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Sample records for morgan falls lahave

  1. Reply to Morgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This article responds to certain objections Jeffrey Morgan raises against the theory of liberal education defended in "Justice and Legitimacy in Upbringing." First, it replies to his claim that the theory is too individualistic and pays insufficient attention to considerations of "care". Second, it recapitulates and clarifies the argument that the…

  2. Reply to Morgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    This article responds to certain objections Jeffrey Morgan raises against the theory of liberal education defended in "Justice and Legitimacy in Upbringing." First, it replies to his claim that the theory is too individualistic and pays insufficient attention to considerations of "care". Second, it recapitulates and clarifies the argument that the…

  3. 75 FR 3251 - JP Morgan Chase and Company; JP Morgan Investment Banking, Global Corporate Financial Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... Company, JP Morgan Investment Banking, Global Corporate Financial Operation, New York, New York. Signed at... Employment and Training Administration JP Morgan Chase and Company; JP Morgan Investment Banking, Global Corporate Financial Operations, New York, NY; Notice of Negative Determination on Reconsideration By...

  4. Building a Science of Animal Minds: Lloyd Morgan, Experimentation, and Morgan's Canon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Simon; Goodrich, Grant

    2016-07-25

    Conwy Lloyd Morgan (1852-1936) is widely regarded as the father of modern comparative psychology. Yet, Morgan initially had significant doubts about whether a genuine science of comparative psychology was even possible, only later becoming more optimistic about our ability to make reliable inferences about the mental capacities of non-human animals. There has been a fair amount of disagreement amongst scholars of Morgan's work about the nature, timing, and causes of this shift in Morgan's thinking. We argue that Morgan underwent two quite different shifts of attitude towards the proper practice of comparative psychology. The first was a qualified acceptance of the Romanesian approach to comparative psychology that he had initially criticized. The second was a shift away from Romanes' reliance on systematizing anecdotal evidence of animal intelligence towards an experimental approach, focused on studying the development of behaviour. We emphasize the role of Morgan's evolving epistemological views in bringing about the first shift - in particular, his philosophy of science. We emphasize the role of an intriguing but overlooked figure in the history of comparative psychology in explaining the second shift, T. Mann Jones, whose correspondence with Morgan provided an important catalyst for Morgan's experimental turn, particularly the special focus on development. We also shed light on the intended function of Morgan's Canon, the methodological principle for which Morgan is now mostly known. The Canon can only be properly understood by seeing it in the context of Morgan's own unique experimental vision for comparative psychology.

  5. Hunting Plan Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan provides guidelines for administration of hunting activity and for development, maintenance, and enforcement of regulations and guidelines on Morgan Brake...

  6. Morgan Stanley viib Eesti maailma / Tarvo Vaarmets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaarmets, Tarvo

    2007-01-01

    Finantsteenuste pakkuja Morgan Stanley allüksus MSCI Barra kavandab indeksite loomist teiste nn. piiriturgude seas ka Eestile, mis peaks kasvatama välisinvestorite huvi Tallinna börsi vastu. Vt. samas: MSCI Barra. Kommenteerib Tõnis Oja

  7. Morgan Stanley viib Eesti maailma / Tarvo Vaarmets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaarmets, Tarvo

    2007-01-01

    Finantsteenuste pakkuja Morgan Stanley allüksus MSCI Barra kavandab indeksite loomist teiste nn. piiriturgude seas ka Eestile, mis peaks kasvatama välisinvestorite huvi Tallinna börsi vastu. Vt. samas: MSCI Barra. Kommenteerib Tõnis Oja

  8. Congruence Permutable Symmetric Extended de Morgan Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie FANG

    2006-01-01

    An algebra A is said to be congruence permutable if any two congruences on it are per-mutable. This property has been investigated in several varieties of algebras, for example, de Morgan algebras, p-algebras, Kn,o-algebras. In this paper, we study the class of symmetric extended de Morgan algebras that are congruence permutable. In particular we consider the case where A is finite, and show that A is congruence permutable if and only if it is isomorphic to a direct product of finitely many simple algebras.

  9. Group marriage: Morgan was not wrong

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Duran

    2016-01-01

    It is argued that the commonly asserted non-existence of group marriage arises solely from an abandonment of Morgan’s (1877) definition of marriage and that the commonly accepted alternative to that definition lacks ethnographic generality. As defined by Morgan group marriage has been practiced by over one-third of the hunter-gatherers listed in Murdock (1971).

  10. Augustus De Morgan behind the Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Augustus De Morgan's support was crucial to the achievements of the four mathematicians whose work is considered greater than his own. This article explores the contributions he made to mathematics from behind the scenes by supporting the work of Hamilton, Boole, Gompertz, and Ramchundra.

  11. 77 FR 3764 - Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization Take notice that on January 6, 2012, Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC (Kinder Morgan), Post Office Box 281304, Lakewood, Colorado 800228-8304, filed in the above Docket,...

  12. The Attack on Panama City by Henry Morgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-05

    1991) : 44- 49. 28 CHAPTER 3 HENRY MORGAN Henry Morgan was born in Whales in 1635. Not much is known about his childhood . Most accounts claim that...was between a Frenchman and an Englishman. The Englishman killed the Frenchman from behind as they prepared to duel . All the Frenchmen in Morgan’s

  13. The development of Lewis Henry Morgan's evolutionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuper, A

    1985-01-01

    Lewis Henry Morgan never used the term evolution in any of his major sociological works. If he may be labeled an evolutionist, the specificity of his views must be taken into account. The main "evolutionist" issue that concerned him was that of the unity or diversity of the human species. This was an urgent political and theological issue in the America of his day, and it impinged also on research on the American Indians. Morgan's first major study was designed to demonstrate the unity of origin of the American aborigines and their "Asian" origins. His methods were derived from the tradition of Indo-European philology. It was virtually as an afterthought that he added a social evolutionary component to what he conceived of as an exercise in philology. Later he came under the direct influence of the English evolutionists, and this was crucial for the conception of Ancient Society.

  14. 76 FR 44903 - Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ...-000] Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization Take notice that on June 30, 2011 Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC (KMIGT), Post...

  15. 77 FR 19055 - Morgan Olson, LLC, Receipt of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Administration [Docket No. NHTSA-2012-0028; Notice 1] Morgan Olson, LLC, Receipt of Petition for Decision of... Petition. SUMMARY: Morgan Olson, LLC (Morgan Olson) \\1\\ has determined that certain model year 2009, 2010, and 2011 Morgan Olson walk-in van-type trucks having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) over...

  16. 77 FR 56701 - Morgan Olson, LLC, Denial of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... Administration [Docket No. NHTSA-2012-0028; Notice 2] Morgan Olson, LLC, Denial of Petition for Decision of... Petition Denial. SUMMARY: Morgan Olson, LLC (Morgan Olson),\\1\\ has determined that certain model year 2009, 2010, and 2011 Morgan Olson walk-in van-type trucks having a gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) over...

  17. Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge Public Use Development Plan - 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan for Morgan Brake NWR involves setting station public use goals, project a positive attitude, welcome and orient visitors, develop key resources awareness,...

  18. Fishery Management Plan for Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge - 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This management plan was prepared by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service for Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge. Data was provided by the Refuge and Area Office...

  19. Crayfish survey at Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Crayfish sampling on Morgan Brake NWR for vernal crawfish and other species was done for 3 days at five sites. Data are present on species of crawfish and amphibians...

  20. A Conversation with James J. Morgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James J.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2015-05-01

    In conversation with professor Dianne Newman, Caltech geobiologist, James "Jim" J. Morgan recalls his early days in Ireland and New York City, education in parochial and public schools, and introduction to science in Cardinal Hayes High School, Bronx. In 1950, Jim entered Manhattan College, where he elected study of civil engineering, in particular water quality. Donald O'Connor motivated Jim's future study of O2 in rivers at Michigan, where in his MS work he learned to model O2 dynamics of rivers. As an engineering instructor at Illinois, Jim worked on rivers polluted by synthetic detergents. He chose to focus on chemical studies, seeing it as crucial for the environment. Jim enrolled for PhD studies with Werner Stumm at Harvard, who mentored his research in chemistry of particle coagulation and oxidation processes of Mn(II) and (IV). In succeeding decades, until retirement in 2000, Jim's teaching and research centered on aquatic chemistry; major themes comprised rates of abiotic manganese oxidation on particle surfaces and flocculation of natural water particles, and chemical speciation proved the key.

  1. Scott Morgan Johnson Middle School: Personalization Leads to Unlimited Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The well-known lyrics may be "The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You," but at Scott Morgan Johnson Middle School in McKinney, TX, it's definitely the "eye of the tiger" that sets the bar for Tiger PRIDE (perseverance, respect, integrity, determination, and excellence). This article describes how those ideals have been infused…

  2. An Athenaeum curiosity : De Morgan's reviews of Boole and Jevons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valencia, VS

    2001-01-01

    In this note we reproduce the book reviews that De Morgan wrote on Boole's and Jevons's first logical works. The most notable property of these documents is the mere fact of their existence and the absence of any reference to them in the specialized literature.

  3. An Athenaeum curiosity : De Morgan's reviews of Boole and Jevons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valencia, VS

    2001-01-01

    In this note we reproduce the book reviews that De Morgan wrote on Boole's and Jevons's first logical works. The most notable property of these documents is the mere fact of their existence and the absence of any reference to them in the specialized literature.

  4. 75 FR 17708 - Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization March 30, 2010. Take notice that on March 25, 2010, Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC (KMLP... directed to Norman Watson, Director, Business Development, Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC, 500...

  5. 75 FR 35019 - Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization June 11, 2010. Take notice that on June 3, 2009, Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas..., Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC, P.O. Box 281304, Lakewood, Colorado 80228-8304, or...

  6. 77 FR 50682 - Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that on August 6, 2012, Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC (KMIGT), 370 Van Gordon Street... Kinder Morgan Pony Express Pipeline LLC (KMPXP). The proposed abandonment also includes three natural...

  7. 78 FR 17390 - Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Application Take notice that on March 1, 2013 Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC (KM Texas), 1001 Louisiana Street, Houston, Texas 77002... Lee Baskin, Director, Regulatory, Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline Group, 1001 Louisiana Street,...

  8. 75 FR 53966 - Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization August 27, 2010. Take notice that on August 25, 2010, Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission, LLC (Kinder Morgan), 370 Van Gordon Street, Lakewood, Colorado 80228-8304...

  9. 75 FR 45111 - Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization July 26, 2010. Take notice that on July 20, 2010, Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas..., Vice President, Regulatory, Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission LLC, 370 Van Gordon...

  10. 78 FR 48466 - Comcast Cable, West Division Customer Care, Morgan Hill, California; Notice of Negative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration Comcast Cable, West Division Customer Care, Morgan Hill, California... workers of Comcast Cable, West Division Customer Care, Morgan Hill, California (subject firm). The... eligibility of Comcast Cable, West Division Customer Care, Morgan Hill, California, to apply for...

  11. 78 FR 73920 - Morgan 3 Wheeler Limited, Receipt of Petition for Decision of Inconsequential Noncompliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Morgan 3 Wheeler Limited, Receipt of Petition for Decision...), Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Receipt of Petition. SUMMARY: Morgan 3 Wheeler Limited \\1... to 49 CFR part 573, Defect and Noncompliance Responsibility and Reports. \\1\\ Morgan 3 Wheeler Limited...

  12. Soil Erosion Prediction Using Morgan-Morgan-Finney Model in a GIS Environment in Northern Ethiopia Catchment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebreyesus Brhane Tesfahunegn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Even though scientific information on spatial distribution of hydrophysical parameters is critical for understanding erosion processes and designing suitable technologies, little is known in Geographical Information System (GIS application in developing spatial hydrophysical data inputs and their application in Morgan-Morgan-Finney (MMF erosion model. This study was aimed to derive spatial distribution of hydrophysical parameters and apply them in the Morgan-Morgan-Finney (MMF model for estimating soil erosion in the Mai-Negus catchment, northern Ethiopia. Major data input for the model include climate, topography, land use, and soil data. This study demonstrated using MMF model that the rate of soil detachment varied from 170 t ha−1 y−1, whereas the soil transport capacity of overland flow (TC ranged from 5 t ha−1 y−1 to >42 t ha−1 y−1. The average soil loss estimated by TC using MMF model at catchment level was 26 t ha−1 y−1. In most parts of the catchment (>80%, the model predicted soil loss rates higher than the maximum tolerable rate (18 t ha−1 y−1 estimated for Ethiopia. Hence, introducing appropriate interventions based on the erosion severity predicted by MMF model in the catchment is crucial for sustainable natural resources management.

  13. 76 FR 39447 - J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, et al.; Notice of Application and Temporary Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... COMMISSION J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, et al.; Notice of Application and Temporary Order June 29, 2011... Act, with respect to an injunction entered against J.P. Morgan Securities LLC (``J.P. Morgan... also have applied for a permanent order. Applicants: J.P. Morgan Securities; Bear Stearns...

  14. DE MORGAN ALGEBRAS WITH DOUBLE DEMI-PSEUDOCOMPLEMENTATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Jie; Wang Leibo

    2011-01-01

    The variety ddpM of de Morgan algebras with double demi-pseudocomplementation consists of those algebras (L; ∧,∨,°,*,+,0,1) of type (2,2,1,1,1,0,0) where (L;∧,∨,°,0,1) is a de Morgan algebra,(L;∧,∨,*,+,0,1) is a double demi-p-lattice and the operations x → x°,x x* and x → x+ are linked by the identities x*° =x°*,x+° =x°+and x*+ =x+*.In this paper,we characterize congruences on a ddpM-algebra,and give a description of the subdirectly irreducible algebras.

  15. Environmental mutagenesis and radiation biology: The legacy of William Morgan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L

    2017-07-25

    A symposium entitled Environmental Mutagenesis and Radiation Biology was held on September 27, 2016 to honor the memory of Dr. William F. Morgan who passed away unexpectedly on November 13, 2015. The speakers presented the latest reviews on homologous recombination repair, induced genetic instability, bystander effects, and risk estimate development. Their presentations are presented following the introduction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Darwin, Hume, Morgan, and the verae causae of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clatterbuck, Hayley

    2016-12-01

    Charles Darwin and C. Lloyd Morgan forward two influential principles of cognitive ethological inference that yield conflicting results about the extent of continuity in the cognitive traits of humans and other animals. While these principles have been interpreted as reflecting commitments to different senses of parsimony, in fact, both principles result from the same vera causa inferential strategy, according to which "We ought to admit no more causes of natural things, than such as are both true and sufficient to explain their appearances". Instead, the conflict stems from Darwin's and Morgan's views about the true causes of human psychology. Darwin holds a thoroughly Humean philosophy of the human mind, from which he infers significant continuity between human and animal minds. In contrast, Morgan argues that Humean cognitive mechanisms cannot account for a class of uniquely human behaviors, and therefore, he concludes that there is a significant discontinuity between human and animal cognition. This historical debate is informative for current controversies in comparative psychology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Characterization of Principal Congruences of De Morgan Algebras and its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    p. 341–349 In this paper a characterization of principal congruences of De Morgan algebras is given and from it we derive that the variety of De Morgan algebras has DPC and CEP. The characterization is then applied to give a new proof of Kalman's characterization of subdirectly irreducibles in this variety and thus to obtain the representation theorem for DeMorgan algebras first proved by Kalman and independently, using topological methods, by Bialynicki-Birula and Rasiowa. From this repre...

  18. Triple Play: From De Morgan to Stirling to Euler to Maclaurin to Stirling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpas, Sid

    2011-01-01

    Augustus De Morgan (1806-1871) was a significant Victorian Mathematician who made contributions to mathematics history, mathematical recreations, mathematical logic, calculus, and probability and statistics. He was an inspiring mathematics professor who influenced many of his students to join the profession. One of De Morgan's significant books…

  19. 77 FR 50493 - Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order; Kinder Morgan Cochin LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order; Kinder Morgan Cochin LLC Take notice that on August 9, 2012, pursuant to Rule 207(a)(2), Kinder Morgan Cochin LLC submitted a...

  20. 75 FR 17406 - Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Compliance Filing March 31, 2010. Take notice that on March 15, 2010, and March 17, 2010, Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline, LLC...

  1. 75 FR 35781 - Kinder Morgan North Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan North Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing June 16, 2010. Take notice that on June 14, 2010, Kinder Morgan North Texas Pipeline LLC submitted a...

  2. 76 FR 20655 - Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filings Take notice that on April 6, 2011, Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline LLC submitted a revised baseline filing of...

  3. 75 FR 31429 - Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing May 27, 2010. Take notice that on May 24, 2010, Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC submitted a baseline filing of...

  4. 76 FR 34975 - Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline, LLC; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on March 24, 2010, Kinder Morgan Texas Pipeline, LLC, (KMTP) filed a petition pursuant...

  5. Risks and Consequences of Oversimplifying Educational Inequities: A Response to Morgan et al. (2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, Russell J.; Artiles, Alfredo J.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B.; Losen, Daniel J.; Harry, Elizabeth G.

    2016-01-01

    In this technical comment, we argue that Morgan et al.'s claim that there is no minority overrepresentation in special education is in error due to (a) sampling considerations, (b) inadequate support from previous and current analyses, and (c) their failure to consider the complexities of special education disproportionality. [For Morgan et al.'s…

  6. 77 FR 124 - Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ... AGENCY Biological Processors of Alabama; Decatur, Morgan County, AL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site located in Decatur, Morgan County, Alabama. DATES: The Agency... name Biological Processors of Alabama Superfund Site by one of the following methods:...

  7. University Mentality or Community College Paranoia: A Critique of Don Morgan's Reaction to David Riesman's Tentative Hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, George B.

    1979-01-01

    Responds to Don Morgan's reaction (JC 502 050) to David Riesman's article, "Community Colleges: Some Tentative Hypotheses" (JC 502 056). Summarizes Riesman's major arguments and challenges Morgan's interpretations of them. (AYC)

  8. 76 FR 41829 - J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, et al.; Notice of Application and Temporary Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-15

    ... COMMISSION J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, et al.; Notice of Application and Temporary Order July 11, 2011... Act, with respect to an injunction entered against J.P. Morgan Securities LLC (``JPMS'') on July 8...) Limited (``JPMAMUK''), JPMorgan Distribution Services, Inc. (``JPMDS''), J.P. Morgan...

  9. Lady Morgan in Italy: A Traveller with an Agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Abbate Badin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lady Morgan (née Sydney Owenson was a professional Irish travellerand travel-writer, who spent over a year on the peninsula. The travelogueItaly (1821 she was commissioned to write on the basis of the reputationshe had acquired as a novelist (e.g. The Wild Irish Girl, 1806 anda socio-political writer (France, 1817, left a mark on Italy and on theunderstanding of Italy in Great Britain. Her writings, in fact, helpeddisseminate the ideal of a unified Italy and influence British and Irishpublic opinion in favour of Italy’s aspirations to cast off foreign or domesticautocratic rule. Moreover, she used her travelogue to serve thecause of Ireland disguising a patriotic message about her home countryunder her many sallies about nationalism and the right to self-determinationconcerning Italy. The political impact of her book, unusualfor a travel account written by a woman, was enhanced by Morgan’sradical ideology, the gender bias of her observations and her originalmethods. The present article purposes to examine Morgan’s double,feminine and masculine, approach of mixing solid documentation withapparently frivolous notes originating in the feminine domain of societynews, commentary on the domestic scene and emotional reporting onsocial and historical events. Distrusting male-authored official history,Morgan gave a central place in her work to the informal sources fromwhich she gathered her insights about Italy. Analysing how she came toobtain the contemporary input for elaborating her ideas will be the aimof this chapter which will dwell on the more worldly aspects of Morgan’ssojourn in the peninsula focussing on the company she kept, theactivities she partook of, the events of a domestic nature she witnessed.

  10. Falling chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Chun Wa; Yasui, Kosuke

    2006-06-01

    The one-dimensional fall of a folded chain with one end suspended from a rigid support and a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Because their Lagrangians contain no explicit time dependence, the falling chains are conservative systems. Their equations of motion are shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred between subchains. We show that Cayley's 1857 energy nonconserving solution for a chain falling from a resting heap is incorrect because it neglects the energy gained when a link leaves a subchain. The maximum chain tension measured by Calkin and March for the falling folded chain is given a simple if rough interpretation. Other aspects of the falling folded chain are briefly discussed.

  11. Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge Deer Harvest Records from 2011 Season

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These harvest data are from Morgan Brake during the 2011 deer season. They measure weight, antler size, prevalence of milk, and number of deer harvested.

  12. 77 FR 27774 - Kinder Morgan, Inc. and El Paso Corporation; Analysis of Proposed Agreement Containing Consent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION Kinder Morgan, Inc. and El Paso Corporation; Analysis of Proposed Agreement Containing Consent Orders To Aid Public Comment; Correction AGENCY: Federal Trade Commission. ACTION: Proposed Consent...

  13. Hillside, Morgan Brake, and Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuges Reforestation Plan for 1992-1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This plan addresses the history of reforestation at Hillside National Wildlife Refuge and its two satellite refuges, Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge and...

  14. Mobile Acoustical Bat Monitoring Annual Summary Report CY 2012 to 2015 - Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These reports summarize bat calls collected along transects at Morgan Brake National Wildlife Refuge between 2012 and 2015. Calls were classified using Bat Call ID...

  15. 78 FR 11226 - Comcast Cable, West Division Customer Care, Morgan Hill, CA; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Comcast Cable, West Division Customer Care, Morgan Hill, CA; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for Reconsideration By application dated January 29, 2013,...

  16. Book review: Pragmatic humanism: on the nature and value of sociological knowledge by Marcus Morgan

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In Pragmatic Humanism: On the Nature and Value of Sociological Knowledge, Marcus Morgan positions sociology not as a science of society, but as a discipline of humanity. Rather than resurrect a problematic, classical conception of humanism, Morgan instead engages with past and contemporary critiques of humanist thought to position humanism as a pragmatic approach to sociology that draws on human action as a tool for progressive social change. Adam Carter heartily recommends this invigorating ...

  17. Falling chains

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, C W; Wong, Chun Wa; Yasui, Kosuke

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional falling motion of a bungee chain suspended from a rigid support and of a chain falling from a resting heap on a table is studied. Their Lagrangians are found to contain no explicit time dependence. As a result, these falling chains are conservative systems. Each of their Lagrange's equations of motion is shown to contain a term that enforces energy conservation when masses are transferred between subchains. We show in particular that Cayley's 1857 energy nonconserving solution for a chain falling from a resting heap is incorrect because it neglects the energy gained when the transferred link is emitted by the emitting subchain. The maximum chain tension measured by Calkin and March for the falling bungee chain is given a simple if rough interpretation. In the simplified one-dimensional treatment, the kinetic energy of the center of mass of the falling bungee chain is found to be converted by the chain tension at the rigid support into the internal kinetic energy of the chain. However, as t...

  18. An early manuscript in the history of American comparative psychology: Lewis Henry Morgan's "Animal Psychology" (1857).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Timothy D

    2002-11-01

    Lewis Henry Morgan (1818-1881) is best known as the 1st ethnographer of Native American culture, but he also wrote on animal psychology, beginning in 1843, some 50 years before the founding of comparative psychology as a scientific discipline. Although not an evolutionist, Morgan argued that animals possess many human mental abilities, such as reason and moral judgment, and he rejected the scientific utility of the concept of instinct, a view that did not gain much currency in psychology until the rise of behaviorism in the 1920s. This 1857 manuscript, which is in the Lewis Henry Morgan Papers at the University of Rochester in Rochester, New York, formed the basis for the last chapter of his 1868 monograph on the American beaver but gives additional information on his sources and an expanded criticism of the concept of instinct.

  19. [Accidental falls].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inokuchi, Koichi

    2013-06-01

    Falls are common cause of injuries among elderly people, and fractures are the most serious consequence of falls. For seniors, hip fractures are the second major cause of bedridden. The feature and acute care of head injury, spinal cord injury, vertebrae fracture, and hip fracture are described. Just had fracture fixation, the patient can not go back to the original ADL. In order not to become bedridden, both medication and physical examination are important based on the new disease concept of locomotive syndrome. To do so, requires hospital and clinic cooperation. Sufficient cooperation is not currently possible, and spread of liaison service is essential.

  20. Algorithms of D-optimal designs for Morgan Mercer Flodin (MMF) models with three parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiharih, Tatik; Haryatmi, Sri; Gunardi, Wilandari, Yuciana

    2016-02-01

    Morgan Mercer Flodin (MMF) model is used in many areas including biological growth studies, animal and husbandry, chemistry, finance, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Locally D-optimal designs for Morgan Mercer Flodin (MMF) models with three parameters are investigated. We used the Generalized Equivalence Theorem of Kiefer and Wolvowitz to determine D-optimality criteria. Number of roots for standardized variance are determined using Tchebysheff system concept and it is used to decide that the design is minimally supported design. In these models, designs are minimally supported designs with uniform weight on its support, and the upper bound of the design region is a support point.

  1. Lloyd Morgan's theory of instinct: from Darwinism to neo-Darwinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, R J

    1977-01-01

    Darwin's proposal of two sources of instinct--natural selection and inherited habit--fostered among late nineteenth century evolutionists a variety of conflicting notions concerning the mechanisms of evolution. The British comparative psychologist C. Lloyd Morgan was a cardinal figure in restructuring the orthodox Darwinian conception to relieve the confusion besetting it and to meet the demands of the new biology of Weismann. This paper traces the development of Morgan's ideas about instinct against the background of his philosophic assumptions and the views of instinct theorists from Darwin and Romanes to McDougall and Lorenz.

  2. Vergleichende morphologische Untersuchung der Morgan-Linie mittels Röntgen, Computertomographie (CT) und Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT)

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, Nannette Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Die hier vorgelegte Studie untersucht 88 Hüftgelenke mit Morgan-Linie von Hunden der HD-Grade A1, A2, B1 und B2 mittels Röntgen, CT und MRT. Die Morgan-Linien werden in 5 verschiedene Morphologie-Gruppen eingeteilt. Es werden verschiedene Parameter im Röntgen (HD-Grad, Subluxationsindex, Norberg-Winkel), in der CT (vorhandenen Arthrosen, Dorsolaterale Subluxation, Dichte des Femurkopf und-hals) und der MRT (Synovial Fluid Index, Kapsel- und Knorpeldicke, Signal des Femurhalses) bestimmt. Ziel...

  3. 78 FR 16262 - J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corporation; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corporation; Supplemental Notice That Initial... notice in the above-referenced proceeding, of J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corporation's application for... . or call (866) 208-3676 (toll free). For TTY, call (202) 502-8659. Dated: March 7, 2013. Nathaniel...

  4. 77 FR 59184 - J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corporation; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund Effective...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corporation; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding... (2006), to determine whether several statements by J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corporation constitute violations of section 35.41(b) of the Commission's regulations under the Federal Power Act (FPA).\\1\\...

  5. 77 FR 60981 - Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission L.L.C.; Notice of Intent To... construction and operation of new facilities by Kinder Morgan Interstate Gas Transmission L.L.C. (KMIGT) in... natural gas pipeline facilities and the natural gas service therefrom by transfer to an affiliate,...

  6. 78 FR 69659 - Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of Complaint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chevron U.S.A. Inc. v. Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC; Notice of.... (Chevron or Complainant), filed a complaint against Kinder Morgan Louisiana Pipeline LLC (KMLP...

  7. 77 FR 52018 - Kinder Morgan Pony Express Pipeline LLC; Belle Fourche Pipeline Company; Notice of Petition for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Pony Express Pipeline LLC; Belle Fourche Pipeline Company...) of the Commission's Rules of Practices and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2012), Kinder Morgan...

  8. 77 FR 55469 - Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC; Notice of Motion for Extension of Rate Case Filing Deadline Take notice that on August 30, 2012, Kinder Morgan Border Pipeline LLC (KM...

  9. 77 FR 65874 - Kinder Morgan Pony Express Pipeline LLC, Hiland Crude, LLC; Notice of Petition For Declaratory Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Kinder Morgan Pony Express Pipeline LLC, Hiland Crude, LLC; Notice of... Commission's Rules of Practices and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2)(2012), Kinder Morgan Pony...

  10. 77 FR 26760 - Kinder Morgan, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Agreement Containing Consent Orders To Aid Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... Kinder Morgan, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Agreement Containing Consent Orders To Aid Public Comment... Comment part of the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write AEl Paso Kinder Morgan, File No. 121... Commission to consider your comment, we must receive it on or before April 16, 2012. Write AEl Paso...

  11. Environmental Setting of the Morgan Creek Basin, Maryland, 2002-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Tracy Connell; Brayton, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    The Morgan Creek Basin is a 31-square-kilometer watershed in Kent County, Maryland on the Delmarva Peninsula. The Delmarva Peninsula covers about 15,500 square kilometers and includes most of the State of Delaware and parts of Maryland and Virginia east of the Chesapeake Bay. The Morgan Creek Basin is one of five sites selected for the study of sources, transport, and fate by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program's: Agricultural Chemicals: Sources, Transport and Fate study team (Agricultural Chemicals Team, ACT). A key component of the study is identifying the natural factors and human influences affecting water quality in the Morgan Creek Basin. The Morgan Creek Basin is in the Coastal Plain Physiographic Province, which is a nearly level seaward-sloping lowland with areas of moderate topographic relief. The study area lies within a well-drained upland region with permeable and porous soils and aquifer sediments. The soils are well suited to most field crops. Agriculture is the principal land use in the Morgan Creek Basin, as well as throughout the entire Delmarva Peninsula. Most agricultural land is used for row crops such as corn, soybeans, and small grains, and slightly less land is used for pasture and hay production involving alfalfa, clover, and various perennial grasses. There are several animal operations in the study area. Farm management practices include fertilizer and herbicide applications, different tillage practices, addition of lime, forested riparian buffers, grassed waterways, and sediment retention ponds. Irrigation in the study area is minimal. The climate of the Morgan Creek Basin is humid and subtropical, with an average annual precipitation of 1.12 meters. Overall annual precipitation is evenly distributed throughout the year, from 76 to 101 millimeters per month; however, the spring and summer (March - September) tend to be slightly wetter than the autumn and winter (October - February

  12. 77 FR 15125 - United States v. Morgan Stanley; Public Comments and Response on Proposed Final Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ...). ] I. PROCEDURAL HISTORY The United States brought this lawsuit against Defendant Morgan Stanley on... agreements with KeySpan Corporation (``KeySpan'') and Astoria Generating Company Acquisitions, L.L.C... States v. Microsoft Corp., 56 F.3d 1448, 1458-62 (DC Cir. 1995); United States v. SBC Commc'ns, 489...

  13. 75 FR 38557 - Application Nos. and Proposed Exemptions; D-11489, Morgan Stanley & Co., Incorporated; L-11609...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... issue exemptions of the type requested to the Secretary of Labor. Therefore, these notices of proposed... fully understand the risks associated with these types of transactions, following disclosure by Morgan... ability to conduct accurate expense forecasting. The Trustees also represent that the terms of the Loan...

  14. 75 FR 45108 - Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC Yankee Gas Services Company Kinder Morgan Tejas Pipeline LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. PR10-63-000; Docket No. PR10-64-000; Docket No. PR10-66- 000] Enterprise Alabama Intrastate, LLC Yankee Gas Services Company Kinder Morgan Tejas Pipeline LLC...

  15. Developing the Frank and Morgan technique for industrial fire risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golmohamadi

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: Results showed that the developed Frank and Morgan method can be a suitable tool for evaluating industrial fire risk and prioritizing units in general level of an industrial complex especially chemicals company. According to the findings in this study, the investigation of likely damages to environment in the case of fire has high importance.

  16. 76 FR 62843 - United States v. Morgan Stanley; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-11

    .... The New York City Installed Capacity Market 11. Sellers of retail electricity must purchase a product... confident that ``bidding the cap'' would remain its best strategy during the 2006-2009 period. It considered... make continuing to ``bid the cap'' its best strategy. KeySpan consulted with Morgan about acquiring the...

  17. 76 FR 53888 - Application to Export Electric Energy; Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... Application to Export Electric Energy; Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity... Inc. (MSCG) has applied to renew its authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to...-year term. The electric energy that MSCG proposes to export to Mexico would be surplus energy...

  18. 75 FR 22579 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; Morgan Stanley Capital Group Inc. AGENCY: Office of Electricity... Inc. (MSCG) has applied to renew its authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to...-185 authorizing MSGC to transmit electric energy from the United States to Canada as a power...

  19. Modelling the effect of fire frequency on runoff and erosion in north-central Portugal using the revised Morgan-Morgan-Finney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mohammadreza; Nunes, João Pedro; González Pelayo, Oscar; Keizer, Jan Jacob; Ritsema, Coen; Geissen, Violette

    2017-04-01

    Models can be valuable for foreseeing the hydrological effects of fires and to plan and execute post-fire management alternatives. In this study, the revised Morgan-Morgan-Finney (MMF) model was utilized to simulate runoff and soil erosion in recently burned maritime pine plantations with different fire regimes, in a wet Mediterranean area of north-central Portugal. The MMF model was adjusted for burned zones in order to accommodate seasonal patterns in runoff and soil erosion, attributed to changes in soil water repellency and vegetation recovery. The model was then assessed by applying it for a sum of 18 experimental micro-plots (0.25 m2) at 9 1x-burnt and 9 4x-burnt slopes, using both literature-based and calibrated parameters, with the collected data used to assess the robustness of each parameterization. The estimate of erosion was more exact than that of runoff, with a general Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.54. Slope angle and the soil's effective hydrological depth (which relies on upon vegetation and additionally crop cover) were found to be the primary parameters enhancing model results, and different hydrological depths were expected to separate between the two differentiating fire regimes. This relative analysis demonstrated that most existing benchmark parameters can be utilized to apply MMF in burnt pine regions with moderate severity to support post-fire management; however it also showed that further endeavours ought to concentrate on mapping soil depth and vegetation cover to enhance these simulations.

  20. « Lewis Henry Morgan, Le castor américain et ses ouvrages »,

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Compte - rendu Lewis Henry Morgan, Le castor américain et ses ouvrages », Gradhiva, 13 | 2011, 231-233.; Le présent ouvrage est la première traduction française du livre initialement publié en 1868 par Lewis Henry Morgan : The American Beaver and His Works. Cette première monographie digne de ce nom dédiée au castor a participé à la fondation de l’éthologie américaine. Mise en contexte du point de vue de l’histoire des idées par Lucienne Strivay, la traduction que nous proposent les éditions ...

  1. The centenary progress of molecular genetics. A 100th anniversary of T. H. Morgan's discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keros, Tomislav; Borovecki, Fran; Jemersić, Lorena; Konjević, Dean; Roić, Besi; Balatinec, Jelena

    2010-09-01

    A century ago, Thomas Hunt Morgan, the American scientist, studied the cytogenetic changes of drosophila and came to cytogenetic explanation of Mendel's basic laws of genetic heredity. These studies resulted in today's Mendel-Morgan chromosomal theory of heredity. On the occasion of the hundredth anniversary of this important discovery the authors have decided to give a review of the most significant achievements in the field of molecular genetics until the completion of the Human Genome Project. The most important points concerning the technology of DNA recombination and genetic engineering are also presented. The final section discusses the significance of previous achievements of molecular genetics in biomedicine and other related fields. There is also a tabular presentation of the sequence of the most important findings in the field of molecular genetics through time.

  2. Central Mississippi Refuges: Yazoo, Panther Swamp, Hillside, Morgan Brake & Bathews Brake: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Yazoo, Hillside, Panther Swamp, Morgan Brake, and Mathews Brake NWRs covers refuge activities during 2001. The report begins with a...

  3. Biweekly Waterfowl Counts from Mathews Brake, Morgan Brake, and Hillside National Wildlife Refuges in 2001 and 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Biweekly Waterfowl Counts from Mathews Brake, Morgan Brake, and Hillside National Wildlife Refuges conducted from October 2001 to February 2002

  4. Hillside, Morgans Brake, and Mathews Brake National Wildlife Refuges Deer Harvest Records are from 2008 and 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These harvest data are from Hillside, Morgans Brake, and Mathews Brake NWRs during the 2008 and 2014 deer seasons. They measure weight, antler size, prevalence of...

  5. W. W. Morgan and the Discovery of the Spiral Arm Structure of our Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Sheehan, William

    2011-01-01

    William Wilson Morgan was one of the great astronomers of the twentieth century. He considered himself a morphologist, and was preoccupied throughout his career with matters of classification. Though his early life was difficult, and his pursuit of astronomy as a career was opposed by his father, he took a position at Yerkes Observatory in 1926 and remained there for the rest of his working life. Thematically, his work was also a unified whole. Beginning with spectroscopic studies under Otto Struve at Yerkes Observatory, by the late 1930s he concentrated particularly on the young O and B stars. His work on stellar classification led to the Morgan-Keenan- Kellman [MKK] system of classification of stars, and later - as he grappled with the question of the intrinsic color and brightness of stars at great distances - to the Johnson-Morgan UBV system for measuring stellar colors. Eventually these concerns with classification and method led to his greatest single achievement - the recognition of the nearby spiral a...

  6. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  7. Evaluation of the MMF (Morgan-Morgan-Finney) model based on soil loss experimental data from vineyards in Alto Monferrato area (NW Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddoccu, Marcella; Cavallo, Eugenio

    2010-05-01

    hydraulic conductivity are available for each plot. They have been used, besides to climate data and land cover guide values, as input parameter in the modified Morgan-Morgan-Finney model (Morgan & Duzant, 2008), specifically elaborated to evaluate effects of crops and vegetation on soil erosion. The model output has been compared with experimental data, in order to validate the model performance. Expected annual soil loss calculated for each plot is consistent with the mean value obtained in the period of observation.

  8. Falls and Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Falls and Older Adults About Falls Risk Increases With Age Many people have a ... problems -- rises with age. Click for more information Falls Lead to Fractures, Trauma Each year, more than ...

  9. Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of health physicist Karl Z. Morgan, Ph.D., conducted January 7, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report provided a transcript of an interview of Dr. Karl. Z. Morgan by representatives of the DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Dr. Morgan was selected for this interview because of his research for the Manhattan Project at the Metallurgical Laboratory in Chicago and his work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The oral history covers Dr. Morgan`s work as a pioneer in the field of Health Physics, his research at ORNL and his work since he retired from ORNL.

  10. Cross-section data and pressure transducer location of the South Platte River near Fort Morgan, Colorado, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    The USGS Colorado Water Science Center, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board, collected hydraulic data for the South Platte River for areas adjacent to Fort Morgan, Colo., based on the USGS streamgage 06759500 South Platte River at Fort Morgan, CO. The hydraulic data include survey point data for 54 cross sections and 10 pressure transducers, which are used to record the river stage beginning at Morgan County Road 16 and extending downstream to Morgan County Road 20.5 near Fort Morgan, Colo. The cross-section and pressure transducer location data were collected using real-time kinematic Global Navigation Satellite Systems by USGS personnel from February 15, 2017, through April 18, 2017. These data can be used to develop inundation maps, which could be available to emergency personnel, public officials, and the general public using an online public mapping application at the USGS Flood Inundation Mapper, which contains flood inundation map libraries from throughout the country created by the USGS.

  11. Transparency and accountability in mass media campaigns about organ donation: a response to Morgan and Feeley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; McGregor, Joan L; Verheijde, Joseph L

    2013-11-01

    We respond to Morgan and Feeley's critique on our article "Mass Media in Organ Donation: Managing Conflicting Messages and Interests." We noted that Morgan and Feeley agree with the position that the primary aims of media campaigns are: "to educate the general public about organ donation process" and "help individuals make informed decisions" about organ donation. For those reasons, the educational messages in media campaigns should not be restricted to "information from pilot work or focus groups" but should include evidence-based facts resulting from a comprehensive literature research. We consider the controversial aspects about organ donation to be relevant, if not necessary, educational materials that must be disclosed in media campaigns to comply with the legal and moral requirements of informed consent. With that perspective in mind, we address the validity of Morgan and Feeley's claim that media campaigns have no need for informing the public about the controversial nature of death determination in organ donation. Scientific evidence has proven that the criteria for death determination are inconsistent with the Uniform Determination of Death Act and therefore potentially harmful to donors. The decision by campaign designers to use the statutory definition of death without disclosing the current controversies surrounding that definition does not contribute to improved informed decision making. We argue that if Morgan and Feeley accept the important role of media campaigns to enhance informed decision making, then critical controversies should be disclosed. In support of that premise, we will outline: (1) the wide-spread scientific challenges to brain death as a concept of death; (2) the influence of the donor registry and team-huddling on the medical care of potential donors; (3) the use of authorization rather than informed consent for donor registration; (4) the contemporary religious controversy; and (5) the effects of training desk clerks as organ

  12. 78 FR 24192 - J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corp. v. Midwest Independent System Operator, Inc. PJM...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission J.P. Morgan Ventures Energy Corp. v. Midwest Independent System Operator, Inc. PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on April 10, 2013, J.P....

  13. 78 FR 3042 - J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, et al.; Notice of Application and Temporary Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ..., LLC (``EMC''), Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I, LLC (``BSABS''), Structured Asset Mortgage.... J.P. Morgan Securities LLC, EMC Mortgage, LLC, Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I, LLC... and misleading disclosures involving offerings of certain residential mortgage-backed securities...

  14. Introduction au "Castor américain" de Lewis Henry Morgan

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Le livre que Lewis Henry Morgan préférait parmi tous ceux dont il était l'auteur, "The American Beaver and his Works", 1868, n'avait pas encore été traduit en français. Le père de l'anthropologie américaine et des recherches sur la parenté s'y révèle aussi un des précurseurs de l'éthologie. Il y place tous les vivants (y compris les animaux qu'il appelle les "Muets") dans une même dynamique des systèmes qui permettent d'agir. Ce traité qui demeure un classique de l'histoire naturelle permet d...

