from the Hainan Island, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Run-Bang; Wang, Ning; Chen, Bei; Liang, Bin

    2018-01-03

    A new species of the genus Goniurosaurus, G. zhoui sp. nov., is described based on specimens collected from karst areas in Hainan Island, China. Quantitative comparison of morphological traits and egg size with two known endemic species in Hainan Island and other known congeners confirmed the distinctiveness of G. zhoui sp. nov., which has a moderate size with a snout-vent length of 93.4-97.4 mm; light purple-brown dorsal ground color in adults; a posteriorly protracted nuchal loop on nape; four faint, purple-gray body bands bearing dark purple spots between and on them; eight nasal scales surrounding nares; single internasal; 49-62 eyelid fringe scales; 130-140 scales around midbody; 11 granular scales surrounding the dorsal tubercles; 36-38 precloacal pores in males (absent in females); claws sheathed by four scales, two lateral scales long and curved. We provide the first data on the natural history of the new species and an expanded key to Goniurosaurus species on Hainan Island and the adjacent mainland. The discovery of the new species facilitates our understanding of the speciation process on continental islands.

  1. Barcoding of Asian seabass across its geographic range provides evidence for its bifurcation into two distinct species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha eVij

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Asian seabass or barramundi (Lates calcarifer is an important food fish with commercial value and a wide geographic distribution. Though some reports based on molecular and/or morphological data exist, a comprehensive effort to establish species identity across its range is lacking. In order to address this issue and especially to ascertain whether the wide-spread distribution has resulted in bifurcation of the species, we collected Asian seabass samples from various locations representing the Western and Eastern Coastline of India, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Bangladesh and Australia. Samples from Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand and Singapore were collected as part of a previous study. DNA sequence variations, including cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI, 16S rDNA and the highly variable D-loop (or control region, were examined to establish species delineation. Data from all the sequences analyzed concordantly point to the existence of at least two distinct species - one representing the Indian subcontinent plus Myanmar, and a second, representing Southeast Asia (Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia plus Northern Australia. These data are useful for conservation ecology, aquaculture management, for establishing the extent of genetic diversity in the Asian seabass and implementing selective breeding programs for members of this species complex.

  2. 77 FR 20774 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Distinct Population Segments of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 223 RIN 0648-XZ58 Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Distinct Population Segments of the Bearded Seal AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

  3. 76 FR 15932 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Listing of Nine Distinct Population Segments of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... Loggerhead Sea Turtles as Endangered or Threatened AGENCIES: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS... Distinct Population Segments (DPS) of loggerhead sea turtles, Caretta caretta, as endangered or threatened... populations of loggerhead sea turtle'' as an endangered species under the ESA. NMFS published a notice in the...

  4. 75 FR 30769 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Listing of Nine Distinct Population Segments of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Parts 223 and 224 RIN 0648-AY49 Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Listing of Nine Distinct Population Segments of Loggerhead Sea Turtles as Endangered or... loggerhead sea turtles as endangered or threatened, which was published on March 16, 2010, until September 13...

  5. A natural M RNA reassortant arising from two distinct tospovirus species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete nucleotide sequence of a tospovirus isolate from south Florida tomatoes was determined. Phylogenetic reconstructions of each genomic RNA segment showed that this isolate was produced by reassortment of segments from two distinct tospovirus species. The S and L segments are most closel...

  6. Introgression between ecologically distinct species following increased salinity in the Colorado Delta- Worldwide implications for impacted estuary diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive L.F. Lau

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigate hybridization and introgression between ecologically distinct sister species of silverside fish in the Gulf of California through combined analysis of morphological, sequence, and genotypic data. Water diversions in the past century turned the Colorado River Delta from a normal estuary to a hypersaline inverse estuary, raising concerns for the local fauna, much of which is endangered. Salinity differences are known to generate ecological species pairs and we anticipated that loss of the fresher-water historic salinity regime could alter the adaptive factors maintaining distinction between the broadly distributed Gulf-endemic Colpichthys regis and the narrowly restricted Delta-endemic Colpichthys hubbsi, the species that experienced dramatic environmental change. In this altered environmental context, these long-isolated species (as revealed by Cytochrome b sequences show genotypic (RAG1, microsatellites evidence of active hybridization where the species ranges abut, as well as directional introgression from C. regis into the range center of C. hubbsi. Bayesian group assignment (STRUCTURE on six microsatellite loci and multivariate analyses (DAPC on both microsatellites and phenotypic data further support substantial recent admixture between the sister species. Although we find no evidence for recent population decline in C. hubbsi based on mitochondrial sequence, introgression may be placing an ancient ecological species at risk of extinction. Such introgressive extinction risk should also pertain to other ecological species historically sustained by the now changing Delta environment. More broadly, salinity gradient associated ecological speciation is evident in silverside species pairs in many estuarine systems around the world. Ecological species pairs among other taxa in such systems are likely poorly understood or cryptic. As water extraction accelerates in river systems worldwide, salinity gradients will necessarily be

  7. Introgression between ecologically distinct species following increased salinity in the Colorado Delta- Worldwide implications for impacted estuary diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Clive L F; Jacobs, David K

    2017-01-01

    We investigate hybridization and introgression between ecologically distinct sister species of silverside fish in the Gulf of California through combined analysis of morphological, sequence, and genotypic data. Water diversions in the past century turned the Colorado River Delta from a normal estuary to a hypersaline inverse estuary, raising concerns for the local fauna, much of which is endangered. Salinity differences are known to generate ecological species pairs and we anticipated that loss of the fresher-water historic salinity regime could alter the adaptive factors maintaining distinction between the broadly distributed Gulf-endemic Colpichthys regis and the narrowly restricted Delta-endemic Colpichthys hubbsi , the species that experienced dramatic environmental change. In this altered environmental context, these long-isolated species (as revealed by Cytochrome b sequences) show genotypic (RAG1, microsatellites) evidence of active hybridization where the species ranges abut, as well as directional introgression from C. regis into the range center of C. hubbsi . Bayesian group assignment (STRUCTURE) on six microsatellite loci and multivariate analyses (DAPC) on both microsatellites and phenotypic data further support substantial recent admixture between the sister species. Although we find no evidence for recent population decline in C. hubbsi based on mitochondrial sequence, introgression may be placing an ancient ecological species at risk of extinction. Such introgressive extinction risk should also pertain to other ecological species historically sustained by the now changing Delta environment. More broadly, salinity gradient associated ecological speciation is evident in silverside species pairs in many estuarine systems around the world. Ecological species pairs among other taxa in such systems are likely poorly understood or cryptic. As water extraction accelerates in river systems worldwide, salinity gradients will necessarily be altered, impacting

  8. Efficient distinction of invasive aquatic plant species from non-invasive related species using DNA barcoding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghahramanzadeh, R.; Esselink, G.; Kodde, L.P.; Duistermaat, H.; Valkenburg, van J.L.C.H.; Marashi, S.H.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Wiel, van de C.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are regarded as threats to global biodiversity. Among invasive aliens, a number of plant species belonging to the genera Myriophyllum, Ludwigia and Cabomba, and to the Hydrocharitaceae family pose a particular ecological threat to water bodies. Therefore, one would try to

  9. Evidence for ontogenetically and morphologically distinct alternative reproductive tactics in the invasive round Goby Neogobius melanostomus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Katinka; Jong, De Karen; Kessel, Van Nils; Hinde, Camilla A.; Nagelkerke, Leopold A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative reproductive tactics are characterized by the occurrence of discrete alternative morphs that differ in behavioural, morphological and physiological traits within the same sex. Although much effort has been made to describe the behaviour, morphology and physiology of such alternative

  10. Molecular and morphological approaches for species delimitation and hybridization investigations of two Cichla species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea A. F. Mourão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The hybridization is a widely-discussed issue in several studies with fish species. For some authors, hybridization may be related with diversification and speciation of several groups, or also with the extinction of populations or species. Difficulties to differentiate species and hybrids may be a problem to correctly apply a management of wild species, because hybrid lineages, especially the advanced ones, may resemble the parental species. The genus Cichla Bloch & Schneider, 1801 constitutes an interesting experimental model, considering that hybridization and taxonomic uncertainties hinder a correct identification. Considering these problems, in this study, we developed genetic methodologies and applied meristic and morphometric approaches in wild samples in order to identify species and for test a possible hybridization between Cichla kelberi Kullander & Ferreira, 2006 and Cichla piquiti Kullander & Ferreira, 2006. For this, C. kelberi, C. piquiti and potential hybrid ( carijó individuals were collected in Paraná and Tietê rivers (SP, Brazil. For meristic and morphometric methods, the individuals were analyzed using the statistical software Pcord 5:31, while for molecular methods, primers for PCR-multiplex were designed and enzyme for PCR-RFLP were selected, under the species-specific nucleotide. All results indicated that the carijó is not an interspecific hybrid, because it presented identical genetic pattern and morphology closed to C. piquiti. Thus, we propose that carijó is a C. piquiti morphotype. In addition, this study promotes a new molecular tool that could be used in future research, monitoring and management programs of the genus Cichla.

  11. Sex and caste-specific variation in compound eye morphology of five honeybee species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Streinzer

    Full Text Available Ranging from dwarfs to giants, the species of honeybees show remarkable differences in body size that have placed evolutionary constrains on the size of sensory organs and the brain. Colonies comprise three adult phenotypes, drones and two female castes, the reproductive queen and sterile workers. The phenotypes differ with respect to tasks and thus selection pressures which additionally constrain the shape of sensory systems. In a first step to explore the variability and interaction between species size-limitations and sex and caste-specific selection pressures in sensory and neural structures in honeybees, we compared eye size, ommatidia number and distribution of facet lens diameters in drones, queens and workers of five species (Apis andreniformis, A. florea, A. dorsata, A. mellifera, A. cerana. In these species, male and female eyes show a consistent sex-specific organization with respect to eye size and regional specialization of facet diameters. Drones possess distinctly enlarged eyes with large dorsal facets. Aside from these general patterns, we found signs of unique adaptations in eyes of A. florea and A. dorsata drones. In both species, drone eyes are disproportionately enlarged. In A. dorsata the increased eye size results from enlarged facets, a likely adaptation to crepuscular mating flights. In contrast, the relative enlargement of A. florea drone eyes results from an increase in ommatidia number, suggesting strong selection for high spatial resolution. Comparison of eye morphology and published mating flight times indicates a correlation between overall light sensitivity and species-specific mating flight times. The correlation suggests an important role of ambient light intensities in the regulation of species-specific mating flight times and the evolution of the visual system. Our study further deepens insights into visual adaptations within the genus Apis and opens up future perspectives for research to better understand the

  12. Distinct signaling roles of ceramide species in yeast revealed through systematic perturbation and systems biology analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefusco, David J; Chen, Lujia; Matmati, Nabil; Lu, Songjian; Newcomb, Benjamin; Cooper, Gregory F; Hannun, Yusuf A; Lu, Xinghua

    2013-10-29

    Ceramide, the central molecule of sphingolipid metabolism, is an important bioactive molecule that participates in various cellular regulatory events and that has been implicated in disease. Deciphering ceramide signaling is challenging because multiple ceramide species exist, and many of them may have distinct functions. We applied systems biology and molecular approaches to perturb ceramide metabolism in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and inferred causal relationships between ceramide species and their potential targets by combining lipidomic, genomic, and transcriptomic analyses. We found that during heat stress, distinct metabolic mechanisms controlled the abundance of different groups of ceramide species and provided experimental support for the importance of the dihydroceramidase Ydc1 in mediating the decrease in dihydroceramides during heat stress. Additionally, distinct groups of ceramide species, with different N-acyl chains and hydroxylations, regulated different sets of functionally related genes, indicating that the structural complexity of these lipids produces functional diversity. The transcriptional modules that we identified provide a resource to begin to dissect the specific functions of ceramides.

  13. Sexual distinction between 5th instar nymphs of six species of Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Aristeu da Rosa

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the analysis of sexual morphological differences observed in 5th instar nymphs of the following species: Panstrongylus megistus; Rhodnius neglectus; Triatoma brasiliensis; T. infestans; T. matogrosensis and T. tibiamaculata. Male and female nymphs were examined and photographed with a Scanning Electron Microscope. The 9th segment dimensions of dorsal and ventral faces were determined through a Profile Projector. Results and statistical analysis showed significant differences: the 9th sternite is significantly broader in male than female nymphs, while in five species; tergites in female nymphs are broad and in male are narrow.

  14. Ecological niche modelling and nDNA sequencing support a new, morphologically cryptic beetle species unveiled by DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawlitschek, Oliver; Porch, Nick; Hendrich, Lars; Balke, Michael

    2011-02-09

    DNA sequencing techniques used to estimate biodiversity, such as DNA barcoding, may reveal cryptic species. However, disagreements between barcoding and morphological data have already led to controversy. Species delimitation should therefore not be based on mtDNA alone. Here, we explore the use of nDNA and bioclimatic modelling in a new species of aquatic beetle revealed by mtDNA sequence data. The aquatic beetle fauna of Australia is characterised by high degrees of endemism, including local radiations such as the genus Antiporus. Antiporus femoralis was previously considered to exist in two disjunct, but morphologically indistinguishable populations in south-western and south-eastern Australia. We constructed a phylogeny of Antiporus and detected a deep split between these populations. Diagnostic characters from the highly variable nuclear protein encoding arginine kinase gene confirmed the presence of two isolated populations. We then used ecological niche modelling to examine the climatic niche characteristics of the two populations. All results support the status of the two populations as distinct species. We describe the south-western species as Antiporus occidentalis sp.n. In addition to nDNA sequence data and extended use of mitochondrial sequences, ecological niche modelling has great potential for delineating morphologically cryptic species.

  15. Chlamydia infection across host species boundaries promotes distinct sets of transcribed anti-apoptotic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eMessinger

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydiae, obligate intracellular bacteria, cause significant human and veterinary associated diseases. Having emerged an estimated 700-million years ago, these bacteria have twice adapted to humans as a host species, causing sexually transmitted infection (C. trachomatis and respiratory associated disease (C. pneumoniae. The principle mechanism of host cell defense against these intracellular bacteria is the induction of cell death via apoptosis. However, in the arms race of co-evolution, Chlamydiae have developed mechanisms to promote cell viability and inhibit cell death. Herein we examine the impact of Chlamydiae infection across multiple host species on transcription of anti-apoptotic genes. We found mostly distinct patterns of gene expression (Mcl1 and cIAPs elicited by each pathogen-host pair indicating Chlamydiae infection across host species boundaries does not induce a universally shared host response. Understanding species specific host-pathogen interactions is paramount to deciphering how potential pathogens become emerging diseases.

  16. Integrating DNA barcodes and morphology for species delimitation in the Corynoneura group (Diptera: Chironomidae: Orthocladiinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, F L; Wiedenbrug, S

    2014-02-01

    In this study, we use DNA barcodes for species delimitation to solve taxonomic conflicts in 86 specimens of 14 species belonging to the Corynoneura group (Diptera: Chironomidae: Orthocladiinae), from the Atlantic Forest, Brazil. Molecular analysis of cytochrome c-oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences supported 14 cohesive species groups, of which two similar groups were subsequently associated with morphological variation at the pupal stage. Eleven species previously described based on morphological criteria were linked to DNA markers. Furthermore, there is the possibility that there may be cryptic species within the Corynoneura group, since one group of species presented internal grouping, although no morphological divergence was observed. Our results support DNA-barcoding as an excellent tool for species delimitation in groups where taxonomy by means of morphology is difficult or even impossible.

  17. Morphological re-description and phylogenetic relationship of five myxosporean species of the family Myxobolidae infecting Nile tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Gaber, Rewaida; Abdel-Ghaffar, Fathy; Maher, Sherein; El-Mallah, Al-Mahy; Al Quraishy, Saleh; Mehlhorn, Heinz

    2017-05-11

    Freshwater fish have a major economic and nutritional importance worldwide. Myxosporeans are highly dangerous parasites that infect different fish species, causing severe damage to a large number of economically important species, especially in aquaculture. We conducted a survey of myxosporean parasites infecting Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus (Perciformes: Cichlidae) collected from different localities along the River Nile passing through Giza province, Egypt. Out of 100 fish specimens collected, 45 were found to be naturally infected with these parasites in the region of the trunk kidney. Light microscopic examination revealed the presence of 5 distinct myxosporean species belonging to 2 different genera, viz. Myxobolus and Triangula, belonging to the family Myxobolidae; all 5 species have been previously described. Morphological characteristics, host specificity and geographical distribution, tissue tropism, and molecular analysis of the partial sequence of small subunit ribosomal DNA gene revealed that the recovered myxosporean species described herein were genetically distinct from other myxozoan species but had 95% sequence similarity to M. cerebralis. Also, phylogenetic analysis placed the present myxosporean species in the freshwater Myxobolus clade, which is a sister group of freshwater Myxobolus/Henneguya species.

  18. Differentiation of Three Centella Species in Australia as Inferred from Morphological Characteristics, ISSR Molecular Fingerprinting and Phytochemical Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Ali; Cho, Jun-Lae; Wong, Ka Ho; Li, Kong M; Razmovski-Naumovski, Valentina; Li, George Q

    2017-01-01

    Centella asiatica is one of the popular herbs used for inflammatory and neural conditions. Its differentiation from similar species is currently lacking. The aims of this study were to differentiate the three closely related Centella species using methods based on morphological characters, genetic biodiversity, phytochemical compositions and antioxidant activities. According to the morphological characteristics, the collected samples were identified as three species: C. asiatica, Centella cordifolia and Centella erecta and clustered into three groups based on their morphometric variability. Dendogram constructed on the basis of the intersimple sequence repeats (ISSR) analyses were consistent with the morphological grouping. Centella cordifolia had the highest triterpene glycosides, phenolics and antioxidant capacity, followed by C. asiatica , then C. erecta , therefore, was genetically and chemically closer to C. asiatica , while C. erecta was distinctively different from them. The results confirm the occurrence of the closely related three species of Centella in Australia, and the differentiation among them can be achieved via the combination of morphometric, molecular and phytochemical methods. This first comparative botanical study on Centella species provides a foundation for further systematic study and medicinal development of Centella .

  19. Differentiation of Three Centella Species in Australia as Inferred from Morphological Characteristics, ISSR Molecular Fingerprinting and Phytochemical Composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alqahtani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Centella asiatica is one of the popular herbs used for inflammatory and neural conditions. Its differentiation from similar species is currently lacking. The aims of this study were to differentiate the three closely related Centella species using methods based on morphological characters, genetic biodiversity, phytochemical compositions and antioxidant activities. According to the morphological characteristics, the collected samples were identified as three species: C. asiatica, Centella cordifolia and Centella erecta and clustered into three groups based on their morphometric variability. Dendogram constructed on the basis of the intersimple sequence repeats (ISSR analyses were consistent with the morphological grouping. Centella cordifolia had the highest triterpene glycosides, phenolics and antioxidant capacity, followed by C. asiatica, then C. erecta, therefore, was genetically and chemically closer to C. asiatica, while C. erecta was distinctively different from them. The results confirm the occurrence of the closely related three species of Centella in Australia, and the differentiation among them can be achieved via the combination of morphometric, molecular and phytochemical methods. This first comparative botanical study on Centella species provides a foundation for further systematic study and medicinal development of Centella.

  20. A distribution-oriented approach to support landscape connectivity for ecologically distinct bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, José M; Alagador, Diogo; Salgueiro, Pedro; Mira, António

    2018-01-01

    Managing landscape connectivity is a widely recognized overarching strategy for conserving biodiversity in human-impacted landscapes. However, planning the conservation and management of landscape connectivity of multiple and ecologically distinct species is still challenging. Here we provide a spatially-explicit framework which identifies and prioritizes connectivity conservation and restoration actions for species with distinct habitat affinities. Specifically, our study system comprised three groups of common bird species, forest-specialists, farmland-specialists, and generalists, populating a highly heterogeneous agricultural countryside in the southwestern Iberian Peninsula. We first performed a comprehensive analysis of the environmental variables underlying the distributional patterns of each bird species to reveal generalities in their guild-specific responses to landscape structure. Then, we identified sites which could be considered pivotal in maintaining current levels of landscape connectivity for the three bird guilds simultaneously, as well as the number and location of sites that need to be restored to maximize connectivity levels. Interestingly, we found that a small number of sites defined the shortest connectivity paths for the three bird guilds simultaneously, and were therefore considered key for conservation. Moreover, an even smaller number of sites were identified as critical to expand the landscape connectivity at maximum for the regional bird assemblage as a whole. Our spatially-explicit framework can provide valuable decision-making support to conservation practitioners aiming to identify key connectivity and restoration sites, a particularly urgent task in rapidly changing landscapes such as agroecosystems.

  1. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variation of common species predicts ranges of threatened ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Trevon L.; Thomassen, Henri A.; Peralvo, Manuel; Buermann, Wolfgang; Milá, Borja; Kieswetter, Charles M.; Jarrín-V, Pablo; Devitt, Susan E. Cameron; Mason, Eliza; Schweizer, Rena M.; Schlunegger, Jasmin; Chan, Janice; Wang, Ophelia; Schneider, Christopher J.; Pollinger, John P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Graham, Catherine H.; Wayne, Robert K.; Smith, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting where threatened species occur is useful for making informed conservation decisions. However, because they are usually rare, surveying threatened species is often expensive and time intensive. Here, we show how regions where common species exhibit high genetic and morphological divergence among populations can be used to predict the occurrence of species of conservation concern. Intraspecific variation of common species of birds, bats and frogs from Ecuador were found to be a significantly better predictor for the occurrence of threatened species than suites of environmental variables or the occurrence of amphibians and birds. Fully 93 per cent of the threatened species analysed had their range adequately represented by the geographical distribution of the morphological and genetic variation found in seven common species. Both higher numbers of threatened species and greater genetic and morphological variation of common species occurred along elevation gradients. Higher levels of intraspecific divergence may be the result of disruptive selection and/or introgression along gradients. We suggest that collecting data on genetic and morphological variation in common species can be a cost effective tool for conservation planning, and that future biodiversity inventories include surveying genetic and morphological data of common species whenever feasible. PMID:23595273

  2. Distinct morphology and current patterns of astrocytes in the rat hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Anděrová, Miroslava; Pivoňková, Helena; Benešová, Jana; Butenko, Olena; Chvátal, Alexandr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 13 (2009), S58-S59 ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glia l Cells in Health and Disease /9./. 09.09.2009-12.09.2009, Paris] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : Hippocampus * Morphology Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  3. Synthesis and properties of core–shell fluorescent hybrids with distinct morphologies based on carbon dots

    KAUST Repository

    Markova, Zdenka; Bourlinos, Athanasios B.; Safarova, Klara; Polakova, Katerina; Tucek, Jiri; Medrik, Ivo; Siskova, Karolina; Petr, Jan; Krysmann, Marta; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zboril, Radek

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent core-shell nanohybrids with the shells derived from carbon dots and cores differing in the chemical nature and morphology were synthesized. Hybrid nanoparticles combine fluorescence with other functionalities such as magnetic response on a single platform. These hybrids can be used in various bioapplications as demonstrated with labeling of stem cells. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012.

  4. Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma of the Female Genital Tract: A Morphologic, Immunohistochemical, and Molecular Cytogenetic Study of 10 Cases With Emphasis on its Distinction From Morphologic Mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoolmeester, J Kenneth; Carlson, Joseph; Keeney, Gary L; Fritchie, Karen J; Oliva, Esther; Young, Robert H; Nucci, Marisa R

    2017-05-01

    Alveolar soft part sarcoma (ASPS) is a morphologically distinctive neoplasm of unknown differentiation that bears a characteristic gene fusion involving ASPSCR1 and TFE3. ASPS can occur in the female genital tract, but is rare. Eleven cases with an initial diagnosis of ASPS at female genital tract sites were evaluated for their morphologic features and immunoprofile using a panel of antibodies (TFE3, HMB45, melan-A, smooth muscle actin, desmin, and h-Caldesmon). In addition, the presence of TFE3 rearrangement and subsequent ASPSCR1-TFE3 fusion were determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Ten tumors retained their classification as ASPS based on their morphologic appearance, immunohistochemical profile, and demonstration of ASPSCR1-TFE3 fusion. The remaining case was reclassified as conventional-type PEComa due to its pattern of HMB45, melan-A, and desmin positivity as well as absence of TFE3 rearrangement. Sites of the 10 ASPS were uterine corpus (3), cervix (2), uterus not further specified (2), vagina (2), and vulva (1). The age of the patients ranged from 15 to 68 years (mean 34 y, median 32 y). The tumors demonstrated a spectrum of morphologic features, but all had a consistent immunophenotype of strong TFE3 nuclear expression and lack of muscle (smooth muscle actin, desmin, h-Caldesmon) and melanocytic (melan-A, HMB45) markers, except focal positivity for HMB45 in 1. Follow-up was available for 4 patients ranging from 1 to 35 months (mean 15 mo, median 25 mo) and they were alive and had no evidence of recurrence or metastasis at last follow-up. Distinguishing ASPS from its morphologic mimics, particularly PEComa, is important due to increasingly efficacious targeted agents such as MET-selective and VEGF signaling inhibitors in the former and mTOR inhibition therapy in the latter.

  5. Role of codeposited impurities during growth. I. Explaining distinctive experimental morphology on Cu(0 0 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Pimpinelli, Alberto; Einstein, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    A unified explanation of the physics underlying all the distinctive features of the growth instabilities observed on Cu vicinals has long eluded theorists. Recently, kinetic Monte Carlo studies showed that codeposition of impurities during growth could account for the key distinctive experimental observations [Hamouda , Phys. Rev. BPLRBAQ0556-280510.1103/PhysRevB.77.245430 77, 245430 (2008)]. To identify the responsible impurity atom, we compute the nearest-neighbor binding energies (ENN) and terrace diffusion barriers (Ed) for several candidate impurity atoms on Cu(0 0 1) using DFT-based VASP. Our calculations show that codeposition (with Cu) of midtransition elements, such as Fe, Mn, and W, could—in conjunction with substantial Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers—cause the observed instabilities; when the experimental setup is considered, W emerges to be the most likely candidate. We discuss the role of impurities in nanostructuring of surfaces.

  6. Molecular and Morphological Species Boundaries in the Gorgonian Octocoral Genus Pterogorgia (Octocorallia: Gorgoniidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman H Wirshing

    Full Text Available Most gorgonian octocoral species are described using diagnostic characteristics of their sclerites (microscopic skeletal components. Species in the genus Pterogorgia, however, are separated primarily by differences in their calyx and branch morphology. Specimens of a morphologically unusual Pterogorgia collected from Saba Bank in the NE Caribbean Sea were found with calyx morphology similar to P. citrina and branch morphology similar to P. guadalupensis. In order to test morphological species boundaries, and the validity of calyx and branch morphology as systematic characters, a phylogenetic analysis was undertaken utilizing partial gene fragments of three mitochondrial (mtMutS, cytochrome b, and igr4; 726bp total and two nuclear (ITS2, 166bp; and SRP54 intron, 143bp loci. The datasets for nuclear and mitochondrial loci contained few phylogenetically informative sites, and tree topologies did not resolve any of the morphological species as monophyletic groups. Instead, the mitochondrial loci and SRP54 each recovered two clades but were slightly incongruent, with a few individuals of P. guadalupensis represented in both clades with SRP54. A concatenated dataset of these loci grouped all P. anceps and P. guadalupensis in a clade, and P. citrina and the Pterogorgia sp. from Saba Bank in a sister clade, but with minimal variation/resolution within each clade. However, in common with other octocoral taxa, the limited genetic variation may not have been able to resolve whether branch variation represents intraspecific variation or separate species. Therefore, these results suggest that there are at least two phylogenetic lineages of Pterogorgia at the species level, and the atypical Pterogorgia sp. may represent an unusual morphotype of P. citrina, possibly endemic to Saba Bank. Branch morphology does not appear to be a reliable morphological character to differentiate Pterogorgia species (e.g., branches "flat" or "3-4 edges" in P. guadalupensis and P

  7. A new morphologically distinct avian malaria parasite that fails detection by established polymerase chain reaction-based protocols for amplification of the cytochrome B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehtindjiev, Pavel; Križanauskienė, Asta; Bensch, Staffan; Palinauskas, Vaidas; Asghar, Muhammad; Dimitrov, Dimitar; Scebba, Sergio; Valkiūnas, Gediminas

    2012-06-01

    Plasmodium polymorphum n. sp. (Haemosporida, Plasmodiidae) was found in the skylark, Alauda arvensis (Passeriformes: Alaudidae), during autumnal migration in southern Italy. This organism is illustrated and described based on the morphology of its blood stages. The most distinctive feature of this malaria parasite is the clear preference of its blood stages (trophozoites, meronts, and gametocytes) for immature red blood cells, including erythroblasts. Based on preference of erythrocytic meronts for immature red blood cells, P. polymorphum is most similar to species of the subgenus Huffia . This parasite can be readily distinguished from all other bird malaria parasites, including Plasmodium ( Huffia ) spp., due to preferential development and maturation of its gametocytes in immature red blood cells, a unique character for avian Plasmodium spp. In addition, the margins of nuclei in blood stages of P. polymorphum are markedly smooth and distinct; this is also a distinct diagnostic feature of this parasite. Plasmodium polymorphum has been recorded only in the skylark; it is probably a rare parasite, whose host range and geographical distribution remain unclear. Microscopic examination detected a light infection of Plasmodium relictum (lineage GRW11, parasitemia of 50-fold higher than that of P. relictum and several different primers were tested, we suggest that the failure to amplify P. polymorphum is a more complex problem than why co-infections are commonly overlooked in PCR-based studies. We suggest possible explanations of these results and call for additional research on evolution of mitochondrial genome of hemosporidian parasites.

  8. Is Homo heidelbergensis a distinct species? New insight on the Mauer mandible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier, Aurélien; Marchal, François; Condemi, Silvana

    2009-03-01

    The discovery of new fossils in Africa, Asia, and Europe, and the recognition of a greater diversity in the middle Pleistocene fossil record, has led to a reconsideration of the species Homo heidelbergensis. This nomen, formulated by Schoetensack in 1908 to describe the Mauer jaw (Germany), was almost forgotten during most of the past century. Numerous fossils have been attributed to it but no consensus has arisen concerning their classification. The holotype anatomical traits are still poorly understood, and numerous fossils with no mandibular remains have been placed in the taxon. Some researchers propose H. heidelbergensis as an Afro-European taxon that is ancestral to both modern humans and Neandertals whereas others think it is a strictly European species that is part of the Neandertal lineage. We focus on the validity of H. heidelbergensis, using the traditional basis of species recognition: anatomical description. We provide a comparative morphological analysis using 47 anatomical traits of 36 Pleistocene fossils from Africa, Asia, and Europe and 35 extant human mandibles. We re-examine the mandibular features of Mauer and discuss the specimen's inclusion in H. heidelbergensis, as well as alternative evolutionary theories. To lend objectivity to specimen grouping, we use multiple correspondence analysis associated with hierarchical classification that creates clusters corresponding to phenetic similarities between jaws. Our phenetic and comparative morphological analyses support the validity of H. heidelbergensis as a taxon. A set of morphological features can be statistically identified for the definition of the species. Some traits can be used to delimit H. heidelbergensis in an evolutionary framework (e.g., foramina mentale posteriorly positioned, horizontal retromolar surface). Those traits are also present on African (e.g., Tighenif) and European (e.g., Sima de los Huesos) specimens that show a close relationship with the Mauer mandible. Therefore, the

  9. Comparative morphology and morphometry of alveolar macrophages from six mammalian species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haley, P.J.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Weissman, D.N.; Bice, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar macrophages (PAM) were collected from normal, healthy mice, rats, dogs, cynomolgus monkeys, chimpanzees and humans and evaluated for morphologic and morphometric characteristics. The PAM of mice, rats, and dogs were morphologically similar to one another and had statistically similar frequency distributions for PAM size. The range of cell size for these three species was narrow. The PAM of nonhuman primates and humans were morphologically heterogenous with increased cytoplasmic vacuolation, irregular cell outlines and increased numbers of multi nucleated cells as compared to the PAM of rodents and dogs. The mean size of human PAMs was statistically greater than that for all other species evaluated, including nonhuman primates. These data indicate that significant differences in PAM morphology and size exist among species and that such differences may be important when selecting species for studies of PAM. (author)

  10. The utricular otoliths, lapilli, of teleosts: their morphology and relevance for species identification and systematics studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Assis

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the general morphology of the utricular otoliths, lapilli, of teleost fishes, proposes a terminology for their parts, identifies their two major morphological types, provides some examples of their use in species identification, and discusses their usefulness in studies of fish phylogeny and systematics.

  11. Pannexin-1 channels show distinct morphology and no gap junction characteristics in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Anja; Grissmer, Alexander; Krause, Elmar; Tschernig, Thomas; Meier, Carola

    2016-03-01

    Pannexins (Panx) are proteins with a similar membrane topology to connexins, the integral membrane protein of gap junctions. Panx1 channels are generally of major importance in a large number of system and cellular processes and their function has been thoroughly characterized. In contrast, little is known about channel structure and subcellular distribution. We therefore determine the subcellular localization of Panx1 channels in cultured cells and aim at the identification of channel morphology in vitro. Using freeze-fracture replica immunolabeling on EYFP-Panx1-overexpressing HEK 293 cells, large particles were identified in plasma membranes, which were immunogold-labeled using either GFP or Panx1 antibodies. There was no labeling or particles in the nuclear membranes of these cells, pointing to plasma membrane localization of Panx1-EYFP channels. The assembly of particles was irregular, this being in contrast to the regular pattern of gap junctions. The fact that no counterparts were identified on apposing cells, which would have been indicative of intercellular signaling, supported the idea of Panx1 channels within one membrane. Control cells (transfected with EYFP only, non-transfected) were devoid of both particles and immunogold labeling. Altogether, this study provides the first demonstration of Panx1 channel morphology and assembly in intact cells. The identification of Panx1 channels as large particles within the plasma membrane provides the knowledge required to enable recognition of Panx1 channels in tissues in future studies. Thus, these results open up new avenues for the detailed analysis of the subcellular localization of Panx1 and of its nearest neighbors such as purinergic receptors in vivo.

  12. Ancient drainages divide cryptic species in Australia's arid zone: morphological and multi-gene evidence for four new species of Beaked Geckos (Rhynchoedura).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Mitzy; Doughty, Paul; Hutchinson, Mark N; Scott Keogh, J

    2011-12-01

    Deserts and other arid zones remain among the least studied biomes on Earth. Emerging genetic patterns of arid-distributed biota suggest a strong link between diversification history and both the onset of aridification and more recent cycles of severe aridification. A previous study based on 1 kb of mtDNA of the monotypic gecko genus Rhynchoedura identified five allopatric clades across the vast Australian arid zone. We supplemented this data with 2.2kb from three nuclear loci and additional mtDNA sequences. Phylogenetic relationships estimated from the mtDNA data with ML and Bayesian methods were largely concordant with relationships estimated with the nDNA data only, and mtDNA and nDNA data combined. These analyses, and coalescent-based species-tree inference methods implemented with (∗)BEAST, largely resolve the relationships among them. We also carried out an examination of 19 morphological characters for 268 museum specimens from across Australia, including all 197 animals for which we sequenced mtDNA. The mtDNA clades differ subtly in a number of morphological features, and we describe three of them as new species, raise a fourth from synonymy, and redescribe it and the type species, Rhynchoedura ornata. We also describe a morphologically distinctive new species from Queensland based on very few specimens. The distribution of arid zone clades across what is now relatively homogeneous sand deserts seems to be related to a topographic divide between the western uplands and eastern lowlands, with species' distributions correlated with dryland rivers and major drainage divides. The existence of five cryptic species within the formerly monotypic Rhynchoedura points to ancient divergences within the arid zone that likely were driven by wet phases as well as dry ones. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. VEGETATIVE MORPHOLOGY FOR SPECIES IDENTIFICATION OF TROPICAL TREES: FAMILY DISTRIBUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hargreaves

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Tree specimens from the ESAL herbarium of the Universidade Federal de Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil, were describedby vegetative characteristics using CARipé, a Microsoft Access database application specially developed for this study. Only onespecimen per species was usually described. Thus, 2 observers described 567 herbarium species as a base to test methods ofidentification as part of a larger study. The present work formed part of that study and provides information on the distribution of22 vegetative characters among 16 families having 10 or more species described. The characters are discussed. The study foundmarked differences, even discontinuities, of distributions of characters between those families. Therefore it should be possible toincorporate phylogenetic relationships into the identification process.

  14. Notes on behaviour and morphology of some species of Odonata in the Maltese Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Degabriele, Godwin

    2016-01-01

    The Maltese Islands have limited availability of freshwater, so the local species of Odonata may adopt behavioural strategies which they may not use elsewhere where water is readily available. Moreover, since local species of Odonata tend to be the more common, hardy and adaptable species found in neighbouring countries, their behavioural strategies and morphological features may be relatively less studied than species which are rarer and perhaps more vulnerable. Between September 2012 and Se...

  15. Morphological and histological characters of penile organization in eleven species of molossid bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelis, Manuela T; Bueno, Larissa M; Góes, Rejane M; Taboga, S R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana

    2018-04-01

    The penis is the reproductive organ that ensures efficient copulation and success of internal fertilization in all species of mammals, with special challenges for bats, where copulation can occur during flight. Comparative anatomical analyses of different species of bats can contribute to a better understanding of morphological diversity of this organ, concerning organization and function. In this study, we describe the external morphology and histomorphology of the penis and baculum in eleven species of molossid bats. The present study showed that penile organization in these species displayed the basic vascular mammalian pattern and had a similar pattern concerning the presence of the tissues constituting the penis, exhibiting three types of erectile tissue (the corpus cavernosum, accessory cavernous tissue, and corpus spongiosum) around the urethra. However, certain features varied among the species, demonstrating that most species are distinguishable by glans and baculum morphology and glans histological organization. Major variations in glans morphology were genus-specific, and the greatest similarities were shared by Eumops species and N. laticaudatus. The greatest interspecific similarities occurred between M. molossus and M. rufus and between Eumops species. Save for M. molossus and M. rufus, morphology of the baculum was species-specific; and in E. perotis, it did not occur in all specimens, indicating that it is probably under selection. In the histological organization, the most evident differences were number of septa and localization of the corpora cavernosa. In species with a baculum (Molossus, Eumops and Nyctinomops species), the corpora cavernosa predominantly occupied the dorsal region of the penile glans and is associated with the proximal (basal) portion of the baculum. In species that do not have a baculum (Cynomops, Molossops and Neoplatymops species), the corpora cavernosa predominantly occupied the ventro-lateral region of the glans

  16. A DNA-Based Assessment of the Phylogenetic Position of a Morphologically Distinct, Anchialine-Lake-Restricted Seahorse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Emily; Masonjones, Heather D; Jones, Adam G

    2016-11-01

    Isolated populations provide special opportunities to study local adaptation and incipient speciation. In some cases, however, morphological evolution can obscure the taxonomic status of recently founded populations. Here, we use molecular markers to show that an anchialine-lake-restricted population of seahorses, originally identified as Hippocampus reidi, appears on the basis of DNA data to be Hippocampus erectus We collected seahorses from Sweetings Pond, on Eleuthera Island, Bahamas, during the summer of 2014. We measured morphological traits and sequenced 2 genes, cytochrome b and ribosomal protein S7, from 19 seahorses in our sample. On the basis of morphology, Sweetings Pond seahorses could not be assigned definitively to either of the 2 species of seahorse, H. reidi and H. erectus, that occur in marine waters surrounding the Bahamas. However, our DNA-based phylogenetic analysis showed that the Sweetings Pond fish were firmly nested within the H. erectus clade with a Bayesian posterior probability greater than 0.99. Thus, Sweetings Pond seahorses most recently shared a common ancestor with H. erectus populations from the Western Atlantic. Interestingly, the seahorses from Sweetings Pond differ morphologically from other marine populations of H. erectus in having a more even torso to tail length ratio. The substantial habitat differences between Sweetings Pond and the surrounding coastal habitat make Sweetings Pond seahorses particularly interesting from the perspectives of conservation, local adaptation, and incipient speciation. © The American Genetic Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Morphological variation and host range of two Ganoderma species from Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotti, Carmel A; Sanderson, Frank R; Aitken, Elizabeth A B; Armstrong, Wendy

    2004-08-01

    Two species of Ganoderma belonging to different subgenera which cause disease on oil palms in PNG are identified by basidiome morphology and the morphology of their basidiospores. The names G. boninense and G. tornatum have been applied. Significant pleiomorphy was observed in basidiome characters amongst the specimens examined. This variation in most instances did not correlate well with host or host status. Spore morphology appeared uniform within a species and spore indices varied only slightly. G. tornatum was found to have a broad host range whereas G. boninense appears to be restricted to palms in Papua New Guinea.

  18. The morphology of saccular otoliths as a tool to identify different mugilid species from the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callicó Fortunato, Roberta; Benedito Durà, Vicent; Volpedo, Alejandra

    2014-06-01

    In the Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea there are 8 species of the Mugilidae family: Mugil cephalus, Liza aurata, Liza ramada, Oedalechilus labeo, Chelon labrosus, Liza saliens, Liza carinata and Liza haematocheila. The identification of mugilids is very important for local fisheries management and regulations, but it is difficult using gross morphological characters. This work aims to contribute to the identification of mullets present in the Northeastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea using saccular otolith features of each species. Specimens of C. labrosus, L. aurata, L. ramada, L. saliens and M. cephalus were obtained from Delta del Ebro (40°38'N-0°44'E) in artisanal catches. For L. carinata and O. labeo photographs extracted from AFORO online database were used. L. haematocheila was not studied for lack of otolith samples. A general pattern of the saccular otoliths for this family was identified: the shape of the otoliths are rectangular to oblong with irregular margins; they present a heterosulcoid, ostial sulcus acusticus, with an open funnel-like ostium to the anterior margin and a closed, tubular cauda, ending towards the posterior ventral corner, always larger than the ostium. In the present study, the mugilid species could be recognized using their saccular otolith morphology. Here we give the first key to identify Northeastern Atlantic and Mediterranean mullets. The distinctive features between the species were the position and centrality of the sulcus, the curvature of the cauda, the presence of areal depositions and plateaus, and the type of anterior and posterior regions. These features could be used not only to reinforce the identification keys through morphological and meristic characters of the species, but also to identify the species consumed by piscivores, being the otoliths the only identifiable remains of the individuals.

  19. Cytological and Morphological Analyses Reveal Distinct Features of Intestinal Development during Xenopus tropicalis Metamorphosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Kazuo; Shi, Yun-Bo

    2012-01-01

    Background The formation and/or maturation of adult organs in vertebrates often takes place during postembryonic development, a period around birth in mammals when thyroid hormone (T3) levels are high. The T3-dependent anuran metamorphosis serves as a model to study postembryonic development. Studies on the remodeling of the intestine during Xenopus (X.) laevis metamorphosis have shown that the development of the adult intestine involves de novo formation of adult stem cells in a process controlled by T3. On the other hand, X. tropicalis, highly related to X. laevis, offers a number of advantages for studying developmental mechanisms, especially at genome-wide level, over X. laevis, largely due to its shorter life cycle and sequenced genome. To establish X. tropicalis intestinal metamorphosis as a model for adult organogenesis, we analyzed the morphological and cytological changes in X. tropicalis intestine during metamorphosis. Methodology/Principal Findings We observed that in X. tropicalis, the premetamorphic intestine was made of mainly a monolayer of larval epithelial cells surrounded by little connective tissue except in the single epithelial fold, the typhlosole. During metamorphosis, the larval epithelium degenerates and adult epithelium develops to form a multi-folded structure with elaborate connective tissue and muscles. Interestingly, typhlosole, which is likely critical for adult epithelial development, is present along the entire length of the small intestine in premetamorphic tadpoles, in contrast to X. laevis, where it is present only in the anterior 1/3. T3-treatment induces intestinal remodeling, including the shortening of the intestine and the typhlosole, just like in X. laevis. Conclusions/Significance Our observations indicate that the intestine undergoes similar metamorphic changes in X. laevis and X. tropicalis, making it possible to use the large amount of information available on X. laevis intestinal metamorphosis and the genome sequence

  20. Infective larvae of Rhabdiasidae (Nematoda): comparative morphology of seven European species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, Yuriy; Junker, Kerstin; Bain, Odile

    2014-03-01

    The morphology of infective third-stage larvae of Rhabdias bufonis, R. rubrovenosa, R. sphaerocephala, R. fuscovenosa, R. elaphe, Entomelas entomelas and E. dujardini is described. The sheath structure in the studied larvae appeared to be similar to that described in other species of the family Rhabdiasidae, its chequered aspect being caused by a combination of outer longitudinal striations and inner longitudinal as well as transverse ridges. The larvae were similar in general morphology but differed in the presence/absence of anterior apical protuberances (pseudolabia), the shape and ornamentation of the tail tip, and the structure of lateral alae in the caudal region of the body. No relationship between the morphological characters of the larvae of the studied species and their taxonomic position or specificity of adult parasites to a particular host group was observed. Regardless, the larvae of each species can be identified by a combination of morphological peculiarities in the anterior and caudal regions of the body.

  1. Pollen morphology of the Phyllanthus species (Euphorbiaceae) occurring in New Guinea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Punt, W.

    1980-01-01

    Thirty-eight species from New Guinea have been examined and their pollen grains could be grouped into nine pollen types. Five of these types are more or less morphologically related. The largest type, the P. aeneus type, comprises 17 species and represents the section Nymania (K. Schumann) J.J.

  2. Species delimitation in the Gehyra nana (Squamata: Gekkonidae) complex: cryptic and divergent morphological evolution in the Australian Monsoonal Tropics, with the description of four new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Paul; Bourke, Gayleen; Tedeschi, Leonardo G; Pratt, Renae C; Oliver, Paul M; Palmer, Russell A; Moritz, Craig

    2018-04-04

    Recent advances in molecular genetic techniques and increased fine scale sampling in the Australian Monsoonal Tropics (AMT) have provided new impetus to reassess species boundaries in the Gehyra nana species complex, a clade of small-bodied, saxicolous geckos which are widely distributed across northern Australia. A recent phylogenomic analysis revealed eight deeply divergent lineages that occur as a series of overlapping distributions across the AMT and which, as a whole, are paraphyletic with four previously described species. Several of these lineages currently included in G. nana are phenotypically distinct, while others are highly conservative morphologically. Here we use an integrated approach to explore species delimitation in this complex. We redefine G. nana as a widespread taxon with complex genetic structure across the Kimberley of Western Australia and Top End of the Northern Territory, including a lineage with mtDNA introgressed from the larger-bodied G. multiporosa. We describe four new species with more restricted distributions within the G. nana complex. The new species are phylogenetically divergent and morphologically diagnosable, and include the relatively cryptic G. paranana sp. nov. from the western Northern Territory, the large-bodied G. pseudopunctata sp. nov. from the southern Kimberley ranges, G. granulum sp. nov., a small-bodied form with granules on the proximal lamellae from the north-west and southern Kimberley ranges and the small-bodied G. pluraporosa sp. nov. restricted to the northern Kimberley. Our revision largely stabilises the taxonomy of the G. nana complex, although further analyses of species limits among the remaining mostly parapatric lineages of G. nana sensu stricto are warranted.

  3. Larval morphology of Chrysomya nigripes (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a fly species of forensic importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Vogtsberger, Roy C; Boonchu, Noppawan; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Sripakdee, Duanghatai; Ngern-Klun, Radchadawan; Piangjai, Somsak; Sukontason, Kom

    2005-05-01

    The morphology of all instars of Chrysomya nigripes Aubertin, a blow fly species of forensic importance, is presented with the aid of both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Morphological features of the cephalopharyngeal skeleton, anterior spiracle, posterior spiracle, and dorsal spines between the prothorax and mesothorax are highlighted. No consistent features were found, even using SEM, for distinguishing the first instar of C. nigripes from that of Chrysomya megacephala (F.) or Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), two other commonly associated blow fly species in corpses in Thailand. Several features observed in second and third instars proved to be valuable characteristics for separating these species.

  4. Community genetics reveal elevated levels of sympatric gene flow among morphologically similar but not among morphologically dissimilar species of Lake Victoria cichlid fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konijnendijk, N.; Joyce, D.A.; Mrosso, H.D.J.; Egas, M.; Seehausen, O.

    2011-01-01

    We examined genetic structure among five species of Lake Victoria haplochromine cichlids in four island communities, using a full factorial sampling design that compared genetic differentiation between pairs of species and populations of varying morphological similarity and geographical proximity.

  5. [Characteristics of Cannabis sativa L.: seed morphology, germination and growth characteristics, and distinction from Hibiscus cannabinus L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Kitazawa, Takashi; Kawano, Noriaki; Iida, Osamu; Kawahara, Nobuo

    2010-02-01

    Illegal cannabis (Cannabis sativa L.) cultivation is still a social problem worldwide. Fifty inquiries on cannabis that Research Center for Medicinal Plant Resources (Tsukuba Division) received between January 1, 2000 and March 31, 2009 were itemized in to 8 categories; 1: seed identification, 2: plant identification, 3: indoor cultivation, 4: outdoor cultivation, 5: germination and growth characteristics, 6: expected amount of cannabis products derived from illegal cannabis plant, 7: non-narcotic cannabis and 8: usage of medicinal cannabis. Top three inquiries were 1: seed identification (16 cases), 3: indoor cultivation (10 cases) and 4: outdoor cultivation (6 cases). Characteristics of cannabis, namely seed morphology, germination and growth characteristics, and distinction from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) that is frequently misjudged as cannabis, were studied to contribute for prevention of illegal cannabis cultivation.

  6. Integrating Phylogenetics and Morphology to Study Diversification and Species Limits in Madagascar’s Tenrecs (Tenrecidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Everson,Kathryn; Olson,Link

    2018-01-01

    Madagascar is one of the world’s hottest biodiversity hotspots and a natural laboratory for evolutionary research. Tenrecs (Tenrecidae; 32 currently recognized species) – small placental mammals endemic to Madagascar – colonized the island >35 million years ago and have evolved a stunning range of behaviors and morphologies, including heterothermic species; species with hedgehog-like spines; and fossorial, aquatic, and scansorial ecotypes. In 2016, we produced the first taxonomically complete...

  7. Integrating Phylogenetics and Morphology to Study Diversification and Species Limits in Madagascar's Tenrecs (Tenrecidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Everson, Kathryn; Olson, Link

    2018-01-01

    Madagascar is one of the world's hottest biodiversity hotspots and a natural laboratory for evolutionary research. Tenrecs (Tenrecidae; 32 currently recognized species) – small placental mammals endemic to Madagascar – colonized the island >35 million years ago and have evolved a stunning range of behaviors and morphologies, including heterothermic species; species with hedgehog-like spines; and fossorial, aquatic, and scansorial ecotypes. In 2016, we produced the first taxonomically complete...

  8. Morphological and molecular data reveal a new species of Neoechinorhynchus (Acanthocephala: Neoechinorhynchidae) from Dormitator maculatus in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinacho-Pinacho, Carlos Daniel; Sereno-Uribe, Ana L; García-Varela, Martín

    2014-12-01

    Neoechinorhynchus (Neoechinorhynchus) mexicoensis sp. n. is described from the intestine of Dormitator maculatus (Bloch 1792) collected in 5 coastal localities from the Gulf of Mexico. The new species is mainly distinguished from the other 33 described species of Neoechinorhynchus from the Americas associated with freshwater, marine and brackish fishes by having smaller middle and posterior hooks and possessing a small proboscis with three rows of six hooks each, apical hooks longer than other hooks and extending to the same level as the posterior hooks, 1 giant nucleus in the ventral body wall and females with eggs longer than other congeneric species. Sequences of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal DNA including the domain D2+D3 were used independently to corroborate the morphological distinction among the new species and other congeneric species associated with freshwater and brackish water fish from Mexico. The genetic divergence estimated among congeneric species ranged from 7.34 to 44% for ITS and from 1.65 to 32.9% for LSU. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses with each dataset showed that the 25 specimens analyzed from 5 localities of the coast of the Gulf of Mexico parasitizing D. maculatus represent an independent clade with strong bootstrap support and posterior probabilities. The morphological evidence, plus the monophyly in the phylogenetic analyses, indicates that the acanthocephalans collected from intestine of D. maculatus from the Gulf of Mexico represent a new species, herein named N. (N.) mexicoensis sp. n. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Individual Neurons Confined to Distinct Antennal-Lobe Tracts in the Heliothine Moth: Morphological Characteristics and Global Projection Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ian, Elena; Zhao, Xin C.; Lande, Andreas; Berg, Bente G.

    2016-01-01

    To explore fundamental principles characterizing chemosensory information processing, we have identified antennal-lobe projection neurons in the heliothine moth, including several neuron types not previously described. Generally, odor information is conveyed from the primary olfactory center of the moth brain, the antennal lobe, to higher brain centers via projection neuron axons passing along several parallel pathways, of which the medial, mediolateral, and lateral antennal-lobe tract are considered the classical ones. Recent data have revealed the projections of the individual tracts more in detail demonstrating three main target regions in the protocerebrum; the calyces are innervated mainly by the medial tract, the superior intermediate protocerebrum by the lateral tract exclusively, and the lateral horn by all tracts. In the present study, we have identified, via iontophoretic intracellular staining combined with confocal microscopy, individual projection neurons confined to the tracts mentioned above, plus two additional ones. Further, using the visualization software AMIRA, we reconstructed the stained neurons and registered the models into a standard brain atlas, which allowed us to compare the termination areas of individual projection neurons both across and within distinct tracts. The data demonstrate a morphological diversity of the projection neurons within distinct tracts. Comparison of the output areas of the neurons confined to the three main tracts in the lateral horn showed overlapping terminal regions for the medial and mediolateral tracts; the lateral tract neurons, on the contrary, targeted mostly other output areas in the protocerebrum. PMID:27822181

  10. Identification of a new species of Aphis (Hemiptera: Aphididae) based on distinct morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aphis elena Lagos-Kutz and Voegtlin, sp. nov. (Hemiptera: Aphididae), is described from specimens collected in Illinois, USA, on the North American native plant, Pycnanthemum virginianum (L.) T. Dur. & B.D. Jacks. ex B.L. Rob. & Fernald (Family: Lamiaceae). Both apterous and alate viviparae are desc...

  11. A Distinctive and Host-Restricted Gut Microbiota in Populations of a Cactophilic Drosophila Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Vincent G; Carpinteyro-Ponce, Javier; Moran, Nancy A; Markow, Therese A

    2017-12-01

    . This study shows that an ecologically specialized Drosophila species possesses a distinctive microbiome, composed of bacterial types absent from the flies' natural food but widespread in other wild-caught insects. This study highlights the importance of fieldwork-informed microbiota research. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Utility of combining morphological characters, nuclear and mitochondrial genes: An attempt to resolve the conflicts of species identification for ciliated protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Yi, Zhenzhen; Gentekaki, Eleni; Zhan, Aibin; Al-Farraj, Saleh A; Song, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    Ciliates comprise a highly diverse protozoan lineage inhabiting all biotopes and playing crucial roles in regulating microbial food webs. Nevertheless, subtle morphological differences and tiny sizes hinder proper species identification for many ciliates. Here, we use the species-rich taxon Frontonia and employ both nuclear and mitochondrial loci. We attempt to assess the level of genetic diversity and evaluate the potential of each marker in delineating species of Frontonia. Morphological features and ecological characteristics are also integrated into genetic results, in an attempt to resolve conflicts of species identification based on morphological and molecular methods. Our studies reveal: (1) the mitochondrial cox1 gene, nuclear ITS1 and ITS2 as well as the hypervariable D2 region of LSU rDNA are promising candidates for species delineation; (2) the cox1 gene provides the best resolution for analyses below the species level; (3) the V2 and V4 hypervariable regions of SSU rDNA, and D1 of LSU rDNA as well as the 5.8S rDNA gene do not show distinct barcoding gap due to overlap between intra- and inter-specific genetic divergences; (4) morphological character-based analysis shows promise for delimitation of Frontonia species; and (5) all gene markers and character-based analyses demonstrate that the genus Frontonia consists of three groups and monophyly of the genus Frontonia is questionable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. External morphology of the adult of Dynamine postverta (Cramer (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Biblidinae and patterns of morphological similarity among species from eight tribes of Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Anderson Ribeiro Leite

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available External morphology of the adult of Dynamine postverta (Cramer (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, Biblidinae and patterns of morphological similarity among species from eight tribes of Nymphalidae. The external structure of the integument of Dynamine postverta postverta (Cramer, 1779 is based on detailed morphological drawings and scanning electron microscopy. The data are compared with other species belonging to eight tribes of Nymphalidae, to assist future studies on the taxonomy and systematics of Neotropical Biblidinae.

  14. The relevance of morphology for habitat use and locomotion in two species of wall lizards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Verónica; Carretero, Miguel A.; Kaliontzopoulou, Antigoni

    2016-01-01

    Understanding if morphological differences between organisms that occupy different environments are associated to differences in functional performance can suggest a functional link between environmental and morphological variation. In this study we examined three components of the ecomorphological paradigm - morphology, locomotor performance and habitat use - using two syntopic wall lizards endemic to the Iberian Peninsula as a case study to establish whether morphological variation is associated with habitat use and determine the potential relevance of locomotor performance for such an association. Differences in habitat use between both lizards matched patterns of morphological variation. Indeed, individuals of Podarcis guadarramae lusitanicus, which are more flattened, used more rocky environments, whereas Podarcis bocagei, which have higher heads, used more vegetation than rocks. These patterns translated into a significant association between morphology and habitat use. Nevertheless, the two species were only differentiated in some of the functional traits quantified, and locomotor performance did not exhibit an association with morphological traits. Our results suggest that the link between morphology and habitat use is mediated by refuge use, rather than locomotor performance, in this system, and advise caution when extrapolating morphology-performance-environment associations across organisms.

