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Sample records for moose jaw advanced

  1. Trace of remote past life: visiting Moose Jaw%久远生活的存照——探访Moose Jaw

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马智

    2011-01-01

    @@ 到加拿大一年多的时候,终于有了一次去外地观光的机会.所谓外地,其实并不遥远,就是距我所暂居的萨斯喀彻温省(Saskatchewan)的首府Regina 70千米,不过四五十分钟车程的小城Moose Jaw.

  2. Censusing Moose

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Because much of the range of moose is remote from population centers, and because large Moose populations have developed relatively recently, little effort has been...

  3. Moose Correspondence

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a series of letters and maps that were exchanged between Dr. Ueckermann in Germany and David Spencer at Kenai National Moose Range. The letters focus on...

  4. Hybrid fixation in the bilateral sagittal split osteotomy for lower jaw advancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Ladeira Pereira

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Miniplate and screw fixation has been widely used in bilateral sagittal split osteotomy, but some issues remain unclear concerning its lack of rigidity when compared to Spiessl's bicortical technique. This paper demonstrates the hybrid fixation technique in a case report. A 34-year-old female patient underwent a double jaw surgery with counter-clockwise rotation of the mandible fixed using the hybrid fixation technique. The patient evolved well in the postoperative period and is still under follow up after 14 months, reporting satisfaction with the results and no significant deviation from the treatment plan up to now. No damage to tooth roots was done, maxillomandibular range of motion was within normality and regression of the inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia was observed bilaterally. The hybrid mandibular fixation is clearly visible in the panoramic and cephalometric control radiographs. It seems that the hybrid fixation can sum the advantages of both monocortical and bicortical techniques in lower jaw advancement, increasing fixation stability without significant damage to the mandibular articulation and the inferior alveolar nerve. A statistical investigation seems necessary to prove its efficacy.

  5. Monster Moose Reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Frank

    Monster Moose (MM) Reading is a program specifically aimed at improving children's language, beginning reading, and self-concept development through the creation and utilization of student-authored reading materials which feature a series of wordless picture books about a magical moose. The MM Program is based on the following general principles…

  6. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of jaws in advanced stage breast cancer was detected from bone scan: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirappapha, Prakasit; Thongjood, Thanaporn; Aroonroch, Rangsima

    2017-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are indicated to treat skeletal-related events (SREs) for cancer patients with bone metastasis. We report a 79-year-old woman with advanced stage breast cancer with bone metastasis who was prescribed BPs (zoledronate), then developed osteonecrosis of jaw. We provide a brief review of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this complication. PMID:28210558

  7. Surgical resection and vascularized bone reconstruction in advanced stage medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldroney, S; Ghazali, N; Dyalram, D; Lubek, J E

    2017-07-01

    A retrospective review of all patients with stage 3 medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ), treated by surgical resection and immediate vascularized bone reconstruction at a tertiary care medical center, was performed. Eleven patients were included, seven female and four male; their mean age was 65.8 years (range 56-73 years). Mean follow-up was 25 months. Ten patients had received intravenous bisphosphonates. The most common pathology was breast cancer (4/11). Pain (n=8) and pathological fracture (n=7) were the most common presenting symptoms. Microvascular free flaps consisted of seven fibula osteocutaneous flaps and four scapula osteocutaneous free flaps. All patients reported resolution of symptoms, with complete bone union identified radiographically (100%). Complications occurred in three patients (27%). One patient required removal of hardware at 8 months postoperative. Dental implant rehabilitation was completed in two patients. Ten patients are tolerating an oral diet. Ten patients are alive without evidence of MRONJ at any of the surgical sites. One patient died 28 months after surgery from progression of metastatic disease. Advanced MRONJ can be successfully treated in patients using vascularized tissue transfer, including those patients with significant peripheral vascular disease. Dental rehabilitation is a viable option for advanced MRONJ patients treated by vascularized flap reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Moose management on the Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers moose management on the Kenai National Moose Range. Topics covered include range conditions, populations, hunting regulations, and research needs.

  9. Nowitna NWR moose survey, 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 1988 Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge moose survey was conducted over a 147.8 square mile portion of the Lower Nowitna Trend Area. A total of 409 moose was...

  10. Feeding profiles of tame moose

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the feeding profiles of tame moose. 3 moose were observed for 99 hours while in natural range, each bite plant species, browse conditions and size...

  11. The effect of the jaw-thrust manoeuvre on the ability to advance a tracheal tube over a bronchoscope during oral fibreoptic intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, S H; Oh, A Y; Jung, C W; Park, S J; Kim, J H; Nahm, F S

    2013-05-01

    During fibreoptic intubation, it is often difficult to advance a tracheal tube over the fibreoptic bronchoscope. We performed a prospective randomised study to investigate the effect of the jaw-thrust manoeuvre on the ability to advance a tracheal tube during oral fibreoptic intubation. After placing the bronchoscope in the trachea, an assistant randomly applied a jaw-thrust manoeuvre (jaw-thrust group) or sham manoeuvre (control group) in 82 patients during tube advancement. The jaw-thrust group had a higher success rate on the first attempt (70.7% vs 34.1%, p = 0.002), required fewer attempts (median (IQR [range]) 1 (1-2 [1-3]) vs 2 (1-3 [1-4]), p thrust manoeuvre facilitates the advancement of a tracheal tube over the bronchoscope during oral fibreoptic intubation. Anaesthesia © 2013 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Yukon Flats cooperative moose management plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Moose management plan designed to promote an increase in the moose populations in the following ways. Improve moose harvest reporting to better document subsistence...

  13. PyMOOSE: Interoperable Scripting in Python for MOOSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Subhasis; Bhalla, Upinder S

    2008-01-01

    Python is emerging as a common scripting language for simulators. This opens up many possibilities for interoperability in the form of analysis, interfaces, and communications between simulators. We report the integration of Python scripting with the Multi-scale Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE). MOOSE is a general-purpose simulation system for compartmental neuronal models and for models of signaling pathways based on chemical kinetics. We show how the Python-scripting version of MOOSE, PyMOOSE, combines the power of a compiled simulator with the versatility and ease of use of Python. We illustrate this by using Python numerical libraries to analyze MOOSE output online, and by developing a GUI in Python/Qt for a MOOSE simulation. Finally, we build and run a composite neuronal/signaling model that uses both the NEURON and MOOSE numerical engines, and Python as a bridge between the two. Thus PyMOOSE has a high degree of interoperability with analysis routines, with graphical toolkits, and with other simulators.

  14. PyMOOSE: interoperable scripting in Python for MOOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasis Ray

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Python is emerging as a common scripting language for simulators. This opens up many possibilities for interoperability in the form of analysis, interfaces, and communications between simulators. We report the integration of Python scripting with the Multi-scale Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE. MOOSE is a general-purpose simulation system for compartmental neuronal models and for models of signaling pathways based on chemical kinetics. We show how the Python-scripting version of MOOSE, PyMOOSE, combines the power of a compiled simulator with the versatility and ease of use of Python. We illustrate this by using Python numerical libraries to analyze MOOSE output online, and by developing a GUI in Python/Qt for a MOOSE simulation. Finally, we build and run a composite neuronal/signaling model that uses both the NEURON and MOOSE numerical engines, and Python as a bridge between the two. Thus PyMOOSE has a high degree of interoperability with analysis routines, with graphical toolkits, and with other simulators.