  15. Isolation of some precursors of 2-methylpyrrole in the Elson–Morgan reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini-Cessi, Franca; Cessi, C.

    1970-01-01

    1-C-(1-Acetylacetonyl)-2-deoxy-2-(1-methyl-3-oxobut-1-enyl)amino -d-galactitol is obtained from the condensation of 2-amino-2-deoxy-d-galactose with pentane-2,4-dione in anhydrous solvent. On treatment with hot alkali it gives 2-methylpyrrole with 37% yield. By acid hydrolysis under mild conditions the compound loses the N substituent and from the resulting unstable derivative 2-methylpyrrole is obtained (52% yield). It is concluded that derivatives of aminohexoses substituted at C-1 with a dioxopentyl chain are the precursors of 2-methylpyrrole in the Cessi & Serafini-Cessi (1963) modification of the Elson–Morgan reaction. As demonstrated previously, products of condensation of aminohexoses with pentane-2,4-dione at the amino group are not converted directly into 2-methylpyrrole, but this step provides protection of the amino group during condensation at C-1. PMID:5495159

  16. Shaping Images of Australia through Translation: Doris Pilkington and Sally Morgan in Slovene Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica Čerče

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available By examining the Slovene translations of the novels My Place and Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence by the Australian indigenous authors Sally Morgan and Doris Pilkington, this article seeks to highlight how they contribute to the bridging of the gap between the two cultures. In particular, and in accord with Gideon Toury’s 1995 proposal to analyse a translation in terms of its “‘adequacy’ in relation to the source text, and its ‘acceptability’ to the target audience,” it aims to establish whether the translators achieved a balance between domestication and foreignisation translation strategies, and how they transposed particular narrative styles and cultural signifiers of Aboriginal writing from the source to the target texts (Limon 2003, 640.

  17. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone populations

  18. First Aid: Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old First Aid: Falls KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Falls Print A A A en español Folleto de instructiones: Caídas (Falls) With all the running, climbing, and exploring kids ...

  19. The Patient Who Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Mary E.; Kumar, Chandrika

    2013-01-01

    Falls are common health events that cause discomfort and disability for older adults and stress for caregivers. Using the case of an older man who has experienced multiple falls and a hip fracture, this article, which focuses on community-living older adults, addresses the consequences and etiology of falls; summarizes the evidence on predisposing factors and effective interventions; and discusses how to translate this evidence into patient care. Previous falls; strength, gait, and balance impairments; and medications are the strongest risk factors for falling. Effective single interventions include exercise and physical therapy, cataract surgery, and medication reduction. Evidence suggests that the most effective strategy for reducing the rate of falling in community-living older adults may be intervening on multiple risk factors. Vitamin D has the strongest clinical trial evidence of benefit for preventing fractures among older men at risk. Issues involved in incorporating these evidence-based fall prevention interventions into outpatient practice are discussed, as are the trade-offs inherent in managing older patients at risk of falling. While challenges and barriers exist, fall prevention strategies can be incorporated into clinical practice. PMID:20085954

  20. One sound velocity profile collected aboard the NAVIGATION RESPONSE TEAM 1 in Berwick Bay near Morgan City, Louisiana on October 4, 2006 (NODC Accession 0013777)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A sound velocity profile was collected using a sound velocimeter cast in Berwick Bay near Morgan City, Louisiana on 04 October 2006 as part of project number...

  1. PPH vs Milligan-Morgan: early and late complications in the treatment of haemorrhoidal disease with circumferential prolapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammarco, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Francesco; Carpino, Antonio; Russo, Emilio; Vescio, Giuseppina; Ammendola, Michele; Sacco, Rosario

    2013-07-23

    In questo studio osservazionale retrospettivo abbiamo confrontato le complicanze post-operatorie tardive e precoci di pazienti affetti da malattia emorroidaria con prolasso circonferenziale (P4-E4 secondo la classificazione PATE 2000) sottoposti ad intervento chirurgico con tecnica Milligan-Morgan (variante laser a fibre ottiche) e con tecnica PPH-Stapler. Nello studio sono stati inclusi 160 pazienti sottoposti a trattamento chirurgico tra gli anni 2001 e 2007. Il gruppo A è composto da 80 pazienti (50 maschi; 30 femmine; età media di 39; range 23-57 anni) trattati con tecnica Milligan-Morgan (variante laser a fibre ottiche); il gruppo B composto da 80 pazienti (58 maschi; 22 femmine; età media di 40; range 23-60 anni) trattati con tecnica PPH-Stapler. Le complicanze precoci sono state eventi trombotici (6 casi in M-M vs 1 in PPH) e ritenzione urinaria (13 MM vs 5 PPH) senza casi di sepsi. Le complicanze tardive invece sono state: sanguinamento occasionale del 13.5 % nel gruppo M-M vs 10 % nel gruppo PPH; incontinenza alla defecazione 2.5 % (M-M-group) vs 5% (PPH-group) con p tecnica PPHStapler risulta essere più indicata della tecnica Milligan- Morgan per il trattamento chirurgico del prolasso emorroidario nonostante possa essere seguita da gravi complicanze con una specifica indicazione però nella malattia emorroidaria con prolasso circonferenziale tipo P4- E4. Nella malattia emorroidaria con uno o più noduli invece, crediamo sia più indicato un trattamento chirurgico con tecnica Milligan-Morgan (variante laser a fibre ottiche).

  2. Low-flow transport models for conservative and sorbed solutes; Uvas Creek, near Morgan Hill, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, A.P.; Walters, R.A.; Kennedy, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Models describing low-flow transport of conservative (nonreactive) and reactive solutes, which adsorb on the streambed, are developed and tested. Temporary storage within the bed plays an important role in solute movement. Three different models of bed-storage processes are developed for conservative solutes. One model assumes the bed is a well-mixed, nondiffusing, nonreacting zone. Solute flux into the bed is then proportional to the difference between stream and bed-solute concentrations. A second model assumes that solute is transported within the bed by a vertical diffusion process. The bed-solute concentration, which matches the stream concentration at the interface, varies with depth in the bed according to Fick 's law. A third model assumes convection in the downstream direction occurs in certain parts of the bed, while the mechanism of the first model functions elsewhere. Storage of absorbing species is assumed to occur by equilibrium adsorption within streambed particles. Uptake rate is described by an intraparticle diffusion process. Model equations were solved using finite element numerical methods. Models were calibrated using data from a 24-hour injection of conservative chloride and adsorptive Sr ions at Uvas Creek near Morgan Hill, California. All models predict well except for some overestimation by the adsorption model during dieaway. (USGS)

  3. Plasmodium immobilization of Physarella oblonga (Berk. & Curt.) Morgan (Myxomycetes) using kaolinite as a matrix of entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Sheyla M; Cavalcanti, Laise H; Pereira, Eugênia C; Silva, Nicácio H

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of using kaolinite-immobilized plasmodium fragments of Physarella oblonga (Berk. & Curt.) Morgan to maintain their metabolic activity was examined. The immobilization process was carried out with 1 mg of plasmodium of P. oblonga entrapped in 10 g of kaolinite. Sodium acetate (1 mM) was used as a metabolic precursor. The collection of fractions was carried out during a one month period, and extracted with ether/ethyl acetate and chloroform/acetonitrile. The extractions from plasmodium in natura were accomplished with the same solvents. The extracts obtained were analyzed in a spectrophotometer at 266 nm and 310 nm, and by thin layer chromatography to assess the productivity of the immobilized plasmodium. The absorbances of the extracts in both wavelengths and the chromatographic tests showed the synthesis of compounds by the immobilized material. Three chromatographic spots were observed in the extracts obtained from the immobilized plasmodium. Two spots coincided with the R(f) values and coloration of the spots observed for the material in natura used as a reference. The kaolinite-immobilized plasmodium of P. oblonga can remain metabolically active for at least one month at room temperature and ambient light conditions.

  4. Fall Leaf Portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

  5. Falls and comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Sahlberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To compare nationwide time trends and mortality in hip and proximal humeral fractures; to explore associations between incidences of falls risk related comorbidities (FRICs) and incidence of fractures. METHODS: The study is a retrospective cohort study using nationwide Danish administrative....... CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the overall reduction in fractures can be explained by reduction in falls related comorbidity....

  6. Fall prevention conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Falls can have lasting psychological and physical consequences, particularly fractures and slow-healing processes, and patients may also lose confidence in walking. Injuries from falls lead to functional decline, institutionalization, higher health care costs, and decreased quality of life. The process related to the problem of patient falls in the hospital, using the nursing model developed by the theorist, Ida Jean Orlando, is explained in this article. The useful tool that provides guidance to marketers in this endeavor is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. During acute illness, individuals are greatly in need of satisfying their physiological needs. If these needs are not met, patients leave the hospital lacking a positive experience. Initial fall risk assessment is critical to plan intervention and individualize care plan. Interventions depend on the severity of fall risk factors.

  7. Geologic map of the Orchard 7.5' quadrangle, Morgan County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Margaret E.; Slate, Janet L.; Hanson, Paul R.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2015-01-01

    The Orchard 7.5' quadrangle is located along the South Platte River corridor on the semi-arid plains of eastern Colorado, and contains surficial deposits that record alluvial, eolian, and hillslope processes that have operated through environmental changes from the Pleistocene to the present. The South Platte River, originating high in the Colorado Front Range, has played a major role in shaping the geology of the quadrangle, which is situated downstream of where the last of the major headwater tributaries (St. Vrain, Big Thompson, and Cache la Poudre) join the river. Recurrent glaciation (and deglaciation) of basin headwaters affected river discharge and sediment supply far downstream, influencing alluvium deposition and terrace formation in the Orchard quadrangle. Kiowa and Bijou Creeks, unglaciated tributaries originating east of the Front Range also have played a major role by periodically delivering large volumes of sediment to the river during flood events, which may have temporarily dammed the river. Eolian sand deposits of the Greeley (north of river) and Fort Morgan (south of river) dune fields cover much of the quadrangle and record past episodes of sand mobilization during times of drought. With the onset of irrigation during historic times, the South Platte River has changed from a broad, shallow, and sandy braided river with highly seasonal discharge to a much narrower, deeper river with braided-meandering transition morphology and more uniform discharge. Along this reach, the river has incised into Upper Cretaceous Pierre Shale, which, although buried by alluvial deposits in Orchard quadrangle, is locally exposed downstream along the South Platte River bluff near the Bijou Creek confluence, in some of the larger draws, and along Wildcat Creek.

  8. Seneca Falls. Classroom Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balantic, Jeannette; Libresco, Andrea S.

    1995-01-01

    Presents a secondary school lesson based on the Seneca Falls Declaration of Sentiments. Provides lesson objectives and step-by-step instructional procedures. Includes quoted sections of the Declaration of Sentiments. (CFR)

  9. How does interference fall?

    CERN Document Server

    Orlando, Patrick J; Modi, Kavan

    2016-01-01

    We study how single- and double-slit interference patterns fall in the presence of gravity. First, we demonstrate that universality of free fall still holds in this case, i.e., interference patterns fall just like classical objects. Next, we explore lowest order relativistic effects in the Newtonian regime by employing a recent quantum formalism which treats mass as an operator. This leads to interactions between non-degenerate internal degrees of freedom (like spin in an external magnetic field) and external degrees of freedom (like position). Based on these effects, we present an unusual phenomenon, in which a falling double slit interference pattern periodically decoheres and recoheres. The oscillations in the visibility of this interference occur due to correlations built up between spin and position. Finally, we connect the interference visibility revivals with non-Markovian quantum dynamics.

  10. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  11. Editors' Fall Picks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffert, Barbara; Heilbrun, Margaret; Kuzyk, Raya; Kim, Ann; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Burns, Ann; Williams, Wilda

    2008-01-01

    From the fall's cascade of great new books, "Library Journal's" editors select their favorites--a dark rendition of Afghan life, a look at the "self-esteem trap," a celebration of Brooklyn activism, and much more.

  12. [Fear of falling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde Tirado, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Fear of falling (FF) can be considered as a protective response to a real threat, preventing the elderly from performing activities with high risk of falling, but can also lead to a restriction of the activities that will result in a long-term adverse effect on social, physical or cognitive functions. There is a prevalence of FF in 30% in the elderly who have no history of falls, and double that in those with a history of falling. Its prevalence is increased in women and with advanced age. Several scales have been developed to measure the psychological effects of FF, among which are noted are, the Fall Efficacy Scale (FES), the Activities-specific Balance and Confidence Scale (ABC), and the survey of activities and fear of falling in the elderly (SAFE). It has negative consequences in the functionality, the subjective feeling of well-being, and in the consequent loss of independence. The functional and physical deterioration, or the quality of life is clearly related to the FF, although it has not been established if these factors are cause or effect. Multiple interventions have been recommended, bringing about changes that reinforce their confidence to carry out activities. Interventions and research should promote a realistic and appropriate approach to the risk of falls and teach the elderly to perform activities safely. The reduction in FF is an important goal in itself to improve the subjective feeling of well-being, and the benefits could be increased if this reduction was also accompanied by an increase in safe behaviour, social participation, and activities of the daily life.

  13. Presença de "Linha Morgan" como indicador de displasia coxofemoral em cães da raça Pastor-Alemão Presence of Morgan-Line as an indicator of canine hip dysplasia in German Shepherd dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C.S. Tôrres

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the presence of Morgan line and hip dysplasia. From June, 1986 to October, 1993, 190 X-ray plates of German Shepherd dogs, from both sexes were collected and analyzed. The results showed that out of the 190 dogs evaluated, 136 (71.6% had hip dysplasia, 43 (22.6% presented Morgan line and 41 (21.5% showed both of them. Just two (1.1% dogs presented Morgan line without hip dysplasia. No statistically significant difference was found between males (21.8% and females (23.3%. From this study it can be concluded that the presence of the Morgan line can be considered indicative to hip dysplasia diagnosis, even though the absence of the line does not exclude the possibility of hip dysplasia.

  14. Informing the public about radiation--the messenger and the message: 1997 G. William Morgan lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakey, J

    1998-10-01

    I am greatly honored to be invited by the Presidents Emeritus Committee of the Health Physics Society as a G. William Morgan Lecturer for 1997. The topic of this Plenary Session on Public Information and Public Relations is very close to my heart; it was a theme for my term as President of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA). I met IRPA members from all of the societies affiliated to IRPA and found that they shared a common concern about the need to improve public information especially in the event of a nuclear emergency. But who should tell them and what should be the message? There is considerable agreement about the desired characteristics of the messenger in risk communication. These include credibility, openness, and the sharing of uncertainty. The profession must maintain the status and credibility of the members, it must train members in communication skills, and above all win the cooperation of other professions. There are many obstacles to radiation protection communication, and, in particular, the complex language, derived from research, should be reserved for colleagues, and our message to the public must be clarified and freed from unnecessary jargon. Communication would be more efficient and possibly cause less anxiety if people were better educated about ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. There is considerable disagreement within the profession about the content of our message to the public. Consistency in the message would be helpful although it would be wrong to expect total unanimity in research. The profession should seek the support of the international agencies and commissions to use plain and consistent language wherever possible. I will discuss the desired characteristics of the messenger, the nature of the message, and examine some of the obstacles in the path of communication using evidence from experience with IRPA and the European Union. In this paper I will suggest some action to improve radiological protection

  15. The News, Fall 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This fall 2002 newsletter from the Community College League of California contains several articles, news stories, and the brochure from the 2002 Annual Convention, "Celebrating the Way California LEARNS." Articles include: (1) "Nursing Shortage Poses Dilemma for Colleges: Access vs. Efficiency," a discussion of the debate over…

  16. FHR Iowa Falls Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    This October 22, 2015, letter from EPA approves the petition from Flint Hills Resources, LLC, regarding non-grandfathered ethanol produced through the FHR Iowa Falls Process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for renewable fuel (D-code 6) RINs under the R

  17. Novel Hierarchical Fall Detection Algorithm Using a Multiphase Fall Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Chia-Yeh; Liu, Kai-Chun; Huang, Chih-Ning; Chu, Woei-Chyn; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2017-01-01

    Falls are the primary cause of accidents for the elderly in the living environment. Reducing hazards in the living environment and performing exercises for training balance and muscles are the common strategies for fall prevention. However, falls cannot be avoided completely; fall detection provides an alarm that can decrease injuries or death caused by the lack of rescue. The automatic fall detection system has opportunities to provide real-time emergency alarms for improving the safety and quality of home healthcare services. Two common technical challenges are also tackled in order to provide a reliable fall detection algorithm, including variability and ambiguity. We propose a novel hierarchical fall detection algorithm involving threshold-based and knowledge-based approaches to detect a fall event. The threshold-based approach efficiently supports the detection and identification of fall events from continuous sensor data. A multiphase fall model is utilized, including free fall, impact, and rest phases for the knowledge-based approach, which identifies fall events and has the potential to deal with the aforementioned technical challenges of a fall detection system. Seven kinds of falls and seven types of daily activities arranged in an experiment are used to explore the performance of the proposed fall detection algorithm. The overall performances of the sensitivity, specificity, precision, and accuracy using a knowledge-based algorithm are 99.79%, 98.74%, 99.05% and 99.33%, respectively. The results show that the proposed novel hierarchical fall detection algorithm can cope with the variability and ambiguity of the technical challenges and fulfill the reliability, adaptability, and flexibility requirements of an automatic fall detection system with respect to the individual differences. PMID:28208694

  18. The Resource. Fall 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Adams, Director of Scientific Visualization, initiated a Bring Your Own Data ( BYOD ) workshop for MSRC users. The first workshop was held June 25-26 in...leverage these assets in their future work. The first BYOD workshop was definitely a benefit to the users. Chris Stone, in particular was able to...publications 28 ERDC MSRC The Resource, Fall 2001 ac ro ny m s AG Access Grid AMR Adaptive Mesh Refinement BYOD Bring Your Own Data CDC Control Data

  19. Modeling a falling slinky

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, R C

    2012-01-01

    A slinky is an example of a tension spring: in an unstretched state a slinky is collapsed, with turns touching, and a finite tension is required to separate the turns from this state. If a slinky is suspended from its top and stretched under gravity and then released, the bottom of the slinky does not begin to fall until the top section of the slinky, which collapses turn by turn from the top, collides with the bottom. The total collapse time t_c (typically ~0.3 s for real slinkies) corresponds to the time required for a wave front to propagate down the slinky to communicate the release of the top end. We present a modification to an existing model for a falling tension spring (Calkin 1993) and apply it to data from filmed drops of two real slinkies. The modification of the model is the inclusion of a finite time for collapse of the turns of the slinky behind the collapse front propagating down the slinky during the fall. The new finite-collapse time model achieves a good qualitative fit to the observed posit...

  20. Modeling a falling slinky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, R. C.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    A slinky is an example of a tension spring: in an unstretched state a slinky is collapsed, with turns touching, and a finite tension is required to separate the turns from this state. If a slinky is suspended from its top and stretched under gravity and then released, the bottom of the slinky does not begin to fall until the top section of the slinky, which collapses turn by turn from the top, collides with the bottom. The total collapse time tc (typically ˜0.3 s for real slinkies) corresponds to the time required for a wave front to propagate down the slinky to communicate the release of the top end. We present a modification to an existing model for a falling tension spring [Calkin, Am. J. Phys. 61, 261-264 (1993)] and apply it to data from filmed drops of two real slinkies. The modification of the model is the inclusion of a finite time for collapse of the turns of the slinky behind the collapse front propagating down the slinky during the fall. The new finite-collapse time model achieves a good qualitative fit to the observed positions of the top of the real slinkies during the measured drops. The spring constant k for each slinky is taken to be a free parameter in the model. The best-fit model values for k for each slinky are approximately consistent with values obtained from measured periods of oscillation of the slinkies.

  1. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  2. Exercises to help prevent falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000493.htm Exercises to help prevent falls To use the sharing features on this page, ... even more serious injuries. Exercising can help prevent falls because it can: Make your muscles stronger and ...

  3. Competitive Exclusion and Axiomatic Set-Theory: De Morgan's Laws, Ecological Virtual Processes, Symmetries and Frozen Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, J C

    2016-03-01

    This work applies the competitive exclusion principle and the concept of potential competitors as simple axiomatic tools to generalized situations in ecology. These tools enable apparent competition and its dual counterpart to be explicitly evaluated in poorly understood ecological systems. Within this set-theory framework we explore theoretical symmetries and invariances, De Morgan's laws, frozen evolutionary diversity and virtual processes. In particular, we find that the exclusion principle compromises the geometrical growth of the number of species. By theoretical extending this principle, we can describe interspecific depredation in the dual case. This study also briefly considers the debated situation of intraspecific competition. The ecological consequences of our findings are discussed; particularly, the use of our framework to reinterpret coupled mathematical differential equations describing certain ecological processes.

  4. Cancer: A Personal Journey. Notes from the Edge.The Diary of Peter J. Morgan, M.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabner

    1997-01-01

    It is a mistake to think that all personal experiences with cancer are the same. For certain, all cancer patients do confront the possibility of an early death and the prospect of pain and suffering due to the tumor and its treatment. But the specific emotional issues differ with each patient and each family, and the responses to these issues take many forms. In an eloquent and moving film, "Cancer: A Personal Journey. Notes from the Edge.," we are given the privilege of accompanying a remarkable young physician, Peter J. Morgan, on his journey with cancer, a two and one-half year journey that ended with his death at age 31. At age 29, Dr. Morgan, an internist-in-training who intended to pursue a career in hematology and oncology, noted a mass on his leg. Tragically, metastasis to the lungs had already taken place at the time of diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma. There followed the all-too-familiar story of chemotherapy and experimental treatments, pain, debilitation, and ultimately demise, and in itself this experience would move us with the sorrow of a precious life lost. What makes this particular story so remarkable are the insights of this young physician and the struggle for survival of a spirit that would not succumb to the "chaos" of cancer. In the two-year period of his life as a cancer patient, Peter Morgan kept a diary that records his thoughts, his emotional turmoil, and his reflections on life and an untimely death. In particular, we are able to understand the need for his spiritual self to remain alive and to grow despite the deterioration of his physical being. And we see that spiritual triumph in his compelling relationships with his family and his colleagues, in his reflections on art and music and nature, and most of all in his writings and his appreciation of the immense possibilities for joy in life. This is not an easy journey to watch, but the intense sadness of his experience is balanced by his friendships and the great satisfaction he derived

  5. Three pioneers of comparative psychology in America, 1843-1890: Lewis H. Morgan, John Bascom, and Joseph LeConte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Timothy D

    2003-02-01

    Scientific comparative psychology in America dates from the mid-1890s, but there is a body of earlier literature on the topic, written during a period of theistic debates over Darwinian evolution. The anthropologist Lewis H. Morgan rejected instinct as an explanation of animal behavior in 1843 and defended the mental similarities between animals and humans, although he was not an evolutionist. John Bascom's textbook Comparative Psychology (1878) is the earliest American work to use that title, and its theistic approach anticipates some arguments found in much later evolutionary works. Beginning in 1860, the geologist Joseph LeConte, who is well known for defending the compatibility of evolution and religion, wrote several articles in which he outlined a comparative evolutionary approach to psychological problems. However, these writers did not establish a coherent research tradition and were ignored by the "New Psychologists" of the 1880s.

  6. Falls in degenerative cerebellar ataxias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P C; Steijns, Janneke A G; Munneke, Marten; Kremer, Berry P H; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2005-01-01

    We retrospectively and prospectively assessed the frequency and characteristics of falls in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias. The results show that falls occur very frequently in patients with degenerative cerebellar ataxias and that these falls are serious and often lead to injuries or

  7. The falls and the fear of falling among elderly institutionalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Almeida

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study it is intended to characterize the history of falls and to evaluate the fear to fall in aged institutionalized. The sample is composed for 113 institutionalized aged people, 32 men and 81 women with a average 82,96 ± 7,03 age of years. The data had been collected by means of a questionnaire and statistical analyzed (descriptive statistics, parametric tests - Test T and Anova - Test U-Mann Whitney, and Test of Kruskal-Wallis – and the Test of Tukey. The results point in the direction of that the women present a bigger number of falls (24.8% and greater fear to fall (Med=55. The falls had occurred in its majority in the context of the room of the institutions. It was verified that people who had at least a fall experience present greater fear to fall comparatively (Med=55 with that they had not the same had no incident of fall in period of time (Med=77. Our results come to strengthen the hypothesis of the changeable sex to be able to be considered a factor of fall risk. Aged that they present a history of falls seems to be more vulnerable to develop the fear to fall.

  8. [Fall risk and fracture. Aging and fall/fracture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Koichi

    2013-05-01

    Fall deteriorates QOL and ADL of elderly people, especially when they suffer from hip and vertebral fractures. It is not easy to identify the cause of falling, because falling usually result from multiple factors. Among various potential causes, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, medication of hypnotic drugs, and environmental factors are important, because they are frequent and can be modifiable. When evaluating fall risks, grasping power, one-leg standing time, timed up&go test, are useful. On the other hand, fall risk index, 22-item self-assessment test, is easy and even better in predicting future falls. In the Cochrane systematic review article 2009, exercise such as Tai-Chi, withdrawal of hypnotic drugs, and vitamin D supplementation are shown to prevent falls in community-dwelling elderly.

  9. Falling Liquid Films

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliadasis, S; Scheid, B

    2012-01-01

    This research monograph gives a detailed review of the state-of-the-art theoretical methodologies for the analysis of dissipative wave dynamics and pattern formation on the surface of a film falling down a planar, inclined substrate. This prototype is an open-flow hydrodynamic instability representing an excellent paradigm for the study of complexity in active nonlinear media with energy supply, dissipation and dispersion. Whenever possible, the link between theory and experiments is illustrated and the development of order-of-magnitude estimates and scaling arguments is used to facilitate the

  10. Why Rhodes must fall

    OpenAIRE

    Newsinger, J

    2016-01-01

    The international Rhodes Must Fall campaign has reinvigorated public interest in the legacy of Cecil Rhodes, Empire and the production of historical memory. But it has also been subject to a fierce backlash in the rightwing media, which has fought against the campaign at an Oxford college to remove a statue of Cecil Rhodes both on the grounds of free speech (and the right to offend) and on the grounds that Rhodes must be judged by the standards of his time. Here, the author revisits Rhodes’ l...

  11. `In free fall'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijerinck, Herman C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Physicists in the lead of a fiction book or a play, that's a rare event! Writers in general do not understand physics, while physicists seldom have the talent of writing for a large audience. So when it happens, we should rejoice. The up-and-coming German author Juli Zeh [1] (1974), who studied law, has succeeded in combining beautiful prose, psychological drama, crime and physics in a challenging book `In free fall' [2]. A good friend of hers, Bettina Bruinier, has put the core message of the book into a compelling play in the `Volkstheater' in Munich [1]. Yes, it can be done.

  12. Coins falling in water

    CERN Document Server

    Heisinger, Luke; Kanso, Eva

    2013-01-01

    When a coin falls in water, its trajectory is one of four types determined by its dimensionless moment of inertia $I^\\ast$ and Reynolds number Re: (A) steady; (B) fluttering; (C) chaotic; or (D) tumbling. The dynamics induced by the interaction of the water with the surface of the coin, however, makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori. Here, we describe a carefully designed experiment in which a coin is dropped repeatedly in water, so that we can determine the probability density functions (pdf) associated with the landing positions for each of the four trajectory types, all of which are radially symmetric about the center-drop line. In the case of the steady mode, the pdf is approximately Gaussian distributed, with variances that are small, indicating that the coin is most likely to land at the center, right below the point it is dropped from. For the other falling modes, the center is one of the least likely landing sites. Indeed, the pdf's of the fluttering, chaotic and tumbling modes ar...

  13. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2006-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance....... Further, to suggest tools for fall prevention in nursing home settings on the basis of the results of this study and the literature. A quantitative method inspired by the survey method was used to give an overview of fall patterns, subjective and objective evaluations of fallrisk. Participants were 16...... physically frail elderly nursing home residents from three different nursing homes. Measures: a small staff-questionnaire about incidences and places where the participants had falling-episodes during a 12 month period, The Falls Effi cacy Scale Swedish version (FES(S)) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Results...

  14. Falling for Fall Reading Games: Great Stories for the Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2004-01-01

    Literacy games are just another strategy in the ultimate goal to increase reading and overall student academic performance. Activities such as the Fall reading game, which focuses on the Fall season, which encourage reluctant readers to take the beginning steps toward developing the skills they would need to become accomplished readers are…

  15. Environmental Assessment for Termination of Lease and the Transfer of Property Back to the Landowner for the Morgan City, LA, Tethered Aerostat Radar System (TARS) Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Appendix B, page B-31, Photograph 60). The tank was used to store water for non-potable use and in case of fire . However, due to problems with...in case of fires . Surface Water. The Morgan City, LA TARS Site is located within the Atchafalaya River Basin (Figure 3-3). The Atchafalaya Basin...wetland. This wetland is characterized by erect, rooted, herbaceous hydrophytes, excluding mosses and lichens . Vegetation is present for the majority of

  16. Supporting the underdog: feminism, animal rights and citizenship in the work of Alice Morgan Wright and Edith Goode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, L

    2000-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the overlap between feminism and animal causes, particularly through the lives of two women, the sculptor, Alice Morgan Wright (1881-1975), and her friend, Edith Goode (1882-1970). Feminism and animal causes had connections in the late nineteenth century, particularly in campaigns to abolish vivisection. Wright and Goode held to these politics throughout their lives, and were "precursors of a generation yet to come" who would argue the connections - as many ecofeminists do today. Both women were involved in suffrage campaigns, and continued to be involved in women's organisations such as the National Woman's Party. They were, however, opposed to all injustice, including human mistreatment of animals. Feminism was, to Wright and Goode, part of a wider set of problems; animal cruelty reflected a greater barbarism leading to mistreatment of humans. Accordingly, they actively campaigned for legislation to protect animals and the environment, and lobbied the fledgling United Nations to include such measures. That challenge to the United Nations represented a unique attempt to bring animals into citizenship' a move being made again today, through initiatives such as the Great Ape Project.

  17. Falls in elderly hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, E M; Turgut, F; Turkmen, K; Balogun, R A

    2011-10-01

    The elderly, (age ≥ 65 years) hemodialysis (HD) patient population is growing rapidly across the world. The risk of accidental falls is very high in this patient population due to multiple factors which include aging, underlying renal disease and adverse events associated with HD treatments. Falls, the most common cause of fatal injury among elderly, not only increase morbidity and mortality, but also increase costs to the health system. Prediction of falls and interventions to prevent or minimize fall risk and associated complications will be a major step in helping these patients as well as decreasing financial and social burdens. Thus, it is vital to learn how to approach this important problem. In this review, we will summarize the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology and complications of falls in elderly HD patients. We will also focus on available methods to assess and predict the patients at higher risk of falling and will provide recommendations for interventions to reduce the occurrence of falls in this population.

  18. Radar fall detectors: a comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Baris; Amin, Moeness; Ahmad, Fauzia; Boashash, Boualem

    2016-05-01

    Falls are a major cause of accidents in elderly people. Even simple falls can lead to severe injuries, and sometimes result in death. Doppler fall detection has drawn much attention in recent years. Micro-Doppler signatures play an important role for the Doppler-based radar systems. Numerous studies have demonstrated the offerings of micro-Doppler characteristics for fall detection. In this respect, a plethora of micro-Doppler signature features have been proposed, including those stemming from speech recognition and wavelet decomposition. In this work, we consider four different sets of features for fall detection. These can be categorized as spectrogram based features, wavelet based features, mel-frequency cepstrum coefficients, and power burst curve features. Support vector machine is employed as the classifier. Performance of the respective fall detectors is investigated using real data obtained with the same radar operating resources and under identical sensing conditions. For the considered data, the spectrogram based feature set is shown to provide superior fall detection performance.

  19. SisFall: A Fall and Movement Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucerquia, Angela; López, José David; Vargas-Bonilla, Jesús Francisco

    2017-01-01

    Research on fall and movement detection with wearable devices has witnessed promising growth. However, there are few publicly available datasets, all recorded with smartphones, which are insufficient for testing new proposals due to their absence of objective population, lack of performed activities, and limited information. Here, we present a dataset of falls and activities of daily living (ADLs) acquired with a self-developed device composed of two types of accelerometer and one gyroscope. It consists of 19 ADLs and 15 fall types performed by 23 young adults, 15 ADL types performed by 14 healthy and independent participants over 62 years old, and data from one participant of 60 years old that performed all ADLs and falls. These activities were selected based on a survey and a literature analysis. We test the dataset with widely used feature extraction and a simple to implement threshold based classification, achieving up to 96% of accuracy in fall detection. An individual activity analysis demonstrates that most errors coincide in a few number of activities where new approaches could be focused. Finally, validation tests with elderly people significantly reduced the fall detection performance of the tested features. This validates findings of other authors and encourages developing new strategies with this new dataset as the benchmark. PMID:28117691

  20. Community College Estimated Growth: Fall 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillippe, Kent; Mullin, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    A survey from the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) found that enrollment growth in fall 2010 slowed its pace at community colleges, increasing 3.2% from the previous year. This contrasts with more dramatic increases in recent years: more than 11% between fall 2008 and fall 2009, and nearly 17% between fall 2007 and fall 2009,…

  1. Surgical complications in 2,840 cases of hemorrhoidectomy by Milligan-Morgan, Ferguson and combined techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme de Almeida Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of 2,840 cases of hemorrhoidectomy by open techniques of Milligan-Morgan (2,189 cases, Ferguson (341 cases and mixed (310 cases in 11,043 patients with hemorrhoidal disease (HD allowed the following conclusions. The patients' acceptance of surgical indication for hemorrhoidectomy was 25.7%. Hemorrhoidectomy was more common among women (53.8% than men (46.2%, and more accepted by women (26.5% than men (24.8%. Hemorrhoidectomy was more common in patients of the fourth (27.7%, fifth (21.9% and third (21.0% decades of age. Most patients who agreed to undergo hemorrhoidectomy were those of the second (38.2%, eighth (35.9% and ninth (34.5% decades of age. The overall incidence of surgical complications was 3.0% (87 cases: anal stenosis (1.8%, bleeding (0.8%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.2%, sepsis (0.1% and systemic complications (0.1%, with no difference among the techniques used. The incidence of surgical complications by Milligan-Morgan technique was 3.0% - stenosis (1.9%, bleeding (1.9%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.2% and systemic complications (0.04%. The incidence of surgical complications by Ferguson's technique was 3.5% - stenosis (1.7%, bleeding (0.6%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.6% and sepsis (0.6%. And the incidence of surgical complications by mixed techniques was 2.5% - stenosis (1.0%, bleeding (0.3%, worsening of anal hypotonia (0.3%, sepsis (0.3% and systemic complications (0.3%. The incidence of surgical complications according to gender was 3.0% among women and 3.2% among men, with higher incidence of stenosis in women (2.0% and hemorrhage in men (1.1%. Surgical complications were more observed in the eighth (5.1% and seventh (3.8% decades of age. The incidence of anal stenosis was 1.8%, being 64.0% without hypotonia and 66.0% without anal fissure (66.0%, with annular stenosis as the most common anatomical shape (70.0%. Anal stenosis was more common among women (2.0% presenting mean age of 38.2 years, with no

  2. How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talk to your doctor about whether you have osteoporosis. Read More "Preventing Falls" Articles Preventing Falls / Great Help for Older Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements ...

  3. Preventing Falls: Great Help for Older Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Falls and Older Adults Great Help for Older Americans ... on National Pepper Center website. Read More "Preventing Falls" Articles Preventing Falls / Great Help for Older Adults / ...

  4. Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health care providers. Learn More Important Facts about Falls Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Each year, ... once doubles your chances of falling again. 2 Falls Are Serious and Costly One out of five ...

  5. Catching a Falling Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    . Comets are another important source of meteoroids and perhaps the most spectacular. After many visits near the Sun, a comet "dirty-snowball" nucleus of ice and dust decays and fragments, leaving a trail of meteoroids along its orbit. Some "meteoroid streams" cross the earth's orbit and when our planet passes through them, some of these particles will enter the atmosphere. The outcome is a meteor shower - the most famous being the "Perseids" in the month of August [2] and the "Leonids" in November. Thus, although meteors are referred to as "shooting" or "falling stars" in many languages, they are of a very different nature. More information The research presented in this paper is published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science, Vol. 39, Nr. 4, p. 1, 2004 ("Spectroscopic anatomy of a meteor trail cross section with the ESO Very Large Telescope", by P. Jenniskens et al.). Notes [1] The team is composed of Peter Jenniskens (SETI Institute, USA), Emmanuël Jehin (ESO), Remi Cabanac (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile), Christophe Laux (Ecole Centrale de Paris, France), and Iain Boyd (University of Michigan, USA). [2] The maximum of the Perseids is expected on August 12 after sunset and should be easily seen.

  6. [Accidental falls in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinimann, Niklas B; Kressig, Reto W

    2014-06-18

    Falls in the elderly are common with consecutive high mortality and morbidity. Recent consecutive data focus on identification and therapy of intrinsic risk factors. Sarcopenia, imbalance and gait disorders represent the major risk factors. Sarcopenia is caused by a disequilibrium of protein synthesis and breakdown, probably in consequence of age-related changes in protein metabolism. Protein supplements in combination with strength training shows the best benefit. Disorders in balance and gait are caused by age-related or pathologic changes in a complex regulation system of gait. The individual fall risk correlates with the gait variability and even increases with bad dual task performance. Activities with high requirements of attention and body awareness are the most effective prevention for falls in the elderly (-50%).

  7. FLOODPLAIN, MORGAN COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  8. Falls in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Yvette Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    Falls in Parkinson’s (PD) and Huntington’s disease (HD) are common. 50 % of moderately affected PD patients sustained two or more falls during a prospective follow-up of 6 months. During a 3 month period 40 % of HD patients reported one or more fall. Many falls resulted in minor injuries and 42 % of

  9. Falling: should one blame the heart?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 30% of people aged 65 and older suffer a fall each year; one in five of these falls will lead to significant injury. As the world’s ageing population increases, healthcare costs associated with falls are only expected to rise. It is estimated that over a third of falls may be preventab

  10. Falls prevention for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Katrin; Bremer, Martina; Schramm, Susanne; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention. The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years), living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT), the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed. Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the inclusion criteria. However, to a variable degree the validity of their

  11. Falls prevention for the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Lühmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention.Research questions: The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years, living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Methods: Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT, the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed.Results: Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the

  12. A Successful ED Fall Risk Program Using the KINDER 1 Fall RiskAssessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Ann B; Valle-Ortiz, Marisol; Sansweet, Tracy

    2016-11-01

    Emergency nurses did not perform falls risk assessments routinely on our ED patients; the instrument used was aimed at inpatients. We identified a need to revise fall assessment practices specific to our emergency department. The purpose of the performance improvement project was to reduce ED falls and evaluate the use of an ED-specific fall risk tool, the KINDER 1 Fall Risk Assessment. The plan was to establish fall risk assessment practices at point of ED entry and to decrease total falls.

  13. Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chinua Achebe's famous novel, Things Fall Apart (TFA), is an extended reductio ad .... Okonkwo's “whole life was dominated by fear, the fear of failure and of weakness. ..... tural ideals and values characteristic of civilized societies on common ...

  14. Fall Armyworm in the Southeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two separate experiments testing fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) migration patterns were set up in the southeastern U.S. in 2012. Previous results showed that moths from progeny of overwintering populations from south Texas were found west of the Chattahoochee-Flint-Apalachicola river basin, ...

  15. Student Transfer Matrix, Fall 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    Comprised primarily of data matrices, this report provides information on students transferring from Oklahoma public and private post-secondary institutions to other public and private post-secondary institutions in the state in fall 1992. The report consists of nine sections. Section I provides an aggregate flow of all students in the state,…

  16. Finding Rising and Falling Words

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong Kim Sang, E.

    2016-01-01

    We examine two different methods for finding rising words (among which neologisms) and falling words (among which archaisms) in decades of magazine texts (millions of words) and in years of tweets (billions of words): one based on correlation coefficients of relative frequencies and time, and one

  17. [Violence Profiles for Fall Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Citizens Committee for Broadcasting, Washington, DC.