  15. Using combined morphological, allometric and molecular approaches to identify species of the genus Raillietiella (Pentastomida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal Kelehear

    Full Text Available Taxonomic studies of parasites can be severely compromised if the host species affects parasite morphology; an uncritical analysis might recognize multiple taxa simply because of phenotypically plastic responses of parasite morphology to host physiology. Pentastomids of the genus Raillietiella are endoparasitic crustaceans primarily infecting the respiratory system of carnivorous reptiles, but also recorded from bufonid anurans. The delineation of pentastomids at the generic level is clear, but the taxonomic status of many species is not. We collected raillietiellids from lungs of the invasive cane toad (Rhinella marina, the invasive Asian house gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus, and a native tree frog (Litoria caerulea in tropical Australia, and employed a combination of genetic analyses, and traditional and novel morphological methods to clarify their identity. Conventional analyses of parasite morphology (which focus on raw values of morphological traits revealed two discrete clusters in terms of pentastome hook size, implying two different species of pentastomes: one from toads and a tree frog (Raillietiella indica and another from lizards (Raillietiella frenatus. However, these clusters disappeared in allometric analyses that took pentastome body size into account, suggesting that only a single pentastome taxon may be involved. Our molecular data revealed no genetic differences between parasites in toads versus lizards, confirming that there was only one species: R. frenatus. This pentastome (previously known only from lizards clearly is also capable of maturing in anurans. Our analyses show that the morphological features used in pentastomid taxonomy change as the parasite transitions through developmental stages in the definitive host. To facilitate valid descriptions of new species of pentastomes, future taxonomic work should include both morphological measurements (incorporating quantitative measures of body size and hook bluntness and

  16. DISTINCTION OF SOUTH-AMERICAN HAPLOGLOIA-ANDERSONII AND CHORDARIA-LINEARIS (PHAEOPHYCEAE) BASED ON DIFFERENCES IN SEXUAL REPRODUCTION, MORPHOLOGY, ECOPHYSIOLOGY, AND DISTRIBUTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PETERS, AF

    1992-01-01

    Haplogloia andersonii (Farlow) Levring is an anti-tropical species that occurs on cold and warm-temperate Pacific coasts of both Americas. In its habit it resembles the subantarctic species Chordaria linearis (Hooker et Harvey) Cotton. Culture studies show that the species differ in morphology and

  17. Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) host-plant variants: two host strains or two distinct species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Pascaline; Legeai, Fabrice; Lemaitre, Claire; Scaon, Erwan; Orsucci, Marion; Labadie, Karine; Gimenez, Sylvie; Clamens, Anne-Laure; Henri, Hélène; Vavre, Fabrice; Aury, Jean-Marc; Fournier, Philippe; Kergoat, Gael J; d'Alençon, Emmanuelle

    2015-06-01

    The moth Spodoptera frugiperda is a well-known pest of crops throughout the Americas, which consists of two strains adapted to different host-plants: the first feeds preferentially on corn, cotton and sorghum whereas the second is more associated with rice and several pasture grasses. Though morphologically indistinguishable, they exhibit differences in their mating behavior, pheromone compositions, and show development variability according to the host-plant. Though the latter suggest that both strains are different species, this issue is still highly controversial because hybrids naturally occur in the wild, not to mention the discrepancies among published results concerning mating success between the two strains. In order to clarify the status of the two host-plant strains of S. frugiperda, we analyze features that possibly reflect the level of post-zygotic isolation: (1) first generation (F1) hybrid lethality and sterility; (2) patterns of meiotic segregation of hybrids in reciprocal second generation (F2), as compared to the meiosis of the two parental strains. We found a significant reduction of mating success in F1 in one direction of the cross and a high level of microsatellite markers showing transmission ratio distortion in the F2 progeny. Our results support the existence of post-zygotic reproductive isolation between the two laboratory strains and are in accordance with the marked level of genetic differentiation that was recovered between individuals of the two strains collected from the field. Altogether these results provide additional evidence in favor of a sibling species status for the two strains.

  18. [Regenerative morphological traits in a woody species community in Tumbesian tropical dry forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Saritama, José Miguel; Pérez-Rúuz, César

    2016-06-01

    The study of functional morphological traits enables us to know fundamental aspects of the dynamics of plant communities in local and global habitats. Regenerative morphological traits play an important role in defining plant history and ecological behavior. Seed and fruit characteristics determine to a large extent the patterns for dispersal, germination, establishment and seedling recruitment a given species exhibits on its natural habitat. Despite their prominent role, seed and fruit traits have been poorly studied at the community level of woody plant species in neo-tropical dry forests. In the present study we aimed at i) evaluate the functional role of morphological traits of seeds, fruits and embryo in woody plant species; ii) determine which are the morphological patterns present in seeds collected from the community of woody species that occur in neo-tropical dry forests; and iii) compare woody plant species seed mass values comparatively between neo-tropical dry and tropical forests. To do so, mature seeds were collected from 79 plant species that occur in the Tumbesian forest of Southwest Ecuador. The studied species included the 42 and 37 most representative tree and shrubbery species of the Tumbesian forest respectively. A total of 18 morphological traits (seven quantitative and 11 qualitative) were measured and evaluated in the seeds, fruits and embryos of the selected species, and we compared the seeds mass with other forest types. Our results showed a huge heterogeneity among traits values in the studied species. Seed mass, volume and number were the traits that vary the most at the community level, i.e. seed length ranged from 1.3 to 39 mm, and seed width from 0.6 to 25 mm. Only six embryo types were found among the 79 plant species. In 40 % of the cases, fully developed inverted embryos with large and thick cotyledons to store considerable amount of nutrients were recorded. We concluded that highly variable and functionally complementary

  19. Taxonomic revision of the Malagasy members of the Nesomyrmex angulatus species group using the automated morphological species delineation protocol NC-PART-clustering

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    Sándor Csősz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Applying quantitative morphological approaches in systematics research is a promising way to discover cryptic biological diversity. Information obtained through twenty-first century science poses new challenges to taxonomy by offering the possibility of increased objectivity in independent and automated hypothesis formation. In recent years a number of promising new algorithmic approaches have been developed to recognize morphological diversity among insects based on multivariate morphometric analyses. These algorithms objectively delimit components in the data by automatically assigning objects into clusters. Method. In this paper, hypotheses on the diversity of the Malagasy Nesomyrmex angulatus group are formulated via a highly automated protocol involving a fusion of two algorithms, (1 Nest Centroid clustering (NC clustering and (2 Partitioning Algorithm based on Recursive Thresholding (PART. Both algorithms assign samples into clusters, making the class assignment results of different algorithms readily inferable. The results were tested by confirmatory cross-validated Linear Discriminant Analysis (LOOCV-LDA. Results. Here we reveal the diversity of a unique and largely unexplored fragment of the Malagasy ant fauna using NC-PART-clustering on continuous morphological data, an approach that brings increased objectivity to taxonomy. We describe eight morphologically distinct species, including seven new species: Nesomyrmex angulatus (Mayr, 1862, N. bidentatus sp. n., N. clypeatus sp. n., N. devius sp. n., N. exiguus sp. n., N. fragilis sp. n., N. gracilis sp. n., and N. hirtellus sp. n.. An identification key for their worker castes using morphometric data is provided. Conclusions. Combining the dimensionality reduction feature of NC clustering with the assignment of samples into clusters by PART advances the automatization of morphometry-based alpha taxonomy.

  20. Polyphasic taxonomic analysis establishes Mycobacterium indicus pranii as a distinct species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Saini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium indicus pranii (MIP, popularly known as Mw, is a cultivable, non-pathogenic organism, which, based on its growth and metabolic properties, is classified in Runyon Group IV along with M. fortuitum, M. smegmatis and M. vaccae. The novelty of this bacterium was accredited to its immunological ability to undergo antigen driven blast transformation of leukocytes and delayed hypersensitivity skin test in leprosy patients, a disease endemic in the Indian sub-continent. Consequently, MIP has been extensively evaluated for its biochemical and immunological properties leading to its usage as an immunomodulator in leprosy and tuberculosis patients. However, owing to advances in sequencing and culture techniques, the citing of new strains with almost 100% similarity in the sequences of marker genes like 16S rRNA, has compromised the identity of MIP as a novel species. Hence, to define its precise taxonomic position, we have carried out polyphasic taxonomic studies on MIP that integrate its phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and molecular phylogenetic attributes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The comparative analysis of 16S rRNA sequence of MIP by using BLAST algorithm at NCBI (nr database revealed a similarity of > or =99% with M. intracellulare, M. arosiense, M. chimaera, M. seoulense, M. avium subsp. hominissuis, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. bohemicum. Further analysis with other widely used markers like rpoB and hsp65 could resolve the phylogenetic relationship between MIP and other closely related mycobacteria apart from M. intracellulare and M. chimaera, which shares > or =99% similarity with corresponding MIP orthologues. Molecular phylogenetic analysis, based on the concatenation of candidate orthologues of 16S rRNA, hsp65 and rpoB, also substantiated its distinctiveness from all the related organisms used in the analysis excluding M. intracellulare and M. chimaera with which it exhibited a close proximity. This

  1. Genes Suggest Ancestral Colour Polymorphisms Are Shared across Morphologically Cryptic Species in Arctic Bumblebees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H Williams

    Full Text Available Our grasp of biodiversity is fine-tuned through the process of revisionary taxonomy. If species do exist in nature and can be discovered with available techniques, then we expect these revisions to converge on broadly shared interpretations of species. But for the primarily arctic bumblebees of the subgenus Alpinobombus of the genus Bombus, revisions by some of the most experienced specialists are unusual for bumblebees in that they have all reached different conclusions on the number of species present. Recent revisions based on skeletal morphology have concluded that there are from four to six species, while variation in colour pattern of the hair raised questions as to whether at least seven species might be present. Even more species are supported if we accept the recent move away from viewing species as morphotypes to viewing them instead as evolutionarily independent lineages (EILs using data from genes. EILs are recognised here in practice from the gene coalescents that provide direct evidence for their evolutionary independence. We show from fitting both general mixed Yule/coalescent (GMYC models and Poisson-tree-process (PTP models to data for the mitochondrial COI gene that there is support for nine species in the subgenus Alpinobombus. Examination of the more slowly evolving nuclear PEPCK gene shows further support for a previously unrecognised taxon as a new species in northwestern North America. The three pairs of the most morphologically similar sister species are separated allopatrically and prevented from interbreeding by oceans. We also find that most of the species show multiple shared colour patterns, giving the appearance of mimicry among parts of the different species. However, reconstructing ancestral colour-pattern states shows that speciation is likely to have cut across widespread ancestral polymorphisms, without or largely without convergence. In the particular case of Alpinobombus, morphological, colour-pattern, and

  2. Distinction among the puparia of three blowfly species (Diptera: Calliphoridae frequently found on unburied corpses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JA Amorim

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Calliphorid larvae are important in the decomposition of carrion. Since these larvae are present in the primary stages of succession on carcasses, they may be important indicators of death time and the movement of corpses in homicide investigations. In this study we examined the morphological differences among puparia of Chrysomya megacephala, C. putoria and Cochliomyia macellaria. Puparia of the three species (N=30, each were obtained from the F2 generation bred in culture medium at 25° C, and 60% relative humidity on a 12 h photoperiod. The interspecific differences found were related to the conspicuousness of six tubercles located in the region near the posterior spiracles and to the distance between the two peritrema involving the spiracles. The latter were (mean ± SD 15.2 ± 3.1 mum for C. megacephala, 18.8 ± 2.8 mum for C. putoria and 16.5 ± 3.5 mum for C. macellaria. The results of the present study may be useful in forensic entomology.

  3. Fern extracts potentiate fluconazole activity and inhibit morphological changes in Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Freitas

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: The extracts obtained from the fern species L. venustum and P. calomelanos dose not present significant antifungal activity. However, P. calomelanos potentiates the activity of fluconazole and both extracts inhibits the morphological changes in Candida species, indicating that they have potential pharmacological activity as modulators of fungal biology. Therefore, novel studies are required to characterize the interference of these extracts in the virulence and pathogenicity of Candida species as well as the potential of fern species to treat fungal infections.

  4. Delimiting species of Protaphorura (Collembola: Onychiuridae): integrative evidence based on morphology, DNA sequences and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin; Zhang, Feng; Ding, Yinhuan; Davies, Thomas W; Li, Yu; Wu, Donghui

    2017-08-15

    Species delimitation remains a significant challenge when the diagnostic morphological characters are limited. Integrative taxonomy was applied to the genus Protaphorura (Collembola: Onychiuridae), which is one of most difficult soil animals to distinguish taxonomically. Three delimitation approaches (morphology, molecular markers and geography) were applied providing rigorous species validation criteria with an acceptably low error rate. Multiple molecular approaches, including distance- and evolutionary model-based methods, were used to determine species boundaries based on 144 standard barcode sequences. Twenty-two molecular putative species were consistently recovered across molecular and geographical analyses. Geographic criteria were was proved to be an efficient delimitation method for onychiurids. Further morphological examination, based on the combination of the number of pseudocelli, parapseudocelli and ventral mesothoracic chaetae, confirmed 18 taxa of 22 molecular units, with six of them described as new species. These characters were found to be of high taxonomical value. This study highlights the potential benefits of integrative taxonomy, particularly simultaneous use of molecular/geographical tools, as a powerful way of ascertaining the true diversity of the Onychiuridae. Our study also highlights that discovering new morphological characters remains central to achieving a full understanding of collembolan taxonomy.

  5. Genetic and morphological diversity of Trisetacus species (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) associated with coniferous trees in Poland: phylogeny, barcoding, host and habitat specialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Mariusz; Skoracka, Anna; Szydło, Wiktoria; Kozak, Marcin; Druciarek, Tobiasz; Griffiths, Don A

    2014-08-01

    Eriophyoid species belonging to the genus Trisetacus are economically important as pests of conifers. A narrow host specialization to conifers and some unique morphological characteristics have made these mites interesting subjects for scientific inquiry. In this study, we assessed morphological and genetic variation of seven Trisetacus species originating from six coniferous hosts in Poland by morphometric analysis and molecular sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene and the nuclear D2 region of 28S rDNA. The results confirmed the monophyly of the genus Trisetacus as well as the monophyly of five of the seven species studied. Both DNA sequences were effective in discriminating between six of the seven species tested. Host-dependent genetic and morphological variation in T. silvestris and T. relocatus, and habitat-dependent genetic and morphological variation in T. juniperinus were detected, suggesting the existence of races or even distinct species within these Trisetacus taxa. This is the first molecular phylogenetic analysis of the Trisetacus species. The findings presented here will stimulate further investigations on the evolutionary relationships of Trisetacus as well as the entire Phytoptidae family.

  6. Morphological and molecular characterization of the metacercaria of Paragonimus caliensis, as a separate species from P. mexicanus in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Chea, Roderico; Jiménez-Rocha, Ana Eugenia; Castro, Ruth; Blair, David; Dolz, Gaby

    2017-04-01

    The trematode Paragonimus mexicanus is the etiological agent of paragonimiasis, a food-borne zoonotic disease in Latin America. This species, as well as Paragonimus caliensis, have been reported from Costa Rica, but it is not known if the two are synonymous. Two types of Paragonimus metacercariae from freshwater pseudothelphusid crabs from several localities in Costa Rica were recognized by light microscopy. Morphologically, these corresponded to descriptions of P. mexicanus and P. caliensis. Metacercariae of the former species lacked a membrane or cyst and their bodies were yellow in color. Those of P. caliensis were contained in a transparent thin cyst and were pink in color. Morphotypes of metacercariae were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Based on the number and distribution of papillae in the ventral sucker, three morphotypes were found for P. mexicanus and two for P. caliensis. Analysis of DNA sequences (nuclear ribosomal 28S and ITS2 genes, and partial mitochondrial cox1 gene) confirmed the presence of P. mexicanus and provided the first molecular data for P. caliensis. The two species are phylogenetically distinct from each other and distant from the Asian species. The confirmation of P. caliensis as a separate species from P. mexicanus raises several questions about the ecology, biological diversity, and epidemiology of the genus Paragonimus in Costa Rica. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing species boundaries using multilocus species delimitation in a morphologically conserved group of neotropical freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex (Poeciliidae.

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    Justin C Bagley

    Full Text Available Accurately delimiting species is fundamentally important for understanding species diversity and distributions and devising effective strategies to conserve biodiversity. However, species delimitation is problematic in many taxa, including 'non-adaptive radiations' containing morphologically cryptic lineages. Fortunately, coalescent-based species delimitation methods hold promise for objectively estimating species limits in such radiations, using multilocus genetic data. Using coalescent-based approaches, we delimit species and infer evolutionary relationships in a morphologically conserved group of Central American freshwater fishes, the Poecilia sphenops species complex. Phylogenetic analyses of multiple genetic markers (sequences of two mitochondrial DNA genes and five nuclear loci from 10/15 species and genetic lineages recognized in the group support the P. sphenops species complex as monophyletic with respect to outgroups, with eight mitochondrial 'major-lineages' diverged by ≥2% pairwise genetic distances. From general mixed Yule-coalescent models, we discovered (conservatively 10 species within our concatenated mitochondrial DNA dataset, 9 of which were strongly supported by subsequent multilocus Bayesian species delimitation and species tree analyses. Results suggested species-level diversity is underestimated or overestimated by at least ~15% in different lineages in the complex. Nonparametric statistics and coalescent simulations indicate genealogical discordance among our gene tree results has mainly derived from interspecific hybridization in the nuclear genome. However, mitochondrial DNA show little evidence for introgression, and our species delimitation results appear robust to effects of this process. Overall, our findings support the utility of combining multiple lines of genetic evidence and broad phylogeographical sampling to discover and validate species using coalescent-based methods. Our study also highlights the

  8. Resolving tumor heterogeneity: genes involved in chordoma cell development identified by low-template analysis of morphologically distinct cells.

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    Amin El-Heliebi

    Full Text Available The classical sacrococcygeal chordoma tumor presents with a typical morphology of lobulated myxoid tumor tissue with cords, strands and nests of tumor cells. The population of cells consists of small non-vacuolated cells, intermediate cells with a wide range of vacuolization and large heavily vacuolated (physaliferous cells. To date analysis was only performed on bulk tumor mass because of its rare incidence, lack of suited model systems and technical limitations thereby neglecting its heterogeneous composition. We intended to clarify whether the observed cell types are derived from genetically distinct clones or represent different phenotypes. Furthermore, we aimed at elucidating the differences between small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells on the genomic and transcriptomic level. Phenotype-specific analyses of small non-vacuolated and large physaliferous cells in two independent chordoma cell lines yielded four candidate genes involved in chordoma cell development. UCHL3, coding for an ubiquitin hydrolase, was found to be over-expressed in the large physaliferous cell phenotype of MUG-Chor1 (18.7-fold and U-CH1 (3.7-fold cells. The mannosyltransferase ALG11 (695-fold and the phosphatase subunit PPP2CB (18.6-fold were found to be up-regulated in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells showing a similar trend in U-CH1 cells. TMEM144, an orphan 10-transmembrane family receptor, yielded contradictory data as cDNA microarray analysis showed up- but RT-qPCR data down-regulation in large physaliferous MUG-Chor1 cells. Isolation of few but morphologically identical cells allowed us to overcome the limitations of bulk analysis in chordoma research. We identified the different chordoma cell phenotypes to be part of a developmental process and discovered new genes linked to chordoma cell development representing potential targets for further research in chordoma tumor biology.

  9. Do ectomycorrhizal and arbuscular mycorrhizal temperate tree species systematically differ in root order-related fine root morphology and biomass?

    OpenAIRE

    Kubisch, Petra; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While most temperate broad-leaved tree species form ectomycorrhizal (EM) symbioses, a few species have arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM). It is not known whether EM and AM tree species differ systematically with respect to fine root morphology, fine root system size and root functioning. In a species-rich temperate mixed forest, we studied the fine root morphology and biomass of three EM and three AM tree species from the genera Acer, Carpinus, Fagus, Fraxinus, and Tilia searching for principal dif...

  10. Drag forces of common plant species in temperate streams: consequences of morphology, velocity and biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kaj Sand

    2008-01-01

    Swift flow in streams may physically influence the morphology and distribution of plants. I quantified drag as a function of velocity, biomass and their interaction on the trailing canopy of seven European stream species in an experimental flume and evaluated its importance for species distributi...... than an uneven distribution with the same biomass confined to dense patches surrounded by open flow channels. Thus, management strategies to ensure a patchy plants distribution should be suitable for combining agricultural drainage and ecological stream quality....

  11. Pollen morphology of some asiatic species of genus salsola (chenopodiaceae) and its taxonomic relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toderich, K.N.; Shuyskaya, E.V.; Ozturk, M

    2010-01-01

    Comparative studies on the pollen grain morphology of 27 Asiatic species of the genus Salsola were conducted by using scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis) in order to assess the taxonomic value of pollen traits. The pollen are radially symmetrical isopolar, pantopolyporate, spherical or subspheroid. The pollen characters like size, pore number, chord (C/D ratio), pore diameter, exine thickness, level of sinking of pore, convexness of mesoporial exine, spinule and minute-hole densities and number of spines on pore membrane appeared to be useful characters in distinguishing the species. Interesting intraspecific variations in pollen grain morphology were recorded for the C/D ratio. This parameter is highly specific, supporting the delimitation of Salsola species, and appears to be more conservative than some flower and fruit characters. The numerical value of form index comprising the ratio between the length of polar axis and diameter (P/E) also was an informative trait for delimitation of the species investigated here. Three pollen types were recognized. Euclidean distance was used to compute the dissimilarity matrix and a cladogram prepared. The quantitative characters of pollen morphology allowed clustering of groups and ordination analyses of species from different sections/subsections within genus Salsola. These features indicated that overall pollen traits reflect the current taxonomic boundaries, except for the Salsola species allocated to Climacoptera and Halothamnus, which should be accepted as separate genera. (author)

  12. Distinct multivariate brain morphological patterns and their added predictive value with cognitive and polygenic risk scores in mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhat Trung Doan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain underpinnings of schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are multidimensional, reflecting complex pathological processes and causal pathways, requiring multivariate techniques to disentangle. Furthermore, little is known about the complementary clinical value of brain structural phenotypes when combined with data on cognitive performance and genetic risk. Using data-driven fusion of cortical thickness, surface area, and gray matter density maps (GMD, we found six biologically meaningful patterns showing strong group effects, including four statistically independent multimodal patterns reflecting co-occurring alterations in thickness and GMD in patients, over and above two other independent patterns of widespread thickness and area reduction. Case-control classification using cognitive scores alone revealed high accuracy, and adding imaging features or polygenic risk scores increased performance, suggesting their complementary predictive value with cognitive scores being the most sensitive features. Multivariate pattern analyses reveal distinct patterns of brain morphology in mental disorders, provide insights on the relative importance between brain structure, cognitive and polygenetic risk score in classification of patients, and demonstrate the importance of multivariate approaches in studying the pathophysiological substrate of these complex disorders.

  13. Comparative studies of jaw morphology and ontogeny in two species of asexually reproducing Dorvilleidae (Annelida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macnaughton, Martin Oliver; Eibye-Jacobsen, Danny; Worsaae, Katrine

    2011-01-01

    found in closely related species (Macnaughton et al. 2009). Details of dentition and numbers of maxillary plates as well as the ontogenetic growth patterns of the jaws were found to provide significant information of systematic value. Based on detailed studies of jaw ontogeny and morphology, Dorvillea...

  14. Morphological Characterization of African Bush Mango trees (Irvingia species) in the Dahomey Gap (West Africa)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vihotogbe, R.; Berg, van den R.G.; Sosef, M.S.M.

    2013-01-01

    The variation of the morphological characters of bitter and sweet African bush mango trees (Irvingia species) was investigated in the Dahomey Gap which is the West African savannah woodland area separating the Upper and the Lower Guinean rain forest blocks. African bush mangoes have been rated as

  15. Two species within Dedroctonus frontalis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae): evidence from morphological, karyological, molecular, and crossing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco Armendariz-Toledano; Alicia Nino; Brian Sullivan; Jorge Macias-Samano; Javier Victor; Stephen R. Clarke; Gerardo Zuniga

    2014-01-01

    Dendroctonus frontalis Zimmermann is considered one of the most important economic and ecological forest pests in the United States, Mexico, and Central America. Recently, two apparent morphological variants of this species were discovered occurring syntopically in Central America and southern Mexico. Morphotype A beetles lack a series of Þne parallel ridges on the...

  16. Pollen morphology of Philippine species of Phyllanthus (Phyllanthaceae, Euphorbiaceae s.l.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Chen, S.-H.; Huang, T.-C.; Wu, M.-J.

    2009-01-01

    The pollen morphology of 21 Philippine Phyllanthus species belonging to five subgenera and eleven sections was studied using scanning electron microscopy. Eleven pollen types were recognized, of which seven were previously reported and four are newly described, i.e., the Phyllanthus erythrotrichus

  17. Jaw morphology and ontogeny in five species of Ophryothrocha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macnaughton, Martin Oliver; Worsaae, Katrine; Eibye-Jacobsen, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Detailed scanning electron microscopy of jaws within the genus Ophryotrocha (Dorvilleidae, Annelida) was performed on 871 jaw parts. The investigations resulted in new understandings of the ontogeny and jaw morphology and have systematic implications for the family. Five species in the genus (Oph...

  18. Pennisetum section Brevivalvula in West Africa : morphological and genetic variation in an agamic species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmelzer, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Section Brevivalvula is one of five sections in the large tropical grass genus Pennisetum . It belongs to the tertiary genepool of P. glaucum (L.) R. Br., pearl millet, and consists of six morphological species: P.

  19. Sea cucumber species identification of family Caudinidae from Surabaya based on morphological and mitochondrial DNA evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Muhammad Hilman Fu'adil; Pidada, Ida Bagus Rai; Sugiharto, Widyatmoko, Johan Nuari; Irawan, Bambang

    2016-03-01

    Species identification and taxonomy of sea cucumber remains a challenge problem in some taxa. Caudinidae family of sea cucumber was comerciallized in Surabaya, and it was used as sea cucumber chips. Members of Caudinid sea cucumber have similiar morphology, so it is hard to identify this sea cucumber only from morphological appearance. DNA barcoding is useful method to overcome this problem. The aim of this study was to determine Caudinid specimen of sea cucumber in East Java by morphological and molecular approach. Sample was collected from east coast of Surabaya, then preserved in absolute ethanol. After DNA isolation, Cytochrome Oxydase I (COI) gene amplification was performed using Echinoderm universal primer and PCR product was sequenced. Sequencing result was analyzed and identified in NCBI database using BLAST. Results showed that Caudinid specimen in have closely related to Acaudina molpadioides sequence in GenBank with 86% identity. Morphological data, especially based on ossicle, also showed that the specimen is Acaudina molpadioides.

  20. Morphology and mitochondrial phylogenetics reveal that the Amazon River separates two eastern squirrel monkey species: Saimiri sciureus and S. collinsi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercês, Michelle P; Lynch Alfaro, Jessica W; Ferreira, Wallax A S; Harada, Maria L; Silva Júnior, José S

    2015-01-01

    Saimiri has a complicated taxonomic history, and there is continuing disagreement about the number of valid taxa. Despite these controversies, one point of consensus among morphologists has been that the eastern Amazonian populations of squirrel monkeys form a single terminal taxon, Saimiri sciureus sciureus (Linnaeus, 1758). This group is distributed to both the north and south of the middle to lower Amazon River and in the Marajó Archipelago. However, a recent molecular study by Lavergne and colleagues suggested that the Saimiri sciureus complex (comprised of S. s. sciureus sensu lato, S. s. albigena, S. s. macrodon, and S. s. cassiquiarensis) was paraphyletic. The discordance between morphological and molecular studies prompted us to conduct a new multidisciplinary analysis, employing a combination of morphological, morphometric, and molecular markers. Our results suggest the currently recognized taxon S. s. sciureus contains two distinct species, recognized by the Phylogenetic Species Concept: Saimiri sciureus (Linnaeus, 1758) and Saimiri collinsi Osgood, 1916. East Amazonian squirrel monkeys north of the Amazon have a gray crown (S. sciureus), and south of the Amazon, the crown is yellow (S. collinsi). Morphometric measurements also clearly distinguish between the two species, with the most important contributing factors including width across upper canines for both sexes. For males, the mean zygomatic breadth was significantly wider in S. sciureus compared to S. collinsi, and for females, the width across the upper molars was wider in S. sciureus compared to S. collinsi. Mitochondrial phylogenetic analyses support this separation of the eastern Amazonian squirrel monkeys into two distinct taxa, recovering one clade (S. sciureus) distributed to the north of the Amazon River, from the Negro River and Branco River to the Guiana coast and the Brazilian state of Amapá, and another clade (S. collinsi) south of the Amazon River, from the region of the Tapaj

  1. A NEW AGAROPHYTE SPECIES, GELIDIUM EUCORNEUM SP. NOV. (GELIDIALES, RHODOPHYTA), BASED ON MOLECULAR AND MORPHOLOGICAL DATA(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Mi; Hwang, Il Ki; Park, Jeong Kwang; Boo, Sung Min

    2011-08-01

    Gelidium is an economically and ecologically important agar-producing genus. Although the taxonomy of Gelidium has been the focus of many published studies, there is still a need to reevaluate species-level diversity. Herein, we describe Gelidium eucorneum sp. nov. based on specimens collected off Geojedo on the southern coast of Korea. G. eucorneum is distinguished by cartilaginous thalli with brush-like haptera, rhizoidal filaments concentrated in the medulla, and globose cytocarps that are horned with multiple determinate branchlets. The species occurs in wave-exposed intertidal sites, sometimes in association with other mat-forming algae. Phylogenetic analyses (rbcL, psaA, and cox1) reveal that G. eucorneum is unique and clearly distinct from other species of the genus. The clade containing Gelidium vagum and Acanthopeltis longiramulosa was resolved as a sister group to G. eucorneum. We suggest that the diverse morphologies of G. eucorneum, G. vagum, and Acanthopeltis developed from a common ancestor in East Asian waters. This study shows that even in well-studied areas, more agarophyte species are to be added to the world inventory of red algae. © 2011 Phycological Society of America.

  2. Distinct genetic differentiation and species diversification within two marine nematodes with different habitat preference in Antarctic sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauquier, Freija; Leliaert, Frederik; Rigaux, Annelien; Derycke, Sofie; Vanreusel, Ann

    2017-05-30

    Dispersal ability, population genetic structure and species divergence in marine nematodes are still poorly understood, especially in remote areas such as the Southern Ocean. We investigated genetic differentiation of species and populations of the free-living endobenthic nematode genera Sabatieria and Desmodora using nuclear 18S rDNA, internal transcribed spacer (ITS) rDNA, and mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene sequences. Specimens were collected at continental shelf depths (200-500 m) near the Antarctic Peninsula, Scotia Arc and eastern side of the Weddell Sea. The two nematode genera co-occurred at all sampled locations, but with different vertical distribution in the sediment. A combination of phylogenetic (GMYC, Bayesian Inference, Maximum Likelihood) and population genetic (AMOVA) analyses were used for species delimitation and assessment of gene flow between sampling locations. Sequence analyses resulted in the delimitation of four divergent species lineages in Sabatieria, two of which could not be discriminated morphologically and most likely constitute cryptic species. Two species were recognised in Desmodora, one of which showed large intraspecific morphological variation. Both genera comprised species that were restricted to one side of the Weddell Sea and species that were widely spread across it. Population genetic structuring was highly significant and more pronounced in the deeper sediment-dwelling Sabatieria species, which are generally less prone to resuspension and passive dispersal in the water column than surface Desmodora species. Our results indicate that gene flow is restricted at large geographic distance in the Southern Ocean, which casts doubt on the efficiency of the Weddell gyre and Antarctic Circumpolar Current in facilitating circum-Antarctic nematode species distributions. We also show that genetic structuring and cryptic speciation can be very different in nematode species isolated from the same geographic area, but with

  3. Morphological and Morphometrical Description of Trichostrongylus Species Isolated from Domestic Ruminants in Khuzestan Province, Southwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Golestan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Genus Trichostrongylus (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae is one of the most impor­tant zoonotic nematodes with wide geographic distribution in the world. The purpose of the present study was to describe morphological and morphometrical characteristics of male Trichostrongylus species, currently prevalent in domestic ruminants of Khuzestan Province, south­west Iran.Methods: Gastro-intestinal organs of 1600 sheep, goats, cattle, and buffalos, slaughtered in Khuzestan Province, southwest Iran, were examined for infectivity with Trichostrongylus spe­cies. For examination and measurements of helminthes, Azo-carmine staining was per­formed, followed by camera lucida drawings of morphological characters and measurements of morphometrical criteria with a calibrated microscope. Using valid nematodes systematic keys, almost all the parasites were identified at the level of species.Results: Overall, 114 animals were found infected with at least one species of Trichostrongy­lus. Considering morphological characteristics of male Trichostrongylus, six species were identi­fied including T. colubriformis, T. vitrinus, T. probolorus, T. capricola, T. longispicu­laris and Trichostrongylus sp. Conclusion: Although, compared to the previous decades, currently Trichostrongylus is much less prevalent in the domestic ruminants of the study area, but still different species occur in these animals.

  4. Echinococcus oligarthrus in the subtropical region of Argentina: First integration of morphological and molecular analyses determines two distinct populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrabal, Juan Pablo; Avila, Hector Gabriel; Rivero, Maria Romina; Camicia, Federico; Salas, Martin Miguel; Costa, Sebastián A; Nocera, Carlos G; Rosenzvit, Mara C; Kamenetzky, Laura

    2017-06-15

    Echinococcosis is a parasitic zoonosis that is considered as a neglected disease by the World Health Organization. The species Echinococcus oligarthrus is one of the causative agents of Neotropical echinococcosis, which is a poorly understood disease that requires a complex medical examination, may threaten human life, and is frequently associated with a low socioeconomic status. Morphological and genetic diversity in E. oligarthrus remains unknown. The aim of this work is to identify and characterize E. oligarthrus infections in sylvatic animals from the Upper Paraná Atlantic Forest in the province of Misiones, Argentina, by following an integrative approach that links morphological, genetic and ecological aspects. This study demonstrates, for the first time, one of the complete life cycles of E. oligarthrus in an important ecoregion. The Upper Paraná Atlantic Forest constitutes the largest remnant continuous forest of the Atlantic Forest, representing 7% of the world's biodiversity. This is the first molecular determination of E. oligarthrus in Argentina. In addition, the agouti (Dasyprocta azarae), the ocelot (Leopardus pardalis) and the puma (Puma concolor) were identified as sylvatic hosts of Neotropical echinococcosis caused by E. oligarthrus. Mitochondrial and nuclear molecular marker analyses showed a high genetic diversity in E. oligarthrus. Moreover, the genetic distance found among E. oligarthrus isolates is higher than the one observed among Echinococcus granulosus genotypes, which clearly indicates that there are at least two different E. oligarthrus populations in Argentina. This study provides valuable information to understand the underlying conditions that favour the maintenance of E. oligarthrus in sylvatic cycles and to evaluate its zoonotic significance for devising preventive measures for human and animal wellbeing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 76 FR 9734 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Distinct Population Segments of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... Population Segments of the Bearded Seal AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic... December 10, 2010, we, NMFS, published a proposed rule to list the Beringia and Okhotsk Distinct Population..., 2010 (75 FR 77476), we published a proposed rule to list the Beringia and Okhotsk Distinct Population...

  6. Morphology of second and third instars of Chrysomya villeneuvi Patton (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a fly species of forensic importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukontason, Kom; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Piangjai, Somsak; Narongchai, Paitoon; Samai, Wirachai; Boonchu, Noppawan; Sripakdee, Duanghatai; Ngern-Klun, Radchadawan; Siriwattanarungsee, Sirisuda

    2005-11-25

    The morphology of the second and third instars of Chrysomya villeneuvi Patton, a fly species of forensic importance, was presented by use of light microscopy. Both instars were of hairy appearance, bearing elongated tubercles along the abdominal and caudal segments. The anterior spiracle had 13-15 papillae. Minute dark spots were observed to thoroughly cover the tubercle's surface, with 4-6 strong dark tips. Regarding the third instar, the intersegmental spines between the prothorax and mesothorax were heavily pigmented. The posterior spiracle had a thick and heavily pigmented incomplete peritreme. The surface and tip of the tubercles was covered with heavily pigmented sharp spines. The integument of the body was covered with numerous distinct net-like patches. A comparison with another well-known hairy maggot, Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), was discussed.

  7. Modeling of the Dorsal Gradient across Species Reveals Interaction between Embryo Morphology and Toll Signaling Pathway during Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslen, Hannah R.; Chiel, Hillel J.; Mizutani, Claudia Mieko

    2014-01-01

    Morphogenetic gradients are essential to allocate cell fates in embryos of varying sizes within and across closely related species. We previously showed that the maternal NF-κB/Dorsal (Dl) gradient has acquired different shapes in Drosophila species, which result in unequally scaled germ layers along the dorso-ventral axis and the repositioning of the neuroectodermal borders. Here we combined experimentation and mathematical modeling to investigate which factors might have contributed to the fast evolutionary changes of this gradient. To this end, we modified a previously developed model that employs differential equations of the main biochemical interactions of the Toll (Tl) signaling pathway, which regulates Dl nuclear transport. The original model simulations fit well the D. melanogaster wild type, but not mutant conditions. To broaden the applicability of this model and probe evolutionary changes in gradient distributions, we adjusted a set of 19 independent parameters to reproduce three quantified experimental conditions (i.e. Dl levels lowered, nuclear size and density increased or decreased). We next searched for the most relevant parameters that reproduce the species-specific Dl gradients. We show that adjusting parameters relative to morphological traits (i.e. embryo diameter, nuclear size and density) alone is not sufficient to reproduce the species Dl gradients. Since components of the Tl pathway simulated by the model are fast-evolving, we next asked which parameters related to Tl would most effectively reproduce these gradients and identified a particular subset. A sensitivity analysis reveals the existence of nonlinear interactions between the two fast-evolving traits tested above, namely the embryonic morphological changes and Tl pathway components. Our modeling further suggests that distinct Dl gradient shapes observed in closely related melanogaster sub-group lineages may be caused by similar sequence modifications in Tl pathway components, which

  8. PRM1 and KAR5 function in cell-cell fusion and karyogamy to drive distinct bisexual and unisexual cycles in the Cryptococcus pathogenic species complex.

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    Ci Fu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sexual reproduction is critical for successful evolution of eukaryotic organisms in adaptation to changing environments. In the opportunistic human fungal pathogens, the Cryptococcus pathogenic species complex, C. neoformans primarily undergoes bisexual reproduction, while C. deneoformans undergoes both unisexual and bisexual reproduction. During both unisexual and bisexual cycles, a common set of genetic circuits regulates a yeast-to-hyphal morphological transition, that produces either monokaryotic or dikaryotic hyphae. As such, both the unisexual and bisexual cycles can generate genotypic and phenotypic diversity de novo. Despite the similarities between these two cycles, genetic and morphological differences exist, such as the absence of an opposite mating-type partner and monokaryotic instead of dikaryotic hyphae during C. deneoformans unisexual cycle. To better understand the similarities and differences between these modes of sexual reproduction, we focused on two cellular processes involved in sexual reproduction: cell-cell fusion and karyogamy. We identified orthologs of the plasma membrane fusion protein Prm1 and the nuclear membrane fusion protein Kar5 in both Cryptococcus species, and demonstrated their conserved roles in cell fusion and karyogamy during C. deneoformans α-α unisexual reproduction and C. deneoformans and C. neoformans a-α bisexual reproduction. Notably, karyogamy occurs inside the basidum during bisexual reproduction in C. neoformans, but often occurs earlier following cell fusion during bisexual reproduction in C. deneoformans. Characterization of these two genes also showed that cell fusion is dispensable for solo unisexual reproduction in C. deneoformans. The blastospores produced along hyphae during C. deneoformans unisexual reproduction are diploid, suggesting that diploidization occurs early during hyphal development, possibly through either an endoreplication pathway or cell fusion-independent karyogamy

  9. Analysis of Genetic Diversity of Two Mangrove Species with Morphological Alterations in a Natural Environment

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    Catarina Fonseca Lira-Medeiros

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mangrove is an ecosystem subjected to tide, salinity and nutrient variations. These conditions are stressful to most plants, except to mangrove plants that are well-adapted. However, many mangrove areas have extremely stressful conditions, such as salt marshes, and the plants nearby usually present morphological alterations. In Sepetiba Bay, two species of mangrove plants, Avicennia schaueriana and Laguncularia racemosa, have poor development near a salt marsh (SM compared to plants at the riverside (RS, which is considered a favorable habitat in mangroves. The level of genetic diversity and its possible correlation with the morphological divergence of SM and RS plants of both species were assessed by AFLP molecular markers. We found moderate genetic differentiation between A. schaueriana plants from SM and RS areas and depleted genetic diversity on SM plants. On the other hand, Laguncularia racemosa plants had no genetic differentiation between areas. It is possible that a limited gene flow among the studied areas might be acting more intensely on A. schaueriana plants, resulting in the observed genetic differentiation. The populations of Laguncularia racemosa appear to be well connected, as genetic differentiation was not significant between the SM and RS populations. Gene flow and genetic drift are acting on neutral genetic diversity of these two mangrove species in the studied areas, and the observed genetic differentiation of A. schaueriana plants might be correlated with its morphological variation. For L. racemosa, morphological alterations could be related to epigenetic phenomena or adaptive loci polymorphism that should be further investigated.

  10. A new, rare and distinctive species of Panorthoptera (Insecta, Archaeorthoptera from the Upper Carboniferous of Xiaheyan (Ningxia, China

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    J.-J. Gu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The Xiaheyan locality is providing abundant material on one of the earliest insect faunas. The most common species are comparatively remote relatives of Orthoptera (grasshoppers, crickets and katydids, belonging to the Archaeorthoptera nec Panorthoptera (the latter including crown Orthoptera. We establish the genus Sinogerarus gen. nov. to accommodate a new, rare species, S. pectinatus spec. nov., which can be conclusively assigned to Panorthoptera. It therefore represents the second occurrence of the group at this locality. The new species displays a distinctive combination of character states, adding to the knowledge of a number of Upper Carboniferous Panorthoptera whose relationships are poorly understood.

  11. DNA barcoding and morphological studies confirm the occurrence of three Atarbolana (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cirolanidae) species along the coastal zone of the Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaji-Pirbalouty, Valiallah; Raupach, Michael J

    2016-11-27

    Two species of Atarbolana (Cirolanidae: Isopoda) from the intertidal zone of the Gulf of Oman and the Persian Gulf were studied and redescribed. The known distribution of this small genus is limited to the northern areas of the Indian Ocean, from the Pakistan coasts to the Persian Gulf. The analyses of DNA barcodes as well as detailed morphological studies clearly support the existence of three distinct Atarbolana species along the coastal zone of the Persian Gulf and northern Arabian Sea. Furthermore, A. dasycolus Yasmeen, 2004 is synonymized with A. setosa Javed and Yasmeen, 1989.

  12. Relationship of species Piper based on morphological and leaf essential oils characters in Yogyakarta

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    PURNOMO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Some of Piper species were used for traditional medicines and condiments. The leaf essential oil (terpenoid of those Piper species usually were used as a main component in traditional medicine. The taxonomycal study was aimed to determined Piper species relationships based on morphological and leaf essential oils characters. The plants were obtained by exploring this province, and samples were collected for identification and leaf essential oils isolation purposes. Species identification were carried out based on identification key (Backer and Bakhuizen v.d. Brink, 1965; Heyne, 1987; Shaorong, 1982. The isolation of leaf essential oils was carried out using Stahl destillation method, and their composition were interpreted with liquid gas chromatography, using caryophyllene and -pinene as a standard of essential oils component. Dendrogram, which showed phenetic relationships among those species, were obtained by hierarchical cluster analysis method. Results of the research showed that there were 8 species found as cultivated plants in Yogyakarta, which were P. miniatum Bl., P. betle L., P. recurvum Bl., P. aduncum L., P. nigrum L., P. cubeba L.f., P. retrofractum Vahl., and P. sarmentosum Roxb. Ex Hunter. Relationship between species of Piper based on morphological character showed that P. aduncum and P. sarmentosum at the same cluster on 69.2% similarity level, and 40.4% similarity level to the other clusters. Relationsips between species of Piper based on leaf essential oils character resulted the difference cluster among the species, P. retrofractum separated from the other species at 45.5% similarity level, P. aduncum and P. cubeba indicated the higest similarity level (81.5%.

  13. Stem/progenitor cells derived from the cochlear sensory epithelium give rise to spheres with distinct morphologies and features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diensthuber, Marc; Oshima, Kazuo; Heller, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    Nonmammalian vertebrates regenerate lost sensory hair cells by means of asymmetric division of supporting cells. Inner ear or lateral line supporting cells in birds, amphibians, and fish consequently serve as bona fide stem cells resulting in high regenerative capacity of hair cell-bearing organs. Hair cell regeneration does not happen in the mammalian cochlea, but cells with proliferative capacity can be isolated from the neonatal cochlea. These cells have the ability to form clonal floating colonies, so-called spheres, when cultured in nonadherent conditions. We noticed that the sphere population derived from mouse cochlear sensory epithelium cells was heterogeneous, consisting of morphologically distinct sphere types, hereby classified as solid, transitional, and hollow. Cochlear sensory epithelium-derived stem/progenitor cells initially give rise to small solid spheres, which subsequently transition into hollow spheres, a change that is accompanied by epithelial differentiation of the majority of sphere cells. Only solid spheres, and to a lesser extent, transitional spheres, appeared to harbor self-renewing stem cells, whereas hollow spheres could not be consistently propagated. Solid spheres contained significantly more rapidly cycling Pax-2-expressing presumptive otic progenitor cells than hollow spheres. Islet-1, which becomes upregulated in nascent sensory patches, was also more abundant in solid than in hollow spheres. Likewise, hair cell-like cells, characterized by the expression of multiple hair cell markers, differentiated in significantly higher numbers in cell populations derived from solid spheres. We conclude that cochlear sensory epithelium cell populations initially give rise to small solid spheres that have self-renewing capacity before they subsequently convert into hollow spheres, a process that is accompanied by loss of stemness and reduced ability to spontaneously give rise to hair cell-like cells. Solid spheres might, therefore, represent

  14. Morphological and molecular characterization of Cladosporium cladosporioides species complex causing pecan tree leaf spot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C; Muniz, M F B; Rolim, J M; Martins, R R O; Rosenthal, V C; Maciel, C G; Mezzomo, R; Reiniger, L R S

    2016-09-16

    The objective of this study was to characterize species of the Cladosporium cladosporioides complex isolated from pecan trees (Carya illinoinensis) with symptoms of leaf spot, based on morphological and molecular approaches. Morphological attributes were assessed using monosporic cultures on potato dextrose agar medium, which were examined for mycelial growth, sporulation, color, and conidia and ramoconidia size. Molecular characterization comprised isolation of DNA and subsequent amplification of the translation elongation factor 1α (TEF-1α) region. Three species of the C. cladosporioides complex were identified: C. cladosporioides, Cladosporium pseudocladosporioides, and Cladosporium subuliforme. Sporulation was the most important characteristic differentiating species of this genus. However, morphological features must be considered together with molecular analysis, as certain characters are indistinguishable between species. TEF-1αcan be effectively used to identify and group isolates belonging to the C. cladosporioides complex. The present study provides an important example of a methodology to ascertain similarity between isolates of this complex causing leaf spot in pecan trees, which should facilitate future pathogenicity studies.

  15. Lecto- and epitypification of Morchella steppicola (Morchellaceae, Pezizales), a morphologically, phylogenetically, and biogeographically distinct member of the Esculenta Clade from central Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The steppe morel, Morchella steppicola, is one of the more iconic species of true morels (Morchellaceae, Pezizales) based on its: 1) distinctive cerebriform pileus with densely packed labyrinthine irregular ridges, 2) genealogically exclusive position as the earliest diverging species lineage within...

  16. QTL for the species-specific male and female genital morphologies in Ohomopterus ground beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasabe, Masataka; Takami, Yasuoki; Sota, Teiji

    2010-12-01

    Animals with internal fertilization often exhibit marked diversification in genital morphology among closely related species. However, our knowledge of the genetic architecture underlying genital evolution is still limited. We constructed genetic linkage maps and analysed quantitative trait loci (QTL) for F(2) hybrids of two closely related species of the carabid beetles Carabus (Ohomopterus) iwawakianus and C. (O.) maiyasanus, which show matching male and female genital shapes within species, but marked differences in genital morphologies between species. The linkage maps comprised both amplified fragment length polymorphism and microsatellite markers. Composite interval mapping to detect QTL for three traits of male copulatory piece (length, width, weight) and two traits for female vaginal appendix (length, width) resulted in the detection of one to five significant QTL for each trait. The QTL explained large proportions of phenotypic variance. Thus, the interspecific difference in the genital morphologies appeared to be determined by relatively small numbers of genes with large genetic effects. QTL of different traits for the same or different sexes co-occurred on five of eight linkage groups with significant QTL; in particular, three QTL for different male and female genital traits occurred almost at the same position. Each of the male genital traits showed uniform signs of additive genetic effects, suggesting that directional selection has led to species-specific morphologies. However, the signs of additive genetic effects in each female genital trait were not uniform, suggesting that coevolution between sexes is not necessarily concerted. This result requires further assessment because the sample size of F(2) females was small. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Tamarix minoa (Tamaricaceae), a new species from the island of Crete (Greece) based on morphological and plastid molecular sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamarix minoa is described from material collected on the S Aegean island of Crete (Kriti), Greece. A morphological comparison with the species considered to be closest, T. africana and T. hampeana, is provided. An original illustration showing the main morphological characters of the new species is...

  18. Genetic and morphological variation of bee-parasitic Tropilaelaps mites (Acari: Laelapidae): new and re-defined species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Denis L; Morgan, Mathew J

    2007-01-01

    Mites in the genus Tropilaelaps are parasites of social honeybees. Two species, Tropilaelaps clareae and T. koenigerum, have been recorded and their primary hosts are presumed to be the giant honeybees of Asia, Apis dorsata and A. laboriosa. The most common species, T. clareae, is also an economically important pest of the introduced Western honeybee (A. mellifera) throughout Asia and is considered an emerging threat to world apiculture. In the studies reported here, genetic (mtDNA CO-I and nuclear ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 gene sequence) and morphological variation and host associations were examined among Tropilaelaps isolates collected from A. dorsata, A. laboriosa and A. mellifera throughout Asia and neighbouring regions. The results clearly indicate that the genus contains at least four species. Tropilaelaps clareae, previously assumed to be ubiquitous in Asia, was found to be two species, and it is here redefined as encompassing haplotypes (mites with distinct mtDNA gene sequences) that parasitise native A. dorsata breviligula and introduced A. mellifera in the Philippines and also native A. d. binghami on Sulawesi Island in Indonesia. Tropilaelaps mercedesae n. sp., which until now has been mistaken for T. clareae, encompasses haplotypes that, together with haplotypes of T. koenigerum, parasitise native A. d. dorsata in mainland Asia and Indonesia (except Sulawesi Island). It also parasitises introduced A. mellifera in these and surrounding regions and, with another new species, T. thaii n. sp., also parasitises A. laboriosa in mountainous Himalayan regions. Methods are described for identifying each species. These studies help to clarify the emerging threat of Tropilaelaps to world apiculture and will necessitate a revision of quarantine protocols for countries that import and export honeybees.

  19. Comparison of morphological variations among three species of the genus Paracobitis in Iran using geometric morphometrics method with a taxonomical review on the genus in Iran

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    Omid Jafari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to apply the landmark-based geometric morphometrics technique to differentiate three species of the genus Paracobitis (P. iranica, P. malapterura and P. rhadinaeus in Iran based on their body shape, because previous works, using traditional morphometrics, could not distinct them. A total of 150 specimens were sampled from the Zaringol, Madarsoo, Ghomrood, Kordan Rivers and Chahnimeh reservoir. The left side of the specimens was photographed using a digital camera and then fifteen landmark-points were digitized on two-dimensional images using TpsDig2. Landmark data were analyzed after a generalised procrustes analysis using PCA, CVA and cluster analysis. The patterns of body shape differences among the populations were illustrated in the deformation grids in relation to consensus configuration. The results showed a significant differences among the studied species and their populations in terms of morphological traits (P<0.0001. Some differences were found in the length and depth of head, depth of body, caudal peduncle length and position of eye and position of dorsal fin. The result also showed that P. iranica from Kordan River can be considered to be a distinct taxon compared to the Ghomrood taxon based on its morphological characteristics. In addition, our findings revealed that the geometric morphometrics approach can be a proper tool for morphological and taxonomic studies in species with small sizes including Nemachelinae.

  20. Morphological and molecular characteristics of a new species of Pasteuria parasitic on Meloidogyne ardenensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Alistair H; Gowen, Simon R; Pembroke, Barbara; Trotter, James R

    2007-09-01

    A species of the hyper-parasitic bacterium Pasteuria was isolated from the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne ardenensis infecting the roots of ash (Fraxinus excelsior). It is morphologically different from some other Pasteuria pathogens of nematodes in that the spores lack a basal ring on the ventral side of the spore and have a unique clumping nature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the clumps of spores are not random aggregates but result from the disintegration of the suicide cells of the thalli. Sporulation within each vegetative mycelium was shown to be asynchronous. In addition to the novel morphological features 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed this to be a new species of Pasteuria which we have called P. hartismeri. Spores of P. hartismeri attach to juveniles of root-knot nematodes infecting a wide range of plants such as mint (Meloidogyne hapla), rye grass (unidentified Meloidogyne sp.) and potato (Meloidogyne fallax).

  1. Integrated dataset of anatomical, morphological, and architectural traits for plant species in Madagascar

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    Amira Azizan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present a dataset, which provides information on the structural diversity of some endemic tropical species in Madagascar. The data were from CIRAD xylotheque (since 1937, and were also collected during various fieldworks (since 1964. The field notes and photographs were provided by French botanists; particularly by Francis Hallé. The dataset covers 250 plant species with anatomical, morphological, and architectural traits indexed from digitized wood slides and fieldwork documents. The digitized wood slides were constituted by the transverse, tangential, and radial sections with three optical magnifications. The main specific anatomical traits can be found within the digitized area. Information on morphological and architectural traits were indexed from digitized field drawings including notes and photographs. The data are hosted in the website ArchiWood (http://archiwood.cirad.fr. Keywords: Morpho-architectural traits, Plant architecture, Wood anatomy, Madagascar

  2. THE DISTRIBUTION, MORPHOLOGY, AND ECOLOGY OF THREE INTRODUCED ASIATIC SPECIES OF PORPHYRA (BANGIALES, RHODOPHYTA) IN THE NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neefus, Christopher D; Mathieson, Arthur C; Bray, Troy L; Yarish, Charles

    2008-12-01

    Distributions of three Asiatic Porphyra species, Porphyra yezoensis Ueda, Porphyra katadae A. Miura, and Porphyra suborbiculata Kjellm., are reported from New England, USA. Species identifications were confirmed by rbcL and nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer-1 (ITS1) sequence comparisons with herbarium specimens, cultures, and GenBank accessions. Two distinct genotypes of P. yezoensis were detected: forma narawaensis A. Miura and f. yezoensis. Forma narawaensis occurs south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and has ITS1 sequences identical to cultivars widely grown in Japan. Forma yezoensis occurs in western Long Island Sound and from Cape Cod northward to midcoastal Maine; its ITS1 sequence is identical to a wild specimen from Hokkaido, Japan. P. katadae has been collected from five locations near Cape Cod; its ITS1 sequence is identical to a cultured specimen from Qingdao, China. P. suborbiculata has been collected at several locations south of Cape Cod; its presence in North Carolina and Delaware during the mid-1960s was confirmed from herbarium specimens. Morphological and ecological characteristics for New England populations of the three Asiatic species were compared to original descriptions. New England P. yezoensis f. yezoensis is similar to Ueda's original description of Japanese specimens, but there are morphological differences for P. yezoensis f. narawaensis. In New England, f. narawaensis typically does not attain the length reported in Japan (max. 19 cm versus 100 cm). New England P. katadae is similar to Miura's original description, except for slight differences in thallus thickness and reproductive patterns. By contrast, New England, Japanese, and other populations of P. suborbiculata exhibit pronounced differences in blade coloration, shape and dimensions, reproductive patterns, seasonal occurrence, and general ecology. © 2008 Phycological Society of America.

  3. Morphological and molecular analyses of larval taeniid species in small mammals from contrasting habitats in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Sabi, Mohammad Nafi Solaiman; Jensen, P. M.; Chrestensen, M. U.

    2015-01-01

    according to habitat type, potentially identifying a ‘sylvatic’ transmission and an ‘urban’ transmission with marked variation among different taeniid species. Versteria mustelae and T. polyacantha were more prevalent in rural forests, while infections with H. taeniaeformis were dominant in urban parks......) for species determination. Small mammals (N=719) were trapped in three different types of habitats in north-east Zealand, Denmark. The sensitivity of the multiplex PCR (90.5%) exceeded that of morphological examination (57.9%) for identifying 95 taeniid infections. The use of the multiplex PCR resulted...

  4. Phylogenetic analyses and morphological characteristics support the description of a second species of Tridimeris (Annonaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, Andres Ernesto; Escobar-Castellanos, Marcos Alberto; Pérez-Farrera, Miguel Angel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Based on phylogenetic and morphological evidence, Tridimeris chiapensis Escobar-Castellanos & Ortiz-Rodr., sp. n. (Annonaceae), a new species from the karst forest of southern Mexico, is described and illustrated. The new species differs from Tridimeris hahniana, the only described species in the genus, in that the latter has flowers with sepals densely tomentose outside, one (rarely two) carpel(s) per flower and fruits densely covered with golden-brown hairs, while Tridimeris chiapensis has flowers with glabrous sepals outside, two to five carpels per flower and glabrous fruits. Furthermore, a shallow triangular white patch at the base of the inner petals is found in Tridimeris chiapensis, a morphological character shared with the sister genus Sapranthus but absent in Tridimeris hahniana. Geographically, both species occur allopatrically. With just one known locality and seven individuals of Tridimeris chiapensis recorded in one sampling hectare, and based on application of the criteria established by the IUCN, we conclude tentatively that the species is critically endangered. PMID:28127237

  5. [Morphologic and AFLP analysis of relationships between tulip species Tulipa biebersteiniana (Liliaceae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlunina, N A; Polezhaeva, M A; Permiakova, M V

    2013-04-01

    In populations of four species of tulips, (Tulipa biebersteiniana, T. patens, T. scytica and T. riparia) from the Volgograd, Kurgansk, Orenburg, and Chelyabinsk regions and the Republic of Bashkortostan, genetic diversity was studied by means of morphological and AFLP analysis. A morphological analysis of seven quantitative and two qualitative criteria was carried out. Three selective EcoRI/MseI primer pairs allowed one to genotype 81 individuals from 13 tulip populations with 87 loci. The low level of variability by AFLP loci were revealed in all species, including T. biebersteiniana (P = 20.41%, UH(e) = 0.075), T. patens (26.97%, 0.082), T. scytica (27.53%, 0.086), and T. riparia (27.72%, 0.096). According to the AMOVA results, the variability proportion that characterizes the differences between the four Tulip species was lower (F(CT) = 0.235) than between populations within species (F(ST) = 0.439). Tulipa patens is well differentiated by means of Nei's distances, coordination, and analysis in the STRUCTURE program. An analysis in the STRUCTURE revealed four genetic groups of tulips that are not completely in accordance with the analyzed species. This acknowledges the presence of complicated genetic process in the tulip population.

  6. Drought Tolerance of Wild and Cultivated Species of Safflower and Assessment of Morphological Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Shiravand

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Wild species of crop plants carry useful genes which can be used for breeding programs. This study was performed to investigate genetic variation of 46 genotypes from five Carthamus species and to evaluate their drought tolerance under field conditions (normal and deficit moisture environments during 2011at Isfahan university of technology research farm. Results indicated that safflower species had different response to drought stress. Results showed that drought stress significantly reduced seed yield in C. tinctorius and C. palaestinus. The wild species of C. palaestinus had higher seed yield, its component and oil percent compared other species in both moisture conditions. Drought tolerance indice (STI showed that C. palaestinus had the highest drought tolerance. Cluster analysis based on agro-morphological traits indicated that three species C. tinctorius, C palaestinu and C. oxyacanthus had the most similarity among studied species. Finally in respect to high hybridization of two main safflower relatives C. palaestinus (because high STI and C. oxyacanthus (because high stability under drought condition are suitable source for transferring drought tolerance genes to cultivated species.