  15. Über salztolerante Moose

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm, Jens; Meßner, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    In den Jahren 2008 und 2009 wurde die Moosflora ausgewählter Stellen an den Küsten von Nordsee (Nordfriesland) und Ostsee Moose untersucht. 16 Arten wurden an direkt vom Salzwasser beeinflussten Standorten gesammelt. Diese Funde werdenmit derMoosflora der Ostfriesischen Inseln verglichen; die Ökologie und Salztoleranz der Moose werden diskutiert.

  16. Moose calving areas and use on the Kenai National Moose Range, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In this paper we describe the locations of several known moose calving areas on the Kenai National Moose Range, the features and vegetation in the Moose-Chickaloon...

  17. Quantum Modified Mooses

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, S; Chang, Spencer; Georgi, Howard

    2003-01-01

    We summarize our findings on the quantum moduli constraints and superpotentials of an infinite family of moose extensions of $n_f = n_c$ SUSY QCD. For $n_c=2$, we perform concrete calculations using traditional integrating out techniques as well as Intriligator's ``integrating in'' technique. Checking the constraints and superpotentials in the limits of setting $\\Lambda$'s to zero or integrating out mass terms, we find that the quantum moduli constraints are local in theory space and are equivalent to a consistent structure of ``splitting relations'' amongst the different theories. Extending the results to arbitrary $n_c$, we show that the splitting relations, along with a set of rules for flowing from a high energy theory to a low energy theory, incorporate much of the physics of the moose chain. The relations can be used both to simplify perturbative calculations of symmetry breaking and to incorporate nonperturbative effects. We illustrate this by analyzing an example of a deconstructed fifth dimension, an...

  18. Quantum modified mooses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Spencer E-mail: chang@physics.harvard.edu; Georgi, Howard E-mail: georgi@physics.harvard.edu

    2003-11-10

    We summarize our findings on the quantum moduli constraints and superpotentials of an infinite family of moose extensions of n{sub f}=n{sub c} SUSY QCD. For n{sub c}=2, we perform concrete calculations using traditional integrating out techniques as well as Intriligator's 'integrating in' technique. Checking the constraints and superpotentials in the limits of setting {lambda}'s to zero or integrating out mass terms, we find that the quantum moduli constraints are local in theory space and are equivalent to a consistent structure of 'splitting relations' amongst the different theories. Extending the results to arbitrary n{sub c}, we show that the splitting relations, along with a set of rules for flowing from a high energy theory to a low energy theory, incorporate much of the physics of the moose chain. The relations can be used both to simplify perturbative calculations of symmetry breaking and to incorporate nonperturbative effects.

  19. PyMOOSE: interoperable scripting in Python for MOOSE

    OpenAIRE

    Subhasis Ray; Bhalla, Upinder S.

    2008-01-01

    Python is emerging as a common scripting language for simulators. This opens up many possibilities for interoperability in the form of analysis, interfaces, and communications between simulators. We report the integration of Python scripting with the Multi-scale Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE). MOOSE is a general-purpose simulation system for compartmental neuronal models and for models of signaling pathways based on chemical kinetics. We show how the Python-scripting version ...

  20. Kenai National Moose Range Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This book presents a summary of the history, wildlife, recreational opportunities, economic uses, and future plans for Kenai National Moose Range.

  1. Fort Richardson moose tagging project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Of the big game animals that inhabit the Fort Richardson-Elmendorf AFB military reservation, moose (Alces a1ces gigas) are the predominant species and may be found...

  2. The Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the geological history, early settlement, game resources, early conservation interests, and establishment of Kenai National Moose Range.

  3. Browse quality and the Kenai moose population

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the browse quality and the Kenai moose population. The quality of moose forage on the north western Kenai Peninsula was evaluated by determining...

  4. Jaw Dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Article Medical Dictionary Also of Interest (Quiz) Biology of the Mouth (Video) Root Canal Additional Content Medical News Jaw Dislocation By David F. Murchison, DDS, MMS, Clinical Professor, Department of Biological Sciences;Clinical Professor, The University ...

  5. The influence of winter severity, predation and senescence on moose habitat use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Robert A; Vucetich, John A; Peterson, Rolf O; Roloff, Gary J; Millenbah, Kelly F

    2013-03-01

    Habitat use is widely known to be influenced by abiotic and biotic factors, such as climate, population density, foraging opportunity and predation risk. The influence of the life-history state of an individual organism on habitat use is less well understood, especially for terrestrial mammals. There is good reason to expect that life-history state would affect habitat use. For example, organisms exhibiting poor condition associated with senescence have an increased vulnerability to predation and that vulnerability is known to alter habitat use strategies. We assessed the influence of life-history stage on habitat use for 732 moose (Alces alces) killed by wolves (Canis lupus) over a 50-year period in Isle Royale National Park, an island ecosystem in Lake Superior, USA. We developed regression models to assess how location of death was associated with a moose's life-history stage (prime-aged or senescent), presence or absence of senescent-associated pathology (osteoarthritis and jaw necrosis), and annual variation in winter severity, moose density and ratio of moose to wolves, which is an index of predation risk. Compared to senescent moose, prime-aged moose tend to make greater use of habitat farther from the shoreline of Isle Royale. That result is ecologically relevant because shoreline habitat on Isle Royale tends to provide better foraging opportunities for moose but is also associated with increased predation risk. During severe winters prime-aged moose tend to make greater use of habitat that is closer to shore in relation to senescent-aged moose. Furthermore, moose of both age classes were more likely to die in riskier, shoreline habitat during years when predation risk was lower in the preceding year. Our results highlight a complicated connection between life history, age-structured population dynamics and habitat-related behaviour. Our analysis also illustrates why intraspecific competition should not be the presumed mechanism underlying density

  6. Nowitna NWR moose survey, 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — 448 moose were observed. Calf:cow ratios (60:100) and twinning rates (13:100) were indicative of good production and survival to six months of age for the 1987...

  7. M3MS-16OR0401086 – Report on NEAMS Workbench Support for MOOSE Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefebvre, Robert A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Langley, Brandon R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Thompson, Adam B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

    2016-09-23

    This report summarizes the status of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Workbench from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the integration of the MOOSE framework. This report marks the completion of NEAMS milestone M3MS-16OR0401086. This report documents the developed infrastructure to support the MOOSE framework applications, the applications’ results, visualization status, the collaboration that facilitated this progress, and future considerations.

  8. Moose census, Fort Richardson, Ship Creek Drainage, November 1981, and moose hunt recommendations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Provides results of a helicopter aerial survey for moose to determine populations and the recommendations for moose harvest including numbers, age ratio, and...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment of jaws and ... Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is best performed by ...

  10. The Balancing Act of Moose and Wolves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Gordon C.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the predator-prey relationship between the moose and the wolves, and the added effect of human exploitations on this relationship. Described is the moose behavior at the population and system levels resulting from the predation pressures on them by the wolves and human exploitation. (DS)

  11. High elaeophorosis prevalence among harvested Colorado moose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVan, Ivy K; Fox, Karen A; Miller, Michael W

    2013-07-01

    Infection with Elaeophora schneideri, a filarial parasite, occurs commonly in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), but seemingly less so in moose (Alces alces). Of 109 carotid artery samples from moose harvested throughout Colorado, USA, in 2007, 14 (13%; 95% binomial confidence interval [bCI]=7-21%) showed gross and 91 (83%; 95% bCI=75-90%) showed histologic evidence of elaeophorosis. Although neither blindness nor other clinical signs associated with elaeophorosis were reported among the harvested moose we examined, the pervasiveness of this parasite may motivate further study of the potential effects of elaeophorosis on moose survival and population performance in the southern Rocky Mountains. Our data suggest histopathology may be more sensitive than gross examination in detecting elaeophorosis in harvested moose.