    This document presented by the National Citizens' Committee for Broadcasting at a 1976 press conference provides an assortment of materials concerned with violence in television. Among the materials included are "Who Sponsors the New Fall Violence?" by Nicholas Johnson, a description of and rationale for the study of advertisers who sponsor…

  18. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret…

  19. Person-Centered Fall Risk Awareness Perspectives: Clinical Correlates and Fall Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe

    2016-12-01

    To identify clinical correlates of person-centered fall risk awareness and their validity for predicting falls. Prospective cohort study. Community. Ambulatory community-dwelling older adults without dementia (N = 316; mean age 78, 55% female). Fall risk awareness was assessed using a two-item questionnaire that asked participants about overall likelihood of someone in their age group having a fall and their own personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. Incident falls were recorded over study follow-up. Fifty-three participants (16.8%) responded positively to the first fall risk awareness question about being likely to have a fall in the next 12 months, and 100 (31.6%) reported being at personal risk of falling over the next 12 months. There was only fair correlation (κ = 0.370) between responses on the two questions. Prior falls and depressive symptoms were associated with positive responses on both fall risk awareness questions. Age and other established fall risk factors were not associated with responses on either fall risk awareness question. The fall risk awareness questionnaire did not predict incident falls or injurious falls. Fall risk awareness is low in older adults. Although person-centered fall risk awareness is not predictive of falls, subjective risk perceptions should be considered when designing fall preventive strategies because they may influence participation and behaviors. © 2016, Copyright the Author Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  20. Watch Out for Falling Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-12-01

    The path taken by the falling fragment in the June 2011 event. [Adapted from Petralia et al. 2016]Sometimes plasma emitted from the Sun doesnt escape into space, but instead comes crashing back down to the solar surface. What can observations and models of this process tell us about how the plasma falls and the local conditions on the Sun?Fallback from a FlareOn 7 June 2011, an M-class flare erupted from the solar surface. As the Solar Dynamics Observatorys Atmospheric Imaging Assembly looked on, plasma fragments from the flare arced away from the Sun and then fell back to the surface.Some fragments fell back where the Suns magnetic field was weak, returning directly to the surface. But others fell within active regions, where they crashed into the Suns magnetic field lines, brightening the channels and funneling along them through the dense corona and back to the Suns surface.The authors model of the falling blobs at several different times in their simulation. The blobs get disrupted when they encounter the field lines, and are then funneled along the channels to the solar surface. [Adapted from Petralia et al. 2016]This sort of flare and fall-back event is a common occurrence with the Sun, and SDOs observations of the June 2011 event present an excellent opportunity to understand the process better. A team of scientists led by Antonino Petralia (University of Palermo, Italy and INAF-OAPA) modeled this event in an effort to learn more about how the falling plasma interacts with strong magnetic fields above the solar surface.Magnetic Fields as GuidesPetralia and collaborators used three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical modeling to attempt to reproduce the observations of this event. They simulated blobs of plasma as they fall back to the solar surface and interact with magnetic field lines over a range of different conditions.The team found that only simulations that assume a relatively strong magnetic field resulted in the blobs funneling along a channel to the

  1. Osteoarthritis and falls in the older person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Teck; Tan, Maw Pin

    2013-09-01

    Osteoarthritis and falls are common conditions affecting older individuals which are associated with disability and escalating health expenditure. It has been widely assumed that osteoarthritis is an established risk factor for falls in older people. The relationship between osteoarthritis and falls has, quite surprisingly, not been adequately elucidated, and published reports have been conflicting. Our review of the existing literature has found limited evidence supporting the current assumption that the presence of osteoarthritis is associated with increased risk of falls with suggestions that osteoarthritis may actually be protective against falls related fractures. In addition, joint arthroplasty appears to increase the risk of falls in individuals with osteoarthritis.

  2. What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Preventing Falls and Fractures Osteoporosis and Falls Osteoporosis and Falls (繁體中文) Partner Resources Falls and Fractures (NIA) Falls and Older Adults (NIH Senior Health) Caídas y fracturas (NIA) Director’s ...

  3. Dynamics of turbulent falling films

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Naraigh, Lennon; Matar, Omar

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of laminar falling films have received considerable attention over the past several decades. In contrast, turbulent falling films have been the subject of far fewer studies. We seek to redress this balance by studying the stability of falling films which have already undergone a transition from a laminar to a turbulent flow regime. We derive a uniform-film base-state for this flow by assuming the averaged turbulent velocity field to be steady and fully-developed, and by employing a modified version of mixing-length theory. The latter features an interpolation function for the eddy viscosity, and van Driest-type functions for turbulence-damping near the wall and interface regions. The predicted base-state streamwise velocity component is in good agreement with experimental data. A linear stability analysis of this base-state is then carried out by solving a modified version of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Our results suggest that the unstable mode is a long-wave one. This provides motivation for the derivation of long-wave equations for the nonlinear evolution of the film.

  4. Associated Factors for Falls, Recurrent Falls, and Injurious Falls in Aged Men Living in Taiwan Veterans Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chiou Ku

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the advanced age, depression status, stroke, gouty arthritis, and cataract are independent variables for predicting falls; depression is the only clinical factor capable of predicting the recurrent falls. These variables were potential targets for effective prevention of falls.

  5. A simple strategy for fall events detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-20

    The paper concerns the detection of fall events based on human silhouette shape variations. The detection of fall events is addressed from the statistical point of view as an anomaly detection problem. Specifically, the paper investigates the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart to detect fall events. Towards this end, a set of ratios for five partial occupancy areas of the human body for each frame are collected and used as the input data to MEWMA chart. The MEWMA fall detection scheme has been successfully applied to two publicly available fall detection databases, the UR fall detection dataset (URFD) and the fall detection dataset (FDD). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations.

  6. Falls Prevention: Unique to Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Falls Prevention Unique to Older Adults This section provides ... and Muscle Strengthening Exercises As part of your fall prevention program, you should follow an exercise program ...

  7. How Many Times Can You Be Wrong and Still Be Right? T. H. Morgan, Evolution, Chromosomes and the Origins of Modern Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Garland E.

    2015-01-01

    Science textbooks and classes mostly emphasize what are considered by today's standards the "right" or "correct" interpretations of particular phenomena or processes. When "incorrect" ideas of the past are mentioned at all, it is simply to point out their errors, with little attention as to why the ideas were put forward in the first place, or ever gained a following. A strong case can be made, however, for presenting contrasting or even what are considered today "wrong" hypotheses as a way of not only emphasizing the dynamic nature of science (which is punctuated throughout by controversies and contrasting views), but also as a way of helping students better understand the details and workings of contemporary views. This article will illustrate these claims by examining the work of embryologist-turned-geneticist Thomas Hunt Morgan in the early decades of the twentieth century.

  8. Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Nancye May

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

  9. Falls, faints, fits and funny turns.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, R.D.; Bloem, B.R.; Dijk, J.G. van

    2009-01-01

    In this practically oriented review, we will outline the clinical approach of patients with falls due to an impairment or loss of consciousness. Following a set of definitions, we describe the salient clinical features of disorders leading to such falls. Among falls caused by true loss of consciousn

  10. Epidemiology of Falls in Older Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Nancye May

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, falls among older people are a public health concern because of their frequency and adverse consequences in terms of morbidity, mortality, and quality of life, as well as their impact on health system services and costs. This epidemiological review outlines the public health burden of falls and fall-related injuries and the impact of…

  11. 29 CFR 1917.41 - House falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false House falls. 1917.41 Section 1917.41 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Cargo Handling Gear and Equipment § 1917.41 House falls. (a) Span beams shall be secured... working with house fall blocks. (c) Designated employees shall inspect chains, links, shackles,...

  12. The variability of meteoroid falling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco Herrera, V. M.; Cordero, G.

    2016-10-01

    We analysed a historical catalogue of meteoroid falling during the last 400 years. We report here for the first time the synchronization between observed meteors and solar barycentric parameters in 19.6 and 13.2 years periodicities using a new multiple cross wavelet. The group of moderated number of meteors is distributed around the positive phase of the solar barycentric periodicity of 13.2 years. While the group of severe number of meteors are distributed on the positive phase of the solar barycentric periodicity of 19.6 years. These periodicities could be associated with Jupiter periodicities. So understanding the modulation of meteoroid falling is important for determining the falling patterns of these objects and for knowing when it is more likely to expect the entry of one of these objects into the Earth's atmosphere, because bodies falling onto the Earth can cause damage from minor impacts to mass-extinctions events. One of the most extreme events was the formation of the Chicxulub impact crater 65,000,000 years ago that caused one of the five major mass extinctions in the last 500,000,000 years. During the 20th and 21st centuries, a series of events demonstrated the importance of collisions between planets and small bodies (comets and asteroids), which included our own planet. In the case of the Earth, we can cite three examples: Tunguska, Curuça and Chelyabinsk. These events invite us to think that perhaps the occurrence of this phenomenon might be more common than we realize, but the lack of communication or people in the area where they happened prevents us from having a complete record. Modern man has not witnessed the impact of large asteroids or comets on our planet, but it has been observed on other planetary bodies. The most spectacular of these events was the collision of fragments of the comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 with Jupiter in 1994. The total energy of the 21 impacts on Jupiter's atmosphere was estimated as the equivalent of tens of millions of

  13. A fully relativistic radial fall

    CERN Document Server

    Spallicci, Alessandro D A M

    2014-01-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A {\\it gedankenexperiment} in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this letter, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) ...

  14. Studies On Falling Ball Viscometry

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Amit Vikram; Gupta-Bhaya, Pinaki

    2012-01-01

    A new method of accurate calculation of the coefficient of viscosity of a test liquid from experimentally measured terminal velocity of a ball falling in the test liquid contained in a narrow tube is described. The calculation requires the value of a multiplicative correction factor to the apparent coefficient of viscosity calculated by substitution of terminal velocity of the falling ball in Stokes formula. This correction factor, the so-called viscosity ratio, a measure of deviation from Stokes limit, arises from non-vanishing values of the Reynolds number and the ball/tube radius ratio. The method, valid over a very wide range of Reynolds number, is based on the recognition of a relationship between two measures of wall effect, the more widely investigated velocity ratio, defined as the ratio of terminal velocity in a confined medium to that in a boundless medium and viscosity ratio. The calculation uses two recently published correlation formulae based on extensive experimental results on terminal velocit...

  15. Intrinsic Risk Factors of Falls in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Amatullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are common geriatric problems. The risk factors of falls are the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Studies on falls are scarcely conducted in Indonesia, especially in Bandung. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the intrinsic risk factors of falls among elderly. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out from August to October 2013 at the Geriatric Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Fifty three participants were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria using consecutive sampling. The determined variables in this study were classification of the risk of falls, demographic profile, history of falls, disease, and medications. After the selection, the participants were tested by Timed up-and-go test (TUGT. Moreover, an interview and analysis of medical records were carried out to discover the risk factors of falls. The collected data were analyzed and presented in the form of percentages shown in tables. Results: From 53 patients, women (35.66% were considered to have higher risk of fall than men (18.34%. The majority of patients (66% with the risk of fall were from the age group 60–74 years. The major diseases suffered by patients were hypertension, osteoarthritis and diabetes mellitus. Drugs that were widely used were antihypertensive drugs; analgesic and antipyretic drugs and antidiabetic drugs. Conclusions: There are various intrinsic risk factors of falls in elderly and each of the elderly has more than one intrinsic risk factor of falls.

  16. Médicos residentes podem realizar com segurança e eficiência técnicas de Milligan-Morgan, Ferguson e grampeadores no tratamento cirúrgico das hemorróidas? Can residents safely and efficiently perform Milligan-Morgan, Ferguson and stapled hemorrhoidopexy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Carlos Nahas

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A cirurgia para hemorróidas sintomáticas é necessária em quase 10% dos pacientes. Embora, a literatura sobre o tratamento cirúrgico da doença hemorroidária seja muito grande, os dados relativos à hemorroidectomia ou hemorroidopexia realizadas por residentes de treinamento é limitado. OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados destes procedimentos em uma instituição de ensino. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados retrospectivamente os dados de todos os pacientes que se submeteram ao tratamento cirúrgico para hemorróidas entre1995 e 2007 em uma única instituição. Residentes supervisionados realizaram todos os procedimentos. As técnicas foram comparadas com base no tempo operatório, permanência hospitalar, morbidade e eficácia a longo prazo. RESULTADOS: Trezentos e trinta e três pacientes foram incluídos no estudo, 182 homens (54,6%, com idade média de 45,3 anos (± 12,02. Hemorróidas de terceiro grau foram a principal indicação (81,7%. Milligan-Morgan foi o procedimento mais comumente realizado (57%, seguido por Ferguson e hemorroidopexia grampeada. A média de tempo operatório foi significativamente menor no grupo hemorroidopexia grampeada quando comparado com os procedimentos abertos e fechados: 49,4 ± 29,3 min vs 61,1 ± 26,5 e 67,1 ± 28,3, respectivamente (p=0,0034. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os grupos quanto às complicações pós-operatórias ou à taxa de reoperação. O tempo de internação foi significativamente maior no grupo Milligan-Morgan quando comparado com Ferguson e grampeamento (1,41 ± 0,86 dias vs 1,19 ± 0,43 vs 1,16 ± 0,37, respectivamente. Recorrência sintomática, taxas de reoperação e o uso de ligadura elástica foram semelhantes entre os grupos. CONCLUSÃO: Os residentes sob supervisão pode executar Milligan-Morgan, Ferguson e grampeamento hemorroidário com baixa incidência de complicações e bons resultados a longo prazo. O grampeamento foi associado com menor

  17. Internship Progress Summary: Fall 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ralph S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valencia, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-13

    This fall I had the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Technology Applications engineering group. I assisted two main projects during my appointment, both related to the Lab’s mission statement: “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” My first project, a thermal source transfer unit, involved skills such as mechanical design, heat transfer simulation, and design analysis. The goal was to create a container that could protect a heat source and regulate its temperature during transit. I generated several designs, performed heat transfer simulations, and chose a design for prototyping. The second project was a soil drying unit for use in post blast sample analysis. To ensure fast and accurate sample processing, agents in the field wanted a system that could process wet dirt and turn it into dry powder. We designed a system of commercially available parts, and we tested the systems to determine the best methods and processes.

  18. Falls and Fear of Falling After Stroke: A Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Hui-Ting; Nadarajah, Mohanasuntharaam; Hamzah, Norhamizan Binti; Varadan, Parimalaganthi; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-12-01

    Falls are common after stroke, with potentially serious consequences. Few investigations have included age-matched control participants to directly compare fall characteristics between older adults with and without stroke. Further, fear of falling, a significant psychological consequence of falls, has only been examined to a limited degree as a risk factor for future falls in a stroke population. To compare the fall history between older adults with and without a previous stroke and to identify the determinants of falls and fear of falling in older stroke survivors. Case-control observational study. Primary teaching hospital. Seventy-five patients with stroke (mean age ± standard deviation, 66 ± 7 years) and 50 age-matched control participants with no previous stroke were tested. Fall history, fear of falling, and physical, cognitive, and psychological function were assessed. A χ(2) test was performed to compare characteristics between groups, and logistic regression was performed to determine the risk factors for falls and fear of falling. Fall events in the past 12 months, Fall Efficacy Scale-International, Berg Balance Scale, Functional Ambulation Category, Fatigue Severity Scale, Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and Patient Healthy Questionnaire-9 were measured for all participants. Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment was used to quantify severity of stroke motor impairments. Twenty-three patients and 13 control participants reported at least one fall in the past 12 months (P = .58). Nine participants with stroke had recurrent falls (≥2 falls) compared with none of the control participants (P control participants (P < .01). Female gender was associated with falls in the nonstroke group, whereas falls in the stroke group were not significantly associated with any measured outcomes. Fear of falling in the stroke group was associated with functional ambulation level and balance. Functional ambulation level alone explained 22% of variance in fear of falling in the

  19. Prediction of falls and/or near falls in people with mild Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Lindholm

    Full Text Available To determine factors associated with future falls and/or near falls in people with mild PD.The study included 141 participants with PD. Mean (SD age and PD-duration were 68 (9.7 and 4 years (3.9, respectively. Their median (q1-q3 UPDRS III score was 13 (8-18. Those >80 years of age, requiring support in standing or unable to understand instructions were excluded. Self-administered questionnaires targeted freezing of gait, turning hesitations, walking difficulties in daily life, fatigue, fear of falling, independence in activities of daily living, dyskinesia, demographics, falls/near falls history, balance problems while dual tasking and pain. Clinical assessments addressed functional balance performance, retropulsion, comfortable gait speed, motor symptoms and cognition. All falls and near falls were subsequently registered in a diary during a six-month period. Risk factors for prospective falls and/or near falls were determined using logistic regression.Sixty-three participants (45% experienced ≥ 1 fall and/or near fall. Three factors were independent predictors of falls and/or near falls: fear of falling (OR = 1.032, p<0.001 history of near falls (OR = 3.475, p = 0.009 and retropulsion (OR = 2.813, p = 0.035. The strongest contributing factor was fear of falling, followed by a history of near falls and retropulsion.Fear of falling seems to be an important issue to address already in mild PD as well as asking about prior near falls.

  20. An outpatient multifactorial falls prevention intervention does not reduce falls in high-risk elderly Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Ane B; Andersen, Hanne E; Pedersen, Kirsten D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of multifactorial fall prevention in community-dwelling people aged 65 and older in Denmark. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled clinical trial. SETTING: Geriatric outpatient clinic at Glostrup University Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred ninety-two elderly people......, mean age 74, 73.7%women, who had visited the emergency department or had been hospitalized due to a fall. INTERVENTION: Identification of general medical, cardiovascular, and physical risk factors for falls and individual intervention in the intervention group. Participants in the control group...... received usual care. MEASUREMENTS: Falls were registered prospectively in falls diaries, with monthly telephone calls for collection of data. Outcomes were fall rates and proportion of participants with falls, frequent falls, and injurious falls in 12 months. RESULTS: Groups were comparable at baseline...

  1. Falls in the Elderly: A Practical Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Handfield-Jones, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Falls in the elderly constitute a major problem confronting physicians. Their cost to individual patients and to society in terms of incidence, morbidity, and mortality is enormous. This paper attempts to outline some of the common etiological factors related to falls and a practical approach to the diagnosis and management. Causes of falls are clssified as extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The latter include disorders of many organ systems, especially those resulting from neurological and car...

  2. Predictors of future falls in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, G K; Worringham, C J; Cole, M H; Lacherez, P F; Wood, J M; Silburn, P A

    2010-07-13

    Falls are a major health and injury problem for people with Parkinson disease (PD). Despite the severe consequences of falls, a major unresolved issue is the identification of factors that predict the risk of falls in individual patients with PD. The primary aim of this study was to prospectively determine an optimal combination of functional and disease-specific tests to predict falls in individuals with PD. A total of 101 people with early-stage PD undertook a battery of neurologic and functional tests in their optimally medicated state. The tests included Tinetti, Berg, Timed Up and Go, Functional Reach, and the Physiological Profile Assessment of Falls Risk; the latter assessment includes physiologic tests of visual function, proprioception, strength, cutaneous sensitivity, reaction time, and postural sway. Falls were recorded prospectively over 6 months. Forty-eight percent of participants reported a fall and 24% more than 1 fall. In the multivariate model, a combination of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total score, total freezing of gait score, occurrence of symptomatic postural orthostasis, Tinetti total score, and extent of postural sway in the anterior-posterior direction produced the best sensitivity (78%) and specificity (84%) for predicting falls. From the UPDRS items, only the rapid alternating task category was an independent predictor of falls. Reduced peripheral sensation and knee extension strength in fallers contributed to increased postural instability. Falls are a significant problem in optimally medicated early-stage PD. A combination of both disease-specific and balance- and mobility-related measures can accurately predict falls in individuals with PD.

  3. Visual impairment and falls: a register study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källstrand-Ericson, Jeanette; Hildingh, Cathrine

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this register study was to investigate falls and fall injuries of inpatients 65 years and over to determine whether a causal factor of visual impairment was documented. All Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries have an increasing older population with falls and fall injuries becoming a major problem. A visual impairment can be an independent risk factor for falls but can also occur in combination with other intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. A retrospective non-randomised register study. In 2004, all documented falls of inpatients aged 65 years and over were examined. Medical records and eye clinic records were scrutinised to identify whether any visual impairment have been documented. The majority of falls occurred between the hours of 24:00-06:00 and the inpatients most often affected were those with a visual impairment. The falls occurred in connection with movement when the inpatient was unaccompanied. Documentation in records at the medical clinic was defective and subjectively perceived visual impairment was not documented at all. Both subjective and objective visual impairment occurred in all eye clinic records. Visual impairment along with the ageing process are features affecting falls and the hospital environment needs to be adapted by improving the use of strong, contrasting colours and providing good lighting for older inpatients with visual impairment during the night time period. Hospital safety for older people with visual impairment is a concern if falls are to be reduced. Healthcare professionals need to undertake individual risk assessments to establish the degree of visual impairment of the older person so that appropriate interventions can be implemented to reduce the incidence of falls and fall injuries.

  4. An outpatient multifactorial falls prevention intervention does not reduce falls in high-risk elderly Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Ane B; Andersen, Hanne E; Pedersen, Kirsten D

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of multifactorial fall prevention in community-dwelling people aged 65 and older in Denmark. DESIGN: Randomized, controlled clinical trial. SETTING: Geriatric outpatient clinic at Glostrup University Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred ninety-two elderly people......% CI 0.81-1.79), frequent falls (OR=0.97, 95% CI=0.60-1.56), or injurious falls (OR=0.97, 95% CI=0.57-1.62). CONCLUSION: A program of multifactorial fall prevention aimed at elderly Danish people experiencing at least one injurious fall was not effective in preventing further falls....

  5. Automatic Fall Detection using Smartphone Acceleration Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Tri Dang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe our work on developing an automatic fall detection technique using smart phone. Fall is detected based on analyzing acceleration patterns generated during various activities. An additional long lie detection algorithm is used to improve fall detection rate while keeping false positive rate at an acceptable value. An application prototype is implemented on Android operating system and is used to evaluate the proposed technique performance. Experiment results show the potential of using this app for fall detection. However, more realistic experiment setting is needed to make this technique suitable for use in real life situations.

  6. Effectiveness of team training on fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiva, LeeAnna; Robertson, Bethany; Delk, Marcia L; Patrick, Sara; Kimrey, Margaret Michelle; Green, Beverly; Gallagher, Erin

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal, repeated-measures design with intervention and comparison groups was used to evaluate the effect of a training curriculum based on TeamSTEPPS with video vignettes focusing on fall prevention. Questionnaires, behavioral observations, and fall data were collected over 9 months from both groups located at separate hospitals. The intervention group questionnaire scores improved on all measures except teamwork perception, while observations revealed an improvement in communication compared with the control group. Furthermore, a 60% fall reduction rate was reported in the intervention group. Team training may be a promising intervention to reduce falls.

  7. Radar fall detection using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokanovic, Branka; Amin, Moeness; Ahmad, Fauzia; Boashash, Boualem

    2016-05-01

    Falls are a major cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries in people aged 65 years and older. Radar has the potential to become one of the leading technologies for fall detection, thereby enabling the elderly to live independently. Existing techniques for fall detection using radar are based on manual feature extraction and require significant parameter tuning in order to provide successful detections. In this paper, we employ principal component analysis for fall detection, wherein eigen images of observed motions are employed for classification. Using real data, we demonstrate that the PCA based technique provides performance improvement over the conventional feature extraction methods.

  8. Nuclear winter or nuclear fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, André

    Climate is universal. If a major modern nuclear war (i.e., with a large number of small-yield weapons) were to happen, it is not even necessary to have a specific part of the world directly involved for there to be cause to worry about the consequences for its inhabitants and their future. Indeed, smoke from fires ignited by the nuclear explosions would be transported by winds all over the world, causing dark and cold. According to the first study, by Turco et al. [1983], air surface temperature over continental areas of the northern mid-latitudes (assumed to be the nuclear war theatre) would fall to winter levels even in summer (hence the term “nuclear winter”) and induce drastic climatic conditions for several months at least. The devastating effects of a nuclear war would thus last much longer than was assumed initially. Discussing to what extent these estimations of long-term impacts on climate are reliable is the purpose of this article.

  9. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Approach to Fall in Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ilkin Naharci

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Falls are one of the geriatric syndromes which occur commonly and significantly increase morbidity and mortality rates in elderly. The incidence of falls increases with age. Falls usually occur when impairments in cognitive, behavioral, and executive function begin. The incidence of fall is between 30 and 40 percent of community-dwelling people and approximately 50 percent of individuals in the long-term care setting over the age of 65 years. Fracture (hip, arm, wrist, pelvis, head trauma or major lacerations, as defined serious wounding, occur 10-25% of elderly cases. Fall is overlooked in clinical examination due to various reasons; the patient never mentions the event to a doctor; there is no injury at the time of the fall; the doctor fails to ask the patient about a history of falls; or either doctor or patient erroneously believes that falls are an inevitable part of the aging process. Elderly give not usually any self-information about fall, for this reason, all older patients should be asked at least once per year about falls and should be assessed in terms of balance and gait disorders. There are many distinct causes for falls in old people. Falls in older individuals occur when a threat to the normal homeostatic mechanisms that maintain postural stability is superimposed on underlying age-related declines in balance, ambulation, and cardiovascular function. This factor may be an acute illness (eg, fever, water loss, arrhythmia, a new medication, an environmental stress (eg, unfamiliar surrounding, or an unsafe walking surface. The elderly person can not cope with happened additional stress. To prevent and decrease the frequency of falls, effective approaches are medical interventions, environmental modifications, education-exercise programs, and assisted device. Detection and amelioration of risk factors can significantly reduce the rate of future falls. The assessment of fall, causing mobility restriction, use of nursing home, and

  11. Risk of falling, fear of falling and functionality in community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Beatriz; Tomás, Mª Teresa; Quirino, Diogo

    2016-01-01

    Ageing among Portuguese population is leading to an increase in the proportion of elderly people. Age-related changes are responsible for high levels of disability, balance problems and high risk of falls, Physiotherapy can identify elderly in risk of falling and provide strategies to prevent falls in this population contributing to maintain functionality. The purpose of this study was to characterise the risk of falling in a sample of community-dwelling older adults and investigate the assoc...

  12. Morphologic studies of high fall injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XIA Peng

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: By studying the mode and morphologic character of high fall injuries on the scene, and exploring the injury situation of different heights, different fall ways and postures, to provide a reference for the foren-sic identification of high fall injury. Methods: All the high fall cases were statistically analysed according to their gender, age, ground-touching posture, fall height, site and type of the injury. Results: Among 134 high fall cases, 98 were male and 36 were female with the age ranging from 2-71 years (37.6 ±16.9 on average, in which, 10-60 years old group con-sisted of 110 cases (82%. Most cases fell from windows or roofs (73% and the touching objects were cement ground or shaft bottom of elevators. Among these cases, head injury was generally serious, followed by chest and abdominal injuries. The morphologic changes depend upon the height, nature, as well as the posture at the point while the body touches the ground. Conclusion: Morphologic study of high fall injury assists medicolegal physicians to make correct identifica-tions of the cause and nature of high fall injuries. Key words: Wounds and injuries; Forensic medicine; Anatomy and histology

  13. Osteosarcopenic obesity and fall prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-02-01

    Sarcopenia, obesity, and osteoporosis are three interrelated entities which may share common pathophysiological factors. In the last decades, overall survival has drastically increased. Postmenopausal women, due to their estrogen depletion, are at higher risk of developing any of these three conditions or the three, which is termed osteosarcopenic obesity. One of the most common health problems among these patients is the elevated risk of falls and fractures. Falls and fall-related injuries are one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in older adults, and have a significant impact on social, economical and health-related costs. Several extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors have been described that play a role in the etiology of falls. A therapeutic approach to osteosarcopenic obesity aimed at the prevention of falls must include several factors, and act on those risk elements which can be effectively modified. An adequate weight-loss diet and a good nutritional intake, with an appropriate amount of vitamin D and the right protein/carbohydrates ratio, may contribute to the prevention of falls. The recommendation of physical exercise, both traditional (resistance or aerobic training) and more recent varieties (Tai Chi, Pilates, body vibration), can improve balance and positively contribute to fall prevention, whether by itself or in combination with other therapeutic strategies. Finally, a pharmacological approach, especially one focused on hormone therapy, has shown to have a positive effect on postmenopausal women's balance, leading to a decreased risk of falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Latino Experience in Central Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, William R.

    2011-01-01

    Central Falls is, by far, the poorest community in Rhode Island. More than 40 percent of the children under 18 live in poverty, and 40 percent of that group live in severe poverty. At Central Falls High School, low-income Latino students have fallen behind their white counterparts, with shockingly low graduation, poor literacy, and low…

  15. Studies on fall armyworm migration and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith; Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) or fall armyworm is an important agricultural pest of a number of crops in thewestern hemisphere. Two morphologically identical host strains of fall armyworm exist, the rice-strain and corn-strain, with the latter inflicting substantial eco...

  16. Nurses' Job Satisfaction and Patient Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia D. Alvarez, DNP, RN

    2007-09-01

    Results and Conclusion: No significant relationship was found between overall nurses' job satisfaction and patient fall rate. MD–RN interactions (r = .65 and decision-making (r = .57 were the job satisfaction subscales that showed a significant positive correlation with patient fall rate (p < .05. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  17. Morphologic studies of high fall injuries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Peng; CHANG Hong-fa; YU Yong-min; DAI Guo-xin; LI Hong-wei; JIANG Qiang-guo; YIN Zhi-yong

    2012-01-01

    Objective:By studying the mode and morphologic character of high fall injuries on the scene,and exploring the injury situation of different heights,different fall ways and postures,to provide a reference for the forensic identification of high fall injury.Methods:All the high fall cases were statistically analysed according to their gender,age,ground-touching posture,fall height,site and type of the injury.Results:Among 134 high fall cases,98 were male and 36 were female with the age ranging from 2-71 years (37.6±16.9 on average),in which,10-60 years old group consisted of 110 cases (82%).Most cases fell from windows or roofs (73%) and the touching objects were cement ground or shaft bottom of elevators.Among these cases,head injury was generally serious,followed by chest and abdominal injuries.The morphologic changes depend upon the height,nature,as well as the posture at the point while the body touches the ground.Conclusion:Morphologic study of high fall injury assists medicolegal physicians to make correct identifications of the cause and nature of high fall injuries.

  18. Falls and stumbles in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Busse, M E; Sampson, C M; Rogers, M T; Fenton-May, J; van Deursen, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate falls and risk factors in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy volunteers. 13 sequential patients with DM1 from different kindreds were compared with 12 healthy volunteers. All subjects were evaluated using the Rivermead Mobility Index, Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, and modified Activities Specific Balance Confidence scale. Measures of lower limb muscle strength, gait speed, and 7-day ambulatory activity monitoring were recorded. Subjects returned a weekly card detailing stumbles and falls. 11 of 13 patients (mean age 46.5 years, seven female) had 127 stumbles and 34 falls over the 13 weeks, compared with 10 of 12 healthy subjects (34.4 years, seven female) who had 26 stumbles and three falls. Patients were less active than healthy subjects but had more falls and stumbles per 5000 right steps taken (mean (SD) events, 0.21 (0.29) v 0.02 (0.02), p = 0.007). Patients who fell (n = 6) had on average a lower Rivermead Mobility score, slower self selected gait speed, and higher depression scores than those who did not. DM1 patients stumble or fall about 10 times more often than healthy volunteers. Routine inquiry about falls and stumbles is justified. A study of multidisciplinary intervention to reduce the risk of falls seems warranted.

  19. Tips for Handling Gourds this Fall Season

    OpenAIRE

    Bratsch, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Each year, more direct market and wholesale growers are adding gourds to their fall sales mix, along with pumpkins, ornamental corn and fall mums. Proper harvest timing, handling and curing are important to ensure maximum longevity of gourds once the consumer brings them home.

  20. How Fast Does a Building Fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the time required for a tower block to collapse is calculated. The tower collapses progressively, with one floor falling onto the floor below, causing it to fall. The rate of collapse is found to be not much slower than freefall. The calculation is an engaging and relevant application of Newton's laws, suitable for undergraduate…

  1. Playful home training for falls prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jari Due; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2015-01-01

    Falling is a big issue among elderly, and prevention of falling is of big importance both for the individual and for society at large. In this paper we present a pilot study with fun exergaming equipment in private homes. The initial findings in the small pilot study suggests that this kind...

  2. [Fear of falling in a fall clinic for geriatric patients: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dautzenberg, P.L.; Buurman, B.H.; Loonen, A.J.; Wouters, C.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we want to determine how often fear of falling occurs in geriatric patients visiting a fall clinic and to study the characteristics of fear of falling and its consequences. DESIGN: Retrospective study of patient's records. METHOD: A random sample of 100 medical records

  3. The effects of time pressure and experience on the performance of fall techniques during a fall.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swigchem, R. van; Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2009-01-01

    Although the practice of fall techniques has been introduced in fall prevention programs, it is not clear whether people can apply acquired techniques during a real-life fall. It would be helpful to know the time it takes to initiate and to successfully execute such techniques, as well as the effect

  4. Prospective study of falls and risk factors for falls in adults with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol A

    2012-06-10

    Retrospective studies of inpatients with cancer suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of falls. In adults with advanced cancer, we aimed to prospectively document the incidence of falls, identify the risk factors, and determine if falls in this population occur predominantly in older patients.

  5. Risk Factors for Falls and Fall-related Fractures in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ziere (Gijsbertus)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractFalls are among the most common and serious problems facing older persons and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. They often lead to reduced functioning and nursing home admissions. The incidence of falls as well as the severity of fall-related complications rises s

  6. Fall Meeting by the numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Pranoti

    2012-02-01

    - Visits to the Fall Meeting Web site: 650,000 - Total participants at the meeting: 20,890 - Abstracts submitted to the meeting: 20,087 - Donors who attended and took advantage of donor lounges: 1835 - Total attendance at Simon Winchester's Presidential Forum Lecture: 1200 - Total attendance at the Honors Banquet: 905 - Books sold at the AGU Marketplace: 671 - Individuals registered for the Fun Run: 487 - Students who participated in the Student Breakfast: 450 - Individuals who crossed the finish line at the Fun Run: 384 - Total attendees at Exploration Station: 307 - Total booths sold in the Exhibit Hall: 304 - registered for the meeting: 288 - Membership transactions completed for renewing and registering members at AGU Marketplace: 156 - Meeting attendees who were past Congressional Visits Day participants: 82 - Editors, associate editors, and their student guests who visited the Editors Resource Center: 63 - Copies of Navigating Graduate School and Beyond: A Career Guide for Graduate Students and a Must Read for Every Advisor sold during and after the talk and book signing by author Sundar A. Christopher: 50 - Kegs of beer consumed during the Ice Breaker on Sunday, 4 December: 48 - Hours of video footage shot at the meeting by the AGU videographer: 40 - Potential geopress authors and editors who attended the daily "Come Publish With geopress" sessions in the AGU Marketplace: 31 - Press conferences held at the meeting: 25 - Average age of minors attending Exploration Station: 8.7 - Educational seminars sponsored by AGU Publications: 2 (one on how to write a good scientific paper and the other on the rewards of reviewing) - Watching three preschoolers in space suits waiting to meet astronaut Andrew Feustel after the Public Lecture: Priceless (with apologies to Mastercard®)

  7. Fall Detection Using Smartphone Audio Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheffena, Michael

    2016-07-01

    An automated fall detection system based on smartphone audio features is developed. The spectrogram, mel frequency cepstral coefficents (MFCCs), linear predictive coding (LPC), and matching pursuit (MP) features of different fall and no-fall sound events are extracted from experimental data. Based on the extracted audio features, four different machine learning classifiers: k-nearest neighbor classifier (k-NN), support vector machine (SVM), least squares method (LSM), and artificial neural network (ANN) are investigated for distinguishing between fall and no-fall events. For each audio feature, the performance of each classifier in terms of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and computational complexity is evaluated. The best performance is achieved using spectrogram features with ANN classifier with sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy all above 98%. The classifier also has acceptable computational requirement for training and testing. The system is applicable in home environments where the phone is placed in the vicinity of the user.

  8. Falls in the Elderly: A Practical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handfield-Jones, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Falls in the elderly constitute a major problem confronting physicians. Their cost to individual patients and to society in terms of incidence, morbidity, and mortality is enormous. This paper attempts to outline some of the common etiological factors related to falls and a practical approach to the diagnosis and management. Causes of falls are clssified as extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The latter include disorders of many organ systems, especially those resulting from neurological and cardiovascular diseases. The role of drugs and alcohol is stressed. Determining the cause of falls requires a thorough history and physical examination. In order to manage successfully an elderly person with multiple falls, a co-ordinated effort by a multi-disciplinary team is often essential. PMID:21249001

  9. Risk of falling in pediatric nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Chromá

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this article is to describe, analyze and compare the assessment tools used to evaluate risk of falling in pediatric nursing. Design: Review - literature review. Methods: Electronic licensed and freely accessible databases (Bibliographia Medica Čechoslovaca, MEDLINE, Web of Science, PubMed a Scopus were used to obtain data. Instruments for measuring risk of falling in languages other than Czech, Slovak or English, and scales unsuitable for measuring risk of falling in pediatric nursing were excluded from the analysis. Results: From analysis of the collected information, the most suitable tool for assessment of risk of falling in pediatric nursing seems to be the Humpty Dumpty measuring scale. Conclusion: At present there are many assessment tools that can be used to evaluate the risk of falling in pediatric nursing, but most are available in English. Czech pediatric nursing continues to lack measuring tools with verified psychometric properties.

  10. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, Aisling M

    2011-12-19

    Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05) in older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05). Upon controlling for age and gender affects, logistic regression modelling revealed that increasing variability associated with the vigilance (top-down) aspect of sustained attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p < 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 - 1.26) in the previous year and was weakly correlated with reduced falls efficacy in non-fallers (p = 0.07). Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention

  11. Reducing falls in a care home

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Rosie

    2017-01-01

    Care home residents are 3 times more likely to fall than their community dwelling peers and 10 times more likely to sustain a significant injury as a result. 2 A project commenced at a care home in Aberdeen with the aim of reducing the number of falls by 20% by 30st April 2016 using the model for improvement. Qualitative data was gathered to establish staff belief about falls and their level of knowledge& understanding about falls risks and how to manage these. This informed the training which was delivered and iterative testing commenced with the introduction of the Lanarkshire Falls Risk/Intervention tool – where the multifactorial nature of a resident's falls risks are explored and specific actions to manage these are identified and implemented. Failure to meet PDSA predictions about sharing risk reducing actions with staff and length of time to complete the tool prompted a focus on communication and the processes whereby the tool is completed. “Teach back” was employed to highlight communication difficulties and ultimately the introduction of Huddles out improved the flow of information about residents and informed the Falls Risk/Intervention tool. 5 PDSAs were completed and within them multiple tests of change. The improvement shift came following a root cause analysis of the nature & cause of one resident's falls and applying the tool & communication processes. The average falls rate fell from 49 per 1000 occupied bed days to 23.6 and was sustained because of the attention to the importance of communication. The aim was achieved with a 36.6% reduction in Falls rate. Care home residents are 3 times more likely to fall than their community dwelling peers and 10 times more likely to sustain a significant injury as a result. 2 A project commenced at a care home in Aberdeen with the aim of reducing the number of falls by 20% by 30th April 2016 using the model for improvement. Qualitative data was gathered to establish staff belief about falls and their level

  12. Falls and fear of falling in vertigo and balance disorders: A controlled cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlick, Cornelia; Schniepp, Roman; Loidl, Verena; Wuehr, Max; Hesselbarth, Kristin; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most prevalent symptoms in neurologic disorders. Although many of these patients suffer from postural instability and gait disturbances, there is only limited data on their risk of falling. We conducted a controlled cross-sectional study at the tertiary care outpatient clinic of the German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders using a self-administered questionnaire to assess falls, fall-related injuries, and fear of falling. The recruitment period was 6 months. A total of 569 patients (mean age 59.6 ± 17.1 years, 55% females) and 100 healthy participants were included (response rate > 90%). Dizzy patients with central balance disorders (Parkinsonian, cerebellar, and brainstem oculomotor syndromes) had the highest fall rates (> 50% recurrent fallers, odds ratio > 10). The rate of recurrent fallers was 30% in bilateral vestibular failure and peripheral neuropathy (odds ratio > 5). Patients with functional dizziness (somatoform or phobic vertigo) were concerned about falling but did not fall more often than healthy controls (odds ratio 0.87). Falls are common in patients presenting to a dizziness unit. Those with central syndromes are at risk of recurrent and injurious falling. Fall rates and fear of falling should be assessed in balance disorders and used to guide the regimen of rehabilitation therapy. The identification of risk factors would help provide protective measures to these groups of patients.

  13. Sleep, insomnia and falls in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Katie L; Ensrud, Kristine E; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2008-09-01

    Insomnia is common in older people and can be associated with significant daytime dysfunction. Sleep problems, and the medications used to treat them, may contribute to the risk of falls and fractures in this population; however, the independent effects of disturbed sleep or the risk of hypnotic use are not well understood. Data arising from the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) cohort of elderly women have confirmed the link between sleep problems (measured subjectively or objectively) and an increased risk of falls after taking into account the use of insomnia medications (benzodiazepines) in a community-dwelling population of older women. The data also suggest that benzodiazepine use is associated with increased risk of falls, although this association is less clear-cut when insomnia/sleep problems are taken into consideration. The risk of falls should be considered when prescribing benzodiazepines in this population. So far no data exist concerning whether the effective treatment of insomnia in the elderly may help prevent falls. Furthermore, studies are warranted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the non-benzodiazepine BZRAs (benzodiazepine receptor agonists) in relation to risk of falls. In addition, there is a need to include fall risk factors such as postural sway and reaction time as outcomes for trials of new insomnia treatments.