  7. Morphological and Molecular Discrimination of Fasciola Species Isolated From Domestic Ruminants of Urmia City, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    YAKHCHALI, Mohammad; MALEKZADEH-VIAYEH, Reza; IMANI-BARAN, Abbas; MARDANI, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Background: The trematodes of the genus Fasciola (the liver flukes) are among the well-known instances of food-borne parasites worldwide. Differentiation of Fasciola species is important because of their different transmission and epidemiological characteristics. The current study was undertaken to discriminate Fasciola species in the domestic ruminants of Urmia city, Iran. Methods: Adult flukes were isolated from the naturally infected livers of the slaughtered water buffaloes and sheep. The flukes were initially identified based on morphological and morphometric parameters. A 618-bp-long fragment of the 28SrRNA gene of Fasciola was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The amplified fragment was digested by DraII or AvaII enzymes for a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequenced for the phylogenetic tree construction. Results: Based on the morphometric examination, the flukes belonged to F. hepatica, F. gigantica and an intermediate Fasciola form. The PCR-RFLP analysis was able to differentiate F. hepatica from F. gigantica. While the phylogenetic reconstruction justified, to some extent, the morphological diagnosis, it failed to segregate F. hepatica from F. gigantica identified in this and the previous studies. Conclusion: To resolve fully the problem of taxonomy and evolution in Fasciola species, employing a broad range of molecular and morphological approaches is necessary. This is crucial for epidemiological surveys and successful clinical management of their infection. PMID:25904945

  8. Morphological and molecular discrimination of fasciola species isolated from domestic ruminants of urmia city, iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Yakhchali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The trematodes of the genus Fasciola (the liver flukes are among the well-known instances of food-borne parasites worldwide. Differentiation of Fasciola species is important because of their different transmission and epidemiological characteristics. The current study was undertaken to discriminate Fasciola species in the domestic ruminants of Urmia city, Iran.Adult flukes were isolated from the naturally infected livers of the slaughtered water buffaloes and sheep. The flukes were initially identified based on morphological and morphometric parameters. A 618-bp-long fragment of the 28SrRNA gene of Fasciola was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The amplified fragment was digested by DraII or AvaII enzymes for a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis and sequenced for the phylogenetic tree construction.Based on the morphometric examination, the flukes belonged to F. hepatica, F. gigantica and an intermediate Fasciola form. The PCR-RFLP analysis was able to differentiate F. hepatica from F. gigantica. While the phylogenetic reconstruction justified, to some extent, the morphological diagnosis, it failed to segregate F. hepatica from F. gigantica identified in this and the previous studies.To resolve fully the problem of taxonomy and evolution in Fasciola species, employing a broad range of molecular and morphological approaches is necessary. This is crucial for epidemiological surveys and successful clinical management of their infection.

  9. Morphology of the spermathecae of twelve species of Triatominae (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) vectors of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Juliana Damieli; Ribeiro, Aline Rimoldi; Almeida, Larissa Aguiar; de Oliveira, Jader; Mendonça, Vagner José; Cilense, Mário; da Rosa, João Aristeu

    2017-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, is transmitted by triatomines that have been described in a large number of studies. Most of those studies are related to external morphology and taxonomy, but some biochemical, genetic and physiological studies have also been published. There are a few publications in the literature about the internal organs of Triatominae, for instance the spermathecae, which are responsible for storing and maintaining the viability of the spermatozoids until the fertilization of the oocytes. This work aims to study the spermathecae of twelve species of triatomines obtained from the Triatominae Insectarium of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, UNESP, Araraquara, using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The spermathecae of the twelve species studied showed three morphological patterns: a) P. herreri sn, P. lignarius, P. megistus, Triatoma brasiliensis, T. juazeirensis, T. sherlocki and T. tibiamaculata have spermathecae with a thin initial portion and an oval-shaped final portion; b) R. montenegrensis, R. nasutus, R. neglectus, R. pictipes and R. prolixus have tubular and winding spermathecae; c) T. infestans has oval spermathecae. In addition to the three morphological patterns, it was noted that each of the twelve species has particular features that differentiate them. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphology of immature stages of blow fly, Lucilia sinensis Aubertin (Diptera: Calliphoridae), a potential species of forensic importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanit, Sangob; Sukontason, Kom; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Wannasan, Anchalee; Kraisittipanit, Rungroj; Sukontason, Kabkaew L

    2017-12-01

    Lucilia sinensis Aubertin (Diptera: Calliphoridae) is a blow fly species of potential forensic importance since adults are attracted to, and colonize, decomposing vertebrate remains. Blow fly larvae associated with human corpses can be useful evidence in forensic investigations; however, their use is dependent in most cases on proper species identification and availability of developmental data. For identification, morphological information on each life stage is traditionally used. We used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the ultrastructure of eggs, all instars, and puparia, of L. sinensis. The important characteristics used to differentiate L. sinensis from other species are provided. Distinctive features of the eggs are the slight widening median area extending almost the entire length. The last abdominal segment of the first instar bears elongated outer ventral tubercles along the rim of the last abdominal segment. These tubercles, as well as the well developed median and outer dorsal tubercles, are more prominent in the second and third instars. The surface integument of the tubercles is equipped with circular rows of microtrichia. Pairs of inner dorsal tubercle are absent. Each anterior spiracle is comprised of 9-12 papillae arrange in a single row in the second and third instars. As for the third instar, the dorsal spines between the first and second thoracic segments are delicate, narrow, small, and close together (as row or set). The peristigmatic tufts adjacent to the posterior spiracle of the third instar are moderately branches of short, fine hairs, but minute in puparia. In conclusion, the prominent outer ventral tubercle in all instars and puparia is a new diagnostic feature of L. sinensis and helpful in differentiating it from other Lucilia species that are forensically important. The description of immature L. sinensis in this study will be useful for forensic entomologists in countries where this species exists. Copyright © 2017

  11. Wood Chemical Composition in Species of Cactaceae: The Relationship between Lignification and Stem Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level. PMID:25880223

  12. Wood chemical composition in species of Cactaceae: the relationship between lignification and stem morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Reyes-Rivera

    Full Text Available In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35% of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level.

  13. Wood chemical composition in species of Cactaceae: the relationship between lignification and stem morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Rivera, Jorge; Canché-Escamilla, Gonzalo; Soto-Hernández, Marcos; Terrazas, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    In Cactaceae, wood anatomy is related to stem morphology in terms of the conferred support. In species of cacti with dimorphic wood, a unique process occurs in which the cambium stops producing wide-band tracheids (WBTs) and produces fibers; this is associated with the aging of individuals and increases in size. Stem support and lignification have only been studied in fibrous tree-like species, and studies in species with WBTs or dimorphic wood are lacking. In this study, we approach this process with a chemical focus, emphasizing the role of wood lignification. We hypothesized that the degree of wood lignification in Cactaceae increases with height of the species and that its chemical composition varies with wood anatomy. To test this, we studied the chemical composition (cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin content) in 13 species (2 WBTs wood, 3 dimorphic, and 8 fibrous) with contrasting growth forms. We also analyzed lignification in dimorphic and fibrous species to determine the chemical features of WBTs and fibers and their relationship with stem support. The lignin contents were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and high performance liquid chromatography. We found that 11 species have a higher percentage (>35%) of lignin in their wood than other angiosperms or gymnosperms. The lignin chemical composition in fibrous species is similar to that of other dicots, but it is markedly heterogeneous in non-fibrous species where WBTs are abundant. The lignification in WBTs is associated with the resistance to high water pressure within cells rather than the contribution to mechanical support. Dimorphic wood species are usually richer in syringyl lignin, and tree-like species with lignified rays have more guaiacyl lignin. The results suggest that wood anatomy and lignin distribution play an important role in the chemical composition of wood, and further research is needed at the cellular level.

  14. Urban habitat complexity affects species richness but not environmental filtering of morphologically-diverse ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ossola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Habitat complexity is a major determinant of structure and diversity of ant assemblages. Following the size-grain hypothesis, smaller ant species are likely to be advantaged in more complex habitats compared to larger species. Habitat complexity can act as an environmental filter based on species size and morphological traits, therefore affecting the overall structure and diversity of ant assemblages. In natural and semi-natural ecosystems, habitat complexity is principally regulated by ecological successions or disturbance such as fire and grazing. Urban ecosystems provide an opportunity to test relationships between habitat, ant assemblage structure and ant traits using novel combinations of habitat complexity generated and sustained by human management. We sampled ant assemblages in low-complexity and high-complexity parks, and high-complexity woodland remnants, hypothesizing that (i ant abundance and species richness would be higher in high-complexity urban habitats, (ii ant assemblages would differ between low- and high-complexity habitats and (iii ants living in high-complexity habitats would be smaller than those living in low-complexity habitats. Contrary to our hypothesis, ant species richness was higher in low-complexity habitats compared to high-complexity habitats. Overall, ant assemblages were significantly different among the habitat complexity types investigated, although ant size and morphology remained the same. Habitat complexity appears to affect the structure of ant assemblages in urban ecosystems as previously observed in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the habitat complexity filter does not seem to be linked to ant morphological traits related to body size.

  15. Urban habitat complexity affects species richness but not environmental filtering of morphologically-diverse ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Michael A.; Christie, Fiona J.; Hahs, Amy K.; Livesley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat complexity is a major determinant of structure and diversity of ant assemblages. Following the size-grain hypothesis, smaller ant species are likely to be advantaged in more complex habitats compared to larger species. Habitat complexity can act as an environmental filter based on species size and morphological traits, therefore affecting the overall structure and diversity of ant assemblages. In natural and semi-natural ecosystems, habitat complexity is principally regulated by ecological successions or disturbance such as fire and grazing. Urban ecosystems provide an opportunity to test relationships between habitat, ant assemblage structure and ant traits using novel combinations of habitat complexity generated and sustained by human management. We sampled ant assemblages in low-complexity and high-complexity parks, and high-complexity woodland remnants, hypothesizing that (i) ant abundance and species richness would be higher in high-complexity urban habitats, (ii) ant assemblages would differ between low- and high-complexity habitats and (iii) ants living in high-complexity habitats would be smaller than those living in low-complexity habitats. Contrary to our hypothesis, ant species richness was higher in low-complexity habitats compared to high-complexity habitats. Overall, ant assemblages were significantly different among the habitat complexity types investigated, although ant size and morphology remained the same. Habitat complexity appears to affect the structure of ant assemblages in urban ecosystems as previously observed in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the habitat complexity filter does not seem to be linked to ant morphological traits related to body size. PMID:26528416

  16. Two distinctive new species of Commicarpus (Nyctaginaceae) from gypsum outcrops in eastern Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ib; Gilbert, Michael G.; Weber, Odile

    2016-01-01

    During field trips in 2013 and 2014, two distinctive plants belonging to the genus Commicarpus were collected in the Lele Hills, Bale Zone, eastern Ethiopia, on outcrops of sedimentary rock belonging to the Gorrahei Formation with high contents of gypsum. The plants are here described as two new...

  17. 76 FR 58867 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Determination of Nine Distinct Population Segments of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... Northern District of California modified the February 19, 2010, deadline to March 8, 2010. On March 16... markedly separated from other populations of the same taxon (an organism or group of organisms) as a... to identify two genetically distinct nesting populations in the Pacific--a northern hemisphere...

  18. Wild plant species growing closely connected in a subalpine meadow host distinct root-associated bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Aleklett

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant roots are known to harbor large and diverse communities of bacteria. It has been suggested that plant identity can structure these root-associated communities, but few studies have specifically assessed how the composition of root microbiota varies within and between plant species growing under natural conditions. We assessed the community composition of endophytic and epiphytic bacteria through high throughput sequencing using 16S rDNA derived from root tissues collected from a population of a wild, clonal plant (Orange hawkweed–Pilosella aurantiaca as well as two neighboring plant species (Oxeye daisy–Leucanthemum vulgare and Alsike clover–Trifolium hybridum. Our first goal was to determine if plant species growing in close proximity, under similar environmental conditions, still hosted unique root microbiota. Our results showed that plants of different species host distinct bacterial communities in their roots. In terms of community composition, Betaproteobacteria (especially the family Oxalobacteraceae were found to dominate in the root microbiota of L. vulgare and T. hybridum samples, whereas the root microbiota of P. aurantiaca had a more heterogeneous distribution of bacterial abundances where Gammaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria occupied a larger portion of the community. We also explored the extent of individual variance within each plant species investigated, and found that in the plant species thought to have the least genetic variance among individuals (P. aurantiaca still hosted just as diverse microbial communities. Whether all plant species host their own distinct root microbiota and plants more closely related to each other share more similar bacterial communities still remains to be fully explored, but among the plants examined in this experiment there was no trend that the two species belonging to the same family shared more similarities in terms of bacterial community composition.

  19. Bat Species Comparisons Based on External Morphology: A Test of Traditional versus Geometric Morphometric Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Daniela A; Benítez, Hugo A; Borissov, Ivailo M; Fruciano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    External morphology is commonly used to identify bats as well as to investigate flight and foraging behavior, typically relying on simple length and area measures or ratios. However, geometric morphometrics is increasingly used in the biological sciences to analyse variation in shape and discriminate among species and populations. Here we compare the ability of traditional versus geometric morphometric methods in discriminating between closely related bat species--in this case European horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera)--based on morphology of the wing, body and tail. In addition to comparing morphometric methods, we used geometric morphometrics to detect interspecies differences as shape changes. Geometric morphometrics yielded improved species discrimination relative to traditional methods. The predicted shape for the variation along the between group principal components revealed that the largest differences between species lay in the extent to which the wing reaches in the direction of the head. This strong trend in interspecific shape variation is associated with size, which we interpret as an evolutionary allometry pattern.

  20. Bat Species Comparisons Based on External Morphology: A Test of Traditional versus Geometric Morphometric Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A Schmieder

    Full Text Available External morphology is commonly used to identify bats as well as to investigate flight and foraging behavior, typically relying on simple length and area measures or ratios. However, geometric morphometrics is increasingly used in the biological sciences to analyse variation in shape and discriminate among species and populations. Here we compare the ability of traditional versus geometric morphometric methods in discriminating between closely related bat species--in this case European horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera--based on morphology of the wing, body and tail. In addition to comparing morphometric methods, we used geometric morphometrics to detect interspecies differences as shape changes. Geometric morphometrics yielded improved species discrimination relative to traditional methods. The predicted shape for the variation along the between group principal components revealed that the largest differences between species lay in the extent to which the wing reaches in the direction of the head. This strong trend in interspecific shape variation is associated with size, which we interpret as an evolutionary allometry pattern.

  1. EVALUATION OF THREE WILD SPECIES OF ALMOND ON THE BASIS OF THEIR MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B BANINASAB

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the suitable climatic conditions, Iran is one of the most important growing centre for wild and domesticated species/varieties of almond. Because of the adaptability of wild almond species to severe environmental conditions and resistance to drought, salinity and some pest and diseases, these can be used as rootstock for almond cultivars and in breeding programs for rootstock improvement in Iran. In this study, seeds of Amygdalous scoparia, A.webbii and A. orientalis were planted. The analysis of variance showed a significant difference between species. However, A. scoparia had highest stem height and leaf length. At the end of the experiment, the thickest stems were developed by A. scoparia, whereas the thinnest stems by A. orientalis. A. webbii produced more number and longer roots per seedling than the other two species. The correlation between various morphological traits showed that a few shoot characters were significantly correlated with root traits. However, leaf length, leaf width, leaf area, root number and root diameter for P. webbii, and leaf number, leaf length, leaf width, petiole length and root number characters for P.scoparia, and stem height, leaf number, leaf length, petiole length, internode length and root number for P. orientalis were found to be important morphological traits to evaluate seedling charactristics of wild almond genotypes before their nursery test.

  2. Morphological characterisation and agronomical parameters of different species of Salvia sp. (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossi, A J; Cansian, R L; Paroul, N; Toniazzo, G; Oliveira, J V; Pierozan, M K; Pauletti, G; Rota, L; Santos, A C A; Serafini, L A

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this work is to assess the morphological characteristics and parameters of biomass production, such as fresh and dry matter weight (FMW and DMW, g/plant), yield of dry matter (YDM) in terms of ton/ha, essential oil content (EOC, mL/100 g) and yield of essential oils (YEO) expressed as L/ha of the following plants Salvia verbenaca, Salvia argentea, Salvia lavandulifolia, Salvia pratensis, Salvia sclarea, Salvia triloba and Salvia officinalis. Except for Salvia argentea (S2) all other species have adapted to the south Brazilian climate conditions, with morphological differences among the species evaluated. In terms of DMW and YDM, S. officinalis was found to be the most productive species with 445.83 g/plant and 11.14 ton/ha. The higher essential oil content and yield was observed for S. officinalis, affording 1.99 mL/100 g and 221.74 L/ha, respectively. Chemical characterisation of the essential oils obtained from hydrodistillation was performed through GC and GC/MSD analyses, which revealed for most of the species studied, α e β-thujone, camphor and 1,8-cineole as major compounds, apart from S. sclarea, for which linalool, linalyl acetate and α-terpineol were the major components.

  3. Morphological characterisation and agronomical parameters of different species of Salvia sp. (Lamiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AJ Mossi

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to assess the morphological characteristics and parameters of biomass production, such as fresh and dry matter weight (FMW and DMW, g/plant, yield of dry matter (YDM in terms of ton/ha, essential oil content (EOC, mL/100 g and yield of essential oils (YEO expressed as L/ha of the following plants Salvia verbenaca, Salvia argentea, Salvia lavandulifolia, Salvia pratensis, Salvia sclarea, Salvia triloba and Salvia officinalis. Except for Salvia argentea (S2 all other species have adapted to the south Brazilian climate conditions, with morphological differences among the species evaluated. In terms of DMW and YDM, S. officinalis was found to be the most productive species with 445.83 g/plant and 11.14 ton/ha. The higher essential oil content and yield was observed for S. officinalis, affording 1.99 mL/100 g and 221.74 L/ha, respectively. Chemical characterisation of the essential oils obtained from hydrodistillation was performed through GC and GC/MSD analyses, which revealed for most of the species studied, α e β-thujone, camphor and 1,8-cineole as major compounds, apart from S. sclarea, for which linalool, linalyl acetate and α-terpineol were the major components.

  4. Morphology, nectar characteristics and avian pollinators in five Andean Puya species (Bromeliaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornung-Leoni, C. T.; González-Gómez, P. L.; Troncoso, A. J.

    2013-08-01

    Five Andean Puya species (Puya alpestris, Puya chilensis, Puya coerulea, Puya raimondii and Puya venusta) were studied to determine the relationship between their avian visitors, and plant morphology and nectar characteristics. Our results showed a significant relationship between nectar concentration, presence of sterile apex and avian pollinators's species. In contrast, nectar composition was not related to the frequency of avian visits. We found that Puya species were mainly visited by specialist nectarivorous birds such as hummingbirds (i.e., P. coerulea and P. venusta), lacked a sterile apex and produced high nectar concentration in low volumes. In contrast, species mainly visited by generalist passerines (i.e., P. chilensis and P. alpestris) were characterized by the presence of a sterile apex and production of highly diluted nectar in large volumes. In a mono-specific group we found that P. raimondii produces highly concentrated nectar in large volumes, and its flowers were visited by hummingbirds and passerine birds. We found no effect of nectar composition on bird's visits. Our study highlights the interplay between morphological traits, nectar characteristics and the ecological framework to explain specialized and generalized birds pollination systems.

  5. Morphological and Molecular Phylogenetic Data Reveal a New Species of Primula (Primulaceae from Hunan, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Xu

    Full Text Available A new species of Primulaceae, Primula undulifolia, is described from the hilly area of Hunan province in south-central China. Its morphology and distributional range suggest that it is allied to P. kwangtungensis, both adapted to subtropical climate, having contiguous distribution and similar habitat, growing on shady and moist cliffs. Petioles, scapes and pedicels of them are densely covered with rusty multicellular hairs, but the new species can be easily distinguished by its smaller flowers and narrowly oblong leaves with undulate margins. Molecular phylogenetic analysis based on four DNA markers (ITS, matK, trnL-F and rps16 confirmed the new species as an independent lineage and constitutes a main clade together with P. kwangtungensis, P. kweichouensis, P. wangii and P. hunanensis of Primula sect. Carolinella.

  6. Bridging the gap between morphological species and molecular barcodes - Exemplified by loricate choanoflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, Nitsche; Thomsen, Helge Abildhauge; Daniel J, Richter

    2017-01-01

    species match a previously unidentified barcode from Tara Oceans, providing access to the global distribution of species isolated from Danish waters. One species, Calliacantha natans, is the second most globally abundant choanoflagellate present in Tara Oceans. Our project translating new ribosomal DNA......Translating the vast amounts of molecular barcodes from global surveys of microbial eukaryotes into ecological insight depends critically on a well-curated reference database with adequate taxonomic coverage. In this respect, the choanoflagellates resemble other eukaryotic lineages: reasonable...... represent an opportunity to link morphological with molecular data within a lineage of eukaryotes. To match morphospecies to sequences, we sampled the Kattegat and the Isefjord in Denmark in September 2014 and February 2015. We identified 45 morphospecies and sequenced ribosomal DNA of nine previously...

  7. Comparison of eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of new world vultures (Aves: Cathartidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisney, Thomas J.; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Vultures are highly reliant on their sensory systems for the rapid detection and localization of carrion before other scavengers can exploit the resource. In this study, we compared eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Cathartidae), turkey vultures (Cathartes...... aura), with a highly developed olfactory sense, and black vultures (Coragyps atratus), with a less developed sense of olfaction. We found that eye size relative to body mass was the same in both species, but that black vultures have larger corneas relative to eye size than turkey vultures. However......, the overall retinal topography, the total number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer, peak and average cell densities, cell soma area frequency distributions, and the theoretical peak anatomical spatial resolving power were the same in both species. This suggests that the visual systems of these two...

  8. MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION OF Fusarium SPECIES AND THEIR PATHOGENICITY FOR WHEAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Poštić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available From the root and lower stem parts of weeds and plant debris of maize, wheat, oat and sunflower we isolated 300 isolates of Fusarium spp. and performed morphological and molecular identification. With molecular identification using AFLP method we determined 14 Fusarium species: F. acuminatum, F. avenaceum, F. concolor, F. crookwellense, F. equiseti, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum, F. proliferatum, F. semitectum, F. solani, F. sporotrichioides, F. subglutinans, F. venenatum and F. verticillioides.By comparing results of morphological and molecular identification we found out that determination of 16,7% isolates was incorrect. Out of 300 isolates identified with molecular methods, 50 did not belong to the species determined with morphological determination.With pathogenicity tests of 30 chosen Fusarium isolates we determined that many of them were pathogenic to wheat and maize seedlings and to wheat heads. The most pathogenic were isolates of F. graminearum from A. retroflexus, A. theophrasti and C. album, F. venenatum from maize debris and and A. theophrasti, F. crookwellense from A. lappa. Antifungal influence of 11 essential oils on mycelia growth and sporulation of chosen Fusarium isolates determined that essential oils of T. vulgaris, P. anisum and E. caryophyllus had the strongest effect on mycelial growth. Influence of essential oils on sporulation was not statistically significant.

  9. Gametophyte Morphology and Development of Six Species of Pteris ( Pteridaceae from Java Island Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Sunarti Puspitasari

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of sporophyte, the type of reproduction, and cytology of Pteris had been reported, while the gametophyte morphology of Pteris in Java island has not been studied yet. The objective of this study was to describe the gametophyte morphology and development of P. biaurita, P. ensiformis, P. exelsa, P. longipinnula, P.tripartita, and P. vittata in Java island. Spores were obtained from fertile leaves of Pteris plants originated from several locations in Java island. The number of spores per sporangium was counted from fresh fertile leaves with mature sporangia. As much as 0.002 g spores was sown in a transparent box with sterile medium contain of vermiculite, sphagnum moss, and perlite with ratio 2:2:1. The gametophyte development of each species was observed under a microscope every 7 days. The spores of P. ensiformis were germinated faster, ten days after sowing, while the spores of P. longipinnula were germinated slower, 18 days after sowing. The pattern of spore germination is Vittaria-type. The development of gametophyte is Ceratopteris-type in common, but in a few cases is the Adiantum-type. The gametophyte development of observed Pteris species is varied in six characters including the number of filament cell, germinated time, the formation time of notch and gametangia, margin shape, and development type.

  10. Assessing Morphological and Physiological Properties of Forest Species Using High Throughput Plant Phenotyping and Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazis, A.; Hiller, J.; Morgan, P.; Awada, T.; Stoerger, V.

    2017-12-01

    High throughput plant phenotyping is increasingly being used to assess morphological and biophysical traits of economically important crops in agriculture. In this study, the potential application of this technique in natural resources management, through the characterization of woody plants regeneration, establishment, growth, and responses to water and nutrient manipulations was assessed. Two woody species were selected for this study, Quercus prinoides and Quercus bicolor. Seeds were collected from trees growing at the edge of their natural distribution in Nebraska and Missouri, USA. Seeds were germinated in the greenhouse and transferred to the Nebraska Innovation Campus Lemnatec3D High Throughput facility at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Seedlings subjected to water and N manipulations, were imaged twice or three times a week using four cameras (Visible, Fluorescence, Infrared and Hyperspectral), throughout the growing season. Traditional leaf to plant levels ecophysiological measurements were concurrently acquired to assess the relationship between these two techniques. These include gas exchange (LI 6400 and LI 6800, LICOR Inc., Lincoln NE), chlorophyll content, optical characteristics (Ocean Optics USB200), water and osmotic potentials, leaf area and weight and carbon isotope ratio. In the presentation, we highlight results on the potential use of high throughput plant phenotyping techniques to assess the morphology and physiology of woody species including responses to water availability and nutrient manipulation, and its broader application under field conditions and natural resources management. Also, we explore the different capabilities imaging provides us for modeling the plant physiological and morphological growth and how it can complement the current techniques

  11. Molecular and Morphological Identification of Mealybug Species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) in Brazilian Vineyards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco da Silva, Vitor C.; Bertin, Aline; Blin, Aurélie; Germain, Jean-François; Bernardi, Daniel; Rignol, Guylène; Botton, Marcos; Malausa, Thibaut

    2014-01-01

    Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell), Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley), Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso), Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret), Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn) and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret). Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species. PMID:25062012

  12. Morphology, Diet Composition, Distribution and Nesting Biology of Four Lark Species in Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbadrakh Mainjargal

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to enhance existing knowledge of four lark species (Mongolian lark , Horned lark, Eurasian skylark, and Lesser short-toed lark, with respect to nesting biology, distribution, and diet, using long-term dataset collected during 2000–2012. Nest and egg measurements substantially varied among species. For pooled data across species, the clutch size averaged 3.72 ± 1.13 eggs and did not differ among larks. Body mass of nestlings increased signi fi cantly with age at weighing. Daily increase in body mass of lark nestlings ranged between 3.09 and 3.89 gram per day. Unsurprisingly, the majority of lark locations occurred in steppe ecosystems, followed by human created systems; whereas only 1.8% of the pooled locations across species were observed in forest ecosystem. Diet composition did not vary among species in the proportions of major food categories consumed. The most commonly occurring food items were invertebrates and frequently consumed were being beetles (e.g. Coleoptera: Carabidae, Scarabaeidae, and Curculionidae and grasshoppers (e.g. Orthoptera: Acrididae, and their occurrences accounted for 63.7% of insect related food items. Among the fi ve morphological traits we measured, there were signi fi cant differences in wing span, body mass, bill, and tarsus; however tail lengths did not differ across four species.

  13. Molecular and morphological identification of mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae in Brazilian vineyards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor C Pacheco da Silva

    Full Text Available Mealybugs (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae are pests constraining the international trade of Brazilian table grapes. They damage grapes by transmitting viruses and toxins, causing defoliation, chlorosis, and vigor losses and favoring the development of sooty mold. Difficulties in mealybug identification remain an obstacle to the adequate management of these pests. In this study, our primary aim was to identify the principal mealybug species infesting the major table grape-producing regions in Brazil, by morphological and molecular characterization. Our secondary aim was to develop a rapid identification kit based on species-specific Polymerase Chain Reactions, to facilitate the routine identification of the most common pest species. We surveyed 40 sites infested with mealybugs and identified 17 species: Dysmicoccus brevipes (Cockerell, Dysmicoccus sylvarum Williams and Granara de Willink, Dysmicoccus texensis (Tinsley, Ferrisia cristinae Kaydan and Gullan, Ferrisia meridionalis Williams, Ferrisia terani Williams and Granara de Willink, Phenacoccus baccharidis Williams, Phenacoccus parvus Morrison, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley, Planococcus citri (Risso, Pseudococcus viburni (Signoret, Pseudococcus cryptus Hempel, four taxa closely related each of to Pseudococcus viburni, Pseudococcus sociabilis Hambleton, Pseudococcus maritimus (Ehrhorn and Pseudococcus meridionalis Prado, and one specimen from the genus Pseudococcus Westwood. The PCR method developed effectively identified five mealybug species of economic interest on grape in Brazil: D. brevipes, Pl. citri, Ps. viburni, Ph. solenopsis and Planococcus ficus (Signoret. Nevertheless, it is not possible to assure that this procedure is reliable for taxa that have not been sampled already and might be very closely related to the target species.

  14. A distinct alleles and genetic recombination of pmrCAB operon in species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hun; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2015-07-01

    To investigate pmrCAB sequence divergence in 5 species of Acinetobacter baumannii complex, a total of 80 isolates from a Korean hospital were explored. We evaluated nucleotide and amino acid polymorphisms of pmrCAB operon, and phylogenetic trees were constructed for each gene of prmCAB operon. Colistin and polymyxin B susceptibility was determined for all isolates, and multilocus sequence typing was also performed for A. baumannii isolates. Our results showed that each species of A. baumannii complex has divergent pmrCAB operon sequences. We identified a distinct pmrCAB allele allied with Acinetobacter nosocomialis in gene trees. Different grouping in each gene tree suggests sporadic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes among Acinetobacter species. Sequence polymorphisms among Acinetobacter species might not be associated with colistin resistance. We revealed that a distinct pmrCAB allele may be widespread across the continents such as North America and Asia and that sporadic genetic recombination or emergence of pmrCAB genes might occur. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Morphology and Phylogeny of a New Species of Anaerobic Ciliate, Trimyema finlayi n. sp., with Endosymbiotic Methanogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William H; Sendra, Kacper M; Embley, T Martin; Esteban, Genoveva F

    2018-01-01

    Many anaerobic ciliated protozoa contain organelles of mitochondrial ancestry called hydrogenosomes. These organelles generate molecular hydrogen that is consumed by methanogenic Archaea, living in endosymbiosis within many of these ciliates. Here we describe a new species of anaerobic ciliate, Trimyema finlayi n. sp., by using silver impregnation and microscopy to conduct a detailed morphometric analysis. Comparisons with previously published morphological data for this species, as well as the closely related species, Trimyema compressum , demonstrated that despite them being similar, both the mean cell size and the mean number of somatic kineties are lower for T. finlayi than for T. compressum , which suggests that they are distinct species. This was also supported by analysis of the 18S rRNA genes from these ciliates, the sequences of which are 97.5% identical (6 substitutions, 1479 compared bases), and in phylogenetic analyses these sequences grouped with other 18S rRNA genes sequenced from previous isolates of the same respective species. Together these data provide strong evidence that T. finlayi is a novel species of Trimyema , within the class Plagiopylea. Various microscopic techniques demonstrated that T. finlayi n. sp. contains polymorphic endosymbiotic methanogens, and analysis of the endosymbionts' 16S rRNA gene showed that they belong to the genus Methanocorpusculum , which was confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization with specific probes. Despite the degree of similarity and close relationship between these ciliates, T. compressum contains endosymbiotic methanogens from a different genus, Methanobrevibacter . In phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes, the Methanocorpusculum endosymbiont of T. finlayi n. sp. grouped with sequences from Methanomicrobia, including the endosymbiont of an earlier isolate of the same species, ' Trimyema sp.,' which was sampled approximately 22 years earlier, at a distant (∼400 km) geographical location

  16. Morphology and Phylogeny of a New Species of Anaerobic Ciliate, Trimyema finlayi n. sp., with Endosymbiotic Methanogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H. Lewis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Many anaerobic ciliated protozoa contain organelles of mitochondrial ancestry called hydrogenosomes. These organelles generate molecular hydrogen that is consumed by methanogenic Archaea, living in endosymbiosis within many of these ciliates. Here we describe a new species of anaerobic ciliate, Trimyema finlayi n. sp., by using silver impregnation and microscopy to conduct a detailed morphometric analysis. Comparisons with previously published morphological data for this species, as well as the closely related species, Trimyema compressum, demonstrated that despite them being similar, both the mean cell size and the mean number of somatic kineties are lower for T. finlayi than for T. compressum, which suggests that they are distinct species. This was also supported by analysis of the 18S rRNA genes from these ciliates, the sequences of which are 97.5% identical (6 substitutions, 1479 compared bases, and in phylogenetic analyses these sequences grouped with other 18S rRNA genes sequenced from previous isolates of the same respective species. Together these data provide strong evidence that T. finlayi is a novel species of Trimyema, within the class Plagiopylea. Various microscopic techniques demonstrated that T. finlayi n. sp. contains polymorphic endosymbiotic methanogens, and analysis of the endosymbionts’ 16S rRNA gene showed that they belong to the genus Methanocorpusculum, which was confirmed using fluorescence in situ hybridization with specific probes. Despite the degree of similarity and close relationship between these ciliates, T. compressum contains endosymbiotic methanogens from a different genus, Methanobrevibacter. In phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA genes, the Methanocorpusculum endosymbiont of T. finlayi n. sp. grouped with sequences from Methanomicrobia, including the endosymbiont of an earlier isolate of the same species, ‘Trimyema sp.,’ which was sampled approximately 22 years earlier, at a distant (∼400 km

  17. Morphology of caterpillars and pupae of European Maculinea species (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) with an identification table

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliwinska, Ewa B.; Nowicki, Piotr; Nash, David Richard

    2006-01-01

    the caterpillars of these species for effective conservation. We present the morphology of the larvae and pupae of these three species, and a simple key to their identification. Inter-specific differences among larvae and pupae, and within-species differences among larval instars, are underlined in order to enable...

  18. Gammarus orinos n. sp. from the Massif Central (France): its genetic and morphological distinction from Gammarus ibericus Margalef, 1951 (Crustacea, Amphipoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pinkster, Sjouk; Scholl, Adolf

    1984-01-01

    Until 1974 Gammarus ibericus was known only from the type-locality in Spain. In that year, Goedmakers recorded the species from many localities in the Massif Central, France. Indeed, these populations show a great morphological resemblance to the Spanish ones. These French populations were used in

  19. Cladotanytarsus Kieffer (Diptera: Chironomidae): several distinctive species reviewed on the basis of records from Canada and USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchalski, Mateusz; Giłka, Wojciech

    2017-03-10

    Two species of the genus Cladotanytarsus Kieffer, 1921 are described as adult males, both peculiar in having distinctively elongated hypopygial anal points. The male of Cladotanytarsus bilyji Giłka et Puchalski, sp. nov. (Canada, Manitoba; USA, Ohio) is presumed to be a close relative of C. nigrovittatus (Goetghebuer, 1922). Another unknown Cladotanytarsus species (USA, Illinois and Louisiana) keys with the European C. donmcbeani Langton et McBean, 2010. The intraspecific variability of the male C. acornutus Jacobsen et Bilyj, 2007 is also presented on the basis of new records (Canada, Ontario; USA, South Carolina). Cladotanytarsus males with similarly structured elongate anal points are reviewed, including C. tobaquardecimus Kikuchi et Sasa, 1990, considered a junior synonym (syn. nov.) of C. conversus (Johannsen, 1932). As a compilation of this study, a key to the identification of the adult males of 14 Cladotanytarsus species is provided.

  20. Accelerated Evolution in Distinctive Species Reveals Candidate Elements for Clinically Relevant Traits, Including Mutation and Cancer Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Ferris

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The identity of most functional elements in the mammalian genome and the phenotypes they impact are unclear. Here, we perform a genome-wide comparative analysis of patterns of accelerated evolution in species with highly distinctive traits to discover candidate functional elements for clinically important phenotypes. We identify accelerated regions (ARs in the elephant, hibernating bat, orca, dolphin, naked mole rat, and thirteen-lined ground squirrel lineages in mammalian conserved regions, uncovering ∼33,000 elements that bind hundreds of different regulatory proteins in humans and mice. ARs in the elephant, the largest land mammal, are uniquely enriched near elephant DNA damage response genes. The genomic hotspot for elephant ARs is the E3 ligase subunit of the Fanconi anemia complex, a master regulator of DNA repair. Additionally, ARs in the six species are associated with specific human clinical phenotypes that have apparent concordance with overt traits in each species.

  1. Mercury's Exosphere During MESSENGER's Second Flyby: Detection of Magnesium and Distinct Distributions of Neutral Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, William E.; Vervack, Ronald J., Jr.; Bradley, E. Todd; Killen, Rosemary M.; Mouawad, Nelly; Sprague, Ann L.; Burger, Matthew H.; Solomon, Sean C.; Izenberg, Noam R.

    2009-01-01

    During MESSENGER's second Mercury flyby, the Mercury Atmospheric and Surface Composition Spectrometer observed emission from Mercury's neutral exosphere. These observations include the first detection of emission from magnesium. Differing spatial distributions for sodium, calcium, and magnesium were revealed by observations beginning in Mercury's tail region, approximately 8 Mercury radii anti-sunward of the planet, continuing past the nightside, and ending near the dawn terminator. Analysis of these observations, supplemented by observations during the first Mercury flyby as well as those by other MESSENGER instruments, suggests that the distinct spatial distributions arise from a combination of differences in source, transfer, and loss processes.

  2. Morphology and morphometry of two banderitas species (Orchidaceae: masdevallia) in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuervo Martinez, Monica Adriana; Bonilla Gomez, Maria Argenis; Bustos Singer, Rodrigo

    2012-01-01

    Masdevallia coccinea and the Masdevallia ignea (Banderitas) are ornamental orchids which are very prized by amateur farmers and collectors. In Colombia, the harvest pressure on these species has been enormous and few natural populations survive in the departments of Boyaca (Arcabuco of Berlin Paramo, Duitama) and Santander (between Malaga and Bucaramanga), in which these populations are reduced and of difficult access. For this reason these species are in the II appendix of cites. However, little is known on their reproductive biology, floral biology and pollination and the literature about this is incomplete. Under this framework, the goal of the project was to study the morphology and morphometry of m. coccinea and m. ignea (pleurothallidinae) under semicultivation conditions in the Villa Rosa Farm located in the municipality of Guasca, Cundinamarca (Colombia). The floral morphology was analyzed by digital photography, morphometry and scanning electron microscope. The main results were differences in color and length of dorsal and lateral sepals between m. coccinea (x = 53.0 mm Sigma = 7.4 mm and x = 44.4 mm and Sigma = 8.3 mm) and m. ignea (x = 34 mm Sigma = 7.7 mm and x = 31.5 mm and Sigma = 6.1 mm). These parts were longest in m. coccinea in contrast to m. ignea. However the lip was longest in m. ignea (x = 7.1 mm y Sigma = 0.6 mm). On the other hand both species had lip articulated to the column but without rewards as nectar and osmophores.

  3. A Hepatozoon species genetically distinct from H. canis infecting spotted hyenas in the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Marion L; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Lieckfeldt, Dietmar; Ludwig, Arne; Goller, Katja; Wilhelm, Kerstin; Schares, Gereon; Thierer, Dagmar; Hofer, Heribert

    2008-01-01

    Health monitoring of spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) in the Serengeti ecosystem, Tanzania, revealed Hepatozoon infection in all of 11 immature individuals examined following death from natural causes. Hepatozoon infection was probably an important factor contributing to mortality in two cases that exhibited clinical signs of ataxia, lethargy, ocular discharge, retching, and labored breathing before death. Whether Hepatozoon infection contributed to six deaths from fire, probable lion predation and unknown causes could not be determined. Four deaths from infanticide and starvation were unlikely to be associated with Hepatozoon infection. Histologic examination revealed lung tissue infected with cyst-like structures containing protozoan stages in all eight cases examined and interstitial pneumonia in most cases. Systemic spread of infection to several organs was found in three cases. Alignment of a 426 bp sequence from the parasite's 18s rRNA gene revealed a Hepatozoon species identical to that recently described from two domestic cats in Spain and only 7 bp substitutions when a 853 bp sequence was aligned to this cat Hepatozoon species. Previous reports of infection of wild carnivores in eastern and southern Africa with an unspecified Hepatozoon species similar in appearance to H. canis may have involved the species described in this study.

  4. 76 FR 77465 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Proposed Threatened Status for Distinct Population Segments of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... Population Segments of the Bearded Seal AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic... population segments (DPS) of the bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) as threatened species under the... posed to this population by the projected habitat changes. Extension of Final Listing Determination The...

  5. The wild tomato species Solanum chilense shows variation in pathogen resistance between geographically distinct populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, Remco; Scheikl, Daniela; Tellier, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    Wild tomatoes are a valuable source of disease resistance germplasm for tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) breeders. Many species are known to possess a certain degree of resistance against certain pathogens; however, evolution of resistance traits is yet poorly understood. For some species, like Solanum chilense , both differences in habitat and within species genetic diversity are very large. Here we aim to investigate the occurrence of spatially heterogeneous coevolutionary pressures between populations of S. chilense . We investigate the phenotypic differences in disease resistance within S. chilense against three common tomato pathogens ( Alternaria solani , Phytophthora infestans and a Fusarium sp .) and confirm high degrees of variability in resistance properties between selected populations. Using generalised linear mixed models, we show that disease resistance does not follow the known demographic patterns of the species. Models with up to five available climatic and geographic variables are required to best describe resistance differences, confirming the complexity of factors involved in local resistance variation. We confirm that within S. chilense , resistance properties against various pathogens show a mosaic pattern and do not follow environmental patterns, indicating the strength of local pathogen pressures. Our study can form the basis for further investigations of the genetic traits involved.

  6. The wild tomato species Solanum chilense shows variation in pathogen resistance between geographically distinct populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco Stam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild tomatoes are a valuable source of disease resistance germplasm for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum breeders. Many species are known to possess a certain degree of resistance against certain pathogens; however, evolution of resistance traits is yet poorly understood. For some species, like Solanum chilense, both differences in habitat and within species genetic diversity are very large. Here we aim to investigate the occurrence of spatially heterogeneous coevolutionary pressures between populations of S. chilense. We investigate the phenotypic differences in disease resistance within S. chilense against three common tomato pathogens (Alternaria solani, Phytophthora infestans and a Fusarium sp. and confirm high degrees of variability in resistance properties between selected populations. Using generalised linear mixed models, we show that disease resistance does not follow the known demographic patterns of the species. Models with up to five available climatic and geographic variables are required to best describe resistance differences, confirming the complexity of factors involved in local resistance variation. We confirm that within S. chilense, resistance properties against various pathogens show a mosaic pattern and do not follow environmental patterns, indicating the strength of local pathogen pressures. Our study can form the basis for further investigations of the genetic traits involved.

  7. The wild tomato species Solanum chilense shows variation in pathogen resistance between geographically distinct populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheikl, Daniela; Tellier, Aurélien

    2017-01-01

    Wild tomatoes are a valuable source of disease resistance germplasm for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) breeders. Many species are known to possess a certain degree of resistance against certain pathogens; however, evolution of resistance traits is yet poorly understood. For some species, like Solanum chilense, both differences in habitat and within species genetic diversity are very large. Here we aim to investigate the occurrence of spatially heterogeneous coevolutionary pressures between populations of S. chilense. We investigate the phenotypic differences in disease resistance within S. chilense against three common tomato pathogens (Alternaria solani, Phytophthora infestans and a Fusarium sp.) and confirm high degrees of variability in resistance properties between selected populations. Using generalised linear mixed models, we show that disease resistance does not follow the known demographic patterns of the species. Models with up to five available climatic and geographic variables are required to best describe resistance differences, confirming the complexity of factors involved in local resistance variation. We confirm that within S. chilense, resistance properties against various pathogens show a mosaic pattern and do not follow environmental patterns, indicating the strength of local pathogen pressures. Our study can form the basis for further investigations of the genetic traits involved. PMID:28133579

  8. 76 FR 515 - Endangered and Threatened Species, Designation of Critical Habitat for Southern Distinct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... populations spawning west of Cook Inlet, Alaska). In the portion of the species' range that lies south of the... Life History and Maturation Eulachon eggs can vary considerably in size but typically are approximately...). Eggs are enclosed in a double membrane; after fertilization in the water, the outer membrane breaks and...

  9. Jamesbrittenia bergae (Scrophulariaceae, a distinctive new species from Limpopo, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lemmer

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Jamesbrittenia bergae P.Lemmer is a new species from the Farm Brakvallei near Thabazimbi in Limpopo [Northern Province]. Large, medium-textured. bright scarlet flowers w ith yellow throats are borne singly in upper leaf axils; the flowering branches, although terminal, do not form elongated racemes: leaves are greyish green, coarsely serrated. It grows in full sun on ferricrete outcrops.

  10. 78 FR 66139 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Delisting of the Eastern Distinct Population Segment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-04

    ... likely to cause the eastern DPS of Steller sea lion to become in danger of extinction throughout all or a... low and not likely to cause this population to become in danger of extinction within the foreseeable... threatened species under the ESA: It is not in danger of extinction or likely to become so within the...

  11. 77 FR 64959 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of 5-Year Review for the Southern Distinct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... listing classification for this species. A 5-year review is based on the best scientific and commercial... on this document, identified by NOAA-NMFS-2012-0198, by any of the following methods: Electronic... resulting list and click on the ``Submit a Comment'' icon on the right of that line. Mail or hand-delivery...

  12. Comparison of eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Aves: Cathartidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisney, Thomas J; Stecyk, Karyn; Kolominsky, Jeffrey; Graves, Gary R; Wylie, Douglas R; Iwaniuk, Andrew N

    2013-12-01

    Vultures are highly reliant on their sensory systems for the rapid detection and localization of carrion before other scavengers can exploit the resource. In this study, we compared eye morphology and retinal topography in two species of New World vultures (Cathartidae), turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), with a highly developed olfactory sense, and black vultures (Coragyps atratus), with a less developed sense of olfaction. We found that eye size relative to body mass was the same in both species, but that black vultures have larger corneas relative to eye size than turkey vultures. However, the overall retinal topography, the total number of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer, peak and average cell densities, cell soma area frequency distributions, and the theoretical peak anatomical spatial resolving power were the same in both species. This suggests that the visual systems of these two species are similar and that vision plays an equally important role in the biology of both species, despite the apparently greater reliance on olfaction for finding carrion in turkey vultures. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Collection and Morphological Characterization of some Native Allium Species of Khorassan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    amirhasan hossini

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Allium is one of the greatest genera in Amarylidaceae family with more than 900 species distributed in northern hemisphere from temperate region to tropical and subtropical areas. There are more than 135 Allium species in Iran, many of which have the ornamental potential and can be exploited in floriculture industry. Northeast of Iran with more than 35 species especially in Razavi and North Khorassan provinces is regarded as one of the main centers of diversity of Alliums. The species of Allium have the great potential to be used either as cut flower and potted plant or as outdoor plant in urban landscape. There are indeed a rich germplasm of Allium in Iran with diverse characteristics of flower colour, size and form. For the utilization of the wild species, it is necessary to identify and fully assess their main morphological and phenotypic characteristics as the initial step. Morphological markers are one of the commonly used tools which are applied in phenotypic evaluation, taxonomic classification and collection management of plant species. The aim of present study was to evaluate morphological traits and genetic diversity of some of the native Allium species of Razavi khorassan in Iran. Materials and Methods: In this study the Allium species were collected from diverse regions of Khorassan, Iran and were cultured as a collection in Research Center for Plant Sciences (RCPS of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in a completely randomized block design. Following the establishment of the Allium species, 29 qualitative and 13 quantitative traits were recorded during the growing season in two successive years. Analysis of variance and comparison of all traits were performed using JMP8 software and simple correlation and factor analysis was calculated using SPSS software. Principal component analysis as well as maximum variance was also performed on the collected data. Results and Discussion: The results exhibited that the species and

  14. Delineation of Culicoides species by morphology and barcode exemplified by three new species of the subgenus Culicoides (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Achim; Kristensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    new species initially separated by DNA barcoding with mitochondrial COI can be distinguished by morphological characters. In this context a key to Scandinavian subgenus Culicoides using wing and maxillary palp characters is presented. The key is including the three new species Culicoides boyi...... is considered, as well as the evolutionary relationships between species within this genus remains problematic. In recent years molecular barcoding has assisted substantially in the identification of biting midges in the multiple entomological survey projects which were initiated in many European countries...... following the bluetongue outbreak in 2006–2009. These studies revealed potentially new species and “species-complexes” with large genetic and morphological variability. Here we use molecular barcoding, together with morphological analysis, to study subgenus Culicoides Latreille from Scandinavia with focus...

  15. Functionalization of Planet-Satellite Nanostructures Revealed by Nanoscopic Localization of Distinct Macromolecular Species

    KAUST Repository

    Rossner, Christian

    2016-09-26

    The development of a straightforward method is reported to form hybrid polymer/gold planet-satellite nanostructures (PlSNs) with functional polymer. Polyacrylate type polymer with benzyl chloride in its backbone as a macromolecular tracer is synthesized to study its localization within PlSNs by analyzing the elemental distribution of chlorine. The functionalized nanohybrid structures are analyzed by scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and spectrum imaging. The results show that the RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) polymers\\' sulfur containing end groups are colocalized at the gold cores, both within nanohybrids of simple core-shell morphology and within higher order PlSNs, providing microscopic evidence for the affinity of the RAFT group toward gold surfaces. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA., Weinheim.

  16. Morphological identification and COI barcodes of adult flies help determine species identities of chironomid larvae (Diptera, Chironomidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, A J; Vasquez, A A; Hudson, P; Fujimoto, M; Ram, J L

    2016-02-01

    Establishing reliable methods for the identification of benthic chironomid communities is important due to their significant contribution to biomass, ecology and the aquatic food web. Immature larval specimens are more difficult to identify to species level by traditional morphological methods than their fully developed adult counterparts, and few keys are available to identify the larval species. In order to develop molecular criteria to identify species of chironomid larvae, larval and adult chironomids from Western Lake Erie were subjected to both molecular and morphological taxonomic analysis. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) barcode sequences of 33 adults that were identified to species level by morphological methods were grouped with COI sequences of 189 larvae in a neighbor-joining taxon-ID tree. Most of these larvae could be identified only to genus level by morphological taxonomy (only 22 of the 189 sequenced larvae could be identified to species level). The taxon-ID tree of larval sequences had 45 operational taxonomic units (OTUs, defined as clusters with >97% identity or individual sequences differing from nearest neighbors by >3%; supported by analysis of all larval pairwise differences), of which seven could be identified to species or 'species group' level by larval morphology. Reference sequences from the GenBank and BOLD databases assigned six larval OTUs with presumptive species level identifications and confirmed one previously assigned species level identification. Sequences from morphologically identified adults in the present study grouped with and further classified the identity of 13 larval OTUs. The use of morphological identification and subsequent DNA barcoding of adult chironomids proved to be beneficial in revealing possible species level identifications of larval specimens. Sequence data from this study also contribute to currently inadequate public databases relevant to the Great Lakes region, while the neighbor

  17. Evidence for a Common Origin of Homomorphic and Heteromorphic Sex Chromosomes in Distinct Spinacia Species

    OpenAIRE

    Fujito, Satoshi; Takahata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Reimi; Hoshino, Yoichiro; Ohmido, Nobuko; Onodera, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The dioecious genus Spinacia is thought to include two wild relatives (S. turkestanica Ilj. and S. tetrandra Stev.) of cultivated spinach (S. oleracea L.). In this study, nuclear and chloroplast sequences from 21 accessions of Spinacia germplasm and six spinach cultivars or lines were subjected to phylogenetic analysis to define the relationships among the three species. Maximum-likelihood sequence analysis suggested that the Spinacia plant samples could be classified into two monophyletic gr...

  18. Contributions of distinct gold species to catalytic reactivity for carbon monoxide oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li-Wen; Du, Pei-Pei; Fu, Xin-Pu; Ma, Chao; Zeng, Jie; Si, Rui; Huang, Yu-Ying; Jia, Chun-Jiang; Zhang, Ya-Wen; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2016-11-01

    Small-size (carbon monoxide at room temperature, by the aid of in situ X-ray absorption fine structure analysis and in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy. We find that the metallic gold component in clusters or particles plays a much more critical role as the active site than the cationic single-atom gold species for the room-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation reaction.

  19. Nitrogen use strategies of seedlings from neotropical tree species of distinct successional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Halley Caixeta; da Silva, Ligia Maria Inocêncio; de Freitas, Letícia Dias; Debiasi, Tatiane Viegas; Marchiori, Nidia Mara; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Bianchini, Edmilson; Pimenta, José Antonio; Stolf-Moreira, Renata

    2017-05-01

    Few studies have analyzed the strategies of neotropical tree seedlings for absorbing, translocating and assimilating the nitrogen. Here, we compared the nitrogen use strategies of seedlings from six tree species that are native to the Brazilian Atlantic Forest and that belong to different successional groups: Trema micrantha, Heliocarpus popayanensis and Cecropia pachystachya (pioneers), Cariniana estrellensis, Eugenia brasiliensis and Guarea kunthiana (non-pioneers). The effects of cultivating seedlings with nitrate or ammonium on the growth, physiology and nitrogen metabolism were analyzed. Nitrate-grown pioneer species had much higher leaf nitrate reductase activity than non-pioneer ones, but non-pioneer seedlings were also able to use nitrate as a nitrogen source. In addition to this remarkable difference between the groups in the capacity for leaf nitrate assimilation, substantial variations in the nitrogen use strategies were observed within the successional classes. Differently from the other non-pioneers, the canopy species C. estrellensis seemed to assimilate nitrate mainly in the leaves. Morphophysiological analyses showed a gradient of ammonium toxicity response, with E. brasiliensis as the most tolerant species, and T. micrantha and H. popayanensis as the most sensitive ones. Guarea kunthiana showed a relatively low tolerance to ammonium and an unusual high translocation of this cation in the xylem sap. In contrast to the other pioneers, C. pachystachya had a high plasticity in the use of nitrogen sources. Overall, these results suggest that nitrogen use strategies of neotropical tree seedlings were not determined solely by their successional position. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Full genome sequencing and genetic characterization of Eubenangee viruses identify Pata virus as a distinct species within the genus Orbivirus.

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    Manjunatha N Belaganahalli

    Full Text Available Eubenangee virus has previously been identified as the cause of Tammar sudden death syndrome (TSDS. Eubenangee virus (EUBV, Tilligery virus (TILV, Pata virus (PATAV and Ngoupe virus (NGOV are currently all classified within the Eubenangee virus species of the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae. Full genome sequencing confirmed that EUBV and TILV (both of which are from Australia show high levels of aa sequence identity (>92% in the conserved polymerase VP1(Pol, sub-core VP3(T2 and outer core VP7(T13 proteins, and are therefore appropriately classified within the same virus species. However, they show much lower amino acid (aa identity levels in their larger outer-capsid protein VP2 (<53%, consistent with membership of two different serotypes - EUBV-1 and EUBV-2 (respectively. In contrast PATAV showed significantly lower levels of aa sequence identity with either EUBV or TILV (with <71% in VP1(Pol and VP3(T2, and <57% aa identity in VP7(T13 consistent with membership of a distinct virus species. A proposal has therefore been sent to the Reoviridae Study Group of ICTV to recognise 'Pata virus' as a new Orbivirus species, with the PATAV isolate as serotype 1 (PATAV-1. Amongst the other orbiviruses, PATAV shows closest relationships to Epizootic Haemorrhagic Disease virus (EHDV, with 80.7%, 72.4% and 66.9% aa identity in VP3(T2, VP1(Pol, and VP7(T13 respectively. Although Ngoupe virus was not available for these studies, like PATAV it was isolated in Central Africa, and therefore seems likely to also belong to the new species, possibly as a distinct 'type'. The data presented will facilitate diagnostic assay design and the identification of additional isolates of these viruses.

  1. Description of three new species of Hepatozoon (Apicomplexa, Hepatozoidae) from Rattlesnakes (Crotalus durissus terrificus) based on molecular, morphometric and morphologic characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dwyer, Lucia Helena; Moço, Tatiana Cristina; Paduan, Karina dos Santos; Spenassatto, Carine; da Silva, Reinaldo José; Ribolla, Paulo Eduardo Martins

    2013-10-01

    Hepatozoon spp. are commonly found infecting snakes. Since the latter are parasitized by diverse forms and data in the literature show divergence, we studied Hepatozoon spp. diversity on Crotalus durissus terrificus snakes using both molecular and morphological approaches. Naturally infected animals were employed. Blood was collected, blood smears were prepared and an aliquot was stored at -20°C for DNA extraction. Five specimens of C. durissus terrificus were selected, each of them infected with one gamont type. Morphological and morphometric analyses of the found gamonts led to their grouping into three populations. For molecular characterization, seven oligonucleotide pairs that amplify distinct regions of rDNA gene were tested by adopting the PCR technique. Only the oligonucleotide pairs HepF300/Hep900 and HEMO1/HEMO2 were efficient in amplifying and distinguishing different isolates of Hepatozoon spp. from snakes. The better results were obtained when both oligonucleotide pairs were used in association. Based on the molecular and morphologic differences, three new species were proposed: Hepatozoon cuestensis sp. nov.; Hepatozoon cevapii sp. nov. and Hepatozoon massardii sp. nov. This is the first description of new Hepatozoon species from snakes, based on molecular characterization and morphological data, in South America. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The sagittal otolith morphology of four selected mugilid species from Iranian waters of the Persian Gulf (Teleostei: Mugilidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Vahideh Salehi; Majid Askari Hesni; Azad Teimori; Mohammad Reza Lashkari

    2016-01-01

    The members of mugilid species are usually difficult to recognize because of the well-known similarity observed in their external morphology. Nevertheless, their identification is very important for local fisheries management and conservation action. Therefore, in the present study we applied otolith morphology to evaluate its significance in identification of four selected mugilid species; Chelon subviridis (Valenciennes, 1836), Liza klunzingeri (Day, 1888), Ellochelon vaigiensis (Quoy & Gai...

  3. Taxonomy and morphology of species of the genus Squalus Linnaeus, 1758 from the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean (Chondrichthyes: Squaliformes: Squalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Sarah T De F; Carvalho, Marcelo R De; Gomes, Ulisses L

    2016-07-04

    Squalus is a genus of reportedly cosmopolitan shark species that have a high taxonomic complexity due to difficulties in their morphological differentiation; many of its species need revision. Currently, there are 26 valid species of Squalus, which have been divided into three species-groups according to overall morphological similarity, the S. acanthias, S. megalops, and S. mitsukurii groups. Loss of type specimens, propagation of erroneous identifications in the literature, and difficulties in obtaining representative series for comparison are secondary challenges that have impeded a global taxonomic revision of the genus. This problem applies clearly to species from the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean, including species that occur off Brazil. Following a current global tendency, a regional taxonomic revision of Squalus was conducted in order to investigate which species are valid in the Southwestern Atlantic Ocean and provide diagnostic morphological characters that can be efficiently used for identifying species. Comparative detailed analysis of external (e.g. morphometrics, dentition, and color pattern) and skeletal morphology (primarily meristic data, neurocrania and claspers) of specimens of Squalus from the region revealed four new species that are herein described (S. albicaudus sp. nov., S. bahiensis sp. nov., S. lobularis sp. nov., and S. quasimodo sp. nov.), as well as S. acanthias, which is redescribed from the region based on new material. Comparisons are offered based on examinations of congeneric species; this work is part of a global systematic revision of Squalus.