  12. Characterization of moose intestinal glycosphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Miralda Madar; Dedic, Benjamin; Lundholm, Klara; Branzell, Filip Berner; Barone, Angela; Benktander, John; Teneberg, Susann

    2015-08-01

    As a part of a systematic investigation of the species-specific expression of glycosphingolipids, acid and non-acid glycosphingolipids were isolated from three small intestines and one large intestine of the moose (Alces alces). The glycosphingolipids were characterized by binding of monoclonal antibodies, lectins and bacteria in chromatogram binding assays, and by mass spectrometry. The non-acid fractions were complex mixtures, and all had glycosphingolipids belonging to the lacto- and neolactoseries (lactotriaosylceramide, lactotetraosylceramide, neolactotetraosylceramide, Galα3-Le(x) hexaosylceramide, and lacto-neolactohexaosylceramide), globo-series (globotriaosylceramide and globotetraosylceramide), and isogloboseries (isoglobotriaosylceramide). Penta- and heptaglycosylceramides with terminal Galili determinants were also characterized. Furthermore, glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group O determinants (H triaosylceramide, H type 2 pentaosylceramide, H type 1 penta- and heptaosylceramide) were characterized in two of the moose small intestines, and in the one large intestine, while the third small intestine had glycosphingolipids with terminal blood group A determinants (A tetraosylceramide, A type 1 hexa- and octaosylceramide, A dodecaosylceramide). The acid glycosphingolipid fractions of moose small and large intestine contained sulfatide, and the gangliosides GM3, GD3, GD1a, GD1b, and also NeuGc and NeuAc variants of the Sd(a) ganglioside and the sialyl-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside. In humans, the NeuAc-globopenta/SSEA-4 ganglioside is a marker of embryonic and adult stem cells, and is also expressed in several human cancers. This is the first time sialyl-globopentaosylceramide/SSEA-4 has been characterized in a fully differentiated normal tissue, and also the first time NeuGc-globopentaosylceramide has been characterized.

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on many aspects of life. Following are some of the conditions that may indicate the need for corrective jaw surgery: Difficulty chewing, or biting food Difficulty swallowing Chronic jaw or jaw joint (TMJ) ...

  14. Temperature mediated moose survival in Northeastern Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarz, M.S.; Nelson, M.E.; Schrage, M.W.; Edwards, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The earth is in the midst of a pronounced warming trend and temperatures in Minnesota, USA, as elsewhere, are projected to increase. Northern Minnesota represents the southern edge to the circumpolar distribution of moose (Alces alces), a species intolerant of heat. Moose increase their metabolic rate to regulate their core body temperature as temperatures rise. We hypothesized that moose survival rates would be a function of the frequency and magnitude that ambient temperatures exceeded the upper critical temperature of moose. We compared annual and seasonal moose survival in northeastern Minnesota between 2002 and 2008 with a temperature metric. We found that models based on January temperatures above the critical threshold were inversely correlated with subsequent survival and explained >78 of variability in spring, fall, and annual survival. Models based on late-spring temperatures also explained a high proportion of survival during the subsequent fall. A model based on warm-season temperatures was important in explaining survival during the subsequent winter. Our analyses suggest that temperatures may have a cumulative influence on survival. We expect that continuation or acceleration of current climate trends will result in decreased survival, a decrease in moose density, and ultimately, a retreat of moose northward from their current distribution.

  15. Grandfather Moose: Sign Language Nursery Rhymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Harley

    1987-01-01

    "Grandfather Moose" rhymes, written to follow the Mother Goose tradition, are short, appealing, easy-to-memorize sign language nursery rhymes which employ visual poetic devices such as similar signs and transitional flow of movement. (CB)

  16. Moose models with vanishing $S$ parameter

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, R; Dominici, Daniele

    2004-01-01

    In the linear moose framework, which naturally emerges in deconstruction models, we show that there is a unique solution for the vanishing of the $S$ parameter at the lowest order in the weak interactions. We consider an effective gauge theory based on $K$ SU(2) gauge groups, $K+1$ chiral fields and electroweak groups $SU(2)_L$ and $U(1)_Y$ at the ends of the chain of the moose. $S$ vanishes when a link in the moose chain is cut. As a consequence one has to introduce a dynamical non local field connecting the two ends of the moose. Then the model acquires an additional custodial symmetry which protects this result. We examine also the possibility of a strong suppression of $S$ through an exponential behavior of the link couplings as suggested by Randall Sundrum metric.

  17. Kenai National Moose Range : Narrative report 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1974 fiscal year. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  18. Fort Richardson moose range rehabilitation program

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Areas to be rehabilitated have been selected for traditional winter moose range along the Glen Highway on Fort Richardson. We use a field reconnaissance to...

  19. Recreational Management Plan: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Kenai National Moose Range, located on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska, was established by Executive Order 8979 on December I6, 1941. This action withdrew all lands...

  20. Kenai National Moose Range : Narrative report : 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  1. Is It Moose-Mooses or Moose-Meese? First Grade Activity. Schools of California Online Resources for Education (SCORE): Connecting California's Classrooms to the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speed, Christie

    You (the student) have been selected to be the school librarian's helper today. You are going to help her shelve books about moose. But you will have to read the books before you shelve them to decide if they are fictional storybooks about moose or nonfictional books about moose. You will decide if the books are real (nonfiction) or make believe…

  2. NEAMS-IPL MOOSE Midyear Framework Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permann, Cody [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alger, Brian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Peterson, John [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Slaughter, Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Andrš, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-05-09

    The MOOSE Framework is a modular pluggable framework for building complex simulations. The ability to add new objects with custom syntax is a core capability that makes MOOSE a powerful platform for coupling multiple applications together within a single environment. The creation of a new, more standardized JSON syntax output improves the external interfaces for generating graphical components or for validating input file syntax. The design of this interface and the requirements it satisfies are covered in this short report.

  3. [Jaws of primitive mammals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubamoto, Takehisa

    2005-06-01

    Some of main osteological differences between mammals and reptiles are seen in the number of bones that constitute lower jaw and in jaw articulation. A lower jaw of mammals consists of only one bone, while in reptiles it consists of several bones (e.g., four to six in lizards and five in crocodiles). The jaw articulation in mammals is performed by squamosal of the skull and the mandible ( = dentary), while in reptiles it is done by quadrate of the skull and articular of the lower jaw. When mammals first appeared about 200 million years ago in the Mesozoic Era, the jaws of primitive mammals were morphologically intermediate between those of reptiles and typical mammals. Here, I briefly introduce the evolution of lower jaw morphology from the reptilian one to the mammalian one, showing lower jaw features of some mammal-like reptiles and primitive mammals.

  4. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and lower jaws and the orbits surrounding the eyes, and facial lacerations. Click here to find out ... and lower jaws and the orbits surrounding the eyes, and facial lacerations. Click here to find out ...

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  6. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  7. Moose/Habitat Management Plan : [Kenai National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Kenai NWR Moose/Habitat Management Plan was developed to guide future FWS management of moose/habitat on Kenai NWR. The present status and trend of Kenai NWR...

  8. Survey report: moose surveys in lower Chignik Unit, May 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Federal Subsistence Board requested that moose surveys be flown in the area of the lower Chignik Unit proposed for closure to non-qualified moose hunters by the...