  14. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  15. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  16. Validation of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Sara Nicole; Zaluski, Neal; Petrie, Amanda; Arnold, Cathy; Basran, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To investigate the concurrent validity of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm (FSRA). Method: A total of 29 older adults (mean age 77.7 [SD 4.0] y) residing in an independent-living senior's complex who met inclusion criteria completed a demographic questionnaire and the components of the FSRA and Berg Balance Scale (BBS). The FSRA consists of the Elderly Fall Screening Test (EFST) and the Multi-factor Falls Questionnaire (MFQ); it is designed to categorize individuals into low, moderate, or high fall-risk categories to determine appropriate management pathways. A predictive model for probability of fall risk, based on previous research, was used to determine concurrent validity of the FSRI. Results: The FSRA placed 79% of participants into the low-risk category, whereas the predictive model found the probability of fall risk to range from 0.04 to 0.74, with a mean of 0.35 (SD 0.25). No statistically significant correlation was found between the FSRA and the predictive model for probability of fall risk (Spearman's ρ=0.35, p=0.06). Conclusion: The FSRA lacks concurrent validity relative to to a previously established model of fall risk and appears to over-categorize individuals into the low-risk group. Further research on the FSRA as an adequate tool to screen community-dwelling older adults for fall risk is recommended. PMID:24381379

  17. Estimation of the kinetic energy dissipation in fall-arrest system and manikin during fall impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, John Z; Powers, John R; Harris, James R; Pan, Christopher S

    2011-04-01

    Fall-arrest systems (FASs) have been widely applied to provide a safe stop during fall incidents for occupational activities. The mechanical interaction and kinetic energy exchange between the human body and the fall-arrest system during fall impact is one of the most important factors in FAS ergonomic design. In the current study, we developed a systematic approach to evaluate the energy dissipated in the energy absorbing lanyard (EAL) and in the harness/manikin during fall impact. The kinematics of the manikin and EAL during the impact were derived using the arrest-force time histories that were measured experimentally. We applied the proposed method to analyse the experimental data of drop tests at heights of 1.83 and 3.35 m. Our preliminary results indicate that approximately 84-92% of the kinetic energy is dissipated in the EAL system and the remainder is dissipated in the harness/manikin during fall impact. The proposed approach would be useful for the ergonomic design and performance evaluation of an FAS. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Mechanical interaction, especially kinetic energy exchange, between the human body and the fall-arrest system during fall impact is one of the most important factors in the ergonomic design of a fall-arrest system. In the current study, we propose an approach to quantify the kinetic energy dissipated in the energy absorbing lanyard and in the harness/body system during fall impact.

  18. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Aisling M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT, commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART. RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention strategies.

  19. Effects of autism spectrum disorders on outcome in teenage-onset anorexia nervosa evaluated by the Morgan-Russell outcome assessment schedule: a controlled community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Søren; Anckarsäter, Henrik; Gillberg, Carina; Gillberg, Christopher; Råstam, Maria; Wentz, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate time trends and effects of co-existing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on outcome in an ongoing long-term follow-up study of anorexia nervosa (AN). The Morgan-Russell Outcome Assessment Schedule (MROAS) was used at 6-, 10- and 18-year follow-up of a representative sample of 51 individuals with teenage-onset AN and a matched group of 51 healthy comparison cases. The full multinomial distribution of responses for the full scale and each of the subscales was evaluated using exact nonparametric statistical methods. The impact of diagnostic stability of ASD on outcome in AN was evaluated in a dose-response model. There were no deaths in either group. Food intake and menstrual pattern were initially poor in the AN group but normalised over time. MROAS 'mental state' was much poorer in the AN group and did not improve over time. The psychosexual MROAS domains 'attitudes' and 'aims' showed persistent problems in the AN group. In the MROAS socioeconomic domain, the subscales 'personal contacts', 'social activities' and 'employment record' all showed highly significant between-group differences at all three follow-ups. A statistically significant negative dose-response relationship was found between a stable diagnosis of ASD over time and the results on the subscales 'mental state', 'psychosexual state' and 'socio-economic state'. Outcome of teenage-onset AN is favourable with respect to mortality and persisting eating disorder, but serious problems remain in the domains 'mental state', 'psychosexual function' and 'socioeconomic state'. Outcome is considerably worse if ASD is present. Treatment programmes for AN need to be modified so as to accommodate co-existing ASD.

  20. On the Motion of Falling Leaves

    CERN Document Server

    Razavi, Pedram

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the motion of falling leaves through modeling using papers and the corresponding data collected from more than four thousands experiments. Two series of experiments were designed in order to study the relationship between different parameters which can affect different paths of motion in leaves. In the first series of experiments, the shapes of the potential paths that falling papers can take were investigated as a whole. A new classification scheme was derived from these experiments, categorizing the motion of falling sheets of paper based on the deviation from the original point of release and the shape of the path they take on their descending journey. We believe this new classification scheme can be very useful with potential applications in various fields such as biology, meteorology, etc.; it can also build a foundation for further experiments. The second set of experiments was focused on the dynamics and shape of the motion of the falling paper itself. It was observed from these...

  1. Playful home training for falls prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Jari Due; Lund, Henrik Hautop

    2015-01-01

    Falling is a big issue among elderly, and prevention of falling is of big importance both for the individual and for society at large. In this paper we present a pilot study with fun exergaming equipment in private homes. The initial findings in the small pilot study suggests that this kind of tr...... barriers. Further, the paper describes how future research within the field will be structured.......Falling is a big issue among elderly, and prevention of falling is of big importance both for the individual and for society at large. In this paper we present a pilot study with fun exergaming equipment in private homes. The initial findings in the small pilot study suggests that this kind...

  2. Falling standards of research in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    Some points related to falling standards of research in India are discussed. The necessity for scientists to compete by publishing in international journals of high I. F.s (Impact Factor) is stressed. India lacks pioneers in science. Scientific...

  3. Usability testing of a fall prevention toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keuter, Kayla R; Berg, Gina M; Hervey, Ashley M; Rogers, Nicole

    2015-05-01

    This study sought to evaluate a fall prevention toolkit, determine its ease of use and user satisfaction, and determine the preferred venue of distribution. Three forms of assessment were used: focus groups, usability testing, and surveys. Focus group participants were recruited from four locations: two rural health clinics and two urban centers. Usability testing participants were recruited from two rural health clinics. Survey questions included self-reported prior falls, current fall prevention habits, reaction to the toolkit, and demographics. Participants reported the toolkit was attractive, well-organized, and easy to use, but may contain too much information. Most participants admitted they would not actively use the toolkit on their own, but prefer having it introduced by a healthcare provider or in a social setting. Healthcare focuses on customer satisfaction; therefore, providers benefit from knowing patient preferred methods of learning fall prevention strategies.

  4. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  5. Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1995-09-01

    In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 1794, established the authenticity of meteorite falls and set in motion the reexaminations of entrenched beliefs that led to the founding of the new science. The Siena fall was heralded by the appearance of an extraordinarily high, dark cloud emitting smoke, sparks like rockets, and bolts of unusually slow-moving red lightning. With a tremendous explosion a shower of stones, ranging in weight from a few milligrams to 3 kg, fell southeast of Siena. This was the first meteorite fall to occur in the vicinity of a sizeable European city and the first to be witnessed by so many people, including English visitors, that the fall of the stones from the sky could not be denied. It also was the first fall to be seriously investigated by scholars, at several universities in Italy, who collected eye-witness reports and specimens and formulated hypotheses of origin. Their task was greatly complicated by the timing of the fall which occurred 18 hours after Mt. Vesuvius sprang into full eruption. Some believed that the two events were entirely coincidental; others thought that the stones either were ejecta from the volcano (which lay about 320 km to the southeast of Siena) or had consolidated in the fiery masses of dust and ash expelled by the mountain. No explanations seemed entirely satisfactory, but, in an age when the very possibility of falling stones had been decisively ruled out by savants of the Enlightenment, the well-observed fall at Siena opened a new dialog on this subject. The Siena fall occurred only two months after the publication in Riga and Leipzig of Ernst F. F. Chladni's book On the Origin of Ironmasses in which he concluded from historical records that

  6. Fall of the Integrated Planning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-17

    programs required to accomplish their missions. Henry Mintzberg identifies a basic planning model called the Core “Design School” Model.26 The Core...26 Henry Mintzberg , “The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning: Reconceiving Roles for Planning, Plans, Planners,” New...21, 2011). Mintzberg , Henry. The Rise and Fall of Strategic Planning: Reconceiving Roles for Planning, Plans, Planners. New York: The Free Press

  7. Evaluation of the "medication fall risk score".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Cyrus; Hall, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Results of a study evaluating the predictive validity of a fall screening tool in hospitalized patients are reported. Administrative claims data from two hospitals were analyzed to determine the discriminatory ability of the "medication fall risk score" (RxFS), a medication review fall-risk screening tool that is designed for use in conjunction with nurse-administered tools such as the Morse Fall Scale (MFS). Through analysis of data on administered medications and documented falls in a population of adults who underwent fall-risk screening at hospital admission over a 15-month period (n = 33,058), the predictive value of admission MFS scores, alone or in combination with retrospectively calculated RxFS-based risk scores, was assessed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis and net reclassification improvement (NRI) analysis were used to evaluate improvements in risk prediction with the addition of RxFS data to the prediction model. The area under the ROC curve for the predictive model for falls compromising both MFS and RxFS scores was computed as 0.8014, which was greater than the area under the ROC curve associated with use of the MFS alone (0.7823, p = 0.0030). Screening based on MFS scores alone had 81.25% sensitivity and 61.37% specificity. Combined use of RxFS and MFS scores resulted in 82.42% sensitivity and 66.65% specificity (NRI = 0.0587, p = 0.0003). Reclassification of fall risk based on coadministration of the MFS and the RxFS tools resulted in a modest improvement in specificity without compromising sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  9. Syncope-related falls in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rose Anne Kenny; Steve W Parry

    2005-01-01

    Age-related physiological impairments of heart rate, blood pressure and cerebral blood flow, in combination with comorbid conditions and concurrent medications, account for an increased susceptibility to syncope in older adults. Common causes of syncope are orthostatic hypotension, neurally-mediated syncope (including carotid sinus syndrome) and cardiac arrhythmias. A high proportion of older patients with cardiovascular syncope present with falls and deny loss of consciousness. Patients who are cognitively normal and have unexplained falls should have a detailed cardiovascular assessment.

  10. Falls incidence underestimates the risk of fall-related injuries in older age groups: A comparison with the FARE (Falls risk by exposure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etman, A.; Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Heuvelen, M.J.G. van; Chorus, A.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: up till now, the risk of falls has been expressed as falls incidence (i.e. the number of falls or fallers per 100 person-years). However, the risk of an accident or injury is the probability of having an accident or injury per unit of exposure. The FARE (Falls risk by Exposure) is a meas

  11. Falls incidence underestimates the risk of fall-related injuries in older age groups : a comparison with the FARE (Falls risk by Exposure)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etman, Astrid; Wijlhuizen, Gert Jan; van Heuvelen, Marieke J. G.; Chorus, Astrid; Hopman-Rock, Marijke

    2012-01-01

    Background: up till now, the risk of falls has been expressed as falls incidence (i.e. the number of falls or fallers per 100 person-years). However, the risk of an accident or injury is the probability of having an accident or injury per unit of exposure. The FARE ( Falls risk by Exposure) is a mea

  12. Get connected: New Fall Meeting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovitch, Mirelle

    2012-11-01

    Kick off your 2012 Fall Meeting experience today by joining the Fall Meeting Community, an interactive Web-based community. Whether you are attending this year's Fall Meeting or are just interested in learning more, this site can help you connect with colleagues, learn about the groundbreaking research and amazing programming being presented in San Francisco, and plan your trip to the largest Earth and space science conference of the year. Available through the Fall Meeting Web site (http://fallmeeting.agu.org), the Community allows you to share your Fall Meeting experience like never before. You can join groups based on your interests, and each group includes a message board that allows you to ask questions, post comments, discuss presentations, and make plans with colleagues. You can also create your own groups and use the Community's robust search engine to find and connect with friends. And because the Fall Meeting Web site was improved for 2012 to allow for nearly seamless functionality on mobile devices, you can access much of the same Community functionality on the go.

  13. Comparison of real-life accidental falls in older people with experimental falls in middle-aged test subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangas, M; Vikman, I; Nyberg, L; Korpelainen, R; Lindblom, J; Jämsä, T

    2012-03-01

    Falling is a common accident among older people. Automatic fall detectors are one method of improving security. However, in most cases, fall detectors are designed and tested with data from experimental falls in younger people. This study is one of the first to provide fall-related acceleration data obtained from real-life falls. Wireless sensors were used to collect acceleration data during a six-month test period in older people. Data from five events representing forward falls, a sideways fall, a backwards fall, and a fall out of bed were collected and compared with experimental falls performed by middle-aged test subjects. The signals from real-life falls had similar features to those from intentional falls. Real-life forward, sideways and backward falls all showed a pre impact phase and an impact phase that were in keeping with the model that was based on experimental falls. In addition, the fall out of bed had a similar acceleration profile as the experimental falls of the same type. However, there were differences in the parameters that were used for the detection of the fall phases. The beginning of the fall was detected in all of the real-life falls starting from a standing posture, whereas the high pre impact velocity was not. In some real-life falls, multiple impacts suggested protective actions. In conclusion, this study demonstrated similarities between real-life falls of older people and experimental falls of middle-aged subjects. However, some fall characteristics detected from experimental falls were not detectable in acceleration signals from corresponding heterogeneous real-life falls.

  14. Martial arts fall techniques decrease the impact forces at the hip during sideways falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, B E; Weerdesteyn, V; Duysens, J

    2007-01-01

    Falls to the side and those with impact on the hip are risky for hip fractures in the elderly. A previous study has indicated that martial arts (MA) fall techniques can reduce hip impact force, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the high impact forces at the hand used to break the fall have raised concerns because of the risk for wrist fractures. The purpose of the study was to get insight into the role of hand impact, impact velocity, and trunk orientation in the reduction of hip impact force in MA techniques. Six experienced judokas performed sideways falls from kneeling height using three fall techniques: block with arm technique (control), MA technique with use of the arm to break the fall (MA-a), and MA technique without use of the arm (MA-na). The results showed that the MA-a and MA-na technique reduced the impact force by 27.5% and 30%, respectively. Impact velocity was significantly reduced in the MA falls. Trunk orientation was significantly less vertical in the MA-a falls. No significant differences were found between the MA techniques. It was concluded that the reduction in hip impact force was associated with a lower impact velocity and less vertical trunk orientation. Rolling after impact, which is characteristic for MA falls, is likely to contribute to the reduction of impact forces, as well. Using the arm to break the fall was not essential for the MA technique to reduce hip impact force. These findings provided support for the incorporation of MA fall techniques in fall prevention programs for elderly.

  15. Falls in spinocerebellar ataxias: Results of the EuroSCA Fall Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonteyn, Ella M R; Schmitz-Hübsch, Tanja; Verstappen, Carla C; Baliko, Laslo; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Boesch, Silvia; Bunn, Lisa; Charles, Perrine; Dürr, Alexandra; Filla, Allesandro; Giunti, Paola; Globas, Christoph; Klockgether, Thomas; Melegh, Bela; Pandolfo, Massimo; De Rosa, Anna; Schöls, Ludger; Timmann, Dagmar; Munneke, Marten; Kremer, Berry P H; van de Warrenburg, Bart P C

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the frequency, details, and consequences of falls in patients with autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and to derive specific disease-related risk factors that are associated with an increased fall frequency. Two hundred twenty-eight patients with SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, or SCA6, recruited from the EuroSCA natural history study, completed a fall questionnaire that assessed the frequency, consequences, and several details of falls in the previous 12 months. Relevant disease characteristics were retrieved from the EuroSCA registry. The database of the natural history study provided the ataxia severity scores as well as the number and nature of non-ataxia symptoms. Patients (73.6%) reported at least one fall in the preceding 12 months. There was a high rate of fall-related injuries (74%). Factors that were associated with a higher fall frequency included: disease duration, severity of ataxia, the presence of pyramidal symptoms, the total number of non-ataxia symptoms, and the genotype SCA3. Factors associated with a lower fall frequency were: the presence of extrapyramidal symptoms (more specifically dystonia of the lower limbs) and the genotype SCA2. The total number of non-ataxia symptoms and longer disease duration were independently associated with a higher fall frequency in a logistic regression analysis, while the presence of extrapyramidal symptoms was independently associated with a lower fall frequency. Our findings indicate that, in addition to more obvious factors that are associated with frequent falls, such as disease duration and ataxia severity, non-ataxia manifestations in SCA play a major role in the fall etiology of these patients.

  16. Tailored prevention of inpatient falls: development and usability testing of the fall TIPS toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuyev, Lyubov; Benoit, Angela N; Chang, Frank Y; Dykes, Patricia C

    2011-02-01

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are serious problems in hospitals. The Fall TIPS application aims to prevent patient falls by translating routine nursing fall risk assessment into a decision support intervention that communicates fall risk status and creates a tailored evidence-based plan of care that is accessible to the care team, patients, and family members. In our design and implementation of the Fall TIPS toolkit, we used the Spiral Software Development Life Cycle model. Three output tools available to be generated from the toolkit are bed poster, plan of care, and patient education handout. A preliminary design of the application was based on initial requirements defined by project leaders and informed by focus groups with end users. Preliminary design partially simulated the paper version of the Morse Fall Scale currently used in hospitals involved in the research study. Strengths and weaknesses of the first prototype were identified by heuristic evaluation. Usability testing was performed at sites where research study is implemented. Suggestions mentioned by end users participating in usability studies were either directly incorporated into the toolkit and output tools, were slightly modified, or will be addressed during training. The next step is implementation of the fall prevention toolkit on the pilot testing units.

  17. Health care professionals' attitudes and compliance to clinical practice guidelines to prevent falls and fall injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Marie; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2011-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aimed at preventing falls and fall injuries have been shown to be effective in acute care hospitals. However, although CPGs are systematically developed and evidence-based tools, there has been a problem with their implementation in clinical practice. To describe influences on health care professionals' attitudes to CPGs for preventing falls and fall injuries. A qualitative approach was chosen and five focus group discussions were conducted, which included physicians, nurses, physiotherapists, and occupational therapists. The transcribed texts were analyzed using manifest and latent content analysis. Two main categories emerged: experiencing a course of events and influence of social factors. Experiencing a course of event included incidence of falls and fall injuries followed by negative consequences, which revealed benefits of using a CPG. Influence of social factors for implementation and compliance with the CPG was described as community obligations and organizational and individual resources. The findings confirm the complex process of implementation and compliance of CPGs for fall prevention. A relation between experiences of high incidence of falls with negative consequences and a positive attitude and compliance to CPGs appeared. To assure compliance and a positive attitude requires an obvious benefit of the CPG in reducing falls. Factors to overcome barriers to implementation and compliance seem to be a supportive leadership, systematic evaluations of the CPG outcome, and the facilitator role. Copyright ©2010 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  18. Polypharmacy and falls in older people: Balancing evidence-based medicine against falls risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zia, Anam; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul Bahyah; Tan, Maw Pin

    2015-04-01

    The term polypharmacy has negative connotations due to its association with adverse drug reactions and falls. This spectrum of adverse events widens when polypharmacy occurs among the already vulnerable geriatric population. To date, there is no consensus definition of polypharmacy, and diverse definitions have been used by various researchers, the most common being the consumption of multiple number of medications. Taking multiple medications is considered a risk factor for falls through the adverse effects of drug-drug or drug-disease interactions. Falls studies have determined that taking ≥ 4 drugs is associated with an increased incidence of falls, recurrent falls, and injurious falls. In light of existing evidence, careful and regular medication reviews are advised to reduce the effect of polypharmacy on falls. However, intervention studies on medication reviews and their effectiveness on falls reduction have been scarce. This article reviews and discusses the evidence behind polypharmacy and its association with falls among older individuals, and highlights important areas for future research.

  19. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation, described as modification of task performance without perception of difficulty, predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. Our results suggest that combined measure of self-reported preclinical mobility limitation...... and fall history may offer one possibility for inexpensive fall-risk evaluation in clinical practice. INTRODUCTION: We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. METHODS: The study population consisted of 428 community...... mobility limitation. Fall history was recalled for previous 12 months and dichotomized. The incidence of future falls over 12 months was followed up with fall calendars. RESULTS: During the fall follow-up, a total of 440 falls were reported by 201 participants. Among those with fall history, women...

  20. Characteristics of daily life gait in fall and non fall-prone stroke survivors and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punt, Michiel; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; van Schooten, Kimberley S; Pijnappels, Mirjam; van de Port, Ingrid G; Wittink, Harriet; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-07-27

    Falls in stroke survivors can lead to serious injuries and medical costs. Fall risk in older adults can be predicted based on gait characteristics measured in daily life. Given the different gait patterns that stroke survivors exhibit it is unclear whether a similar fall-prediction model could be used in this group. Therefore the main purpose of this study was to examine whether fall-prediction models that have been used in older adults can also be used in a population of stroke survivors, or if modifications are needed, either in the cut-off values of such models, or in the gait characteristics of interest. This study investigated gait characteristics by assessing accelerations of the lower back measured during seven consecutive days in 31 non fall-prone stroke survivors, 25 fall-prone stroke survivors, 20 neurologically intact fall-prone older adults and 30 non fall-prone older adults. We created a binary logistic regression model to assess the ability of predicting falls for each gait characteristic. We included health status and the interaction between health status (stroke survivors versus older adults) and gait characteristic in the model. We found four significant interactions between gait characteristics and health status. Furthermore we found another four gait characteristics that had similar predictive capacity in both stroke survivors and older adults. The interactions between gait characteristics and health status indicate that gait characteristics are differently associated with fall history between stroke survivors and older adults. Thus specific models are needed to predict fall risk in stroke survivors.

  1. Fijian seasonal scourge of mango tree falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anuj; Reeves, Ben

    2009-12-01

    Mango tree falls are a frequent presentation at any health facility in the South Pacific. This study aims to identify (i) the number of admissions because of falls from mango trees; (ii) epidemiology; (iii) seasonal trend; (iv) injury profile; and (v) hospital care provided. Retrospective case review on all mango tree falls related injuries resulting in admissions at the Lautoka Hospital, Fiji during a 1-year period (2007). Patient records were analysed to identify specific injury patterns such as upper/lower limb fractures, spinal cord injury and head injury, caused by mango tree falls. Thirty-nine cases were identified. Eighty-two percent (n = 32) of the falls occurred in the mango season (June-November). Seventy-two percent (n = 28) of the patients were males and 28% (n = 11) were females. Seventy-six percent were aged 5-13 and only 21% were adults. Also, 77% (n = 30) of the patients were ethnic Fijians and 23% (n = 9) were Fijian-Indians. Sixty-four percent (n = 25) had closed fractures and 17% (n = 7) had open fractures. Fifty-six percent (n = 22) of the fractures were of the fore arm. There were two cases of spinal cord injury, four cases of head injury, one ICU admission and one death. Average hospital stay was 7.56 days. All these injuries were recreational and the majority in the urban setting. They were all avoidable.

  2. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alves Rudelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%. Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%, and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%. In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  3. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudelli, Bruno Alves; Silva, Marcelo Valerio Alabarce da; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%). Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%), and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%). In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  4. Martial arts fall techniques decrease the impact forces at the hip during sideways falling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Falls to the side and those with impact on the hip are risky for hip fractures in the elderly. A previous study has indicated that martial arts (MA) fall techniques can reduce hip impact force, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the high impact forces at the hand used to break the

  5. Older persons afraid of falling reduce physical activity to prevent outdoor falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Jong, R. de; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2007-01-01

    Objective.: The aim of this study was to test the assumption that the level of outdoor physical activity mediates the relationship between fear of falling and actual outdoor falls according to the Task Difficulty Homeostasis Theory. Method.: A prospective follow-up study of 10 months conducted in th

  6. Neurology Falls. Patient Falls Risk Assessment, Neurology Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-06

    slip and fall injuries. The Journal of Forensic Science: pp.733-746. Hendrich, A., Nyhuis, A., Kippenbrock, T., & Soja , M.E. (1995). Hospital...shuffles. If patient is Neurology Falls 56 5. HFRM (Hendrich Fail Risk Assessment Model) (Hendrich, Nyhuis, Kippenbrock and Soja , 1995

  7. Martial arts fall techniques decrease the impact forces at the hip during sideways falling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Falls to the side and those with impact on the hip are risky for hip fractures in the elderly. A previous study has indicated that martial arts (MA) fall techniques can reduce hip impact force, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the high impact forces at the hand used to break the

  8. Evaluation of Accelerometer-Based Fall Detection Algorithms on Real-World Falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagala, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elders. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing s

  9. Older people's perception of and coping with falling, and their motivation for fall-prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Dorte; Hendriksen, Carsten; Borup, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes.......This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes....

  10. Morgan line and its relationship with distraction index, angle of inclination and degenerative joint disease in the diagnosis of canine hip dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.G. Miranda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We evaluated 160 hip joint radiographs of 40 dogs of different large breeds (25 females and 15 males from the metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. The radiographs of each dog were obtained at two different stages: stage 1 (mean 7.23 months and stage 2 (mean 14.25. The conventional radiographic method (CRM and the radiographic distraction method (RDM were used, carried out in both stages. CRM measured the Norberg angle (NA, the angle of inclination (AI and evaluated the presence of degenerative joint disease (DJD. The MRD was performed to establish the distraction index (DI. The aims were to evaluate the presence of the Morgan line and other signs of DJD and correlate them with the degree of canine hip dysplasia (CHD and also check if the DI greater than 0.3 (first stage was associated with the presence of ML (second stage. It was found that DI, AI and changes of femoral neck and the formation of osteophytes were associated with the presence of ML. It was observed that if the DI is greater than 0.3 at the first stage, the chance of a positive outcome of ML in the second stage increases by 7.2 times. Thus, 49 joints showed DI > 0.3 at the first stage, in which 31 (63.3 % presented ML at the second stage. Of the 31 animals that showed DI ≤ 0.3 at first, six (19.4% had LM at the second stage. There has been a significant association between the presence of ML and the degree of CHD. The more severe the CHD, the higher the percentage of positive ML results. Thus, among the 24 (60 % animals that showed ML, 11 (45.83 % were classified as severe dysplastics, 5 (20.83% as moderate and 8 (33.33 % as mild. None of the animals classified as normal or borderline presented ML. Among the 8 animals classified as mild dysplastics, 5 showed only ML as DJD.

  11. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  12. Elderly fall detection using SIFT hybrid features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Gao, Chao; Guo, Yongcai

    2015-10-01

    With the tendency of aging society, countries all over the world are dealing with the demographic change. Fall had been proven to be of the highest fatality rate among the elderly. To realize the elderly fall detection, the proposed algorithm used the hybrid feature. Based on the rate of centroid change, the algorithm adopted VEI to offer the posture feature, this combined motion feature with posture feature. The algorithm also took advantage of SIFT descriptor of VEI(V-SIFT) to show more details of behaviors with occlusion. An improved motion detection method was proposed to improve the accuracy of front-view motion detection. The experimental results on CASIA database and self-built database showed that the proposed approach has high efficiency and strong robustness which effectively improved the accuracy of fall detection.

  13. Statistical modelling for falls count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Shahid; Finch, Caroline F; Day, Lesley

    2010-03-01

    Falls and their injury outcomes have count distributions that are highly skewed toward the right with clumping at zero, posing analytical challenges. Different modelling approaches have been used in the published literature to describe falls count distributions, often without consideration of the underlying statistical and modelling assumptions. This paper compares the use of modified Poisson and negative binomial (NB) models as alternatives to Poisson (P) regression, for the analysis of fall outcome counts. Four different count-based regression models (P, NB, zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP), zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB)) were each individually fitted to four separate fall count datasets from Australia, New Zealand and United States. The finite mixtures of P and NB regression models were also compared to the standard NB model. Both analytical (F, Vuong and bootstrap tests) and graphical approaches were used to select and compare models. Simulation studies assessed the size and power of each model fit. This study confirms that falls count distributions are over-dispersed, but not dispersed due to excess zero counts or heterogeneous population. Accordingly, the P model generally provided the poorest fit to all datasets. The fit improved significantly with NB and both zero-inflated models. The fit was also improved with the NB model, compared to finite mixtures of both P and NB regression models. Although there was little difference in fit between NB and ZINB models, in the interests of parsimony it is recommended that future studies involving modelling of falls count data routinely use the NB models in preference to the P or ZINB or finite mixture distribution. The fact that these conclusions apply across four separate datasets from four different samples of older people participating in studies of different methodology, adds strength to this general guiding principle.

  14. NAIP ORTHOIMAGERY, MORGAN COUNTY, UTAH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Digital orthographic imagery datasets contain georeferenced images of the Earth's surface, collected by a sensor in which object displacement has been removed for...

  15. Memoir of Augustus De Morgan

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Morgan, Sophia Elizabeth; De Morgan, Augustus

    2010-07-01

    Preface; 1. From 1806 to 1827; 2. From 1827 to 1831; 3. From 1831 to 1836; 4. Correspondence from 1831 to 1836; 5. From 1836 to 1846; 6. Correspondence from 1836 to 1846; 7. From 1846 to 1855; 8. Correspondence from 1846 to 1855; 9. From 1856 to 1865; 10. Correspondence from 1856 to 1866; 11. From 1866 to 1871; 12. Correspondence from 1867 to 1870; List of writings; Index.

  16. 1984 Morgan Hill, USA Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This magnitude 6.2 earthquake caused $30 million in property damage in northern California. The epicenter of the quake was located near Mount Hamilton in the Diablo...

  17. 46 CFR 122.704 - Maintenance of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maintenance of falls. 122.704 Section 122.704 Shipping..., Maintenance, and Inspection of Lifesaving Equipment § 122.704 Maintenance of falls. (a) Each fall used in a... fall must be renewed when necessary due to deterioration or at internals of not more than 5...

  18. 46 CFR 131.550 - Maintenance of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maintenance of falls. 131.550 Section 131.550 Shipping..., Drills, and Inspections § 131.550 Maintenance of falls. (a) Each fall used with a launching appliance must be turned end for end at intervals of not more than 30 months. (b) Each fall used with a...

  19. 46 CFR 185.704 - Maintenance of falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maintenance of falls. 185.704 Section 185.704 Shipping... of falls. (a) Each fall used in a launching appliance on a vessel must be turned end for end at intervals of not more than 30 months. (b) Each fall must be renewed when necessary due to deterioration...

  20. Seneca Falls: A Women's Demonstration for Peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Billie

    1984-01-01

    A reporter gives her personal impressions of the Seneca Falls Women's Encampment for a Future of Peace and Justice and the march by members of the encampment to the Seneca Army Depot. Confrontations between the demonstrators and conservative counterdemonstrators and the army response are also covered. (IS)

  1. TAP into Learning, Fall-Winter 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Mary; Dimock, Vicki; Martinez, Danny

    2000-01-01

    This document consists of the final three issues of "TAP into Learning" (Technology Assistance Program). The double fall issue focuses on knowledge construction and on using multimedia applications in the classroom. Contents include: "Knowledge Under Construction"; "Hegel and the Dialectic"; "Implications for…

  2. AAAI 1991 Fall Symposium Series Reports

    OpenAIRE

    AAAI,

    1992-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1991 Fall Symposium Series on November 15-17 at the Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California. This article contains summaries of the four symposia: Discourse Structure in Natural Language Understanding and Generation, Knowledge and Action at Social and Organizational Levels, Principles of Hybrid Reasoning, Sensory Aspects of Robotic Intelligence.

  3. Have a Safe and Healthy Fall

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-14

    Fall is a great time to try new and healthy activities with your parents! Have a food tasting or a leaf raking contest! Whatever your plans, make sure to have fun and be safe!  Created: 10/14/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 10/14/2010.

  4. Community College Users' Report, Fall 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, A. L., Ed.

    This report was compiled from information supplied by instructors participating in the National Science Foundation's community college field test of PLATO IV--a computer-based system developed at the University of Illinois--during the fall semester of 1975. Represented here are the responses of instructors at five Illinois community colleges to…

  5. Riemann pendulum in free fall systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    The possible detection in space and in different free fall system of the tidal effects via a Riemann pendulum rate, is considered. The possibility to perform such an experiment for educational purpouse by a Moire' or Holographic double exposure detection is described. The International Space Station may obtain high quality test of 3D Riemann pendulum effects.

  6. Milestones in gait, balance, and falling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nutt, J.G.; Horak, F.B.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gait, balance, and falls have become increasingly common topics of published articles in the Movement Disorders journal since its launch in 1986. This growth represents an increasing awareness of the importance of mobility to patients' quality of life. New methods have become available that allow fo

  7. Exploring fall training adaptations while walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Tobin A; Mokha, G Monique; Peacock, Corey A

    2016-06-13

    Trips are common in and out of the workplace with most people recovering to avoid a subsequent fall. However, when the recovery attempt fails, a fall can be detrimental. The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine adaptations to the elevating response during obstacle tripping while walking on a treadmill. Additionally, the possible transfer effects from adapted responses in the lab to the worksite are explored. Fourteen healthy participants that covered the general working age range (20-70 yrs.) were presented with two different types of tripping obstacles while walking. Elevating the foot over the obstacle was expected due to all trips being induced during early swing phase (first 33% of the swing phase). However, in addition to the elevating strategy, a novel "push" strategy was observed in all but three participants. The current study provided support that obstacle type influences the behavioral response after a trip. Therefore, obstacles that catch the shoe should be considered when designing functional fall programs. Furthermore, information from the current study is useful for establishing guidelines when developing a fall prevention program in the workplace.

  8. A new view on falling aprons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Hoeven, M.; Thiel, B.

    2003-01-01

    In a flume of BallastHam Dredging a falling apron model has been constructed and loaded by current. The tests have been done with different rock sizes, different layer thickness of the top storage of the apron and two different gradings. In summary it was found that for both the narrow graded rock

  9. Maribo - a new CM fall from Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Henning; Grau, Thomas; Bischoff, Addi

    2012-01-01

    Maribo is a new Danish CM chondrite, which fell on January 17, 2009, at 19:08:28 CET. The fall was observed by many eye witnesses and recorded by a surveillance camera, an all sky camera, a few seismic stations, and by meteor radar observatories in Germany. A single fragment of Maribo with a dry...

  10. Community College Humanities Review, Fall 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Susan, Ed.; Wilson, Ned M., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The "Community College Humanities Review" is a forum for scholarly work focusing on research, curriculum change, and developments within the humanities disciplines. The fall 1998 issue offers the following articles: (1) "Feminist Currents and Confluence in Southern and Latin America, Women's Narrative: Gertrudis Gomez de Avellaneda y Arteaga and…

  11. Montana Advanced Biofuels Great Falls Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    This November 20, 2015 letter from EPA approves the petition from Montana Advanced Biofuels, LLC, Great Falls facility, regarding ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for advanced biofuel (D-code 5) and renewable

  12. West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Anna; Hailey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the West Tennessee ACEI 2006 Fall Conference held at Union University in Jackson, Tennessee on October 14, 2006. The conference theme, Turning the Pages: A Focus on Children's Literature, was emphasized throughout the day. During the conference, the early childhood classroom teachers, preservice teachers, and administrators…

  13. Kentucky College and University Enrollments. Fall 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentucky Center for Education Statistics, Frankfort.

    Fall 1977 enrollment data from the Kentucky state-supported and independent colleges and universities, seminaries, proprietary business colleges and Eagle University are presented. Total enrollment in the state and independent colleges and universities was 126,162. Of this total, 108,546 students were enrolled in the state universities and…

  14. Preventing Older Adult Falls and TBI

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-05

    This podcast provides tips on how older adults can prevent falls and related injuries, such as traumatic brain injuries (TBI).  Created: 3/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/7/2008.

  15. Milestones in gait, balance, and falling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nutt, J.G.; Horak, F.B.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Gait, balance, and falls have become increasingly common topics of published articles in the Movement Disorders journal since its launch in 1986. This growth represents an increasing awareness of the importance of mobility to patients' quality of life. New methods have become available that allow

  16. Protect the Ones You Love From Falls

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-10

    This podcast, developed as part of the Protect the Ones You Love initiative, discusses steps parents can take to help protect their children from falls, one of the leading causes of child injury.  Created: 12/10/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 12/10/2008.

  17. Recurrent Falls in Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Natalie E.; Allison K. Schwarzel; Canning,Colleen G.

    2013-01-01

    Most people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) fall and many experience recurrent falls. The aim of this review was to examine the scope of recurrent falls and to identify factors associated with recurrent fallers. A database search for journal articles which reported prospectively collected information concerning recurrent falls in people with PD identified 22 studies. In these studies, 60.5% (range 35 to 90%) of participants reported at least one fall, with 39% (range 18 to 65%) reporting recurr...

  18. Fear of falling in elderly persons: association with falls, functional ability, and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuzhong; Fisher, K John; Harmer, Peter; McAuley, Edward; Wilson, Nicole L

    2003-09-01

    This study examined heterogeneity in response patterns of the participants of the Survey of Activities and Fear of Falling in the Elderly (SAFFE) and their relationships to falls, functional ability, quality of life, and activity restriction measures in a cohort of 256 older people (mean age = 77.5 years). Participants recruited from local primary care clinics were administered the SAFFE instrument, an activity restriction measure, a combination of self-reported and performance-based functional ability tests, and quality-of-life measures. Latent class analyses identified two classes: Class 1 (n = 209), which had a low SAFFE fear of falling, and Class 2 (n = 47), which had a high SAFFE fear of falling. Subsequent analyses of variance indicated that the two-class (low fear and high fear) SAFFE fear of falling profiles discriminated fallers from nonfallers, and low and high levels of functional ability, activity restriction, and quality of life. The findings from this study suggest that variations in the SAFFE response patterns on a single dimension of fear of falling and that high levels of fear of falling measured by the SAFFE are linked to a range of adverse health consequences.

  19. Maxillofacial Fractures due to Falls: does Fall Modality Determine the Pattern of Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Roccia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In several epidemiological studies of maxillofacial trauma, falls were one of the most frequent causes of facial injury. The aim of this study is to analyse the patterns of fall-related maxillofacial injuries based on the height of the fall. Material and Methods: Using a systematic computer-assisted database of patients hospitalised with maxillofacial fractures, only those with fall-related injuries were considered. The falls were divided into four groups: falls from slipping, tripping or stumbling (STSF, loss of consciousness (LOCF, stairs (SAF, and height (HF. Data on the age, gender, fracture site, Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS, facial lacerations, associated lesions, type of treatment, and length of hospital stay were also analysed. Results: This study included 557 patients (338 males, 219 females; average age 51.5 years [range 4 - 99 years]. In the over 60 age group, females were more prevalent in STSF than males. According to aetiology, STSF was the most frequent cause of maxillofacial fractures (315 patients; 56.5% followed by LOCF (157; 28.2%, HF (55; 9.9%, and SAF (30; 5.4%. The middle third of the face was affected most frequently. After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved. The majority of associated fractures, as well as the most severe injuries and greatest rate of facial lacerations, occurred secondary to HF. Conclusions: This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

  20. [Home falls in infants before walking acquisition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, I; Gurrera, E; Honorat, R; Rekhroukh, H; Casasoprana, A; Grouteau, E

    2013-05-01

    Minor head trauma is frequent among infants and leads to numerous visits to emergency departments for neurological assessment to evaluate the value of cerebral CT scan with the risk for traumatic brain injuries (TBI). To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of nonwalking infants admitted after falling at home and to analyze associated factors for skull fractures and TBI. Between January 2007 and December 2011, all children aged 9 months or younger and admitted after a home fall to the pediatric emergency unit of a tertiary children's hospital were included. The data collected were age, sex, weight and height, body mass index; geographic origin, referral or direct admission, mode of transportation; month, day and time of admission; causes of the fall, alleged fall height, presence of an eyewitness, type of landing surface; Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, application of the head trauma protocol, location and type of injuries, cerebral CT scan results, length of hospital stay, progression, and neglect or abuse situations. DESCRIPTIVE ANALYSIS: within the study period, 1910 infants were included. Fifty-four percent of children were aged less than 6 months with a slight male prevalence (52%). Falls from parental bed and infant carriers accounted for the most frequent fall circumstances. GCS score on admission was equal to 14 or 15 in 99% of cases. A cerebral CT scan was performed in 34% of children and detected 104 skull fractures and 55 TBI. Infants aged less than 1 month had the highest rate of TBI (8.5%). Eleven percent of patients were hospitalized. A situation of abuse was identified in 51 infants (3%). UNIVARIATE ANALYSIS: Male children and infants aged less than 3 months had a higher risk of skull fractures (P = 0.03 and P = 0.0003, respectively). In the TBI group, children were younger (3.8 ± 2.6 months versus 5.4 ± 2.5 months, P walking acquisition, children are particularly vulnerable and have the highest rate of TBI after a vertical fall. In this age

  1. Development and Process Evaluation of a 5-Week Exercise Program to Prevent Falls in People after Stroke: The FALLS Program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, H.J.R. van; Kam, D. de; Hellebrand, W.; Smulders, E.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a common complication after stroke, with balance and gait deficits being the most important risk factors. Taking into account the specific needs and capacities of people with stroke, we developed the FALLS program (FALL prevention after Stroke), based on the "Nijmegen falls prevention

  2. Impact of falls and fear of falling on health-related quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Schrag, A.; Mazibrada, G.; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    Postural instability, recurrent falls and fear of falling are common in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined the impact of fall frequency, fear of falling, balance confidence and objectively measured balance impairment (using Tinetti's Mobility Index) on health-related quality of life

  3. Impact of falls and fear of falling on health-related quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Schrag, A.; Mazibrada, G.; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    Postural instability, recurrent falls and fear of falling are common in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined the impact of fall frequency, fear of falling, balance confidence and objectively measured balance impairment (using Tinetti's Mobility Index) on health-related quality of life (HrQ

  4. Development and Process Evaluation of a 5-Week Exercise Program to Prevent Falls in People after Stroke: The FALLS Program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, H.J.R. van; Kam, D. de; Hellebrand, W.; Smulders, E.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2012-01-01

    Falls are a common complication after stroke, with balance and gait deficits being the most important risk factors. Taking into account the specific needs and capacities of people with stroke, we developed the FALLS program (FALL prevention after Stroke), based on the "Nijmegen falls prevention prog

  5. 75 FR 1587 - Medford-Park Falls Ranger District, Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, Park Falls Hardwoods...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ... Forest Service Medford-Park Falls Ranger District, Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, Park Falls... Statement. SUMMARY: The USDA Forest Service, Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest, Medford-Park Falls Ranger... within the Park Falls Hardwoods project area. The primary purpose of this proposal is to...