  4. Morphological, molecular and biological evidence reveal two cryptic species in Mecinus janthinus Germar (Coleoptera, Curculionidae), a successful biological control agent of Dalmatian toadflax, Linaria dalmatica (Lamiales, Plantaginaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivo Tosevski; Roberto Caldara; Jelena Jovic; Gerardo Hernandez-Vera; Cosimo Baviera; Andre Gassmann; Brent C. Emerson

    2011-01-01

    A combined morphological, molecular and biological study shows that the weevil species presently named Mecinus janthinus is actually composed of two different cryptic species: M. janthinus Germar, 1821 and M. janthiniformis Tosevski & Caldara sp.n. These species are morphologically distinguishable from each other by a few very subtle morphological characters. On...

  5. Comprehensive genetic analyses reveal evolutionary distinction of a mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei) proposed for delisting from the US Endangered Species Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tim L; Switzer, John F; Morrison, Cheryl L; Eackles, Michael S; Young, Colleen C; Lubinski, Barbara A; Cryan, Paul

    2006-12-01

    Zapus hudsonius preblei, listed as threatened under the US Endangered Species Act (ESA), is one of 12 recognized subspecies of meadow jumping mice found in North America. Recent morphometric and phylogenetic comparisons among Z. h. preblei and neighbouring conspecifics questioned the taxonomic status of selected subspecies, resulting in a proposal to delist the Z. h. preblei from the ESA. We present additional analyses of the phylogeographic structure within Z. hudsonius that calls into question previously published data (and conclusions) and confirms the original taxonomic designations. A survey of 21 microsatellite DNA loci and 1380 base pairs from two mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) regions (control region and cytochrome b) revealed that each Z. hudsonius subspecies is genetically distinct. These data do not support the null hypothesis of a homogeneous gene pool among the five subspecies found within the southwestern portion of the species' range. The magnitude of the observed differentiation was considerable and supported by significant findings for nearly every statistical comparison made, regardless of the genome or the taxa under consideration. Structuring of nuclear multilocus genotypes and subspecies-specific mtDNA haplotypes corresponded directly with the disjunct distributions of the subspecies investigated. Given the level of correspondence between the observed genetic population structure and previously proposed taxonomic classification of subspecies (based on the geographic separation and surveys of morphological variation), we conclude that the nominal subspecies surveyed in this study do not warrant synonymy, as has been proposed for Z. h. preblei, Z. h. campestris, and Z. h. intermedius.

  6. Cirolana bambang, a distinctive new species of Cirolana Leach, 1818 (Crustacea: Isopoda: Cirolanidae) from Bitung, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidabalok, Conni M; Bruce, Niel L

    2018-01-25

    Cirolana bambang sp. nov. from Bitung, North Sulawesi, Indonesia is described. The species can be recognised by generally smooth body with small, acute, submedian nodules on pleonites 4-5 and the anterior dorsal surface of the pleotelson together with a flat, pentagonal frontal lamina, linguiform and sexually dimorphic pleotelson with the dorsal surface covered by short setae in males, deeply bifid uropod apices, and a conspicuously large robust seta on the superodistal angle of pereopod 1 ischium. Cirolana bambang sp. nov. appears to belong to a group of Indo-West Pacific Cirolana with prominent penial process, a large robust seta on the superodistal angle of pereopod 1 ischium and the presence of setae on dorsal surface of pleotelson and or uropod in males. The most similar species are Cirolana comata Keable, 2001; Cirolana dissimilis Keable, 2001; Cirolana aldabrensis Schotte Kensley, 2005; and Cirolana somalia Schotte Kensley, 2005. Cirolana kiliani Müller, 1993 and C. somalia are found not to belong to the Cirolana'parva-group'.

  7. Distinction of neurochemistry between the cores and their shells of auditory nuclei in tetrapod species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, ShaoJu; Li, Jia; Zhang, XinWen; Zuo, MingXue

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of Met-enkephalin (ENK), substance P (SP) and serotonin (5-HT) differs between the core and shell regions of the mesencephalic and diencephalic auditory nuclei of the turtle [Belekhova et al., 2002]. These neurochemical distinctions are also found in other tetrapods (mammals, birds and amphibians). The distribution of ENK, SP and 5-HT was examined in the core and shell regions of both mesencephalic and diencephalic auditory nuclei, and in the telencephalic auditory areas of Bengalese finches (Lonchura striata) and mice (Mus musculus), as well as in corresponding auditory areas in toads (Bufo bufo). ENK, SP and 5-HT immunoreactive fibers and perikarya were largely absent from the core regions of both mesencephalic and diencephalic auditory nuclei, in comparison with the shell regions of mice and Bengalese finches. In the toad, however, this pattern was observed in the mesencephalic auditory nucleus, but not in the diencephalic auditory areas. ENK and SP immunoreactive perikarya were detected in the telencephalic auditory area of mice, whereas no ENK, SP or 5-HT immunolabeling was observed in the telencephalic auditory area (Field L) of Bengalese finches. These findings are discussed in terms of the evolution of the core-and-shell organization of auditory nuclei of tetrapods. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Morphology of the hyoid apparatus of some species of odontocetes from southern Brazil.

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    Dan Jacobs Pretto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The hyoid apparatus of odontocetes serves as a major attachment point for the muscles and ligaments that subserve breathing, sound production and swallowing. However, most of the literature on anatomy does not consider the bones of this region, presenting general osteological descriptions without considering the comparative aspects. This study sought to determine the intra and interspecific variations of the ossified hyoid apparatus elements from six species of odontocetus. We studied 96 hyoid apparatuses from the following species: Phocoena spinipinnis (n = 1, Pontoporia blainvillei (n = 20, Sotalia guianensis (n = 37, Stenella frontalis (n = 13, Steno bredanensis (n = 6 and Tursiops truncatus (n = 19. Among the six species analyzed, P. spinipinnis, P. blainvillei and S. guianenses presented a diagnostic feature of this apparatus, while the others were best described morphometrically when considering all the hyoid apparatus bones. Intraspecific variation was registered with greater amplitude in T. truncatus, while S. guianensis showed sexual dimorphism. The morphology of the hyoid apparatus proved to be important in the differentiation and characterization of all studied species.

  9. Genetic relatedness among Solanum L. species assayed by seed morphology and isozyme markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.M.; Fadl, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of their economic and medicinal value, no adequate attention has been paid to the diversity, characterization and taxonomical identification of Solanum L. species in Saudi Arabia. In this study, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of seed coat morphology and isozyme electrophoresis were employed for studying the genetic variability and relationships among seven Solanum L. species namely; S. incanum L., S. nigrum L., S. villosum L., S. schemprianum Hochst, S. galabratum Dunal, S. lycopersicum L. and S. melongena L. collected from Taif highlands. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) investigation of seed coat sculpturing showed three basic patterns namely; rugulate, reticulate and levigate. The analyses on six enzymes were coded by 19 loci. The number of alleles ranged from one to three with a mean of 1.58 alleles per locus. The proportion of polymorphic loci for Solanum L. species ranged from 0.87 for S. nigrum L. and S. villosum L. to 0.80 for S. lycopersicum L. The mean observed heterozygosity varied from 0.00 to 1.00, while mean expected heterozygosity ranged between 0.00 and 0.5. The UPGMA phenogram confirmed the extensive genetic diversity existed in the studied Solanum L. species and showed the close relationship between S. incanum L. and S. melongena L. (author)

  10. Ultrastructure and pollen morphology of Bromeliaceae species from the Atlantic Rainforest in Southeastern Brazil

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    Vanessa J.D. Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollen grain morphology of Bromeliaceae species collected in areas of the Atlantic Rainforest of southeastern Brazil was studied. The following species were analyzed: Aechmea bambusoides L.B.Sm. & Reitz, A. nudicaulis (L. Griseb., A. ramosa Mart. ex Schult.f., Ananas bracteatus (Lindl. Schult.f., Billbergia distachia (Vell. Mez, B. euphemiae E. Morren, B. horrida Regel, B. zebrina (Herb. Lindl., Portea petropolitana (Wawra Mez, Pitcairnia flammea Lindl., Quesnelia indecora Mez, Tillandsia polystachia (L. L., T. stricta Sol., T. gardneri Lindl., T. geminiflora Brongn. and Vriesea grandiflora Leme. Light and scanning electron microscopy were used and the species were grouped into three pollen types, organized according to aperture characteristics: Type I - pantoporate pollen grains observed in P. petropolitana, Type II - 2-porate pollen grains, observed in the genera Ananas, Aechmea and Quesnelia, and Type III - 1-colpate pollen grains, observed in the genera Billbergia, Pitcairnia, Tillandsia and Vriesea. Pollen data led to the construction of an identification key. The results showed that the species analyzed can be distinguished using mainly aperture features and exine ornamentation, and that these characteristics may assist in taxonomic studies of the family.

  11. Ultrastructure and pollen morphology of Bromeliaceae species from the Atlantic Rainforest in Southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vanessa J D; Ribeiro, Ester M; Luizi-Ponzo, Andrea P; Faria, Ana Paula G

    2016-01-01

    Pollen grain morphology of Bromeliaceae species collected in areas of the Atlantic Rainforest of southeastern Brazil was studied. The following species were analyzed: Aechmea bambusoides L.B.Sm. & Reitz, A. nudicaulis (L.) Griseb., A. ramosa Mart. ex Schult.f., Ananas bracteatus (Lindl.) Schult.f., Billbergia distachia (Vell.) Mez, B. euphemiae E. Morren, B. horrida Regel, B. zebrina (Herb.) Lindl., Portea petropolitana (Wawra) Mez, Pitcairnia flammea Lindl., Quesnelia indecora Mez, Tillandsia polystachia (L.) L., T. stricta Sol., T. gardneri Lindl., T. geminiflora Brongn. and Vriesea grandiflora Leme. Light and scanning electron microscopy were used and the species were grouped into three pollen types, organized according to aperture characteristics: Type I - pantoporate pollen grains observed in P. petropolitana, Type II - 2-porate pollen grains, observed in the genera Ananas, Aechmea and Quesnelia, and Type III - 1-colpate pollen grains, observed in the genera Billbergia, Pitcairnia, Tillandsia and Vriesea. Pollen data led to the construction of an identification key. The results showed that the species analyzed can be distinguished using mainly aperture features and exine ornamentation, and that these characteristics may assist in taxonomic studies of the family.

  12. Genetic diversity within the morphological species Giardia intestinalis and its relationship to host origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monis, Paul T; Andrews, Ross H; Mayrhofer, Graham; Ey, Peter L

    2003-05-01

    A genetic analysis of Giardia intestinalis, a parasitic protozoan species that is ubiquitous in mammals worldwide, was undertaken using organisms derived from a variety of mammalian hosts in different geographical locations. The test panel of 53 Giardia isolates comprised 48 samples of G. intestinalis, including representatives of all known genetic subgroups, plus an isolate of G. ardeae and four isolates of G. muris. The isolates were compared by allozymic analysis of electrophoretic data obtained for 21 cytosolic enzymes, representing 23 gene loci. Neighbour Joining analysis of the allelic profiles supported the monophyly of G. intestinalis but showed that the species encompasses a rich population substructure. Seven major clusters were evident within G. intestinalis, corresponding to lineages designated previously as genetic assemblages A-G. Some genotypes, e.g. those defining assemblage A, are found in divergent host species and may be zoonotic. However other genotypes, e.g. those defining assemblages C-G, appear to be confined to particular hosts or host groups. The findings reinforce other evidence that G. intestinalis, which was defined on the basis of morphological criteria only, is a species complex.

  13. The genetics of reproductive organ morphology in two Petunia species with contrasting pollination syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Katrin; Klahre, Ulrich; Venail, Julien; Brandenburg, Anna; Kuhlemeier, Cris

    2015-05-01

    Switches between pollination syndromes have happened frequently during angiosperm evolution. Using QTL mapping and reciprocal introgressions, we show that changes in reproductive organ morphology have a simple genetic basis. In animal-pollinated plants, flowers have evolved to optimize pollination efficiency by different pollinator guilds and hence reproductive success. The two Petunia species, P. axillaris and P. exserta, display pollination syndromes adapted to moth or hummingbird pollination. For the floral traits color and scent, genetic loci of large phenotypic effect have been well documented. However, such large-effect loci may be typical for shifts in simple biochemical traits, whereas the evolution of morphological traits may involve multiple mutations of small phenotypic effect. Here, we performed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of floral morphology, followed by an in-depth study of pistil and stamen morphology and the introgression of individual QTL into reciprocal parental backgrounds. Two QTLs, on chromosomes II and V, are sufficient to explain the interspecific difference in pistil and stamen length. Since most of the difference in organ length is caused by differences in cell number, genes underlying these QTLs are likely to be involved in cell cycle regulation. Interestingly, conservation of the locus on chromosome II in a different P. axillaris subspecies suggests that the evolution of organ elongation was initiated on chromosome II in adaptation to different pollinators. We recently showed that QTLs for pistil and stamen length on chromosome II are tightly linked to QTLs for petal color and volatile emission. Linkage of multiple traits will enable major phenotypic change within a few generations in hybridizing populations. Thus, the genomic architecture of pollination syndromes in Petunia allows for rapid responses to changing pollinator availability.

  14. Passerine morphology: external measurements of approximately one-quarter of passerine bird species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklefs, Robert E

    2017-05-01

    Studies of community organization and clade diversification that include functional traits have become an important component of the analysis of ecological and evolved systems. Such studies frequently are limited by availability of consistently collected data. Here, I present a data set including eight measurements of the external morphology of 1642 species, roughly one-quarter of all passerine birds (Aves: Order Passeriformes), from all parts of the world, characterizing the relative proportions of the wing, tail, legs, and beak. Specimens were measured opportunistically over the past 40 years in museums in the United States and Europe. Numbers of individuals measured per species vary from one to dozens in some cases. Measurements for males and females of sexually size-dimorphic species are presented separately. The measurements include total length, the lengths of the wing, tail, tarsus, and middle toe, and the length, breadth, and depth of the beak. Particular attention was paid to obtaining a broad representation of passerine higher taxa, with special interest in small families and subfamilies of passerines, as well as species produced by evolutionary radiations of birds in archipelagoes, including the Galapagos, Hawaii, and the Lesser Antilles. Taxonomy follows the Taxonomy in Flux (TIF) checklist as well as the World Bird List of the International Ornithological Council. Geographic distributions are summarized from Edwards's Coded List of Birds of the World. Coverage of taxa and geographic regions varies and reflects the changing interests of the author over the past four decades. North American and South American species are particularly well represented in the sample, as well as species belonging to the families Tyrannidae, Furnariidae, Thamnophilidae, Mimidae, Sturnidae, Fringillidae, Parulidae, Icteridae, Cardinalidae, and Thraupidae. © 2017 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Understanding morphological variability in a taxonomic context in Chilean diplomystids (Teleostei: Siluriformes, including the description of a new species

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    Gloria Arratia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Following study of the external morphology and its unmatched variability throughout ontogeny and a re-examination of selected morphological characters based on many specimens of diplomystids from Central and South Chile, we revised and emended previous specific diagnoses and consider Diplomystes chilensis, D. nahuelbutaensis, D. camposensis, and Olivaichthys viedmensis (Baker River to be valid species. Another group, previously identified as Diplomystes sp., D. spec., D. aff. chilensis, and D. cf. chilensis inhabiting rivers between Rapel and Itata Basins is given a new specific name (Diplomystes incognitus and is diagnosed. An identification key to the Chilean species, including the new species, is presented. All specific diagnoses are based on external morphological characters, such as aspects of the skin, neuromast lines, and main lateral line, and position of the anus and urogenital pore, as well as certain osteological characters to facilitate the identification of these species that previously was based on many internal characters. Diplomystids below 150 mm standard length (SL share a similar external morphology and body proportions that make identification difficult; however, specimens over 150 mm SL can be diagnosed by the position of the urogenital pore and anus, and a combination of external and internal morphological characters. According to current knowledge, diplomystid species have an allopatric distribution with each species apparently endemic to particular basins in continental Chile and one species (O. viedmensis known only from one river in the Chilean Patagonia, but distributed extensively in southern Argentina.

  16. Synthetical Analysis for Morphology, biological Species, and stable Isotopes (SAMSI) of single-cell planktonic foraminifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujiie, Y.; Kimoto, K.; Ishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifers are widely used in the studies of paleontology and paleoceanography, because the morphology of their calcareous shells is enough highly variable to identify the morphospecies and the chemical composition of the shells reflect ambient seawater condition. Although the morphospecies were believed to represent environments associating with latitudinal temperature range of the world ocean, molecular phylogeographic studies have unveiled the presence of multiple biological species in a single morphospecies and their species-specific distributions. This implicates the actual complexity of planktonic foraminiferal ecology. Conversely, these biological species have a high potential for providing novel ecological and environmental information to us. In order to reassess the morphological and geochemical characters of biological species, the DNA extraction method with the guanidium isothiocyanate buffer was developed to preserve the calcareous shells. The present study carefully tested the physical and chemical damages of the DNA extraction process to the shells, by our novel approaches with geochemical analysis of the shells after non-destructive analysis for morphometrics on a same specimen. First, we checked the changes of the shell densities between pre- and post-DNA extraction by using the micro-focus X-ray CT (MXCT) scanning. Based on the simultaneous measurement of a sample and the standard material, we confirmed no significant changes to the shell densities through the DNA extraction process. As a next step, we compared stable oxygen and carbon isotopes among individuals of three sample sets: (1) no chemical and incubation as control, (2) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 40 minutes as standard way, and (3) incubation in the DNA extraction buffer at 65-70°C for 120 minutes, by using the microscale isotopic analytical system (MICAL3c). Consequently, there were no significant differences among the three sample sets. These

  17. Distinct sesquiterpene pyridine alkaloids from in Salvadoran and Peruvian Celastraceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callies, Oliver; Núñez, Marvin J; Perestelo, Nayra R; Reyes, Carolina P; Torres-Romero, David; Jiménez, Ignacio A; Bazzocchi, Isabel L

    2017-10-01

    As part of a bioprospecting program aimed at the discovery of undescribed natural products from Salvadoran and Peruvian flora, the phytochemical investigations of four Celastraceae species, Celastrus vulcanicola, Maytenus segoviarum, Maytenus jeslkii, and Maytenus cuzcoina, were performed. The current study reports the isolation and structural characterization of five previously undescribed macrolide sesquiterpene pyridine alkaloids, named vulcanicoline-A, cuzcoinine, vulcanicoline-B, jelskiine, and vulcanicoline-C, along with sixteen known alkaloids. The structures of the alkaloids were established by spectrometric and extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis, including COSY, HSQC, HMBC, and ROESY experiments. The absolute configurations of alkaloids were proposed based on optical rotation sign, and biogenetic considerations. This study represents the first phytochemical analysis of Maytenus segoviarum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Transports of acetate and haloacetate in Burkholderia species MBA4 are operated by distinct systems

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    Su Xianbin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetate is a commonly used substrate for biosynthesis while monochloroacetate is a structurally similar compound but toxic and inhibits cell metabolism by blocking the citric acid cycle. In Burkholderia species MBA4 haloacetate was utilized as a carbon and energy source for growth. The degradation of haloacid was mediated by the production of an inducible dehalogenase. Recent studies have identified the presence of a concomitantly induced haloacetate-uptake activity in MBA4. This uptake activity has also been found to transport acetate. Since acetate transporters are commonly found in bacteria it is likely that haloacetate was transported by such a system in MBA4. Results The haloacetate-uptake activity of MBA4 was found to be induced by monochloroacetate (MCA and monobromoacetate (MBA. While the acetate-uptake activity was also induced by MCA and MBA, other alkanoates: acetate, propionate and 2-monochloropropionate (2MCPA were also inducers. Competing solute analysis showed that acetate and propionate interrupted the acetate- and MCA- induced acetate-uptake activities. While MCA, MBA, 2MCPA, and butyrate have no effect on acetate uptake they could significantly quenched the MCA-induced MCA-uptake activity. Transmembrane electrochemical potential was shown to be a driving force for both acetate- and MCA- transport systems. Conclusions Here we showed that acetate- and MCA- uptake in Burkholderia species MBA4 are two transport systems that have different induction patterns and substrate specificities. It is envisaged that the shapes and the three dimensional structures of the solutes determine their recognition or exclusion by the two transport systems.

  19. Distinct and conserved prominin-1/CD133-positive retinal cell populations identified across species.

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    József Jászai

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Besides being a marker of various somatic stem cells in mammals, prominin-1 (CD133 plays a role in maintaining the photoreceptor integrity since mutations in the PROM1 gene are linked with retinal degeneration. In spite of that, little information is available regarding its distribution in eyes of non-mammalian vertebrates endowed with high regenerative abilities. To address this subject, prominin-1 cognates were isolated from axolotl, zebrafish and chicken, and their retinal compartmentalization was investigated and compared to that of their mammalian orthologue. Interestingly, prominin-1 transcripts--except for the axolotl--were not strictly restricted to the outer nuclear layer (i.e., photoreceptor cells, but they also marked distinct subdivisions of the inner nuclear layer (INL. In zebrafish, where the prominin-1 gene is duplicated (i.e., prominin-1a and prominin-1b, a differential expression was noted for both paralogues within the INL being localized either to its vitreal or scleral subdivision, respectively. Interestingly, expression of prominin-1a within the former domain coincided with Pax-6-positive cells that are known to act as progenitors upon injury-induced retino-neurogenesis. A similar, but minute population of prominin-1-positive cells located at the vitreal side of the INL was also detected in developing and adult mice. In chicken, however, prominin-1-positive cells appeared to be aligned along the scleral side of the INL reminiscent of zebrafish prominin-1b. Taken together our data indicate that in addition to conserved expression of prominin-1 in photoreceptors, significant prominin-1-expressing non-photoreceptor retinal cell populations are present in the vertebrate eye that might represent potential sources of stem/progenitor cells for regenerative therapies.

  20. Molecular phylogeny and comparative morphology indicate that odontostomatids (Alveolata, Ciliophora) form a distinct class-level taxon related to Armophorea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Noemi M; Vizzoni, Vinicius F; Borges, Bárbara do N; A G Soares, Carlos; Silva-Neto, Inácio D da; S Paiva, Thiago da

    2018-04-18

    The odontostomatids are among the least studied ciliates, possibly due to their small sizes, restriction to anaerobic environments and difficulty in culturing. Consequently, their phylogenetic affinities to other ciliate taxa are still poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed newly obtained ribosomal gene sequences of the odontostomatids Discomorphella pedroeneasi and Saprodinium dentatum, together with sequences from the literature, including Epalxella antiquorum and a large assemblage of ciliate sequences representing the major recognized classes. The results show that D. pedroeneasi and S. dentatum form a deep-diverging branch related to metopid and clevelandellid armophoreans, corroborating the old literature. However E. antiquorum clustered with the morphologically discrepant plagiopylids, indicating that either the complex odontostomatid body architecture evolved convergently, or the positioning of E. antiquorum as a plagiopylid is artifactual. A new ciliate class, Odontostomatea n. cl., is proposed based on molecular analyses and comparative morphology of odontostomatids with related taxa. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  2. Morphology-Independent Virulence of Candida Species during Polymicrobial Intra-abdominal Infections with Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Evelyn E; Peters, Brian M; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2016-01-01

    Intra-abdominal polymicrobial infections cause significant morbidity and mortality. An experimental mouse model of Candida albicans-Staphylococcus aureus intra-abdominal infection (IAI) results in 100% mortality by 48 to 72 h postinoculation, while monomicrobial infections are avirulent. Mortality is associated with robust local and systemic inflammation without a requirement for C. albicans morphogenesis. However, the contribution of virulence factors coregulated during the yeast-to-hypha transition is unknown. This also raised the question of whether other Candida species that are unable to form hyphae are as virulent as C. albicans during polymicrobial IAI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of non-albicans Candida (NAC) species with various morphologies and C. albicans transcription factor mutants (efg1/efg1 and cph1/cph1) to induce synergistic mortality and the accompanying inflammation. Results showed that S. aureus coinoculated with C. krusei or C. tropicalis was highly lethal, similar to C. albicans, while S. aureus-C. dubliniensis, S. aureus-C. parapsilosis, and S. aureus-C. glabrata coinoculations resulted in little to no mortality. Local and systemic interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels were significantly elevated during symptomatic and/or lethal coinfections, and hypothermia strongly correlated with mortality. Coinoculation with C. albicans strains deficient in the transcription factor Efg1 but not Cph1 reversed the lethal outcome. These results support previous findings and demonstrate that select Candida species, without reference to any morphological requirement, induce synergistic mortality, with IL-6 and PGE2 acting as key inflammatory factors. Mechanistically, signaling pathways controlled by Efg1 are critical for the ability of C. albicans to induce mortality from an intra-abdominal polymicrobial infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Phylogenetic, Morphological, and Pathogenic Characterization of Alternaria Species Associated with Fruit Rot of Blueberry in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X Q; Xiao, C L

    2015-12-01

    Fruit rot caused by Alternaria spp. is one of the most important factors affecting the postharvest quality and shelf life of blueberry fruit. The aims of this study were to characterize Alternaria isolates using morphological and molecular approaches and test their pathogenicity to blueberry fruit. Alternaria spp. isolates were collected from decayed blueberry fruit in the Central Valley of California during 2012 and 2013. In total, 283 isolates were obtained and five species of Alternaria, including Alternaria alternata, A. tenuissima, A. arborescens, A. infectoria, and A. rosae, were identified based on DNA sequences of the plasma membrane ATPase, Alt a1 and Calmodulin gene regions in combination with morphological characters of the culture and sporulation. Of the 283 isolates, 61.5% were identified as A. alternata, 32.9% were A. arborescens, 5.0% were A. tenuissima, and only one isolate of A. infectoria and one isolate of A. rosae were found. These fungi were able to grow at temperatures from 0 to 35°C, and mycelial growth was arrested at 40°C. Optimal radial growth occurred between 20 to 30°C. Pathogenicity tests showed that all five Alternaria spp. were pathogenic on blueberry fruit at 0, 4, and 20°C, with A. alternata, A. arborescens, and A. tenuissima being the most virulent species, followed by A. infectoria and A. rosae. Previously A. tenuissima has been reported to be the primary cause of Alternaria fruit rot of blueberry worldwide. Our results indicated that the species composition of Alternaria responsible for Alternaria fruit rot in blueberry can be dependent on geographical region. A. alternata, A. arborescens, A. infectoria, and A. rosae are reported for the first time on blueberry in California. This is also the first report of A. infectoria and A. rosae infecting blueberry fruit.

  4. Diatom species abundance and morphologically-based dissolution proxies in coastal Southern Ocean assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Jonathan P.; Scherer, Reed P.

    2015-07-01

    Taphonomic processes alter diatom assemblages in sediments, thus potentially negatively impacting paleoclimate records at various rates across space, time, and taxa. However, quantitative taphonomic data is rarely included in diatom-based paleoenvironmental reconstructions and no objective standard exists for comparing diatom dissolution in sediments recovered from marine depositional settings, including the Southern Ocean's opal belt. Furthermore, identifying changes to diatom dissolution through time can provide insight into the efficiency of both upper water column nutrient recycling and the biological pump. This is significant in that reactive metal proxies (e.g. Al, Ti) in the sediments only account for post-depositional dissolution, not the water column where the majority of dissolution occurs. In order to assess the range of variability of responses to dissolution in a typical Southern Ocean diatom community and provide a quantitative guideline for assessing taphonomic variability in diatoms recovered from core material, a sediment trap sample was subjected to controlled, serial dissolution. By evaluating dissolution-induced changes to diatom species' relative abundance, three preservational categories of diatoms have been identified: gracile, intermediate, and robust. The relative abundances of these categories can be used to establish a preservation grade for diatom assemblages. However, changes to the relative abundances of diatom species in sediment samples may reflect taphonomic or ecological factors. In order to address this complication, relative abundance changes have been tied to dissolution-induced morphological change to the areolae of Fragilariopsis curta, a significant sea-ice indicator in Southern Ocean sediments. This correlation allows differentiation between gracile species loss to dissolution versus ecological factors or sediment winnowing. These results mirror a similar morphological dissolution index from a parallel study utilizing

  5. The effect of structural enrichment in hatchery tanks on the morphology of two neotropical fish species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah de Oliveira Saraiva

    Full Text Available Reared fish differ from wild fish in several aspects, including morphology, because they are adapted to captive conditions that are totally different from natural conditions. To minimize the influence of the hatchery environment on the morphology of fish, the use of environmental enrichment through the incorporation of natural designs in captivity, has been proposed. In the present study, we performed the physical structuring of fish farming tanks to verify the enrichment effect on the morphology of two species of neotropical fishes: Prochilodus lineatus and Brycon orbignyanus. Each species was subjected to four different treatments over two months: tanks with submersed logs, with artificial aquatic plants, with both structures and without any structure. Results showed that the structural enrichment had a strong effect on the morphology of the cultured fish, which varied with each species analyzed and with the type of structural complexity added to the tanks. There was an increase of morphological variability in the population of P. lineatus and an increase of the average length in the population of B. orbignyanus. This shows that the environmental enrichment is capable to induce morphological differentiation through phenotypic plasticity, probably generating phenotypes more adapted to exploiting a complex environment. Peixes cultivados diferem de peixes selvagens em vários aspectos, incluindo morfologia, pois são adaptados às condições de cativeiro, que são totalmente diferentes das condições naturais. Para minimizar a influência do meio de cultivo sobre a morfologia dos peixes, o enriquecimento ambiental, através da incorporação de 'designs' naturais em cativeiro, tem sido proposto. No presente estudo, foi realizada a estruturação física de tanques de piscicultura para verificar o efeito deste tipo de enriquecimento ambiental sobre a morfologia de duas espécies de peixes neotropicais: Prochilodus lineatus e Brycon orbignyanus

  6. Revision of the western Palaearctic species of Aleiodes Wesmael (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Rogadinae. Part 1: Introduction, key to species groups, outlying distinctive species, and revisionary notes on some further species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis van Achterberg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Seven new species of the genus Aleiodes Wesmael, 1838 (Braconidae: Rogadinae are described and illustrated: A. abraxanae sp. n., A. angustipterus sp. n., A. artesiariae sp. n., A. carminatus sp. n., A. diarsianae sp. n., A. leptofemur sp. n., and A. ryrholmi sp. n. A neotype is designated for each of Aleiodes circumscriptus (Nees, 1834 and A. pictus (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838, and both species are redescribed and illustrated. Aleiodes ochraceus Hellén, 1927 (not A. ochraceus (Curtis, 1834 is renamed as A. curticornis nom. n. & stat. rev., and redescribed and illustrated. Aleiodes bistrigatus Roman, 1917, A. nigriceps Wesmael, 1838, and A. reticulatus (Noskiewicz, 1956, are re-instated as valid species. A lectotype is designated for Aleiodes bistrigatus Roman. An illustrated key is given to some distinctive species and the residual species groups along which further parts of an entire revision of western Palaearctic species of Aleiodes and Heterogamus will be organised. Biology, host associations and phenology are discussed for the keyed species (in addition to the above, A. albitibia (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838, A. apiculatus (Fahringer, 1932, A. arcticus (Thomson, 1892, A. cantherius (Lyle, 1919, A. esenbeckii (Hartig, 1834, A. jakowlewi (Kokujev, 1898, A. modestus (Reinhard, 1863, A. nigricornis Wesmael, 1838, A. pallidator (Thunberg, 1822, A. praetor (Reinhard, 1863, A. seriatus (Herrich- Schäffer, 1838 sensu lato, A. testaceus (Telenga, 1941, A. ungularis (Thomson, 1892, and A. varius (Herrich-Schäffer, 1838 which are dealt with in full here (with the exception of A. seriatus s.l. which is, however, included in the key. The experimental methodology covering the revision as a whole, which involves some behavioural investigation, is outlined.

  7. Pinworm diversity in free-ranging howler monkeys (Alouatta spp.) in Mexico: Morphological and molecular evidence for two new Trypanoxyuris species (Nematoda: Oxyuridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano-García, Brenda; Nadler, Steven A; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2016-10-01

    Two new species of Trypanoxyuris are described from the intestine of free-ranging howler monkeys in Mexico, Trypanoxyuris multilabiatus n. sp. from the mantled howler Alouatta palliata, and Trypanoxyuris pigrae n. sp. from the black howler Alouatta pigra. An integrative taxonomic approach is followed, where conspicuous morphological traits and phylogenetic trees based on DNA sequences are used to test the validity of the two new species. The mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 gene, and the nuclear ribosomal 18S and 28S rRNA genes were used for evolutionary analyses, with the concatenated dataset of all three genes used for maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. The two new species of pinworms from howler monkeys were morphologically distinct and formed reciprocally monophyletic lineages in molecular phylogenetic trees. The three species from howler monkeys, T. multilabiatus n. sp., T. pigrae n. sp., and Trypanoxyuris minutus, formed a monophyletic group with high bootstrap and posterior probability support values. Phylogenetic patterns inferred from sequence data support the hypothesis of a close evolutionary association between these primate hosts and their pinworm parasites. The results suggest that the diversity of pinworm parasites from Neotropical primates might be underestimated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Morphology of seeds and seedlings of four species of Vigna Savi (Leguminosae, Phaseolinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Soledad Ojeda

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Four neotropical species of Vigna Savi (Leguminosae, Phaseolinae have potential value as forage crops or ornamentals and could be cultivated in tropical or subtropical areas, even on floodplains. In order to obtain useful data for their culture and taxonomy, the seed morphology, germination pattern (hypogeal or epigeal and seedling development were studied. The studied species belong to different sections of the genus: V. adenantha (G.F.W. Meyer Maréchal, Mascherpa & Stainier (Sect. Leptospron; V. candida (Vell. Maréchal, Mascherpa & Stainier (Sect. Sigmoidotropis; V. caracalla (L. Verdc. (Sect. Caracallae and V. luteola (Jacq. Benth. (Sect. Vigna. The seeds were collected during fieldwork conducted in northwestern and northeastern Argentina. The qualitative and quantitative characters of the seeds were registered, after which they were sown. The development of the emerged seedlings was followed, first in a greenhouse and thereafter in open field. We recorded the type of germination, the thigmotropic movements of the hypocotyl and of the stem, seedling architecture and plant longevity. These traits allowed us to differentiate the species and construct an identification key that could be useful for agronomic or floricultural purposes. The data obtained partially support the current taxonomic treatment of the genus.

  9. Anatomical and morphological features of seedlings of some Cactoideae Eaton (Cactaceae Juss. species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna Kalashnyk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-month-old seedlings of 11 species of the subfamily Cactoideae (Melocactus bahiensis, Melocactus curvispinus, Echinopsis eyriesii, E. mirablis, E. peruviana, Oreocereus celsianus, Rebutia flavistyla, Rebutia minuscula, Astrophytum myriostigma, Mamillaria columbiana, and M. prolifera have been studied. These plants exhibit a uniseriate epidermis, covered by a thin cuticle. Except for E. peruviana and A. myriostigma, no hypodermis could be detected. The shoots of all studied specimens consist mainly of cortex parenchyma with large thin-walled cells. The pith parenchyma is composed of much smaller cells. Due to the fact that the cortex parenchyma comprises the largest portion of the cross-sectional area, it can be concluded that it is the main water-storing tissue. The extent of vascular tissue development varies. Collateral vascular bundles are present in the stele. The studied seedlings contain various ergastic substances, in particular inclusions of calcium oxalate (all studied species, starch (Mammillaria prolifera, E. mirabilis, and the genus Melocactus, inulin-like inclusions, and occasionally lipid drops (some Echinopsis species. Thus, it was found that all studied plants have a highly specialized anatomical and morphological structure. At the same time, the epidermis and hypodermis are poorly developed. Accordingly, the adaptation to arid conditions of the examined seedlings involves an increased growth of the water-storing tissue and the production of ergastic substances.

  10. Molecular and morphological identification of fungal species isolated from bealmijang meju.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Yeun; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Baek, Sung Yeol; Choi, Hye Sun

    2011-12-01

    Bealmijang is a short-term aged paste made from meju, which is a brick of fermented soybeans and other ingredients. Different types of bealmijang are available depending on the geographic region or ingredients used. However, no study has clarified the microbial diversity of these types. We identified 17 and 14 fungal species from black soybean meju (BSM) and buckwheat meju (BWM), respectively, on the basis of morphology, culture characteristics, and internal transcribed spacer and beta-tubulin gene sequencing. In both meju, Aspergillus oryzae, Rhizopus oryzae, Penicillium polonicum, P. steckii, Cladosporium tenuissimum, C. cladosporioides, C. uredinicola, and yeast species Pichia burtonii were commonly found. Moreover, A. flavus, A. niger, P. crustosum, P. citrinum, Eurotium niveoglaucum, Absidia corymbifera, Setomelanomma holmii, Cladosporium spp. and unclassified species were identified from BSM. A. clavatus, Mucor circinelloides, M. racemosus, P. brevicompactum, Davidiella tassiana, and Cladosporium spp. were isolated from BWM. Fast growing Zygomycetous fungi is considered important for the early stage of meju fermentation, and A. oryae and A. niger might play a pivotal role in meju fermentation owing to their excellent enzyme productive activities. It is supposed that Penicillium sp. and Pichia burtonii could contribute to the flavor of the final food products. Identification of this fungal diversity will be useful for understanding the microbiota that participate in meju fermentation, and these fungal isolates can be utilized in the fermented foods and biotechnology industries.

  11. Aspects of the morphology and the ecology of a Paradiplozoon species from Barbus aeneus in the Vaal Dam, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    M.Sc. Zoology Only a few species of the family Diplozoidae have previously been described from Africa, from various Labeo and Barbus species. An investigation was undertaken respectively in the Vaal Dam and Vaal River Barrage in the Vaal River system, South Africa to determine aspects of the morphology, taxonomy and ecology of specimens of this family collected from the gills of Barbus aeneus. Various fish species, namely B. aeneus, Barbus kimberleyensis, Labeo capensis, Labeo umbratus, Cy...

  12. Blind to morphology: Genetics identifies several widespread ecologically common species and few endemics among Indo-Pacific cauliflower corals (Pocillopora, Scleractinia)

    KAUST Repository

    Pinzón, Jorge H C

    2013-04-05

    Aim: Using high-resolution genetic markers on samples gathered from across their wide distributional range, we endeavoured to delimit species diversity in reef-building Pocillopora corals. They are common, ecologically important, and widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific, but their phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental conditions and their nearly featureless microskeletal structures confound taxonomic assignments and limit an understanding of their ecology and evolution. Location: Indo-Pacific, Red Sea, Arabian/Persian Gulf. Methods: Sequence analysis of nuclear ribosomal (internal transcribed spacer 2, ITS2) and mitochondrial (open reading frame) loci were combined with population genetic data (seven microsatellite loci) for Pocillopora samples collected throughout the Indo-Pacific, Red Sea and Arabian Gulf, in order to assess the evolutionary divergence, reproductive isolation, frequency of hybridization and geographical distributions of the genus. Results: Between five and eight genetically distinct lineages comparable to species were identified with minimal or no hybridization between them. Colony morphology was generally incongruent with genetics across the full range of sampling, and the total number of species is apparently consistent with lower estimates from competing morphologically based hypotheses (about seven or eight taxa). The most commonly occurring genetic lineages were widely distributed and exhibited high dispersal and gene flow, factors that have probably minimized allopatric speciation. Uniquely among scleractinian genera, this genus contains a monophyletic group of broadcast spawners that evolved recently from an ancestral brooder. Main conclusions: The delineation of species diversity guided by genetics fundamentally advances our understanding of Pocillopora geographical distributions, ecology and evolution. Because traditional diagnostic features of colony and branch morphology are proving to be of limited utility, the

  13. Blind to morphology: Genetics identifies several widespread ecologically common species and few endemics among Indo-Pacific cauliflower corals (Pocillopora, Scleractinia)

    KAUST Repository

    Pinzó n, Jorge H C; Sampayo, Eugenia M.; Cox, Evelyn F.; Chauka, Leonard J.; Chen, Chaolun Allen; Voolstra, Christian R.; LaJeunesse, Todd C.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Using high-resolution genetic markers on samples gathered from across their wide distributional range, we endeavoured to delimit species diversity in reef-building Pocillopora corals. They are common, ecologically important, and widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific, but their phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental conditions and their nearly featureless microskeletal structures confound taxonomic assignments and limit an understanding of their ecology and evolution. Location: Indo-Pacific, Red Sea, Arabian/Persian Gulf. Methods: Sequence analysis of nuclear ribosomal (internal transcribed spacer 2, ITS2) and mitochondrial (open reading frame) loci were combined with population genetic data (seven microsatellite loci) for Pocillopora samples collected throughout the Indo-Pacific, Red Sea and Arabian Gulf, in order to assess the evolutionary divergence, reproductive isolation, frequency of hybridization and geographical distributions of the genus. Results: Between five and eight genetically distinct lineages comparable to species were identified with minimal or no hybridization between them. Colony morphology was generally incongruent with genetics across the full range of sampling, and the total number of species is apparently consistent with lower estimates from competing morphologically based hypotheses (about seven or eight taxa). The most commonly occurring genetic lineages were widely distributed and exhibited high dispersal and gene flow, factors that have probably minimized allopatric speciation. Uniquely among scleractinian genera, this genus contains a monophyletic group of broadcast spawners that evolved recently from an ancestral brooder. Main conclusions: The delineation of species diversity guided by genetics fundamentally advances our understanding of Pocillopora geographical distributions, ecology and evolution. Because traditional diagnostic features of colony and branch morphology are proving to be of limited utility, the

  14. Accelerated Evolution in Distinctive Species Reveals Candidate Elements for Clinically Relevant Traits, Including Mutation and Cancer Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Elliott; Abegglen, Lisa M; Schiffman, Joshua D; Gregg, Christopher

    2018-03-06

    The identity of most functional elements in the mammalian genome and the phenotypes they impact are unclear. Here, we perform a genome-wide comparative analysis of patterns of accelerated evolution in species with highly distinctive traits to discover candidate functional elements for clinically important phenotypes. We identify accelerated regions (ARs) in the elephant, hibernating bat, orca, dolphin, naked mole rat, and thirteen-lined ground squirrel lineages in mammalian conserved regions, uncovering ∼33,000 elements that bind hundreds of different regulatory proteins in humans and mice. ARs in the elephant, the largest land mammal, are uniquely enriched near elephant DNA damage response genes. The genomic hotspot for elephant ARs is the E3 ligase subunit of the Fanconi anemia complex, a master regulator of DNA repair. Additionally, ARs in the six species are associated with specific human clinical phenotypes that have apparent concordance with overt traits in each species. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Morphological variability and molecular identification of Uncinaria spp. (Nematoda: Ancylostomatidae) from grizzly and black bears: new species or phenotypic plasticity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Stefano; Lejeune, Manigandan; van Paridon, Bradley; Pagan, Christopher A; Wasmuth, James D; Tizzani, Paolo; Duignan, Pádraig J; Nadler, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    The hookworms Uncinaria rauschi Olsen, 1968 and Uncinaria yukonensis ( Wolfgang, 1956 ) were formally described from grizzly ( Ursus arctos horribilis) and black bears ( Ursus americanus ) of North America. We analyzed the intestinal tracts of 4 grizzly and 9 black bears from Alberta and British Columbia, Canada and isolated Uncinaria specimens with anatomical traits never previously documented. We applied morphological and molecular techniques to investigate the taxonomy and phylogeny of these Uncinaria parasites. The morphological analysis supported polymorphism at the vulvar region for females of both U. rauschi and U. yukonensis. The hypothesis of morphological plasticity for U. rauschi and U. yukonensis was confirmed by genetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS-1 and ITS-2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA. Two distinct genotypes were identified, differing at 5 fixed sites for ITS-1 (432 base pairs [bp]) and 7 for ITS-2 (274 bp). Morphometric data for U. rauschi revealed host-related size differences: adult U. rauschi were significantly larger in black bears than in grizzly bears. Interpretation of these results, considering the historical biogeography of North American bears, suggests a relatively recent host-switching event of U. rauschi from black bears to grizzly bears which likely occurred after the end of the Wisconsin glaciation. Phylogenetic maximum parsimony (MP) and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of the concatenated ITS-1 and ITS-2 datasets strongly supported monophyly of U. rauschi and U. yukonensis and their close relationship with Uncinaria stenocephala (Railliet, 1884), the latter a parasite primarily of canids and felids. Relationships among species within this group, although resolved by ML, were unsupported by MP and bootstrap resampling. The clade of U. rauschi, U. yukonensis, and U. stenocephala was recovered as sister to the clade represented by Uncinaria spp. from otariid pinnipeds. These results support the absence of strict

  16. Experimental Crossing of Two Distinct Species of Leopard Geckos, Eublepharis angramainyu and E. macularius: Viability, Fertility and Phenotypic Variation of the Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jančúchová-Lásková, Jitka; Landová, Eva; Frynta, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hybridization between distinct species of animals and subsequent genetic introgression plays a considerable role in the speciation process and the emergence of adaptive characters. Fitness of between-species hybrids usually sharply decreases with the divergence time of the concerned species and the divergence depth, which still allows for a successful crossing differs among principal clades of vertebrates. Recently, a review of hybridization events among distinct lizard species revealed that lizards belong to vertebrates with a highly developed ability to hybridize. In spite of this, reliable reports of experimental hybridizations between genetically fairly divergent species are only exceptional. Here, we show the results of the crossing of two distinct allopatric species of eyelid geckos possessing temperature sex determination and lacking sex chromosomes: Eublepharis macularius distributed in Pakistan/Afghanistan area and E. angramainyu, which inhabits Mesopotamia and adjacent areas. We demonstrated that F1 hybrids were viable and fertile, and the introgression of E. angramainyu genes into the E. macularius genome can be enabled via a backcrossing. The examined hybrids (except those of the F2 generation) displayed neither malformations nor a reduced survival. Analyses of morphometric and coloration traits confirmed phenotypic distinctness of both parental species and their F1 hybrids. These findings contrast with long-term geographic and an evolutionary separation of the studied species. Thus, the occurrence of fertile hybrids of comparably divergent species, such as E. angramainyu and E. macularius, may also be expected in other taxa of squamates. This would violate the current estimates of species diversity in lizards.

  17. Investigating spatial variability of vertical water fluxes through the streambed in distinctive stream morphologies using temperature and head data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Jiang, Weiwei; Song, Jinxi; Dou, Xinyi; Guo, Hongtao; Xu, Shaofeng; Zhang, Guotao; Wen, Ming; Long, Yongqing; Li, Qi

    2017-08-01

    Investigating the interaction of groundwater and surface water is key to understanding the hyporheic processes. The vertical water fluxes through a streambed were determined using Darcian flux calculations and vertical sediment temperature profiles to assess the pattern and magnitude of groundwater/surface-water interaction in Beiluo River, China. Field measurements were taken in January 2015 at three different stream morphologies including a meander bend, an anabranching channel and a straight stream channel. Despite the differences of flux direction and magnitude, flux directions based on vertical temperature profiles are in good agreement with results from Darcian flux calculations at the anabranching channel, and the Kruskal-Wallis tests show no significant differences between the estimated upward fluxes based on the two methods at each site. Also, the upward fluxes based on the two methods show similar spatial distributions on the streambed, indicating (1) that higher water fluxes at the meander bend occur from the center of the channel towards the erosional bank, (2) that water fluxes at the anabranching channel are higher near the erosional bank and in the center of the channel, and (3) that in the straight channel, higher water fluxes appear from the center of the channel towards the depositional bank. It is noted that higher fluxes generally occur at certain locations with higher streambed vertical hydraulic conductivity ( K v) or where a higher vertical hydraulic gradient is observed. Moreover, differences of grain size, induced by stream morphology and contrasting erosional and depositional conditions, have significant effects on streambed K v and water fluxes.

  18. Morphology of the European species of the aphid genus Eulachnus (Hemiptera: Aphididae: Lachninae) - A SEM comparative and integrative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanturski, Mariusz; Karcz, Jagna; Wieczorek, Karina

    2015-09-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods were used for the first time to elucidate the external morphology of the European species of the genus Eulachnus (Hemiptera: Aphididae: Lachninae), a representative genus of the conifer-feeding aphids tribe Eulachnini. We examined and compared the external morphology of apterous and alate viviparous females from the parthenogenetic generation as well as oviparous females and alate males belonging to the sexual generation. FE-SEM images based on HMDS and cryo-SEM preparation techniques revealed better image quality than the CPD technique in regard to surface tension and morphological signs of cell deteriorations (i.e., existence of depressions, drying artifacts and membrane blebs). Three morphologically different species groups "agilis", "brevipilosus" and "cembrae" were proposed due to the differences in head, antennae, legs and dorsal chaetotaxy as well as dorsal sclerotization. The most characteristic features and differences of representatives of these groups are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of the Lipase3 gene family in five plant species reveals distinct evolutionary origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Zhang, Lin; Hu, JunFeng; Gao, Dianshuai; Liu, Xin; Sha, Yan

    2018-04-01

    Lipases are physiologically important and ubiquitous enzymes that share a conserved domain and are classified into eight different families based on their amino acid sequences and fundamental biological properties. The Lipase3 family of lipases was reported to possess a canonical fold typical of α/β hydrolases and a typical catalytic triad, suggesting a distinct evolutionary origin for this family. Genes in the Lipase3 family do not have the same functions, but maintain the conserved Lipase3 domain. There have been extensive studies of Lipase3 structures and functions, but little is known about their evolutionary histories. In this study, all lipases within five plant species were identified, and their phylogenetic relationships and genetic properties were analyzed and used to group them into distinct evolutionary families. Each identified lipase family contained at least one dicot and monocot Lipase3 protein, indicating that the gene family was established before the split of dicots and monocots. Similar intron/exon numbers and predicted protein sequence lengths were found within individual groups. Twenty-four tandem Lipase3 gene duplications were identified, implying that the distinctive function of Lipase3 genes appears to be a consequence of translocation and neofunctionalization after gene duplication. The functional genes EDS1, PAD4, and SAG101 that are reportedly involved in pathogen response were all located in the same group. The nucleotide diversity (Dxy) and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide substitutions rates (Ka/Ks) of the three genes were significantly greater than the average across the genomes. We further observed evidence for selection maintaining diversity on three genes in the Toll-Interleukin-1 receptor type of nucleotide binding/leucine-rich repeat immune receptor (TIR-NBS LRR) immunity-response signaling pathway, indicating that they could be vulnerable to pathogen effectors.

  20. Two new genera and five new species of Mugadina-like small grass cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadidae: Cicadettini) from Central and Eastern Australia: comparative morphology, songs, behaviour and distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, A

    2018-04-20

    Moulds (2012) established the genus Mugadina for two small cicadas, M. marshalli (Distant) and M. emma (Goding and Froggatt), both grass inhabiting species known from Queensland and New South Wales. Both species are notable for their relatively simple 'ticking' songs. Moulds further noted that there were at least two superficially similar genera of cicadas, but each with different genitalia. This paper describes two new genera of small (9-15 mm body lengths) and distinctive grass cicadas with genitalia that are very similar to those of Mugadina, but possess clear morphological, colour and calling song differences. The new genera are: Heremusina n. gen. with two known species namely H. udeoecetes n. sp. and H. pipatio n. sp.; the second new genus is Xeropsalta n. gen., containing four known species, X. thomsoni n. sp., X. aridula n. sp., X. rattrayi n. sp., and X. festiva n. comb. Heremusina n. gen. species are described from the Alice Springs area of Northern Territory and the Cloncurry area of northwest Queensland, from arid to semi arid habitats. The Xeropsalta n. gen. species are described from western, southwest and central Queensland, and from the Simpson and Strzelecki Deserts in northeastern South Australia and northwestern New South Wales, respectively, all locations in very arid to arid habitats, but close to seasonal (often irregular) rivers and lakes. X. festiva n. comb. occurs in semi arid habitats in southern and southeastern Australia.        Detailed taxonomic descriptions are provided of the new species, together with distributions, habitats, and the calling songs. The Heremusina species emit songs with short repetitive buzzing echemes, the echeme durations differing between each species. The Xeropsalta songs are notable for their complexity, containing multiple elements with rapid changes of amplitudes and temporal structures, rather atypical of the songs of most small grass dwelling cicadas. Detailed song structures distinguishing each of

  1. Cephalic salivary glands of two species of advanced eusocial bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae: morphology and secretion

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    Silvana B. Poiani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some adult eusocial bees have a pair of cephalic salivary glands (CSG in addition to the thoracic labial or salivary gland pairs. This paper deals with variations in morphological features and secretion production of the CSG of females and males of Apis mellifera Linnaeus, 1758 and Scaptotrigona postica Latreille, 1807. The following life stages were studied: newly emerged, nurse, and forager workers; newly emerged and egg-laying queens; and newly emerged and sexually mature males. The histological results showed that the CSG differs between the two species in the following features: while alveoli and duct cells are cuboidal in workers and queens of A. mellifera, they change from cuboidal to flat in S. postica as the workers age. The glands of newly emerged males and females of A. mellifera are similar. However, as males become sexually mature, glands degenerate and practically disappear. The secretion from the glands of females of both species is oleaginous and gradually accumulates in the lumen of the alveoli in the beginning of the adult phase. Consequently, forager workers and egg-laying queens exhibit more turgid alveoli than younger individuals. Sudan black and Nile's blue staining indicated that the CSG secretion consists of neutral lipids. The possible role of gland secretion is discussed taking in account tasks performed by the individuals in the particular phases studied.

  2. Morphological, Physiological, and Structural Responses of Two Species of Artemisia to NaCl Stress

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    Zhi-Yong Guan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of salt stress on Artemisia scoparia and A. vulgaris “Variegate” were examined. A. scoparia leaves became withered under NaCl treatment, whereas A. vulgaris “Variegate” leaves were not remarkably affected. Chlorophyll content decreased in both species, with a higher reduction in A. scoparia. Contents of proline, MDA, soluble carbohydrate, and Na+ increased in both species under salt stress, but A. vulgaris “Variegate” had higher level of proline and soluble carbohydrate and lower level of MDA and Na+. The ratios of K+/Na+, Ca2+/Na+, and Mg2+/Na+ in A. vulgaris “Variegate” under NaCl stress were higher. Moreover, A. vulgaris “Variegate” had higher transport selectivity of K+/Na+ from root to stem, stem to middle mature leaves, and upper newly developed leaves than A. scoparia under NaCl stress. A. vulgaris “Variegate” chloroplast maintained its morphological integrity under NaCl stress, whereas A. scoparia chloroplast lost integrity. The results indicated that A. scoparia is more sensitive to salt stress than A. vulgaris “Variegate.” Salt tolerance is mainly related to the ability of regulating osmotic pressure through the accumulation of soluble carbohydrates and proline, and the gradient distribution of K+ between roots and leaves was also contributed to osmotic pressure adjustment and improvement of plant salt tolerance.

  3. Sexual conflict predicts morphology and behavior in two species of penduline tits

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    Komdeur Jan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary interests of males and females rarely coincide (sexual conflict, and these conflicting interests influence morphology, behavior and speciation in various organisms. We examined consequences of variation in sexual conflict in two closely-related passerine birds with contrasting breeding systems: the Eurasian penduline tit Remiz pendulinus (EPT exhibiting a highly polygamous breeding system with sexually antagonistic interests over parental care, and the socially monogamous Cape penduline tit Anthoscopus minutus (CPT. We derived four a priori predictions from sexual conflict theory and tested these using data collected in Central Europe (EPT and South Africa (CPT. Firstly, we predicted that EPTs exhibit more sexually dimorphic plumage than CPTs due to more intense sexual selection. Secondly, we expected brighter EPT males to provide less care than duller males. Thirdly, since song is a sexually selected trait in many birds, male EPTs were expected to exhibit more complex songs than CPT males. Finally, intense sexual conflict in EPT was expected to lead to low nest attendance as an indication of sexually antagonistic interests, whereas we expected more cooperation between parents in CPT consistent with their socially monogamous breeding system. Results Consistent with our predictions EPTs exhibited greater sexual dimorphism in plumage and more complex song than CPTs, and brighter EPT males provided less care than duller ones. EPT parents attended the nest less frequently and less simultaneously than CPT parents. Conclusions These results are consistent with sexual conflict theory: species in which sexual conflict is more manifested (EPT exhibited a stronger sexual dimorphism and more elaborated sexually selected traits than species with less intense sexual conflict (CPT. Our results are also consistent with the notion that EPTs attempt to force their partner to work harder as expected under sexual conflict: each

  4. Sexual conflict predicts morphology and behavior in two species of penduline tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, René E; Pogány, Akos; Komdeur, Jan; Lloyd, Penn; Székely, Tamás

    2010-04-23

    The evolutionary interests of males and females rarely coincide (sexual conflict), and these conflicting interests influence morphology, behavior and speciation in various organisms. We examined consequences of variation in sexual conflict in two closely-related passerine birds with contrasting breeding systems: the Eurasian penduline tit Remiz pendulinus (EPT) exhibiting a highly polygamous breeding system with sexually antagonistic interests over parental care, and the socially monogamous Cape penduline tit Anthoscopus minutus (CPT). We derived four a priori predictions from sexual conflict theory and tested these using data collected in Central Europe (EPT) and South Africa (CPT). Firstly, we predicted that EPTs exhibit more sexually dimorphic plumage than CPTs due to more intense sexual selection. Secondly, we expected brighter EPT males to provide less care than duller males. Thirdly, since song is a sexually selected trait in many birds, male EPTs were expected to exhibit more complex songs than CPT males. Finally, intense sexual conflict in EPT was expected to lead to low nest attendance as an indication of sexually antagonistic interests, whereas we expected more cooperation between parents in CPT consistent with their socially monogamous breeding system. Consistent with our predictions EPTs exhibited greater sexual dimorphism in plumage and more complex song than CPTs, and brighter EPT males provided less care than duller ones. EPT parents attended the nest less frequently and less simultaneously than CPT parents. These results are consistent with sexual conflict theory: species in which sexual conflict is more manifested (EPT) exhibited a stronger sexual dimorphism and more elaborated sexually selected traits than species with less intense sexual conflict (CPT). Our results are also consistent with the notion that EPTs attempt to force their partner to work harder as expected under sexual conflict: each member of the breeding pair attempts to shift the

  5. Not only size matters: achene morphology affects time of seedling emergence in three heterocarpic species of Anacyclus (Anthemideae, Asteraceae

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    Torices, Rubén

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The production of two or more distinct fruit types by an individual, i.e. heterocarpy, is considered as a mixed dispersal strategy in which a proportion of the offspring is able to colonize new sites, whilst others remain near the maternal location. Here, we aimed to explore the effects of achene morphology (winged vs. unwinged achenes and achene size –measured here as achene mass– on post-dispersal life-history traits (probability and time of seedling emergence in three heterocarpic Anacyclus species (Anthemideae, Asteraceae. Morphology, size and germination performance were studied in achenes from six populations of Anacyclus clavatus (Desf. Pers., A. homogamos (Maire Humphries, and A. valentinus L. Our results show that achene morphology and size were related to their position within the capitulum, such that outer, winged achenes were significantly heavier than the inner, unwinged ones. Additionally, winged achenes germinated faster than unwinged ones. This pattern may be related to the sequential achene time of release displayed by these species. Finally, our findings cast doubt on the role of wings as structures that favor dispersal by wind in these three species of Anacyclus.La producción de dos o más tipos de frutos diferentes por un mismo individuo, i.e. heterocarpia, es considerada como una estrategia mixta de dispersión en la que una parte de la descendencia es capaz de colonizar nuevos sitios, mientras que la otra permanece cerca de la planta madre. En este trabajo, nuestro objetivo fue explorar los efectos de la morfología del aquenio (aquenios alados vs. no alados y de su tamaño –medido aquí como masa del aquenio– en la etapa del ciclo de vida siguiente a la dispersión (probabilidad de germinación y tiempo de emergencia de las plántulas de tres especies heterocárpicas del género Anacyclus (Anthemideae, Asteraceae. Se estudió la morfología, el tamaño y la germinación en aquenios de seis poblaciones de Anacyclus

  6. A new cryptic species of South American freshwater pufferfish of the genus Colomesus (Tetraodontidae, based on both morphology and DNA data.