  9. Adaptation of jaw closing muscles after surgical mandibular advancement procedures in different vertical craniofacial types : a magnetic resonance imaging study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dicker, Gertjan; Van Spronsen, Peter; Van Schijndel, Ronald; van Ginkel, Floris; Manoliu, Radu; Boom, Heleen; Tuinzing, D. Bram

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Surgical mandibular advancement influences the biomechanics of the mandible and as a result may provoke relapse. In this study, the adaptation of the masseter (MAS) and medial pterygoid muscles (MPM) after surgical mandibular advancement was evaluated. Study design. Of 12 patients with ma

  10. Moose Calving Areas and Use on the Kenai National Moose Range, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a study done on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge to determine which habitats moose prefer to calve in. The majority of observations of female...

  11. Sufentanil citrate immobilization of Alaskan moose calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreeger, Terry J; Kellie, Kalin A

    2012-10-01

    Free-ranging Alaskan moose calves (Alces alces gigas) were immobilized with 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil (S; n=16), 0.12 mg/kg sufentanil plus 0.27 mg/kg xylazine (SX; n=11), or 0.007 mg/kg carfentanil plus 0.36 mg/kg xylazine (CX; n=13). Immobilants were antagonized with 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone (S) or 1.2 mg/kg naltrexone plus 2.4 mg/kg tolazoline (SX, CX). There were no differences in induction (P ≥ 0.29) or processing (P ≥ 0.44) times between groups. Moose given either S or SX had significantly shorter recovery times than moose given CX (P=0.001) and recovery times from S were shorter than from SX (P=0.02). Oxygen saturation values for all groups averaged 85 ± 8%, but were significantly higher (P=0.048) for CX (89 ± 7%) than for S (82 ± 8%). Based on these data, sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg or sufentanil at 0.1 mg/kg plus xylazine at 0.25 mg/kg could provide effective remote immobilization for Alaskan moose calves and could be substituted for carfentanil or thiafentanil should the need arise.

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of jaws and teeth. Surgery can improve chewing, speaking and breathing. While the patient's appearance may be dramatically enhanced as a result of their surgery, orthognathic surgery is performed to correct functional problems. Jaw Surgery can have a dramatic effect on ...

  13. Effect of Roadside Vegetation Cutting on Moose Browsing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Tanner

    Full Text Available Moose (Alces americanus vehicle collisions (MVCs are an issue throughout the distribution of moose. Many mitigation strategies have been tested and implemented to reduce the number of MVCs, but there have been few empirical analyses of the effectiveness of roadside vegetation cutting. The goal of this study was to determine if roadside vegetation cutting attracted moose into roadside areas to browse on the vegetation regrowth. We hypothesized that moose would be attracted to roadside areas with cut vegetation. Consequently, we predicted that there would be higher levels of browsing in cut areas compared to uncut areas. To determine if moose were browsing more in cut or uncut areas, we measured the number of plants browsed by moose in paired treatment (cut on or after 2008 and control (not cut since at least 2008 sites, along with a suite of potential environmental covariates. Using a model selection approach, we fit generalized linear mixed-effects models to determine the most parsimonious set of environmental variables to explain variation in the proportion of moose browse among sites. In contrast to our hypothesis, our results show that the proportion of moose browse in the uncut control areas was significantly higher than in the cut treatment areas. The results of this study suggest that recently cut roadside areas (7 years or less based on our work may create a less attractive foraging habitat for moose. The majority of the variance in the proportion of moose browse among sites was explained by treatment type and nested plot number within site identification (34.16%, with additional variance explained by traffic region (5.00% and moose density (4.35%. Based on our study, we recommend that vegetation cutting be continued in roadside areas in Newfoundland as recently cut areas may be less attractive browsing sites for moose.

  14. Effect of Roadside Vegetation Cutting on Moose Browsing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Amy L; Leroux, Shawn J

    2015-01-01

    Moose (Alces americanus ) vehicle collisions (MVCs) are an issue throughout the distribution of moose. Many mitigation strategies have been tested and implemented to reduce the number of MVCs, but there have been few empirical analyses of the effectiveness of roadside vegetation cutting. The goal of this study was to determine if roadside vegetation cutting attracted moose into roadside areas to browse on the vegetation regrowth. We hypothesized that moose would be attracted to roadside areas with cut vegetation. Consequently, we predicted that there would be higher levels of browsing in cut areas compared to uncut areas. To determine if moose were browsing more in cut or uncut areas, we measured the number of plants browsed by moose in paired treatment (cut on or after 2008) and control (not cut since at least 2008) sites, along with a suite of potential environmental covariates. Using a model selection approach, we fit generalized linear mixed-effects models to determine the most parsimonious set of environmental variables to explain variation in the proportion of moose browse among sites. In contrast to our hypothesis, our results show that the proportion of moose browse in the uncut control areas was significantly higher than in the cut treatment areas. The results of this study suggest that recently cut roadside areas (7 years or less based on our work) may create a less attractive foraging habitat for moose. The majority of the variance in the proportion of moose browse among sites was explained by treatment type and nested plot number within site identification (34.16%), with additional variance explained by traffic region (5.00%) and moose density (4.35%). Based on our study, we recommend that vegetation cutting be continued in roadside areas in Newfoundland as recently cut areas may be less attractive browsing sites for moose.

  15. Spatial and temporal predictions of moose winter distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Månsson, J; Bunnefeld, N; Andrén, H; Ericsson, G

    2012-10-01

    Herbivores are usually distributed unevenly across the landscape often because of variation in resource availability. We used zero-inflated generalised additive models (to account for data with a high number of zeros) that include georeferences to predict winter distribution of a large herbivore (moose Alces alces). Moose distribution was analysed in relation to forage availability and distance to neighbouring sites. Our results showed that the ability to explain moose distribution indexed by pellet count data at a local scale increased when spatial information (longitude and latitude) was added to the model compared to the model only including food availability. By using the relationship between moose and forage distribution, and the spatial information, we predicted patch choice by moose reasonably well in 2 out of 4 years. However, the distribution of moose was also influenced by weather conditions, as it was most clumped in the year with most snow. In conclusion, our study lends support for a non-linear approach using georeferences for a comprehensive understanding of herbivore distribution at a small scale. This result also indicates that the use of a certain patch by moose not only depends on the selected patch itself but is also influenced by the neighbouring patch and factors at a larger spatial scale, such as moose management influencing the density above moose home range level. The relatively high proportion of unexplained variation suggests that the use of a certain patch is also influenced by other factors such as topography, predation, competition, weather conditions, and wildlife management strategies.

  16. NEAMS-IPL MOOSE Framework Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, Andrew Edward [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Permann, Cody James [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kong, Fande [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The Multiapp Picard iteration Milestone’s purpose was to support a framework level “tight-coupling” method within the hierarchical Multiapp’s execution scheme. This new solution scheme gives developers new choices for running multiphysics applications, particularly those with very strong nonlinear effects or those requiring coupling across disparate time or spatial scales. Figure 1 shows a typical Multiapp setup in MOOSE. Each node represents a separate simulation containing a separate equation system. MOOSE solves the equation system on each node in turn, in a user-controlled manner. Information can be aggregated or split and transferred from parent to child or child to parent as needed between solves. Performing a tightly coupled execution scheme using this method wasn’t possible in the original implementation. This is was due to the inability to back up to a previous state once a converged solution was accepted at a particular Multiapp level.