  6. 77 FR 21761 - Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Alice Falls Corporation, Alice Falls Hydro, LLC; Notice of Application for Transfer of License, and Soliciting Comments and Motions To Intervene On February 23, 2012, Alice Falls Corporation (transferor) and Alice Falls Hydro, LLC (transferee) filed an ] application for transfer...

  7. Myths and Misconceptions in Fall Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epp, R J

    2006-02-23

    Since 1973, when OSHA CFRs 1910 and 1926 began to influence the workplace, confusion about the interpretation of the standards has been a problem and fall protection issues are among them. This confusion is verified by the issuance of 351 (as of 11/25/05) Standard Interpretations issued by OSHA in response to formally submitted questions asking for clarification. Over the years, many workers and too many ES&H Professionals have become 'self-interpreters', reaching conclusions that do not conform to either the Standards or the published Interpretations. One conclusion that has been reached by the author is that many ES&H Professionals are either not aware of, or do not pay attention to the Standard Interpretations issued by OSHA, or the State OSHA interpretation mechanism, whoever has jurisdiction. If you fall in this category, you are doing your organization or clients a disservice and are not providing them with the best information available. Several myths and/or misconceptions have been promulgated to the point that they become accepted fact, until an incident occurs and OSHA becomes involved. For example, one very pervasive myth is that you are in compliance as long as you maintain a distance of 6 feet from the edge. No such carte blanche rule exists. In this presentation, this myth and several other common myths/misconceptions will be discussed. This presentation is focused only on Federal OSHA CFR1910 Subpart D--Walking-Working Surfaces, CFR1926 Subpart M--Fall Protection and the Fall Protection Standard Interpretation Letters. This presentation does not cover steel erection, aerial lifts and other fall protection issues. Your regulations will probably be different than those presented if you are operating under a State plan.

  8. Influences on modern multifactorial falls prevention interventions and fear of falling in non-frail older adults: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svantesson, Ulla; Babagbemi, Buki; Foster, Lakicia; Alricsson, Marie

    2014-10-01

    This review explores underlying features that may influence fear of falling and the effectiveness of multifactorial falls prevention programs in community dwelling non-frail adults aged 65 and older. It also examines the interrelationship between fear of falling and multifactorial falls prevention interventions. A literature search of medical databases was conducted to identify articles that address the fear of falling and multifactorial programs as either a primary or secondary component of their findings. Multifactorial interventions were assessed in terms of their program content, design, demographics, implementation techniques, and cost-effectiveness. Falls are a common, but preventable, cause of morbidity and injury in older adults 65 and over. In addition to physiological variables, fear of falling and self-efficacy are psychosocial factors that impact the incidence of falls in this population. Addressing fear of falling in addition to physiological parameters may influence the success of multifactorial falls prevention programs for adults 65 and over.

  9. Monitoring Emperor Goose Populations by Aerial Counts and the Fall Age Ratio - Fall 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2003, we photographed flocks of emperor geese (Chen canagica) during fall migration at lagoons along the north side of the Alaska Peninsula for the 19th...

  10. Elderly fall risk prediction using static posturography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining and controlling postural balance is important for activities of daily living, with poor postural balance being predictive of future falls. This study investigated eyes open and eyes closed standing posturography with elderly adults to identify differences and determine appropriate outcome measure cut-off scores for prospective faller, single-faller, multi-faller, and non-faller classifications. 100 older adults (75.5 ± 6.7 years) stood quietly with eyes open and then eyes closed while Wii Balance Board data were collected. Range in anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) center of pressure (CoP) motion; AP and ML CoP root mean square distance from mean (RMS); and AP, ML, and vector sum magnitude (VSM) CoP velocity were calculated. Romberg Quotients (RQ) were calculated for all parameters. Participants reported six-month fall history and six-month post-assessment fall occurrence. Groups were retrospective fallers (24), prospective all fallers (42), prospective fallers (22 single, 6 multiple), and prospective non-fallers (47). Non-faller RQ AP range and RQ AP RMS differed from prospective all fallers, fallers, and single fallers. Non-faller eyes closed AP velocity, eyes closed VSM velocity, RQ AP velocity, and RQ VSM velocity differed from multi-fallers. RQ calculations were particularly relevant for elderly fall risk assessments. Cut-off scores from Clinical Cut-off Score, ROC curves, and discriminant functions were clinically viable for multi-faller classification and provided better accuracy than single-faller classification. RQ AP range with cut-off score 1.64 could be used to screen for older people who may fall once. Prospective multi-faller classification with a discriminant function (-1.481 + 0.146 x Eyes Closed AP Velocity—0.114 x Eyes Closed Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity—2.027 x RQ AP Velocity + 2.877 x RQ Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity) and cut-off score 0.541 achieved an accuracy of 84.9% and is viable as a screening tool for older

  11. 摩尔根《古代社会》中的美学思想%Aesthetic Thoughts of Ancient Society by Lewis Henry Morgan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李新市

    2011-01-01

    The daily life of ancient ordinary people became Morgan's main topic in his field work.It not only expressed a kind of aesthetic feeling to readers on the whole,it also made people feel the works in a simple and plentiful style.From uncivilized times to savage times,and then civilized times,the process was the result that showed man's increased essential power.It impressed people deeply that the feeling of aesthetics that came from the mass pushing by social productive forces.Morgan paid much attention to family,the small important organization that produced productive forces,and was dedicated to probing aesthetics of the organizations' dialectical development.He expounded macroscopic logical evolution of history from microcosmic system of ownership and explained to people that living ways of savages should be improved from the angle of aesthetics.Ladders which people used to get to civilization had historic necessity.He stressed that the contradiction between economic base and superstructure made people step into ideal society,and he also stressed the action that violent revolution can put into in the process.He also told people that the steps of society making progress couldn't be reversed.From the angle of aesthetics,future society was satisfactory to people's living and development.%古代普通人的日常生活成了摩尔根研究视野里的主要话题,既给人一种整体的美感,又给人以质朴和丰富的感觉。从蒙昧时代到野蛮时代再进入文明时代,都是人的本质力量增强的结果。人民群众推动社会生产力发展的感性形象之美给人以强烈的震撼。摩尔根极为重视家庭这种生产生产力的重要微型组织,他致力于探索其在古代社会中的辩证发展之美,从微观所有制阐述历史的宏观逻辑演进,给人一种微观生活对宏观历史的塑造之美。从审美的角度向人们说明了野蛮人生存方式需要改进、迈向文明的阶梯具有历史必然

  12. A Wavelet-Based Approach to Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Palmerini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Falls among older people are a widely documented public health problem. Automatic fall detection has recently gained huge importance because it could allow for the immediate communication of falls to medical assistance. The aim of this work is to present a novel wavelet-based approach to fall detection, focusing on the impact phase and using a dataset of real-world falls. Since recorded falls result in a non-stationary signal, a wavelet transform was chosen to examine fall patterns. The idea is to consider the average fall pattern as the “prototype fall”.In order to detect falls, every acceleration signal can be compared to this prototype through wavelet analysis. The similarity of the recorded signal with the prototype fall is a feature that can be used in order to determine the difference between falls and daily activities. The discriminative ability of this feature is evaluated on real-world data. It outperforms other features that are commonly used in fall detection studies, with an Area Under the Curve of 0.918. This result suggests that the proposed wavelet-based feature is promising and future studies could use this feature (in combination with others considering different fall phases in order to improve the performance of fall detection algorithms.

  13. Analysis of reasons for falls of hemiparetic inpatient rehabilited patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek, Andrzej; Lewicka, Krystyna

    2002-10-30

    Background. Patients undergoing rehabilitation in rehablitation wards particulary those focused on geriatry or neurology are expose to falls.It is connected with advanced age and also their illness essence. This kind of falls appears to be very important problem because some of them could lead to severe physical contusion or loss of trust in own ability and fear against the activities. The aim of this study was to analyse incidence of falls in all groups of patients rehabilited in the ward, the causes of falls and consequences of them and estabilshing the preventional rules for hemiparetic patients after stroke or operated brain's tumors. Material and methods. The prospective study was conducted during 2000 year. We used erlier prepared record of falls included data conected with age, diagnosis, day of hospitalisation, causes, circumstances and consequences of falls. Results. Among 724 observed inpatient rehabilited patients falled 46 persons what is 6,3%. The most often falls concerned hemiparetic patients (8,7% rehabilited patients). In group with patients after cranio-cerebral trauma falls were registered in 18,1% rehabilited. Walking without support was the most frequent circumstance of falls (27%). In 9 % of falled patients suffered from consequences as local petechie, swellings, tenderness of soft tissue whereas 1 patient needed to be transfered and observated in traumatic ward after fall. Conclusions. From this analysis come that restriction of ussing sleeping and psychotropic pills, creation of save enviroment, isolation of group of patients predisponated to falls are very important factors in prevention of falls.

  14. Survey on Fall Detection and Fall Prevention Using Wearable and External Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueng Santiago Delahoz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available According to nihseniorhealth.gov (a website for older adults, falling represents a great threat as people get older, and providing mechanisms to detect and prevent falls is critical to improve people’s lives. Over 1.6 million U.S. adults are treated for fall-related injuries in emergency rooms every year suffering fractures, loss of independence, and even death. It is clear then, that this problem must be addressed in a prompt manner, and the use of pervasive computing plays a key role to achieve this. Fall detection (FD and fall prevention (FP are research areas that have been active for over a decade, and they both strive for improving people’s lives through the use of pervasive computing. This paper surveys the state of the art in FD and FP systems, including qualitative comparisons among various studies. It aims to serve as a point of reference for future research on the mentioned systems. A general description of FD and FP systems is provided, including the different types of sensors used in both approaches. Challenges and current solutions are presented and described in great detail. A 3-level taxonomy associated with the risk factors of a fall is proposed. Finally, cutting edge FD and FP systems are thoroughly reviewed and qualitatively compared, in terms of design issues and other parameters.

  15. High Falls generation station expansion approvals process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litschko, C. [Lakeland Holding, Bracebridge, ON (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    Lakeland Holding Ltd. is the parent company for Lakeland Power Distribution Ltd., Bracebridge Generation Ltd., and Lakeland Energy Ltd. This PowerPoint presentation highlighted the High Falls generation expansion process. During construction of the High Falls plant, a concrete foundation was built beside the plant for future expansion. The expansion process involves building a 1,500 kilowatt generator to supply electricity to as many as 1600 households. The presentation described the context and background for the expansion and presented information on the water power generation plants. It presented site specifications as well as the approvals process by which final approval was granted in 2004. Observations and lessons learned from the approval process were identified. figs.

  16. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  17. Air Resistance on Falling Balls and Balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluck, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Studying the effect of air resistance on falling objects in an introductory mechanics course has the merit of relevance to a considerable part of our everyday experience: Leaves, parachutes, raindrops, or soot particles do not keep accelerating as they fall. This topic has been discussed in this and other journals many times,1-7 ranging from theoretical treatments to various experimental investigations, mostly for coffee filters, depending on the apparatus at the disposal of the writers (video clips, graphic calculators, and so on). We report here a sequence of activities for our 11th-grade high school students dealing with this topic. The analysis of data emphasizes points that do not seem to have been done in previous articles.

  18. Astronomy and the Fall of Babylon

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G

    2000-01-01

    This illustrated article represents a popular account of the study of the Babylonian astronomical records of Enuma Anu Enlil tablet series i.e. of the Venus Tablet of Ammisaduqa and of two lunar eclipses linked with the IIIrd dynasty of Ur, having resulted in the proposal of Ultra-Low chronology of the Near East in II millennium B.C. The emerged Ultra-Low chronology is by 96 years shorter than the conventional Middle chronology and by now is supported by various independent studies. Tables of relative chronologies of principal kingdoms of Mesopotamia are given, along with some dates associated with the fall of Babylon in II millennium B.C. The technical details are given in the book by H.Gasche, J.A.Armstrong, S.W.Cole and V.G.Gurzadyan, "Dating the Fall of Babylon" (Mesopotamian History and Environment, Series II, University of Ghent and Chicago Press, 1998) and in subsequent articles.

  19. Rendering Falling Leaves on Graphics Hardware

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Balsa

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in simulating natural phenomena in computer graphics applications. Animating natural scenes in real time is one of the most challenging problems due to the inherent complexity of their structure, formed by millions of geometric entities, and the interactions that happen within. An example of natural scenario that is needed for games or simulation programs are forests. Forests are difficult to render because the huge amount of geometric entities and the large amount of detail to be represented. Moreover, the interactions between the objects (grass, leaves and external forces such as wind are complex to model. In this paper we concentrate in the rendering of falling leaves at low cost. We present a technique that exploits graphics hardware in order to render thousands of leaves with different falling paths in real time and low memory requirements.

  20. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  1. Ecological justice in the falls by Oates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘巍

    2015-01-01

    <正>Oates is a prolific writer,who has published more than forty novels,numerous short stories,poetry and other works since 1963.Known as the"female Faulkner",she has won the O.Henry awards,America National Book Award and other awards,and was nominated Nobel literary prize.As a realistic writer,Oates focuses on ecological ethics issues in her novels.The novel displays problems of environmental pollution in the Niagara falls

  2. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation : Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra-Berns, Mary

    2003-01-01

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present potential acquisition projects, and to discuss and evaluate other issues affecting the Work Group and Project. Work Group members protected 1,386.29 acres of wildlife habitat in 2002. To date, the Albeni Falls project has protected approximately 5,914.31 acres of wildlife habitat. About 21% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities have increased as more properties are purchased and continue to center on restoration, operation and maintenance, and monitoring. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development of a monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. This year the Work Group began implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program performing population and plant surveys, data evaluation and storage, and map development as well as developing management plans. Assuming that the current BPA budget restrictions will be lifted in the near future, the Work Group expects to increase mitigation properties this coming year with several potential projects.

  3. A Second H Chondrite Stream of Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, S. F.; Wang, M.-S.; Dodd, R. T.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1995-09-01

    Earlier, Dodd et al. [1] described a statistically significant concentration of 17 H4-6 chondrite falls in May between 1855 and 1895, that clustered on a year-day plot, indicating a coorbital meteoroid stream or two closely-related ones. Contents of 10 thermally labile trace elements (Rb, Ag, Se, Cs, Te,Zn, Cd, Bi, Tl, In) determined by RNAA demonstrated that 13 of these H Cluster 1 (hereafter HC1) falls are compositionally distinguishable from another 45 non-H Cluster 1 (non-HC1) falls [1] (as are Antarctic samples with nominal terrestrial ages >50 ky [2,3]). This compositional distinguishability is demonstrable using two standard, model-dependent multivariate statistical tests (linear discriminant analysis LDA or logistic regression LR) or the model-independent, randomization-simulation (R-S) methods of Lipschutz and Samuels [4]. Despite petrographic and cosmic ray exposure age variabilities, like Antarctic suites [2] HC1 meteorites seemingly derive from coorbital meteoroids (from their circumstances of fall) and apparently have a common thermal history (reflected in contents of thermally labile trace elements) distinguishable from those of other H4-6 chondrite falls [1]. Other explanations seem inviable [5]. During days 220-300 when streams of large fireballs [6] and near-Earth asteroids [7] occur several H chondrite concentrations are evident (Fig. 1), particularly if petrographic type becomes a criterion [1]. Here, we focus on H Clusters 2 through 4 (HC2-4) containing, respectively, 10 H4-6, 5 H5 and 12 H6 chondrite members, for which full data sets exist because of the generosity of many colleagues/institutions. H chondrite clusters in the same time-span might include samples derived from related parent regions. Hence, we changed our comparison-base to approximate a random background of falls by including only the 34 non-Cluster H chondrites, HC0; this also simplified our calculations. To establish whether this choice impacts our observations, we compared 13

  4. Hospitalisations due to falls in older persons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carey, D

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes hospitalisations due to falls among people aged 65 years and over resident in the Eastern Region of Ireland. Of the 2,029 hospitalisations recorded for 2002, 78% were female and 68% were aged 75 years and over. Fractures accounted for 1,697 or 84% of cases with nearly half of them (841) sustained to the hip. Females were more likely to have a limb fracture whereas males were more likely to have a head injury. The total inpatient costs of the 2,029 hospitalisations were estimated at 10.6 million euros. Hip fractures were the costliest injuries as they accounted for 7.4 million euros (70%) of inpatient costs. There are also substantial additional costs implications for hip fractures as they constituted the majority (56%) of cases transferred to nursing\\/convalescent homes or long-stay health facilities. In keeping with an ageing population, the problem of injuries in older people is likely to increase over time and as falls are the dominant cause of those injuries, all acute and long-stay health facilities need to develop and implement fall prevention strategies for older people.

  5. Falling through the black hole horizon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brustein, Ram [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University,Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Medved, A.J.M. [Department of Physics & Electronics, Rhodes University,Grahamstown 6140 (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP),Matieland, Western Cape 7602 (South Africa)

    2015-06-15

    We consider the fate of a small classical object, a “stick”, as it falls through the horizon of a large black hole (BH). Classically, the equivalence principle dictates that the stick is affected by small tidal forces, and Hawking’s quantum-mechanical model of BH evaporation makes essentially the same prediction. If, on the other hand, the BH horizon is surrounded by a “firewall”, the stick will be consumed as it falls through. We have recently extended Hawking’s model by taking into account the quantum fluctuations of the geometry and the classical back-reaction of the emitted particles. Here, we calculate the strain exerted on the falling stick for our model. The strain depends on the near-horizon state of the Hawking pairs. We find that, after the Page time when the state of the pairs deviates significantly from maximal entanglement (as required by unitarity), the induced strain in our semiclassical model is still parametrically small. This is because the number of the disentangled pairs is parametrically smaller than the BH entropy. A firewall does, however, appear if the number of disentangled pairs near the horizon is of order of the BH entropy, as implicitly assumed in previous discussions in the literature.

  6. Fall Down Detection Under Smart Home System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Li-Hong; Wu, Ming-Ni

    2015-10-01

    Medical technology makes an inevitable trend for the elderly population, therefore the intelligent home care is an important direction for science and technology development, in particular, elderly in-home safety management issues become more and more important. In this research, a low of operation algorithm and using the triangular pattern rule are proposed, then can quickly detect fall-down movements of humanoid by the installation of a robot with camera vision at home that will be able to judge the fall-down movements of in-home elderly people in real time. In this paper, it will present a preliminary design and experimental results of fall-down movements from body posture that utilizes image pre-processing and three triangular-mass-central points to extract the characteristics. The result shows that the proposed method would adopt some characteristic value and the accuracy can reach up to 90 % for a single character posture. Furthermore the accuracy can be up to 100 % when a continuous-time sampling criterion and support vector machine (SVM) classifier are used.

  7. Falls and Use of Assistive Devices in Stroke Patients with Hemiparesis: Association with Balance Ability and Fall Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Oksoo; Kim, Jung-Hee

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates balance ability and the fall efficacy with regard to the experiences of stroke patients with hemiparesis. The experience of falling, the use of assistive devices, and each disease-related characteristic were assessed using face-to-face interviews and a self-reported questionnaire. The Berg Balance Scale and Fall Efficacy Scale were used to measure balance ability and confidence. The fall efficacy was significantly lower in participants who had experienced falls than those who had not. The participants who used assistive devices exhibited low balance ability and fall efficacy compared to those who did not use assistive devices. Stroke patients with fall experience and walking aids might be considered at increased risk of falling. Preventive measures for individuals using walking aids may be beneficial in reducing the fall rate of community-dwelling stroke patients. © 2014 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  8. Educational intervention to reduce falls and fear of falling in patients after fragility fracture: results of a controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Diana; Rowe, Brian H; Johnson, Jeffrey A; Steiner, Ivan P; Russell, Anthony S; Hanley, David A; Maksymowych, Walter P; Holroyd, Brian R; Harley, Charles H; Morrish, Donald W; Wirzba, Brian J; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2006-04-01

    Falls and fear of falling are a major health problem. We sought to determine the effectiveness of an educational intervention in reducing fear of falling and preventing recurrent falls in community-dwelling patients after a fragility fracture. One hundred two community-dwelling patients aged 50 years or older who fell and sustained a wrist fracture and were treated at Emergency Departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada (2001-2002) were allocated to either standardized educational leaflets and post-discharge telephone counseling regarding fall prevention strategies ("intervention") or attention-controls ("controls"). Main outcomes were fear of falling and recurrent falls 3 months after fracture. Mean age was 67 years and most patients were female (80%). The majority of falls (76%) leading to fracture occurred outdoors. Three months post-fracture, almost half of patients (48%) reported increased fear of falling and 11 of 102 (11%) reported falling again. The intervention did not reduce the fear of falling (43% had increased fear vs. 53% of controls, adjusted P value=0.55) or decrease recurrent falls (17% fell vs. 5% of controls, adjusted P value=0.059) within 3 months of fracture. An educational intervention undertaken in the Emergency Department was no more effective than usual care in reducing fear of falling or recurrent falls in community-dwelling patients. Future strategies must address a number of dimensions beyond simple education.

  9. Completion and return of fall diaries varies with participants' level of education, first language, and baseline fall risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Laura; Kendrick, Denise; Morris, Richard; Dinan, Susie; Masud, Tahir; Skelton, Dawn; Iliffe, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Consensus guidelines recommend the use of prospective fall diaries in studies of fall rates. We sought to determine the characteristics associated with return and successful completion of a falls diary and whether characteristics such as gender, education level, native language, income, and falls risk influenced self-reported fall rates. Two hundred and seventy people aged 65 years and older participating in a randomized controlled trial evaluating two exercise programmes. Fall diaries were collected for 6 months, then evaluated for correct completion and falls reported. An increasing risk of falls was associated with a reducing odds of returning diaries (odds ratio for a one unit increase in Falls Risk Assessment Tool score 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.96). Native English speakers were more likely to complete more than half the diaries correctly (odds ratio 2.63, 95% confidence interval 1.20-5.75). Problems arise in the correct completion of falls diaries among those for whom English is not their first language. Diaries may underreport the rate of falls as those at higher risk were less likely to return diaries but more likely to report falls. Careful consideration should be given to the analysis of falls diaries as missing data are unlikely to be missing completely at random. We recommend additional training in the use of falls diaries for these groups or the utilization of simpler instruments.

  10. Melanoma Rates Rise in Some States, Fall in Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162797.html Melanoma Rates Rise in Some States, Fall in Others ... THURSDAY, Dec. 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of melanoma cases and deaths are either rising or falling, ...

  11. Brain Scan Test Predicts Fall Risk in Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Brain Scan Test Predicts Fall Risk in Elderly Such a test gives insight into neurological changes ... News) -- Falls can prove very disabling for the elderly, and new research suggests that measurements of healthy ...

  12. Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165985.html Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People ... 26, 2017 FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression appears to raise the risk of falls in ...

  13. Polypharmacy including falls risk-increasing medications and subsequent falls in community-dwelling middle-aged and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kathryn; Bennett, Kathleen; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2015-01-01

    polypharmacy is an important risk factor for falls, but recent studies suggest only when including medications associated with increasing the risk of falls. a prospective, population-based cohort study. 6,666 adults aged ≥50 years from The Irish Longitudinal study on Ageing. participants reported regular medication use at baseline. Any subsequent falls, any injurious falls and the number of falls were reported 2 years later. The association between polypharmacy (>4 medications) or fall risk-increasing medications and subsequent falls or injurious falls was assessed using modified Poisson regression. The association with the number of falls was assessed using negative binomial regression. during follow-up, 231 falls per 1,000 person-years were reported. Polypharmacy including antidepressants was associated with a greater risk of any fall (adjusted relative risk (aRR) 1.28, 95% CI 1.06-1.54), of injurious falls (aRR 1.51, 95% CI 1.10-2.07) and a greater number of falls (adjusted incident rate ratio (aIRR) 1.60, 95% CI 1.19-2.15), but antidepressant use without polypharmacy and polypharmacy without antidepressants were not. The use of benzodiazepines was associated with injurious falls when coupled with polypharmacy (aRR 1.40, 95% CI 1.04-1.87), but was associated with a greater number of falls (aIRR 1.32, 95% CI 1.05-1.65), independent of polypharmacy. Other medications assessed, including antihypertensives, diuretics and antipsychotics, were not associated with outcomes. in middle-aged and older adults, polypharmacy, including antidepressant or benzodiazepine use, was associated with injurious falls and a greater number of falls. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zijden, A M; Groen, B E; Tanck, E; Nienhuis, B; Verdonschot, N; Weerdesteyn, V

    2012-06-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of fall techniques, landing surface and fall height on the impact force and the loading configuration in sideways falls. Twelve experienced judokas performed sideways MA and Block ('natural') falls on a force plate, both with and without a judo mat on top. Kinematic and force data were analysed to determine the hip impact force and the loading configuration. In falls from a kneeling position, the MA technique reduced the impact force by 27%, but did not change the loading configuration. The use of the mat did not change the loading configuration. Falling from a standing changed the force direction. In all conditions, the point of application was distal and posterior to the greater trochanter, but it was less distal and more posterior in falls from standing than from kneeling position. The present decrease in hip impact force with an unchanged loading configuration indicates the potential protective effect of the MA technique on the femoral fracture risk. The change in loading configuration with an increased fall height warrant further studies to examine the effect of MA techniques on fall severity under more natural fall circumstances.

  15. The Effects of the A Matter of Balance Program on Falls and Physical Risk of Falls, Tampa, Florida, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tuo-Yu; Edwards, Jerri D; Janke, Megan C

    2015-09-24

    This study investigated the effects of the A Matter of Balance (MOB) program on falls and physical risk factors of falling among community-dwelling older adults living in Tampa, Florida, in 2013. A total of 110 adults (52 MOB, 58 comparison) were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Data on falls, physical risk of falling, and other known risk factors of falling were collected at baseline and at the end of the program. Multivariate analysis of covariance with repeated measures and logistic regressions were used to investigate the effects of this program. Participants in the MOB group were less likely to have had a fall and had significant improvements in their physical risk of falling compared with adults in the comparison group. No significant effects of the MOB program on recurrent falls or the number of falls reported were found. This study contributes to our understanding of the MOB program and its effectiveness in reducing falls and the physical risk of falling among older adults. The findings support extended use of this program to reduce falls and physical risk of falling among older adults.

  16. Fear of Falling in Women with Fibromyalgia and Its Relation with Number of Falls and Balance Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Collado-Mateo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate fear of falling, number of falls, and balance performance in women with FM and to examine the relationship between these variables and others, such as balance performance, quality of life, age, pain, and impact of fibromyalgia. Methods. A total of 240 women participated in this cross-sectional study. Of these, 125 had fibromyalgia. Several variables were assessed: age, fear of falling from 0 to 100, number of falls, body composition, balance performance, lower limb strength, health-related quality of life, and impact of fibromyalgia. Results. Women with fibromyalgia reported more falls and more fear of falling. Fear of falling was associated with number of falls in the last year, stiffness, perceived balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL whereas the number of falls was related to fear of falling, balance performance with eyes closed, pain, tenderness to touch level, anxiety, self-reported balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL. Conclusion. FM has an impact on fear of falling, balance performance, and number of falls. Perceived balance problems seem to be more closely associated with fear of falling than objective balance performance.

  17. Risk of falls and associated factors in institutionalized elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Jacy Aurelia Vieira de Sousa; Anna Isadora Ferreira Stremel; Clóris Regina Blanski Grden; Pollyanna Kássia de Oliveira Borges; Péricles Martim Reche; Juliana Heloise de Oliveira da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Objective: to identify the factors associated with the risk of falls in institutionalized elderly. Methods: analytical study carried out in two long-stay institutions for the elderly, with 61 residents of both sexes. Data collection was performed by means of a socio-demographic and clinical form and Downton’s Fall Risk Index. Results: 31 (50.8%) old people at high risk of falling were identified. There was an association of risk for falls in institutionalized elderly wit...

  18. Falls in Korean Polio Survivors: Incidence, Consequences, and Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Kiyeun; Lee, Seungyeol; Yang, Eun Joo; Kim, Keewon; Jung, Se Hee; Jang, Soong-Nang; Han, Soo Jeong; Kim, Wan-Ho; Lim, Jae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries are important issue among polio survivors. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of, and consequences and factors associated with falls among Korean polio survivors. A total of 317 polio survivors participated in this study. All participants completed a questionnaire including fall history, symptoms related to post-polio syndrome and other information through a telephone interview. Among them, 80 participants visited our clinic for additional...

  19. The Pendulum: From Constrained Fall to the Concept of Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Fabio; Falomo, Lidia; Fregonese, Lucio; Giannetto, Enrico; Giudice, Franco; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Kuhn underlined the relevance of Galileo's gestalt switch in the interpretation of a swinging body from constrained fall to time metre. But the new interpretation did not eliminate the older one. The constrained fall, both in the motion of pendulums and along inclined planes, led Galileo to the law of free fall. Experimenting with physical…

  20. Fall classification by machine learning using mobile phones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark V Albert

    Full Text Available Fall prevention is a critical component of health care; falls are a common source of injury in the elderly and are associated with significant levels of mortality and morbidity. Automatically detecting falls can allow rapid response to potential emergencies; in addition, knowing the cause or manner of a fall can be beneficial for prevention studies or a more tailored emergency response. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate techniques to not only reliably detect a fall but also to automatically classify the type. We asked 15 subjects to simulate four different types of falls-left and right lateral, forward trips, and backward slips-while wearing mobile phones and previously validated, dedicated accelerometers. Nine subjects also wore the devices for ten days, to provide data for comparison with the simulated falls. We applied five machine learning classifiers to a large time-series feature set to detect falls. Support vector machines and regularized logistic regression were able to identify a fall with 98% accuracy and classify the type of fall with 99% accuracy. This work demonstrates how current machine learning approaches can simplify data collection for prevention in fall-related research as well as improve rapid response to potential injuries due to falls.

  1. Falls and other geriatric syndromes in Blantyre, Malawi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of falls may result in fracture or other serious injury,5,6 but we did not collect .... Chartered Society of Physiotherapy/College of Occupational. Therapists, Falls ... C. Prevention of falls in the elderly trial (PROFET): a randomised controlled trial.

  2. The Pendulum: From Constrained Fall to the Concept of Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Fabio; Falomo, Lidia; Fregonese, Lucio; Giannetto, Enrico; Giudice, Franco; Mascheretti, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    Kuhn underlined the relevance of Galileo's gestalt switch in the interpretation of a swinging body from constrained fall to time metre. But the new interpretation did not eliminate the older one. The constrained fall, both in the motion of pendulums and along inclined planes, led Galileo to the law of free fall. Experimenting with physical…

  3. The Association of Cardiovascular Disorders and Falls : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Sofie; Bhangu, Jaspreet; de Rooij, Sophia; Daams, Joost; Kenny, Rose Anne; van der Velde, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cardiovascular disorders are recognized as risk factors for falls in older adults. The aim of this systematic review was to identify cardiovascular disorders that are associated with falls, thus providing angles for optimization of fall-preventive care. Design: Systematic review. Data Sou

  4. 76 FR 72003 - Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... National Park Service Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... of the Interior (Secretary) has established, in the State of New Jersey, Paterson Great Falls...: (b) PATERSON GREAT FALLS NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK.-- (1) ESTABLISHMENT.-- (A) IN GENERAL.--Subject...

  5. 36 CFR 13.1226 - Brooks Falls area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brooks Falls area. 13.1226... Developed Area § 13.1226 Brooks Falls area. The area within 50 yards of the ordinary high water marks of the Brooks River from the Riffles Bear Viewing Platform to a point 100 yards above Brooks Falls is closed...

  6. Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... osteoporosis most often break bones in the wrist, spine, and hip. Photos: NIHSeniorHealth Men and women with osteoporosis need to take care not to fall down. Falls can break bones. Some reasons people fall are: Poor vision Poor balance Certain diseases that affect how you walk Some ...

  7. - Mãe!? O mundo vai acabar...? Reflexões sobre Desdobramentos e Implicações dos Paradigmas Sociológicos de Burrell e Morgan para os Estudos Organizacionais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Zanon da Silveira

    Full Text Available Este ensaio se orienta pela seguinte pergunta: Quais desdobramentos e debates importantes ocorreram nos Estudos Organizacionais associados aos estudos de Burrell e Morgan (1979 sobre os paradigmas sociológicos? O objetivo é apresentar um entendimento sobre os estudos desses dois professores, esboçar um panorama das discussões sobre o assunto e discutir, introdutoriamente, novos debates em perspectiva. O ensaio se inspira em indagações lúdicas de uma criança a sua mãe na tentativa de interpretar a realidade social que a envolve. A partir daí, são desenvolvidas reflexões nos campos da objetividade e da subjetividade, integradas com questões epistemológicas e sociológicas da Ciência da Administração. O trabalho é desenvolvido como ensaio teórico e aborda panoramicamente a intensidade das agitações por que passaram e ainda passam os Estudos Organizacionais desde a publicação da obra de Burrell e Morgan (1979, enfocando sua contribuição para enfrentar a hegemonia do funcionalismo nas pesquisas sobre organizações no Brasil. São discutidos aspectos dicotômicos relativos à pesquisa qualitativa e quantitativa e suas relações com pontos de vista epistemológicos e metodológicos correspondentes. Discute-se a possibilidade de utilização de perspectivas teóricas diferentes para o mesmo objeto de estudo, como o chamado multiparadigmatismo e interparadigmatismo nos Estudos Organizacionais, por exemplo. O ensaio indica que as discussões acerca das ideias desses dois professores continuam intensas, gerando um espaço de debates amplo e rico aos pesquisadores dos Estudos Organizacionais, notadamente àqueles interessados no desenvolvimento de pesquisas críticas e interpretativas.

  8. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Garrett

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  9. Traumatic Lung Herniation following Skateboard Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafney L. Davare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung herniation (LH is a rare clinical entity involving the protrusion of lung outside the thoracic cage. It has a variety of etiologies and clinical presentations, making diagnosis difficult. We present a case of a 20-year-old male who reported pleuritic pain after falling from a skateboard. Evaluation through computed tomography (CT scanning of the chest revealed an anterior lung hernia associated with rib fractures. This case emphasizes the need for clinicians to include lung herniation in the differential diagnosis of patients with trauma and inexplicable or persistent pulmonary issues.

  10. Dispersion and fall out of heavier particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Poul

    2016-01-01

    they may like gasses and aerosols be transported more or less far by the wind. The present paper focuses on the growth of plumes of such particles larger and heavier than aerosols and transported by the wind. Implementation in existing decision support puff dispersion programs requires a parameterization...... of this growth, and two reasonable describing parameterizations have been found, one in the literature, one proposed here, and both are compared to experimental work found in the literature. The parameterization from the literature has been implemented in the dispersion program RIMPUFF, which has subsequently...... shown that the effect on fall out to a large extent overrules the effect on the dispersion of such particles....

  11. Proceedings of the KNS 2015 Fall Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-10-15

    This proceedings contains articles of 2015 fall meeting of the Korean Nuclear Society. It was held on October 28-30 in Kyungju, Korea. This proceedings is comprised of 11 sessions. The main subject titles of session are as follows: Reactor system technology, Reactor physics and computational science, Radioactive waste management, Nuclear fuel and materials, Thermal hydraulics and safety, Radiation utilization and protection, Quantum engineering and nuclear fusion, Nuclear power plant construction and operation technology, Nuclear policy, human resources and cooperation, Nuclear I and C and automatic remote systems, Competition Session. (Yi, J. H.)

  12. Impact force of a falling drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Dan; Clanet, Cristophe; Quere, David; Xavier Boutillon Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    Controlling droplet deposition is crucial in many industrial processes such as spraying pesticides on crops, inkjet printing or spray coating. Therefore, the dynamics of drop impacts have been extensively studied for more than one century. However, few literature describe the impacting force of a drop on a solid flat surface, although it might be a way to measure the size distribution of a collection of falling drops. We investigated experimentally how the instantaneous force at impact depends on impact velocity and drop radius. We also propose a new model to understand our observations. Physique et Mecanique des Milieux Heterogenes, CNRS, ESPCI, Paris France & Ladhyx, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France.

  13. Free fall onto magnetized neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpeter, E. E.

    Some compact X-ray sources show evidence of cyclotron line radiation from excited electron Landau orbits, powered by hydrogen and helium falling onto a neutron star atmosphere along the magnetic field. The slowing of the incident matter is discussed, including the spread in energy loss due to Coulomb scattering and direct nuclear reactions for disintegrating the α particles. The α disintegrations, followed by neutron capture, lead to nuclear γ rays; the γ-ray intensity is (indirectly) coupled to the Coulomb energy loss and the cyclotron line emission.

  14. American Telemedicine Association 2012 Fall Forum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Forstag

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ATA 2012 Fall Forum will follow a similar format to our highly-rated 2011 program, which was filled with unique ideas in an innovative format. We are looking for short talks, two-person dialogues, and demonstrations or other inventive presentation formats on a wide range of telemedicine subject areas. Topics might include: a unique approach to delivering telehealth services; a new and better device; a successful way of introducing telemedicine to providers or consumers; a novel way to organize and fund a program; or a fresh look at overcoming a barrier.

  15. Contemporary Records of the (1492) Ensisheim Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, F. A.; Levi-Donati, G. R.

    1992-07-01

    On the occasion of the five-hundredth anniversary of the Ensisheim (LL6) stone (November 16, 1492), five rare documents on this fall are presented: 1) Anonymous, Annali del Convento di S. Domenico. (in Italian) Manuscript n. 1151, Biblioteca Com. "Augusta", Perugia. 2) Eusebii Pamphili C. (1570) Chronicon. Petri, Basilea. (in Latin). 3) Lycosthenes (Wolffhart) C. (1557) Prodigiorum ac ostentorum Chronicon. Petri, Basilea. (in Latin). 4) Sansovino F. (1582) Cronologia del Mondo. Salicato, Vinegia. (in Italian). 5) Schedel H. (1492) Liber Chronicarum cum figuris et ymagi(ni)bus ab inicio mu(n)di. Koberger, Nuremberga. (in Latin).

  16. Predicting falls using two instruments (the Hendrich Fall Risk Model and the Morse Fall Scale) in an acute care setting in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Nada; Helou, Nancy; Madi, Chantal

    2014-06-01

    To assess the predictive value of two instruments (the Morse Fall Scale (MFS) and the Heindrich II Fall Risk Model (HFRM)] in a Middle Eastern country (Lebanon) and to evaluate the factors that are related to falls. A prospective observational cross-sectional design was used. Falls and fall-related injuries in the acute care settings contribute a substantial health and economic burden on patients and organisations. Preventing falls is a priority for most healthcare organisations. While the risk of falling cannot be eliminated, it can be significantly reduced through accurate assessment of patients' risk of falling. Data from 1815 inpatients at the American University of Beirut Medical Center (AUBMC) in Lebanon were evaluated using two instruments to predict falls: the MFS and the HFRM. The incidence of falls was 2·7% in one year. The results indicate that while the instruments were significantly correlated, the HFRM was more sensitive in predicting falls than the MFS. The internal consistency of both scales was moderate, but inter-rater reliability was high. Patients using antiepileptic drugs and assistance devises had higher odds of falling. Although both instruments were easy to use in a Middle Eastern country, the HFRM rather than the MFS is recommended for inpatients in an acute care setting as it had higher sensitivity and specificity. It is recommended that while the HFRM had adequate sensitivity, it is not seamless, and as such, nurses should not rely entirely on it. Rather, nurses should use their expert clinical judgement, their ethical obligations and cultural considerations to implement a safer environment of care for the patient. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Stock, Gregory M.; Reichenbach, P.; Snyder, J.B.; Borchers, J.W.; Godt, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m 3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  18. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Wieczorek

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  19. Characteristics of outdoor falls among older people: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, Samuel R; Ballinger, Claire; Phillips, Judith E; Newton, Rita

    2013-11-18

    Falls are a major threat to older people's health and wellbeing. Approximately half of falls occur in outdoor environments but little is known about the circumstances in which they occur. We conducted a qualitative study to explore older people's experiences of outdoor falls to develop understanding of how they may be prevented. We conducted nine focus groups across the UK (England, Wales, and Scotland). Our sample was from urban and rural settings and different environmental landscapes. Participants were aged 65+ and had at least one outdoor fall in the past year. We analysed the data using framework and content analyses. Forty-four adults aged 65 - 92 took part and reported their experience of 88 outdoor falls. Outdoor falls occurred in a variety of contexts, though reports suggested the following scenarios may have been more frequent: when crossing a road, in a familiar area, when bystanders were around, and with an unreported or unknown attribution. Most frequently, falls resulted in either minor or moderate injury, feeling embarrassed at the time of the fall, and anxiety about falling again. Ten falls resulted in fracture, but no strong pattern emerged in regard to the contexts of these falls. Anxiety about falling again appeared more prevalent among those that fell in urban settings and who made more visits into their neighbourhood in a typical week. This exploratory study has highlighted several aspects of the outdoor environment that may represent risk factors for outdoor falls and associated fear of falling. Health professionals are recommended to consider outdoor environments as well as the home setting when working to prevent falls and increase mobility among older people.