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    Cesar R L Amaral

    Full Text Available The Tetraodontidae are an Acantomorpha fish family with circumglobal distribution composed of 189 species grouped in 19 genera, occurring in seas, estuaries, and rivers between the tropical and temperate regions. Of these, the genus Colomesus is confined to South America, with what have been up to now considered only two species. C. asellus is spread over the entire Amazon, Tocantins-Araguaia drainages, and coastal environments from the Amazon mouth to Venezuela, and is the only freshwater puffers on that continent. C. psittacus is found in coastal marine and brackish water environments from Cuba to the northern coast of South America as far south as to Sergipe in Brazil. In the present contribution we used morphological data along with molecular systematics techniques to investigate the phylogeny and phylogeography of the freshwater pufferfishes of the genus Colomesus. The molecular part is based on a cytochrome C oxidase subunit I dataset constructed from both previously published and newly determined sequences, obtained from specimens collected from three distinct localities in South America. Our results from both molecular and morphological approaches enable us to identify and describe a new Colomesus species from the Tocantins River. We also discuss aspects of the historical biogeography and phylogeography of the South American freshwater pufferfishes, suggesting that it could be more recent than previously expected.

  7. Morphological and genetic evidence for multiple evolutionary distinct lineages in the endangered and commercially exploited red lined torpedo barbs endemic to the Western Ghats of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Lijo; Philip, Siby; Dahanukar, Neelesh; Anvar Ali, Palakkaparambil Hamsa; Tharian, Josin; Raghavan, Rajeev; Antunes, Agostinho

    2013-01-01

    Red lined torpedo barbs (RLTBS) (Cyprinidae: Puntius) endemic to the Western Ghats Hotspot of India, are popular and highly priced freshwater aquarium fishes. Two decades of indiscriminate exploitation for the pet trade, restricted range, fragmented populations and continuing decline in quality of habitats has resulted in their 'Endangered' listing. Here, we tested whether the isolated RLTB populations demonstrated considerable variation qualifying to be considered as distinct conservation targets. Multivariate morphometric analysis using 24 size-adjusted characters delineated all allopatric populations. Similarly, the species-tree highlighted a phylogeny with 12 distinct RLTB lineages corresponding to each of the different riverine populations. However, coalescence-based methods using mitochondrial DNA markers identified only eight evolutionarily distinct lineages. Divergence time analysis points to recent separation of the populations, owing to the geographical isolation, more than 5 million years ago, after the lineages were split into two ancestral stocks in the Paleocene, on north and south of a major geographical gap in the Western Ghats. Our results revealing the existence of eight evolutionarily distinct RLTB lineages calls for the re-determination of conservation targets for these cryptic and endangered taxa.

  8. Morphological and genetic evidence for multiple evolutionary distinct lineages in the endangered and commercially exploited red lined torpedo barbs endemic to the Western Ghats of India.

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    Lijo John

    Full Text Available Red lined torpedo barbs (RLTBS (Cyprinidae: Puntius endemic to the Western Ghats Hotspot of India, are popular and highly priced freshwater aquarium fishes. Two decades of indiscriminate exploitation for the pet trade, restricted range, fragmented populations and continuing decline in quality of habitats has resulted in their 'Endangered' listing. Here, we tested whether the isolated RLTB populations demonstrated considerable variation qualifying to be considered as distinct conservation targets. Multivariate morphometric analysis using 24 size-adjusted characters delineated all allopatric populations. Similarly, the species-tree highlighted a phylogeny with 12 distinct RLTB lineages corresponding to each of the different riverine populations. However, coalescence-based methods using mitochondrial DNA markers identified only eight evolutionarily distinct lineages. Divergence time analysis points to recent separation of the populations, owing to the geographical isolation, more than 5 million years ago, after the lineages were split into two ancestral stocks in the Paleocene, on north and south of a major geographical gap in the Western Ghats. Our results revealing the existence of eight evolutionarily distinct RLTB lineages calls for the re-determination of conservation targets for these cryptic and endangered taxa.

  9. Comparison of morphological and kinetic parameters in distinction of benign and malignant breast lesions in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

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    Direnç Özlem Aksoy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the value of qualitative morphologicaland kinetic data and quantitative kinetic data indistinction of malignancy in dynamic contrast enhancedmagnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI of the breast.Methods: DCE-MRIs of 49 subjects were evaluated.Morphological and contrast enhancement parameters of95 lesions were recorded in these subjects. Post-contrastkinetic behavior of these lesions were also investigated.Among the quantitative parameters, relative enhancements(E1, E2, Epeak, time-to-peak (Tpeak, slope ofcurve (Slope, signal enhancement ratio (SER, and maximumintensity time ratio (MITR were calculated. Theseresults were compared with the pathological diagnosis.Results: Spiculated contour (100%, rim enhancement(97.87%, irregular shape (95.74%, and irregular margin(91.49% were the most specific morphological featuresof malignancy in mass lesions. In non-mass lesions, focalzone (91.49% was the most specific feature of malignancy.74.5% of the benign lesions showed type 1, 77.1%of the malignant lesions showed type 2 and 3 curves accordingto the kinetic curve evaluation. All quantitativeparameters except Epeak were found to be statisticallysignificant in distinction of malignancy.Conclusion: None of the morphological features of thebenign lesions were found to be significantly specific.More specific features can be described for malignantlesions. Early behavior of the kinetic curve is not usefulfor diagnosis of malignancy but the intermediate and latebehavior gives useful information. Quantitative data involvedin this study might be promising.Key words: Morphological, kinetic, breast lesions, magnetic resonance imaging, dynamic

  10. A new species of freshwater Chaetonotidae (Gastrotricha, Chaetonotida from Obodska Cave (Montenegro based on morphological and molecular characters

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    Małgorzata Kolicka

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastrotricha is a cosmopolitan phylum of aquatic and semi-aquatic invertebrates that comprises about 820 described species. Current knowledge regarding freshwater gastrotrichs inhabiting caves is extremely poor and there are no extant data regarding Gastrotricha from Montenegro. We describe a new species from Obodska Cave, which is also the first record of a gastrotrich from this region. Due to its unusual habitat and morphological characteristics, this species may be important when considering the evolution and dispersion routes of Chaetonotidae Gosse, 1864 (sensu Leasi & Todaro 2008. We provide morphometric, molecular and phylogenetic data for the new species, together with photomicrographs and drawings.

  11. Molecular and morphological characterization of Dothiorella species associated with dieback of Ostrya carpinifolia in Slovenia and Italy

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    Draginja PAVLIC-ZUPANC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Isolates that resemble Dothiorella (Botryosphaeriaceae, Ascomycota species were isolated from dead twigs, asymptomatic and necrotized bark of European hop hornbeam (Ostrya carpinifolia Scop., Eurasian smoke tree (Cotinus coggygria Scop. and common juniper (Juniperus communis L. growing in western Slovenia and northern Italy. They were identified based on anamorph morphology and phylogenetic analyses of the ITS rDNA and EF-1α sequences, and previously designated as Dothiorella sp. A, B and C. This study has clarified the identity of these species by comparing them with other Dothiorella species known from culture based on gene sequence data, as well as morphological characters of the anamorphs. The phylogenetic results revealed three species, Dothiorella iberica, Dothiorella parva, and a Dothiorella sp. Isolates identified in the phylogenetic analyses as D. parva differed from the original description of this species and are thus described here based on the anamorph morphology. Isolates of D. parva were identified from O. carpinifolia in western Slovenia and northern Italy, and C. coggygria in western Slovenia, and coexist with Dothiorella sp. on O. carpinifolia in northern Italy. Dothiorella iberica was identified on J. communis in western Slovenia, thus expanding the geographic range of this species. This is the first record of D. parva from these hosts and countries. Our results indicate that these Dothiorella species occur widely across the Mediterranean region, and on a variety of hosts.

  12. Integrating Morphology, Breeding Ground and Mitochondrial COI Gene Analysis for Species Identification of Bellamya lithophaga (Gastropoda: Viviparidae in China.

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    Youzhu Cheng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a zoonotic public health concern that causes human severe eosinophilic meningitis in Southeast Asia and China. As a medically important intermediate host of A. cantonensis, Bellamya lithophaga (Gastropoda: Viviparidae is often confused with other morphologically similar sibling species of genus Bellamya, such as B. aeruginosa and B. purificata in the past. Hence, the aim of the present study was to investigate evidences to discriminate these equivocal Bellamya species.This study was carried out by getting Bellamya snail samples from Fujian Province in the South-East of China. The snail morphological features, breeding grounds and phylogenetic relationship according to mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI gene marker were analyzed.Based on external morphology, radular shape and cusp formula, as well as major breeding environment, B. lithophaga could be distinguished from B. aeruginosa, B. purificata. The phylogenetic tree also unconfirmed that B. lithophaga belongs to a different genetic clade from other morphologically similar species.Our findings demonstrate the significant differences in B. lithophaga and other sibling species, which supports the traditional species delimitation in the genus Bellamya.

  13. The late Miocene Phractocephalus catfish (Siluriformes: Pimelodidae from Urumaco, Venezuela: additional specimens and reinterpretation as a distinct species

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    John G. Lundberg

    . However, the genus does not occur west or north of the Andes or Venezuelan coastal ranges. Recognizing the Urumaco Phractocephalus as a distinct species does not alter the obvious conclusion that this catfish marks a large river connection between the Caribbean coastal region and the Orinoco system during at least part of the Neogene. Other Urumaco fossils show this same biogeographic relationship.

  14. Range extension and morphological characterization of rhodolith-forming species (Corallinales, Rhodophyta) from shallow water in the Mexican South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta-García, Edith Concepción; Rosas-Alquicira, Edgar Francisco

    2014-12-01

    Living rhodolith beds are widely distributed along the Eastern Pacific ocean. Despite their widespread distribution, little is known about the rhodolith-forming species from shallow water in the Mexican South Pacific. Many taxonomic and morphological studies about rhodoliths have been carried out in the Gulf of California, where the forming species belong to the Hapalidiaceae and Corallinaceae families. This paper is the first report on the occurrence of the rhodolith-forming Hapalidiaceae species Lithothamnion muelleri and Phymatolithon repandum at three sites in the Mexican South Pacific. The branch density, maximum length and sphericity were measured for each determined species. Rhodoliths were distributed between 4 and 6 m depth, but differences in the branch density between species and sites were not found. Finally, the present record of L. muelleri fills the gap in the species distribution along the Eastern Pacific ocean, while the record of P. repandum is the first of the species in the region.

  15. Review of the Eulamprotes wilkella species-group based on morphology and DNA barcodes, with descriptions of new taxa (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huemer, Peter; Elsner, Gustav; Karsholt, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Eulamprotes wilkella species-group is revised based on morphological characters and on DNA barcodes of the mtCOI (Cytochrome c Oxidase 1) gene. Adult morphology combined with sequence information for 9 species supports the existence of 12 species, 7 of which are described as new to science: E...

  16. Morphological and molecular data for a new species of Pomphorhynchus Monticelli, 1905 (Acanthocephala: Pomphorhynchidae) in the Mexican redhorse Moxostoma austrinum Bean (Cypriniformes: Catostomidae) in central Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Varela, Martín; Mendoza-Garfias, Berenit; Choudhury, Anindo; Pérez-Ponce de León, Gerardo

    2017-11-01

    Pomphorhynchus purhepechus n. sp. is described from the intestine of the Mexican redhorse Moxostoma austrinum Bean (Catostomidae) in central Mexico. The new species can be distinguished from the other seven described species of Pomphorhynchus Monticelli, 1905 in the Americas by a subspherical proboscis and 14 longitudinal rows with 16-18 hooks each; the third and the fourth row of hooks are alternately longest. Sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene and the large subunit (LSU) rDNA (including the domains D2-D3) were used to corroborate the morphological distinction between the new species and Pomphorhynchus bulbocolli Linkins in Van Cleave, 1919, a species widely distributed in several freshwater fish species across Canada, USA, and Mexico. The genetic divergence estimated between the new species and the isolates of P. bulbocolli ranged between 13 and 14% for cox1, and between 0.6 and 0.8% for LSU. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analyses of each dataset showed that the isolates of P. bulbocolli parasitising freshwater fishes from three families, the Catostomidae, Cyprinidae and Centrarchidae, represent a separate lineage, and that the acanthocephalans collected from two localities in central Mexico comprise an independent lineage. In addition, our analysis of the genetic variation of P. bulbocolli demonstrates that individuals of this acanthocephalan from different host species are conspecific. Finally, the distribution, host-association, and phylogenetic relationship of the new species, when placed in the context of the region's geological history, suggest that both host and parasite underwent speciation after their ancestors became isolated in Central Mexico.

  17. Genetic Diversity of Aegilops cylindrica Species from West of Iran Using Morphological and Phenological Traits

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    M. Arabbeigi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aegilops cylindrica species (CCDD, 2n = 4x = 28 is one of the wild relatives of wheat and hence known as a valuable source of genes related to biotic and abiotic stress tolerance. In this study genetic variation of 66 Aegilops cylindrica genotypes collected from west and northwestern of Iran was evaluated using quantitative and qualitative morphological traits. The results indicated that glumelle (lemma length and glume color traits had the highest variation as the quantitative and qualitative traits, respectively. The principal components analysis (PCA indicated 6 components that first component justified %30.3 total variation. Flag leaf color and fluffiness had the highest contribution in this component and thus the first component named as the flag leaf component. The cluster analysis divided the studied genotypes into three groups.  Genotypes originating from west of Iran were included in the first group and genotypes from northwestern Iran were clustered into the second and third groups. It could be concluded that the high genetic variation among genotypes of Ae. cylindrica revealed in this study can be utilized to improve wheat particularly for tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses.

  18. Investigation on the pollen morphology of traditional cultivars of Prunus species in Sicily

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    Anna Geraci

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study pollen grains of 13 cultivars and 3 rootstocks belonging to 5 species (P. armeniaca, P. domestica, P. dulcis, P. persica, P. avium of the genus Prunus collected from North-East Sicily were examined for the micromorphological characterization through the scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The length of polar axis (P and the equatorial diameter (E of grain, P/E ratio, the length of colpi (C, diameter of perforations (DP and the number of perforations in 25 μm2 (PN, the width of muri (WM, the distance between muri (DM and their number in 25 μm2 (MN, the width of grooves (WG were measured and their variation was compared among studied taxa. Moreover multivariate statistical analysis was carried out to distinguish morphometric information from measured parameters. All pollen grains are trizonocolpate, isopolar, medium-large sized and their shape varies from prolate to perprolate. Regarding outline pollen grains are subtriangular in polar view and elliptic in equatorial view. Exine sculpturing is striate with perforations on grain surface. The arrangement of ridges appears roughly parallel but too sloped (sometimes curved compared to polar axis, or branched and oriented in different directions, or perfectly parallel or more irregular with bifurcated ridges often sinuous. The analyses showed a great variability (particularly in P. domestica cultivars related in some cases to the diversity in the morphological features of the leaves and the fruits of the investigated entities.

  19. Differential Essential Oil Composition and Morphology between Perennial Satureja species Growing in Spain

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    David García-Rellán

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of the essential oils obtained by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts of thirty six samples of perennial Spanish savouries (Satureja montana L., Satureja innota (Pau G. López, Satureja cuneifolia Ten. and Satureja intricata Lange, was investigated by GC and GC-MS. A total of 72 compounds accounting between 98.25-99.55% of the total oil were identified. High content of carvacrol (59.72±1.50% followed by g -terpinene (17.40±1.11% were found in S.montana essential oils. S. cuneifolia yielded an oil rich in camphor (45.04±1.67% and camphene (12.42±1.71% whereas S. innota produces an essential oil with linalool (23.94±7.58% or geraniol (8.62±3.45% according to the locality of collection and S. intricata showed chemical polymorphism with camphor (16.02±1.75%, as the main compound followed with populations with myrcene (8.46±1.46% and populations with g -terpinene (8.22±1.33%. Although the morphological affinity between S. innota, S.cuneifolia and S. intricata could lead to consider the subspecies level, the phytochemical discriminant analysis support the taxonomic classification of Flora Iberica which ranks these taxa into species.

  20. The sagittal otolith morphology of four selected mugilid species from Iranian waters of the Persian Gulf (Teleostei: Mugilidae

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    Vahideh Salehi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The members of mugilid species are usually difficult to recognize because of the well-known similarity observed in their external morphology. Nevertheless, their identification is very important for local fisheries management and conservation action. Therefore, in the present study we applied otolith morphology to evaluate its significance in identification of four selected mugilid species; Chelon subviridis (Valenciennes, 1836, Liza klunzingeri (Day, 1888, Ellochelon vaigiensis (Quoy & Gaimard, 1825 and Mugil cephalus Linnaeus, 1758 occurring in the Iranian waters of the Persian Gulf in southern Iran. The results indicated several otolith features to be important for identification of the selected mugilid species as follow; the position and sulcus centrality, the curvature of the cauda, and the type of anterior and posterior regions. Based on the total approach evidences, we conclude that otolith morphology in mugilid fishes can be evidently used for the species identification and probably estimation of their phylogeny. The findings are in agreement with the previous studies which documented taxonomic importance of otolith morphology.

  1. Hepatozoon species (Adeleorina: Hepatozoidae) of African bufonids, with morphological description and molecular diagnosis of Hepatozoon ixoxo sp. nov. parasitising three Amietophrynus species (Anura: Bufonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherlands, Edward C; Cook, Courtney A; Smit, Nico J

    2014-12-20

    Haemogregarines comprise a large group of apicomplexan blood parasites. In 1996 all anuran haemogregarines still in the genus Haemogregarina Danilewsky, 1885 were reassigned to the genus Hepatozoon Miller, 1908. Most (11/15, 73%) African anuran Hepatozoon species have been recorded from the family Bufonidae, however, all these are recorded from only two host species, Amietophrynus mauritanicus (Schlegel, 1841) and Amietophrynus regularis (Reuss, 1833) from Northern and central Africa. To the authors' knowledge the only description of an anuran haemogregarine from South Africa is Hepatozoon theileri (Laveran, 1905), parasitising Amietia quecketti (Boulenger, 1895). Thin blood smears for morphometrics and whole blood for molecular work, were collected from 32 Amietophrynus garmani (Meek, 1897), 12 Amietophrynus gutturalis (Power, 1927), and nine Amietophrynus maculatus (Hallowell, 1854), in Ndumo Game Reserve and Kwa Nyamazane Conservancy, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Smears were Giemsa-stained, screened for haemogregarines, parasite stages measured, compared to each other and to other described African bufonid haemogregarines. Parasite 18S rDNA was amplified using two apicomplexan-specific primer sets, HepF300/HepR900 and 4558/2733. Resulting sequences of the haemogregarine isolates from the three Amietophrynus species were compared with each other and to comparative haemogregarine sequences selected from GenBank. Morphological characteristics of parasite stages, in particular characteristically capped mature gamont stages, and molecular findings, supported all three haemogregarine isolates from all three Amietophrynus species to be the same, a species of Hepatozoon, and furthermore different morphologically from other previously recorded bufonid Hepatozoon species. The haemogregarine fell within a clade comprising other anuran Hepatozoon species and furthermore, within a monophyletic sub-clade along with H. theileri and are described as Hepatozoon ixoxo sp. nov

  2. Morphological Characteristics of Flower and Seed Coat of the Endangered Species of Thismia taiwanensis (Burmanniaceae

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    Sheng-Zehn Yang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Since insufficient materials of Thismia taiwanensis were collected in the past, the structural details of the annulus, stamens and other characters of this critically endangered species have not been examined. The aim of this study was to determine the characteristics of flowers and fruits, especially those of the perianth tube and stamens, using fresh material. Seed surfaces were photographed by using scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that the flowers of T. taiwanensis were found either without a pedicel or with an elongated pedicel that becomes carnose in the fruit stage. The latter was more common. The perianth is not covered with glands; there are six stamens, which are separate and opposite the perianth lobes, with dilated, ribbon-like connectives, pendulous from annulus. The seeds are ellipsoid to fusiform, with somewhat tapering poles, 0.2-0.4 × 0.1-0.15 mm, and with epidermal cells that are raised, with distinctly longitudinal anticlinal walls and sunken anticlinal boundaries, forming a superficial network pattern.

  3. Genetic and morphological characterization of Cladobotryum species causing cobweb disease of mushrooms.

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    McKay, G J; Egan, D; Morris, E; Scott, C; Brown, A E

    1999-02-01

    Cladobotryum dendroides (= Dactylium dendroides) has hitherto been regarded as the major causal agent of cobweb disease of the cultivated mushroom, Agaricus bisporus. Nucleotide sequence data for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of four Cladobotryum/Hypomyces species reported to be associated with cobweb disease, however, indicate that the most common pathogen is now C. mycophilum. This cobweb pathogen varies somewhat in conidial septation from published descriptions of C. mycophilum and lacks the distinctive colony odor. ITS sequencing revealed minor nucleotide variation which split isolates of the pathogen into three subgroups, two comprising isolates that were sensitive to methylbenzimidazole carbamate (MBC) fungicides and one comprising MBC-resistant isolates. The MBC-resistant isolates, which were only obtained from Ireland and Great Britain, clustered together strongly in randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR analysis, suggesting that they may be clonal. The MBC-sensitive isolates were more diverse. A RAPD fragment of 800 to 900 bp, containing a microsatellite and found in the MBC-resistant isolates, also indicated their clonal nature; the microsatellites of these isolates contained the same number of GA repeats. Smaller, polymorphic microsatellites, similarly comprising GA repeats, in the MBC-sensitive isolates in general correlated with their geographic origin.

  4. Velvet bean severe mosaic virus: a distinct begomovirus species causing severe mosaic in Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC.

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    Zaim, Mohammad; Kumar, Yogesh; Hallan, Vipin; Zaidi, A A

    2011-08-01

    Velvet bean [Mucuna pruriens (L.) DC] is one of the most important medicinal plants. It is used to treat many ailments, but is widely used for the treatment especially for Parkinson's disease because of the presence of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-dopa) in it. It was noticed in last 5 years that the plants in the field showed severe mosaic, downward curling of the leaves, stunting, etc. This is consistently observed over the years in India. The disease was transmitted by whiteflies and by grafting and the causal agent was found to be a bipartite begomovirus. The whole genome was amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA) using ϕ-29 DNA polymerase and characterized. DNA-A and DNA-B shared a 124-nucleotide (nt) long highly conserved (98%) common region (CR). Comparisons with other begomovirus showed that DNA-A sequence has highest identity (76%) with an isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV; AY937195) reported from India. This data suggested that the present isolate is a new species of genus Begomovirus for which the name "Velvet bean severe mosaic virus" (VbSMV) is proposed. DNA-B has a maximum sequence identity of 49% with an isolate of Horsegram yellow mosaic virus (HgYMV; AM932426) reported from India. Infectious clones consisting of a 1.7 mer partial tandem repeat of DNA-A and a dimer of DNB-B were constructed and agro-inoculated to Macuna pruriens (L.) DC plants, which showed field observed symptoms 24 days post-infiltration (dpi). In phylogenetic analysis, DNA-A and DNA-B of the present isolate grouped with DNA-A of different begomoviruses reported from fabaceous crops. The study presents first ever molecular evidence of any disease in velvet bean and whole genome analysis of the causative virus which is a distinct bipartite species of Begomovirus.

  5. Seed morphology of Iberian species of the genus Aconitum L.

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    Molero, Julià

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available A biometric-morphological study of' the seeds of the taxons of the genus Aconitum L. occurring in the Iberian peninsula is given. The following features are treated: 1 arrangement of the seeds on the follicle, 2 definition of the parameters (general shape and ornamentation of the episperm, 3 biometry, and 4 description of the seeds of the Iberian taxa. Microcharacteristics related to the seed coat, shape and ornamentation or the insertion base (hilum and surrounding cells have been found most useful in differentiating the taxa; furthermore, they may provide more phylogenetic information than other features. The results given agree generally with those reported by other authors (Seitz, 1969; Cappeleti & Poldini, 1984 but some important discrepancies have been noted with reference to seminal morphology, particularly episperm ornamentation in the species A. anthora. A. napellus s.l., A. burnatii and A. vulparia subsp. ranunculifolium. Seminal polymorphism is frequently observed in different geographically isolated colonies or the same species or subspecies. both in the Iberian Peninsula and in Central and Southern Europe. We conclude that polymorphism is further evidence of the phenotypical flexibility of this genus, probably owing to genetic drift in the populations. This flexibility is particularly important in colonizing species or wide ecological valence (A . napellus, s. l.; A. vulparia s.l..

    [ca] Es presenta un estudi morfològica-biomètric de les granes dels tàxons del gènere Aconitum L. presents a la Península Ibèrica. Es tracten aspectes que fan referència a: 1 disposició de les granes al fol-licle. 2 definició de paràmetres (forma general i ornamentació de l'episperma, 3 biometria i 4 descripció de les granes dels representants ibèrics. Els microcaràcters relacionats fonamentalment amb el relleu epispèrmic, forma i ornamentació de la base d'inserció (hílum i

  6. A morphological gap for Iberian Zospeum filled: Zospeum percostulatum sp. n. (Gastropoda, Eupulmonata, Carychiidae a new species from Asturias (Spain

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    Alvaro Alonso

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Zospeum percostulatum sp. n. from Cueva de La Herrería (Llanes, Asturias is described. It is characterized by a relatively large shell (1.4–1.8 mm height, conical, with ovate aperture, continuous peristome and thickened parietal callus; shell costulate except two first whorls; without any sort of inner formations. It is the first clearly costulate Iberian species, filling a morphological gap in the Iberian clade, and the largest species from the Cantabrian region, being the first species described from Asturias.

  7. Morphology and molecular phylogeny of Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. (Cnidaria: Octocorallia), a new bubblegum coral species from a seamount in the tropical Western Pacific

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    Li, Yang; Zhan, Zifeng; Xu, Kuidong

    2017-07-01

    A new species of bubblegum coral, Paragorgia rubra sp. nov., discovered from a seamount at a water depth of 373 m near the Yap Trench is studied using morphological and molecular approaches. Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. is the fourth species of the genus found in the tropical Western Pacific. The new gorgonian is red-colored, uniplanar, and measures approximately 530 mm high and 440 mm wide, with autozooids distributed only on one side of the colony. Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. is most similar to P. kaupeka Sánchez, 2005, but differs distinctly in the polyp ovals with large and compound protuberances (vs. small and simple conical protuberances) and the medullar spindles possessing simple conical protuberances (vs. compound protuberances). Moreover, P. rubra sp. nov. differs from P. kaupeka in the smaller length/width ratio of surface radiates (1.53 vs. 1.75). The genetic distance of the mtMutS gene between P. rubra sp. nov. and P. kaupeka is 0.66%, while the intraspecific distances within Paragorgia Milne-Edwards & Haime, 1857 except the species P. regalis complex are no more than 0.5%, further supporting the establishment of the new species. Furthermore, the ITS2 secondary structure of P. rubra sp. nov. is also different from those of congeners. Phylogenetic analyses indicate Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. and P. kaupeka form a clade, which branched early within Paragorgia and diversified approximately 15 Mya.

  8. Experimental Crossing of Two Distinct Species of Leopard Geckos, Eublepharis angramainyu and E. macularius: Viability, Fertility and Phenotypic Variation of the Hybrids.

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    Jitka Jančúchová-Lásková

    Full Text Available Hybridization between distinct species of animals and subsequent genetic introgression plays a considerable role in the speciation process and the emergence of adaptive characters. Fitness of between-species hybrids usually sharply decreases with the divergence time of the concerned species and the divergence depth, which still allows for a successful crossing differs among principal clades of vertebrates. Recently, a review of hybridization events among distinct lizard species revealed that lizards belong to vertebrates with a highly developed ability to hybridize. In spite of this, reliable reports of experimental hybridizations between genetically fairly divergent species are only exceptional. Here, we show the results of the crossing of two distinct allopatric species of eyelid geckos possessing temperature sex determination and lacking sex chromosomes: Eublepharis macularius distributed in Pakistan/Afghanistan area and E. angramainyu, which inhabits Mesopotamia and adjacent areas. We demonstrated that F1 hybrids were viable and fertile, and the introgression of E. angramainyu genes into the E. macularius genome can be enabled via a backcrossing. The examined hybrids (except those of the F2 generation displayed neither malformations nor a reduced survival. Analyses of morphometric and coloration traits confirmed phenotypic distinctness of both parental species and their F1 hybrids. These findings contrast with long-term geographic and an evolutionary separation of the studied species. Thus, the occurrence of fertile hybrids of comparably divergent species, such as E. angramainyu and E. macularius, may also be expected in other taxa of squamates. This would violate the current estimates of species diversity in lizards.

  9. [Ontogenetic Mechanisms of Explosive Morphological Divergence in the Lake Tana (Ethiopia) Species Flock of Large African Barbs (Labeobarbus; Cyprinidae; Teleostei)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkila, F N; Lazebny, O E; Kapitanova, D V; Abdissa, Belay; Borisov, V B; Smirnov, S V

    2015-01-01

    Species flock of Lake Tana (Ethiopia) large African barbs (Labeobarbus; Cyprinidae; Teleostei) was studied as a model system for investigating ontogenetic mechanisms of the explosive morphological divergence often accompanying sympatric speciation in bony fishes. Comparative morphological analysis carried out with the use ofgeometric morphometric techniques revealed quantitative differences in the head shapes of species under study. Comparative analysis of skull development revealed significant interspecies differences in the temporal characteristics of craniogenesis in these species. These two lines of evidence suggest that heterochronies in craniogenesis underlie divergence in the head shapes of adult Tana barbs. This prediction was verified via experimental changes of temporal characteristics of craniogenesis in L. intermedius, a putative ancestor for the Lake Tana species flock. For this aim, timing and rate of skull development were changed by artificial manipulation of thyroid hormone levels. In sum, it was shown that it is heterochronies that underlie an explosive morphological divergence of the Lake Tana barbs species flock. Our findings together with those reported in the literature suggest variability in the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis to contribute to these heterochronies.

  10. Morphological identification of Candida species on glucose agar, rice extract agar and corn meal agar with and without Tween-80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K R; Solanki, A; Prakash, P

    1993-01-01

    A comparative study for the identification of 32 known strains of Candida species on the basis of morphology on glucose agar, rice extract agar and corn meal agar with and without Tween 80 revealed that when Tween 80 is incorporated in the media identification is possible for 96.8% of the species within 48 hours on rice extract agar and for 96.8% of the species within 48 hours on rice extract agar and for 90.6% of the species on glucose agar. The germ tubes and chlamydospores were also produced more on rice extract agar than on 0.1% glucose agar. Rice extract agar with Tween 80 can be used as single medium for morphologic identification of Candida species. The inoculated medium is first incubated at 37 degrees C for 3 hours and examined for germ tube formation and then incubated at 25 degrees C for 24 to 72 hours and examined for appearance of chlamydospores and mycelial morphology.

  11. Discovery of a novel bottlenose dolphin coronavirus reveals a distinct species of marine mammal coronavirus in Gammacoronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Patrick C Y; Lau, Susanna K P; Lam, Carol S F; Tsang, Alan K L; Hui, Suk-Wai; Fan, Rachel Y Y; Martelli, Paolo; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    While gammacoronaviruses mainly comprise infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) and its closely related bird coronaviruses (CoVs), the only mammalian gammacoronavirus was discovered from a white beluga whale (beluga whale CoV [BWCoV] SW1) in 2008. In this study, we discovered a novel gammacoronavirus from fecal samples from three Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus), which we named bottlenose dolphin CoV (BdCoV) HKU22. All the three BdCoV HKU22-positive samples were collected on the same date, suggesting a cluster of infection, with viral loads of 1 × 10(3) to 1 × 10(5) copies per ml. Clearance of virus was associated with a specific antibody response against the nucleocapsid of BdCoV HKU22. Complete genome sequencing and comparative genome analysis showed that BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1 have similar genome characteristics and structures. Their genome size is about 32,000 nucleotides, the largest among all CoVs, as a result of multiple unique open reading frames (NS5a, NS5b, NS5c, NS6, NS7, NS8, NS9, and NS10) between their membrane (M) and nucleocapsid (N) protein genes. Although comparative genome analysis showed that BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1 should belong to the same species, a major difference was observed in the proteins encoded by their spike (S) genes, which showed only 74.3 to 74.7% amino acid identities. The high ratios of the number of synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks) to the number of nonsynonymous substitutions per nonsynonymous site (Ka) in multiple regions of the genome, especially the S gene (Ka/Ks ratio, 2.5), indicated that BdCoV HKU22 may be evolving rapidly, supporting a recent transmission event to the bottlenose dolphins. We propose a distinct species, Cetacean coronavirus, in Gammacoronavirus, to include BdCoV HKU22 and BWCoV SW1, whereas IBV and its closely related bird CoVs represent another species, Avian coronavirus, in Gammacoronavirus.

  12. Cryptic or pseudocryptic: can morphological methods inform copepod taxonomy? An analysis of publications and a case study of the Eurytemora affinis species complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajus, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Natalia; Alekseev, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Interest in cryptic species has increased significantly with current progress in genetic methods. The large number of cryptic species suggests that the resolution of traditional morphological techniques may be insufficient for taxonomical research. However, some species now considered to be cryptic may, in fact, be designated pseudocryptic after close morphological examination. Thus the “cryptic or pseudocryptic” dilemma speaks to the resolution of morphological analysis and its utility for identifying species. We address this dilemma first by systematically reviewing data published from 1980 to 2013 on cryptic species of Copepoda and then by performing an in-depth morphological study of the former Eurytemora affinis complex of cryptic species. Analyzing the published data showed that, in 5 of 24 revisions eligible for systematic review, cryptic species assignment was based solely on the genetic variation of forms without detailed morphological analysis to confirm the assignment. Therefore, some newly described cryptic species might be designated pseudocryptic under more detailed morphological analysis as happened with Eurytemora affinis complex. Recent genetic analyses of the complex found high levels of heterogeneity without morphological differences; it is argued to be cryptic. However, next detailed morphological analyses allowed to describe a number of valid species. Our study, using deep statistical analyses usually not applied for new species describing, of this species complex confirmed considerable differences between former cryptic species. In particular, fluctuating asymmetry (FA), the random variation of left and right structures, was significantly different between forms and provided independent information about their status. Our work showed that multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis, can be powerful techniques for the morphological discrimination of cryptic taxons. Despite increasing cryptic species

  13. Molecular insights into species phylogeny, biogeography, and morphological stasis in the ancient spider genus Hypochilus (Araneae: Hypochilidae).

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    Hedin, M C

    2001-02-01

    The spider genus Hypochilus is currently restricted to cool, moist microhabitats in three widely separated montane regions of North America, providing an opportunity to study both deep (i.e., continental level) and shallow (within montane region) biogeographic history. Members of the genus also retain many plesiomorphic morphological characteristics, inviting the study of comparative rates of morphological evolution. In this paper, Hypochilus phylogeny and associated evolutionary problems are addressed using both new molecular (28S nDNA and CO1 mtDNA) and previously published (K. M. Catley, 1994, Am. Mus. Nov. 3088, 1-27) morphological data. Although the molecular data provide limited resolution of root placement within Hypochilus, most analyses are at least consistent with morphology-supported montane relationships of (Rockies (California, Appalachian)). The monophyly of Hypochilus species distributed in the California mountains is ambiguous, with several analyses indicating that this fauna may be paraphyletic with respect to a monophyletic Appalachian lineage. The montane regions differ in consistent ways in depths of both mitochondrial and nuclear phylogenetic divergence. Molecular clock analyses, in combination with arthropod-based mtDNA rate calibrations, suggest that the regional faunas are of different ages and that speciation in all faunas likely occurred prior to the Pleistocene. Limited intraspecific sampling reveals extraordinarily high levels of mtDNA cytochrome oxidase sequence divergence. These extreme divergences are most consistent with morphological stasis at the species level, despite preliminary evidence that Hypochilus taxa are characterized by fragmented population structures. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  14. A new species of Mollitrichosiphum Suenaga from Taiwan Island (Hemiptera, Aphididae), based on morphological characteristics and DNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Yun; Chen, Jing; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Mollitrichosiphum Suenaga, Mollitrichosiphum tumorisiphum Qiao & Jiang, sp. n., from Fagus longipetiolata in Taiwan island is described. Siphunculi of Mollitrichosiphum tumorisiphum in alatae are distinctly swollen on the distal part, unlike those of the other known species in the genus. Updated keys to apterous and alate viviparous females of all known Chinese species of Mollitrichosiphum are provided. The specimens studied are deposited in the National Zoological Museum of China, Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China and the Natural History Museum, London, United Kingdom. PMID:26478705

  15. Morphology meets molecules: a new genus and two new species of diphyllidean cestodes from the Yellowspotted skate, Leucoraja wallacei, from South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Lauren McKenna; Caira, Janine N

    2014-06-01

    Two morphologically disparate undescribed species of diphyllidean cestodes from the Yellowspotted skate, Leucoraja wallacei , from South Africa were included in a recent molecular phylogenetic study aimed at revising diphyllidean classification. From a molecular standpoint, these species were determined to be only distantly related to one another. One (originally referred to as Echinobothrium n. sp. 2) showed affinities with species of the batoid-parasitizing Echinobothrium sensu stricto and is described here as Echinobothrium marquesi n. sp. This species most closely resembles Echinobothrium joshuai, an affinity supported by the previous molecular study, but differs in the form of its "B" hooks and degree of overlap between bothria and cephalic peduncle. The other species (originally referred to as New genus n. sp. 1), although exhibiting the full complement of scolex armature, grouped among primarily shark-hosted genera, most of which lack or exhibit reduced scolex armatures. That unexpected result suggested that erection of a novel genus might be warranted, but morphological grounds supporting the action were not apparent at that time. The present study aimed to explore the morphology of this taxon in more detail. Light and scanning electron microscopy revealed this taxon to be exceptional in that its lateral hooklets, which are arranged in 2 clusters like those of Echinobothrium and Coronocestus, are unique in being arranged in anterior and posterior rows, rather than in a single row. Andocadoncum n. gen. is erected, with Andocadoncum meganae n. sp. as its type, to accommodate this taxon. A minor adjustment to the existing hook formula by presenting counts for the anterior hooklets (a) separately from the posterior hooklets (b) readily accommodates this new form. Leucoraja wallacei is distinctive among skates in hosting 2 different genera of diphyllideans. In the context of the previous molecular phylogenetic analyses, it appears that the presence of

  16. EFFECT OF CLEARINGS OF BIDENS PILOSA AND COMMELINA BENGHALENSIS SPECIES ON MORPHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CORN

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    João Paulo Lemos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the study of the interaction and competition between the crop harvested, and the weed is critical to diagnose the efficiency of the administration of them, especially the mechanical control. We carried out this work in order to evaluate the effects of interference of Bidens pilosa and Commelina benghalensis, mowed in different seasons on the morphological characteristics of corn plants conducted in a greenhouse. The experimental design was in entirely casualized blocks, with three repetitions, in a factorial scheme 2 x 3 + 1, on which the first factor consisted of two weeds and the second of three times of handling of these plants (clearing of the stage of three corn leaves, clearing of the stage of three and six corn leaves, and corn without weed control. The additional treatment (witness consisted in the cultivation of corn free from the interference of weeds. The accumulation of dry matter on plants in all parts of the corn plant (leaf, stalk, root, and floral organs, the interval between male and female florescence, the number of leaves (green, senescent and total, specific foliar area, foliar mass rate, stalk mass rate, root mass rate and aerial part/radicular system rate of corn plants in greenhouses were evaluated. Independently from the weed species studies, two clearings provided a bigger accumulation of dry matter on corn plants. Plant corn in competition with B. pilosa or C. benghalensis without the use of control presented decreases (MSF, ALT, and NFV RMF and increments (NFS, IAE and AEF undesirable for its productive potential.

  17. Adrenocortical and adrenomedullary homologs in eight species of adult and developing teleosts: morphology, histology, and immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi Milano, E; Basari, F; Chimenti, C

    1997-12-01

    Morphology, histology, and immunohistochemistry of the adrenocortical and adrenomedullary homologs (adrenal glands) of the following developing and adult teleosts were examined: Salmoniformes-Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), Salmo trutta fario (brown trout), Coregonus lavaretus (white fish); Cyprinodontiformes-Gambusia affinis (mosquito fish). Perciformes-Dicentrarchus labrax (sea bass), Sparus aurata (sea bream), Diplodus sargus (white bream), Oblada melanura (saddled bream). The anatomical relationships of the gland with the renal system and venous vessels were also noted. In adults of all species steroidogenic and catecholaminergic chromaffin cells were found in the head kidney, which is pronephric in origin and subsequently transformed into a hematopoietic lymphatic organ. In Perciformes, chromaffin cells are distributed around the anterior and posterior cardinal veins and ducts of Cuvier; in Salmoniformes, around the posterior cardinal veins and in the hematopoietic tissue; and in G. affinis, around the ducts of Cuvier and posterior cardinal veins, while a few are visible also around the sinus venosus. In Perciformes and Salmoniformes, numerous chromaffin cells are also present in the posterior kidney, derived from the opisthonephros, in contact with the caudal vein. Steroidogenic cells are always confined to the head kidney. During development chromaffin and steroidogenic cells appear early after hatching in the pronephric kidney, at the level of the ducts of Cuvier and of the cephalic part of the posterior cardinal veins. Later, chromaffin cells in Perciformes reach the anterior cardinal veins, and subsequently, in both Perciformes and Salmoniformes, they reach the developing posterior kidney. Their localization along the posterior kidney is still in progress about 4 months after hatching and is completed about a year after hatching. These findings support the concept that the structure of the adrenal gland in teleosts is intermediate between that of the

  18. Ultrastructural morphologic description of the wild rice species Oryza latifolia (Poaceae in Costa Rica

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    Ethel Sánchez

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The wild rice species Oryza latifolia is endemic to Tropical America, allotetraploid and has a CCDD genome type. It belongs to the officinalis group of the genus Oryza. This species is widely distributed through-out the lowlands of Costa Rica and it is found on different life zones, having great morphologic diversity. The purpose of this research is to perform a morphologic description of O. latifolia samples of three Costa Rican localities (Carara, Liberia and Cañas and to see if the phenotypic diversity of the species is reflected at the ultra-structure level. Structures such as the leaf blade, ligule, auricles and spikelet were analyzed. Leaf blade morphology of the specimens from the three localities is characterized by the presence of diamond-shaped stomata with papillae, zipper-like rows of silica cells; a variety of evenly distributed epicuticular wax papillae and bulky prickle trichomes. The central vein of the leaf blade from the Cañas populations is glabrous, while those from Carara and Liberia have abundant papillae. There are also differences among the borders of the leaf blade between these locations. Cañas and Liberia present alternating large and small prickle trichomes ca. 81 and 150 µm, while Carara exhibits even sized prickle trichomes of ca. 93 µm. Auricles from Cañas are rectangular and present long trichomes along the surface ca. 1.5 mm, while those of Liberia and Carara wrap the culm and exhibit trichomes only in the borders. The ligule from the plants of Carara has an acute distal tip, while that of Cañas and Liberia is blunt. The Liberia spikelet has large lignified spines while Cañas and Carara show flexible trichomes.La especie silvestre Oryza latifolia es endémica de América, tetraploide y de genoma CCDD. Pertenece a las especies del género Oryza del grupo officinalis. Presenta una amplia distribución en las tierras bajas de Costa Rica y se le encuentra en varias zonas de vida, mostrando una gran diversidad

  19. New approaches for morphological diagnosis of bovine Eimeria species: a study on a subtropical organic dairy farm in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florião, Mônica Mateus; Lopes, Bruno do Bomfim; Berto, Bruno Pereira; Lopes, Carlos Wilson Gomes

    2016-03-01

    Bovine eimeriosis or coccidiosis is an intestinal disease caused by Eimeria spp. which is related to gastrointestinal disorders and, in some cases, death. The current work aimed to identify and provide detailed morphological characteristic features of the different Eimeria spp. parasites of crossbred cows of a subtropical organic dairy farm in Brazil, offering tools for the diagnosis of bovine eimeriosis. Eimeria auburnensis, Eimeria bovis, Eimeria bukidnonensis, Eimeria canadensis, Eimeria cylindrica, Eimeria ildefonsoi, and Eimeria zuernii were identified. The application of line regressions and ANOVA provided a means for the identification of these species. Finally, the current work proposes a dichotomous key to assist in the morphologic identification of bovine Eimeria spp. oocysts.

  20. Recognition of hypoxyloid and xylarioid Entonaema species and allied Xylaria species from a comparison of holomorphic morphology, HPLC profiles, andribosomal DNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stadler, M.; Fournier, J.; Læssøe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    pallidum is thus regarded as a later synonym of E. mesentericum. Therefore, the latter name is transferred to Xylaria. A key to entonaemoid Xylariaceae is provided. Colour reactions (NH3, KOH) of the ectostroma were applied to a limited number of Xylaria spp., but metabolite profiles of cultures appear......The genus Entonaema comprises Xylariaceae with hollow, gelatinous stromata that accumulate liquid. Some of its species, including the type species, appear related to Daldinia from a polyphasic approach, comprising morphological studies, comparisons of ribosomal DNA sequences, and high performance...

  1. Character’s Selection of Leaf Morphology in Some Families (Tree Habit In Sumatra Region for Species Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saida Rasnovi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Identification is a basic activity and one of primary objective on systematic. For plant biodiversity studies, it was the first steps that researcher performed before studying any topics in the research area. Unfortunately, species identification is usually a time consuming activity. One of the main objectives of this study was to obtain a set of leaf morphology characters that were useful and efficient enough for species identification, especially on the tree habits group in order to reduce time consuming for the identification species.  All of the leaf morphology characters were selected by correlation coefficient and separation coefficient values. Besides of that, the stability, simplicity and validity of the characters were also part of concern. The characters that had high value of separation coefficient and low value of correlation coefficient would be added one by one as in their rank, until the value of the combination separation coefficient was equal to 1 (100%. The result of this study suggested that 30 from 92 characters of leaf morphology were recommended as a set of characters that useful and efficient enough for species identification.

  2. Different Reactive Oxygen Species Lead to Distinct Changes of Cellular Metal Ions in the Eukaryotic Model Organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Rogers

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Elemental uptake and export of the cell are tightly regulated thereby maintaining the ionomic homeostasis. This equilibrium can be disrupted upon exposure to exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, leading to reduction or elevation of the intracellular metal ions. In this study, the ionomic composition in the eukaryotic model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae was profiled using the inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES following the treatment with individual ROS, including hydrogen peroxide, cumen hydroperoxide, linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LAH, the superoxide-generating agent menadione, the thiol-oxidising agent diamide [diazine-dicarboxylic acid-bis(dimethylamide], dimedone and peroxynitrite. The findings demonstrated that different ROS resulted in distinct changes in cellular metal ions. Aluminium (Al3+ level rose up to 50-fold after the diamide treatment. Cellular potassium (K+ in LAH-treated cells was 26-fold less compared to the non-treated controls. The diamide-induced Al3+ accumulation was further validated by the enhanced Al3+ uptake along the time course and diamide doses. Pre-incubation of yeast with individual elements including iron, copper, manganese and magnesium failed to block diamide-induced Al3+ uptake, suggesting Al3+-specific transporters could be involved in Al3+ uptake. Furthermore, LAH-induced potassium depletion was validated by a rescue experiment in which addition of potassium increased yeast growth in LAH-containing media by 26% compared to LAH alone. Taken together, the data, for the first time, demonstrated the linkage between ionomic profiles and individual oxidative conditions.

  3. Induction of reactive oxygen species-stimulated distinctive autophagy by chelerythrine in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng-Hai; Cao, Wen-Xiang; Wang, Zhao-Yu; Lu, Jia-Hong; Liu, Bo; Chen, Xiuping; Lu, Jin-Jian

    2017-08-01

    Chelerythrine (CHE), a natural benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloid, shows anti-cancer effect through a number of mechanisms. Herein, the effect and mechanism of the CHE-induced autophagy, a type II programmed cell death, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells were studied for the first time. CHE induced cell viability decrease, colony formation inhibition, and apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner in NSCLC A549 and NCI-H1299 cells. In addition, CHE triggered the expression of phosphatidylethanolamine-modified microtubule-associated protein light-chain 3 (LC3-II). The CHE-induced expression of LC3-II was further increased in the combination treatment with chloroquine (CQ), an autophagy inhibitor, and large amounts of red-puncta were observed in the CHE-treated A549 cells with stable expression of mRFP-EGFP-LC3, indicating that CHE induces autophagy flux. Silence of beclin 1 reversed the CHE-induced expression of LC3-II. Inhibition of autophagy remarkably reversed the CHE-induced cell viability decrease and apoptosis in NCI-H1299 cells but not in A549 cells. Furthermore, CHE triggered reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in both cell lines. A decreased level of ROS through pretreatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine reversed the CHE-induced cell viability decrease, apoptosis, and autophagy. Taken together, CHE induced distinctive autophagy in A549 (accompanied autophagy) and NCI-H1299 (pro-death autophagy) cells and a decreased level of ROS reversed the effect of CHE in NSCLC cells in terms of cell viability, apoptosis, and autophagy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Morphological and ecological parallels between sublittoral and abyssal foraminiferal species in the NE Atlantic: a comparison of Stainforthia fusiformis and Stainforthia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooday, Andrew J.; Alve, Elisabeth

    Dead specimens of a minute fusiform rotaliid foraminifer are common in the 28-63 μm fraction of multiple corer samples from a 4850 m-deep site on the Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP). Their test morphology is remarkably similar to small specimens of Stainforthia fusiformis ( Williamson, 1858), a species which is well known from coastal settings (intertidal to outer shelf) around NW Europe and North America. A detailed comparison of the PAP form with typical individuals of S. fusiformis from Norwegian waters (55-203 m depth), however, reveals slight but consistent morphological differences. The PAP specimens are smaller (test length 40-140 μm) than those from Norway (test length 80-380 μm), the chambers tend to be rather less elongate, the density of pores in the test wall is much lower, and there are differences in apertural features. We therefore conclude that the diminutive abyssal form is a distinct species, here referred to as Stainforthia sp. This interpretation is consistent with increasing evidence for genetic differentiation in deep-sea organisms, particularly along bathymetric gradients. Stainforthia sp. was previously illustrated by Pawlowski as Fursenkoina sp. and appears to be widespread and abundant in the abyssal North Atlantic (>4000 m depth). Stainforthia fusiformis, on the other hand, is most abundant in continental shelf and coastal settings. It extends onto the continental slope in the North Atlantic but has not been reported reliably from depths greater than about 2500 m. We suggest that the striking morphological convergence between these two species reflects the adoption of similar ecological strategies in widely separated habitats. Both are enrichment opportunists, a life-style which may explain the rather broad bathymetric range of Stainforthia fusiformis. This is a dominant species in organically-enriched and sometimes extremely oxygen-depleted environments on the continental shelf, and is a rapid coloniser of formerly azoic habitats. Live

  5. 75 FR 77602 - Endangered and Threatened Species; 90-Day Finding on Petitions To Delist the Eastern Distinct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... the Eastern Distinct Population Segment of the Steller Sea Lion AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries... delist the eastern Distinct Population Segment (DPS) of the Steller Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) under...-implementing regulations issued by NMFS and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) also establish procedures...

  6. Are sympatrically speciating Midas cichlid fish special? Patterns of morphological and genetic variation in the closely related species Archocentrus centrarchus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruciano, Carmelo; Franchini, Paolo; Raffini, Francesca; Fan, Shaohua; Meyer, Axel

    2016-06-01

    Established empirical cases of sympatric speciation are scarce, although there is an increasing consensus that sympatric speciation might be more common than previously thought. Midas cichlid fish are one of the few substantiated cases of sympatric speciation, and they formed repeated radiations in crater lakes. In contrast, in the same environment, such radiation patterns have not been observed in other species of cichlids and other families of fish. We analyze morphological and genetic variation in a cichlid species (Archocentrus centrarchus) that co-inhabits several crater lakes with the Midas species complex. In particular, we analyze variation in body and pharyngeal jaw shape (two ecologically important traits in sympatrically divergent Midas cichlids) and relate that to genetic variation in mitochondrial control region and microsatellites. Using these four datasets, we analyze variation between and within two Nicaraguan lakes: a crater lake where multiple Midas cichlids have been described and a lake where the source population lives. We do not observe any within-lake clustering consistent across morphological traits and genetic markers, suggesting the absence of sympatric divergence in A. centrarchus. Genetic differentiation between lakes was low and morphological divergence absent. Such morphological similarity between lakes is found not only in average morphology, but also when analyzing covariation between traits and degree of morphospace occupation. A combined analysis of the mitochondrial control region in A. centrarchus and Midas cichlids suggests that a difference between lineages in the timing of crater lake colonization cannot be invoked as an explanation for the difference in their levels of diversification. In light of our results, A. centrarchus represents the ideal candidate to study the genomic differences between these two lineages that might explain why some lineages are more likely to speciate and diverge in sympatry than others.

  7. Comparative morphology and identification key for females of nine Sarcophagidae species (Diptera with forensic importance in Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Pinto e Vairo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe identification of female flesh flies was always considered a difficult task since morphological descriptions and keys for females are rare. Even in a forensic entomology framework, where females play a major role, female flesh flies are usually not identified. In order to fill this gap in Southern Brazil fauna we provide detailed descriptions and key for the female of nine species included in four genera: Microcerella halli (Engel, Oxysarcodexia paulistanensis (Mattos, Oxysarcodexia riograndensis (Lopes, Peckia (Euboettcheria australis (Townsend, Peckia(Euboettcheria florencioi (Prado and Fonseca, Peckia (Pattonella intermutans (Walker, Peckia(Pattonella resona (Lopes, Peckia (Sarcodexia lambens (Wiedemann, and Sarcophaga(Bercaea africa (Wiedemann. These species are distinguished mainly by genital characters as tergite 6 divided or undivided, presence of tergite 8, spermatheca morphology and vaginal plate shape.

  8. Changes in hyphal morphology and activity of phenoloxidases during interactions between selected ectomycorrhizal fungi and two species of Trichoderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucha, Joanna

    2011-06-01

    Patterns of phenoloxidase activity can be used to characterize fungi of different life styles, and changes in phenoloxidase synthesis were suspected to play a role in the interaction between ectomycorrhizal and two species of Trichoderma. Confrontation between the ectomycorrhizal fungi Amanita muscaria and Laccaria laccata with species of Trichoderma resulted in induction of laccase synthesis, and the laccase enzyme was bound to mycelia of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Tyrosinase release was noted only during interaction of L. laccata strains with Trichoderma harzianum and T. virens. Ectomycorrhizal fungi, especially strains of Suillus bovinus and S. luteus, inhibited growth of Trichoderma species and caused morphological changes in its colonies in the zone of interaction. In contrast, hyphal changes occurred less often in the ectomycorrhizal fungi tested. Species of Suillus are suggested to present a different mechanism in their interaction with other fungi than A. muscaria and L. laccata.

  9. the functional morphology of the fore-gut of three species of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and related forms, however, is considerable, but no attempt has been made to review it. ... the crab C. punctatus is a general scavenger which eats large pieces of food, ... A morphological and functional description of a generalised decapod ...

  10. Morphological and molecular identification of Phytophthora species isolated from the rhizosphere of declining oak trees in Krotoszyn Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkaczyk Miłosz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The following paper presents the results on the determination of the diversity of species from the Phytophthora genus occurring in the declining oak stands in Krotoszyn Plateau in Poland. From the 50s of the last century, significant deterioration of oak health was observed in these stands, and Phytophthora species were suggested as one of the factors of the decline. In order to determine the presence of pathogenic organisms from the Phytophthora genus in these stands, 180 rhizosphere soil samples from three forest districts throughout the Krotoszyn Plateau were collected and subjected to the isolation method. Phytophthora species were consistently isolated from all the sampled stands, and 194 isolates from 111 positive samples were obtained. However, 150 (77% and 44 (23% isolates originated from the samples taken under the symptomatic and asymptomatic trees, respectively. All the obtained isolates were morphologically classified using the light and scanning electron microscopy and divided into morphological groups. Genomic DNA was isolated from selected isolates representing each group, ITS regions were amplified and sequence analyses were performed. In total, four different Phytophthora species were detected, including P. cactorum, P. plurivora, P. quercina and P. europaea. The most often isolated species were P. cactorum and P. plurivora. This is the first report of P. europaea in oak stands in Poland.

  11. X-ray computed microtomography as a tool for the comparative morphological characterization of Proceratophrys bigibbosa species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmann, Francielle da Silva; Evseev, Ivan; Paz, Manoela Guimaraes Ferreira da; Lingnau, Rodrigo; Ievsieieva, Ievgeniia; Assis, Joaquim T. de; Alves, Haimon D.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Proceratophrys bigibbosa species group is characterized by the presence of postocular swellings and absence of hornlike palpebral appendages. A new member of this group was described recently from southern Brazil: Proceratophrys brauni. Its body size is between the smaller Proceratophrys avelinoi and the larger Proceratophrys bigibbosa species, both living in the same region. As the external appearance of these three members of the group is very similar to each other, it is interesting to discover a specific morphological categorization through internal characteristics, such as the cranium's proportions. In this paper, we report the preliminary results for comparative cranium's morphological characterization of Proceratophrys bigibbosa species from Brazil using the X-ray computed Microtomography technique through Skyscan 1174 system. Five samples of each three species, i.e., fifteen samples in total, were scanned. The tomographic slice images were reconstructed by SkyScan software. Then, these 2D images were used to create the cranium's models by 3D DOCTOR software. The main result is that some visible differences in the cranium's proportions of the species were observed. (author)

  12. Molecular and morphological identification of  pistachio armored scale insects (Hemiptera: Diaspididae), with description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseininaveh, Fatemeh; Nozari, Jamasb; Kaydan, Mehmet Bora; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2016-12-01

    Members of the family Diaspididae (Hemiptera: Coccomorpha) can be devastating pests that suck parenchyma cell contents from crops and cause severe damage to pistachio trees (Pistacia vera L.). The current research collected and characterized diaspidid species from pistachio orchards in Kerman province, Iran, according to their morphological and molecular features. Lepidosaphes pistaciae Archangelskaya, Suturaspis davatchi (Balachowsky & Kaussari) and Melanaspis inopinata (Leonardi) are redescribed and a new species, Melanaspis pistaciae Hosseininaveh & Kaydan sp. n., is described. Phylogenetic trees based on molecular analysis of COI and 28S rDNA fragments placed all the species in separated clades and confirmed M. pistaciae as a new taxon which is concluded by morphological differences. Molecular analysis suggests non-monophyly of the populations of each species. Melanaspis pistaciae sp. n. has spread to most cultivated pistachio areas in Iran and has probably been misidentified as M. inopinata in the past. Further investigation of the biology of this species may lead to development of more effective approaches for controlling this pest.