  17. Strings from Quivers, Membranes from Moose

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhi, S; Verlinde, Erik; Mukhi, Sunil; Rangamani, Mukund; Verlinde, Erik

    2002-01-01

    We consider N=2 moose/quiver gauge theories corresponding to N_1 D3-branes at a C^2/Z_{N_2} singularity in the ``large moose'' limit where N_1 and N_2 are scaled to infinity together. In the dual holographic description, this scaling gives rise to a maximally symmetric pp-wave background with a compact light-cone direction. We identify the gauge theory operators that describe the Discrete Light-Cone Quantization (DLCQ) of the string in this background. For each discrete light-cone momentum and winding sector there is a separate ground state and Fock space. The large moose/quiver diagram provides a useful graphical representation of the string and its excitations. This representation is naturally explained in a T-dual language. The dual theory is a non-relativistic type IIA string wound around the T-dual direction, and bound by a quadratic Newtonian potential. We end with some comments on D-string/D-particle states, a possible lift to M-theory and the relation to deconstruction.

  18. Pervasive Restart In MOOSE-based Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derek Gaston; Cody Permann; David Andrs; John Peterson; Andrew Slaughter; Jason Miller

    2014-01-01

    Multiphysics applications are inherently complicated. Solving for multiple, interacting physical phenomena involves the solution of multiple equations, and each equation has its own data dependencies. Feeding the correct data to these equations at exactly the right time requires extensive effort in software design. In an ideal world, multiphysics applications always run to completion and produce correct answers. Unfortunately, in reality, there can be many reasons why a simulation might fail: power outage, system failure, exceeding a runtime allotment on a supercomputer, failure of the solver to converge, etc. A failure after many hours spent computing can be a significant setback for a project. Therefore, the ability to “continue” a solve from the point of failure, rather than starting again from scratch, is an essential component of any high-quality simulation tool. This process of “continuation” is commonly termed “restart” in the computational community. While the concept of restarting an application sounds ideal, the aforementioned complexities and data dependencies present in multiphysics applications make its implementation decidedly non-trivial. A running multiphysics calculation accumulates an enormous amount of “state”: current time, solution history, material properties, status of mechanical contact, etc. This “state” data comes in many different forms, including scalar, tensor, vector, and arbitrary, application-specific data types. To be able to restart an application, you must be able to both store and retrieve this data, effectively recreating the state of the application before the failure. When utilizing the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework developed at Idaho National Laboratory, this state data is stored both internally within the framework itself (such as solution vectors and the current time) and within the applications that use the framework. In order to implement restart in MOOSE

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Corrective Jaw ...

  20. MOOSES: Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapp, Jon; Wehby, Joseph

    The Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies (MOOSES) is a flexible data collection and analysis package for applied behavioral research that addresses the needs of researchers interested in live coding of observational data. MOOSES allows the researcher to design a coding system for a particular research question. General types…

  1. Jaw fractures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotilainen, R; Kärjä, J; Kullaa-Mikkonen, A

    1990-03-01

    From a total of 350 jaw fractures treated in 1980-1984 at Kuopio University Central Hospital, 20% were in children. These injuries were evaluated retrospectively regarding age, sex, incidence and etiology. Forty-five of the patients were boys and 25 girls. The frequency of maxillary and mandibular fractures in 70 young patients was 28.6%. The most common type of bone fractures was fracture of the alveolar process, which was prevalent in persons with mixed dentition. Before the age of 7 years, falls from height were the common causes of jaw fractures. The major cause of the jaw fractures in children from 7 to 15 years old was road accidents (47.1%), especially in boys. Most of these were cycling accidents, only a few patients were victims of automobile accidents. In addition, about one third (25.7%) of the patients were treated in the hospital because of multiple injuries to other organs.

  2. Precision of jaw-closing movements for different jaw gaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Daniel; Becker, Georg; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos N; Eberhard, Lydia; Fingerhut, Christopher; Rammelsberg, Peter; Schindler, Hans J

    2014-02-01

    Jaw-closing movements are basic components of physiological motor actions precisely achieving intercuspation without significant interference. The main purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that, despite an imperfect intercuspal position, the precision of jaw-closing movements fluctuates within the range of physiological closing movements indispensable for meeting intercuspation without significant interference. For 35 healthy subjects, condylar and incisal point positions for fast and slow jaw-closing, interrupted at different jaw gaps by the use of frontal occlusal plateaus, were compared with uninterrupted physiological jaw closing, with identical jaw gaps, using a telemetric system for measuring jaw position. Examiner-guided centric relation served as a clinically relevant reference position. For jaw gaps ≤4 mm, no significant horizontal or vertical displacement differences were observed for the incisal or condylar points among physiological, fast, and slow jaw-closing. However, the jaw positions under these three closing conditions differed significantly from guided centric relation for nearly all experimental jaw gaps. The findings provide evidence of stringent neuromuscular control of jaw-closing movements in the vicinity of intercuspation. These results might be of clinical relevance to occlusal intervention with different objectives. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  3. Osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambrook, Philip N; Ebeling, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Bisphosphonates are effective therapy for osteoporosis, Paget's disease, and metastatic bone disease. Generally, the side effects of bisphosphonates are minimal. Recently, an uncommon adverse reaction affecting the maxilla or mandible, called osteonecrosis of the jaw, has been reported, especially in those patients receiving high doses of bisphosphonates in the oncology setting. Regarding doses used to treat osteoporosis, clinicians must keep the very small potential absolute risk of jaw osteonecrosis in perspective and consider it in relation to the demonstrated benefit of bisphosphonates. Still, in a very small number of patients taking bisphosphonates, intractable, painful, nonhealing exposed bone may occur following dental extractions or denture irritation.

  4. Population structure and genetic diversity of moose in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jennifer I; Hundertmark, Kris J; Bowyer, R Terry; McCracken, Kevin G

    2009-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are highly mobile mammals that occur across arboreal regions of North America, Europe, and Asia. Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) range across much of Alaska and are primary herbivore consumers, exerting a prominent influence on ecosystem structure and functioning. Increased knowledge gained from population genetics provides insights into their population dynamics, history, and dispersal of these unique large herbivores and can aid in conservation efforts. We examined the genetic diversity and population structure of moose (n = 141) with 8 polymorphic microsatellites from 6 regions spanning much of Alaska. Expected heterozygosity was moderate (H(E) = 0.483-0.612), and private alleles ranged from 0 to 6. Both F(ST) and R(ST) indicated significant population structure (P moose from the Yakutat and Tetlin regions versus all other moose, with slight substructure observed among the second population. Estimates of dispersal differed between analytical approaches, indicating a high level of historical or current gene flow. Mantel tests indicated that isolation-by-distance partially explained observed structure among moose populations (R(2) = 0.45, P moose in Alaska with population expansion from interior Alaska westward toward the coast.

  5. Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    ER D C/ CH L TR -1 2 -2 0 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway C oa st al a n d H yd ra u lic s La b or at...distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-12-20 September 2012 Two Dimensional Hydrodynamic Analysis of the Moose Creek Floodway Stephen H. Scott, Jeremy A...A two-dimensional Adaptive Hydraulics (AdH) hydrodynamic model was developed to simulate the Moose Creek Floodway. The Floodway is located

  6. Jaw - broken or dislocated

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If the jaw is wired, you can only drink liquids or eat very soft foods. Have blunt scissors readily available to cut the elastics in the event of vomiting or choking. If the wires must be cut, call your health care provider right away so they can be ...

  7. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We ... may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to ...