  20. Prediction of Falls and/or Near Falls in People with Mild Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Beata Lindholm; Peter Hagell; Oskar Hansson; Nilsson, Maria H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine factors associated with future falls and/or near falls in people with mild PD. Methods The study included 141 participants with PD. Mean (SD) age and PD-duration were 68 (9.7) and 4 years (3.9), respectively. Their median (q1–q3) UPDRS III score was 13 (8-18). Those >80 years of age, requiring support in standing or unable to understand instructions were excluded. Self-administered questionnaires targeted freezing of gait, turning hesitations, walking difficulties in da...

  1. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijden, A.M. van der; Groen, B.E.; Tanck, E.J.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force).

  2. The effects of Tai Chi on fall prevention, fear of falling and balance in older people: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logghe, I.H.; Verhagen, A.P.; Rademaker, A.C.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Rossum, E. van; Faber, M.J.; Koes, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tai Chi (TC) is an exercise training that is becoming increasingly popular as an intervention for single fall prevention. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of TC on fall rate, fear of falling and balance in older people. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials publis

  3. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijden, A.M. van der; Groen, B.E.; Tanck, E.J.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force).

  4. Proposal for a multiphase fall model based on real-world fall recordings with body-fixed sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, C; Schwickert, L; Mellone, S; Bagalà, F; Chiari, L; Helbostad, J L; Zijlstra, W; Aminian, K; Bourke, A; Todd, C; Bandinelli, S; Kerse, N; Klenk, J

    2012-12-01

    Falls are by far the leading cause of fractures and accidents in the home environment. The current Cochrane reviews and other systematic reviews report on more than 200 intervention studies about fall prevention. A recent meta-analysis has summarized the most important risk factors of accidental falls. However, falls and fall-related injuries remain a major challenge. One novel approach to recognize, analyze, and work better toward preventing falls could be the differentiation of the fall event into separate phases. This might aid in reconsidering ways to design preventive efforts and diagnostic approaches. From a conceptual point of view, falls can be separated into a pre-fall phase, a falling phase, an impact phase, a resting phase, and a recovery phase. Patient and external observers are often unable to give detailed comments concerning these phases. With new technological developments, it is now at least partly possible to examine the phases of falls separately and to generate new hypotheses.The article describes the practicality and the limitations of this approach using body-fixed sensor technology. The features of the different phases are outlined with selected real-world fall signals.

  5. Comparison of the Validity of Four Fall-Related Psychological Measures in a Community-Based Falls Risk Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Delilah S.; Ellis, Rebecca; Kosma, Maria; Fabre, Jennifer M.; McCarter, Kevin S.; Wood, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the measurement properties of fall-related psychological instruments with a sample of 133 older adults (M age = 74.4 years, SD = 9.4). Measures included the Comprehensive Falls Risk Screening Instrument, Falls-efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC), modified Survey of Activities and Fear of…

  6. Review on prevention of falls in hospital settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Yuan Gu; Koen Balcaen; Yicheng Ni; Jan Ampe; Jan Goffin

    2016-01-01

    This review will first cover the root causes of falls, identify preventive measures associated with these falls, and provide an overview of best practice of fall prevention at leading institutions. There is signif-icant benefit in instituting a comprehensive program to reduce falls. After analyzing the results from many successful programs, it is apparent that an integrative program that consists of patient evaluations, environmental modification, and staff training can lead to a significant reduction in the overall preva-lence of falls. Such programs can be implemented at a low cost and therefore represent an improvement in care with a high return on investment.

  7. Falling sand tests on various coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manetti, M.; Zonfrillo, G.; Pratesi, F. [Florence Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Meccanica e Tecnologie Industriali; Giovannetti, I. [GE Oil and Gas - Nuovo Pilnone, Florence (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    Abrasive wear is responsible for severe machine parts and in particular of compressor impellers. Methods of increasing service lifetime are based on employment of abrasion resistant materials or more frequently of the creation of hard, wear-resistant surface layers. In this work a bare aluminium alloy and the same alloy with four different coatings have been tested at room temperature, in order to verify their resistance to falling abrasive. Following standard ASTM D968-93, tests have been performed using a precise quantity of sand as abrasive and letting it fall on the sample with a standard apparatus: two different kinds of sand have been used, in order to obtain also information on the influence of composition and Grain size of the abrasive on material resistance. Determinations of hardness, roughness, weight loss, and morphology of the eroded surface have also been carried out. The comparison between the coatings in vestilated has been performed on the basis of the thickness decrease of the samples. (orig.)

  8. Fall velocity of multi-shaped clasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Jacobus P.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate settling velocity predictions of differently shaped micro- or macroclasts are required in many branches of science and engineering. Here, a single, dimensionally correct equation is presented that yields a significant improvement on previous settling formulas for a wide range of clast shapes. For smooth or irregular clasts with known axial dimensions, a partially polynomial equation based on the logarithmic values of dimensionless sizes and settling velocities is presented, in which the values of only one coefficient and one exponent need to be adapted for different shapes, irrespective of the Reynolds number. For irregular, natural clasts with unknown axial dimensions, a polynomial equation of the same form is applied, but with different coefficients. Comparison of the predicted and measured settling velocities of 8 different shape classes as well as natural grains with unknown axial dimensions in liquids, representing a total of 390 experimental data points, shows a mean percentage error of - 0.83% and a combined R2 value of 0.998. The settling data of 169 differently shaped particles of pumice, glass and feldspar falling in air were also analyzed, which demonstrates that the proposed equation is also valid for these conditions. Two additional shape classes were identified in the latter data set, although the resultant equations are less accurate than for liquids. An Excel spreadsheet is provided to facilitate the calculation of fall velocities for grains settling individually and in groups, or alternatively to determine the equivalent sieve size from the settling velocity, which can be used to calibrate settling tubes.

  9. Doppler radar sensor positioning in a fall detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Popescu, Mihail; Ho, K C; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Falling is a common health problem for more than a third of the United States population over 65. We are currently developing a Doppler radar based fall detection system that already has showed promising results. In this paper, we study the sensor positioning in the environment with respect to the subject. We investigate three sensor positions, floor, wall and ceiling of the room, in two experimental configurations. Within each system configuration, subjects performed falls towards or across the radar sensors. We collected 90 falls and 341 non falls for the first configuration and 126 falls and 817 non falls for the second one. Radar signature classification was performed using a SVM classifier. Fall detection performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for each sensor deployment. We found that a fall is more likely to be detected if the subject is falling toward or away from the sensor and a ceiling Doppler radar is more reliable for fall detection than a wall mounted one.

  10. Doppler radar fall activity detection using the wavelet transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Bo Yu; Ho, K C; Rantz, Marilyn J; Skubic, Marjorie

    2015-03-01

    We propose in this paper the use of Wavelet transform (WT) to detect human falls using a ceiling mounted Doppler range control radar. The radar senses any motions from falls as well as nonfalls due to the Doppler effect. The WT is very effective in distinguishing the falls from other activities, making it a promising technique for radar fall detection in nonobtrusive inhome elder care applications. The proposed radar fall detector consists of two stages. The prescreen stage uses the coefficients of wavelet decomposition at a given scale to identify the time locations in which fall activities may have occurred. The classification stage extracts the time-frequency content from the wavelet coefficients at many scales to form a feature vector for fall versus nonfall classification. The selection of different wavelet functions is examined to achieve better performance. Experimental results using the data from the laboratory and real inhome environments validate the promising and robust performance of the proposed detector.

  11. Risk factors of falls in community dwelling active elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuunainen, Eeva; Rasku, Jyrki; Jäntti, Pirkko; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2014-02-01

    To search for measures to describe and relate to accidental falls in community dwelling elderly. A EuroQol EQ-5D questionnaire based on a patient's otoneurological case history provided a general health related quality of life measure, a fall history for the last 3 months and force platform measures for 96 active elderly from a pensioner organization. On average, the elderly experienced 0.3 falls over the preceding three months. A fall was seen to cause a significant deterioration in the quality of life and vertigo and caused fear of falling. The postural instability correlated with falls. Vertigo was present among 42% and was most commonly characterized as episodic and rotatory in factorial analysis items relating to vertigo correlated to falls and balance complaints. Four factors were identified and three of these correlated with falls. Vestibular failure correlated to a fall occurring when a person was rising up; Movement intolerance correlated with falls due to slips and trips, and Near-syncope factor correlated to falls for other reasons. In posturography, the variable measuring critical time describing the memory based "closed loop" control of postural stability carried a risk for accidental fall with an odds ratio of 6. The variable measuring zero crossing velocity showed a high rate of velocity change around the neutral position of stance. Vertigo and poor postural stability were the major reasons for falls in the active elderly. In ageing, postural control is shifted towards open loop control (visual, proprioception, exteroception and vestibular) instead of closed loop control and is a factor that contributes to a fall. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Hourly rounding and patient falls: what factors boost success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsack, Jennifer; Bergey, Meredith; Mascioli, Susan; Cunningham, Janet

    2015-02-01

    Falls are a persistent problem in all healthcare settings, with rates in acute care hospitals ranging from 1.3 to 8.9 falls per 1,000 inpatient days, about 30% resulting in serious injury. A 30-day prospective pilot study was conducted on two units with pre- and postimplementation evaluation to determine the impact of patient-centered proactive hourly rounding on patient falls as part of a Lean Six Sigma process improvement project. Nurse leaders and a staff champion from Unit 1 were involved in the process from the start of the implementation period, while Unit 2 was introduced to the project for training shortly before the intervention began. On Unit 1, where staff and leadership were engaged in the project from the outset, the 1-year baseline mean fall rate was 3.9 falls/1,000 patient days. The pilot period fall rate of 1.3 falls/1,000 patient days was significantly lower than the baseline fall rate (P = 0.006). On Unit 2, where there was no run-in period, the 1-year baseline mean fall rate was 2.6 falls/1,000 patient days, which fell, but not significantly, to 2.5 falls/1,000 patient days during the pilot period (P = 0.799). Engaging an interdisciplinary team, including leadership and unit champions, to complete a Lean Six Sigma process improvement project and implement a patient-centered proactive hourly rounding program was associated with a significant reduction in the fall rate in Unit 1. Implementation of the same program in Unit 2 without engaging leadership or front-line staff in program design did not impact its fall rate. The active involvement of leadership and front-line staff in program design and as unit champions during the project run-in period was critical to significantly reducing inpatient fall rates and call bell use in an adult medical unit.

  13. Going nuts: Measuring free-fall acceleration by analyzing the sound of falling metal pieces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jochen; Vogt, Patrik; Theilmann, Florian

    2016-03-01

    Galilei presented the kinematics of a one-dimensional accelerated motion with ease and in terms of elegant geometry. Moreover, he believed, "Philosophy [i.e. physics] is written in this grand book—I mean the universe—which stands continually open to our gaze, but it cannot be understood unless one first learns to comprehend the language and interpret the characters in which it is written. It is written in the language of mathematics, and its characters are triangles, circles, and other geometrical figures, without which it is humanly impossible to understand a single word of it." In classroom practice, however, it can be difficult to reveal this mathematical heart of nature; free fall and other accelerated motions often get obscured by friction or other sources of errors. In this paper, we introduce a method of analyzing free-fall motion indirectly by evaluating the noise of freely falling metal pieces. The method connects a deeper understanding of the mathematical structure of accelerated motion with the possibility to derive a numerical value for the free-fall acceleration g.

  14. A system for improving fall detection performance using critical phase fall signal and a neural network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patimakorn Jantaraprim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a system for improving fall detection performance using a short time min-max feature based on the specificsignatures of critical phase fall signal and a neural network as a classifier. Two subject groups were tested: Group A involvingfalls and activities by young subjects; Group B testing falls by young and activities by elderly subjects. The performance wasevaluated by comparing the short time min-max with a maximum peak feature using a feed-forward backpropagation networkwith two-fold cross validation. The results, obtained from 672 sequences, show that the proposed method offers a betterperformance for both subject groups. Group B’s performance is higher than Group A’s. The best performances are 98.2%sensitivity and 99.3% specificity for Group A, and 99.4% sensitivity and 100% specificity for Group B. The proposed systemuses one sensor for a body’s position, without a fixed threshold for 100% sensitivity or specificity and without additionalprocessing of posture after a fall.

  15. Falling Into the Light: About Fall Prevention and Self-development


    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte

    2014-01-01

    It is normal to tell a story about falls focusing on the negative side. It is not normal to talk about the decline in old age as a positive thing that opens up the possibility for a more substantial quality of life and for the courage and zest for life. Nevertheless, it is what I want to write...

  16. Symmetric Rock Fall on Waste Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreten Mastilovic

    2001-08-09

    The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of the Naval SNF (spent nuclear fuel) Waste Package (WP) and the emplacement pallet (EP) subjected to the rock fall DBE (design basis event) dynamic loads. The scope of this calculation is limited to reporting the calculation results in terms of stress intensities and residual stresses in the WP, and stress intensities and maximum permanent downward displacements of the EP-lifting surface. The information provided by the sketches (Attachment I) is that of the potential design of the type of WP and EP considered in this calculation, and all obtained results are valid for those designs only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and is performed by the Waste Package Design Section in accordance with Reference 24. AP-3.124, ''Calculations'', is used to perform the calculation and develop the document.

  17. High Falls Hydroelectric Plant feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diezemann, Gustav A.

    1979-07-01

    This study was made in order to determine if re-activating the retired High Falls Hydro Station in New York would result in a more economical generation of some of the power required in the Central Hudson System than is being obtained with the oil-burning thermal plants. The findings show that the construction of a new plant is more economical than rehabilitation of the existing station. All new construction schemes are marginally unattractive at today's costs but are found to become profitable within a short period as alternative energy sources escalate in price. A new powerhouse with an installed capacity of 2390 kW proved most economical, and its construction is recommended.

  18. Box of ideal gas in free fall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothawala, Dawood, E-mail: dawood@physics.iitm.ac.in [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2013-03-26

    We study the quantum partition function of non-relativistic, ideal gas in a (non-cubical) box falling freely in arbitrary curved spacetime with center 4-velocity u{sup a}. When perturbed energy eigenvalues are properly taken into account, we find that corrections to various thermodynamic quantities include a very specific, sub-dominant term which is independent of kinematic details such as box dimensions and mass of particles. This term is characterized by the dimensionless quantity, Ξ=R{sub 0{sup ^}0{sup ^}}Λ{sup 2}, where R{sub 0{sup ^}0{sup ^}}=R{sub ab}u{sup a}u{sup b} and Λ=βℏc, and, quite intriguingly, produces Euler relation of homogeneity two between entropy and energy – a relation familiar from black hole thermodynamics.

  19. Legal education for scientists at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbrock, Kristan

    2012-10-01

    In today's increasingly polarized political climate, science is becoming more politicized, which in turn leads to scientists facing an increased involvement in legal discussion about their work, their correspondence, and their public statements. At times these attacks on scientists and their academic freedom are unwarranted and can leave many confused and wondering how to handle the situation. To help out, AGU and the Climate Science Legal Defense Fund (CSLDF) have partnered to prepare the scientific community for these challenges through a Legal Education Series, a series of webinars along with events at AGU's 2012 Fall Meeting. This series provides scientists with information to help guide and update them on legal issues and situations currently making their way through the courts.

  20. Comparison and Characterization of Android-Based Fall Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luque

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a foremost source of injuries and hospitalization for seniors. The adoption of automatic fall detection mechanisms can noticeably reduce the response time of the medical staff or caregivers when a fall takes place. Smartphones are being increasingly proposed as wearable, cost-effective and not-intrusive systems for fall detection. The exploitation of smartphones’ potential (and in particular, the Android Operating System can benefit from the wide implantation, the growing computational capabilities and the diversity of communication interfaces and embedded sensors of these personal devices. After revising the state-of-the-art on this matter, this study develops an experimental testbed to assess the performance of different fall detection algorithms that ground their decisions on the analysis of the inertial data registered by the accelerometer of the smartphone. Results obtained in a real testbed with diverse individuals indicate that the accuracy of the accelerometry-based techniques to identify the falls depends strongly on the fall pattern. The performed tests also show the difficulty to set detection acceleration thresholds that allow achieving a good trade-off between false negatives (falls that remain unnoticed and false positives (conventional movements that are erroneously classified as falls. In any case, the study of the evolution of the battery drain reveals that the extra power consumption introduced by the Android monitoring applications cannot be neglected when evaluating the autonomy and even the viability of fall detection systems.

  1. Comparison and characterization of Android-based fall detection systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Rafael; Casilari, Eduardo; Morón, María-José; Redondo, Gema

    2014-10-08

    Falls are a foremost source of injuries and hospitalization for seniors. The adoption of automatic fall detection mechanisms can noticeably reduce the response time of the medical staff or caregivers when a fall takes place. Smartphones are being increasingly proposed as wearable, cost-effective and not-intrusive systems for fall detection. The exploitation of smartphones' potential (and in particular, the Android Operating System) can benefit from the wide implantation, the growing computational capabilities and the diversity of communication interfaces and embedded sensors of these personal devices. After revising the state-of-the-art on this matter, this study develops an experimental testbed to assess the performance of different fall detection algorithms that ground their decisions on the analysis of the inertial data registered by the accelerometer of the smartphone. Results obtained in a real testbed with diverse individuals indicate that the accuracy of the accelerometry-based techniques to identify the falls depends strongly on the fall pattern. The performed tests also show the difficulty to set detection acceleration thresholds that allow achieving a good trade-off between false negatives (falls that remain unnoticed) and false positives (conventional movements that are erroneously classified as falls). In any case, the study of the evolution of the battery drain reveals that the extra power consumption introduced by the Android monitoring applications cannot be neglected when evaluating the autonomy and even the viability of fall detection systems.

  2. Circumstances and consequences of falls among people with chronic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene A. Schmid, PhD, OTR

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are common after stroke; however, circumstances and consequences are relatively unknown. Our objectives were to identify the differences between fallers and ??non-fallers among people with chronic stroke, identify the circumstances of fall events, and examine the consequences of the falls. This is a secondary data analysis; all participants included sustained a stroke. Variables included demographics, stroke characteristics, and comorbidities. Falls were collected via self-report, and circumstances and consequences were derived from participant description of the event and categorized as appropriate. Among 160 participants, 53 (33% reported a fall during the 1 yr period. Circumstances of falls were categorized as intrinsic or extrinsic. Location and circumstance of the fall were included: 70% occurred at home and 40% were associated with impaired physical or mental state (e.g., inattention to tying shoes. Additionally, 21% of falls were associated with activities of daily living and mobility and 34% with slips or trips. The majority who fell sustained an injury (72%. Injuries ranged from bruising to fractures, and 55% of those with an injury sought medical care (32% to emergency department. Poststroke falls are associated with an alarming rate of injury and healthcare utilization. Targeting mental and physical states may be key to fall prevention.

  3. Falls in the audiology clinic: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criter, Robin E; Honaker, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a common and often preventable cause of injury and death among older adults. Hearing loss, vestibular disorders, dizziness, and imbalance are common risk factors for falls; however, the rate of falls among older audiology patients has never been assessed. To examine the fall history and risk factors of older adults seen in a university audiology clinic. A descriptive and correlational retrospective chart review of fall history and characteristics of patients seen in a university audiology clinic. 88 (51 women, 37 men) patients aged 60 yr and older seen in a university audiology clinic. At the time of hearing evaluation, clinic patients filled out the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale, as well as a history form containing fall-related questions. These measures, as well as demographic information (gender and age) were retrieved during a retrospective chart review. Data were analyzed with independent-samples t-tests, Pearson correlations, and descriptive statistics. Fifty percent of the study sample reported falling within the preceding 12 mo, while 70% reported having fallen at some point in the past. ABC Scale score was negatively correlated with age and number of recent falls. There appears to be a higher prevalence of falls within a university audiology clinic relative to previously published fall rates in the general population. American Academy of Audiology.

  4. Inspection of four-sensor falls detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Wójtowicz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The studies presented in this article are the continuation of previous work to develop a mobile fall detector. The algorithm is based on a discrete wavelet transform of the signals from the sensors available at the detector and a linear support vector machine as a classifier. Fisher score method is used for feature selection in the proposed algorithm. As a result of reducing the number of features, the number of support vectors has been also reduced — it has a direct impact on the upper estimate of the classification error. On the basis of the obtained results, the classifier parameters have been calculated. This allows presenting the developed concept in the field of ROCROCROC curves (Receiver Operating Characteristics and their comparison with the results obtained for individual sensors. The developed concept gives much better results than each of the sensors acting independently. The findings of this study have given very good results in comparison with the previous findings, with a significant reduction in the number of required features. Due to the close relationship between the number of training data and the number of support vectors which directly affect the upper estimate of the classification error, the number of features has been reduced. Finally, satisfactory results have been obtained with the reduction of the number of features from 38 to just six, ensuring that the upper estimation of the classification error in the set of the new test data does not exceed 5.3%.[b]Keywords[/b]: falls detection, data fusion, discrete wavelet transform, support vector machine

  5. Risk of falls in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Nigar; Sarkaya, Selda; Ozdolap, Senay; Dursun, Erbil; Zateri, Coskun; Altan, Lale; Birtane, Murat; Akgun, Kenan; Revzani, Aylin; Aktas, İlknur; Tastekin, Nurettin; Celiker, Reyhan

    2015-03-01

    Risk of vertebral fractures is increased in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The underlying mechanisms for the elevated fracture risk might be associated with bone and fall-related risks. The aims of this study were to evaluate the risk of falls and to determine the factors that increase the risk of falls in AS patients. Eighty-nine women, 217 men, a total of 306 AS patients with a mean age of 40.1 ± 11.5 years from 9 different centers in Turkey were included in the study. Patients were questioned regarding history of falls within the last 1 year. Their demographics, disease characteristics including Bath AS Disease Activity Index, Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI), Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI), and risk factors for falls were recorded. The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) test was used for evaluation of static and dynamic balance. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured. Forty of 306 patients reported at least 1 fall in the recent 1 year. The patients with history of falls had higher mean age and longer disease duration than did nonfallers (P = 0.001). In addition, these patients' BASMI and BASFI values were higher than those of nonfallers (P = 0.002; P = 0.000, respectively). We found that the patients with history of falls had lower SPPB scores (P = 0.000). We also found that the number of falls increased with longer disease duration and older age (R = 0.117 [P = 0.041] and R = 0.160 [P = 0.005]). Our results show that decreased SPPB scores were associated with increased number of falls (R = 0.183, P = 0.006). Statistically significant correlations were found between number of falls and AS-related lost job (R = 0.140, P = 0.014), fear of falling (R = 0.316, P = 0.000), hip involvement (R = 0.112, P = 0.05), BASMI (R =0.234, P = 0.000), and BASFI (R = 0.244, P = 0.000). Assessment of pain, stiffness, fatigue, and lower-extremity involvement as well as asking for a history of falls will

  6. Falls in nursing home residents receiving pharmacotherapy for anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Gregory Reardon,1 Naushira Pandya,2 Robert A Bailey31Informagenics, LLC and The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Department of Geriatrics, Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA; 3Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Horsham, PA, USAPurpose: Falls are common among nursing home residents and have potentially severe consequences, including fracture and other trauma. Recent evidence suggests anemia may be independently related to these falls. This study explores the relationship between the use of anemia-related pharmacotherapies and falls among nursing home residents.Methods: Forty nursing homes in the United States provided data for analysis. All incidents of falls over the 6-month post-index follow-up period were used to identify the outcomes of falls (≥1 fall and recurrent falls (>1 fall. Logistic regression was used to analyze the relationship between falls and recurrent falls with each of the anemia pharmacotherapies after adjusting for potential confounders.Results: A total of 632 residents were eligible for analysis. More than half (57% of residents were identified as anemic (hemoglobin < 12 g/dL females, or <13 g/dL males. Of anemic residents, 50% had been treated with one or more therapies (14% used vitamin B12, 10% folic acid, 38% iron, 0.3% darbepoetin alfa [DARB], and 1.3% epoetin alfa [EPO]. Rates of falls/recurrent falls were 33%/18% for those receiving vitamin B12, 40%/16% for folic acid, 27%/14% for iron, 38%/8% for DARB, 18%/2% for EPO, and 22%/11% for those receiving no therapy. In the adjusted models, use of EPO or DARB was associated with significantly lower odds of recurrent falls (odds ratio = 0.06; P = 0.001. Other significant covariates included psychoactive medication use, age 75–84 years, age 85+ years, worsened balance score, and chronic kidney disease (P < 0.05 for all.Conclusion: Only half of the anemic residents were found to be using anemia

  7. Early experience of a fall and fracture prevention clinic at Mayo General Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanley, A

    2010-06-01

    Falls in the elderly are a significant public health problem. Previous studies have shown that most falls are multifactorial and an efficacious way of reducing the risk of falling is provided by a falls clinic.

  8. A Growing Troubling Triad: Diabetes, Aging, and Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan T. Crews

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a significant and troubling link between diabetes (DM and falls in the elderly. Individuals with DM are prone to fall for reasons such as decreased sensorimotor function, musculoskeletal/neuromuscular deficits, foot and body pain, pharmacological complications, and specialty (offloading footwear devices. Additionally, there is some concern that DM patients are prone to have more severe problems with falls than non-DM individuals. Fractures, poorer rehabilitation, and increased number of falls are all concerns. Fortunately, efforts to mitigate falls by DM patients show promise. A number of studies have shown that balance, strength, and gait training may be utilized to successfully reduce fall risk in this population. Furthermore, new technologies such as virtual reality proprioceptive training may be able to provide this reduced risk within a safe training environment.

  9. Emerging concept: 'central benefit model' of exercise in falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Hsu, Chun Liang; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a common geriatric syndrome and are the third leading cause of chonic disability worldwide. Falls are not random events and occur, at least in part, due to impaired physiological function, such as impaired balance, and cognitive impairment. The clinical syndrome of falls is important for Sports and Exercise Medicine Clinicians as there is Level 1 evidence that targeted exercise prescription is an effective intervention strategy. The widely accepted dogma is that improved physical function, balance and muscle strength, underlies the effectiveness of the exercise in reducing falls. However, findings from randomised controlled trials suggest that exercise reduce falls via mechanisms other than improved physiological function. The authors propose that improved cognitive function - specifically, executive functions - and associated functional plasticity may be an important yet underappreciated mechanism by which the exercise reduces falls in older adults.

  10. A novel wearable smart button system for fall detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wei; Sun, Xiang; Zhi, Yueyan; Han, Yue; Mao, Hande

    2017-05-01

    Fall has been the second most cause of accidental injury to death in the world. It has been a serious threat to the physical and mental health of the elders. Therefore, developing wearable node system with fall detecting ability has become increasingly pressing at present. A novel smart button for long-term fall detection is proposed in this paper, which is able to accurately monitor the falling behavior, and sending warning message online as well. The smart button is based on the tri-axis acceleration sensor which is used to collect the body motion signals. By using the statistical metrics of acceleration characteristics, a new SVM classification algorithm with high positive accuracy and stability is proposed so as to classify the falls and activities of daily living, and the results can be real-time displayed on Android based mobile phone. The experiments show that our wearable node system can continuously monitor the falling behavior with positive rate 94.8%.

  11. Identifying fall-protection training needs for residential roofing subcontractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Hsiu; Winchester, Woodrow W; Smith-Jackson, Tonya L; Kleiner, Brian M; Babski-Reeves, Kari L; Mills, Thomas H

    2013-05-01

    Falls remain the leading cause of injuries and fatalities in the small residential roofing industry and analogous investigations are underrepresented in the literature. To address this issue, fall-protection training needs were explored through 29 semi-structured interviews among residential roofing subcontractors with respect to recommendations for the design of fall-protection training. Content analysis using grounded theory was conducted to analyze participants' responses. Results of the analysis revealed six themes related to the design of current fall-protection training: (1) barriers to safety training; (2) problems of formal safety-training programs; (3) recommendations for training implementation; (4) important areas for fall-protection training; (5) training delivery means; and (6) design features of training materials. Results of the study suggest the need for informal jobsite safety training to complement what had been covered in formalized safety training. This work also provides recommendations for the design of a more likely adopted fall-protection training program.

  12. INCREASING OF FALL RYE CORN FEEDING VALUE BY HYDROBARATHERNAL TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The results of production experience on hydrobarathernal treatment fall rye grain feeding are presented in the article. It is determined that ater high temperature and pressure impact on fall rye grain in aqueous media dextrinization of starch specifically amylopectin occurs to monosugar in the form of glucose, therewith, sugar content increases more than in twice in comparison with parent grain. It is revealed that replacement of milled corn grain mixture to fall rye grain hydrolyzate in rat...

  13. Free fall of a cat—freshman physics exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnička, Filip; Šlégr, Jan; Štegner, David

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes theoretical calculation of the terminal velocity of falling cat, taking the air drag into account. The results show that a fall from the seventh floor is critical for the cat so we introduce a new quantity called the ‘coefficient of the cat’s fear’ during free fall. A subsequent experiment with a model of a cat carrying the accelerometer confirmed this conclusion. This calculation and experiment can act as a strong motivational factor during introductory physics courses.

  14. Perception of nurses about falls of hospitalized patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi Rocha, Fernanda Ludmilla; Palucci Marziale, Maria Helena

    2008-01-01

    Patients falls represent a preoccupation to health professionals and administrators, since they compose one of the greatest categories of hospitalized patients incidents. This research had as objectives: explain the factors related to the falls of patients described by the literature and identify the causes of falls occurrences attributed by the nurses. The research was conducted at a University Hospital in the inner state of São Paulo, on the Medical, Surgical, Ear-nose-eye and Orthopaedic C...

  15. Neighborhood Environment and Falls among Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklett, Emily Joy; Lohman, Matthew C; Smith, Matthew Lee

    2017-02-10

    Background: Falls present a major challenge to active aging, but the relationship between neighborhood factors and falls is poorly understood. This study examined the relationship between fall events and neighborhood factors, including neighborhood social cohesion (sense of belonging, trust, friendliness, and helpfulness) and physical environment (vandalism/graffiti, rubbish, vacant/deserted houses, and perceived safety walking home at night). Methods: Data were analyzed from 9259 participants over four biennial waves (2006-2012) of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative sample of adults aged 65 and older in the United States. Results: In models adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates, a one-unit increase in neighborhood social cohesion was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (odds ratio (OR): 0.96, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93-0.99) and 6% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.94, 95% CI: 0.90-0.98). A one-unit increase in the physical environment scale was associated with 4% lower odds of experiencing a single fall (OR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93-0.99) and with 5% lower odds of experiencing multiple falls (OR: 0.95, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00) in adjusted models. Conclusions: The physical and social neighborhood environment may affect fall risk among community-dwelling older adults. Findings support the ongoing need for evidence-based fall prevention programming in community and clinical settings.

  16. Falling while walking: A hidden contributor to pedestrian injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Jennifer; O'Hern, Steve; Burtt, Duane; Rossiter, Ben

    2017-02-07

    Walking is a sustainable mode of transportation which is beneficial to both individuals and to the broader community, however, there are risks and it is essential that road design and operation provides safe conditions for walking. In Victoria, pedestrians represent one of the most vulnerable road user groups, accounting for approximately 12% of all road fatalities and serious injuries. These figures largely represent injuries where the pedestrian has been struck by a vehicle with the extent of pedestrian-only injuries largely un-reported. Falling while walking may be a significant contributor to pedestrian only injuries. Indeed, the World Health Organisation has identified falls generally as the second leading cause of unintentional injury death in older populations. Despite the prevalence of fall-related injuries, there has been relatively little research undertaken to address the issues surrounding falls that occur while walking for transport and in public spaces. This study, therefore, aimed to address this gap in our knowledge. Analyses of various data sources were undertaken to enhance our understanding of fall-related injuries while walking in Victoria. Two sources of data were accessed: Only 85 fall-related incidents were reported in the crash-based data, however, pedestrian falls while walking in the road environment accounted for an average of 1680 hospital admissions and 3545 emergency department presentations each year, and this number is rising. The findings in this study show clearly that Police data is of little use when attempting to understand issues of safe travel for pedestrians other than vehicle-pedestrian incidents. However, analysis of hospital data provides a more realistic indication of the extent of pedestrian fall-related injuries and highlights the significant number of pedestrian fall-related injuries that occur each year. Moreover, the findings identified that older pedestrians are significantly over-represented amongst fall

  17. Development of a Wearable-Sensor-Based Fall Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falin Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fall detection is a major challenge in the public healthcare domain, especially for the elderly as the decline of their physical fitness, and timely and reliable surveillance is necessary to mitigate the negative effects of falls. This paper develops a novel fall detection system based on a wearable device. The system monitors the movements of human body, recognizes a fall from normal daily activities by an effective quaternion algorithm, and automatically sends request for help to the caregivers with the patient’s location.

  18. Development of a Wearable-Sensor-Based Fall Detection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hengyang; Zhao, Yan; Zhong, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Fall detection is a major challenge in the public healthcare domain, especially for the elderly as the decline of their physical fitness, and timely and reliable surveillance is necessary to mitigate the negative effects of falls. This paper develops a novel fall detection system based on a wearable device. The system monitors the movements of human body, recognizes a fall from normal daily activities by an effective quaternion algorithm, and automatically sends request for help to the caregivers with the patient's location. PMID:25784933

  19. The patient who falls: "It's always a trade-off".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Mary E; Kumar, Chandrika

    2010-01-20

    Falls are common health events that cause discomfort and disability for older adults and stress for caregivers. Using the case of an older man who has experienced multiple falls and a hip fracture, this article, which focuses on community-living older adults, addresses the consequences and etiology of falls; summarizes the evidence on predisposing factors and effective interventions; and discusses how to translate this evidence into patient care. Previous falls; strength, gait, and balance impairments; and medications are the strongest risk factors for falling. Effective single interventions include exercise and physical therapy, cataract surgery, and medication reduction. Evidence suggests that the most effective strategy for reducing the rate of falling in community-living older adults may be intervening on multiple risk factors. Vitamin D has the strongest clinical trial evidence of benefit for preventing fractures among older men at risk. Issues involved in incorporating these evidence-based fall prevention interventions into outpatient practice are discussed, as are the trade-offs inherent in managing older patients at risk of falling. While challenges and barriers exist, fall prevention strategies can be incorporated into clinical practice.

  20. Falls prevention at Mayo Clinic Rochester: a path to quality care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulla, Stephanie J; McMyler, Eileen

    2007-01-01

    Falls prevention is a complex problem. Following in the footsteps of an earlier fall prevention team, the Safe Landings Fall Prevention Team used many strategies for implementing a fall prevention/reduction program. The tactics we used to prevent falls combined with the adoption of a fall assessment risk model are shared.

  1. Falling into the Light-using music and poetry as complementary modes of understanding falls in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Clausen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    that a broader understanding of falls in old age in the health care system might help health professionals to understand the complexity of falls and by this inspire older persons to prevent falls in different ways. Using poetry and music in our performance we seek to open up for a broader understanding of falls......: irresponsible behavior, disease, destiny, desire to remain independent in old age, appearing elegant/aesthetical and being physical active. One of the interviews was selected and transformed it into a poem (2-3). The poem was then translated into music by the second author. First we present the six...... understandings of falls in old age then we read the poem and finally a musical interpretation of the poem is performed by song and cello. The music is written for soprano and cello and created with direct inspiration from the poem. The fall is reproduced in a series of descending tones coming back as a "chorus...

  2. An analysis of the relationship between bodily injury severity and fall height in victims of fatal falls from height

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Teresiński

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : One of the basic issues discussed in forensic literature regarding falls from a height is determination of fall heights and differentiation between suicidal and accidental falls. The aim of the study was to verify the usefulness of the available methods for the purposes of forensic expertises. Material and methods : The study encompassed fatalities of falls from a height whose autopsies were performed in the Department of Forensic Medicine in Lublin. Results : Similarly to other authors, the severity of injuries was assessed using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS and injury severity score (ISS. The study findings demonstrated a statistically significant correlation between the fall height and the severity of injuries according to ISS and a statistically significant difference in fall heights between the groups of accidents and suicides.

  3. Evaluation of an inpatient fall risk screening tool to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kang, Chun-Mei; Ho, Mu-Hsing; Kuo, Jessie Ming-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the inpatient fall risk screening tool and to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients. Variations exist in several screening tools applied in acute care hospitals for examining risk factors for falls and identifying high-risk inpatients. Secondary data analysis. A subset of inpatient data for the period from June 2011-June 2014 was extracted from the nursing information system and adverse event reporting system of an 818-bed teaching medical centre in Taipei. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 205 fallers and 37,232 nonfallers were identified. The results revealed that the inpatient fall risk screening tool (cut-off point of ≥3) had a low sensitivity level (60%), satisfactory specificity (87%), a positive predictive value of 2·0% and a negative predictive value of 99%. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0·805 (sensitivity, 71·8%; specificity, 78%). To increase the sensitivity values, the Youden index suggests at least 1·5 points to be the most suitable cut-off point for the inpatient fall risk screening tool. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a considerably increased fall risk in patients with impaired balance and impaired elimination. The fall risk factor was also significantly associated with days of hospital stay and with admission to surgical wards. The findings can raise awareness about the two most critical risk factors for falls among future clinical nurses and other healthcare professionals and thus facilitate the development of fall prevention interventions. This study highlights the needs for redefining the cut-off points of the inpatient fall risk screening tool to effectively identify inpatients at a high risk of falls. Furthermore, inpatients with impaired balance and impaired elimination should be closely

  4. Fall 2012 Graduate Engineering Internship Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    In the fall of 2012, I participated in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Pathways Intern Employment Program at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. This was my second internship opportunity with NASA, a consecutive extension from a summer 2012 internship. During my four-month tenure, I gained valuable knowledge and extensive hands-on experience with payload design and testing as well as composite fabrication for repair design on future space vehicle structures. As a systems engineer, I supported the systems engineering and integration team with the testing of scientific payloads such as the Vegetable Production System (Veggie). Verification and validation (V&V) of the Veggie was carried out prior to qualification testing of the payload, which incorporated a lengthy process of confirming design requirements that were integrated through one or more validatjon methods: inspection, analysis, demonstration, and testing. Additionally, I provided assistance in verifying design requirements outlined in the V&V plan with the requirements outlined by the scientists in the Science Requirements Envelope Document (SRED). The purpose of the SRED was to define experiment requirements intended for the payload to meet and carry out.

  5. Box of Ideal Gas in Free Fall

    CERN Document Server

    Kothawala, Dawood

    2011-01-01

    We study the quantum partition function of non-relativistic, ideal gas in a (non-cubical) box falling freely in arbitrary curved spacetime with centre 4-velocity u^a. Using perturbed energy eigenvalues to evaluate the canonical partition function, we find that corrections to various thermodynamic quantities such as mean energy, entropy and specific heat include a very specific, sub-dominant term characterized by the dimensionless quantity, X = R_00 q^2, where R_00 = R_ab u^a u^b and q = \\beta \\hbar c. This X-contribution does not depend on kinematic details of the system such as box dimensions and mass of particles, and in particular leads to S_X = (1/2) \\beta U_X (see text), a relation familiar from black hole thermodynamics. What is curious is that our result depends crucially on quantum mechanics since, in effect, the gas is allowed to "feel" the presence of the box through use of unperturbed wave function satisfying appropriate boundary conditions at the box walls. This is the feature which a classical an...

  6. The Fall 2004 SDSS Supernova Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Sako, M; Frieman, J A; Adelman-McCarthy, J; Becker, A; De Jongh, F; Dilday, B; Estrada, J; Hendry, J; Holtzman, J; Kaplan, J; Kessler, R; Lampeitl, H; Marriner, J P; Miknaitis, G; Riess, A; Tucker, D; Barentine, J; Blandford, R D; Brewington, H; Dembicky, J; Harvanek, M; Hawley, S; Hogan, C; Johnston, D; Kahn, S; Ketzeback, B; Kleinman, S; Krzesínski, J; Lamenti, D; Long, D; McMillan, R; Newman, P; Nitta, A; Nichol, R; Scranton, R; Sheldon, E S; Snedden, S A; Stoughton, C; York, D; Sako, Masao; Romani, Roger; Frieman, Josh; Carthy, Jen Adelman-Mc; Becker, Andrew; Jongh, Fritz De; Dilday, Ben; Estrada, Juan; Hendry, John; Holtzman, Jon; Kaplan, Jared; Kessler, Rick; Lampeitl, Hubert; Marriner, John; Miknaitis, Gajus; Riess, Adam; Tucker, Douglas

    2005-01-01

    In preparation for the Supernova Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) II, a proposed 3-year extension to the SDSS, we have conducted an early engineering and science run during the fall of 2004, which consisted of approximately 20 scheduled nights of repeated imaging of half of the southern equatorial stripe. Transient supernova-like events were detected in near real-time and photometric measurements were made in the five SDSS filter bandpasses with a cadence of ~2 days. Candidate type Ia supernovae (SNe) were pre-selected based on their colors, light curve shape, and the properties of the host galaxy. Follow-up spectroscopic observations were performed with the Astrophysical Research Consortium 3.5m telescope and the 9.2m Hobby-Eberly Telescope to confirm their types and measure the redshifts. The 2004 campaign resulted in 22 spectroscopically confirmed SNe, which includes 16 type Ia, 5 type II, and 1 type Ib/c. These SN Ia will help fill in the sparsely sampled redshift interval of z = 0.05 - 0.35,...