  13. Morphology of the larval shell of three oyster species of the genus Crassostrea Sacco, 1897 (Bivalvia: Ostreidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christo, S W; Absher, T M; Boehs, G

    2010-08-01

    In this study we describe the morphology of the larval shell of three oyster species of Crassostrea genus. Two species, C. rhizophorae and C. brasiliana, are native to the Brazilian coast, and C. gigas is an introduced species. Samples of laboratory reared larvae, obtained through artificial fertilisation, were collected at intervals during the cultivation process for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Prodissoconch morphology was observed in relation to the presence, position, form and number of teeth in the three larval stages: D-shaped larva, umbo larva and pediveliger. Characteristic of D-shaped larvae of C. rhizophorae was the total absence of teeth in the provinculum area while C. brasiliana and C. gigas had two anterior and two posterior teeth in each valve. In the umbo larval phase, the three species had the same number of teeth in each valve: two posterior and two anterior teeth in the right valve and three posterior and three anterior in the left valve. In the pediveliger stage the three species could be differentiated by the number of anterior teeth of the right valve: C. rhizophorae had two teeth, C. brasiliana one tooth and C. gigas three teeth.

  14. Comparative morphological studies of the neurocranium and the gills of two species of blennies living in different habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrito, Venera; Mauceri, Angela; Minniti, Franco; Isaja, Manuela; Maisano, Maria; Tigano, Concetta

    2007-01-01

    Two species of Blennies--Salaria fluviatilis, which lives in freshwaters, and Salaria pavo, which lives in the sea--are considered to be phylogenetically related. Due to the interesting feature of one species having a freshwater and one having a marine habitat, and because of the paucity of studies on the intraspecific and interspecific variability of skeletal characters, in the study reported here, several populations of S. fluviatilis and S. pavo were compared. The intraspecific and interspecific morphology of the cranial characteristics, as well as the branchial epithelium, was studied in relationship to the adaptation of the two species to different environments. Osteological results confirmed the intraspecific variability already found in S. fluviatilis and showed a notable interspecific differentiation between S. pavo and S. fluviatilis. Histological studies indicate that the two species have morphological differences, which are the result of the diversity of the environments in which they live. The results from the two approaches, taken together, are in agreement with the hypothesis of the origin of these two species being from a common marine ancestor.

  15. Morphology of the larval shell of three oyster species of the genus Crassostrea Sacco, 1897 (Bivalvia: Ostreidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SW. Christo

    Full Text Available In this study we describe the morphology of the larval shell of three oyster species of Crassostrea genus. Two species, C. rhizophorae and C. brasiliana, are native to the Brazilian coast, and C. gigas is an introduced species. Samples of laboratory reared larvae, obtained through artificial fertilisation, were collected at intervals during the cultivation process for analysis using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Prodissoconch morphology was observed in relation to the presence, position, form and number of teeth in the three larval stages: D-shaped larva, umbo larva and pediveliger. Characteristic of D-shaped larvae of C. rhizophorae was the total absence of teeth in the provinculum area while C. brasiliana and C. gigas had two anterior and two posterior teeth in each valve. In the umbo larval phase, the three species had the same number of teeth in each valve: two posterior and two anterior teeth in the right valve and three posterior and three anterior in the left valve. In the pediveliger stage the three species could be differentiated by the number of anterior teeth of the right valve: C. rhizophorae had two teeth, C. brasiliana one tooth and C. gigas three teeth.

  16. X-ray computed microtomography as a tool for the comparative morphological characterization of Proceratophrys bigibbosa species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmann, Francielle da Silva; Evseev, Ivan; Paz, Manoela Guimaraes Ferreira da; Lingnau, Rodrigo, E-mail: evseev@utfpr.edu.b, E-mail: rodrigolingnau@utfpr.edu.b [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Francisco Beltrao, PR (Brazil); Ievsieieva, Ievgeniia; Assis, Joaquim T. de, E-mail: ievsieieva@iprj.uerj.b, E-mail: joaquim@iprj.uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (IPRJ/UERJ), Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico; Alves, Haimon D.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The Proceratophrys bigibbosa species group is characterized by the presence of postocular swellings and absence of hornlike palpebral appendages. A new member of this group was described recently from southern Brazil: Proceratophrys brauni. Its body size is between the smaller Proceratophrys avelinoi and the larger Proceratophrys bigibbosa species, both living in the same region. As the external appearance of these three members of the group is very similar to each other, it is interesting to discover a specific morphological categorization through internal characteristics, such as the cranium's proportions. In this paper, we report the preliminary results for comparative cranium's morphological characterization of Proceratophrys bigibbosa species from Brazil using the X-ray computed Microtomography technique through Skyscan 1174 system. Five samples of each three species, i.e., fifteen samples in total, were scanned. The tomographic slice images were reconstructed by SkyScan software. Then, these 2D images were used to create the cranium's models by 3D DOCTOR software. The main result is that some visible differences in the cranium's proportions of the species were observed. (author)

  17. Morphological and molecular characterization of three Agaricus species from tropical Asia (Pakistan, Thailand) reveals a new group in section Xanthodermatei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongklang, Naritsada; Nawaz, Rizwana; Khalid, Abdul N; Chen, Jie; Hyde, Kevin D; Zhao, Ruilin; Parra, Luis A; Hanif, Muhammad; Moinard, Magalie; Callac, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The genus Agaricus is known for its medicinal and edible species but also includes toxic species that belong to section Xanthodermatei. Previous phylogenetic reconstruction for temperate species, based on sequence data of nuc rRNA gene (rDNA) internal transcribed spacers (ITS), has revealed two major groups in this section and a possible third lineage for A. pseudopratensis. Recent research in Agaricus has shown that classifications need improving with the addition of tropical taxa. In this study we add new tropical collections to section Xanthodermatei. We describe three species from collections made in Pakistan and Thailand and include them in a larger analysis using all available ITS data for section Xanthodermatei. Agaricus bisporiticus sp. nov. and A. fuscopunctatus sp. nov. are introduced based on molecular and morphological studies, whereas A. microvolvatulus is recorded for the first time in Asia. Specimens from Thailand however have a much larger pileus than the type specimens from Congo. In maximum likelihood (ML) and maximum parsimony (MP) phylogenetic analyses these three species cluster with A. pseudopratensis from the Mediterranean area and A. murinocephalus recently described from Thailand. In Agaricus section Xanthodermatei this new group is monophyletic and receives low bootstrap support whereas the two previously known groups receive strong support. Within the new group, the most closely related species share some traits, but we did not find any unifying morphological character; however the five species of the group share a unique short nucleotide sequence. Two putatively toxic species of section Xanthodermatei are now recognized in Pakistan and six in Thailand. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  18. Enhanced magnetization in morphologically and magnetically distinct BiFeO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Shreeja; Reshi, Hilal Ahmad; Bagwaiya, Toshi; Banerjee, Alok; Shelke, Vilas

    2017-09-01

    Nanomaterials exhibit properties different from those of their bulk counterparts. The modified magnetic characteristics of manganite nanoparticles were exploited to improve magnetization in multiferroic BiFeO3 compound. We studied the composite of two morphologically and magnetically distinct compounds BiFeO3 (BFO) and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO). The microcrystalline BiFeO3 sample was prepared by solid state reaction method and the nanocrystalline La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 by sol-gel method. Composites with nominal compositions (1-x)BiFeO3-(x)La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 were prepared by modified solid state reaction method. The phase purity and crystal structures were checked by using X-ray diffraction. The formation of composites with phase separated BFO and LSMO was confirmed using Raman and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy studies. The composite samples showed relatively high value of magnetization with finite coercivity. This improvement in magnetic behavior is ascribed to the coexistence of multiple magnetic orderings in composite samples. We scrutinized the possibility of oxygen vacancy or Fe mixed valency formation in the samples using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique.

  19. Aedeagus morphology as a discriminant marker in two closely related Cactophilic species of Drosophila (Diptera; Drosophilidae in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Fernando F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila serido and D. antonietae are sibling species belonging to the Drosophila buzzatii cluster. Morphologically, they can only be discriminated by quantitative traits. In this paper we analyze the length and equalized average curvature of four regions of the aedeagus of D. antonietae and D. serido. Specimens of D. serido and D. antonietae were classified correctly 96.74% of the time. Based only on the variable that most contributed to the discrimination of the groups (equalized average curvature of the arch IV of the aedeagus, we observed significant intraspecific morphological divergence in D. serido in relation to the D. antonietae, in agreement with other markers. The high morphological divergence in equalized average curvature of the arch IV of the aedeagus shows that this region evolved faster than others, since the divergence of the two species. The importance of the present study to the understanding of the genetic basis that controls the formation of the aedeagus, in the species of the Drosophila buzzatii cluster, is discussed.

  20. Two distinct variants of simian foamy virus in naturally infected mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx and cross-species transmission to humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Preston

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Each of the pathogenic human retroviruses (HIV-1/2 and HTLV-1 has a nonhuman primate counterpart, and the presence of these retroviruses in humans results from interspecies transmission. The passage of another simian retrovirus, simian foamy virus (SFV, from apes or monkeys to humans has been reported. Mandrillus sphinx, a monkey species living in central Africa, is naturally infected with SFV. We evaluated the natural history of the virus in a free-ranging colony of mandrills and investigated possible transmission of mandrill SFV to humans. Results We studied 84 semi-free-ranging captive mandrills at the Primate Centre of the Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville (Gabon and 15 wild mandrills caught in various areas of the country. The presence of SFV was also evaluated in 20 people who worked closely with mandrills and other nonhuman primates. SFV infection was determined by specific serological (Western blot and molecular (nested PCR of the integrase region in the polymerase gene assays. Seropositivity for SFV was found in 70/84 (83% captive and 9/15 (60% wild-caught mandrills and in 2/20 (10% humans. The 425-bp SFV integrase fragment was detected in peripheral blood DNA from 53 captive and 8 wild-caught mandrills and in two personnel. Sequence and phylogenetic studies demonstrated the presence of two distinct strains of mandrill SFV, one clade including SFVs from mandrills living in the northern part of Gabon and the second consisting of SFV from animals living in the south. One man who had been bitten 10 years earlier by a mandrill and another bitten 22 years earlier by a macaque were found to be SFV infected, both at the Primate Centre. The second man had a sequence close to SFVmac sequences. Comparative sequence analysis of the virus from the first man and from the mandrill showed nearly identical sequences, indicating genetic stability of SFV over time. Conclusion Our results show a high

  1. Two distinct variants of simian foamy virus in naturally infected mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) and cross-species transmission to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Betsem, Edouard; Caron, Mélanie; Makuwa, Maria; Sallé, Bettina; Renault, Noemie; Saib, Ali; Telfer, Paul; Marx, Preston; Gessain, Antoine; Kazanji, Mirdad

    2010-12-14

    Each of the pathogenic human retroviruses (HIV-1/2 and HTLV-1) has a nonhuman primate counterpart, and the presence of these retroviruses in humans results from interspecies transmission. The passage of another simian retrovirus, simian foamy virus (SFV), from apes or monkeys to humans has been reported. Mandrillus sphinx, a monkey species living in central Africa, is naturally infected with SFV. We evaluated the natural history of the virus in a free-ranging colony of mandrills and investigated possible transmission of mandrill SFV to humans. We studied 84 semi-free-ranging captive mandrills at the Primate Centre of the Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville (Gabon) and 15 wild mandrills caught in various areas of the country. The presence of SFV was also evaluated in 20 people who worked closely with mandrills and other nonhuman primates. SFV infection was determined by specific serological (Western blot) and molecular (nested PCR of the integrase region in the polymerase gene) assays. Seropositivity for SFV was found in 70/84 (83%) captive and 9/15 (60%) wild-caught mandrills and in 2/20 (10%) humans. The 425-bp SFV integrase fragment was detected in peripheral blood DNA from 53 captive and 8 wild-caught mandrills and in two personnel. Sequence and phylogenetic studies demonstrated the presence of two distinct strains of mandrill SFV, one clade including SFVs from mandrills living in the northern part of Gabon and the second consisting of SFV from animals living in the south. One man who had been bitten 10 years earlier by a mandrill and another bitten 22 years earlier by a macaque were found to be SFV infected, both at the Primate Centre. The second man had a sequence close to SFVmac sequences. Comparative sequence analysis of the virus from the first man and from the mandrill showed nearly identical sequences, indicating genetic stability of SFV over time. Our results show a high prevalence of SFV infection in a semi-free-ranging colony

  2. Spiders (Araneae) of Churchill, Manitoba: DNA barcodes and morphology reveal high species diversity and new Canadian records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoev, Gergin A; Nikolova, Nadya I; Sobel, Crystal N; Hebert, Paul D N; Adamowicz, Sarah J

    2013-11-26

    Arctic ecosystems, especially those near transition zones, are expected to be strongly impacted by climate change. Because it is positioned on the ecotone between tundra and boreal forest, the Churchill area is a strategic locality for the analysis of shifts in faunal composition. This fact has motivated the effort to develop a comprehensive biodiversity inventory for the Churchill region by coupling DNA barcoding with morphological studies. The present study represents one element of this effort; it focuses on analysis of the spider fauna at Churchill. 198 species were detected among 2704 spiders analyzed, tripling the count for the Churchill region. Estimates of overall diversity suggest that another 10-20 species await detection. Most species displayed little intraspecific sequence variation (maximum Churchill, but the other species represents a range extension from the USA. The first description of the female of S. monticola was also presented. As well, one probable new species of Alopecosa (Lycosidae) was recognized. This study provides the first comprehensive DNA barcode reference library for the spider fauna of any region. Few cryptic species of spiders were detected, a result contrasting with the prevalence of undescribed species in several other terrestrial arthropod groups at Churchill. Because most (97.5%) sequence clusters at COI corresponded with a named taxon, DNA barcoding reliably identifies spiders in the Churchill fauna. The capacity of DNA barcoding to enable the identification of otherwise taxonomically ambiguous specimens (juveniles, females) also represents a major advance for future monitoring efforts on this group.

  3. Patterns of leaf morphology and leaf N content in relation to winter temperatures in three evergreen tree species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Sonia; Gallardo-López, Victoria; González-Zurdo, Patricia; Escudero, Alfonso

    2012-09-01

    The competitive equilibrium between deciduous and perennial species in a new scenario of climate change may depend closely on the productivity of leaves along the different seasons of the year and on the morphological and chemical adaptations required for leaf survival during the different seasons. The aim of the present work was to analyze such adaptations in the leaves of three evergreen species ( Quercus ilex, Q. suber and Pinus pinaster) and their responses to between-site differences in the intensity of winter harshness. We explore the hypothesis that the harshness of winter would contribute to enhancing the leaf traits that allow them to persist under conditions of stress. The results revealed that as winter harshness increases a decrease in leaf size occurs in all three species, together with an increase in the content of nitrogen per unit leaf area and a greater leaf mass per unit area, which seems to be achieved only through increased thickness, with no associated changes in density. P. pinaster was the species with the most intense response to the harshening of winter conditions, undergoing a more marked thickening of its needles than the two Quercus species. Our findings thus suggest that lower winter temperatures involve an increase in the cost of leaf production of evergreen species, which must be taken into account in the estimation of the final cost and benefit balance of evergreens. Such cost increases would be more pronounced for those species that, like P. pinaster, show a stronger response to the winter cold.

  4. Identification of morphological and molecular Aspergillus species isolated from patients based on beta-tubulin gene sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahnaz Kheirkhah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Aspergillus species are opportunistic pathogens among immunocompromised patients. In terms of pathogenesis and mycotoxin production, they are in great value. The aim of the this study was to evaluate of beta-tubulin gene for identification of clinical Aspergillus species by PCR-sequencing method compared to morphological features of clinical isolates (such as conidial shape in direct microscopic examination, colony shape in culture, and physiological tests. Materials and Methods: In this study, 465 patients referred to the Shefa laboratory of Isfahan were evaluated. Morphological and molecular identification of clinical samples were performed using culture on sabouraud agar, malt extract agar, czapekdox agar, direct microscopy, and PCR-sequencing of beta tubulin gene, respectively. Sequences were analyzed in comparison with gene bank data. Results: Thirty nine out of 465 suspected cases (8.4% had aspergillosis. The most prevalent species were Aspergillus flavus (56.4%, A. oryzae (20.5%, and A. fumigatus (10.2%, respectively. Fifty nine percent of patients were females and 49% were males. Conclusion: In comparison with phenotypic tests, sequencing of beta-tubulin gene for identification of Aspergillus species is at great value. Replacement of molecular techniques with conventional tests is recommended for precise identification of microorganism for better management of infection.

  5. Vegetation development following stream/river restoration: more natural fluvial dynamics and morphology, return of aquatic and riparian plant species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soons, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    After centuries of human interventions in stream/river dynamics and morphology aimed at optimizing landscapes for agricultural and industrial purposes, new insights have inspired water managers to try and combine stream and river ecosystem functions with the conservation of biodiversity. Around the world, aquatic and riparian species have declined strongly due to pollution, destruction and fragmentation of their habitat, so that biodiversity conservation initiatives primarily focus on habitat restoration. In the past decades many stream and river restoration projects have been carried out and often hydrological dynamics and morphology have been restored to a more natural state. However, the successful restoration of aquatic and riparian habitats very often failed to result in restoration of their biodiversity. This lack of success from a biodiversity conservation perspective is usually attributed to 'dispersal limitation', meaning that the habitat may be restored, but species fail to reach the site and re-colonize it. Especially re-colonization by aquatic and riparian plant species is important, as such species function as ecosystem engineers: their presence alters fluvial dynamics and morphology, generates additional habitat heterogeneity and provides habitat and food for animal species. Following minor disturbances, re-colonization is often possible through locally remaining populations, by seeds in the seed bank or by surviving plant fragments. However, following major disturbances, colonization and establishment from other source populations are necessary. This usually occurs through dispersal of seeds (and in more aquatic species also by dispersal of vegetative fragments) into the restored wetland area. As dispersal occurs predominantly over short distances and source populations of aquatic and riparian species may be lacking in the surroundings, dispersal may be a limiting factor in the development of aquatic and riparian vegetation at a restored site. But

  6. Surface morphology of some articulated corallines from India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kerkar, V.; Iyer, S.D.

    Surface structures of seven species belonging to four genera of subfamily Corallinoidae (Fly: Corallinaceae) were microscopically investigated Two distinct surface morphologies were revealed namely a 'Corallina type' (c-type) with round to irregular...

  7. Diversity of morphology and oil content of rosa damascena land races and related rosa species from Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, A.; Khan, M.; Riaz, A.; Ali, A.

    2011-01-01

    For the perfume industry, Rosa damascena is the most important species used in the production of rose attar which is made by distilling volatile oils from the petals of flowers. It is also used widely in the production of rose water, a flavoring agent. Other species like R. gallica L., R. centifolia L., R. bourboniana and Gruss an Teplitz also exhibit the fragrance that is sought by perfumeries in the world. Eight land races of Damask rose along with related Rosa species were collected from Punjab province and evaluated to determine the diversity on the basis of morphology and oil yield. The investigated characters were flower weight, flower diameter, peduncle length, number of petals, number of stamens and oil content. Pearson's coefficients showed a negative association of flower weight with peduncle length (r = -0.3348) and a positive and strong correlation was observed for flower weight with the all other morphological characters. Flower diameter showed a positive but weak correlation with peduncle length, number of petals and number of stamens with the values of r = 0.0733, r 0.5302 and r = 0.1241, respectively. Oil content (%) was measured from the Rosa species by using Soxhlet extractor with N-hexane. R. damascena land race from Choha Syedan Shah produced the highest oil content of absolute oil (0.147%) on petal basis while the lowest value for absolute oil content was 0.36% from R. indica. Dendrogram created by cluster analysis for morphological characters, indicated no relationship of genetic variation with their collection sites. This study has revealed that the selection of land races for their specific characteristic could be possible for future breeding program. It also provides practical information for the future collection of Damask rose germplasm and breeding program. (author)

  8. Effect of Wind on the Relation of Leaf N, P Stoichiometry with Leaf Morphology in Quercus Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Leaf nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P stoichiometry correlates closely to leaf morphology, which is strongly impacted by wind at multiple scales. However, it is not clear how leaf N, P stoichiometry and its relationship to leaf morphology changes with wind load. We determined the leaf N and P concentrations and leaf morphology—including specific leaf area (SLA and leaf dissection index (LDI—for eight Quercus species under a simulated wind load for seven months. Leaf N and P concentrations increased significantly under these conditions for Quercus acutissima, Quercus rubra, Quercus texana, and Quercus palustris—which have elliptic leaves—due to their higher N, P requirements and a resultant leaf biomass decrease, which is a tolerance strategy for Quercus species under a wind load. Leaf N:P was relatively stable under wind for all species, which supports stoichiometric homeostasis. Leaf N concentrations showed a positive correlation to SLA, leaf N and P concentrations showed positive correlations to LDI under each wind treatment, and the slope of correlations was not affected by wind, which indicates synchronous variations between leaf stoichiometry and leaf morphology under wind. However, the intercept of correlations was affected by wind, and leaf N and P use efficiency decreased under the wind load, which suggests that the Quercus species changes from “fast investment-return” in the control to “slow investment-return” under windy conditions. These results will be valuable to understanding functional strategies for plants under varying wind loads, especially synchronous variations in leaf traits along a wind gradient.

  9. Phylogenetic assessment of global Suillus ITS sequences supports morphologically defined species and reveals synonymous and undescribed taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nhu H; Vellinga, Else C; Bruns, Thomas D; Kennedy, Peter G

    The genus Suillus represents one of the most recognizable groups of mushrooms in conifer forests throughout the Northern Hemisphere. Although for decades the genus has been relatively well defined morphologically, previous molecular phylogenetic assessments have provided important yet preliminary insights into its evolutionary history. We present the first large-scale phylogenetic study of the boundaries of each species in the genus Suillus based on the most current internal transcribed spacer (ITS) barcode sequences available inPUBLIC databases, as well as sequencing of 224 vouchered specimens and cultures, 15 of which were type specimens from North America. We found that species boundaries delimited by morphological data are broadly congruent with those based on ITS sequences. However, some species appear to have been described several times under different names, several species groups cannot be resolved by ITS sequences alone, and undescribed taxa are apparent, especially in Asia. Therefore, we elevated S. tomentosus var. discolor to S. discolor; proposed synonymies of S. neoalbidipes with S. glandulosipes, S. borealis with S. brunnescens, Boletus serotinus and B. solidipes with Suillus elbensis, S. lactifluus with S. granulatus, S. himalayensis with S. americanus; and proposed usage of the names S. clintonianus in the place of the North American S. grevillei, S. weaverae for North American S. granulatus, S. ampliporus in the place of the North American S. cavipes, and S. elbensis in place of the North American S. viscidus. We showed that the majority of Suillus species have strong affinities for particular host genera. Although deep node support was low, geographic differentiation was apparent, with species from North America, Eurasia, and Asia often forming their own clades. Collectively, this comprehensive genus-level phylogenetic integration of currently available Suillus ITS molecular data and metadata will aid future taxonomic and ecological work on an

  10. Species delimitation and evolution in morphologically and chemically diverse communities of the lichen-forming genus Xanthoparmelia (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) in western North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavitt, Steven D; Johnson, Leigh; St Clair, Larry L

    2011-02-01

    Accurate species delimitation is important for understanding the diversification of biota and has critical implications for ecological and conservation studies. However, a growing body of evidence indicates that morphology-based species circumspection in lichenized fungi misrepresents fungal diversity. The foliose lichen genus Xanthoparmelia includes over 800 species displaying a complex array of morphological and secondary metabolite diversity. We used a multifaceted approach, applying phylogenetic, population genetic, and genealogical analyses to delimit species in a single well-supported monophyletic clade containing 10 morphologically and chemically diverse Xanthoparmelia species in western North America. Sequence data from four ribosomal and two low-copy, protein-coding markers, along with chemical and morphological data were used to assess species diversity. We found that traditionally circumscribed species are not supported by molecular data. Rather, all sampled taxa were better represented by three polymorphic population clusters. Our results suggest that secondary metabolite variation may have limited utility in diagnosing lineages within this group, while identified populations clusters did not reflect major phylogeographic or ecological patterns. In contrast to studies revealing previously undiscovered fungal lineages masked within lichen species circumscribed by traditional morphological and chemical concepts, the present study suggests that species diversity has been overestimated in the species-rich genus Xanthoparmelia.

  11. Screening Study of Leaf Terpene Concentration of 75 Borneo Rainforest Plant Species: Relationships with Leaf Elemental Concentrations and Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Sardans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpenes confer advantage in plant protection against abiotic stresses such as heat and drought and biotic stresses such as herbivore and pathogen attack. We conducted a screening of leaf mono- and sesquiterpene concentrations in 75 common woody plant species in the rainforest of Danum Valley (Borneo. Terpene compounds were found in 73 out of the 75 analysed species. Similar or lower proportions have been reported in other parts of the world. To our knowledge, this study reports for the first time the foliar concentration of mono- and/or sesquiterpene for 71 species and 39 genera not previously analyzed. Altogether 80 terpene compounds were determined across the species, and out of these only linalool oxide and (E- g -bisabolene had phylogenetic signal. A significant negative relationship between leaf monoterpene concentration and leaf length was observed, but leaf mono- and sesquitepene concentration were not related to any other leaf morphological trait nor to leaf elemental composition. Functions such as temperature protection, radiation protection or signaling and communication could underlie the high frequency of terpene-containing species of this tropical ecosystem which has multiple and very diverse interactions among multiple species.

  12. Mitogenomes from type specimens, a genotyping tool for morphologically simple species: ten genomes of agar-producing red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Ga Hun; Hughey, Jeffery R; Miller, Kathy Ann; Boo, Sung Min

    2016-10-14

    DNA sequences from type specimens provide independent, objective characters that enhance the value of type specimens and permit the correct application of species names to phylogenetic clades and specimens. We provide mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from archival type specimens of ten species in agar-producing red algal genera Gelidium and Pterocladiella. The genomes contain 43-44 genes, ranging in size from 24,910 to 24,970 bp with highly conserved gene synteny. Low Ka/Ks ratios of apocytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase genes support their utility as markers. Phylogenies of mitogenomes and cox1+rbcL sequences clarified classification at the genus and species levels. Three species formerly in Gelidium and Pterocladia are transferred to Pterocladiella: P. media comb. nov., P. musciformis comb. nov., and P. luxurians comb. and stat. nov. Gelidium sinicola is merged with G. coulteri because they share identical cox1 and rbcL sequences. We describe a new species, Gelidium millariana sp. nov., previously identified as G. isabelae from Australia. We demonstrate that mitogenomes from type specimens provide a new tool for typifying species in the Gelidiales and that there is an urgent need for analyzing mitogenomes from type specimens of red algae and other morphologically simple organisms for insight into their nomenclature, taxonomy and evolution.

  13. Phylogenetic and morphological re-evaluation of the Botryosphaeria species causing diseases of Mangifera indica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slippers, B.; Johnson, G.I.; Crous, P.W.; Coutinho, T.A.; Wingfield, B.D.; Wingfield, M.J.

    2005-01-01

    Species of Botryosphaeria are among the most serious pathogens that affect mango trees and fruit. Several species occur on mangoes, and these are identified mainly on the morpholopy of the anamorphs. Common taxa include Dothiorella dominicana, D. mangiferae (= Natrassia mangiferae), D. aromatica and

  14. Hepatozoon silvestris sp. nov.: morphological and molecular characterization of a new species of Hepatozoon (Adeleorina: Hepatozoidae) from the European wild cat (Felis silvestris silvestris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodžić, Adnan; Alić, Amer; Prašović, Senad; Otranto, Domenico; Baneth, Gad; Duscher, Georg Gerhard

    2017-04-01

    Based on morphological and genetic characteristics, we describe a new species of Hepatozoon in the European wild cat (Felis silvestris silvestris), herein named Hepatozoon silvestris sp. nov. The study also provides the first data on the occurrence of H. felis in this wild felid. Hepatozoon meronts were observed in multiple cross-sections of different organs of four (44%) cats. Additionally, extracellular forms, resembling mature gamonts of Hepatozoon, were found in the spleen and myocardium of two cats. Furthermore, tissues of six animals (67%) were positive by PCR. Hepatozoon felis was identified infecting one cat (11%), whereas the 18S rRNA sequences of the remaining five cats (56%) were identical, but distinct from the sequences of H. felis. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that those sequences form a highly supported clade distant from other Hepatozoon spp. Future studies should include domestic cats from the areas where the wild cats positive for H. silvestris sp. nov. were found, in order to investigate their potential role to serve as intermediate hosts of this newly described species. Identification of its definitive host(s) and experimental transmission studies are required for elucidating the full life cycle of this parasite and the possible alternative routes of its transmission.

  15. Pollination and Reproductive Biology of Twelve Species of Neotropical Malpighiaceae: Stigma Morphology and its Implications for the Breeding System

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIGRIST, MARIA ROSÂNGELA; SAZIMA, MARLIES

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims This study on reproductive biology examines the stigmatic morphology of 12 Brazilian Malpighiaceae species with regard to their pollination and breeding system. • Methods The species were studied in natural populations of a semi‐deciduous forest fragment. Style tips were processed for observation by SEM and pollen‐tube growth was analyzed under fluorescence microscopy. The breeding system was investigated by isolating flowers within waterproof bags. Floral visitors were recorded through notes and photographs. • Key Results Flowers are yellow, pink or white, protogynous, herkogamous and sometimes lack oil glands. While Banisteriopsis pubipetala has functional female flowers (with indehiscent anthers), 11 species present hermaphrodite flowers. Stigmas of these species may be terminal, with a slightly concave surface, or internal, consisting of a circular cavity with a large orifice, and are covered with a thin, impermeable cuticle that prevents pollen from adhering, hydrating, or germinating. Malpighiaceae have a special type of ‘wet’ stigma, where a secretion accumulates under the cuticle and is released by mechanical means—mainly rupture by pollinators. Even though six species show a certain degree of self‐compatibility, four of them present a form of late‐acting self‐incompatibility, and the individual of B. pubipetala is agamospermous. Species of Centris, Epicharis and Monoeca bees pollinate these flowers, mainly collecting oil. Some Epicharis and Monoeca species collected pollen by vibration. Paratetrapedia and Tetrapedia bees are pollen and oil thieves. • Conclusions The Malpiguiaceae species studied are pollinator‐dependent, as spontaneous self‐pollination is limited by herkogamy, protogyny and the stigmatic cuticle. Both the oil‐ and pollen‐collecting behaviours of the pollinators favour the rupture of the stigmatic cuticle and the deposition of pollen on or inside the stigmas. As fruit‐set rates in

  16. External Morphology of Adult Citrus Butterfly, Papilio memnon (Linnaeus, 1758) and Seasonal Abundance of the Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ni Win

    2005-10-01

    Sexual dimorphism is obvious in Papilio memnon. The female adult resembles that of Papilio polytes another citrus butterfly species. However, marked difference is observed in the size and red spots on the base of the forewing. The adult male P. memnon is blue black in colour and red spots are present on the base of the underside of both for and hind wings. The win span of sexes ranges from 120mm to 150mm. The breeding season is from end of June to early part of January, the peak being in the month of November. The recorded diagnostic external features of this studied species are described supported by scaled photographs. Seasonal abundance of this species is also mentioned. It is learnt through the internet that a mounted specimen of this species fetched $2.95 in Malaysia. It is therefore concluded that successful rearing of this species in captivity could be of benefit to the country.

  17. Studies on fluctuating asymmetry (FA for certain morphological traits in four species of the Drosophila bipectinata complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Parul

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA is defined as subtle deviations from perfect bilateral symmetry, evident in differences between the right and the left sides of any given trait. It is a pattern of variation between sides and measures developmental instability. Differences in the level of FA may be used for comparing developmental precision among closely related species and thus may give an idea whether developmental stability was affected during the divergence and separation of populations into distinct species. Keeping this in view, FA was studied in four species of the Drosophila bipectinata complex i.e. D. bipectinata, D. parabipectinata, D. malerkotliana and D. pseudoananassae. In females of all the four species, FA values did not vary significantly for any of the traits considered. However, in case of males, they varied significantly for Wing length (WL and sex comb tooth number (SCTN. Also, while in females Composite fluctuating asymmetry (CFA did not exhibit significant variation, in males it was found to vary significantly across the four species. However, Bonferroni t-tests did not reveal any consistent difference in FA levels between any two species. The magnitude of FA was found to differ significantly among traits and CFA values were found to be higher for males than females in all the four species. Therefore, it may be concluded that the level of FA shows trait specific variations and males are more prone to developmental perturbations. However, the FA levels are more or less similar in all the four species of this complex. Thus, developmental precision remains nearly same in all the four species of this complex irrespective of the degree of evolutionary divergence reached.

  18. 75 FR 37385 - Endangered and Threatened Species; Initiation of a 5-Year Review of the Eastern Distinct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    .... The list is published at 50 CFR 17.11 (for animals) and 17.12 (for plants). Section 4(c)(2)(A) of the... of the following reasons: (1) the species is considered extinct; (2) the species is considered to be...

  19. Revision of the Malagasy Camponotus edmondi species group (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Formicinae): integrating qualitative morphology and multivariate morphometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotonirina, Jean Claude; Csősz, Sándor; Fisher, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The Malagasy Camponotus edmondi species group is revised based on both qualitative morphological traits and multivariate analysis of continuous morphometric data. To minimize the effect of the scaling properties of diverse traits due to worker caste polymorphism, and to achieve the desired near-linearity of data, morphometric analyses were done only on minor workers. The majority of traits exhibit broken scaling on head size, dividing Camponotus workers into two discrete subcastes, minors and majors. This broken scaling prevents the application of algorithms that uses linear combination of data to the entire dataset, hence only minor workers were analyzed statistically. The elimination of major workers resulted in linearity and the data meet required assumptions. However, morphometric ratios for the subsets of minor and major workers were used in species descriptions and redefinitions. Prior species hypotheses and the goodness of clusters were tested on raw data by confirmatory linear discriminant analysis. Due to the small sample size available for some species, a factor known to reduce statistical reliability, hypotheses generated by exploratory analyses were tested with extreme care and species delimitations were inferred via the combined evidence of both qualitative (morphology and biology) and quantitative data. Altogether, fifteen species are recognized, of which 11 are new to science: Camponotus alamaina sp. n. , Camponotus androy sp. n. , Camponotus bevohitra sp. n. , Camponotus galoko sp. n. , Camponotus matsilo sp. n. , Camponotus mifaka sp. n. , Camponotus orombe sp. n. , Camponotus tafo sp. n. , Camponotus tratra sp. n. , Camponotus varatra sp. n. , and Camponotus zavo sp. n. Four species are redescribed: Camponotus echinoploides Forel, Camponotus edmondi André, Camponotus ethicus Forel, and Camponotus robustus Roger. Camponotus edmondi ernesti Forel, syn. n. is synonymized under Camponotus edmondi . This revision also includes an identification key to

  20. Species-Specific Morphological and Physiological Responses of Four Korean Native Trees Species under Elevated CO2 Concentration using Open Top Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Byeon, S.; Lee, H.; Lee, M.; Lim, H.; Kim, H. S.

    2017-12-01

    For the last three years, studies on the morphological and physiological characteristics were carried out for four tree species (Pinus densiflora, Quercus acutissima, Sorbus alnifolia and Fraxinus rhynchophylla) which are representative native species of Korea. We used a control site and three open top chambers (con, chamber 1, 2, and 3) which were exposed to ambient and two elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]); the concentration were the ambient (400ppm) for control and chamber 1 and 1.4 times (560ppm) and 1.8 times (720 ppm) of the atmosphere for chamber 2 and 3, respectively. Leaf mass per area (LMA), stomatal size, density and area were examined to investigate the morphological changes of the trees. Among four species, F. rhynchophylla increased their LMA with increase of CO2 concentration. In addition, F. rhynchophylla showed the decrease of stomatal density significantly (p-value=0.02), while there was no difference in stoma size. These findings resulted in 25.5% and 38.7% decrease of stomata area per unit leaf area calculated by multiplying the size and density of the stomata. On the other hand, all 4 tree species were significantly increased in height and diameter growth with the elevated CO2. However, in the case of Q. acutissima, the increase in height growth was prominent. For physiological characteristics, the maximum photosynthetic rate was faster in the chambers exposed to high [CO2] than that in the control. However the rate of carboxylation and the electron transfer rate showed no particular tendency. The measurement of hydraulic conductivity (Ks, kg/m/s/Mpa) for Crataegus pinnatifida, increased as the [CO2] in the atmosphere increased, and the 50% Loss Conductance (Mpa) tended to increase slightly with the [CO2]. The correlation analysis between hydraulic conductivity and vulnerability to cavitation showed a strong negative correlation (P <0.05), which was unlike the general tendency.

  1. A new species of bird’s nest fungi: characterisation of Cyathus subglobisporus sp. nov. based on morphological and molecular data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, R.-L.; Desjardin, D.E.; Soytong, K.; Hyde, K.D.

    2008-01-01

    Recent collections of bird’s nest fungi (i.e. Crucibulum, Cyathus, Mycocalia, Nidula, and Nidularia species) in northern Thailand resulted in the discovery of a new species of Cyathus, herein described as C. subglobisporus. This species is distinct by a combination of ivory-coloured fruiting bodies

  2. Do species differ in their ability to coexist with the dominant alien Lupinus polyphyllus? A comparison between two distinct invaded ranges and a native range

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hejda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The community-level impacts of invasive plants are likely to vary depending on the character of native species of the target communities and their ability to thrive within the stands of the dominant alien invader. Therefore, I examined the response of native species richness to the cover of the dominant alien Lupinus polyphyllus in two distinct invaded ranges: Czech Republic (Central Europe and New Zealand. I compared the relation between native species richness and the cover of the dominant alien L. polyphyllus with that in its native range, Pacific Northwest, USA.In the native range, I found no response of native species richness to the cover of L. polyphyllus. In the Czech Republic (central Europe, the richness of native species related to it negativelly, but the relation was only marginally significant. Contrary to that, the richness of species native to New Zealand related to the cover of L. polyphyllus strongly negatively and the negative relation was significantly stronger than that of species native to Europe.Of the two invaded ranges, species native to New Zealand have been documented to be much more vulnerable to the conditions associated with the invasion and dominance of L. polyphyllus, compared to species native to central Europe. This principle has been shown both across these two invaded ranges and in New Zealand, where the aliens of european origin successfully coexist with the dominant invasive alien L. polyphyllus. Similarly, species in the native range of L. polyphyllus showed no relation to its cover, indicating their ability to thrive even in dense stands of this dominant species.

  3. Morphological comparison of Astropecten cingulatus and a new species of Astropecten (Paxillosida, Astropectinidae) from the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, John M; Cobb, Janessa C; Herrera, Joan C; DurÁn-gonzÁlez, Alicia; SolÍs-marÍn, Francisco Alonso

    2018-04-09

    Astropecten cingulatus is a conspicuous species, which displays a large superomarginal plate series on the abactinal surface. Herein we describe a new species from off the Texas coast that shows the superficial appearance of A. cingulatus, including these large superomarginal plates, but with armature differing from that of typological A. cingulatus. This species shows the actinal surface of the inferomarginal plates without the squamules present on A. cingulatus. In addition, the adambulacral plates possessed but a single central large spine surrounded by a circle of spines rather than spine rows. The abactinal paxillar region was also very narrow. Statistical analysis of these and other morphological characters showed the specimens differed significantly from those of A. cingulatus. The regression of the slope of R:SM# vs. R was significant but the intercept was not. Therefore the two species are indistinguishable at small sizes based on R:SM. Compared to known Atlantic Astropecten spp. these observed characters warrant the description of a new species, Astropecten karankawai, for the specimens from off the coasts of Texas and Mexico.

  4. Poles Apart: The “Bipolar” Pteropod Species Limacina helicina Is Genetically Distinct Between the Arctic and Antarctic Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarsek, Nina; Linse, Katrin; Nelson, R. John; Pakhomov, Evgeny; Seibel, Brad; Steinke, Dirk; Würzberg, Laura

    2010-01-01

    The shelled pteropod (sea butterfly) Limacina helicina is currently recognised as a species complex comprising two sub-species and at least five “forma”. However, at the species level it is considered to be bipolar, occurring in both the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Due to its aragonite shell and polar distribution L. helicina is particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification. As a key indicator of the acidification process, and a major component of polar ecosystems, L. helicina has become a focus for acidification research. New observations that taxonomic groups may respond quite differently to acidification prompted us to reassess the taxonomic status of this important species. We found a 33.56% (±0.09) difference in cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences between L. helicina collected from the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. This degree of separation is sufficient for ordinal level taxonomic separation in other organisms and provides strong evidence for the Arctic and Antarctic populations of L. helicina differing at least at the species level. Recent research has highlighted substantial physiological differences between the poles for another supposedly bipolar pteropod species, Clione limacina. Given the large genetic divergence between Arctic and Antarctic L. helicina populations shown here, similarly large physiological differences may exist between the poles for the L. helicina species group. Therefore, in addition to indicating that L. helicina is in fact not bipolar, our study demonstrates the need for acidification research to take into account the possibility that the L. helicina species group may not respond in the same way to ocean acidification in Arctic and Antarctic ecosystems. PMID:20360985

  5. Poles apart: the "bipolar" pteropod species Limacina helicina is genetically distinct between the Arctic and Antarctic oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Brian; Strugnell, Jan; Bednarsek, Nina; Linse, Katrin; Nelson, R John; Pakhomov, Evgeny; Seibel, Brad; Steinke, Dirk; Würzberg, Laura

    2010-03-23

    The shelled pteropod (sea butterfly) Limacina helicina is currently recognised as a species complex comprising two sub-species and at least five "forma". However, at the species level it is considered to be bipolar, occurring in both the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. Due to its aragonite shell and polar distribution L. helicina is particularly vulnerable to ocean acidification. As a key indicator of the acidification process, and a major component of polar ecosystems, L. helicina has become a focus for acidification research. New observations that taxonomic groups may respond quite differently to acidification prompted us to reassess the taxonomic status of this important species. We found a 33.56% (+/-0.09) difference in cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequences between L. helicina collected from the Arctic and Antarctic oceans. This degree of separation is sufficient for ordinal level taxonomic separation in other organisms and provides strong evidence for the Arctic and Antarctic populations of L. helicina differing at least at the species level. Recent research has highlighted substantial physiological differences between the poles for another supposedly bipolar pteropod species, Clione limacina. Given the large genetic divergence between Arctic and Antarctic L. helicina populations shown here, similarly large physiological differences may exist between the poles for the L. helicina species group. Therefore, in addition to indicating that L. helicina is in fact not bipolar, our study demonstrates the need for acidification research to take into account the possibility that the L. helicina species group may not respond in the same way to ocean acidification in Arctic and Antarctic ecosystems.

  6. Morphological and Phenological characterization of Mediterranean species in Northern Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piga, Alessandra; Duce, Pierpaolo; Cesaraccio, Carla

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of vegetation, in particular methodologies for phenological and biometrical monitoring, are widely implied for climate change studies and their importance for understanding the consequences of global environmental change on vegetation is highlighted in the most recent IPCC reports. It is very likely that, during the next decades, the Mediterranean Regions will cope to the very negative effects of climatic changes. Consequently, due to the climate change impacts and the effects of anthropogenic pressures upon natural resources, these regions are among the most vulnerable ecosystems to the effects of climate change. Therefore, appears to be of crucial importance to better understand the physiological strategies for cope to climate change adaptation for the Mediterranean maquis shrub species which are key information for developing adaptation strategies guidelines. In this work, the biological and reproductive cycle of some Mediterranean species growing in an experimental area located within a nature reserve in the peninsula of Capo Caccia, north-west Sardinia, Italy, was investigated for a period of two years. In particular, the research was focused on: (1) the study of the development processes and the description of phenological phases, and (2) the analysis of the growth processes performed through biometric and floristic composition measurements. Specific BBCH scales for each species were developed. Shoot growth and floristic composition analysis did not show a clear trend in the response of the different species to climatic manipulations but a downward trend in the number of species. The results obtained in this study add useful information on the phenological cycle and growth of the Mediterranean species, improving the knowledge on the mechanisms of adaptation to adverse environmental conditions of these species

  7. Genetic and morphological diversity of Trisetacus species (Eriophyoidea: Phytoptidae) associated with coniferous trees in Poland: phylogeny, barcoding, host and habitat specialization

    OpenAIRE

    Lewandowski, Mariusz; Skoracka, Anna; Szydło, Wiktoria; Kozak, Marcin; Druciarek, Tobiasz; Griffiths, Don A.

    2014-01-01

    Eriophyoid species belonging to the genus Trisetacus are economically important as pests of conifers. A narrow host specialization to conifers and some unique morphological characteristics have made these mites interesting subjects for scientific inquiry. In this study, we assessed morphological and genetic variation of seven Trisetacus species originating from six coniferous hosts in Poland by morphometric analysis and molecular sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I ge...

  8. MORPHOLOGICAL AND AGRONOMICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME WILD AND CULTIVATED ISATIS SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Süleyman KIZIL

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated Isatis tinctoria, I. constricta, I. glauca, I. cochlearis, I. aucheri and I. demiriziana during 2002-03 and 2003-04 growing seasons for different agronomic characteristics affecting the percentage of dye in them. The results showed wide variations in the agronomic characteristics of Isatis constricta, Isatis cochlearis, Isatis aucheri, Isatis demiriziana collected from wild; compared to culture Isatis tinctoria and Isatis glauca. I. tinctoria showed early emergence (36 day compared to other species, and I. glauca was determined as late fl owering (512 day species. Among Isatis species, I. glauca showed the maximum plant height (113.4 cm, stem diameter (10.84 mm seed yield per plant (103.0 g . Whereas, I. tinctoria produced the largest number of branches per plant (16.8 plant-1 and the maximum number of seeds (17918 per plant.

  9. [Effects of tree species diversity on fine-root biomass and morphological characteristics in subtropical Castanopsis carlesii forests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Wei; Huang, Jin-Xue; Chen, Feng; Xiong, De-Cheng; Lu, Zheng-Li; Huang, Chao-Chao; Yang, Zhi-Jie; Chen, Guang-Shui

    2014-02-01

    Fine roots in the Castanopsis carlesii plantation forest (MZ), the secondary forest of C. carlesii through natural regeneration with anthropogenic promotion (AR), and the secondary forest of C. carlesii through natural regeneration (NR) in Sanming City, Fujian Province, were estimated by soil core method to determine the influence of tree species diversity on biomass, vertical distribution and morphological characteristics of fine roots. The results showed that fine root biomass for the 0-80 cm soil layer in the MZ, AR and NR were (182.46 +/- 10.81), (242.73 +/- 17.85) and (353.11 +/- 16.46) g x m(-2), respectively, showing an increased tendency with increasing tree species diversity. In the three forests, fine root biomass was significantly influenced by soil depth, and fine roots at the 0-10 cm soil layer accounted for more than 35% of the total fine root biomass. However, the interaction of stand type and soil depth on fine-root distribution was not significant, indicating no influence of tree species diversity on spatial niche segregation in fine roots. Root surface area density and root length density were the highest in NR and lowest in the MZ. Specific root length was in the order of AR > MZ > NR, while specific root surface area was in the order of NR > MZ > AR. There was no significant interaction of stand type and soil depth on specific root length and specific root surface area. Fine root morphological plasticity at the stand level had no significant response to tree species diversity.

  10. MORPHOLOGICAL AND MICROMORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS REGARDING THE LEAVES OF SEVERAL ROSA L. SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia ADUMITRESEI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Multicellular secretory glands are present on Rosa L. species, at least on the stipellae edge; some of them have a larger number and different particularities. The researches have been made on leaves of the following species: Rosa agrestis, R. x damascena, R. multibracteata, R. pimpinellifolia and R. rubiginosa. Micromorphological studies emphasized a large number of cells which forming both terminal secretory part and foot, even though their dimensions are small. These researches highlight the micromorphological aspect of these glands, tector hairs and epicuticular wax. All of them were examined through scanning electron microscopy method.

  11. Multilocus phylogeny of the avian family Alaudidae (larks) reveals complex morphological evolution, non-monophyletic genera and hidden species diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alström, Per; Barnes, Keith N; Olsson, Urban; Barker, F Keith; Bloomer, Paulette; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Qureshi, Masood Ahmed; Guillaumet, Alban; Crochet, Pierre-André; Ryan, Peter G

    2013-12-01

    The Alaudidae (larks) is a large family of songbirds in the superfamily Sylvioidea. Larks are cosmopolitan, although species-level diversity is by far largest in Africa, followed by Eurasia, whereas Australasia and the New World have only one species each. The present study is the first comprehensive phylogeny of the Alaudidae. It includes 83.5% of all species and representatives from all recognised genera, and was based on two mitochondrial and three nuclear loci (in total 6.4 kbp, although not all loci were available for all species). In addition, a larger sample, comprising several subspecies of some polytypic species was analysed for one of the mitochondrial loci. There was generally good agreement in trees inferred from different loci, although some strongly supported incongruences were noted. The tree based on the concatenated multilocus data was overall well resolved and well supported by the data. We stress the importance of performing single gene as well as combined data analyses, as the latter may obscure significant incongruence behind strong nodal support values. The multilocus tree revealed many unpredicted relationships, including some non-monophyletic genera (Calandrella, Mirafra, Melanocorypha, Spizocorys). The tree based on the extended mitochondrial data set revealed several unexpected deep divergences between taxa presently treated as conspecific (e.g. within Ammomanes cinctura, Ammomanes deserti, Calandrella brachydactyla, Eremophila alpestris), as well as some shallow splits between currently recognised species (e.g. Certhilauda brevirostris-C. semitorquata-C. curvirostris; Calendulauda barlowi-C. erythrochlamys; Mirafra cantillans-M. javanica). Based on our results, we propose a revised generic classification, and comment on some species limits. We also comment on the extraordinary morphological adaptability in larks, which has resulted in numerous examples of parallel evolution (e.g. in Melanocorypha mongolica and Alauda leucoptera [both

  12. Differences in haematology and respiratory system morphology at three neogobiid species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Halačka, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2015), s. 514-520 ISSN 2391-5412 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP505/11/1768 Institutional support: RVO:68081766 Keywords : invasive species * goblet cells * oxygen transport * Neogobius melanostomus * Neogobius fluviatilis * Neogobius kessleri Subject RIV: EG - Zoology

  13. Ecogeographic variation in the morphology of two Asian wild rice species Oryza nivara and O. ruftipogon.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banaticla, M.C.N.; Sosef, M.S.M.; McNally, K.L.; Sackville Hamilton, R.; Berg, van den R.G.

    2013-01-01

    To search for variation patterns and diagnostic features between Asian wild rice species, several numerical methods were applied to phenotypic data obtained from 116 accessions representing sympatric populations of Oryza nivara and Oryza rufipogon from tropical continental Asia and O. rufipogon

  14. Skull ontogeny and modularity in two species of Lagenorhynchus: Morphological and ecological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, Daniela L; Viglino, Mariana; Flores, David A; Cappozzo, Humberto L

    2017-02-01

    Comparisons of skull shape between closely related species can provide information on the role that phylogeny and function play in cranial evolution. We used 3D-anatomical landmarks in order to study the skull ontogeny of two closely related species, Lagenorhynchus obscurus and Lagenorhynchus australis, with a total sample of 52 skulls. We found shared trends between species, such as the relative compression of the neurocranium and the enlargement of the rostrum during ontogeny. However, these are common mammalian features, associated with prenatal brain development and sensory capsules. Moreover, we found a posterior displacement of the external nares and infraorbital foramina, and a strong development of the rostrum in an anteroposterior direction. Such trends are associated with the process of telescoping and have been observed in postnatal ontogeny of other odontocetes, suggesting a constraint in the pattern. Interspecific differences related to the deepness of facial region, robustness of the feeding apparatus and rostrum orientation may be related with the specific lifestyles of L. obscurus and L. australis. We also tested the presence of three different modules in the skull (basicranium, neurocranium, rostrum), all of which presented strong integration. Only the rostrum showed a different ontogenetic trajectory between species. Even though we detected directional asymmetry, changes in this feature along ontogeny were not detectable. Because asymmetry may be related to echolocation, our results suggest a functional importance of directional asymmetry from the beginning of postnatal life. J. Morphol. 278:203-214, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals,Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Molecular and morphological identification of the mealybug pest species, Phenacoccus solani Ferris (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the summer and autumn of 2016, heavy infestations of the mealybug, Phenacoccus solani Ferris (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae), were observed on pumpkins, Cucurbita spp. (Cucurbitaceae). This was the first record of the species in Egypt. Several populations have been collected in various pumpkin fr...

  16. Relevance of wing morphology in distinguishing and classifying genera and species of Stenogastrinae wasps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baracchi, D.; Dapporto, L.; Turillazzi, S.

    2011-01-01

    The phylogeny of the Stenogastrinae wasps is still under discussion and their systematic incomplete. In the present work we used geometric morphometrics, a technique based on a rigorous statistical assessment of shape, to compare the forewings of fifteen species of Stenogastrinae wasps belonging to

  17. The Relationships between Morphological Characteristics and Foraging Behavior in Four Selected Species of Shorebirds and Water Birds Utilizing Tropical Mudflats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Atiqah Norazlimi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the physical morphology of shorebirds and water birds (i.e., Lesser adjutant (Leptoptilos javanicus, Common redshank (Tringa totanus, Whimbrel (Numenius phaeopus, and Little heron (Butorides striata and their foraging behavior in the mudflats area of Selangor, Peninsular Malaysia, from August 2013 to July 2014 by using direct observation techniques (using binoculars and a video recorder. The actively foraging bird species were watched, and their foraging activities were recorded for at least 30 seconds for up to a maximum of five minutes. A Spearman Rank Correlation highlighted a significant relationship between bill size and foraging time (R=0.443, p<0.05, bill size and prey size (R=-0.052, p<0.05, bill size and probing depth (R=0.42, p=0.003, and leg length and water/mud depth (R=0.706, p<0.005. A Kruskal-Wallis Analysis showed a significant difference between average estimates of real probing depth of the birds (mm and species (H=15.96, p=0.0012. Three foraging techniques were recorded: pause-travel, visual-feeding, and tactile-hunting. Thus, morphological characteristics of bird do influence their foraging behavior and strategies used when foraging.

  18. Morphological and molecular features of some freshwater prawn species under genus Macrobrachium Spence Bate, 1868 (Crustacea: Decapoda: Palaemonidae) from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Win; Kang, Peng-Fei; Mao, Bin; Wang, Yu-Feng

    2018-02-28

    Myanmar is abundant in lakes and rivers, yet only a few investigations on the fauna of shrimps and prawns have been conducted and no molecular characteristics of prawn species have been described. This study reveals the morphologically identification of five freshwater prawn species under the genus Macrobrachium, including M. cavernicola, M. australiense, M. johnsoni, M. josephi and Macrobrachium sp.WMY-2017. As there was no previous record and information concerning with M. australiense, M. johnsoni, M. josephi and Macrobrachium sp. WMY-2017, they were regarded as the first record from Myanmar. A fragment of Mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I Gene (COI) was amplified successfully from three studied species: M. australiense, M. josephi, and Macrobrachium sp.WMY-2017. The interspecific divergences of studied species varied from 0.01 to 0.15. The phylogenetic tree based on COI fragment sequences showed that M. australiense was closely related to M. rosenbergii, while Macrobrachium sp. WMY-2017 was closest to M. josephi. The results of molecular phylogeny has clarified the relationship within the genus Macrobrachium and represents the first step toward understanding the pattern of speciation base on molecular approach in Myanmar.

  19. Little evidence for morphological change in a resilient endemic species following the introduction of a novel predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, D M T; Langerhans, R B; Low-Décarie, E; Chapman, L J

    2015-11-01

    Human activities, such as species introductions, are dramatically and rapidly altering natural ecological processes and often result in novel selection regimes. To date, we still have a limited understanding of the extent to which such anthropogenic selection may be driving contemporary phenotypic change in natural populations. Here, we test whether the introduction of the piscivorous Nile perch, Lates niloticus, into East Africa's Lake Victoria and nearby lakes coincided with morphological change in one resilient native prey species, the cyprinid fish Rastrineobola argentea. Drawing on prior ecomorphological research, we predicted that this novel predator would select for increased allocation to the caudal region in R. argentea to enhance burst-swimming performance and hence escape ability. To test this prediction, we compared body morphology of R. argentea across space (nine Ugandan lakes differing in Nile perch invasion history) and through time (before and after establishment of Nile perch in Lake Victoria). Spatial comparisons of contemporary populations only partially supported our predictions, with R. argentea from some invaded lakes having larger caudal regions and smaller heads compared to R. argentea from uninvaded lakes. There was no clear evidence of predator-associated change in body shape over time in Lake Victoria. We conclude that R. argentea have not responded to the presence of Nile perch with consistent morphological changes and that other factors are driving observed patterns of body shape variation in R. argentea. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  20. A comparison of morphological and molecular-based surveys to estimate the species richness of Chaetoceros and Thalassiosira (bacillariophyta, in the Bay of Fundy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Hamsher

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to compare the ability of morphology and molecular-based surveys to estimate species richness for two species-rich diatom genera, Chaetoceros Ehrenb. and Thalassiosira Cleve, in the Bay of Fundy. Phytoplankton tows were collected from two sites at intervals over two years and subsampled for morphology-based surveys (2010, 2011, a culture-based DNA reference library (DRL; 2010, and a molecular-based survey (2011. The DRL and molecular-based survey utilized the 3' end of the RUBISCO large subunit (rbcL-3P to identify genetic species groups (based on 0.1% divergence in rbcL-3P, which were subsequently identified morphologically to allow comparisons to the morphology-based survey. Comparisons were compiled for the year (2011 by site (n = 2 and by season (n = 3. Of the 34 taxa included in the comparisons, 50% of taxa were common to both methods, 35% were unique to the molecular-based survey, and 12% were unique to the morphology-based survey, while the remaining 3% of taxa were unidentified genetic species groups. The morphology-based survey excelled at identifying rare taxa in individual tow subsamples, which were occasionally missed with the molecular approach used here, while the molecular methods (the DRL and molecular-based survey, uncovered nine cryptic species pairs and four previously overlooked species. The last mentioned were typically difficult to identify and were generically assigned to Thalassiosira spp. during the morphology-based survey. Therefore, for now we suggest a combined approach encompassing routine morphology-based surveys accompanied by periodic molecular-based surveys to monitor for cryptic and difficult to identify taxa. As sequencing technologies improve, molecular-based surveys should become routine, leading to a more accurate representation of species composition and richness in monitoring programs.

  1. Synonymization of key pest species within the Bactrocera dorsalis species complex (Diptera: Tephritidae): taxonomic changes based on a review of 20 years of integrative morphological, molecular, cytogenetic, behavioral, and c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bactrocera papayae Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera philippinensis Drew & Hancock, Bactrocera carambolae Drew & Hancock, and Bactrocera invadens Drew, Tsuruta & White are four horticultural pest tephritid fruit fly species that are highly morphologically and genetically similar to the destructive pest, th...