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Ussurian moose, Alces alces cameloides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Jiang, Guangshun

    2016-11-01

    Ussurian moose (Alces alces cameloides) in Northeast China, which is on the southmost edge of the species' Eurasian range, are facing dramatic decline in population size and distribution areas. We undertook the first sequencing of the entire mitogenome of Ussurian moose, which is thought as the oldest moose subspecies to better understand the evolutionary history of this circumboreal sole extant species. The mitogenome is 16,418 bp in length, consisting of two ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, 22 transfer RNA (tRNA) genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and one control region. The overall base composition is A: 33.7%, T: 30.1%, C: 23.2%, and G: 13.0%, with a much higher A + T content. The phylogenetic tree of moose and 10 other most closely related Cervidae species was built.

  9. 1986 moose census, lower Nowitna River drainage: Final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A moose survey of the lower Nowitna drainage on the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge was conducted from 17-21 November 1986. The 1986 population estimate for the...

  10. Quantum Moduli Spaces of Linear and Ring Mooses

    CERN Document Server

    Hailu, G

    2003-01-01

    Quantum moduli spaces of four dimensional $SU(2)^{r}$ linear and ring mooses with $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supersymmetry and link chiral superfields in the fundamental representation are produced starting from simple pure gauge theories of disconnected nodes.

  11. Refuge narrative report : January - April, 1959 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from January through April of 1959. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  12. Refuge narrative report : 1967 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1967 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  13. Kenai National Moose Range : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1965 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  14. Moose Survey-Inventory Progress Report : Unit 15A Kenai

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the 1972 moose surveys on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 15(A). Harvest report returns indicate a hunter harvest of 193...

  15. Arctic wildlife sketches: Moose of the Northwest Territories

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers moose of the Northwest Territories. Topics covered include distribution, behavior, food, reproduction, and economic status and management.

  16. Fall 1979 moose surveys, Sheenjek, Old Woman, Coleen drainages

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary of fall moose population statistics for the upper Sheenjek River drainage (including all tributaries upstream of Lobo Lake) and of Old Woman Creek. William...

  17. [Changes in 2000 moose hunting season : Red Rock Lakes NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This letter to Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks about changes in the 2000 moose season lengths at Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge. It includes...

  18. Moose Survey-Inventory Progress Report : Unit 15C Homer

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the 1972 moose surveys on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 15(C). Harvest report returns show a harvest of 170 bulls; this...

  19. Kenai National Moose Range : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1966

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1966 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing the...

  20. Moose Survey-Inventory Progress Report : Unit 15B Soldotna

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the 1972 moose surveys on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 15(B). Harvest report returns indicate a hunter harvest of 73...

  1. Can cortisol be used to assess acute stress in moose?

    OpenAIRE

    Lundstein, Line Gertrud

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the serum concentration of cortisol was measured in 78 hunted moose (Alces alces) shot by rifle. All animals died within 5 minutes after being shot and blood samples were collected. Blood levels of cortisol have been used to assess acute stress and evaluate animal welfare in wild animals, but the animals have been influenced by people during physical or chemical restraint. Little is known about physiology of cortisol in free-ranging moose, and studying these animals without dis...

  2. Deconstructing Noncommutativity with a Giant Fuzzy Moose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Allan W.

    2001-12-05

    We argue that the world volume theories of D-branes probing orbifolds with discrete torsion develop, in the large quiver limit, new non-commutative directions. This provides an explicit ''deconstruction'' of a wide class of noncommutative theories. This also provides insight into the physical meaning of discrete torsion and its relation to the T-dual B field. We demonstrate that the strict large quiver limit reproduces the matrix theory construction of higher-dimensional D-branes, and argue that finite ''fuzzy moose'' theories provide novel regularizations of non-commutative theories and explicit string theory realizations of gauge theories on fuzzy tori. We also comment briefly on the relation to NCOS, (2,0) and little string theories.

  3. Deconstructing Noncommutativity with a Giant Fuzzy Moose

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, A; Adams, Allan; Fabinger, Michal

    2002-01-01

    We argue that the worldvolume theories of D-branes probing orbifolds with discrete torsion develop, in the large quiver limit, new non-commutative directions. This provides an explicit `deconstruction' of a wide class of noncommutative theories. This also provides a novel insight into the physical meaning of discrete torsion and its relation to the T-dual B field. We demonstrate that the strict large quiver limit reproduces the matrix theory construction of higher-dimensional D-branes, and argue that finite `fuzzy moose' theories provide novel regularizations of non-commutative theories and explicit string theory realizations of gauge theories on fuzzy tori. We also comment briefly on the relation to NCOS, (2,0) and little string theories.

  4. Ranking Alaska moose nutrition: Signals to begin liberal antlerless harvests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boertje, R.D.; Kellie, K.A.; Seaton, C.T.; Keech, M.A.; Young, D.D.; Dale, B.W.; Adams, L.G.; Aderman, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    We focused on describing low nutritional status in an increasing moose (Alces alces gigas) population with reduced predation in Game Management Unit (GMU) 20A near Fairbanks, Alaska, USA. A skeptical public disallowed liberal antlerless harvests of this moose population until we provided convincing data on low nutritional status. We ranked nutritional status in 15 Alaska moose populations (in boreal forests and coastal tundra) based on multiyear twinning rates. Data on age-of-first-reproduction and parturition rates provided a ranking consistent with twinning rates in the 6 areas where comparative data were available. Also, short-yearling mass provided a ranking consistent with twinning rates in 5 of the 6 areas where data were available. Data from 5 areas implied an inverse relationship between twinning rate and browse removal rate. Only in GMU 20A did nutritional indices reach low levels where justification for halting population growth was apparent, which supports prior findings that nutrition is a minor factor limiting most Alaska moose populations compared to predation. With predator reductions, the GMU 20A moose population increased from 1976 until liberal antlerless harvests in 2004. During 1997–2005, GMU 20A moose exhibited the lowest nutritional status reported to date for wild, noninsular, North American populations, including 1) delayed reproduction until moose reached 36 months of age and the lowest parturition rate among 36-month-old moose (29%, n = 147); 2) the lowest average multiyear twinning rates from late-May aerial surveys (x̄ = 7%, SE = 0.9%, n = 9 yr, range = 3–10%) and delayed twinning until moose reached 60 months of age; 3) the lowest average mass of female short-yearlings in Alaska (x̄ = 155 ± 1.6 [SE] kg in the Tanana Flats subpopulation, up to 58 kg below average masses found elsewhere); and 4) high removal (42%) of current annual browse biomass compared to 9–26% elsewhere in boreal forests. When average multiyear twinning

  5. Refuge Narrative Report: September to December 1948: Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 1948 September to December Narrative Report for the Kenai National Moose Range. The Kenai National Moose Range was established on December 16, 1941 after the...

  6. Habitat suitability index model for moose (Alces alces) on the Kenai peninsula

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This descriptive model applies only to moose on the Kenai Peninsula and was specifically developed for use in the evaluation of potential impacts on moose resulting...

  7. Effects of moose density and supplementary feeding on field layer vegetation

    OpenAIRE

    Torgersen, Silje Bjørgan

    2011-01-01

    English: Large mammalian herbivores have the potential to directly and indirectly affect the ecosystem they live in, such as plant structure and dynamics of vascular plants. The present study experimentally estimated the impact of moose density and moose feeding stations on field layer vegetation. The effects of browsing on the field layer vegetation horn moose feeding stations are somewhat unanswered, and there are few studies referring to this problem. Supplementary feeding of moose in wint...