  7. [Falls and osteoporotic fractures prevention units: proposed Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures Group of the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duaso, Enric; Casas, Alvaro; Formiga, Francesc; Lázaro Del Nogal, Montserrat; Salvà, Antoni; Marcellán, Teresa; Navarro, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Since forming the Osteoporosis, Falls and Fractures Group of the Spanish Society (GOCF) of Geriatrics and Gerontology (SEGG) a review was performed of the epidemiology of falls, along with a description of measures that have shown a degree of effectiveness in prevention. We also present the proposal of a common basic model of action in fall prevention units, mainly addressed to the community. Finally, a consensus model falls register is presented, common to community level and institutional areas, with the objective of being useful and easy to fill in at any care level. Copyright © 2011 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Why do patients with Parkinson’s disease fall? A cross-sectional analysis of possible causes of falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrag, Anette; Choudhury, Mahbuba; Kaski, Diego; Gallagher, David A

    2017-01-01

    Background Falls in Parkinson’s disease (PD) are associated with significant injury, disability, hospitalization, and reduced quality of life. Aims To identify modifiable medical causes of falls in a cohort of PD patients. Methods Eighty seven PD patients were interviewed and examined using validated scales assessing motor and nonmotor aspects of PD, comorbidities and medication use. The frequency of falls in the last month was the primary outcome measure. Falls were hypothesized to be associated with increasing age, advanced motor severity, particularly axial features (e.g., freezing and postural instability), and dyskinesia. Nonmotor features hypothesized to be associated with falls included; cognitive impairment, psychosis, sleep disorders, cardiovascular dysfunction, and ophthalmological and medical comorbidities. Results Fallers had longer disease duration, higher Levodopa-equivalent doses, greater ‘On’ time with dyskinesia (all P falls did not differ from non-fallers in age or overall motor UPDRS scores. Severity of psychosis, executive cognitive impairment, autonomic (particularly cardiovascular) dysfunction and sleep disturbances (particularly REM sleep behavioral disorder) were significantly associated with falls (all P falls. Conclusions The causes of falls in PD are multifactorial and extend beyond motor impairment and dyskinesia; addressing these in patients already treated with dopaminergic medications has the potential to improve this important complication of PD.

  9. Validity and sensitivity to change of the falls efficacy scales international to assess fear of falling in older adults with and without cognitive impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauer, Klaus A; Kempen, Gertrudis I J M; Schwenk, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Measures of fear of falling have not yet been validated in patients with dementia, leaving a methodological gap that limits research in a population at high risk of falling and fall-related consequences.......Measures of fear of falling have not yet been validated in patients with dementia, leaving a methodological gap that limits research in a population at high risk of falling and fall-related consequences....

  10. CHI SYMBOLISM IN ACHEBE'S THINGS FALL APART: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    the chi symbolism as exhibited in his famous work Things Fall. Apart. Things Fall Apart by ... of Igbo life and times which are close to the reality of our era. Philosophy .... being is itself a definite characteristic of Dasein's being. To understand, in ...

  11. Rises and Falls in Dutch and Mandarin Chinese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Ao; Chen, Aoju; Kager, René; Wong, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Despite of the different functions of pitch in tone and nontone languages, rises and falls are common pitch patterns across different languages. In the current study, we ask what is the language specific phonetic realization of rises and falls. Chinese and Dutch speakers participated in a production

  12. Falls in Older People and the Effects of Tai Chi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.J. Logghe (Inge)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractNowadays, falling is no longer regarded as a common, inevitable adverse consequence of aging but classified as one of the geriatric syndromes. The concept of a geriatric syndrome is not clearly defined yet, but all geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, incontinence, frailty) have the same cli

  13. P270: Factors associated with fall rate in psychogeriatric residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kosse, N.M.; de Groot, Maartje H; Hortobágyi, T.; Lamoth, C.J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Falls in psychogeriatric residents represent a costly but unresolved safety issue. Identifying fall risk factors and their inter-relationship may help to individualize prevention programs and increase the effectiveness. Therefore, we aimed to examine the relationship between patient ch

  14. The development of a fear of falling interdisciplinary intervention program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gomez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fernando Gomez, Carmen-Lucia CurcioResearch Group on Gerontology and Geriatrics, Health Sciences Faculty, University of Caldas, Manizales, ColombiaObjective: To describe the development process of a protocol for a fear of falling interdisciplinary intervention program based on the main factors associated with fear of falling.Design/methods: The process of developing a protocol consisted of defining the target population, selecting the initial assessment components, adapting the intervention program based on findings about fear of falling and restriction of activities in this population.Settings: University-affiliated outpatient vertigo, dizziness and falls clinic in coffee-growers zone of Colombian Andes Mountains.Results: An intervention program was developed based on three main falling conceptual models. A medical intervention, based on a biomedical and pathophysiological model, a physiotherapeutic intervention based on a postural control model and a psychological intervention based on a biological-behavioral model.Conclusion: This interdisciplinary fear of falling intervention program developed is based on particular characteristics of target population, with differences in the inclusion criteria and the program intervention components; with emphasis on medical (recurrent falls and dizziness evaluation and management, psychological (cognitive-behavioral therapy and physiotherapeutic (balance and transfers training components.Keywords: fear of falling, elderly programs, Colombian, intervention

  15. Preventing Falls | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... They are largely preventable, with the right preparations. fast facts 1 Each year, one in every three U.S. adults 65 and older falls, but less than half tell their healthcare providers about it. 2 Falls can cause hip, leg, and arm fractures, and head trauma. This makes it hard to get around or ...

  16. Comparison of Simple Versus Performance-Based Fall Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar K. Gadkaree BS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the predictive ability of standard falls prediction models based on physical performance assessments with more parsimonious prediction models based on self-reported data. Design: We developed a series of fall prediction models progressing in complexity and compared area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC across models. Setting: National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS, which surveyed a nationally representative sample of Medicare enrollees (age ≥65 at baseline (Round 1: 2011-2012 and 1-year follow-up (Round 2: 2012-2013. Participants: In all, 6,056 community-dwelling individuals participated in Rounds 1 and 2 of NHATS. Measurements: Primary outcomes were 1-year incidence of “ any fall ” and “ recurrent falls .” Prediction models were compared and validated in development and validation sets, respectively. Results: A prediction model that included demographic information, self-reported problems with balance and coordination, and previous fall history was the most parsimonious model that optimized AUC for both any fall (AUC = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.67, 0.71] and recurrent falls (AUC = 0.77, 95% CI = [0.74, 0.79] in the development set. Physical performance testing provided a marginal additional predictive value. Conclusion: A simple clinical prediction model that does not include physical performance testing could facilitate routine, widespread falls risk screening in the ambulatory care setting.

  17. Optimising a fall out dust monitoring sampling programme at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREG

    The aim of this study at the specific cement manufacturing plant and open cast mine was ... Key words: Fall out dust monitoring, cement plant, optimising, air pollution sampling, ..... meters as this is in line with the height of a typical fall out dust.

  18. Risk of Fall for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Yoshida, Futoshi; Keino, Hiromi; Hasegawa, Mariko; Ikari, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Shikako; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to identify risk factors for falling and establish a method to assess risk for falls in adults with intellectual disabilities. In a cross-sectional survey of 144 Japanese adults, we found that age, presence of epilepsy, and presence of paretic conditions were independent risk factors. The Tinetti balance and gait instrument was…

  19. Parasitoids attacking fall armyworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in sweet corn habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall armyworm larvae, Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith), were collected from sweet corn plants (Zea mays L.) in fields located in three south Florida counties. Fields were sampled from 2010 – 2015 during the fall and spring seasons. Larvae were brought back to the laboratory to complete developme...

  20. Developing an audit checklist to assess outdoor falls risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curl, Angela; Thompson, Catharine Ward; Aspinall, Peter; Ormerod, Marcus

    2016-06-01

    Falls by older people (aged 65+) are linked to disability and a decrease in mobility, presenting a challenge to active ageing. As such, older fallers represent a vulnerable road user group. Despite this there is little research into the causes and prevention of outdoor falls. This paper develops an understanding of environmental factors causing falls or fear of falling using a walk-along interview approach with recent fallers to explore how older people navigate the outdoor environment and which aspects of it they perceived facilitate or hinder their ability to go outdoors and fear of falling. While there are a number of audit checklists focused on assessing the indoor environment for risk or fear of falls, nothing exists for the outdoor environment. Many existing street audit tools are focused on general environmental qualities and have not been designed with an older population in mind. We present a checklist that assesses aspects of the environment most likely to encourage or hinder those who are at risk of falling outdoors, developed through accounting for the experiences and navigational strategies of elderly individuals. The audit checklist can assist occupational therapists and urban planners, designers and managers in working to reduce the occurrence of outdoor falls among this vulnerable user group.

  1. Preventing Death and Serious Injury from Falling Trees and Branches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookes, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Of 128 outdoor education related deaths examined since 1960, 14 have been due to falling trees or branches. This article examines the grounds on which death or serious injury due to falling trees or branches can be regarded as an inherent risk in outdoor education, and the extent to which such incidents can be regarded as preventable. It compares…

  2. Fall detection with body-worn sensors : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwickert, L.; Becker, C.; Lindemann, U.; Marechal, C.; Bourke, A.; Chiari, L.; Helbostad, J. L.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Aminian, K.; Todd, C.; Bandinelli, S.; Klenk, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Falls among older people remain a major public health challenge. Body-worn sensors are needed to improve the understanding of the underlying mechanisms and kinematics of falls. The aim of this systematic review is to assemble, extract and critically discuss the information avail

  3. Causes of falls of roof in South African collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Merwe, JN

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available on ta l s tre ss W ea th er ing Ba d m ini ng Dy ke s Bu rn t c oa l Contribution (% ) All Skin Large Major Figure 25. Causes of roof falls seen against the background of thickness of roof falls. 24 10 Influence of roof rock...

  4. Analysis of patient falls among hospitalised patients in Makkah region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flimban, Mohammed Abdulwahab; Abduljabar, Dalal Fouad; Dhafar, Khalid Obaid; Deiab, Basma Abdulhameed; Gazzaz, Zohair Jamil; Bansuan, Abasra Usman; Balbed, Abeer Ahmad; Al-Shaikhi, Ahmad Mohammed; Al-Motari, Sultan Saad; Suliman, Muhammad Imran

    2016-08-01

    To assess the frequency and its correlation of patient fall with preventing or precipitating factors among inpatients. The observational study was conducted in Makkah Region, Saudi Arabia from October 15 2012 to November 4, 2013. Data was collected using a questionnaire from 16 hospitals in four districts of Makkah province. The material was sampled through systematic randomisation from inpatient files and data was collected for those who had fallen inside the hospital. The questionnaire, validated through a pilot study run under the Directorate of Quality and Patient Safety in Makkah, was used to see whether the hospitals had adopted and applied international standards for assessment of adult and paediatric patients for falls as well as effectiveness of these applications. Of 4,799 beds, occupancy rates ranged from 1680(35%) to 4,799(100%). Out of 291 falls in all, 144(49.48%) were in Jeddah. Besides, 116(40%) of the falls occurred in the last quarter of the Islamic calendar. Statistically significant difference was found in fall episodes in different months (p=0.007). Statistical analysis indicated that the factors that significantly raised the number of patient falls were increase in hospital beds and their occupancy rate (Spearman's correlation: 0.621 and 0.579 respectively). The frequency of falls varied from hospital to hospital and factors like higher number of bed capacity and occupancy rate increased the falls.

  5. Polypharmacy and falls in the middle age and elderly population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ziere; J.P. Dieleman (Jeanne); A. Hofman (Albert); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractAim: Falls in the elderly are common and often serious. We studied the association between multiple drug use (polypharmacy) and falls in the elderly. Methods: This was a population-based cross-sectional study, part of the Rotterdam Study. The participants were 6928 individuals aged ≥55

  6. Risk of Fall for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Yoichi; Shimada, Atsuyoshi; Yoshida, Futoshi; Keino, Hiromi; Hasegawa, Mariko; Ikari, Hiroyuki; Miyake, Shikako; Hosokawa, Masanori

    2009-01-01

    Our aim was to identify risk factors for falling and establish a method to assess risk for falls in adults with intellectual disabilities. In a cross-sectional survey of 144 Japanese adults, we found that age, presence of epilepsy, and presence of paretic conditions were independent risk factors. The Tinetti balance and gait instrument was…

  7. 29 CFR 1926.501 - Duty to have fall protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be protected from tripping in or stepping into or through holes (including skylights) by covers. (iii... (including skylights) by covers. (5) Formwork and reinforcing steel. Each employee on the face of formwork or reinforcing steel shall be protected from falling 6 feet (1.8 m) or more to lower levels by personal fall...

  8. Mild cognitive impairment is associated with falls among older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyrovolas, Stefanos; Koyanagi, Ai; Lara, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The role of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) on falls among older adults remains under-investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between MCI and number of falls or occurrence of non-accidental falls among older adults. METHODS: Data from the first wave......; and no limitations in activities of daily living (ADL). Multivariable Poisson and logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between MCI and number of falls or the presence of non-accidental falls in the past 12 months. RESULTS: The prevalence of MCI was 10.1%. In the fully-adjusted model......, MCI was associated with a higher rate of falls (PR=1.41 95%CI=1.05-1.89) and odds for non-accidental falls in the past 12 months (OR=1.67 95%CI=1.07-2.61). Muscle strength and performance indicators, and medical health conditions were influential factors in the association between MCI and falls...

  9. 33 CFR 117.653 - St. Mary's Falls Canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false St. Mary's Falls Canal. 117.653 Section 117.653 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Michigan § 117.653 St. Mary's Falls Canal. The draw...

  10. High fall incidence and fracture rate in elderly dialysis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polinder-Bos, H. A.; Emmelot-Vonk, M. H.; Gansevoort, R. T.; Diepenbroek, A.; Gaillard, C. A. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although it is recognised that the dialysis population is ageing rapidly, geriatric complications such as falls are poorly appreciated, despite the many risk factors for falls in this population. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, complications and risk factors f

  11. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Phelan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ with a history of repeated falls or fall-related healthcare use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79±8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged 6 primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety to 78% (for vitamin D. An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21% and home safety (24%. Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall risk factors (P=0.003. Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p=.04 and perform more fall risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p=.007 than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice.

  12. Dynamic Bayesian Networks for Context-Aware Fall Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Koshmak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fall incidents among the elderly often occur in the home and can cause serious injuries affecting their independent living. This paper presents an approach where data from wearable sensors integrated in a smart home environment is combined using a dynamic Bayesian network. The smart home environment provides contextual data, obtained from environmental sensors, and contributes to assessing a fall risk probability. The evaluation of the developed system is performed through simulation. Each time step is represented by a single user activity and interacts with a fall sensors located on a mobile device. A posterior probability is calculated for each recognized activity or contextual information. The output of the system provides a total risk assessment of falling given a response from the fall sensor.

  13. The role of exercise for fall prevention in older age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Tiedemann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a common, costly and preventable consequence of sensorimotor impairments that increase in prevalence with advancing age. A fall occurs when the physical ability of the individual is unable to match the immediate demands of the environment and/or of the activity being undertaken. Targeted exercise aimed at improving the physical ability of the individual, such as balance and strength training, is crucial for promoting functional independence and mobility and reducing the risk of falling in older age. Exercise programs that provide a high challenge to balance, have a high dose, include progression of intensity over time and are ongoing are most effective for preventing falls. This paper provides guidance to health professionals involved with the prescription of physical activity and exercise to older people regarding the safe and effective provision of programs aimed at improving strength and balance and preventing falls in older age.

  14. Optimization and evaluation of the human fall detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzoubi, Hadeel; Ramzan, Naeem; Shahriar, Hasan; Alzubi, Raid; Gibson, Ryan; Amira, Abbes

    2016-10-01

    Falls are the most critical health problem for elderly people, which are often, cause significant injuries. To tackle a serious risk that made by the fall, we develop an automatic wearable fall detection system utilizing two devices (mobile phone and wireless sensor) based on three axes accelerometer signals. The goal of this study is to find an effective machine learning method that distinguish falls from activities of daily living (ADL) using only a single triaxial accelerometer. In addition, comparing the performance results for wearable sensor and mobile device data .The proposed model detects the fall by using seven different classifiers and the significant performance is demonstrated using accuracy, recall, precision and F-measure. Our model obtained accuracy over 99% on wearable device data and over 97% on mobile phone data.

  15. Falls and Physical Activity in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Sosnoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the association between fall history and physical activity using an objective measure of physical activity (i.e., accelerometry in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design. A community-based sample of 75 ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis volunteered for the investigation. Participants self-reported fall history in the last year, underwent a neurological exam to determine Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score, and wore an accelerometer around the waist for 7 consecutive days to determine physical activity. Results. Overall, 37 persons (49.3% of the sample reported falling in the last year with 28 of the 37 falling more than once. Persons who fell in the last year had a significantly lower number of steps/day than nonfallers (3510 versus 4940 steps/day; P.05. Conclusions. Collectively, the findings suggest that fall history may have little impact on current physical activity levels in persons with multiple sclerosis.

  16. [Falls mortality trends in México, 1979-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis-de la Rosa, Alfredo de Jesús; Méndez-Magaña, Ana; Orozco-Valerio, María; Baez-Baez, Guadalupe Laura; Dávalos-Guzmán, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the mortality trend by accidental falls in Mexico, from 1979 to 2010. We used official mortality data in México. Variables included were mortality cause, place of lesion, age, sex, year of mortality registration, size of the town of occurrence, state, occupation, workplace falls. During that period, 124,509 deaths by accidental and intentional falls were registered; of these 77.03% were men. From 1989 (3.20 per 100,000) to 2010 (1.99 per 100,000), the mortality trend was falling (β = -0.053/ 100,000, p ≤ 0.001). In the majority of states, we found a decreased between 1993-1997 and 2006 to 2010, except in Aguascalientes, Puebla, Baja California Sur, Durango and Nuevo León. This is the first study in México that showed the descending trend of mortality in accidental falls in the last two decades.

  17. Urinary incontinence in the prediction of falls in hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cristina de Almeida Abreu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the effect of urinary incontinence as a predictor of the incidence of falls among hospitalized elderly. Method Concurrent cohort study where 221 elderly inpatients were followed from the date of admission until discharge, death or fall. The Kaplan-Meier methods, the incidence density and the Cox regression model were used for the survival analysis and the assessment of the association between the exposure variable and the other variables. Results Urinary incontinence was a strong predictor of falls in the surveyed elderly, and was associated with shorter time until the occurrence of event. Urinary incontinence, concomitant with gait and balance dysfunction and use of antipsychotics was associated with falls. Conclusion Measures to prevent the risk of falls specific to hospitalized elderly patients who have urinary incontinence are necessary.

  18. Urinary incontinence in the prediction of falls in hospitalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cristina de Almeida Abreu

    Full Text Available Objective Analyzing the effect of urinary incontinence as a predictor of the incidence of falls among hospitalized elderly. Method Concurrent cohort study where 221 elderly inpatients were followed from the date of admission until discharge, death or fall. The Kaplan-Meier methods, the incidence density and the Cox regression model were used for the survival analysis and the assessment of the association between the exposure variable and the other variables. Results Urinary incontinence was a strong predictor of falls in the surveyed elderly, and was associated with shorter time until the occurrence of event. Urinary incontinence, concomitant with gait and balance dysfunction and use of antipsychotics was associated with falls. Conclusion Measures to prevent the risk of falls specific to hospitalized elderly patients who have urinary incontinence are necessary.

  19. Individual income and falls among the elderly in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Antonio J; Puvanachandra, Prasanthi; Hyder, Adnan A

    2011-04-01

    The burden of falls amongst the elderly raises important public health concerns. Empirical evidence suggests that macroeconomic growth may not be sufficient to reduce mortality and morbidity from injuries among the elderly. This paper consolidates macro- and microeconomic evidence of the effect of income on elderly falls in Latin America. Using household databases, we estimate an empirical model to assess the relationship between income and falls. The estimations indicate that an increase in personal income reduces the probability of falling; yet, the size of the effect is negligible. A 10% increase in income reduces the probability of falling between 0.001 and 0.002% while a 20% increase reduced the probability by up to 1%. These findings are consistent with macroeconomic data where morbidity and mortality among seniors are inelastic to economic growth. Policy implications of cash transfer programs targeting the elderly are discussed. © 2010 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  20. Fall-grown oat to extend the fall grazing season for replacement dairy heifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coblentz, W K; Brink, G E; Hoffman, P C; Esser, N M; Bertram, M G

    2014-03-01

    Our objective was to assess the pasture productivity and forage characteristics of 2 fall-grown oat (Avena sativa L.) cultivars, specifically for extending the grazing season and reducing reliance on harvested forages by replacement dairy heifers. A total of 160 gravid Holstein heifers (80 heifers/yr) were stratified by weight, and assigned to 1 of 10 identical research pens (8 heifers/pen). Initial body weights were 480 ± 43.5 kg in 2011 and 509 ± 39.4 kg in 2012. During both years of the trial, four 1.0-ha pasture replicates were seeded in August with Ogle oat (Schumitsch Seed Inc., Antigo, WI), and 4 separate, but similarly configured, pasture replicates were seeded with Forage Plus oat (Kratz Farms, Slinger, WI). Heifer groups were maintained as units, assigned to specific pastures, and then allowed to graze fall-oat pastures for 6h daily before returning to the barn, where they were offered a forage-based basal total mixed ration. Two heifer groups were retained in confinement (without grazing) as controls and offered the identical total mixed ration as pasture groups. During 2011, available forage mass increased with strong linear and quadratic effects for both cultivars, peaking at almost 9 Mg/ha on October 31. In contrast, forage mass was not affected by evaluation date in 2012, remaining ≤ 2,639 kg/ha across all dates because of droughty climatic conditions. During 2012, Ogle exhibited greater forage mass than Forage Plus across all sampling dates (2,678 vs. 1,856 kg/ha), largely because of its more rapid maturation rate and greater canopy height. Estimates of energy density for oat forage ranged from 59.6 to 69.1% during 2011, and ranged narrowly from 68.4 to 70.4% during 2012. For 2011, responses for both cultivars had strong quadratic character, in which the most energy-dense forages occurred in mid November, largely due to accumulation of water-soluble carbohydrates that reached maximum concentrations of 18.2 and 15.1% for Forage Plus and Ogle

  1. Can falls risk prediction tools correctly identify fall-prone elderly rehabilitation inpatients? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    da Costa, Bruno Roza; Rutjes, Anne Wilhelmina Saskia; Mendy, Angelico; Freund-Heritage, Rosalie; Vieira, Edgar Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Background Falls of elderly people may cause permanent disability or death. Particularly susceptible are elderly patients in rehabilitation hospitals. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify falls prediction tools available for assessing elderly inpatients in rehabilitation hospitals. Methods and Findings We searched six electronic databases using comprehensive search strategies developed for each database. Estimates of sensitivity and specificity were plotted in ROC ...

  2. Can Falls Risk Prediction Tools Correctly Identify Fall-Prone Elderly Rehabilitation Inpatients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Roza da Costa; Anne Wilhelmina Saskia Rutjes; Angelico Mendy; Rosalie Freund-Heritage; Edgar Ramos Vieira

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Falls of elderly people may cause permanent disability or death. Particularly susceptible are elderly patients in rehabilitation hospitals. We systematically reviewed the literature to identify falls prediction tools available for assessing elderly inpatients in rehabilitation hospitals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched six electronic databases using comprehensive search strategies developed for each database. Estimates of sensitivity and specificity were plotted in ROC space gra...

  3. Defining the user requirements for wearable and optical fall prediction and fall detection devices for home use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gövercin, Mehmet; Költzsch, Y; Meis, M; Wegel, S; Gietzelt, M; Spehr, J; Winkelbach, S; Marschollek, M; Steinhagen-Thiessen, E

    2010-01-01

    One of the major problems in the development of information and communication technologies for older adults is user acceptance. Here we describe the results of focus group discussions that were conducted with older adults and their relatives to guide the development of assistive devices for fall detection and fall prevention. The aim was to determine the ergonomic and functional requirements of such devices and to include these requirements in a user-centered development process. A semi-structured interview format based on an interview guide was used to conduct three focus group discussions with 22 participants. The average age was 75 years in the first group, 68 years in the second group and 50 years in the third group (relatives). Overall, participants considered a fall prediction system to be as important as a fall detection system. Although the ambient, unobtrusive character of the optical sensor system was appreciated, wearable inertial sensors were preferred because of their wide range of use, which provides higher levels of security. Security and mobility were two major reasons for people at risk of falling to buy a wearable and/or optical fall prediction and fall detection device. Design specifications should include a wearable, non-stigmatising sensor at the user's wrist, with an emergency option in case of falling.

  4. Fragility, fear of falling, physical activity and falls among older persons: Some theoretical considerations to interpret mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In their letters to the editor, Lacherez et al. [Lacherez, P.F., Wood, J.M., Kerr, G.K., 2007. Does activity level mediate or suppress the association between fear of falling and falls? Prev. Med. 31; (Electronic publication ahead of print)] and Hafeman and Schwartz [Hafeman, D., Schwart

  5. Fragility, fear of falling, physical activity and falls among older persons: Some theoretical considerations to interpret mediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijlhuizen, G.J.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Hopman-Rock, M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: In their letters to the editor, Lacherez et al. [Lacherez, P.F., Wood, J.M., Kerr, G.K., 2007. Does activity level mediate or suppress the association between fear of falling and falls? Prev. Med. 31; (Electronic publication ahead of print)] and Hafeman and Schwartz [Hafeman, D., Schwart

  6. Circumstances of falls and falls-related injuries in a cohort of older patients following hospital discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill AM

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anne-Marie Hill,1 Tammy Hoffmann,2,3 Terry P Haines4,51School of Physiotherapy, Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, WA, 2Centre for Research in Evidence-Based Practice, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, QLD, 3School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland, 4School of Primary Health Care, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 5Allied Health Research Unit, Kingston Centre, Southern Health, Clayton, VIC, AustraliaBackground: Older people are at increased risk of falls after hospital discharge. This study aimed to describe the circumstances of falls in the six months after hospital discharge and to identify factors associated with the time and location of these falls.Methods: Participants in this randomized controlled study comprised fallers (n = 138 who were part of a prospective observational cohort (n = 343 nested within a randomized controlled trial (n = 1206. The study tested patient education on falls prevention in hospital compared with usual care in older patients who were discharged from hospital and followed for six months after hospital discharge. The outcome measures were number of falls, falls-related injuries, and the circumstances of the falls, measured by use of a diary and a monthly telephone call to each participant.Results: Participants (mean age 80.3 ± 8.7 years reported 276 falls, of which 150 (54.3% were injurious. Of the 255 falls for which there were data available about circumstances, 190 (74.5% occurred indoors and 65 (25.5% occurred in the external home environment or wider community. The most frequent time reported for falls was the morning (between 6 am and 10 am when 79 (28.6% falls, including 49 (32.7% injurious falls, occurred. The most frequently reported location for falls (n = 80, 29.0%, including injurious falls (n = 42, 28.0%, was the bedroom. Factors associated with falling in the bedroom included

  7. Falls risk assessment begins with hello: lessons learned from the use of one home health agency's fall risk tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Patricia J; Ramsay, Katherine

    2012-10-01

    Identifying older adults at risk for falls is a challenge all home healthcare agencies (HHAs) face. The process of assessing for falls risk begins with the initial home visit. One HHA affiliated with an academic medical center describes its experience in development and use of a Falls Risk Assessment (FRA) tool over a 10-year period. The FRA tool has been modified since initial development to clarify elements of the tool based on research and to reflect changes in the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) document. The primary purpose of this article is to share a validated falls risk assessment tool to facilitate identification of fall-related risk factors in the homebound population. A secondary purpose is to share lessons learned by the HHA during the 10 years using the FRA.

  8. Comparison of Simple Versus Performance-Based Fall Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar K. Gadkaree BS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the predictive ability of standard falls prediction models based on physical performance assessments with more parsimonious prediction models based on self-reported data. Design: We developed a series of fall prediction models progressing in complexity and compared area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC across models. Setting: National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS, which surveyed a nationally representative sample of Medicare enrollees (age ≥65 at baseline (Round 1: 2011-2012 and 1-year follow-up (Round 2: 2012-2013. Participants: In all, 6,056 community-dwelling individuals participated in Rounds 1 and 2 of NHATS. Measurements: Primary outcomes were 1-year incidence of “any fall” and “recurrent falls.” Prediction models were compared and validated in development and validation sets, respectively. Results: A prediction model that included demographic information, self-reported problems with balance and coordination, and previous fall history was the most parsimonious model that optimized AUC for both any fall (AUC = 0.69, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.67, 0.71] and recurrent falls (AUC = 0.77, 95% CI = [0.74, 0.79] in the development set. Physical performance testing provided a marginal additional predictive value. Conclusion: A simple clinical prediction model that does not include physical performance testing could facilitate routine, widespread falls risk screening in the ambulatory care setting.

  9. Development of a Pediatric Fall Risk And Injury Reduction Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramlich, Debra L; Dende, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Fall prevention programs that include reliable, valid, and clinically tested screening tools have demonstrated more positive effects for adult and geriatric populations than those not including such assessment. In contrast, because falling is a natural part of growth and development for pediatric patients, progression toward effective prevention programs for this population has proven to be a challenge; a significant impediment is the lack of definition regarding what constitutes a reportable fall. This project explored pediatric health care providers' perceptions of patient falls in order to define a reportable pediatric fall and inform development of a prevention program. A concept analysis of defining attributes, antecedents, and consequences of pediatric falls from literature formed the basis for a set of questions; a convenience sample of 28 pediatric health care providers in an acute care hospital in New England participated in six moderated focus groups. Constant comparison method was used to code the qualitative data and develop themes. Participants unanimously agreed on several points; as expected, their years of experience in pediatric practice provided valuable insight. Three major themes emerged: patient characteristics, caregiver characteristics, and environmental characteristics. Based on factors identified by staff, a screening tool was adopted and integrated into the electronic medical record. Staff were actively engaged in developing definitions, selecting tools, and identifying next steps toward a comprehensive fall reduction program for their patients. As a result, they have embraced changes and advocated successfully for endorsement by the organization.

  10. [Prevention of falls in the elderly and physiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duez, M; Solis, S; Benoît, F; Martin Martinez, M; Pegnyemb, M; Simonetti, C; Pepersack, T

    2003-09-01

    Frequency and dangerousness of falls in elderly people are a public health problem because of its prevalence and its consequences. Because of its high frequency a program designed to avoid the risk of fall and to restore the balance is of importance. Nowadays in Belgium, only the ones belonging to the F-pathology list are reimbursed for the walking functional reeducation. The troubles of walking and balance increasing the risk of falls, are evaluated by different tests like: Tinetti's test (POMA), Time-up-and-go tests. To screen the patient in its physical psychological and environmental sides is mandatory. The physiotherapist is the key to evaluate the patient globally. The main aim is to restore the patient's independence after a fall and to ensure an optimal quality of live. A functional reeducation including the relearning of walking, balance, standing up and proprioception is a must. A preventive way should be more adequate for the patient at risk and the society. A prevention program for fall involving a multidisciplinary team could be the solution of the public health's problem. A lost still remains to be done! In some countries such programs do exist. They inform the elderly about falls' risks and the sometimes tragic consequences. To prevent falls, GP's, ergotherapists, physiotherapists, nurses and social workers have to work together.

  11. Functional neural correlates of reduced physiological falls risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is currently unclear whether the function of brain regions associated with executive cognitive processing are independently associated with reduced physiological falls risk. If these are related, it would suggest that the development of interventions targeted at improving executive neurocognitive function would be an effective new approach for reducing physiological falls risk in seniors. Methods We performed a secondary analysis of 73 community-dwelling senior women aged 65 to 75 years old who participated in a 12-month randomized controlled trial of resistance training. Functional MRI data were acquired while participants performed a modified Eriksen Flanker Task - a task of selective attention and conflict resolution. Brain volumes were obtained using MRI. Falls risk was assessed using the Physiological Profile Assessment (PPA. Results After accounting for baseline age, experimental group, baseline PPA score, and total baseline white matter brain volume, baseline activation in the left frontal orbital cortex extending towards the insula was negatively associated with reduced physiological falls risk over the 12-month period. In contrast, baseline activation in the paracingulate gyrus extending towards the anterior cingulate gyrus was positively associated with reduced physiological falls risk. Conclusions Baseline activation levels of brain regions underlying response inhibition and selective attention were independently associated with reduced physiological falls risk. This suggests that falls prevention strategies may be facilitated by incorporating intervention components - such as aerobic exercise - that are specifically designed to induce neurocognitive plasticity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00426881

  12. Risk factors for falls in the institutionalized elder population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Romero

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to determine the risk factorspredictors of falls in institutionalized elderlypeople. Methodology: Analysis of data from alongitudinal cohort study. Subjects: Institutionalizedelderly volunteers residents of a nursinghome in Arbelaez, Colombia enrolled andfollowed for six months (N= 116; mean age: 78years. Main outcome measures: Falls detected via nurses reports and medical records. Independentvariables: Baseline measures of demographics,medical history, drug intake, depression, mentalstate, visual acuity, orthostatic hypotension,body mass index, cardiovascular state, limbdeformities, limb strength, tone, trophism, rageof motion, Romberg, one leg balance test, GetUp and Go test and timed Get Up and Go test.Evaluation of home facilities by the TESS-NHand SCUEQS scales. Results: Over the six monthfollow-up 36% experienced a fall. All noneinjurious falls. The independent significantpredictors of all falls using logistic regression were female gender, history of dizziness and anabnormal one leg balance test. With coefficientB values of 1.029, 2.024 and 1.712, respectively.Conclusion: The female gender, the history ofdizziness and abnormal one-leg balance testappear to be the main and significant predictorsof falls in institutionalized elderly persons.However, no single factor seems to be accurateenough to be relied on as a sole predictor of fallrisk because so many diverse factors are involvedin falling

  13. Incidence and predicting factors of falls of older inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Cristina de Almeida Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To estimate the incidence and predicting factors associated with falls among older inpatients. METHODS Prospective cohort study conducted in clinical units of three hospitals in Cuiaba, MT, Midwestern Brazil, from March to August 2013. In this study, 221 inpatients aged 60 or over were followed until hospital discharge, death, or fall. The method of incidence density was used to calculate incidence rates. Bivariate analysis was performed by Chi-square test, and multiple analysis was performed by Cox regression. RESULTS The incidence of falls was 12.6 per 1,000 patients/day. Predicting factors for falls during hospitalization were: low educational level (RR = 2.48; 95%CI 1.17;5.25, polypharmacy (RR = 4.42; 95%CI 1.77;11.05, visual impairment (RR = 2.06; 95%CI 1.01;4.23, gait and balance impairment (RR = 2.95; 95%CI 1.22;7.14, urinary incontinence (RR = 5.67; 95%CI 2.58;12.44 and use of laxatives (RR = 4.21; 95%CI 1.15;15.39 and antipsychotics (RR = 4.10; 95%CI 1.38;12.13. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of falls of older inpatients is high. Predicting factors found for falls were low education level, polypharmacy, visual impairment, gait and balance impairment, urinary incontinence and use of laxatives and antipsychotics. Measures to prevent falls in hospitals are needed to reduce the incidence of this event.

  14. Accidental falls involving medical implant re-operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kevin L; Lau, Edmund; Moore, Tara; Heller, Michelle F

    2009-10-01

    Implantation of medical devices is becoming more prevalent, and as a result, a greater number of patients who fall accidentally are expected to have a medical implant. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was used to evaluate hospital admissions following accidental falls involving re-operation of existing medical implants (hip, knee, spine, and fracture fixation) from 1990 to 2005. From 1990 to 2005, hospitalisations due to accidental falls on level surfaces increased by 306%, and hospitalisations due to falls from stairs increased by 310%. Falls involving orthopaedic revision surgery (re-operation) are relatively rare, but the incidence has increased by approximately 35%. Hospital stays after falls on level surfaces involving re-operation were 1.0 day (median) longer and cost 50% (median) more than those that did not involve re-operation in 2005. After staircase falls, hospital stays for patients undergoing re-operations were 2.0 days (median) longer and cost 108% (median) more. The greater hospital costs and hospital stay for patients needing re-operations indicate that additional medical treatment was required.

  15. Falls prevention in the elderly: translating evidence into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, James K H; Chan, T Y; Chan, Daniel K Y

    2015-04-01

    Falls are a common problem in the elderly. A common error in their management is that injury from the fall is treated, without finding its cause. Thus a proactive approach is important to screen for the likelihood of fall in the elderly. Fall assessment usually includes a focused history and a targeted examination. Timed up-and-go test can be performed quickly and is able to predict the likelihood of fall. Evidence-based fall prevention interventions include multi-component group or home-based exercises, participation in Tai Chi, environmental modifications, medication review, management of foot and footwear problems, vitamin D supplementation, and management of cardiovascular problems. If possible, these are best implemented in the form of multifactorial intervention. Bone health enhancement for residential care home residents and appropriate community patients, and prescription of hip protectors for residential care home residents are also recommended. Multifactorial intervention may also be useful in a hospital and residential care home setting. Use of physical restraints is not recommended for fall prevention.

  16. Can echocardiographic findings predict falls in older persons?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie van der Velde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The European and American guidelines state the need for echocardiography in patients with syncope. 50% of older adults with syncope present with a fall. Nonetheless, up to now no data have been published addressing echocardiographic abnormalities in older fallers. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In order to determine the association between echocardiographic abnormalities and falls in older adults, we performed a prospective cohort study, in which 215 new consecutive referrals (age 77.4, SD 6.0 of a geriatric outpatient clinic of a Dutch university hospital were included. During the previous year, 139 had experienced a fall. At baseline, all patients underwent routine two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Falls were recorded during a three-month follow-up. Multivariate adjustment for confounders was performed with a Cox proportional hazards model. 55 patients (26% fell at least once during follow-up. The adjusted hazard ratio of a fall during follow-up was 1.35 (95% CI, 1.08-1.71 for pulmonary hypertension, 1.66 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.89 for mitral regurgitation, 2.41 (95% CI, 1.32 to 4.37 for tricuspid regurgitation and 1.76 (95% CI, 1.03 to 3.01 for pulmonary regurgitation. For aortic regurgitation the risk of a fall was also increased, but non-significantly (hazard ratio, 1.57 [95% CI, 0.85 to 2.92]. Trend analysis of the severity of the different regurgitations showed a significant relationship for mitral, tricuspid and pulmonary valve regurgitation and pulmonary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Echo (Doppler cardiography can be useful in order to identify risk indicators for falling. Presence of pulmonary hypertension or regurgitation of mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary valves was associated with a higher fall risk. Our study indicates that the diagnostic work-up for falls in older adults might be improved by adding an echo (Doppler cardiogram in selected groups.

  17. Injury from falls in infants under one year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher S; Adams, Susan; Tzioumi, Dimitra; Brown, Julie

    2017-08-01

    Falls in infants are a common cause of injury. Compared to older children, infants under age one are likely to have distinctive causation and injury patterns, as they are pre-mobile or have limited independent mobility and falls are more directly the responsibility of the care giver. There is little known about the mechanistic factors, predictors of injury and injury patterns in this age group. We conducted a retrospective review of infants under age one who presented after a fall to a paediatric trauma centre in Sydney, Australia. Circumstances and mechanisms of the fall, injury patterns, burden of investigations and outcomes were analysed. Over a 3-year period (2011-2013), 916 infants presented following a fall. One hundred and six (11.6%) were admitted and there was one death. Head injury was the most common reason for admission (85%). While there were severe and critical head injuries (Abbreviated Injury Scale 4-5) these were infrequent (2% of presentations). All admitted cases involved a short distance fall. Patients dropped by others were three times more likely to be admitted than infants presenting following other fall types (95% CI 1.9-4.8). Compared to other mechanisms, patients who fell from furniture had significantly longer hospital stays. Fall mechanisms involving infants being dropped by adults, and falls from beds or couches carry the highest clinical burden. These mechanisms should be targets for injury prevention and inform the design of safe equipment and environments for babies. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  18. Orthostatic Hypotension in Middle-Age and Risk of Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juraschek, Stephen P; Daya, Natalie; Appel, Lawrence J; Miller, Edgar R; Windham, Beverly Gwen; Pompeii, Lisa; Griswold, Michael E; Kucharska-Newton, Anna; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    One-third of older adults fall each year. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) has been hypothesized as an important risk factor for falls, but findings from prior studies have been inconsistent. We conducted a prospective study of the association between baseline OH (1987-1989) and risk of falls in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Falls were ascertained during follow-up via ICD-9 hospital discharge codes or Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services claims data. OH was defined as a drop in systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥20mm Hg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥10mm Hg within 2 minutes of moving from the supine to standing position. Changes in SBP or DBP during OH assessments were also examined as continuous variables. During a median follow-up of 23 years, there were 2,384 falls among 12,661 participants (mean age 54 years, 55% women, 26% black). OH was associated with risk of falls even after adjustment for demographic characteristics and other risk factors (hazard ratio (HR): 1.30; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10, 1.54; P = 0.002). Postural change in DBP was more significantly associated with risk of falls (HR 1.09 per -5mm Hg change in DBP; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.13; P < 0.001) than postural change in SBP (HR 1.03 per -5mm Hg change in SBP; 95% CI: 1.01, 1.05; P = 0.002). In a community-based, middle-aged population, OH, and in particular, postural change in DBP, were independent risk factors for falls over 2 decades of follow-up. Future studies are needed to examine OH thresholds associated with increased risk of falls. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2016. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Epidemiological characteristics and preventive strategies for fall injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the epidemiological characteristics and to define some preventive strategies for fall injury (FI). Methods: The medical records of patients admitted following a fall from a certain height between August 1996and July 1997 were analyzed retrospectively. Results: A total of 138 patients were assessed, with a mortality of 31.2%. The male-to-female ratio was 3.5: 1.The persons between 20 and 59 years old were the main victims (81.8%), of which 52.2% were related with their work altitude. The remaining adults fall because of,accidents in daily life, suicide attempts, drug abuse,alcohol, or criminal behavior. There were significant differences between the death group and the survival group in the Revised Trauma Score (RTS) and the Injury Severity Score (ISS) value (P <0.05 and P <0.01, respectively).Six children fall from balconies, open windows or roofs.There were significant differences for the height of fall and RTS value in aged group than those in children,adolescents, and adults (P <0.001, 0.005, 0.05; and P <0.05, 0.01, 0.05, respectively). The mortality of FI was significantiy correlated to the height of fall (r = 0.897, P <0.005). Conclusions: Male adults are the main victims,especially the workers at high altitudes. The mortality of FI is significantly correlated to the height of fall. The preventive strategies developed through analyzing the risk factors of fall in different age groups might reduce the injuries and deaths following fall.