  2. Development of a molecular assay for the general detection of tospoviruses and the distinction between tospoviral species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bald-Blume, Niklas; Bergervoet, Jan H.W.; Maiss, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    A Luminex xTAG-based assay for plant-infecting tospoviruses was developed. The test enables the detection of tospoviruses in general and the differentiation of the four important member species of this genus: Tomato spotted wilt virus, Impatiens necrotic spot virus, the proposed ‘Capsicum chlorosis

  3. Morphological, cytological and metabolic consequences of autopolyploidization in Hylocereus (Cactaceae) species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Hagai; Fait, Aaron; Tel-Zur, Noemi

    2013-11-04

    Genome doubling may have multi-level effects on the morphology, viability and physiology of polyploids compared to diploids. We studied the changes associated with autopolyploidization in two systems of somatic newly induced polyploids, diploid-autotetraploid and triploid-autohexaploid, belonging to the genus Hylocereus (Cactaceae). Stomata, fruits, seeds, embryos, and pollen were studied. Fruit pulp and seeds were subjected to metabolite profiling using established gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) Q-TOF-MS/MS (time of flight)-protocols. Autopolyploid lines produced lower numbers of tetrads, larger pollen grains with lower viability, larger stomata with lower density, and smaller fruits with lower seed numbers and decreased seed viability. The abundance of sugars was lower in the fruits and seeds of the two duplicated lines than in their donor lines, accompanied by increased contents of amino acids, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, organic acids and flavonoids. Betacyanins, the major fruit pigments in diploid and triploid donors, decreased following genome doubling. Both autopolyploid Hylocereus lines thus exhibited unfavorable changes, with the outcome being more dramatic in the autohexaploid than in the autotetraploid line. Induced autotetraploid and autohexaploid lines exhibited morphological and cytological characteristics that differed from those of their donor plants and that were accompanied by significant metabolic alterations. It is suggested that a developmental arrest occurs in the fruits of the autohexaploid line, since their pericarp shows a greater abundance of acids and of reduced sugars. We conclude that genome doubling does not necessarily confer a fitness advantage and that the extent of alterations induced by autopolyploidization depends on the genetic background of the donor genotype.

  4. The species concept in a marine diatom: LSU rDNA–based phylogenetic differentiation in Skeletonema marinoi/dohrnii (Bacillariophyceae) is not reflected in morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Marianne; Godhe, Anna; Härnström, Karolina

    2008-01-01

    and Canada) included in the study showed differences in LSU rDNA sequence within the morphospecies, with differences seen even among clones established from a single plankton net sample. Morphologically, all clones were indistinguishable from each other and from the closely related species Skeletonema...... dohrnii. In the original description of these two species, they were differentiated by the structure of the girdle bands. However, the girdle band types of both species were found within single samples of almost all clones of S. marinoi in this study. The LSU-based phylogeny is consistent with the split...... into two species, and there may be a difference in their biogeographical distribution. We therefore do not at present suggest that the two species be merged. Questions regarding species delimitation and cryptic species within protists often arise from such studies that include data from both morphological...

  5. THERMAL DEGRADATION AND MORPHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF FOUR WOOD SPECIES USED IN LUMBER INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Poletto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this work was characterize four wood waste samples from lumber industry in order to obtain previous information about structure and properties of wood before use it as a biofuel or as reinforcement in composite formulations. The influence of wood components on the thermal degradation stability of different wood species has been investigated using thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy. Four wood species, Eucalyptus grandis (EUG, Pinus elliottii (PIE, Dipteryx odorata (DIP and Mezilaurus itauba (ITA, were used in this study. The results showed that higher extractives contents may form a thin film on the wood fiber surface which can accelerate the degradation process and reduce the wood thermal stability

  6. MORPHOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS AND NECTAR ROBBING IN THREE ANDEAN BUMBLE BEE SPECIES (HYMENOPTERA, APIDAE, BOMBINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RIVEROS ANDRE J.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We report differences in foraging behavior of three Andean bumblebee species onflowers of Digitalis purpurea (Scrophulariaceae. Bombus atratus was a potentialpollinator while B. hortulanus and B. rubicundus collected nectar by robbing throughholes. We attribute behavioral differences to physical constraints. B. atratus has alonger glossa and a larger body size and is able to reach the nectaries, whereas B.hortulanus and B. rubicundus have shorter glossae and smaller bodies and probablymust rob nectar through holes at the base of flowers.

  7. Historical abundance and morphology of Didymosphenia species in Naknek Lake, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Pite, Danielle P.; Lane, Kelly A.; Hermann, Anna K.; Spaulding, Sarah A.; Finney, Bruce P.

    2009-01-01

    Since the 1980s, nuisance blooms of Didymosphenia geminata (Lyngbye) M. Schmidt have been documented in sites that are warmer and more mesotrophic than historical records indicate. While the invasion of D. geminata in New Zealand is well documented, it is less clear whether nuisance blooms in North America are a new phenomenon. In order to test the hypothesis that D. geminata blooms have increased in recent years, we examined the historical record of this species in sediments of Naknek Lake, ...

  8. New species of Cryptosporidium Tyzzer, 1907 (Apicomplexa) from amphibian host: morphology, biology and phylogeny

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirků, Miloslav; Valigurová, A.; Koudela, Břetislav; Křížek, Jaroslav; Modrý, David; Šlapeta, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2008), s. 81-94 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD524/03/H133; GA ČR GA524/05/0992; GA MŠk LC522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium fragile * new species * Duttaphrynus melanostictus * Host specificity * ultrastructure * global amphibian decline * hylogeny * quarantine Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 1.307, year: 2008

  9. Genetic and Morphological Characterization of Cladobotryum Species Causing Cobweb Disease of Mushrooms

    OpenAIRE

    McKay, Gareth J.; Egan, Damian; Morris, Elizabeth; Scott, Carol; Brown, Averil E.

    1999-01-01

    Cladobotryum dendroides (= Dactylium dendroides) has hitherto been regarded as the major causal agent of cobweb disease of the cultivated mushroom, Agaricus bisporus. Nucleotide sequence data for the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of four Cladobotryum/Hypomyces species reported to be associated with cobweb disease, however, indicate that the most common pathogen is now C. mycophilum. This cobweb pathogen varies somewhat in conidial septation from published descriptions of C. mycoph...

  10. Sperm morphology in four species of African platypleurine cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha: Cicadidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawanji, A S; Hodgson, A N; Villet, M H

    2005-08-01

    Mature spermatozoa from four species of platypleurine cicadas (Albanycada albigera, Azanicada zuluensis, Platypleura capensis and P. hirtipennis) were examined by light and electron microscopy. The filiform sperm have a similar ultrastructure in all species but notable variations were found in sperm dimensions. All species produce more than one discrete length of nucleated, motile sperm, a form of polymorphism termed polymegaly. Polymegaly is expressed in two ways: sperm have bi- or trimodal head and tail lengths. The anterior parts of sperm heads are embedded in an elongate homogenous matrix forming a spermatodesm. The conical acrosome is deeply invaginated posteriorly, and sits on top of the nucleus. The acrosomal contents are differentiated internally with an electron-lucent central medulla and a denser cortex. The homogenously electron-dense nucleus is pointed anteriorly and is generally cylindrical, although posteriorly there is a lateral invagination that extends part-way along the nucleus. This invagination houses fine granular material of the centriolar adjunct. Vesicle-like elements that are associated with both the posterior nucleus and the centriolar adjunct are also found within the invagination. Immediately posterior of and adjoining the centriolar adjunct is a pair of mitochondrial derivatives that are elongated and extend for almost the entire length of the tail. The absence of accessory bodies in cicada sperm suggests that within the Cicadomorpha, the families Cicadidae and Cercopidae are closely affiliated.

  11. The morphology of hairs in species of Plantago L. Sections: Novorbis Decne and Mesembrynia Decne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Andrzejewska-Golec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a continuation of the investigation of hairs in representatives of various sections of the genus Plantago L.(Andrzejewska-Golec and Świętosławski 1987, 1988, 1989 a, b, 1991, in press 2. It deals with the species of the related sections: Novorbis Decne (3 species and Mesembrynia Decne (5 species. The investigated taxa of both sections have one type of headed hair (typical of the representatives of the genus Plantago as well as three types of headless hairs: 1 1-3-celled-bristle-shaped, 2 consisting of several cells, and 3 multicellular-web-like. Only slight differences between the hairs of the investigated taxa of sections Novorbis and Mesembrynia were noticed. The hairs of the representatives of these sections are also similar to the hairs of representatives of another section, related to those mentioned above, viz. Lamprosantha Decne (Andrzejewska-Golec and Świętosławski 1991.

  12. Evolutionary Genetic Analysis Uncovers Multiple Species with Distinct Habitat Preferences and Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes in the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Complex

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    Luz E. Ochoa-Sánchez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The genus Stenotrophomonas (Gammaproteobacteria has a broad environmental distribution. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is its best known species because it is a globally emerging, multidrug-resistant (MDR, opportunistic pathogen. Members of this species are known to display high genetic, ecological and phenotypic diversity, forming the so-called S. maltophilia complex (Smc. Heterogeneous resistance and virulence phenotypes have been reported for environmental Smc isolates of diverse ecological origin. We hypothesized that this heterogeneity could be in part due to the potential lumping of several cryptic species in the Smc. Here we used state-of-the-art phylogenetic and population genetics methods to test this hypothesis based on the multilocus dataset available for the genus at pubmlst.org. It was extended with sequences from complete and draft genome sequences to assemble a comprehensive set of reference sequences. This framework was used to analyze 108 environmental isolates obtained in this study from the sediment and water column of four rivers and streams in Central Mexico, affected by contrasting levels of anthropogenic pollution. The aim of the study was to identify species in this collection, defined as genetically cohesive sequence clusters, and to determine the extent of their genetic, ecological and phenotypic differentiation. The multispecies coalescent, coupled with Bayes factor analysis was used to delimit species borders, together with population genetic structure analyses, recombination and gene flow estimates between sequence clusters. These analyses consistently revealed that the Smc contains at least 5 significantly differentiated lineages: S. maltophilia and Smc1 to Smc4. Only S. maltophilia was found to be intrinsically MDR, all its members expressing metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs. The other Smc lineages were not MDR and did not express MBLs. We also obtained isolates related to S. acidaminiphila, S. humi and S. terrae. They

  13. Tracing early stages of species differentiation: Ecological, morphological and genetic divergence of Galápagos sea lion populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunner Sylvia

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oceans are high gene flow environments that are traditionally believed to hamper the build-up of genetic divergence. Despite this, divergence appears to occur occasionally at surprisingly small scales. The Galápagos archipelago provides an ideal opportunity to examine the evolutionary processes of local divergence in an isolated marine environment. Galápagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki are top predators in this unique setting and have an essentially unlimited dispersal capacity across the entire species range. In theory, this should oppose any genetic differentiation. Results We find significant ecological, morphological and genetic divergence between the western colonies and colonies from the central region of the archipelago that are exposed to different ecological conditions. Stable isotope analyses indicate that western animals use different food sources than those from the central area. This is likely due to niche partitioning with the second Galápagos eared seal species, the Galápagos fur seal (Arctocephalus galapagoensis that exclusively dwells in the west. Stable isotope patterns correlate with significant differences in foraging-related skull morphology. Analyses of mitochondrial sequences as well as microsatellites reveal signs of initial genetic differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest a key role of intra- as well as inter-specific niche segregation in the evolution of genetic structure among populations of a highly mobile species under conditions of free movement. Given the monophyletic arrival of the sea lions on the archipelago, our study challenges the view that geographical barriers are strictly needed for the build-up of genetic divergence. The study further raises the interesting prospect that in social, colonially breeding mammals additional forces, such as social structure or feeding traditions, might bear on the genetic partitioning of populations.

  14. Proteomic analysis of human skin treated with larval schistosome peptidases reveals distinct invasion strategies among species of blood flukes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ingram

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Skin invasion is the initial step in infection of the human host by schistosome blood flukes. Schistosome larvae have the remarkable ability to overcome the physical and biochemical barriers present in skin in the absence of any mechanical trauma. While a serine peptidase with activity against insoluble elastin appears to be essential for this process in one species of schistosomes, Schistosoma mansoni, it is unknown whether other schistosome species use the same peptidase to facilitate entry into their hosts.Recent genome sequencing projects, together with a number of biochemical studies, identified alternative peptidases that Schistosoma japonicum or Trichobilharzia regenti could use to facilitate migration through skin. In this study, we used comparative proteomic analysis of human skin treated with purified cercarial elastase, the known invasive peptidase of S. mansoni, or S. mansoni cathespin B2, a close homolog of the putative invasive peptidase of S. japonicum, to identify substrates of either peptidase. Select skin proteins were then confirmed as substrates by in vitro digestion assays.This study demonstrates that an S. mansoni ortholog of the candidate invasive peptidase of S. japonicum and T. regenti, cathepsin B2, is capable of efficiently cleaving many of the same host skin substrates as the invasive serine peptidase of S. mansoni, cercarial elastase. At the same time, identification of unique substrates and the broader species specificity of cathepsin B2 suggest that the cercarial elastase gene family amplified as an adaptation of schistosomes to human hosts.

  15. Multigene phylogeny of the scyphozoan jellyfish family Pelagiidae reveals that the common U.S. Atlantic sea nettle comprises two distinct species (Chrysaora quinquecirrha and C. chesapeakei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Bayha

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Species of the scyphozoan family Pelagiidae (e.g., Pelagia noctiluca, Chrysaora quinquecirrha are well-known for impacting fisheries, aquaculture, and tourism, especially for the painful sting they can inflict on swimmers. However, historical taxonomic uncertainty at the genus (e.g., new genus Mawia and species levels hinders progress in studying their biology and evolutionary adaptations that make them nuisance species, as well as ability to understand and/or mitigate their ecological and economic impacts. Methods We collected nuclear (28S rDNA and mitochondrial (cytochrome c oxidase I and 16S rDNA sequence data from individuals of all four pelagiid genera, including 11 of 13 currently recognized species of Chrysaora. To examine species boundaries in the U.S. Atlantic sea nettle Chrysaora quinquecirrha, specimens were included from its entire range along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts, with representatives also examined morphologically (macromorphology and cnidome. Results Phylogenetic analyses show that the genus Chrysaora is paraphyletic with respect to other pelagiid genera. In combined analyses, Mawia, sampled from the coast of Senegal, is most closely related to Sanderia malayensis, and Pelagia forms a close relationship to a clade of Pacific Chrysaora species (Chrysaora achlyos, Chrysaora colorata, Chrysaora fuscescens, and Chrysaora melanaster. Chrysaora quinquecirrha is polyphyletic, with one clade from the U.S. coastal Atlantic and another in U.S. Atlantic estuaries and Gulf of Mexico. These genetic differences are reflected in morphology, e.g., tentacle and lappet number, oral arm length, and nematocyst dimensions. Caribbean sea nettles (Jamaica and Panama are genetically similar to the U.S. Atlantic estuaries and Gulf of Mexico clade of Chrysaora quinquecirrha. Discussion Our phylogenetic hypothesis for Pelagiidae contradicts current generic definitions, revealing major disagreements between DNA-based and

  16. Seed morphology, germination phenology, and capacity to form a seed bank in six herbaceous layer apiaceae species of the eastern deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy S. Hawkins; Jerry M. Baskin; Carol C. Baskin

    2007-01-01

    We compared seed mass, seed morphology, and long-term germination phenology of three monocarpic (MI and three polycarpic (P) Apiaceae species of the herbaceous layer of the Eastern Deciduous Forest. Seeds (mericarps) of the six species differed considerably in mass, shape, and ornamentation. Mean seed masses were ranked Cryptotaenia canadensis (M)...

  17. Assessment of compatibility among Armillaria cepistipes, A. sinapina, and North American biological species X and XI, using culture morphology and molecular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark T. Banik; Harold H. Burdsall

    1998-01-01

    Ten single-spore isolates each of Armillaria sinapina, A. cepistipes, and North American biological species (NABS)X and XI were paired in all combinations. A second set of ten single-spore isolates of each species was likewise paired. Each pairing was duplicated for a total of 3280 pairs. Using the standard morphological criteria (e.g., fluffy, crustose) to assess the...

  18. Comparative morphology of the penis and clitoris in four species of moles (Talpidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Adriane Watkins; Glickman, Stephen; Catania, Kenneth; Shinohara, Akio; Baskin, Lawrence; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2017-01-01

    The penile and clitorial anatomy of four species of Talpid moles (broad-footed, star-nosed, hairy-tailed, and Japanese shrew moles) were investigated to define penile and clitoral anatomy and to examine the relationship of the clitoral anatomy with the presence or absence of ovotestes. The ovotestis contains ovarian tissue and glandular tissue resembling fetal testicular tissue and can produce androgens. The ovotestis is present in star-nosed and hairy-tailed moles, but not in broad-footed and Japanese shrew moles. Using histology, 3D reconstruction, and morphometric analysis, sexual dimorphism was examined in regard to a nine feature masculine trait score that included perineal appendage length (prepuce), anogenital distance, and presence/absence of bone. The presence/absence of ovotestes was discordant in all four mole species for sex differentiation features. For many sex differentiation features, discordance with ovotestes was observed in at least one mole species. The degree of concordance with ovotestes was highest for hairy-tailed moles and lowest for broad-footed moles. In relationship to phylogenetic clade, sex differentiation features also did not correlate with the similarity/divergence of the features and presence/absence of ovotestes. Hairy-tailed and Japanese shrew moles reside in separated clades, but they exhibit a high degree of congruence. Broad-footed and hairy-tailed moles reside within the same clade but had one of the lowest correlations in features and presence/absence of ovotestes. Thus, phylogenetic affinity and the presence/absence of ovotestes are poor predictors for most sex differentiation features within mole external genitalia. PMID:28251823

  19. Sperm morphology in five species of cicadettine cicadas (Hemiptera: Cicadomorpha: Cicadidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawanji, Abraham S; Hodgson, Alan N; Villet, Martin H

    2006-12-01

    Mature spermatozoa from five species of cicadas of the subfamily Cicadettinae (Quintilia wealei, Melampsalta leucoptera, Stagira simplex, Xosopsaltria thunbergi and Monomatapa matoposa) were examined by light and electron microscopy. In each species sperm are elongate, aggregated into organized bundles with their heads embedded in a homogenous matrix to form spermatodesmata, and exhibit polymegaly. The head of the sperm consist of an anteriorly positioned conical acrosome that has a tubular substructure and a deep, posterior invagination that forms the subacrosomal space (eccentrically positioned anteriorly). The acrosome is flattened anteriorly; posteriorly it extends along either side of the nucleus as two tubular processes that gradually decrease in diameter. The filiform nucleus tapers anteriorly and intrudes into the subscrosomal space. Posteriorly the nucleus has a lateral invagination that houses material of the so-called centriolar adjunct. Posterior to the centriolar adjuct and the nucleus are two crystalline mitochondrial derivatives and a centriole, respectively, the latter giving rise to the axoneme, which has a 9 + 9 + 2 arrangement of microtubules. In these respects the sperm are similar to those of platypleurine cicadas. However, some features seem unique to cicadettines, including the structural organization of an enlarged centriolar adjunct and the dimensions of the tails. The enlarged centriolar adjunct has a lamella-like substructure and can be considered a synapomorphic character in the Cicadettinae. It is, therefore, potentially useful in the separation of this subfamily from the Cicadinae. In addition, the great length of the sperm nucleus of long-headed sperm in M. matoposa could be a synapomorphy of this genus and related taphurine and cicadettine species.

  20. Chemical and morphological characteristics of key tree species of the Carpathian Mountains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mankovska, Blanka; Godzik, Barbara; Badea, Ovidiu; Shparyk, Yuri; Moravcik, Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations of Al, B, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, N, Na, P, S and Zn in the foliage of white fir (Abies alba), Norway spruce (Picea abies) and common beech (Fagus sylvatica) from 25 sites of the Carpathian Mts. forests (Czech Republic, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Ukraine) are discussed in a context of their limit values. S/N ratio was different from optimum in 90% of localities when compared with the European limit values. Likewise we found increase of Fe and Cu concentrations compared with their background levels in 100% of locations. Mn concentrations were increased in 76% of localities. Mn mobilization values indicate the disturbance of physiological balance leading to the change of the ratio with Fe. SEM-investigation of foliage waxes from 25 sites in the Carpathian Mts. showed, that there is a statistically significant difference in mean wax quality. Epistomatal waxes were damaged as indicated by increased development of net and amorphous waxes. The most damaged stomata in spruce needles were from Yablunitsa, Synevir and Brenna; in fir needles from Stoliky, and in beech leaves from Mala Fatra, Morske Oko and Beregomet. Spruce needles in the Carpathian Mts. had more damaged stomata than fir needles and beech leaves. Spruce seems to be the most sensitive tree species to environmental stresses including air pollution in forests of the Carpathian Mountains. Foliage surfaces of three forest tree species contained Al, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, K, Cl, Mn, Na, Ni and Ti in all studied localities. Presence of nutrition elements (Ca, Fe, Mg, K and Mn) on foliage surface hinders opening and closing stomata and it is not physiologically usable for tree species. - Chemical composition of foliage and structure of epicuticular waxes indicated phytotoxic effects of air pollution in many forest sites of the Carpathian Mountains

  1. Genetic and Morphological Analyses Demonstrate That Schizolecis guntheri (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) Is Likely to Be a Species Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Camila S.; Costa-Silva, Guilherme J.; Roxo, Fábio F.; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Schizolecis is a monotypic genus of Siluriformes widely distributed throughout isolated coastal drainages of southeastern Brazil. Previous studies have shown that fish groups found in isolated river basins tend to differentiate over time in the absence of gene flow, resulting in allopatric speciation. In this study, we used partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI with the analysis of the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC) and the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) for single locus species delimitation, and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of external morphology to test the hypothesis that Schizolecis guntheri is a complex of species. We analyzed 94 samples of S. guntheri for GMYC and ABGD, and 82 samples for PCA from 22 coastal rivers draining to the Atlantic in southeastern Brazil from the Paraná State to the north of the Rio de Janeiro State. As a result, the GMYC model and the ABGD delimited five operational taxonomy units (OTUs – a nomenclature referred to in the present study of the possible new species delimited for the genetic analysis), a much higher number compared to the traditional alfa taxonomy that only recognizes S. guntheri across the isolated coastal rivers of Brazil. Furthermore, the PCA analysis suggests that S. guntheri is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including dorsal-fin spine length, pectoral-fin spine length, pelvic-fin spine length, lower caudal-fin spine length, caudal peduncle depth, anal width and mandibular ramus length. However, no exclusive character was found among the isolated populations that could be used to describe a new species of Schizolecis. Therefore, we can conclude, based on our results of PCA contrasting with the results of GMYC and ABGD, that S. guntheri represents a complex of species. PMID:29552028

  2. Genetic and Morphological Analyses Demonstrate That Schizolecis guntheri (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) Is Likely to Be a Species Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Camila S; Costa-Silva, Guilherme J; Roxo, Fábio F; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Schizolecis is a monotypic genus of Siluriformes widely distributed throughout isolated coastal drainages of southeastern Brazil. Previous studies have shown that fish groups found in isolated river basins tend to differentiate over time in the absence of gene flow, resulting in allopatric speciation. In this study, we used partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI with the analysis of the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC) and the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD) for single locus species delimitation, and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of external morphology to test the hypothesis that Schizolecis guntheri is a complex of species. We analyzed 94 samples of S. guntheri for GMYC and ABGD, and 82 samples for PCA from 22 coastal rivers draining to the Atlantic in southeastern Brazil from the Paraná State to the north of the Rio de Janeiro State. As a result, the GMYC model and the ABGD delimited five operational taxonomy units (OTUs - a nomenclature referred to in the present study of the possible new species delimited for the genetic analysis), a much higher number compared to the traditional alfa taxonomy that only recognizes S. guntheri across the isolated coastal rivers of Brazil. Furthermore, the PCA analysis suggests that S. guntheri is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including dorsal-fin spine length, pectoral-fin spine length, pelvic-fin spine length, lower caudal-fin spine length, caudal peduncle depth, anal width and mandibular ramus length. However, no exclusive character was found among the isolated populations that could be used to describe a new species of Schizolecis . Therefore, we can conclude, based on our results of PCA contrasting with the results of GMYC and ABGD, that S. guntheri represents a complex of species.

  3. Genetic and Morphological Analyses Demonstrate That Schizolecis guntheri (Siluriformes: Loricariidae Is Likely to Be a Species Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila S. Souza

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizolecis is a monotypic genus of Siluriformes widely distributed throughout isolated coastal drainages of southeastern Brazil. Previous studies have shown that fish groups found in isolated river basins tend to differentiate over time in the absence of gene flow, resulting in allopatric speciation. In this study, we used partial sequences of the mitochondrial gene COI with the analysis of the General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC and the Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD for single locus species delimitation, and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA of external morphology to test the hypothesis that Schizolecis guntheri is a complex of species. We analyzed 94 samples of S. guntheri for GMYC and ABGD, and 82 samples for PCA from 22 coastal rivers draining to the Atlantic in southeastern Brazil from the Paraná State to the north of the Rio de Janeiro State. As a result, the GMYC model and the ABGD delimited five operational taxonomy units (OTUs – a nomenclature referred to in the present study of the possible new species delimited for the genetic analysis, a much higher number compared to the traditional alfa taxonomy that only recognizes S. guntheri across the isolated coastal rivers of Brazil. Furthermore, the PCA analysis suggests that S. guntheri is highly variable in aspects of external body proportions, including dorsal-fin spine length, pectoral-fin spine length, pelvic-fin spine length, lower caudal-fin spine length, caudal peduncle depth, anal width and mandibular ramus length. However, no exclusive character was found among the isolated populations that could be used to describe a new species of Schizolecis. Therefore, we can conclude, based on our results of PCA contrasting with the results of GMYC and ABGD, that S. guntheri represents a complex of species.

  4. Effects of Seedbed Density on Seedling Morphological Characteristics of four Broadleaved Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yucedag, C.; Gailing, O.

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of seedling spacing on morphological characteristics of one year-old Amygdalus communis L., Prunus avium L., Pyrus elaeagnifolia Pall. and Eriolobus trilobatus (Poiret) Roemer seedlings under nursery conditions. Seedlings were grown in completely randomized blocks with four replications. Seedbeds were 1.2 m wide with 5 rows each 20 cm apart. Within-row spacings were chosen as 4, 8 and 12 cm to analyze the effect of seedlings density on growth performance. Seedling spacing significantly affected root collar diameter, shoot height, tap root length and number of fine roots in A. communis and P. avium, but not in P. elaeagnifolia and E. tribolatus. Additionally wider seedling spacings resulted in larger seedlings in A. communis and P. avium. In conclusion, it would be beneficial to use wider seedling spacing in order to obtain better seedling growth in A. communis and P. avium. Larger seedlings could also provide significant advantages because of reduced cultural activities and an expected higher growth and survival rate. (Author) 27 refs.

  5. Revision of the genus Dinotoperla Tillyard, 1921 (Plecoptera: Gripopterygidae) using morphological characters and molecular data: Establishes two new genera, three new species and updates the larval taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynott, Julia H; Suter, Phillip J; Theischinger, Gunther

    2017-01-23

    The larval taxonomy of Australian stoneflies (Plecoptera) shows a large disparity in knowledge when compared to the adult taxonomy with many species having undescribed larval forms. The importance of stoneflies as an indicator group for monitoring aquatic ecosystems means knowledge of the larval taxonomy and the ability to identify species is essential. This study combined morphology and mitochondrial gene sequences to associate the adult and larval life-stages for species of Dinotoperla Tillyard. Morphological identification of adult males was recognised for 17 of the 35 Dinotoperla species and combining molecular data with morphology confirmed eight new adult-larval life stage associations. Further, molecular data supported the larval taxonomy for five morphospecies which remain unassociated. The combination of molecular and morphological methods enabled the larval morphology to be reassessed for the genus Dinotoperla and this has led to the establishment of two new genera, Odontoperla, gen. nov. and Oedemaperla, gen. nov., and the new species Dinotoperla aryballoi, sp. nov, D. tasmaniensis, sp. nov. and Oedemaperla shackletoni, sp. nov. as well as the new or updated descriptions of the larvae of 31 species and a comprehensive dichotomous key to these larvae.

  6. Taxonomic review of the species of Mugil (Teleostei: Perciformes: Mugilidae) from the Atlantic South Caribbean and South America, with integration of morphological, cytogenetic and molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Naércio A; Nirchio, Mauro; De Oliveira, Cláudio; Siccharamirez, Raquel

    2015-01-10

    Analysis of morphological, molecular and cytological data helped to define and more precisely characterize the species of Mugil from the Atlantic coasts of South Caribbean and South America, allowing a correction of prior misidentifications and distributional ranges. A new species from Venezuela is described and all the species from the area are redescribed. It is demonstrated that the apparent similarity in morphological traits, which contradicted the results from recent molecular studies, is the result of the misuse of traditional morphological characters, and thus both the molecular and cytological data instead are congruent with the morphological differences that are found among mullet species. The presence of Mugil hospes Jordan & Culver in the western south Atlantic is refuted based on the comparison of type material of this species with specimens from this area that also indicated a very significant morphological difference, what on the other hand justifies the recognition of these specimens as Mugil brevirostris (Ribeiro). The distribution of Mugil incilis Hancock is restricted and the similarities among the species formerly depicted in a prior dendrogram is modified following the inclusion of recently obtained molecular data for Mugil curvidens Valenciennes.

  7. Species composition and diversity of fish larvae in the Subtropical Convergence Zone of the Sargasso Sea from morphology and DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayala, Daniel Jiro; Munk, Peter; Riemann, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    . In order to evaluate spatial variability of larval fish in the region, we examined species diversity, composition and abundances at eight stations in the Subtropical Convergence Zone (STCZ) using morphological identification and DNA barcoding. From a total of approximately 3500 specimens collected...... of the strong environmental gradients. Common eel species were concentrated between the fronts whereas common myctophids were of highest abundance at the outer edges of the fronts. The abundances of most species were generally enhanced in the vicinity of the fronts. The use of combined morphological and DNA-barcoding...

  8. Species composition and morphologic variation of Porites in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, R. A.

    2013-09-01

    Morphometric analysis of corallite calices confirmed that from the late Miocene to the Recent, four species of Porites have inhabited the Gulf of California: the extinct Porites carrizensis, the locally extirpated Porites lobata and the extant Porites sverdrupi and Porites panamensis. Furthermore, large-scale spatial and temporal phenotypic plasticity was observed in the dominant species P. panamensis. Canonical discriminant analysis and ANOVA demonstrated that the calice structures of P. panamensis experienced size reduction between the late Pleistocene and Recent. Similarly, PERMANOVA, regression and correlation analyses demonstrated that across the 800 km north to south in the gulf, P. panamensis populations displayed a similar reduction in calice structures. Based on correlation analysis with environmental data, these large spatial changes are likely related to changes in nutrient concentration and sea surface temperature. As such, the large-scale spatial and temporal phenotypic variation recorded in populations of P. panamensis in the Gulf of California is likely related to optimization of corallite performance (energy acquisition) within various environmental scenarios. These findings may have relevance to modern conservation efforts within this ecological dominant genus.

  9. Differentiations of chitin content and surface morphologies of chitins extracted from male and female grasshopper species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kaya

    Full Text Available In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, elemental analysis (EA, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM to investigate chitin structure isolated from both sexes of four grasshopper species. FT-IR, EA, XRD, and TGA showed that the chitin was in the alpha form. With respect to gender, two main differences were observed. First, we observed that the quantity of chitin was greater in males than in females and the dry weight of chitin between species ranged from 4.71% to 11.84%. Second, using SEM, we observed that the male chitin surface structure contained 25-90 nm wide nanofibers and 90-250 nm nanopores, while no pores or nanofibers were observed in the chitin surface structure of the majority of females (nanofibers were observed only in M. desertus females. In contrast, the elemental analysis, thermal properties, and crystalline index values for chitin were similar in males and females. Also, we carried out enzymatic digestion of the isolated chitins using commercial chitinase from Streptomyces griseus. We observed that there were no big differences in digestion rate of the chitins from both sexes and commercial chitin. The digestion rates were for grasshoppers' chitins; 88.45-95.48% and for commercial chitin; 94.95%.

  10. Differentiations of chitin content and surface morphologies of chitins extracted from male and female grasshopper species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Murat; Lelešius, Evaldas; Nagrockaitė, Radvilė; Sargin, Idris; Arslan, Gulsin; Mol, Abbas; Baran, Talat; Can, Esra; Bitim, Betul

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), elemental analysis (EA), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate chitin structure isolated from both sexes of four grasshopper species. FT-IR, EA, XRD, and TGA showed that the chitin was in the alpha form. With respect to gender, two main differences were observed. First, we observed that the quantity of chitin was greater in males than in females and the dry weight of chitin between species ranged from 4.71% to 11.84%. Second, using SEM, we observed that the male chitin surface structure contained 25-90 nm wide nanofibers and 90-250 nm nanopores, while no pores or nanofibers were observed in the chitin surface structure of the majority of females (nanofibers were observed only in M. desertus females). In contrast, the elemental analysis, thermal properties, and crystalline index values for chitin were similar in males and females. Also, we carried out enzymatic digestion of the isolated chitins using commercial chitinase from Streptomyces griseus. We observed that there were no big differences in digestion rate of the chitins from both sexes and commercial chitin. The digestion rates were for grasshoppers' chitins; 88.45-95.48% and for commercial chitin; 94.95%.

  11. Morphological evaluation on leaf characteristics of common Aquilaria species in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad Hanif Azhari Noor; Azhar Mohamad; Roohaida Othman; Syarul Nataqain Baharum

    2014-01-01

    Aquilaria sp. belongs to the Thymelaeaceae family and is well distributed in Asia region. The species has multipurpose use from root to shoot and is an economically important crop, which generates wide interest in understanding genetic diversity of the species. Knowledge on DNA-based markers has become a prerequisite for more effective application of molecular marker techniques in breeding and mapping programs. In this work, both targeted genes and tandem repeat sequences were used for DNA fingerprinting in Aquilaria sp. A total of 100 ISSR (inter simple sequence repeat) primers and 50 combination pairs of specific primers derived from conserved region of a specific protein known as system in were optimized. 38 ISSR primers were found affirmative for polymorphism evaluation study and were generated from both specific and degenerate ISSR primers. And one utmost combination of system in primers showed significant results in distinguishing the Aquilaria sp. In conclusion, polymorphism derived from ISSR profiling and targeted stress genes of protein system in proved as a powerful approach for identification and molecular classification of Aquilaria sp. which will be useful for diversification in identifying any mutant lines derived from nature. (author)

  12. Species interactions in an Andean bird–flowering plant network: phenology is more important than abundance or morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Gonzalez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Biological constraints and neutral processes have been proposed to explain the properties of plant–pollinator networks. Using interactions between nectarivorous birds (hummingbirds and flowerpiercers and flowering plants in high elevation forests (i.e., “elfin” forests of the Andes, we explore the importance of biological constraints and neutral processes (random interactions to explain the observed species interactions and network metrics, such as connectance, specialization, nestedness and asymmetry. In cold environments of elfin forests, which are located at the top of the tropical montane forest zone, many plants are adapted for pollination by birds, making this an ideal system to study plant–pollinator networks. To build the network of interactions between birds and plants, we used direct field observations. We measured abundance of birds using mist-nets and flower abundance using transects, and phenology by scoring presence of birds and flowers over time. We compared the length of birds’ bills to flower length to identify “forbidden interactions”—those interactions that could not result in legitimate floral visits based on mis-match in morphology. Diglossa flowerpiercers, which are characterized as “illegitimate” flower visitors, were relatively abundant. We found that the elfin forest network was nested with phenology being the factor that best explained interaction frequencies and nestedness, providing support for biological constraints hypothesis. We did not find morphological constraints to be important in explaining observed interaction frequencies and network metrics. Other network metrics (connectance, evenness and asymmetry, however, were better predicted by abundance (neutral process models. Flowerpiercers, which cut holes and access flowers at their base and, consequently, facilitate nectar access for other hummingbirds, explain why morphological mis-matches were relatively unimportant in this system. Future

  13. Frequent discordance between morphology and mitochondrial DNA in a species group of European water beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae

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    David T. Bilton

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Hydroporus memnonius species group includes both widespread and range restricted diving beetle taxa in the western Palaearctic, some of which have been divided into a number of geographical subspecies. Of these, Hydroporus necopinatus is distributed in the far west of Europe, from central Spain to southern Britain, and has been split into three subspecies, occurring in Iberia (necopinatus sst., France (robertorum and England (roni respectively—the last of these being a rare example of an insect taxon apparently endemic to northern Europe. Here we explore inter-relationships between populations and subspecies of H. necopinatus and related members of the Hydroporus melanarius subgroup, using mitochondrial COI sequence data. We reveal widespread discordance between mitochondrial DNA sequence variation and morphology in areas where H. necopinatus and H. melanarius come into contact, consistent with historical introgressive hybridization between these taxa. In light of this discordance, the lack of clear genetic divergence between H. necopinatus subspecies, and the fact that both robertorum and roni are morphologically intermediate between H. necopinatus sstr. and H. melanarius, we suggest that these taxa may be of hybridogenic origin, rather than representing discrete evolutionary lineages.

  14. Different temperatures select distinctive acetic acid bacteria species and promotes organic acids production during Kombucha tea fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Francesca; Troise, Antonio Dario; Vitaglione, Paola; Ercolini, Danilo

    2018-08-01

    Kombucha is a traditional beverage produced by tea fermentation, carried out by a symbiotic consortium of bacteria and yeasts. Acetic Acid Bacteria (AAB) usually dominate the bacterial community of Kombucha, driving the fermentative process. The consumption of this beverage was often associated to beneficial effects for the health, due to its antioxidant and detoxifying properties. We characterized bacterial populations of Kombucha tea fermented at 20 or 30 °C by using culture-dependent and -independent methods and monitored the concentration of gluconic and glucuronic acids, as well as of total polyphenols. We found significant differences in the microbiota at the two temperatures. Moreover, different species of Gluconacetobacter were selected, leading to a differential abundance of gluconic and glucuronic acids. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular diversity of poleroviruses infecting cucurbit crops in four countries reveals the presence of members of six distinct species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, D; Tsai, W S; Maiss, E; Kenyon, L

    2014-06-01

    When 66 cucurbit samples with yellowing symptoms from fields in Mali, the Philippines, Thailand and Uzbekistan were screened by RT-PCR using universal polerovirus primers, 21 were identified as harboring polerovirus RNA. When these 21 samples were screened with specific primers for the known cucurbit-infecting poleroviruses, suakwa aphid-borne yellows virus and a recombinant strain of cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus were detected for the first time in the Philippines and Thailand. However, seven polerovirus-positive samples did not react with any of the known species-specific primers. Sequencing of 1.4-kb universal polerovirus RT-PCR products revealed the presence of two poleroviruses that had not been described previously. These viruses, from Mali and Thailand, were provisionally named pepo aphid-borne yellows virus and luffa aphid-borne yellows virus, respectively.

  16. Functional implications of species differences in the size and morphology of the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristián Gutiérrez-Ibáñez

    Full Text Available In birds, there is a retinofugal projection from the brain to the retina originating from the isthmo optic nucleus (ION in the midbrain. Despite a large number of anatomical, physiological and histochemical studies, the function of this retinofugal system remains unclear. Several functions have been proposed including: gaze stabilization, pecking behavior, dark adaptation, shifting attention, and detection of aerial predators. This nucleus varies in size and organization among some species, but the relative size and morphology of the ION has not been systematically studied. Here, we present a comparison of the relative size and morphology of the ION in 81 species of birds, representing 17 different orders. Our results show that several orders of birds, besides those previously reported, have a large, well-organized ION, including: hummingbirds, woodpeckers, coots and allies, and kingfishers. At the other end of the spectrum, parrots, herons, waterfowl, owls and diurnal raptors have relatively small ION volumes. ION also appears to be absent or unrecognizable is several taxa, including one of the basal avian groups, the tinamous, which suggests that the ION may have evolved only in the more modern group of birds, Neognathae. Finally, we demonstrate that evolutionary changes in the relative size and the cytoarchitectonic organization of ION have occurred largely independent of phylogeny. The large relative size of the ION in orders with very different lifestyles and feeding behaviors suggest there is no clear association with pecking behavior or predator detection. Instead, our results suggest that the ION is more complex and enlarged in birds that have eyes that are emmetropic in some parts of the visual field and myopic in others. We therefore posit that the ION is involved in switching attention between two parts of the retina i.e. from an emmetropic to a myopic part of the retina.

  17. Distinct cell-specific expression of homospermidine synthase involved in pyrrolizidine alkaloid biosynthesis in three species of the boraginales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemüller, Daniel; Reimann, Andreas; Ober, Dietrich

    2012-07-01

    Homospermidine synthase (HSS) is the first specific enzyme in pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) biosynthesis, a pathway involved in the plant's chemical defense. HSS has been shown to be recruited repeatedly by duplication of a gene involved in primary metabolism. Within the lineage of the Boraginales, only one gene duplication event gave rise to HSS. Here, we demonstrate that the tissue-specific expression of HSS in three boraginaceous species, Heliotropium indicum, Symphytum officinale, and Cynoglossum officinale, is unique with respect to plant organ, tissue, and cell type. Within H. indicum, HSS is expressed exclusively in nonspecialized cells of the lower epidermis of young leaves and shoots. In S. officinale, HSS expression has been detected in the cells of the root endodermis and in leaves directly underneath developing inflorescences. In young roots of C. officinale, HSS is detected only in cells of the endodermis, but in a later developmental stage, additionally in the pericycle. The individual expression patterns are compared with those within the Senecioneae lineage (Asteraceae), where HSS expression is reproducibly found in specific cells of the endodermis and the adjacent cortex parenchyma of the roots. The individual expression patterns within the Boraginales species are discussed as being a requirement for the successful recruitment of HSS after gene duplication. The diversity of HSS expression within this lineage adds a further facet to the already diverse patterns of expression that have been observed for HSS in other PA-producing plant lineages, making this PA-specific enzyme one of the most diverse expressed proteins described in the literature.

  18. Anterior segment morphology and morphometry in selected reptile species using optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rival, Franck; Linsart, Adeline; Isard, Pierre-François; Besson, Christian; Dulaurent, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To provide new and original images of the anterior segment (AS) of the eye of selected Ophidian, Chelonian, and Saurian species and to compare the AS architecture among and within these three groups. 17 Saurians, 14 Ophidians, and 11 Chelonians with no concurrent systemic or eye disease were included in the study. Age, weight, nose-cloaca distance (NCD), and pupil shape were collected for each animal. The AS was examined by optical coherence tomography (OCT). After gross description of the appearance of the AS, the central and peripheral corneal thickness (CCT, PCT) and anterior chamber depth (ACD) were measured using the software provided with the OCT device. The ratio CCT/ACD was then calculated for each animal. Pupil shape was a vertical slit in all the crepuscular or nocturnal animals (except for 1 chelonian and 1 ophidian). Each group had its own particular AS architecture. Saurians had a regularly thin cornea with a flat anterior lens capsule and a deep anterior chamber. Ophidians had a thick cornea with a narrow anterior chamber due to a very anteriorly anchored spherical lens. The spectacle was difficult to identify in all ophidians except in Python molurus bivitattus in which it was more obvious. Chelonians displayed an intermediate architecture which more closely resembled the Saurian type than the Ophidian type. Despite grossly similar AS architecture, the three groups of reptiles in the study demonstrated differences that are suggestive of a link between anatomical disparities and variations in environment and lifestyle. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  19. Comments on the variation of spike morphology in selected species of Elytrigia and Elymus (Triticeae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romuald Kosina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of spikes of Elytrigia repens, E. intermedia and Elymus caninus was investigated. The number of spikelets per spike reveals the weakest correlations with other characters of the spike. The same concerns some character ratios. The correlations provide information about the segmented structure (metamers of the spike. There is a great difference between matrices of correlation coefficients for E. repens and E. intermedia related to the development and structure of spike. Characters important for the description of the spike were chosen - in five-character set these are among others: length of glume awn in median spikelet, length of lemma awn in the first floret of the median spikelet, number of spikelets per spike. Length of lemma awn and mean length of the rachis segment were recognized as the best discriminants for species. Ordination of forms along axes of canonical variates does not indicate the subunits within E. repens. Intermediate forms between E. repens and Elymus caninus have not been found. Between E. repens and E. intermedia there exists some proximity. Heteromorphic individuals were described by means of cluster analysis. They prove the mobility of the genome in ramets of a single genet.

  20. Anatomical and morphological modifications in response to flooding by six Cerrado tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson Serafim de Oliveira

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are common in the Cerrado (Brazilian savannas biome, however flooding of these wetlands impairs growth and development of most plants. We evaluated flood tolerance of typical Cerrado trees. Seedlings of Aspidosperma macrocarpon (Apocynaceae, Tabebuia rosea (Bignoniaceae, Handroanthus chrysotrichus (Bignoniaceae, Myracrodruon urundeuva (Anacardiaceae, Kielmeyera coriacea (Calophyllaceae and Copaifera langsdorffii (Fabaceae were flooded up to the stem base for 30 days. Stems with cortical cracks, secondary aerenchyma and hypertrophic lenticels were observed in flooded plants of M. urundeuva,H. chrysotrichus and T. rosea while adventitious roots were formed in flooded plants of T. rosea and H. chrysotrichus. However, only T. rosea developed aerenchyma in the root cortex. K. coriacea and A. macrocarpon were the most sensitive to flooding, showing a decrease in survival and necrosis of the leaves and roots. C. langsdorffii and M. urundeuva were less sensitive to flooding, although reductions in root biomass and symptoms of necrosis of the roots were noticeable in flooded seedlings. Flooded M. urundeuva seedlings also had a decrease in total leaf area, leaf biomass, total biomass and in stem growth. Flooding affected root development and reduced stem growth of H. chrysotrichus with symptoms of necrosis of the leaves and roots. T. rosea was the only species where symptoms of injury from flooding were not evident.

  1. Clinically relevant morphological structures in breast cancer represent transcriptionally distinct tumor cell populations with varied degrees of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and CD44+CD24- stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, Evgeny V; Skryabin, Nikolay A; Gerashchenko, Tatiana S; Tashireva, Lubov A; Wilhelm, Jochen; Buldakov, Mikhail A; Sleptcov, Aleksei A; Lebedev, Igor N; Vtorushin, Sergey V; Zavyalova, Marina V; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V; Perelmuter, Vladimir M

    2017-09-22

    Intratumor morphological heterogeneity in breast cancer is represented by different morphological structures (tubular, alveolar, solid, trabecular, and discrete) and contributes to poor prognosis; however, the mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study, we performed 3D imaging, laser microdissection-assisted array comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression microarray analysis of different morphological structures and examined their association with the standard immunohistochemistry scorings and CD44 + CD24 - cancer stem cells. We found that the intratumor morphological heterogeneity is not associated with chromosomal aberrations. By contrast, morphological structures were characterized by specific gene expression profiles and signaling pathways and significantly differed in progesterone receptor and Ki-67 expression. Most importantly, we observed significant differences between structures in the number of expressed genes of the epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes and the association with cancer invasion pathways. Tubular (tube-shaped) and alveolar (spheroid-shaped) structures were transcriptionally similar and demonstrated co-expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers. Solid (large shapeless) structures retained epithelial features but demonstrated an increase in mesenchymal traits and collective cell migration hallmarks. Mesenchymal genes and cancer invasion pathways, as well as Ki-67 expression, were enriched in trabecular (one/two rows of tumor cells) and discrete groups (single cells and/or arrangements of 2-5 cells). Surprisingly, the number of CD44 + CD24 - cells was found to be the lowest in discrete groups and the highest in alveolar and solid structures. Overall, our findings indicate the association of intratumor morphological heterogeneity in breast cancer with the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and CD44 + CD24 - stemness and the appeal of this heterogeneity as a model for the study of cancer invasion.

  2. Analyses of fungal community by Illumina MiSeq platforms and characterization of Eurotium species on Liupao tea, a distinctive post-fermented tea from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yan; Wei, BaoYao; Teng, JianWen; Huang, Li; Xia, Ning

    2017-09-01

    Liupao tea is a distinctive Chinese dark tea obtained by indigenous tea fermentation facilitated by the symbiotic association of bacteria and fungi. The composition of fungal community in 4 Liupao tea samples stored for several years under natural microbial fermentation was evaluated by MiSeq sequencing. Taxonomic analysis revealed 3 phyla, 6 families, 8 genera. The genera Eurotium and Aspergillus were dominant fungi in almost all the samples. A total of 85 strains found in 41 other tea samples were species of Eurotium. amstelodami, Eurotium. niveoglaucum, Eurotium. repens, Eurotium. rubrum, Eurotium. tonophilum and Eurotium. cristatum by culture-dependent method. Of these species, E. repens, E. rubrum and E. tonophilum have not been previously associated with Liupao tea. This report is the first to reveal fungal flora composition using Illumina-based sequencing and provide useful information for relevant studies on the isolation of Eurotium species in Liupao tea. The predominant molds are Eurotium species, and the comparison of fungal diversity in dark teas is worth considering. The taxonomic analysis of the microbial community would also aid the further study of functional genes and metabolic pathways of Liupao tea fermentation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Two Distinct Approaches for CRISPR-Cas9-Mediated Gene Editing in Cryptococcus neoformans and Related Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping

    2018-06-27

    Cryptococcus neoformans and related species are encapsulated basidiomycetous fungi that cause meningoencephalitis in individuals with immune deficiency. This pathogen has a tractable genetic system; however, gene disruption via electroporation remains difficult, while biolistic transformation is often limited by lack of multiple genetic markers and the high initial cost of equipment. The approach using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) has become the technology of choice for gene editing in many organisms due to its simplicity, efficiency, and versatility. The technique has been successfully demonstrated in C. neoformans and Cryptococcus deneoformans in which two DNA plasmids expressing either the Streptococcus pyogenes CAS9 gene or the guide RNA (gRNA) were employed. However, potential adverse effects due to constitutive expression and the time-consuming process of constructing vectors to express each gRNA remain as a primary barrier for wide adaptation. This report describes the delivery of preassembled CRISPR-Cas9-gRNA ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) via electroporation that is able to generate edited mutant alleles. RNP-mediated CRISPR-Cas9 was used to replace the wild-type GIB2 gene encoding a Gβ-like/RACK1 Gib2 protein with a gib2 :: NAT allele via homologous recombination in both C. neoformans and C. deneoformans In addition, a DNA plasmid (pCnCas9:U6-gRNA) that expresses both Cas9 and gRNA, allowing for convenient yet low-cost DNA-mediated gene editing, is described. pCnCas9:U6-gRNA contains an endogenous U6 promoter for gRNA expression and restriction sites for one-step insertion of a gRNA. These approaches and resources provide new opportunities to accelerate genetic studies of Cryptococcus species. IMPORTANCE For genetic studies of the Cryptococcus genus, generation of mutant strains is often hampered by a limited number of selectable genetic markers, the tedious process of vector

  4. Distinct contributions of reactive oxygen species in amygdala to bee venom-induced spontaneous pain-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun-Fei; Neugebauer, Volker; Chen, Jun; Li, Zhen

    2016-04-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, play essential roles in physiological plasticity and are also involved in the pathogenesis of persistent pain. Roles of peripheral and spinal ROS in pain have been well established, but much less is known about ROS in the amygdala, a brain region that plays an important role in pain modulation. The present study explored the contribution of ROS in the amygdala to bee venom (BV)-induced pain behaviors. Our data show that the amygdala is activated following subcutaneous BV injection into the left hindpaw, which is reflected in the increased number of c-Fos positive cells in the central and basolateral amygdala nuclei in the right hemisphere. Stereotaxic administration of a ROS scavenger (tempol, 10mM), NADPH oxidase inhibitor (baicalein, 5mM) or lipoxygenase inhibitor (apocynin, 10mM) into the right amygdala attenuated the BV-induced spontaneous licking and lifting behaviors, but had no effect on BV-induced paw flinch reflexes. Our study provides further evidence for the involvement of the amygdala in nociceptive processing and pain behaviors, and that ROS in amygdala may be a potential target for treatment strategies to inhibit pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Discrepancy between species borders at morphological and molecular levels in the genus Cochliopodium (Amoebozoa, Himatismenida), with the description of Cochliopodium plurinucleolum n. sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisen, Stefan; Kudryavtsev, Alexander; Bonkowski, Michael; Smirnov, Alexey

    2014-05-01

    Amoebae of the genus Cochliopodium are characterized by a tectum that is a layer of scales covering the dorsal surface of the cell. A combination of scale structure, morphological features and, nowadays, molecular information allows species discrimination. Here we describe a soil species Cochliopodium plurinucleolum n. sp. that besides strong genetic divergence from all currently described species of Cochliopodium differs morphologically by the presence of several peripheral nucleoli in the nucleus. Further, we unambiguously show that the Golgi attachment associated with a dictyosome in Cochliopodium is a cytoplasmic microtubule organizing center (MTOC). Last, we provide detailed morphological and molecular information on the sister clade of C. plurinucleolum, containing C. minus, C. minutoidum, C. pentatrifurcatum and C. megatetrastylus. These species share nearly identical sequences of both, small subunit ribosomal RNA and partial Cox1 genes, and nearly identical structure of the scales. Scales of C. pentatrifurcatum differ, however, strongly from scales of the others while sequences of C. pentatrifurcatum and C. minus are nearly identical. These discrepancies urge for future sampling efforts to disentangle species characteristics within Cochliopdium and to investigate morphological and molecular patterns that allow reliable species differentiation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Hepatozoon martis n. sp. (Adeleorina: Hepatozoidae): Morphological and pathological features of a Hepatozoon species infecting martens (family Mustelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodžić, Adnan; Alić, Amer; Beck, Relja; Beck, Ana; Huber, Doroteja; Otranto, Domenico; Baneth, Gad; Duscher, Georg G

    2018-05-01

    Species of the genus Hepatozoon (Adeleorina: Hepatozoidae) are arthropod-transmitted protozoan parasites that infect a wide range of vertebrate hosts. In the present study, we describe a new species of Hepatozoon primarily infecting martens and propose the name Hepatozoon martis n. sp., based on its unique morphological, molecular and pathogenic features. The overall prevalence of infection with H. martis n. sp. assessed by PCR in European pine martens (Martes martes) from Bosnia and Herzegovina and stone martens (Martes foina) from Croatia was 100% and 64%, respectively. Gamonts were found in neutrophils and monocytes, and various developmental stages were described in tissue cross-sections. Hepatozoon martis n. sp. shows a high predilection for muscle tissue, and the heart was the most frequently affected organ among the tissues tested by histopathology. Microscopically, pyogranulomatous lesions associated with the presence of the parasitic forms were observed in the cardiac and skeletal muscles of all positive animals examined. Furthermore, the possible existence of alternative, non-vectorial routes of transmission is discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis and protein structure modelling identifies distinct Ca(2+)/Cation antiporters and conservation of gene family structure within Arabidopsis and rice species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Jon K; Hirschi, Kendal D

    2016-12-01

    The Ca(2+)/Cation Antiporter (CaCA) superfamily is an ancient and widespread family of ion-coupled cation transporters found in nearly all kingdoms of life. In animals, K(+)-dependent and K(+)-indendent Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers (NCKX and NCX) are important CaCA members. Recently it was proposed that all rice and Arabidopsis CaCA proteins should be classified as NCX proteins. Here we performed phylogenetic analysis of CaCA genes and protein structure homology modelling to further characterise members of this transporter superfamily. Phylogenetic analysis of rice and Arabidopsis CaCAs in comparison with selected CaCA members from non-plant species demonstrated that these genes form clearly distinct families, with the H(+)/Cation exchanger (CAX) and cation/Ca(2+) exchanger (CCX) families dominant in higher plants but the NCKX and NCX families absent. NCX-related Mg(2+)/H(+) exchanger (MHX) and CAX-related Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-like (NCL) proteins are instead present. Analysis of genomes of ten closely-related rice species and four Arabidopsis-related species found that CaCA gene family structures are highly conserved within related plants, apart from minor variation. Protein structures were modelled for OsCAX1a and OsMHX1. Despite exhibiting broad structural conservation, there are clear structural differences observed between the different CaCA types. Members of the CaCA superfamily form clearly distinct families with different phylogenetic, structural and functional characteristics, and therefore should not be simply classified as NCX proteins, which should remain as a separate gene family.

  8. Sternaspidae (Annelida, Sedentaria) from Vietnam with description of three new species and clarification of some morphological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhadan, Anna E; Tzetlin, Alexander B; Salazar-Vallejo, Sergio I

    2017-01-25

    Five sternaspid species were found near Vietnam shores: Sternaspis britayevi sp. nov., S. costata von Marenzeller, 1879, S. nana sp. nov., S. papillosa sp. nov., and S. spinosa Sluiter 1882. Sternaspis britayevi is described from the shallow water in Vietnam inhabiting soft bottoms; it resembles S. spinosa described from Java and S. thorsoni Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 described from the Persian Gulf, but differs in having a medially projected and markedly ribbed fan of the ventro-caudal shield and nearly parallel, distally widened and rounded branchial plates. Sternaspis nana sp. nov. is described from Nha Trang Bay; it differs from the other known species by the combination of the following characters: small size, evenly distributed micropapillae and regular rows of long cirriform papillae; posterior chaetal fascicles consisting of single thick chaeta; a ventral shield with smooth integument, without ribs and usually without concentric lines. Sternaspis papillosa sp. nov. is also described from Nha Trang Bay; it resembles S. africana Augener, 1918 and S. andamanensis Sendall & Salazar-Vallejo, 2013 by having similar ventro-caudal shields but differs by body papillation and details of the ventro-caudal shield. Based upon observations of different species some morphological features are clarified: 1) notochaetae are present in introvert chaetigers as delicate capillaries; 2) peg-chaetae are really a dense group of more than 100 thin individual chaetae, embedded in a fibrous matrix, and covered by a common sheath; 3) the pharynx is an eversible, lobed, axial non-muscular proboscis with a ciliated surface; 4) the body cavity is divided by three septa in the anterior body region, and there are no other septa; and 5) an eversible anal peduncle is confirmed, as has been shown by early taxonomists.