  8. Complete mitochondrial genome of a Wild Amur Moose (Alces alces cameloides).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanze; Feng, Yuan; Wang, Hongcheng; Yang, Yong; Duan, Yubao; Zhou, Zhengyan; Zhang, Minghai

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome (mt DNA) of Amur Moose (Alces alces cameloides) was sequenced, using muscle tissue obtained from a male Amur moose. The total length of the mitochondrial genome is 16,305 bp. The genome structure of Amur moose is similar to other moose and it contains 12S rRNA gene, 16S rRNA gene, 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes, and 1 control region.

  9. 78 FR 73559 - Moose-Wilson Corridor Comprehensive Management Plan, Environmental Impact Statement, Grand Teton...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... National Park Service Moose-Wilson Corridor Comprehensive Management Plan, Environmental Impact Statement... the Moose-Wilson Corridor, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming. DATES: The National Park Service will...://parkplanning.nps.gov/MooseWilson , at the Grand Teton National Park Headquarters Building, 1 Teton Park...

  10. Managing moose harvests by the seat of your pants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Mark S; Baxter, Peter W J; Possingham, Hugh P

    2012-12-01

    Moose populations are managed for sustainable yield balanced against costs caused by damage to forestry or agriculture and collisions with vehicles. Optimal harvests can be calculated based on a structured population model driven by data on abundance and the composition of bulls, cows, and calves obtained by aerial-survey monitoring during winter. Quotas are established by the respective government agency and licenses are issued to hunters to harvest an animal of specified age or sex during the following autumn. Because the cost of aerial monitoring is high, we use a Management Strategy Evaluation to evaluate the costs and benefits of periodic aerial surveys in the context of moose management. Our on-the-fly "seat of your pants" alternative to independent monitoring is management based solely on the kill of moose by hunters, which is usually sufficient to alert the manager to declines in moose abundance that warrant adjustments to harvest strategies. Harvests are relatively cheap to monitor; therefore, data can be obtained each year facilitating annual adjustments to quotas. Other sources of "cheap" monitoring data such as records of the number of moose seen by hunters while hunting also might be obtained, and may provide further useful insight into population abundance, structure and health. Because conservation dollars are usually limited, the high cost of aerial surveys is difficult to justify when alternative methods exist.

  11. Redwing: A MOOSE application for coupling MPACT and BISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick N. Gleicher; Michael Rose; Tom Downar

    2014-11-01

    Fuel performance and whole core neutron transport programs are often used to analyze fuel behavior as it is depleted in a reactor. For fuel performance programs, internal models provide the local intra-pin power density, fast neutron flux, burnup, and fission rate density, which are needed for a fuel performance analysis. The fuel performance internal models have a number of limitations. These include effects on the intra-pin power distribution by nearby assembly elements, such as water channels and control rods, and the further limitation of applicability to a specified fuel type such as low enriched UO2. In addition, whole core neutron transport codes need an accurate intra-pin temperature distribution in order to calculate neutron cross sections. Fuel performance simulations are able to model the intra-pin fuel displacement as the fuel expands and densifies. These displacements must be accurately modeled in order to capture the eventual mechanical contact of the fuel and the clad; the correct radial gap width is needed for an accurate calculation of the temperature distribution of the fuel rod. Redwing is a MOOSE-based application that enables coupling between MPACT and BISON for transport and fuel performance coupling. MPACT is a 3D neutron transport and reactor core simulator based on the method of characteristics (MOC). The development of MPACT began at the University of Michigan (UM) and now is under the joint development of ORNL and UM as part of the DOE CASL Simulation Hub. MPACT is able to model the effects of local assembly elements and is able calculate intra-pin quantities such as the local power density on a volumetric mesh for any fuel type. BISON is a fuel performance application of Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is under development at Idaho National Laboratory. BISON is able to solve the nonlinearly coupled mechanical deformation and heat transfer finite element equations that model a fuel element as it is

  12. 25 CFR 309.14 - What are examples of beadwork, quillwork, and moose hair tufting that are Indian products?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are examples of beadwork, quillwork, and moose hair..., quillwork, and moose hair tufting that are Indian products? (a) Beadwork, quillwork, and moose hair tufting... decorated with moose hair tufting, beaded miniature dolls, and quilled and beaded amulets....

  13. Material Flow in Jaw Crusher

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jinxi; RONG Xingfu; YANG Shichun

    2006-01-01

    Jaw crusher is a kind of machine widely used in mining and aggregates industry, but it still has some shortcomings, such as liners wear, terrible power draw etc. The lack of research on material flow strongly limits the design improvement. The size reduction of the jaw crusher relies on the moving jaw movement that is a kind of complicated swing. Based on the movement analysis of the moving jaw and the single particle breakage characters, the material flow is analyzed. The measure of the breakage force is carried out. Material flow analysis is partly confirmed by the experimental results and some new information is also learned from the crushing force distribution. The job on the material flow will be helpful to the jaw crusher design improvement.

  14. N=1 Supersymmetric $SU(2)^r$ Moose Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Hailu, G

    2003-01-01

    We study the quantum moduli spaces and dynamical superpotentials of four dimensional $SU(2)^r$ linear and ring moose theories with $\\mathcal{N}=1$ supersymmetry and link chiral superfields in the fundamental representation. Nontrivial quantum moduli spaces and dynamical superpotentials are produced. When the moduli space is perturbed by generic tree level superpotentials, the vacuum space becomes discrete. The ring moose is in the Coulomb phase and we find two singular submanifolds with a nontrivial modulus that is a function of all the independent gauge invariants needed to parameterize the quantum moduli space. The massive theory near these singularities confines. The Seiberg-Witten elliptic curve that describes the quantum moduli space of the ring moose is produced.

  15. Influence of jaw gape on EMG of jaw muscles and jaw-stretch reflexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kelun; Lobbezoo, Frank; Svensson, Peter; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2007-06-01

    The influence of jaw gapes on jaw-stretch reflexes and jaw muscles activity was studied in order to test the sensitivity of human muscle spindle afferents in various jaw muscles. Twelve healthy men (mean age+/-S.E.M.: 25.0+/-1.2yr) participated in the study. Short-latency excitatory reflex responses were evoked by a custom-made stretch device with the subjects biting on a jaw-bar with their front teeth. Surface electromyographic (sEMG) recordings from right masseter (MAR), and right temporalis (TAR), intramuscular EMG (imEMG) recordings from right lateral pterygoid (LPR) and right anterior digastric (ADR) muscles were made. The reflex at different jaw gapes of 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, 34, and 38mm were examined in random order with standard stretch conditions of 1mm displacement and 10ms ramp time. Twenty sweeps of the reflex were recorded at each level with at least 5s interval between each sweep with online monitoring of the visual feed back at 15% of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of each jaw gape from MAR. The results showed that the peak-to-peak amplitude of the jaw-stretch reflex in MAR was significantly higher at 14mm compared to 30, 34, and 38mm (Pjaw gape until a maximum at 34mm. There was no significant effect of jaw gape in LPR muscles (P=0.825) and no obvious stretch reflex was observed in ADR. When the amplitude was normalised to the pre-stimulus EMG at each jaw gape, the highest normalised amplitude was observed at 14mm jaw gape in MAR, however there was no significant effect of jaw gape on the normalised amplitude in TAR and LPR. In addition, masseter EMG at MVC significantly decreased with the increase of the gapes, i.e. biting at 6, 14, and 18mm gapes had a significantly higher MVC compared to 26, 30, 34, and 38mm (ANOVA: Pjaw gapes influence the sensitivity of the human muscle spindle afferents in jaw-closing muscles with a distinct peak, which is within normal jaw gapes during function.