  20. Interfacial Evaporation of Falling Liquid Films with Wall Heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张金涛; 王补宣; 彭晓峰

    2001-01-01

    The interfacial evaporation of falling water films with wall heating was experimentally studied andanalyzed. The results presented in this paper showed that the capillary-induced interfacial evaporation playedan important role in heat transfer of a falling liquid film. It would be independent of the wall heat flux andsomewhat lower than that without wall heating for impure fluids such as water-air system. The thermodynamicanalysis conducted gave a theoretical basis for the experimental observations. The effective capillary radiuswas correlated with the mass flow rate. The experimental results and analysis showed that the interfacialevaporation should be taken into account in the study of falling liquid film heat transfer.``

  1. Risk of falling in patients with a recent fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willems Gittie

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with a history of a fracture have an increased risk for future fractures, even in short term. The aim of this study was to assess the number of patients with falls and to identify fall risk factors that predict the risk of falling in the first three months after a clinical fracture. Methods Prospective observational study with 3 months of follow-up in a large European academic and regional hospital. In 277 consenting women and men aged ≥ 50 years and with no dementia and not receiving treatment for osteoporosis who presented to hospital with a clinical fracture, fall risk factors were assessed according to the guidelines on fall prevention in the Netherlands. Follow-up information on falls and fractures was collected by monthly telephone interview. Incidence of falls and odds ratio's (OR, with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 512 consecutive patients with a fracture were regarded for analysis, 87 were not eligible for inclusion and 137 patients were excluded. No follow-up data were available for 11 patients. Therefore full analysis was possible in 277 patients. A new fall incident was reported by 42 patients (15%, of whom five had a fracture. Of the 42 fallers, 32 had one new fall and 10 had two or more. Multivariate analysis in the total group with sex, age, ADL difficulties, urine incontinence and polypharmacy showed that sex and ADL were significant fall risk factors. Women had an OR of 3.02 (95% CI 1.13–8.06 and patients with ADL-difficulties had an OR of 2.50 (95% CI 1.27–4.93. Multivariate analysis in the female group with age, ADL difficulties, polypharmacy and presence of orthostatic hypotension indicated that polypharmacy was the predominant risk factor (OR 2.51; 95% CI: 1.19 – 5.28. The incidence of falls was 35% in women with low ADL score and polypharmacy compared to 15% in women without these risk factors (OR 3.56: CI 1.47 – 8.67. Conclusion 15% of patients reported a new fall

  2. Numerical study of free-fall arches in hopper flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, P.; Zhang, S.; Qi, J.; Xing, Y. M.; Yang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Beverloo's law describes the flow rate of grains discharging from hoppers, where the assumption of a free-fall arch (FFA) is very useful in understanding the physical picture of this process. The FFA has been observed in previous experiments but a clear systematic study of the FFA is still necessary. In this paper, dense granular flow in hoppers was studied by numerical simulations, in attempts to explore the free-fall region and its boundary. Generally, the numerical simulation results support the free-fall arch assumption, although the statistical description of the FFA is not exactly equivalent to its strict definition.

  3. Investigating the relationship between reduced self-awareness of falls risk, rehabilitation engagement and falls in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaljcic, Tijana; Haines, Terry P; Ponsford, Jennie L; Stolwyk, Renerus J

    The present study aimed to investigate whether self-awareness of falls risk is associated with rehabilitation engagement, motivation for rehabilitation, and number of falls after hospital discharge. The sample comprised 91 older adults (Mage=77.97, SD=8.04) undergoing inpatient rehabilitation. The Self-Awareness of Falls Risk Measure (SAFRM) was used to measure different aspects of self-awareness. The treating physiotherapist and occupational therapist rated the patient's engagement in rehabilitation and the patient reported his/her motivation for treatment. Falls information was collected from the patient and significant other once a month for three months following hospital discharge. Significant correlations were found between physiotherapist-rated engagement and intellectual (rs=-0.22, pself-awareness (rs=-0.31 and -0.26, pself-awareness provided a unique contribution to occupational therapist-rated engagement when controlling for age, gender, cognition and functional ability. Falls were reported by 29.9% of participants, however, self-awareness did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. The findings suggest that self-awareness of falls risk is associated with rehabilitation engagement and motivation. Therefore, improving patient self-awareness of falls risk may increase engagement in therapy leading to better patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  5. Efficacy of a short multidisciplinary falls prevention program for elderly persons with osteoporosis and a fall history: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Groen, B.E.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Eijsbouts, A.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of the Nijmegen Falls Prevention Program (NFPP) for persons with osteoporosis and a fall history in a randomized controlled trial. Persons with osteoporosis are at risk for fall-related fractures because of decreased bone strength. A decrease in the number of fall

  6. Representing and Retrieving Patients' Falls Risk Factors and Risk for Falls among Adults in Acute Care through the Electronic Health Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Jann

    2013-01-01

    Defining fall risk factors and predicting fall risk status among patients in acute care has been a topic of research for decades. With increasing pressure on hospitals to provide quality care and prevent hospital-acquired conditions, the search for effective fall prevention interventions continues. Hundreds of risk factors for falls in acute care…

  7. Screening for fall risk in the elderly in the capital region of Copenhagen: the need for fall assessment exceeds the present capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchhoff, Marianne; Melin, Anette

    2011-01-01

    As falls in the elderly are a major problem, the Danish National Board of Health recommends systematic screening of 65+ year-olds who visit an emergency department following a fall.......As falls in the elderly are a major problem, the Danish National Board of Health recommends systematic screening of 65+ year-olds who visit an emergency department following a fall....

  8. Falling Down on the Job: Evaluation and Treatment of Fall Risk Among Older Adults With Upper Extremity Fragility Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Christine M; Colla, Carrie H; Carmichael, Donald; Tosteson, Anna N A; Tosteson, Tor D; Bell, John-Erik; Cantu, Robert V; Lurie, Jonathan D; Bynum, Julie P W

    2017-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend fall risk assessment and intervention for older adults who sustain a fall-related injury to prevent future injury and mobility decline. The aim of this study was to describe how often Medicare beneficiaries with upper extremity fracture receive evaluation and treatment for fall risk. Observational cohort. Participants were fee-for-service beneficiaries age 66 to 99 treated as outpatients for proximal humerus or distal radius/ulna ("wrist") fragility fractures. -Participants were studied using Carrier and Outpatient Hospital files. The proportion of patients evaluated or treated for fall risk up to 6 months after proximal humerus or wrist fracture from 2007-2009 was examined based on evaluation, treatment, and diagnosis codes. Time to evaluation and number of treatment sessions were calculated. Logistic regression was used to analyze patient characteristics that predicted receiving evaluation or treatment. Narrow (gait training) and broad (gait training or therapeutic exercise) definitions of service were used. There were 309,947 beneficiaries who sustained proximal humerus (32%) or wrist fracture (68%); 10.7% received evaluation or treatment for fall risk or gait issues (humerus: 14.2%; wrist: 9.0%). Using the broader definition, the percentage increased to 18.5% (humerus: 23.4%; wrist: 16.3%). Factors associated with higher likelihood of services after fracture were: evaluation or treatment for falls or gait prior to fracture, more comorbidities, prior nursing home stay, older age, humerus fracture (vs wrist), female sex, and white race. Claims analysis may underestimate physician and physical therapist fall assessments, but it is not likely to qualitatively change the results. A small proportion of older adults with upper extremity fracture received fall risk assessment and treatment. Providers and health systems must advance efforts to provide timely evidence-based management of fall risk in this population.

  9. Validation of the Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium's Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Sara Nicole; Zaluski, Neal; Petrie, Amanda; Arnold, Cathy; Basran, Jenny; Dal Bello-Haas, Vanina

    2013-01-01

    Objectif : Étudier la validité concurrente de l'algorithme de dépistage des risques de chute et de renvoi en consultation (Falls Screening and Referral Algorithm, FSRA) du Saskatoon Falls Prevention Consortium. Méthode : Vingt-neuf personnes âgées (moyenne d'âge [ET] de 77,7 ans [4,0]) vivant dans une résidence pour personnes âgées autonomes satisfaisaient les critères d'inclusion; elles ont rempli un questionnaire démographique et ont été soumises à certaines composantes du FSRA et du test d'équilibre de l'échelle de Berg (EEB). Le FSRA comprend un test de dépistage des risques de chute (Elderly Fall Screening Test, EFST) et le questionnaire multifactoriel en matière de chutes (Multi-Factor Falls Questionnaire, MFQ). Il est conçu pour classer les individus dans trois catégories – risque de chute élevé, modéré ou faible – afin d'établir les approches de gestion appropriées. Un modèle prédictif de probabilité des risques de chute basé sur une étude antérieure a été utilisé pour établir la validité concurrente du FRSA. Résultats : Au total, 79 % des participants ont été classés dans la catégorie à faible risque du FSRA, puisque le modèle prédictif a permis d'établir la probabilité des risques de chute dans leur cas entre 0,04 et 0,74, avec une moyenne de 0,35 (ET=0,25). On n'a pu établir aucune corrélation significative sur le plan statistique entre le FSRA et le modèle prédictif de la probabilité des risques de chute (ρ de Spearman=0,35, p=0,06). Conclusion : Le FSRA manque de validité concurrente si on le compare à un modèle de risques de chute préalablement établi et semble « surclasser » les individus dans le segment à faible risque. D'autres études sur le FSRA en tant qu'outil approprié de dépistage chez les aînés résidant dans la communauté sont recommandées.

  10. “The balancing act”— Licensed practical nurse experiences of falls and fall prevention: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Häggqvist Beatrice

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are common in old age and may have serious consequences. There are many strategies to predict and prevent falls from occurring in long-term care and hospitals. The aim of this study was to describe licensed practical nurse experiences of predicting and preventing further falls when working with patients who had experienced a fall-related fracture. Licensed practical nurses are the main caretakers that work most closely with the patients. Methods A qualitative study of focus groups interviews and field observations was done. 15 licensed practical nurses from a rehabilitation ward and an acute ward in a hospital in northern Sweden were interviewed. Content was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The result of the licensed practical nurse thoughts and experiences about risk of falling and fall prevention work is represented in one theme, “the balancing act”. The theme includes three categories: “the right to decide”, “the constant watch”, and “the ongoing negotiation” as well as nine subcategories. The analysis showed similarities and differences between rehabilitation and acute wards. At both wards it was a core strategy in the licensed practical nurse work to always be ready and to pay attention to patients’ appearance and behavior. At the rehabilitation ward, it was an explicit working task to judge the patients’ risk of falling and to be active to prevent falls. At the acute ward, the words “risk of falling” were not used and fall prevention were not discussed; instead the licensed practical nurses used for example “dizzy and pale”. The results also indicated differences in components that facilitate workplace learning and knowledge transfer. Conclusions Differences between the wards are most probably rooted in organizational differences. When it is expected by the leadership, licensed practical nurses can express patient risk of falling, share their observations with others

  11. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism (KDWPT) for fall 2011 public hunting access through the...

  12. Fall migration bird banding: 20 years of monitoring migratory landbirds

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Tetlin NWR established the fall migration bird banding station in 1993 as part of a state-wide initiative to better understand distribution, abundance and population...

  13. Fall detection using supervised machine learning algorithms: A comparative study

    KAUST Repository

    Zerrouki, Nabil

    2017-01-05

    Fall incidents are considered as the leading cause of disability and even mortality among older adults. To address this problem, fall detection and prevention fields receive a lot of intention over the past years and attracted many researcher efforts. We present in the current study an overall performance comparison between fall detection systems using the most popular machine learning approaches which are: Naïve Bayes, K nearest neighbor, neural network, and support vector machine. The analysis of the classification power associated to these most widely utilized algorithms is conducted on two fall detection databases namely FDD and URFD. Since the performance of the classification algorithm is inherently dependent on the features, we extracted and used the same features for all classifiers. The classification evaluation is conducted using different state of the art statistical measures such as the overall accuracy, the F-measure coefficient, and the area under ROC curve (AUC) value.

  14. NOS CO-OPS Meteorological Data, Rain Fall, 6-Minute

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has Rain Fall data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS). WARNING: These preliminary data have not been...

  15. Fall survey of emperor geese of southwest coastal Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The annual fall emperor goose survey was conducted 3 - 8 October, 1984. As during the previous five years the survey began in Bethel, included all coastal habitat to...

  16. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2009 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2009. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 21 August and...

  17. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2012 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2012. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 4 September...

  18. SEAMAP Fall 2014 Plankton Survey (GU1405, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2014 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  19. U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167050.html U.S. Opioid Prescriptions Fall, But Numbers Still High: CDC And ... THURSDAY, July 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Prescriptions for opioid painkillers have dropped since 2010 in the United ...

  20. The development of the RISK tool for fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brians, L K; Alexander, K; Grota, P; Chen, R W; Dumas, V

    1991-01-01

    The authors tailored a 26-item risk assessment tool (RAT) for falls based on a literature review and an analysis of causative factors of falls that had occurred over a 3-month period at the Olin E. Teague VA Medical Center, an 1,100-bed acute medical-surgical, psychiatric, and extended care facility in Temple, TX. The RAT was completed by nursing staff on 10 patient units (four medical, four surgical, and two nursing home units) for all admissions during the period. A 25% sample of the completed RATs was randomly selected (n = 208). Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to identify factors that would most likely predict falls from the RATs of the randomly selected group and of the patients who fell (n = 78). Only 4 of the 26 items were statistically related to falls. Based on findings from this study, the RAT was shortened to the four items and called the RISK (Reassessment Is Safe "Kare") tool.

  1. Fall Chinook Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for FALL CHINOOK contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  2. Kids' Asthma Flareups Fall Off After No-Smoking Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162952.html Kids' Asthma Flareups Fall Off After No-Smoking Laws Researchers ... adopted indoor smoking bans, fewer children need emergency asthma treatment, a new study finds. ER visits for ...

  3. Fall 2011 Small Pelagics Survey (PC1108, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives of the Fall 2011 Small Pelagics Survey were to sample the waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico less than 500 meters deep with 90-ft high opening fish...

  4. SEAMAP 2015 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1504, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2015 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  5. Observations of Birds Northern Great Plains: Fall 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This survey summarizes bird observations in the eastern half of North Dakota during the fall of 1982. A species list and comments are included in this survey.

  6. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2010 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2010. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 26 August and...

  7. Postural balance and the risk of falling during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Bulent; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Inanir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological process and many changes occur in a woman's body during pregnancy. These changes occur in all systems to varying degrees, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems. The hormonal, anatomical, and physiological changes occurring during pregnancy result in weight gain, decreased abdominal muscle strength and neuromuscular control, increased ligamentous laxity, and spinal lordosis. These alterations shift the centre of gravity of the body, altering the postural balance and increasing the risk of falls. Falls during pregnancy can cause maternal and foetal complications, such as maternal bone fractures, head injuries, internal haemorrhage, abruption placenta, rupture of the uterus and membranes, and occasionally maternal death or intrauterine foetal demise. Preventative strategies, such as physical exercise and the use of maternity support belts, can increase postural stability and reduce the risk of falls during pregnancy. This article reviews studies that have investigated changes in postural balance and risk of falling during pregnancy.

  8. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  9. Fall 2010 Small Pelagics Survey (PC1006, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Objectives of the Fall 2010 Small Pelagics Survey were to sample the waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico less than 500 meters deep with 90-ft high opening fish...

  10. Lidar-Based Rock-Fall Hazard Characterization of Cliffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Brian; Greg M.Stock,

    2017-01-01

    Rock falls from cliffs and other steep slopes present numerous challenges for detailed geological characterization. In steep terrain, rock-fall source areas are both dangerous and difficult to access, severely limiting the ability to make detailed structural and volumetric measurements necessary for hazard assessment. Airborne and terrestrial lidar survey methods can provide high-resolution data needed for volumetric, structural, and deformation analyses of rock falls, potentially making these analyses straightforward and routine. However, specific methods to collect, process, and analyze lidar data of steep cliffs are needed to maximize analytical accuracy and efficiency. This paper presents observations showing how lidar data sets should be collected, filtered, registered, and georeferenced to tailor their use in rock fall characterization. Additional observations concerning surface model construction, volumetric calculations, and deformation analysis are also provided.

  11. U.S. Cancer Death Rates Continue to Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162896.html U.S. Cancer Death Rates Continue to Fall: Report Researchers ... be diagnosed with cancer and about 600,000 U.S. cancer patients will die. "The drop in cancer ...

  12. SEAMAP 2013 Fall Plankton Survey (PC1305, ME70)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During the 2013 Fall Plankton Survey, plankton samples were collected from a systematic grid of stations to assess distribution, occurrence and abundance of the...

  13. Fall 1979 moose surveys, Sheenjek, Old Woman, Coleen drainages

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of fall moose population statistics for the upper Sheenjek River drainage (including all tributaries upstream of Lobo Lake) and of Old Woman Creek. William...

  14. Fall migration goose and swan observation in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper summarizes the observations of migratory geese and swan in Alaska during the fall of 1965. Whistling Swans, Canada Geese, Black Brant, Emperor Geese, and...

  15. Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge 2008 Fall Banding Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes bird banding results at Ninigret National Wildlife Refuge during the fall of 2008. The Ninigret banding station opened nets on 29 August and...

  16. PHYSIOTHERAPY METHODS IN PREVENTION OF FALLS IN ELDERLY PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAŁGORZATA GAJOS

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of population ageing is observed not only in Poland but also in other European countries. Physiological processes of ageing reduces the functional capacity. In particular, associated diseases, progressive weakness and failure of the motor system increases the risk of collapse in seniors. Dangerous consequences of falls, inter alia, injuries, can often cause death, what justifies its classification as a so-called geriatric giant. Health and psychosocial consequences of falls should be noted. Therefore, there is a great need for induction of preventive measures. Many results of studies constantly show, that an effective intervention in preventing falls in seniors should include, first and foremost, multidirectional rehabilitation, which aims to improve balance and increase postural strength muscle. In addition, prevention should include: patient education, pharmacotherapy prescribed by a medical specialist, eyesight improvement, elimination of potential risks surrounding the patient. The introduction of multi-directional prevention of falls can reduce the risk of their occurrence up to 50%.

  17. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks for fall 2009 public hunting access through the Walk-In Hunting...

  18. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks for fall 2008 public hunting access through the Walk-In Hunting...

  19. Walk-In Hunting Access (WIHA) Fall 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This shapefile represents the private lands leased by the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks for fall 2010 public hunting access through the Walk-In Hunting...

  20. Occurrence and Predictors of Falls in People With Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minet, Lisbeth Rosenbek; Peterson, Elizabeth; Koch, Lena von

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose was to investigate the occurrence of self-reported falls in people with stroke at 3, 6, and 12 months and 6 years post stroke and predictors for falls during 6 years. METHODS: A prospective study involving 121 people with stroke. Data were obtained through...... structured interviews and assessments. Generalized estimating equation modeling using proportional odds was used to explore the predictive value of fall history, functioning/disability, and personal factors during 6 years. RESULTS: The proportion of fallers constituted of 35%, 26%, 33%, and 35% of the sample...... at 3, 6, and 12 months and 6 years of follow-up, respectively. Higher perceived effect of stroke on activities of daily living (odds ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.80), falls at 3 months (odds ratio, 1.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.01-3.94), and no gait/balance disability at baseline...

  1. RadNet Air Data From Idaho Falls, ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page presents radiation air monitoring and air filter analysis data for Idaho Falls, ID from EPA's RadNet system. RadNet is a nationwide network of monitoring stations that measure radiation in air, drinking water and precipitation.

  2. Nursing Home - Falls within the Past 30 days

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Percent of residents reporting one or more falls within the past 30 days. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) is part of the federally mandated process for clinical...

  3. Free fall of water drops in laboratory rainfall simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, M. Nasimul; Testik, Firat Y.; Hornack, Mathew C.; Khan, Abdul A.

    2016-02-01

    Motivated by various hydrological and meteorological applications, this paper investigates the free fall of water drops to provide guidance in laboratory simulations of natural rainfall and to elucidate drop morphodynamics. Drop fall velocity and shape parameters such as axis ratio (ratio of the maximum vertical and horizontal chords of the drop), chord ratio [ratio of the two orthogonal chords where one chord (cl) is the longest chord in the drop and the other one (cs) is the longest chord that is orthogonal to cl], canting angle (angle between the longest chord of the drop and the horizontal axis), and relative fluctuation of chords (difference between vertical and horizontal chord fluctuations) were investigated for three selected water drop sizes (2.6, 3.7, and 5.1 mm spherical volume equivalent diameter) using high speed imaging. Based upon experimental observations, three distinct fall zones were identified: Zone I, in which source-induced oscillations and shape adjustment take place; Zone II, in which equilibrium-shaped drops accelerate to achieve terminal velocity; and Zone III, in which equilibrium-shaped drops fall at terminal velocity. Our results revealed that the fall distance values of approximately 6 m and 12 m can be used as conservative reference values for rainfall experiments with oscillation-free fall of drops (i.e. end of Zone I and onset of Zone II) and with equilibrium-shaped drops falling at terminal velocities (i.e. end of Zone II and onset of Zone III), respectively, for the entire raindrop size spectrum in natural rainfall. These required fall distance values are smaller than the distances discussed in the literature. Methodology and results presented here will facilitate optimum experimental laboratory simulations of natural rainfall.

  4. Dizziness and Falls in Obese Inpatients Undergoing Metabolic Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corna, Stefano; Aspesi, Valentina; Cau, Nicola; Scarpina, Federica; Gattini Valdés, Natalia; Brugliera, Luigia; Cimolin, Veronica

    2017-01-01

    Aim The relationship between dizziness and falls in the obese population is a relatively unexplored issue. The aims of the present study were to define the 1-year prevalence of dizziness in an obese inpatient population undergoing metabolic rehabilitation and to investigate possible correlations with fall events. Materials and Methods We recruited 329 obese subjects: 203 female (BMI 43,74 kg/m2 ± 0.5 SE; age 17–83 years, 58.33 ± 0.9 SE) and 126 male (BMI 44,27kg/m2 ± 0.7 DE age 27–79 years, 58.84 ± 1 SE). To assess dizziness we used the validated Italian version (38) of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). Results Out of the experimental sample, 100 subjects did not complain of dizziness and felt confident about their balance control, while 69.6% reported some degree of dizziness. Their mean DHI score was 22.3, which corresponds to mild dizziness. Twenty-one percent reported more severe dizziness (DHI score > 40). The majority of our sample reported minor dizziness and its perception appears to be independent from BMI: DHI scores were consistent across classes of obesity. Discussion The rate of dizziness and falls (30.1%) in an this obese population was higher than that previously reported in a general matched population. However, obese subjects, in our sample, seem to underestimate their risk of fall and DHI score does not appear a reliable predictor of falls. Since complications associated with falls in obese persons generally require longer treatments than in lean individuals, our findings should be taken into account in order to identify other predictors, including cognitive and perceptual, of risk of fall and to implement fall prevention programs. PMID:28076370

  5. Testing a fall risk model for injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Barbara; Templin, Thomas N; Goldberg, Allon

    2012-01-01

    Fall risk is a critical component of clinical assessment and has not been examined for persons who have injected illicit drugs and are aging. The aim of this study was to test and develop the Fall Risk Model for Injection Drug Users by examining the relationships among injection drug use, chronic venous insufficiency, lower extremity impairments (i.e., decreased ankle range of motion, reduced calf muscle endurance, and leg pain), age and other covariates, and the Tinetti balance and gait total score as a measure of fall risk. A cross-sectional comparative design was used with four crossed factors. Standardized instruments were used to assess the variables. Moderated multiple regression with linear and quadratic trends in age was used to examine the nature of the relationship between the Tinetti balance and gait total and age and the potential moderating role of injection drug use. A prespecified series of models was tested. Participants (n = 713) were men (46.9%) and women with a mean age of 46.26 years and primarily African American (61.7%) in methadone treatment centers. The fall risk of a 48-year-old leg injector was comparable with the fall risk of a 69-year-old who had not injected drugs. Variables were added to the model sequentially, resulting in some lost significance of some when they were explained by subsequent variables. Final significant variables in the model were employment status, number of comorbidities, ankle range of motion, leg pain, and calf muscle endurance. Fall risk was associated with route of drug use. Lower extremity impairments accounted for the effects of injection drug use and chronic venous insufficiency on risk for falls. Further understanding of fall risk in injection users is necessary as they age, attempt to work, and participate in activities.

  6. Analysis of Android Device-Based Solutions for Fall Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilari, Eduardo; Luque, Rafael; Morón, María-José

    2015-01-01

    Falls are a major cause of health and psychological problems as well as hospitalization costs among older adults. Thus, the investigation on automatic Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) has received special attention from the research community during the last decade. In this area, the widespread popularity, decreasing price, computing capabilities, built-in sensors and multiplicity of wireless interfaces of Android-based devices (especially smartphones) have fostered the adoption of this technology to deploy wearable and inexpensive architectures for fall detection. This paper presents a critical and thorough analysis of those existing fall detection systems that are based on Android devices. The review systematically classifies and compares the proposals of the literature taking into account different criteria such as the system architecture, the employed sensors, the detection algorithm or the response in case of a fall alarms. The study emphasizes the analysis of the evaluation methods that are employed to assess the effectiveness of the detection process. The review reveals the complete lack of a reference framework to validate and compare the proposals. In addition, the study also shows that most research works do not evaluate the actual applicability of the Android devices (with limited battery and computing resources) to fall detection solutions. PMID:26213928

  7. Analysis of Android Device-Based Solutions for Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Casilari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Falls are a major cause of health and psychological problems as well as hospitalization costs among older adults. Thus, the investigation on automatic Fall Detection Systems (FDSs has received special attention from the research community during the last decade. In this area, the widespread popularity, decreasing price, computing capabilities, built-in sensors and multiplicity of wireless interfaces of Android-based devices (especially smartphones have fostered the adoption of this technology to deploy wearable and inexpensive architectures for fall detection. This paper presents a critical and thorough analysis of those existing fall detection systems that are based on Android devices. The review systematically classifies and compares the proposals of the literature taking into account different criteria such as the system architecture, the employed sensors, the detection algorithm or the response in case of a fall alarms. The study emphasizes the analysis of the evaluation methods that are employed to assess the effectiveness of the detection process. The review reveals the complete lack of a reference framework to validate and compare the proposals. In addition, the study also shows that most research works do not evaluate the actual applicability of the Android devices (with limited battery and computing resources to fall detection solutions.

  8. The Association Between Anxiety and Falls: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallford, David John; Nicholson, Geoff; Sanders, Kerrie; McCabe, Marita P

    2017-09-01

    Falls occur frequently among older adults and can lead to a range of adverse and debilitating outcomes. Although symptoms of clinical anxiety have been implicated as risk factors for falls, there is no current consensus on the empirical association between anxiety and falls. The current study aimed to address this gap in the literature by conducting a quantitative, meta-analytic review of findings from previous studies. A systematic literature search of bibliographic databases was conducted, yielding 18 studies that fit the criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. A random-effects model of all 18 studies showed a significant overall odds ratio of 1.53 (95% CI 1.28-1.83, p anxiety were associated with a 53% increased likelihood of falls. A high amount of variance among effect sizes was observed. Only age was identified as a moderator of this relationship in a subgroup of the samples. Clinical anxiety is associated with falls, however, further research is required to elucidate the factors that might moderate or mediate this relationship, the casual pathways through which they are related, and the associations between different types of anxiety and falls.

  9. Fall scenarios In causing older women's hip fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägvide, Mona-Lisa; Larsson, Tore J; Borell, Lena

    2013-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries among older women constitute a major public health problem with huge costs for the society and personal suffering. The aim of this study was to describe and illustrate how a number of circumstances, conceptualized as a scenario, that were related to the individual, the environment, and the ongoing occupation contributed to a fall that led to a hip fracture among women. The sample included 48 women over 55 years old. Interviews were conducted during home visits and the analysis provided a descriptive picture of circumstances in the shape of a scenario related to the risk of falling. A number of scenarios were developed based on the data and named to provide an understanding of the interplay between the individual, the environment, and the ongoing occupation at the time of the fall. By applying the concept of a scenario, occupational therapists can increase the awareness of fall risks among older people, and are relevant also for interior designers, architects, and town planners to consider when designing the local environment as well as furniture and other objects.

  10. Factors associated with the completion of falls prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Anamica; Page, Timothy; Melchior, Michael; Seff, Laura; Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Palmer, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    Falls and fear of falling can affect independence and quality of life of older adults. Falls prevention programs may help avoiding these issues if completed. Understanding factors that are associated with completion of falls prevention programs is important. To reduce fear of falling and increase activity levels, a Matter of Balance (MOB) and un Asunto de Equilibrio (ADE) workshops were offered to 3420 older adults in South Florida between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2011. Workshops were conducted in English or Spanish over eight, 2-hour sessions. Participants completed a demographic and a pre-post questionnaire. Factors associated with program completion were identified using logistic regression. For MOB, females were more likely to complete the program (OR = 2.076, P = 0.02). For ADE, females, moderate and extreme interference by falls in social activities were found to affect completion (OR = 2.116, P = 0.001; OR = 2.269, P = 0.003 and OR = 4.133, P = 0.008, respectively). Different factors predicted completion of both programs. Awareness of these factors can help lower the attrition rates, increase benefits and cost effectiveness of program. Future research needs to explore why certain groups had a higher likelihood of completing either program.

  11. Clinical Prediction of Fall Risk and White Matter Abnormalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Bang-Bon; Bergethon, Peter; Qiu, Wei Qiao; Scott, Tammy; Hussain, Mohammed; Rosenberg, Irwin; Caplan, Louis R.; Bhadelia, Rafeeque A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Tinetti scale is a simple clinical tool designed to predict risk of falling by focusing on gait and stance impairment in elderly persons. Gait impairment is also associated with white matter (WM) abnormalities. Objective To test the hypothesis that elderly subjects at risk for falling, as determined by the Tinetti scale, have specific patterns of WM abnormalities on diffusion tensor imaging. Design, Setting, and Patients Community-based cohort of 125 homebound elderly individuals. Main Outcome Measures Diffusion tensor imaging scans were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics analysis to determine the location of WM abnormalities in subjects with Tinetti scale scores of 25 or higher (without risk of falls) and lower than 25 (with risk of falls). Multivariate linear least squares correlation analysis was performed to determine the association between Tinetti scale scores and local fractional anisotropy values on each skeletal voxel controlling for possible confounders. Results In subjects with risk of falls (Tinetti scale score scores, while the other locations were unrelated to these scores. Conclusions Elderly individuals at risk for falls as determined by the Tinetti scale have WM abnormalities in specific locations on diffusion tensor imaging, some of which correlate with cognitive function scores. PMID:22332181

  12. Analysis of Android Device-Based Solutions for Fall Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilari, Eduardo; Luque, Rafael; Morón, María-José

    2015-07-23

    Falls are a major cause of health and psychological problems as well as hospitalization costs among older adults. Thus, the investigation on automatic Fall Detection Systems (FDSs) has received special attention from the research community during the last decade. In this area, the widespread popularity, decreasing price, computing capabilities, built-in sensors and multiplicity of wireless interfaces of Android-based devices (especially smartphones) have fostered the adoption of this technology to deploy wearable and inexpensive architectures for fall detection. This paper presents a critical and thorough analysis of those existing fall detection systems that are based on Android devices. The review systematically classifies and compares the proposals of the literature taking into account different criteria such as the system architecture, the employed sensors, the detection algorithm or the response in case of a fall alarms. The study emphasizes the analysis of the evaluation methods that are employed to assess the effectiveness of the detection process. The review reveals the complete lack of a reference framework to validate and compare the proposals. In addition, the study also shows that most research works do not evaluate the actual applicability of the Android devices (with limited battery and computing resources) to fall detection solutions.

  13. Epidemiology of falls and osteoporotic fractures: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alan Morrison,1 Tao Fan,2 Shuvayu S Sen,2 Lauren Weisenfluh11SCRIBCO, Effort, PA, 2Global Health Outcomes, Merck and Co, Inc, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USABackground and methods: Fractures in elderly populations result from the combination of falls and osteoporosis. We report a systematic review of studies indexed in PubMed reporting annual rates of low-trauma falls and associated osteoporotic fractures among older community-dwelling people (age ≥ 50 years. An osteoporotic fracture was defined as either a fracture resulting from a low-impact fall in subjects with clinical osteoporosis, a fall resulting in an investigator-defined osteoporotic fracture, or a fall resulting in a low-trauma fracture. Rates are presented using descriptive statistics. Meta-analysis was conducted for statistically homogeneous data sets.Results: The median (range annual fall prevalence rates (median proportion of people who experienced one or more falls during the past year for cohorts of women and men (10 determinations, women alone (seven determinations, and men alone (four determinations were, respectively, 0.334 (0.217–0.625, 0.460 (0.372–0.517, and 0.349 (0.284–0.526. In studies that reported fall prevalence rates for Western men and women separately (four determinations, the pooled risk ratio (95% confidence interval [CI] for men versus women was 0.805 (95% CI 0.721–0.900. The ranges of fall prevalence rates in East Asian women (two studies and East Asian men (two studies were, respectively, 0.163–0.258 and 0.087–0.184. The risk ratio (95% CI for fall prevalence in East Asian men versus women was 0.634 (0.479–0.838 in studies (two determinations reporting results for East Asian men and women separately. In cohorts of Western women and men (five determinations, the pooled rate (95% CI of low-impact falls resulting in fractures was 0.041 (0.031–0.054. The proportion of low-trauma fractures attributable to falls among the Western community

  14. The economics of preventing hospital falls: demonstrating ROI through a simple model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Brown, Diane S; Aydin, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the cost savings associated with implementing nursing approaches to prevent in-hospital falls. Hospital rating programs often report fall rates, and performance-based payment systems force hospitals to bear the costs of treating patients after falls. Some interventions have been demonstrated as effective for falls prevention. Costs of falls-prevention programs, financial savings associated with in-hospital falls reduction, and achievable fall rate improvement are measured using published literature. Net costs are calculated for implementing a falls-prevention program as compared with not making improvements in patient fall rates. Falls-prevention programs can reduce the cost of treatment, but in many scenarios, the costs of falls-prevention programs were greater than potential cost savings. Falls-prevention programs need to be carefully targeted to patients at greatest risk in order to achieve cost savings.

  15. 75 FR 61772 - Meeting of the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park Advisory Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ... National Park Service Meeting of the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park Advisory Commission... of the meeting of the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park Advisory Commission. DATES: The.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Bill Bolger, Project Director, Paterson Great Falls...

  16. 77 FR 1721 - Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park Federal Advisory Commission Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... National Park Service Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park Federal Advisory Commission Meetings... the 2012 meetings of the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park Federal Advisory Commission..., NJ. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Superintendent; Paterson Great Falls National Historical...

  17. Adoption of Evidence-Based Fall Prevention Practices in Primary Care for Older Adults with a History of Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Aerts, Sally; Dowler, David; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Casey, Colleen M.

    2016-01-01

    A multifactorial approach to assess and manage modifiable risk factors is recommended for older adults with a history of falls. Limited research suggests that this approach does not routinely occur in clinical practice, but most related studies are based on provider self-report, with the last chart audit of United States practice published over a decade ago. We conducted a retrospective chart review to assess the extent to which patients aged 65+ years with a history of repeated falls or fall-related health-care use received multifactorial risk assessment and interventions. The setting was an academic primary care clinic in the Pacific Northwest. Among the 116 patients meeting our inclusion criteria, 48% had some type of documented assessment. Their mean age was 79 ± 8 years; 68% were female, and 10% were non-white. They averaged six primary care visits over a 12-month period subsequent to their index fall. Frequency of assessment of fall-risk factors varied from 24% (for home safety) to 78% (for vitamin D). An evidence-based intervention was recommended for identified risk factors 73% of the time, on average. Two risk factors were addressed infrequently: medications (21%) and home safety (24%). Use of a structured visit note template independently predicted assessment of fall-risk factors (p = 0.003). Geriatrics specialists were more likely to use a structured note template (p = 0.04) and perform more fall-risk factor assessments (4.6 vs. 3.6, p = 0.007) than general internists. These results suggest opportunities for improving multifactorial fall-risk assessment and management of older adults at high fall risk in primary care. A structured visit note template facilitates assessment. Given that high-risk medications have been found to be independent risk factors for falls, increasing attention to medications should become a key focus of both public health educational efforts and fall prevention in primary care practice. PMID:27660753

  18. Effect of dissemination of evidence in reducing injuries from falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Mary E; Baker, Dorothy I; King, Mary; Gottschalk, Margaret; Murphy, Terrence E; Acampora, Denise; Carlin, Bradley P; Leo-Summers, Linda; Allore, Heather G

    2008-07-17

    Falling is a common and morbid condition among elderly persons. Effective strategies to prevent falls have been identified but are underutilized. Using a nonrandomized design, we compared rates of injuries from falls in a region of Connecticut where clinicians had been exposed to interventions to change clinical practice (intervention region) and in a region where clinicians had not been exposed to such interventions (usual-care region). The interventions encouraged primary care clinicians and staff members involved in home care, outpatient rehabilitation, and senior centers to adopt effective risk assessments and strategies for the prevention of falls (e.g., medication reduction and balance and gait training). The outcomes were rates of serious fall-related injuries (hip and other fractures, head injuries, and joint dislocations) and fall-related use of medical services per 1000 person-years among persons who were 70 years of age or older. The interventions occurred from 2001 to 2004, and the evaluations took place from 2004 to 2006. Before the interventions, the adjusted rates of serious fall-related injuries (per 1000 person-years) were 31.2 in the usual-care region and 31.9 in the intervention region. During the evaluation period, the adjusted rates were 31.4 and 28.6, respectively (adjusted rate ratio, 0.91; 95% Bayesian credibility interval, 0.88 to 0.94). Between the preintervention period and the evaluation period, the rate of fall-related use of medical services increased from 68.1 to 83.3 per 1000 person-years in the usual-care region and from 70.7 to 74.2 in the intervention region (adjusted rate ratio, 0.89; 95% credibility interval, 0.86 to 0.92). The percentages of clinicians who received intervention visits ranged from 62% (131 of 212 primary care offices) to 100% (26 of 26 home care agencies). Dissemination of evidence about fall prevention, coupled with interventions to change clinical practice, may reduce fall-related injuries in elderly persons

  19. The falling risk and physical fitness in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Ayşe; Yildirim, Necmiye Un

    2010-01-01

    Aims of this study was to analyze the correlation between the falling risk and their physical fitness, determining the top parameters affecting the falling risk, and preparing an evaluation procedure for the medical department working on this issue for the old people in retirement homes. This study includes 60 persons whose mean age was 73.3+/-6.6 years. Their demographic characteristics, cognitive function, their balance, falling risk and their physical fitness level have been evaluated. A survey has been done to determine their demographic features. The cognitive function was determined using mini-mental state examination (MMSE) test; for falling risk the Berg balance test (BBT) and balance by standing on one foot test were used, and the physical fitness was determined by senior fitness test (SFT). While the BBT correlation between chair stand, arm curl and 2-min step test are positive; but the correlation between BBT and '8-foot up-and-go test' were negative. However, there was no correlation between the BBT and chair sit-and-reach test, back scratch test (p>0.05). Due to the results of logistic regression models in order to find out the variations affecting the falling risk most, it has been showed that '8-foot up-and-go test' was reliable. Additionally the subjects probability performing the '8-foot up-and-go' before 8.14s was OR=11 (95% confidence interval=95%CI=2.25-53.84) times more with maximum 56 points in BBT. We have shown that the falling risk increases with declining of upper and lower extremity muscle strength, aerobic endurance, agility and dynamic balance performance. Agility and dynamic balance performance were mostly relevant with falling risk. We concluded that the old persons' falling risk and physical fitness level should be evaluated in some intervals. According to their falling risks and physical fitness level, the rehabilitation programs should be programmed to decrease their falling risk, and to increase lower and upper extremity muscle

  20. The Complex Interplay of Depression and Falls in Older Adults: A Clinical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Iaboni, Andrea; Flint, Alastair J.

    2013-01-01

    Depression and falls have a significant bidirectional relationship. Excessive fear of falling, which is frequently associated with depression, also increases the risk of falls. Both depression and fear of falling are associated with impairment of gait and balance, an association that is mediated through cognitive, sensory, and motor pathways. The management of depression in fall-prone individuals is challenging, since antidepressant medications can increase the risk of falls, selective seroto...