  9. Post-Colonization Interval Estimates Using Multi-Species Calliphoridae Larval Masses and Spatially Distinct Temperature Data Sets: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherbee, Courtney R.; Pechal, Jennifer L.; Stamper, Trevor; Benbow, M. Eric

    2017-01-01

    Common forensic entomology practice has been to collect the largest Diptera larvae from a scene and use published developmental data, with temperature data from the nearest weather station, to estimate larval development time and post-colonization intervals (PCIs). To evaluate the accuracy of PCI estimates among Calliphoridae species and spatially distinct temperature sources, larval communities and ambient air temperature were collected at replicate swine carcasses (N = 6) throughout decomposition. Expected accumulated degree hours (ADH) associated with Cochliomyia macellaria and Phormia regina third instars (presence and length) were calculated using published developmental data sets. Actual ADH ranges were calculated using temperatures recorded from multiple sources at varying distances (0.90 m–7.61 km) from the study carcasses: individual temperature loggers at each carcass, a local weather station, and a regional weather station. Third instars greatly varied in length and abundance. The expected ADH range for each species successfully encompassed the average actual ADH for each temperature source, but overall under-represented the range. For both calliphorid species, weather station data were associated with more accurate PCI estimates than temperature loggers associated with each carcass. These results provide an important step towards improving entomological evidence collection and analysis techniques, and developing forensic error rates. PMID:28375172

  10. Post-Colonization Interval Estimates Using Multi-Species Calliphoridae Larval Masses and Spatially Distinct Temperature Data Sets: A Case Study

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    Courtney R. Weatherbee

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Common forensic entomology practice has been to collect the largest Diptera larvae from a scene and use published developmental data, with temperature data from the nearest weather station, to estimate larval development time and post-colonization intervals (PCIs. To evaluate the accuracy of PCI estimates among Calliphoridae species and spatially distinct temperature sources, larval communities and ambient air temperature were collected at replicate swine carcasses (N = 6 throughout decomposition. Expected accumulated degree hours (ADH associated with Cochliomyia macellaria and Phormia regina third instars (presence and length were calculated using published developmental data sets. Actual ADH ranges were calculated using temperatures recorded from multiple sources at varying distances (0.90 m–7.61 km from the study carcasses: individual temperature loggers at each carcass, a local weather station, and a regional weather station. Third instars greatly varied in length and abundance. The expected ADH range for each species successfully encompassed the average actual ADH for each temperature source, but overall under-represented the range. For both calliphorid species, weather station data were associated with more accurate PCI estimates than temperature loggers associated with each carcass. These results provide an important step towards improving entomological evidence collection and analysis techniques, and developing forensic error rates.

  11. Morphological and genetic evolution in eastern populations of the Macrhybopsis aestivalis complex (Cypriniformes: Cyprinidae), with the descriptions of four new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Carter R; Mayden, Richard L; Powers, Steven L

    2017-03-30

    For many years the North American cyprinid fish Macrhybopsis aestivalis (common name: Speckled Chub) was regarded as a single widespread and morphologically variable species, occurring in rivers throughout much of the Mississippi Valley and geographically adjacent eastern Gulf slope drainages, west to the Rio Grande basin in Texas, New Mexico, and Mexico. Eisenhour (1997) completed a morphological study of western populations of the Speckled Chub, the results of which appeared thereafter in published form (Eisenhour 1999, 2004). He demonstrated the existence of five valid species west of the Mississippi River (aestivalis, marconis, australis, tetranema, hyostoma), of which the name aestivalis was shown to be restricted to the population occurring in the Rio Grande and the geographically adjacent Rio San Fernando system, in northeastern Mexico. Eisenhour (2004) considered populations throughout the middle Mississippi Valley and its major tributaries to be a single morphologically variable species (hyostoma), and he also indicated that populations of Macrhybopsis from eastern Gulf slope drainages may represent a complex of species. Genetic confirmation of Eisenhour's conclusions regarding western species appeared in the publication by Underwood et al. (2003), who also showed that western populations of M. hyostoma, as presently recognized, are genetically much more complex than previously considered.     Meanwhile, the present authors were involved in a companion study of eastern populations of Macrhybopsis, for which a genetic summary of the eastern Gulf coast species was published by Mayden & Powers (2004). Based on their findings, four species were recognized from southeastern drainages (identified as species A-D), although no formal taxonomic descriptions were included. Their genetic data, in combination with meristic, morphometric and other morphological data presented herein, form the basis for a revised classification of eastern Macrhybopsis populations

  12. Phylogenetic relationship and virulence inference of Streptococcus Anginosus Group: curated annotation and whole-genome comparative analysis support distinct species designation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    VNTR numbers that occurred over the course of one year. Conclusions The comparative genomic analysis of the SAG clarifies the phylogenetics of these bacteria and supports the distinct species classification. Numerous potential virulence determinants were identified and provide a foundation for further studies into SAG pathogenesis. Furthermore, the data may be used to enable the development of rapid diagnostic assays and therapeutics for these pathogens. PMID:24341328

  13. Extremely low microsatellite diversity but distinct population structure in a long-lived threatened species, the Australian lungfish Neoceratodus forsteri (Dipnoi.

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    Jane M Hughes

    Full Text Available The Australian lungfish is a unique living representative of an ancient dipnoan lineage, listed as 'vulnerable' to extinction under Australia's Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Historical accounts indicate this species occurred naturally in two adjacent river systems in Australia, the Burnett and Mary. Current day populations in other rivers are thought to have arisen by translocation from these source populations. Early genetic work detected very little variation and so had limited power to answer questions relevant for management including how genetic variation is partitioned within and among sub-populations. In this study, we use newly developed microsatellite markers to examine samples from the Burnett and Mary Rivers, as well as from two populations thought to be of translocated origin, Brisbane and North Pine. We test whether there is significant genetic structure among and within river drainages; assign putatively translocated populations to potential source populations; and estimate effective population sizes. Eleven polymorphic microsatellite loci genotyped in 218 individuals gave an average within-population heterozygosity of 0.39 which is low relative to other threatened taxa and for freshwater fishes in general. Based on FST values (average over loci = 0.11 and STRUCTURE analyses, we identify three distinct populations in the natural range, one in the Burnett and two distinct populations in the Mary. These analyses also support the hypothesis that the Mary River is the likely source of translocated populations in the Brisbane and North Pine rivers, which agrees with historical published records of a translocation event giving rise to these populations. We were unable to obtain bounded estimates of effective population size, as we have too few genotype combinations, although point estimates were low, ranging from 29 - 129. We recommend that, in order to preserve any local adaptation in the three distinct

  14. RNA sequencing supports distinct reactive oxygen species-mediated pathways of apoptosis by high and low size mass fractions of Bay leaf (Lauris nobilis) in HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, Annabelle L; Ververis, Katherine; Sayakkarage, Dheeshana; Khan, Abdul W; Rafehi, Haloom; Ziemann, Mark; Loveridge, Shanon J; Lazarus, Ross; Kerr, Caroline; Lockett, Trevor; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C; Bennett, Louise E

    2015-08-01

    Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) in mammalian cancer and HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells have been previously attributed to effects of polyphenolic and essential oil chemical species. Recently, we demonstrated differentiated growth-regulating effects of high (HFBL) versus low molecular mass (LFBL) aqueous fractions of bay leaf and now confirm by comparative effects on gene expression, that HFBL and LFBL suppress HT-29 growth by distinct mechanisms. Induction of intra-cellular lesions including DNA strand breakage by extra-cellular HFBL, invoked the hypothesis that iron-mediated reactive oxygen species with capacity to penetrate cell membrane, were responsible for HFBL-mediated effects, supported by equivalent effects of HFBL in combination with γ radiation. Activities of HFBL and LFBL were interpreted to reflect differentiated responses to iron-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS), occurring either outside or inside cells. In the presence of LFBL, apoptotic death was relatively delayed compared with HFBL. ROS production by LFBL mediated p53-dependent apoptosis and recovery was suppressed by promoting G1/S phase arrest and failure of cellular tight junctions. In comparison, intra-cellular anti-oxidant protection exerted by LFBL was absent for extra-cellular HFBL (likely polysaccharide-rich), which potentiated more rapid apoptosis by producing DNA double strand breaks. Differentiated effects on expression of genes regulating ROS defense and chromatic condensation by LFBL versus HFBL, were observed. The results support ferrous iron in cell culture systems and potentially in vivo, can invoke different extra-cellular versus intra-cellular ROS-mediated chemistries, that may be regulated by exogenous, including dietary species.

  15. Interactions and competition processes among tree species in young experimental mixed forests, assessed with chlorophyll fluorescence and leaf morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollastrini, M; Holland, V; Brüggemann, W; Koricheva, J; Jussila, I; Scherer-Lorenzen, M; Berger, S; Bussotti, F

    2014-03-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence (ChlF) and leaf morphology were assessed in two sites in Europe (Kaltenborn, Germany, and Satakunta, Finland) within a forest diversity experiment. Trees at Satakunta, planted in 1999, form a stratified canopy, while in Kaltenborn the trees are 7 years old, with no apparent canopy connection among broadleaf species. The following ChlF parameters from measured OJIP transient curves were examined: F(V)/F(M) (a proxy for maximum quantum yield); ΨEo (a proxy for efficiency in transferring an electron from reduced QA to the electron transport chain); I-P phase (a proxy for efficiency of reducing final acceptors beyond PSI); and PItot (total performance index for potential energy conservation from photons absorbed by PSII to reduction of PSI end acceptors). At Satakunta F(V)/F(M) and ΨEo in Betula pendula were higher in monocultures and lower in mixed plots, perhaps due to increasing light availability in mixed plots, which can induce photoinhibition. The opposite trend was observed in Picea abies, which was shaded in mixed plots. At Kaltenborn F(V)/F(M) decreased in Fagus sylvatica and P. abies in mixed plots due to competition both above- and belowground. At Satakunta LMA increased in B. pendula leaves with increasing species richness. Leaf area of ten leaves was reduced in F. sylvatica in mixed plots at Kaltenborn. By up-scaling the overall fluorescence response to plot level (PItot_plot ), a significant positive correlation with tree diversity was found at Kaltenborn, but not at Satakunta. This could suggest that competition/facilitation processes in mixed stands play a significant role in the early stages of forest establishment, but then tend to be compensated in more mature stands. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Morphological characteristics of developmental stages of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria species before and after staining by various techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ithoi, Init; Ahmad, Arine-Fadzlun; Mak, J W; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Lau, Yee-Ling; Mahmud, Rohela

    2011-11-01

    Seven stains were studied to determine the best color and contrast for staining the developmental stages of free living pathogenic Acanthamoeba and Naegleria species. The acid-fast bacilli stain (AFB) produced a blue color without contrast; trichrome-eosin and modified Field's showed various color contrasts; Giemsa, iron-hematoxylin, modified AFB and Gram produced only one color which distinguished the nucleus, nucleolus, cytoplasm, food- and water-vacuoles. The motile organs (acanthopodia, pseudopodia, lobopodia and flagella) were also clearly differentiated but produced a similar color as the cytoplasm. These motile organelles were first induced by incubating at 37 degrees C for at least 15 minutes and then fixing with methanol in order to preserve the protruding morphology prior to staining. The trichrome-eosin and iron-hematoxylin stains showed good color contrast for detecting all three stages, the trophozoite, cyst and flagellate; Giemsa and Gram stained the trophozoite and flagellate stages; the modified Field's and modified AFB stains stained only the trophozoite stage. Depending on the purpose, all these stains (except the AFB stain) can be used to identify the developmental stages of Acanthamoeba and Naegleria for clinical, epidemiological or public health use.

  17. Aspergillus atacamensis and A. salisburgensis: two new halophilic species from hypersaline/arid habitats with a phialosimplex-like morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Livia; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina; Azua-Bustos, Armando; Sterflinger, Katja; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2017-07-01

    Halophilic fungal strains isolated from historical wooden staircase in a salt mine in Austria, and from wall biofilm and soil of a cave in the Coastal Range of the hyperarid Atacama Desert in Chile were characterised and described newly as Aspergillus salisburgensis and Aspergillus atacamensis. Morphological characters including solitary phialides producing solitary conidia and conidia in chains and/or heads suggested affinity to Aspergillus subgenus Polypaecilum. Strains required salt for growth, grew optimally on media with 10-25% NaCl and at 15-28 °C. These values are similar to those observed for Aspergillus salinarus comb. nov. (Phialosimplex salinarum), while the ex-type strains of Aspergillus sclerotialis, Aspergillus chlamydosporus and Aspergillus caninus (all belonging to Aspergillus subgen. Polypaecilum) grew optimally at 0-5% NaCl and showed fastest growth at 28-37 °C. Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of rDNA sequences, RAPD-PCR fingerprint patterns, and cellobiohydrolase gene (cbh-I) polymorphism clustered the strains into three groups and supported their taxonomic recognition as A. salinarus, A. atacamensis and A. salisburgensis. On the basis of phylogenetic inferences, also Sagenomella keratitidis is newly combined as Aspergillus keratitidis and inferred as a species of Aspergillus subgenus Polypaecilum.

  18. Morphology, Mechanical Properties and Dimensional Stability of Biomass Particles/High Density Polyethylene Composites: Effect of Species and Composition

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    Binshan Mu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of four types of biomass particles, including hardwood (poplar, softwood (radiata pine, crop (wheat straw and bamboo (moso bamboo, as reinforcing fillers in preparing high density polyethylene (HDPE based composites was studied. To improve interfacial compatibility, maleic anhydride grafted polyethylene (MAPE was applied as the coupling agent. The effects of the biomass species on the mechanical and water absorption properties of the resulting composites were evaluated based on chemical composition analysis. A creep-recovery test was conducted in single cantilever mode using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. Results show that the four types of biomass particles had similar chemical compositions but different composition contents. Poplar particles with high cellulose content loading in the HDPE matrix exhibited higher tensile and flexure properties and creep resistance. Fracture morphology analysis indicated a weak particle-matrix interface in wheat straw based composites. Given the high crystallinity and minimum hemicellulose content, the moso bamboo reinforced composite showed high impact strength and better water resistance.

  19. A new Metaculus species (Acari: Eriophyoidea) on Diplotaxis tenuifolia (Brassicaceae) from Serbia: a combined description using morphology and DNA barcode data

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new species of eriophyoid mite, Metaculus diplotaxi n.sp. inhabiting Diplotaxis tenuifolia (L.) DC., has been described from Serbia. To investigate interspecific variability between Metaculus spp., on three different host plants of Brassicaceae we analyzed phenotypic variability of morphological t...

  20. Revision of the West Palaearctic Polistes Latreille, with the descriptions of two species – an integrative approach using morphology and DNA barcodes (Hymenoptera, Vespidae

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    Christian Schmid-Egger

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The genus Polistes is revised for the West Palaearctic region based on morphology and DNA barcodes. The revision includes all known West Palaearctic species, raising the number of species in Europe to 14 and to 17 for the West Palaearctic realm. DNA barcodes were recovered from 15 species, 14 of which belong to the subgenus Polistes, and one, P. wattii, to the subgenus Gyrostoma. An integrative taxonomic approach combining morphology and molecular data (DNA barcoding was employed to resolve longstanding taxonomic problems in this group. Two species, P. austroccidentalis van Achterberg & Neumeyer, sp. n. (= P. semenowi auctt. from W and SW Europe and P. maroccanus Schmid-Egger, sp. n. from Morocco are described as new. Polistes bucharensis Erichson, 1849, and P. foederatus Kohl, 1898, were restored from synonymy. The following new synonyms are proposed: P. sulcifer Zimmermann, 1930, and Pseudopolistes sulcifer var. similator Zirngiebl, 1955, under P. semenowi Morawitz, 1889, syn. n.; Polistes iranus Guiglia, 1976, Polistes gallica var. ornata Weyrauch, 1938 and Polistes gallicus muchei Gusenleitner, 1976, under P. bucharensis Erichson, 1849, syn. n.; Polistes omissus var. ordubadensis Zirngiebl, 1955, and P. hellenicus Arens, 2011, under Polistes mongolicus du Buysson, 1911, syn. n. An illustrated key includes all species and additionally three species from the subgenera Aphanilopterus Meunier, 1888 and Gyrostoma Kirby, 1828 (including a Nearctic species recently introduced to Spain and two species occurring in Egypt, the Arabian Peninsula, and SW Asia. A phylogenetic analysis using Bayesian inference provides insights into phylogenetic relationships within the genus Polistes.

  1. A comparative study on Ca content and distribution in two Gesneriaceae species reveals distinctive mechanisms to cope with high rhizospheric soluble calcium

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    Wenlong eLi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Excessive Ca is toxic to plants thus significantly affects plant growth and species distribution in Ca-rich karst areas. To understand how plants survive high Ca soil, laboratory experiments were established to compare the physiological responses and internal Ca distribution in organ, tissue, cell and intracellular levels under different Ca levels for Lysionotus pauciflorus and Boea hygrometrica, two karst habitant Gesneriaceae species in Southwest China. In the controlled condition, L. pauciflorus could survive as high as 200 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, attributed to a series of physiological responses and preferential storage that limited Ca accumulation in chloroplasts of palisade cells. In contrast, B. hygrometrica could survive only 20 mM rhizospheric soluble Ca, but accumulated a high level of internal Ca in both palisade and spongy cells without disturbance on photosynthetic activity. By phenotype screening of transgenic plants expressing high Ca-inducible genes from B. hygrometrica, the expression of BhDNAJC2 in A. thaliana was found to enhance plant growth and photosynthesis under high soluble Ca stress. BhDNAJC2 encodes a recently reported heat shock protein (HSP 40 family DnaJ-domain protein. The Ca-resistant phenotype of BhDNAJC2 highlights the important role of chaperone-mediated protein quality control in Ca tolerance in B. hygrometrica. Taken together, our results revealed that distinctive mechanisms were employed in the two Gesneriaceae karst habitants to cope with a high Ca environment.

  2. A morphology-based phylogeny of Phymaturus (Iguania: Liolaemidae with the description of four new species from Argentina

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    Fernando Lobo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic relationships within the liolaemid lizard genus Phymaturus were studied using parsimony analysis of morphological data. The data set includes 133 characters: 28 described in the literature as apomorphies of the three genera of Liolaemidae (Ctenoblepharys, Liolaemus, and Phymaturus, 21 published characters of allozymes and karyology, 53 characters taken from external morphology across all terminals of Phymaturus, and 31 from the skeletal anatomy. This data set includes representatives of 10 of the 12 species currently recognized in the literature plus twelve other terminals considered in this study and representing independent lineages assigned to patagonicus or palluma. Four of these terminals are described in the present study as new species, one belonging to the palluma group and the other three to the patagonicus group. We performed four analyses using different methods of coding binary polymorphic characters, and a new method for treating continuous characters. The traditional division of the genus in two groups is not supported here, with the patagonicus group resulting paraphyletic in some of the analyses. The palluma group is monophyletic and supported by many characters. A majority rule consensus tree of all runs recovers a reasonably well-resolved topology of the group. All analyses recovered a northern subclade within the palluma group, formed by species distributed in Argentina from northern of San Juan province (north to 30 degrees of latitude. In this analysis palluma from El Planchón (Chile was found to be more closely related to this northern subclade than any other "palluma" form.Estudaram-se as relações dentro do gênero Phymaturus da familia Liolaemidae, usando análise de parsimônia de uma matriz formada principalmente por dados morfológicos. A matriz inclui 133 caracteres: 28 descritos na literatura como apomorfias dos três gêneros de Liolaemidae (Ctenoblepharys, Liolaemus e Phymaturus, 21 caracteres de

  3. Integrated DNA and morphological taxonomy to describe a new species of the Family Bathynellidae (Crustacea, Syncarida from Spain

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    Camacho, A. I.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Bathynellidae Grobben, 1905 is described from Spain. Vejdovskybathy-nella vasconica sp. nov. displays an exclusive feature within the genus: eightsegmented antenna. Besides, the new species has a unique combination of morphological characters, including medial seta on exopod of antenna, antennule length similar to antenna, three-segmented mandibular palp without sexual dimorphism, four segments on endopod of thoracopod I to VII, three spines on the sympod of uropod, two claws on the endopod of uropod, first spine longer than the rest on the furcal rami, exopod smaller than endopod on female thoracopod VIII, a long frontal projection and medium size outer protuberance on penial region of male thoracopod VIII, and a medium size frontal crest with a small “spur” on basipod of male thoracopod VIII. Partial sequences from mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase I (COI and 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene have been obtained from specimens of the type locality of the new species. The analyses of molecular data demonstrate the presence of two highly divergent genetic units within the Bathynellidae, corresponding to two morphologically well differenciated genera.Se describe una nueva especie de la familia Bathynellidae Grobben, 1905 de España. Vejdovskybathynella vasconica sp. nov. presenta un carácter único dentro del género, tener la antena de 8 segmentos. Además la nueva especie exhibe una única combinación de caracteres morfológicos que incluye: seda mediana presente en el exopodio de la antena, anténula y antena de igual longitud, palpo mandibular de tres segmentos y sin dimorfismo sexual, cuatro segmentos en el endopodio de todas las patas, tres espinas en el simpodio del urópodo, dos uñas en el endopodio del urópodo, la primera espina de la furca más larga que las demás, toracópodo VIII hembra con exopodio más pequeño que el endopodio, toracópodo VIII macho con una larga prolongación frontal y una protuberancia

  4. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Caio Henrique Nasi; Cruz, Guilherme Crispim Faria; Mayrink, Willian; Tasic, Ljubica

    2018-01-01

    Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange ( Citrus sinensis ) waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated), and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. AgNPs were synthesized using orange ( C. sinensis ) peel extract (Or-AgNPs) in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs) and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges) in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri ( Xac ), the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of -19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm) and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (-28.2±1.0 mV) stabilization to the nanoparticles. Both AgNPs presented roughly the same activity against Xac , with the minimum inhibitory concentration range between 22 and 24 μg mL -1 . Despite the fact that different capping biomolecules on AgNPs had an influence on morphology, size, and stability of AgNPs, the antibacterial

  5. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Caio Henrique Nasi; Cruz, Guilherme Crispim Faria; Mayrink, Willian; Tasic, Ljubica

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange (Citrus sinensis) waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated), and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. Methods AgNPs were synthesized using orange (C. sinensis) peel extract (Or-AgNPs) in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs) and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges) in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac), the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Results Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of −19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm) and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (−28.2±1.0 mV) stabilization to the nanoparticles. Both AgNPs presented roughly the same activity against Xac, with the minimum inhibitory concentration range between 22 and 24 μg mL−1. Conclusion Despite the fact that different capping biomolecules on AgNPs had an influence on morphology, size, and stability

  6. Bio-based synthesis of silver nanoparticles from orange waste: effects of distinct biomolecule coatings on size, morphology, and antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barros CHN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Caio Henrique Nasi de Barros, Guilherme Crispim Faria Cruz, Willian Mayrink, Ljubica Tasic Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Department of Organic Chemistry, Instituto de Química da Universidade Estadual de Campinas–Unicamp, Campinas, SP, Brazil Purpose: Despite the numerous reports on biological syntheses of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs, little is known about the composition of their capping agents, protein corona of plant extract-mediated synthesis, and their influence on the properties of AgNPs. Here, orange (Citrus sinensis waste was utilized as a source of an extract for AgNP synthesis (the protein corona composition of which was elucidated, and also as a starting material for hesperidin and nanocellulose extraction, which were used for bio-based AgNP synthesis. A comparison of the results using the two methods of synthesis is presented. Methods: AgNPs were synthesized using orange (C. sinensis peel extract (­Or-AgNPs in a biological route, and using hesperidin (Hsd-AgNPs and nanocellulose (extracted from oranges in a green chemical route. Characterization of nanoparticles was carried out using zeta potential and hydrodynamic size measurements, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Elucidation of proteins from protein corona was performed via ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer experiments. Antimicrobial activity was assessed via minimum inhibitory concentration assays against Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri (Xac, the bacterium that causes citric canker in oranges. Results: Or-AgNPs were not completely uniform in morphology, having a size of 48.1±20.5 nm and a zeta potential of −19.0±0.4 mV. Stabilization was performed mainly by three proteins, which were identified by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS experiments. Hsd-AgNPs were smaller (25.4±12.5 nm and had uniform morphology. Nanocellulose provided a strong steric and electrostatic (−28.2±1.0 mV stabilization to the nanoparticles

  7. Light Absorption in Coralline Algae (Rhodophyta: A Morphological and Functional Approach to Understanding Species Distribution in a Coral Reef Lagoon

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    Román M. Vásquez-Elizondo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Red coralline algae are a cosmopolitan group with the ability to precipitate CaCO3 within the walls of their vegetative cells. The resultant carbonate structure is key for explaining their ecological success, as it provides protection against herbivores and resistance to water motion. However, its potential contribution to enhance thallus light absorption efficiency through multiple light scattering on algal skeleton, similar to the effect documented for scleractinian corals, has not been yet investigated. Here, we initiate this analysis, characterizing thallus optical properties of three coralline species, which differed in pigment content and thallus mass area (TMA, gDW m−2. The three species, the rhodolith Neogoniolithon sp., the crustose coralline alga (CCA, Lithothamnion sp., and the articulated alga Amphiroa tribulus, represent the more distinctive coralline growth-forms and are able to colonize contrasting light environments in Caribbean coral reefs. The thicker thalli of the rhodoliths were the most efficient light collectors, as evidenced by their higher pigment absorption efficiency (a*Chla; m2 mgChla−1 and photosynthetic rates per unit area. This could explain rhodolith success in oligotrophic, highly illuminated reef environments. In contrast, the thinner thalli of the CCA, a low-light specialist, showed the highest metabolic rates normalized to mass and the highest light absorption efficiencies per unit mass (a*M; m2 gdw−1. Therefore, the ecological success of the CCA in cryptic habitats within the reef cannot be explained only by its low-light physiology, but also by its capacity to reduce the structural costs of their thalli, and thus of its new growth. Lastly, the ecological success of Amphiroa tribulus, which displayed intermediate values for the efficiency of light absorption, metabolic rates and TMA, was explained by its ability to construct the largest light collectors (algal canopies thanks to the presence of flexible

  8. Field identification of two morphologically similar bats, Miniopterus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Miniopterus schreibersii natalensis and Miniopterus fraterculus are two morphologically similar, but genetically distinct, species of insectivorous bat that, more often than not, share roosts. Identifying these two species in the field is difficult because of an overlap in the ranges of both forearm and mass. We thus attempted to ...

  9. Population morphological variation of the Nile perch (Lates niloticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    The analysis clustered the Nile perch into two groups, which were found to be as characterised by earlier morphological description of this species and most probably are representatives of two distinct ... species of Lates niloticus as the specimens from Lakes ... (K), which is one factor that is considered when determining the ...

  10. Molecular identification, morphological characterization and new insights into the ecology of larval Pseudoterranova cattani in fishes from the Argentine coast with its differentiation from the Antarctic species, P. decipiens sp. E (Nematoda: Anisakidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timi, Juan T; Paoletti, Michela; Cimmaruta, Roberta; Lanfranchi, Ana L; Alarcos, Ana J; Garbin, Lucas; George-Nascimento, Mario; Rodríguez, Diego H; Giardino, Gisela V; Mattiucci, Simonetta

    2014-01-17

    Larvae of the genus Pseudoterranova constitute a risk for human health when ingested through raw or undercooked fish. They can provoke pseudoterranovosis in humans, a fish-borne zoonotic disease whose pathogenicity varies with the species involved, making their correct specific identification a necessary step in the knowledge of this zoonosis. Larvae of Pseudoterranova decipiens s.l. have been reported in several fish species from off the Argentine coasts; however, there are no studies dealing with their specific identification in this region. Here, a genetic identification and morphological characterization of larval Pseudoterranova spp. from three fish species sampled from Argentine waters and from Notothenia coriiceps from Antarctic waters was carried out. Larvae were sequenced for their genetic/molecular identification, including the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit II (mtDNA cox2), the first (ITS-1) and the second (ITS-2) internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal DNA, and compared with all species of the P. decipiens (sensu lato) species complex (sequences available in GenBank). Further, adults of Pseudoterranova spp. from the definitive host, the southern sea lion, Otaria flavescens, from Argentine and Chilean coasts were sequenced at the same genes. The sequences obtained at the ITS-1 and ITS-2 genes from all the larvae examined from fish of Argentine waters, as well as the adult worms, matched 100% the sequences for the species P. cattani. The sequences obtained at mtDNA cox2 gene for Antarctic larvae matched 99% those available in GenBank for the sibling P. decipiens sp. E. Both MP and BI phylogenetic trees strongly supported P. cattani and P. decipiens sp. E as two distinct phylogenetic lineages and depicted the species P. decipiens sp. E as sister taxon to the remaining taxa of the P. decipiens complex. Larval morphometry was similar between specimens of P. cattani from Argentina, but significantly different from those of P

  11. Patterns of morphological variation amongst semifossorial shrews in the highlands of Guatemala, with the description of a new species (Mammalia, Soricomorpha, Soricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Neal

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Cryptotis goldmani group of small-eared shrews (Mammalia, Soricomorpha, Soricidae) represent a clade within the genus that is characterized by modifications of the forelimb that include broadened forefeet, elongated and broadened foreclaws, and massive humeri with enlarged processes. These modifications are consistent with greater adaptation to their semifossorial habits than other members of the genus. The species in this group occur discontinuously in temperate highlands from southern Tamaulipas, Mexico, to Honduras. In Guatemala, there are three species: the relatively widespread Cryptotis goodwini and two species (Cryptotis lacertosus, Cryptotis mam) endemic to highland forests in the Sierra de los Cuchumatanes of western Guatemala. Ongoing studies focusing on the relationships of variation in cranial and postcranial skeletal morphology have revealed a fourth species from remnant cloud forest in the Sierra de Yalijux, central Guatemala. In this paper, I describe this new species and characterize its morphology relative to other species in the C. goldmani group and to other species of Cryptotis in Guatemala. In addition, I summarize available details of its habitat and ecology.

  12. Identifying drug-induced repolarization abnormalities from distinct ECG patterns in congenital long QT syndrome: a study of sotalol effects on T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graff, Claus; Andersen, Mads P; Xue, Joel Q

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal repolariz......BACKGROUND: The electrocardiographic QT interval is used to identify drugs with potential harmful effects on cardiac repolarization in drug trials, but the variability of the measurement can mask drug-induced ECG changes. The use of complementary electrocardiographic indices of abnormal...... are typical ECG patterns in LQT2. Blinded to labels, the new morphology measures were tested in a third group of 39 healthy subjects receiving sotalol. Over 3 days the sotalol group received 0, 160 and 320 mg doses, respectively, and a 12-lead Holter ECG was recorded for 22.5 hours each day. Drug...... with QTcF, p ECG patterns in LQT2 carriers effectively quantified repolarization changes induced by sotalol. Further studies are needed to validate whether this measure has...

  13. Genetic evidence for malaria vectors of the Anopheles sundaicus complex in Sri Lanka with morphological characteristics attributed to Anopheles subpictus species B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Pavillupillai J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anopheles subpictus sensu lato, a widespread malaria vector in Asia, is reportedly composed of four sibling species A - D. Mosquitoes morphologically identified as belonging to the Subpictus complex were collected from different locations near the east coast of Sri Lanka, and specific ribosomal DNA sequences determined to validate their taxonomic status. Methods Anopheles subpictus s.l. larvae and blood-fed adults were collected from different locations in the Eastern province and their sibling species status was determined based on published morphological characteristics. DNA sequences of the D3 domain of 28 S ribosomal DNA (rDNA and the internal transcribed spacer -2 (ITS-2 of mosquitoes morphologically identified as An. subpictus sibling species A, B, C and D were determined. Results Phylogenetic analysis based on D3 domain of rDNA resulted in two clades: one clade with mosquitoes identified as An. subpictus species A, C, D and some mosquitoes identified as species B, and another clade with a majority of mosquitoes identified as species B with D3 sequences that were identical to Anopheles sundaicus cytotype D. Analysis of ITS-2 sequences confirmed a close relationship between a majority of mosquitoes identified as An. subpictus B with members of the An. sundaicus complex and others identified as An. subpictus B with An. subpictus s.l. Conclusions The study suggests that published morphological characteristics are not specific enough to identify some members of the Subpictus complex, particularly species B. The sequences of the ITS-2 and D3 domain of rDNA suggest that a majority that were identified morphologically as An. subpictus species B in the east coast of Sri Lanka, and some identified elsewhere in SE Asia as An. subpictus s.l., are in fact members of the Sundaicus complex based on genetic similarity to An. sundaicus s.l. In view of the well-known ability of An. sundaicus s.l. to breed in brackish and fresh water and

  14. Morphological Features of Regurgitate and Defecatory Stains Deposited by Five Species of Necrophagous Flies are Influenced by Adult Diets and Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, David B; McGregor, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The morphological characteristics of artifacts from five species of necrophagous flies were examined following feeding on several types of diets. Four types of insect stains were produced by each species: regurgitate, defecatory, translocation, and tarsal tracks. Regurgitate was the most frequent type deposited (70.9 ± 2.4%), followed by defecatory (19.8 ± 4.0%), tarsal tracks (8.6 ± 1.2%), and translocation (0.7 ± 0.1%). Artifact shapes, sizes, and color were highly variable and species and diet specific. Calliphora vicina and Sarcophaga bullata consistently deposited the largest artifacts after feeding, whereas Chrysomya rufifacies and Ch. megacephala produced more tarsal tracks than the other species examined. Artifacts with tails were infrequently observed (4.1 ± 0.6% of all stains) but occurred as either defecatory or regurgitate stains. The widely variable morphologies of all types of fly artifacts underscores the view that insect stains cannot be distinguished from human bloodstains based on morphology alone. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. Response-based selection of barley cultivars and legume species for complementarity: Root morphology and exudation in relation to nutrient source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Courtney D; Brown, Lawrie K; Adu, Michael O; Mezeli, Malika M; Sandral, Graeme A; Simpson, Richard J; Wendler, Renate; Shand, Charles A; Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Darch, Tegan; Stutter, Marc I; Lumsdon, David G; Zhang, Hao; Blackwell, Martin S A; Wearing, Catherine; Cooper, Patricia; Haygarth, Philip M; George, Timothy S

    2017-02-01

    Phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) use efficiency may be improved through increased biodiversity in agroecosystems. Phenotypic variation in plants' response to nutrient deficiency may influence positive complementarity in intercropping systems. A multicomponent screening approach was used to assess the influence of P supply and N source on the phenotypic plasticity of nutrient foraging traits in barley (H. vulgare L.) and legume species. Root morphology and exudation were determined in six plant nutrient treatments. A clear divergence in the response of barley and legumes to the nutrient treatments was observed. Root morphology varied most among legumes, whereas exudate citrate and phytase activity were most variable in barley. Changes in root morphology were minimized in plants provided with ammonium in comparison to nitrate but increased under P deficiency. Exudate phytase activity and pH varied with legume species, whereas citrate efflux, specific root length, and root diameter lengths were more variable among barley cultivars. Three legume species and four barley cultivars were identified as the most responsive to P deficiency and the most contrasting of the cultivars and species tested. Phenotypic response to nutrient availability may be a promising approach for the selection of plant combinations for minimal input cropping systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaMata, Jarina Pena; Mendes, Bárbara Pinheiro; Maciel-Lima, Kátia; Menezes, Cristiane Alves Silva; Dutra, Walderez Ornelas; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Horta, Maria Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6), whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection.

  17. Distinct Macrophage Fates after in vitro Infection with Different Species of Leishmania: Induction of Apoptosis by Leishmania (Leishmania amazonensis, but Not by Leishmania (Viannia guyanensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarina Pena DaMata

    Full Text Available Leishmania is an intracellular parasite in vertebrate hosts, including man. During infection, amastigotes replicate inside macrophages and are transmitted to healthy cells, leading to amplification of the infection. Although transfer of amastigotes from infected to healthy cells is a crucial step that may shape the outcome of the infection, it is not fully understood. Here we compare L. amazonensis and L. guyanensis infection in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice and investigate the fate of macrophages when infected with these species of Leishmania in vitro. As previously shown, infection of mice results in distinct outcomes: L. amazonensis causes a chronic infection in both strains of mice (although milder in C57BL/6, whereas L. guyanensis does not cause them disease. In vitro, infection is persistent in L. amazonensis-infected macrophages whereas L. guyanensis growth is controlled by host cells from both strains of mice. We demonstrate that, in vitro, L. amazonensis induces apoptosis of both C57BL/6 and BALB/c macrophages, characterized by PS exposure, DNA cleavage into nucleosomal size fragments, and consequent hypodiploidy. None of these signs were seen in macrophages infected with L. guyanensis, which seem to die through necrosis, as indicated by increased PI-, but not Annexin V-, positive cells. L. amazonensis-induced macrophage apoptosis was associated to activation of caspases-3, -8 and -9 in both strains of mice. Considering these two species of Leishmania and strains of mice, macrophage apoptosis, induced at the initial moments of infection, correlates with chronic infection, regardless of its severity. We present evidence suggestive that macrophages phagocytize L. amazonensis-infected cells, which has not been verified so far. The ingestion of apoptotic infected macrophages by healthy macrophages could be a way of amastigote spreading, leading to the establishment of infection.

  18. Notes on the Reproductive Ecology and Description of the Preimaginal Morphology of Elaphrus sugai Nakane, the Most Endangered Species of Elaphrus Fabricius (Coleoptera: Carabidae Ground Beetle Worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kôji Sasakawa

    Full Text Available Elucidating the basic life-history of endangered species is the first important step in the conservation of such species. This study examined the reproductive ecology and the preimaginal morphology of the endangered ground beetle Elaphrus sugai Nakane (Coleoptera: Carabidae; currently, the Watarase wetland of the central Kanto Plain, Japan is the only confirmed locality of this beetle species. Laboratory rearing of reproductive adults collected in early April revealed that females can lay more than 131 eggs. Eggs were laid in mud, without an egg chamber. Larvae reached adulthood when fed a diet of mealworms, indicating that E. sugai larvae are insect larvae feeders. An earthworm diet, the optimal diet for larvae of a congeneric species (E. punctatus Motschulsky, was lethal to E. sugai larvae. The egg stage was 3-4 days in duration under a 16L8D cycle (22°C. The duration from hatching to adult eclosion was 23-42 days at various temperatures simulating those of the reproductive period. Larval morphology was similar to that of consubgeneric species described previously. The pupa is unusual, in that the setae on the abdominal tergites are long (twice as long as those of the abdominal segment and have somewhat "coiled" apices. Finally, the current endangered status of E. sugai was compared to that of E. viridis Horn, which has been regarded as the most endangered species of the genus worldwide.

  19. Detailed LC-MS/MS analysis of ciguatoxins revealing distinct regional and species characteristics in fish and causative alga from the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogi, Kentaro; Oshiro, Naomasa; Inafuku, Yasuo; Hirama, Masahiro; Yasumoto, Takeshi

    2011-12-01

    Toxin profiles of representative ciguatera species caught at different locations of Japan were investigated in fish flesh by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Identification and quantification of 16 toxins were facilitated by the use of 14 reference toxins prepared by either synthesis or isolation from natural sources and the previous LC-MS data thereof. Sodium adduct ions [M + Na](+) were used as parent and product ions. Distinct regional differences were unveiled: ciguatoxin-1B type toxins were found in snappers and groupers from Okinawa, ciguatoxin-3C type toxins were found in a spotted knifejaw, Oplegnathus punctatus, from Miyazaki located 730 km north of Okinawa, and both types of toxins were found in a red snapper, Lutjanus bohar, from Minamitorishima (Marcus) Island. Twelve toxins were identified in a dinoflagellate, Gambierdiscus toxicus, collected as the primary toxin source in French Polynesia. Occurrence of M-seco-toxins in fish and oxidized toxins in the dinoflagellate was confirmed for the first time. The present LC-MS/MS method is rapid, specific, and accurate. It not only outperforms the currently employed mouse bioassays but also enables the study of the toxin dynamics during the food chain transmission.

  20. Morphological and molecular differentiation of two new species of Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1958 (Acanthocephala: Echinorhynchidae) from amphibians and reptiles in the Philippines, with identification key for the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkach, Vasyl V; Lisitsyna, Olga I; Crossley, Janna L; Binh, Tran Thi; Bush, Sarah E

    2013-05-01

    The genus Pseudoacanthocephalus Petrochenko, 1958 currently includes 14 species of acanthocephalans parasitic in amphibians and reptiles worldwide. This work describes two new species of Pseudoacanthocephalus from amphibians and reptiles collected in several localities on Luzon Island, Philippines. Pseudoacanthocephalus nickoli n. sp. was found in two species of frogs, Rana luzonensis Boulenger and Rana similis (Günther), and Pseudoacanthocephalus smalesi n. sp. was found in a scincid lizard, Sphenomorphus abdictus Brown & Alcala. Differential diagnoses of the two new species of Pseudoacanthocephalus from their congeners are provided. Comparative analysis of nuclear ribosomal rRNA sequences encompassing the 3' end of 18S nuclear rDNA gene, internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1+5.8S+ITS2), and 5' end of the 28S gene strongly corroborated the morphological evidence and demonstrated significant differences between the two new species as well as between these species and closely related species from continental China and Vietnam. No intraspecific sequence variability was detected among different individuals representing each of the examined species. This is the first report of Pseudoacanthocephalus in the Philippines. A key to known species of Pseudoacanthocephalus is provided.

  1. Description of Neblinichthys brevibracchium and N. echinasus from the upper Mazaruni River, Guyana (Siluriformes: Loricariidae, and recognition of N. roraima and N. yaravi as distinct species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Taphorn

    Full Text Available Neblinichthys brevibracchium and N. echinasus are new sympatric species from upland tributaries of the Mazaruni River (Essequibo River basin of Guyana. These two new species are the first Neblinichthys reported from Guyana. Adult males of both new species have short pectoral-fin spines and several series of hypertrophied odontodes covering the entire dorsal surface and along the entire edge of the snout. They are distinguished from each other by dorsal-fin base length/standard length (18.1-22.8% in N. brevibracchium vs. 24.3-27.0% in N. echinasus, dorsal-anal distance/SL (13.7-18.3% in N. brevibracchium vs. 11.9-12.5% in N. echinasus, by having the snout decreasing in steep arc just anterior to eyes and then flattening in area anterior of nares in N. brevibracchium vs. the snout tapering shallowly and continuously from eyes to snout tip in N. echinasus; and by having the adpressed dorsal fin reaching the anterior preadipose plate in N. brevibracchium (vs. not reaching anterior preadipose plate in N. echinasus. They are distinguished from all congeners by lacking odontodes on the opercle (vs. odontodes present; and by completely lacking an iris operculum (vs. congeners with small iris operculum present or at least dorsal portion of iris flat instead of rounded. Neblinichthys echinasus and N. brevibracchium differ from all congeners by having a spotted or vermiculated pigment pattern on the abdomen (vs. abdomen plain; in N. echinasus the abdomen is darkly pigmented with bold white spots and in Neblinichthys brevibracchium the abdomen is light-colored with gray spots and vermiculations. Neblinichthys brevibracchium and N. echinasus differ from N. roraima by having one to two preadipose plates (vs. four or more. New observations revealed Neblinichthys roraima and N. yaravi to be distinct, with N. roraima having four or more preadipose plates and N. yaravi having one or two. Both are present in the upper río Caroní, an Orinoco tributary that drains

  2. Morphology of the jaw, suspensorial, and opercle musculature of Beloniformes and related species (Teleostei: Acanthopterygii), with a special reference to the m. adductor mandibulae complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneburg, Ingmar

    2015-01-01

    The taxon Beloniformes represents a heterogeneous group of teleost fishes that show an extraordinary diversity of jaw morphology. I present new anatomical descriptions of the jaw musculature in six selected beloniforms and four closely related species. A reduction of the external jaw adductor (A1) and a changed morphology of the intramandibular musculature were found in many Beloniformes. This might be correlated with the progressively reduced mobility of the upper and lower jaw bones. The needlefishes and sauries, which are characterised by extremely elongated and stiffened jaws, show several derived characters, which in combination enable the capture of fish at high velocity. The ricefishes are characterised by several derived and many plesiomorphic characters that make broad scale comparisons difficult. Soft tissue characters are highly diverse among hemiramphids and flying fishes reflecting the uncertainty about their phylogenetic position and interrelationship. The morphological findings presented herein may help to interpret future phylogenetic analyses using cranial musculature in Beloniformes.

  3. Morphology of the jaw, suspensorial, and opercle musculature of Beloniformes and related species (Teleostei: Acanthopterygii, with a special reference to the m. adductor mandibulae complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Werneburg

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The taxon Beloniformes represents a heterogeneous group of teleost fishes that show an extraordinary diversity of jaw morphology. I present new anatomical descriptions of the jaw musculature in six selected beloniforms and four closely related species. A reduction of the external jaw adductor (A1 and a changed morphology of the intramandibular musculature were found in many Beloniformes. This might be correlated with the progressively reduced mobility of the upper and lower jaw bones. The needlefishes and sauries, which are characterised by extremely elongated and stiffened jaws, show several derived characters, which in combination enable the capture of fish at high velocity. The ricefishes are characterised by several derived and many plesiomorphic characters that make broad scale comparisons difficult. Soft tissue characters are highly diverse among hemiramphids and flying fishes reflecting the uncertainty about their phylogenetic position and interrelationship. The morphological findings presented herein may help to interpret future phylogenetic analyses using cranial musculature in Beloniformes.

  4. Xanthomendoza borealis - a bipolar lichen species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LIndblom, Louise; Søchting, Ulrik

    It has been uncertain whether the two xanthorioid taxa known as Xanthoria mawsonii and Xanthomen-doza borealis truly are distinct species or if they should best be treated as one species. They are morphologically very similar, but inhabit two disjunct geographical areas, that is, circumpolar on t...

  5. A new earthworm species within a controversial genus: Eiseniona gerardoi sp. n. (Annelida, Lumbricidae - description based on morphological and molecular data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Diaz Cosin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The morphological and anatomical simplicity of soil dwelling animals, such as earthworms, has limited the establishment of a robust taxonomy making it sometimes subjective to authors’ criteria. Within this context, integrative approaches including molecular information are becoming more popular to solve the phylogenetic positioning of conflictive taxa. Here we present the description of a new lumbricid species from the region of Extremadura (Spain, Eiseniona gerardoi sp. n. The assignment to this genus is based on both a morphological and a phylogenetic study. The validity of the genus Eiseniona, one of the most controversial within Lumbricidae, is discussed. A synopsis of the differences between the type species and the west-European members of the genus is provided.

  6. External morphology of sensory structures of fourth instar larvae of neotropical species of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae under scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pessoa Felipe Arley Costa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, some morphological structures of antennae, maxillary palps and caudal setae of fourth instar larvae of laboratory-reared phlebotomine sand flies (Lutzomyia longipalpis, L. migonei, L. evandroi, L. lenti, L. sericea, L. whitmani and L. intermedia of the State of Ceará, Brazil, were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The antennal structures exhibited considerable variation in the morphology and position. A prominent digitiform distal segment has been observed only on the antenna of species of the subgenus Nyssomyia. The taxonomic relevance of this and other antennal structure is discussed. The papiliform structures found in the maxillae and the porous structures of the caudal setae of all species examined may have chemosensory function. Further studies with transmission electron microscopy are needed to better understand the physiological function of these external structures.

  7. A study on the determination of the morphological, yield and quality characteristics of some sainfoin species (onobrychis spp.) native to east anatolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okcu, M.; Sengul, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective of the present study is to identify the species belonging to the genus Onobrychis (Fabaceae) growing native in and around Erzurum, and to determine their overall prevalence and morphological and quality characteristics. Species samples were collected from different locations in flowering periods of 2007, 2008 and 2009. At the end of the study, totally 10 genotypes were found representing 8 species and 2 sub-species. It was found that leaf length and leaflet frequency were the largest in O. atropatana var. grandiflora, the number of leaflets was the highest in O. viciifolia, the length and width of leaflets were maximum in O. radiata, the number of main branches and the number of fascicles in main branches were in O. hajastana, crude ash rate was highest in O. stenostachya, plant fresh and dry weight, ADF and NDF rate were highest in O. cornuta, where as crude protein rate was slightly higher in O. stenostachya subsp. sosnowskyi than other taxa. (author)

  8. Statistical evaluation of fuel yield and morphological variates for some promising energy plantation tree species in western Rajasthan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalla, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Stepwise regression analysis suggested that tree height and collar diameter were, in general, the morphological parameters that most reliably predicted fuel yield in Acacia nilotica, A. tortilis, Albizzia lebbek, Azadirachta indica and Prosopis juliflora.

  9. Hepatozoon silvestris sp. nov.: morphological and molecular characterization of a new species of Hepatozoon (Adeleorina: Hepatozoidae) from the European wild cat (Felis silvestris silvestris)

    OpenAIRE

    HOD?I?, ADNAN; ALI?, AMER; PRA?OVI?, SENAD; OTRANTO, DOMENICO; BANETH, GAD; DUSCHER, GEORG GERHARD

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Based on morphological and genetic characteristics, we describe a new species of Hepatozoon in the European wild cat (Felis silvestris silvestris), herein named Hepatozoon silvestris sp. nov. The study also provides the first data on the occurrence of H. felis in this wild felid. Hepatozoon meronts were observed in multiple cross-sections of different organs of four (44%) cats. Additionally, extracellular forms, resembling mature gamonts of Hepatozoon, were found in the spleen and myo...

  10. Description and Comparison of Morphological Structures of the Eggs of Anopheles Hyrcanus Group and Related Species (Diptera: Culicidae) from the Republic of Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-20

    major vector of malaria in China ; however, its vectorial capacity is unknown in the ROK. The other remaining four Anopheles species are not considered to...morphometry and morphology of Anopheles aconitus Form B and C eggs under scanning electron microscope. Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo...and its genetic identity with An. (Ano.) anthropophagus from China (Diptera: Culicidae). Zootaxa, 378, 1–14. RUEDA ET AL.40 · Zootaxa 2268 © 2009

  11. Morphological features of the species of the genus Chlamydomonas s.l. (Chlorophyta from various molecular clades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria N. Pavlovska

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The morphology of 78 authentic strains from 5 clades into culture condition was investigated. The complex of phenotype features was established. Such features as: type of mucilage and their origin, mucilage collapse under methylene blue, saving papilla and stigma in not motile stage, extracellular matrix formation inside cell wall, the way of sporangium break, pyrenoid and stigma habit before cell division, cell shape, chloroplast morphology. Diagnostic features for determination of taxa on clades level are discussed.

  12. New species of Simona Moulds, 2012 and Chelapsalta Moulds, 2012 cicadas (Cicadidae: Cicadettinae: Cicadettini) from Australia: comparative morphology, songs, behaviour and distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewart, A; Popple, L W; Marshall, D C

    2015-08-20

    In 2012, Moulds established the morphologically similar cicada genera Simona and Chelapsalta, each with one Australian species (sancta Distant and puer Walker, respectively). In this paper, two new species are described within the genus Simona Moulds 2012, S. erema sp. nov. and S. retracta sp. nov., and one within the genus Chelapsalta Moulds 2012, C. myoporae sp. nov. The type species of Simona (female holotype), S. sancta (Distant, 1913), is redescribed based on a contemporary male, nominated a plesiotype, held in the Australian National Insect Collection. Melampsalta subgulosa Ashton 1914 is supported as a junior synonym of S. sancta. The species within the two genera of Simona and Chelapsalta are morphologically very similar. S. erema occurs widely through the arid regions of inland Australia, extending west from western Queensland through the Northern Territory, to central-western Western Australia, a linear distance of approximately 2200 km. S. retracta is known from a single semi-arid locality in southern inland Queensland. C. myoporae occurs widely through southeast, central and southwest Queensland, extending southwards into inland and western N.S.W. and southeastern South Australia. It tends to occur most commonly within vegetation associated with seasonal riverine floodplains, and in some areas of poorly drained and clay-rich soils. The calling songs of these three species, together with those of S. sancta and C. puer, are described. Detailed comparisons made of the songs of S. erema and C. myoporae, each from three widely separated locations, clearly exhibit structural consistency in their calling songs across their distributions. The Simona songs are complex and contain multiple elements; the species are very mobile and wary, and inhabit low dense shrubland. The songs of the two Chelapsalta species, both relatively sedentary in behaviour, in contrast consist of relatively uniform chirping and buzzing elements. It is suggested that, although the two

  13. Study of the inorganic constituents in different species of Casearia medicinal plant collected in distinct regions of the Atlantic Forest, SP State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Celina Izumi

    2006-01-01

    The use of medicinal plants in the treatment of diseases has increased significantly in the last years, as has research concerning chemical characterization of these plants. In this study, inorganic constituents were determined in leaves and in extracts from three medicinal plant species of the Casearia genus (C. sylvestris, C. decandra and C. obliqua) collected in distinct regions of the Atlantic Forest, SP. The elemental compositions of the soils in which these plants were grown were also determined. Traditionally, these plants are used due to their antiinflammatory, antiacid, antiseptic and cicatrizing properties. The antiulcer and the antitumor activities of the Casearia genus and its capacity to neutralize snake and bee venoms, have also been scientifically confirmed. The analytical methodology used was neutron activation analysis. Long and short irradiation periods of the samples and the standards were carried out at IPEN's IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor. In the leaf K was found at the percentage levels, Ca, Cl, Mg and Na at mg g -1 levels and the elements Br, Fe, Mn, Rb and Zn at the μg g -1 levels. As, Co, Cr, Cs, La, Sb, Sc and Se at the ng g -1 levels. Results obtained in the extracts indicated that the same elements present in the leaves are also found in their extracts. The comparison between the inorganic composition of Casearia sylvestris leaves collected from three different regions of the Atlantic Forest showed that the elemental concentrations in the plants leaves varied depending on the place where they were grown. Different Casearia species cultivated in a same region presented similar elemental compositions. Based on these findings it can be concluded that the studies about the pharmacological effect of Casearia genus plants grown in different types of soil are of great importance. The quality of the obtained results was assured by the analyses of the certified reference materials NIST 1573a Tomato Leaves, NIST 1515 Apple Leaves, INCT-TL-1 Tea

  14. Plasticity in seedling morphology, biomass allocation and physiology among ten temperate tree species in response to shade is related to shade tolerance and not leaf habit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmura, D J; Modrzyński, J; Chmielarz, P; Tjoelker, M G

    2017-03-01

    Mechanisms of shade tolerance in tree seedlings, and thus growth in shade, may differ by leaf habit and vary with ontogeny following seed germination. To examine early responses of seedlings to shade in relation to morphological, physiological and biomass allocation traits, we compared seedlings of 10 temperate species, varying in their leaf habit (broadleaved versus needle-leaved) and observed tolerance to shade, when growing in two contrasting light treatments - open (about 20% of full sunlight) and shade (about 5% of full sunlight). We analyzed biomass allocation and its response to shade using allometric relationships. We also measured leaf gas exchange rates and leaf N in the two light treatments. Compared to the open treatment, shading significantly increased traits typically associated with high relative growth rate (RGR) - leaf area ratio (LAR), specific leaf area (SLA), and allocation of biomass into leaves, and reduced seedling mass and allocation to roots, and net assimilation rate (NAR). Interestingly, RGR was not affected by light treatment, likely because of morphological and physiological adjustments in shaded plants that offset reductions of in situ net assimilation of carbon in shade. Leaf area-based rates of light-saturated leaf gas exchange differed among species groups, but not between light treatments, as leaf N concentration increased in concert with increased SLA in shade. We found little evidence to support the hypothesis of a increased plasticity of broadleaved species compared to needle-leaved conifers in response to shade. However, an expectation of higher plasticity in shade-intolerant species than in shade-tolerant ones, and in leaf and plant morphology than in biomass allocation was supported across species of contrasting leaf habit. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  15. Comparative study of the oospore morphology of two populations of a rare species Chara baueri A. Braun in Cedynia (Poland and Batzlow (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Pukacz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Morphological features of oospores of Chara baueri A. Braun, one of the rarest charophyte species worldwide, were studied based on 100 oospores collected from a small and temporarily dried mid-field pond near Cedynia, Western Poland. This is the first Polish and fifth presently known locality of this species. For comparison 67 oospores from a German population (similar pond localized near Batzlow, Germany were also measured. So far, data on morphology of C. baueri oospores as well as the species ecology are limited. The only more detailed study of oospores for this species was earlier performed on 15 oospores from Kazakhstan. Largest polar axis (LPA, length, largest equatorial diameter (LED, width, isopolarity index (ISI = LPA/LED × 100, number of ridges, width of fossa, distance from apical pole to LED (AND and anisipolarity index (ANI = AND/LPA × 100 were measured. The comparative analysis revealed that the oospores from Poland are generally bigger and more prolate than the Ger­man ones. The differences for most of studied parameters were statistically significant. The finding is discussed in the context of habitat differentiation of both studied sites. Moreover, the results obtained of oospore measurements for both populations differs from most of the data known so far from the literature.

  16. Morphology of new for Ukrane Bacillariophyta from the hydrotopes of Right-Bank Forest-Steepe. II. Species of Gomphonema Ehrenb.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila N. Bukhtiyarova

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two species Gomphonema laticollum Reichardt and Gomphonema bukycanyona sp. nov. are recorded for the first time from the hydrotopes of Ukraine. Their morphology using CM and SEM microphotos and geographic distribution are described. New terminology is suggested for the poles of the heteropolar frustule. Depending on the pole contour valve headand footor head poleandfoot pole are used to date. However, many species of GomphonemaEhrenb. do not have a wide round pole that resembles a head, instead they may have the same contour on both poles. According of every pole functions an attaching valve pole is a pole with pore fields or other structures that attach individual to substratum. A free valve poleis relatively freely located in a space pole. The function of free pole consists in expansion ofindividual contact space – a part of the environment where an individual may interact directly with its physical body and its biospace (=био-поле in Rus.. Within an individual contact space physical, maximum energy and informative interaction, high interchange of substances are accomplished between individual and environment. This ecosystem parameter is a part of individual biosphereand impacts directly on the formation of a species econiche. Proposed terms concern functional morphology of the genera with heteropolar frustule as Gomphonema, Didymosphenia M. Schmidt, MeridionAgardh, LicmophoraAgardh and other. Species typification of Bacillariophyta is discussed.

  17. Revision of Australian Matini diving beetles based on morphological and molecular data (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Matinae, with description of a new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Hendrich

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphological characters and mitochondrial DNA sequence data were used to revise the Australian diving beetles in the genera Allomatus Mouchamps, 1964 and Batrachomatus Clark, 1863. As a result of these studies Allomatus syn. n. is synonymised with Batrachomatus, and Allomatus nannup Watts, 1978 from SW Australia and A. wilsoni Mouchamps, 1964 from SE Victoria are transferred to Batrachomatus. The four Australian Matini species known so far are re-described, and B. larsoni sp. n. from the Windsor Tableland in NE Queensland is described. After more than 40 years B. wilsoni has been re-discovered in two rivers in Victoria. We delineate the species using traditionally employed morphological structures such as in the male genitalia and body size, shape and colour pattern, as well as mitochondrial cox1 sequence data for 20 individuals. Important species characters (median lobes, parameres and colour patterns were illustrated. We provide an identification key and outline distribution and habitat preferences of each species. All Australian Matini are lotic, inhabiting permanent and intermittent streams, creeks and rivers.

  18. Grateloupia ramosa Wang & Luan sp. nov. (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta), a new species from China based on morphological evidence and comparative rbcL sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Cuicui; Liu, Miao; Guo, Shaoru; Zhao, Dan; Luan, Rixiao; Wang, Hongwei

    2016-03-01

    Grateloupia ramosa Wang & Luan sp. nov. (Halymeniaceae, Rhodophyta) is newly described from Hainan Province, southern China. The organism has the following morphological features: (1) purplish red, cartilaginous and lubricous thalli 5-10 cm in height; (2) compressed percurrent axes bearing abundant branches with opposite arrangement; (3) claw-like apices on top, constricted to 2-4 cm at the base; (4) cortex consisting of 3-6 layers of elliptical or anomalous cells and a medulla covered by compact medullary filaments; (5) reproductive structures distributed throughout the thallus, especially centralized at the bottom of the end portion of the branches; and (6) 4-celled Carpogonial branches and 3-celled auxiliary-cell branches, both of the Gra