  16. Trace elements in moose (Alices alces) found dead in Northwestern Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custer, T.W.; Cox, E.; Gray, B.

    2004-01-01

    The moose (Alces alces) population in bog and forest areas of Northwestern Minnesota has declined for more than 25 years, and more recently the decline is throughout Northwestern Minnesota. Both deficiencies and elevations in trace elements have been linked to the health of moose worldwide. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether trace element toxicity or deficiency may have contributed to the decline of moose in Northwestern Minnesota. Livers of 81 moose found dead in Northwestern Minnesota in 1998 and 1999 were analyzed for trace elements. With the exception of selenium (Se) and copper (Cu), trace elements were not at toxic or deficient levels based on criteria set for cattle. Selenium concentrations in moose livers based on criteria set for cattle were deficient in 3.7% of livers and at a chronic toxicity level in 16% of livers. Copper concentrations based on criteria set for cattle were deficient in 39.5% of livers, marginally deficient in 29.5% of livers and adequate in 31% of livers. Moose from agricultural areas had higher concentrations, on average, of Cd, Cu, Mo and Se in their livers than moose from bog and forest areas. Older moose had higher concentrations of Cd and Zn, and lower concentrations of Cu than younger moose. Copper deficiency, which has been associated with population declines of moose in Alaska and Sweden, may be a factor contributing to the decline of moose in Northwestern Minnesota. (C) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of simulated moose Alces alces browsing on the morphology of rowan Sorbus aucuparia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, N.R.D.; Pastor, J.

    2010-01-01

    In much of northern Sweden moose Alces alces browse rowan Sorbus aucuparia heavily and commonly revisit previously browsed plants. Repeated browsing of rowan by moose has created some concern for its long-term survival in heavily browsed areas. We therefore measured how four years of simulated moose browsing at four population densities (0, 10, 30 and 50 moose/1,000 ha) changed plant height, crown width, available bite mass, the number of bites per plant and per plant forage biomass of rowan saplings. Increased biomass removal led to a significant decline in plant height (P moose relative to unbrowsed controls. Moose therefore stand to benefit from revisiting previously browsed plants, which may result in feeding loops between moose and previously browsed rowan saplings. ?? 2010 Wildlife Biology, NKV.

  18. A method for studying jaw muscle activity during standardized jaw movements under experimental jaw muscle pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Lee, Daraporn; Wanigaratne, Kamal; Whittle, Terry; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M

    2006-10-30

    This paper describes a method for studying superficial and deep jaw muscle activity during standardized jaw movements under experimental jaw muscle pain. In 22 healthy adults, pain was elicited in the right masseter muscle via tonic infusion of 4.5% hypertonic saline and which resulted in scores of 30-60 mm on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Subjects performed tasks in five sessions in a repeated measures design, i.e., control 1, test 1 (during hypertonic or isotonic saline infusion), control 2 (without infusion), test 2 (during isotonic or hypertonic saline infusion), control 3 (without infusion). During each session, subjects performed maximal clenching and standardized jaw tasks, i.e., protrusion, lateral excursion, open/close, chewing. Mandibular movement was recorded with a 6-degree-of-freedom tracking system simultaneously with electromyographic (EMG) activity from the inferior head of the lateral pterygoid muscle with fine-wire electrodes (verified by computer tomography), and from posterior temporalis, the submandibular muscle group and bilateral masseter muscles with surface electrodes. EMG root mean square values were calculated at each 0.5 mm increment of mandibular incisor movement for all tasks under each experimental session. This establishes an experimental model for testing the effects of pain on jaw muscle activity where the jaw motor system is required to perform goal-directed tasks, and therefore should extend our understanding of the effects of pain on the jaw motor system.

  19. Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection in moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pūraitė, Irma; Rosef, Olav; Paulauskas, Algimantas; Radzijevskaja, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-borne bacterium that infects a wide range of animal species. The aim of our study was to investigate the prevalence of A. phagocytophilum in Norwegian moose Alces alces and to characterize the bacteria by sequencing of partial msp4 and 16S rRNA genes. Hunters collected spleen samples from 99 moose of different ages during 2013 and 2014 in two areas: Aust-Agder County (n = 70) where Ixodes ricinus ticks are abundant and Oppland County (n = 29) where ticks were either absent, or abundance very low. A. phagocytophilum was detected only in moose from the I. ricinus - abundant area. The overall prevalence of infection according to 16S rRNA and msp4 gene-based PCR was 41.4% and 31.4% respectively. Sequence analysis of the partial 16S rRNA and msp4 gene revealed two and eight different sequence types respectively. Four of eight msp4 sequence types determined in this study were unique, while others were identical to sequences derived from other ruminants and ticks. The present study indicates that moose could be a potential wildlife reservoir of A. phagocytophilum in Norway.

  20. Report of the Mighty Moose Reading Project, 1977-1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Planning and Research Branch.

    To assist Cree-speaking native Canadian students in English language acquisition, the Mighty Moose Reading Project was initiated with a threefold aim: to develop program materials designed specifically as supplementary beginning reading materials for native students; to determine the effectiveness of the materials in improving reading skills, oral…

  1. Novel hepatitis E like virus found in Swedish moose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jay; Norder, Heléne; Uhlhorn, Henrik; Belák, Sándor; Widén, Frederik

    2014-03-01

    A novel virus was detected in a sample collected from a Swedish moose (Alces alces). The virus was suggested as a member of the Hepeviridae family, although it was found to be highly divergent from the known four genotypes (gt1-4) of hepatitis E virus (HEV). Moose are regularly hunted for consumption in the whole of Scandinavia. Thus, the finding of this virus may be important from several aspects: (a) as a new diverged HEV in a new animal species, and (b) potential unexplored HEV transmission pathways for human infections. Considering these aspects, we have started the molecular characterization of this virus. A 5.1 kb amplicon was sequenced, and corresponded to the partial ORF1, followed by complete ORF2, ORF3 and poly(A) sequence. In comparison with existing HEVs, the moose HEV genome showed a general nucleotide sequence similarity of 37-63% and an extensively divergent putative ORF3 sequence. The junction region between the ORFs was also highly divergent; however, two putative secondary stem-loop structures were retained when compared to gt1-4, but with altered structural appearance. In the phylogenetic analysis, the moose HEV deviated and formed its own branch between the gt1-4 and other divergent animal HEVs. The characterization of this highly divergent genome provides important information regarding the diversity of HEV infecting various mammalian species. However, further studies are needed to investigate its prevalence in the moose populations and possibly in other host species, including the risk for human infection.

  2. Factors affecting deer ked (Lipoptena cervi prevalence and infestation intensity in moose (Alces alces in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madslien Knut

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi, a hematophagous ectoparasite of Cervids, is currently spreading in Scandinavia. In Norway, keds are now invading the south-eastern part of the country and the abundant and widely distributed moose (Alces alces is the definitive host. However, key factors for ked abundance are poorly elucidated. The objectives of our study were to (i determine deer ked infestation prevalence and intensity on moose and (ii evaluate if habitat characteristics and moose population density are determinants of deer ked abundance on moose. Methods In order to identify key factors for deer ked abundance, a total of 350 skin samples from the neck of hunted moose were examined and deer keds counted. Infestation intensity was analyzed in relation to moose age and sex, moose population density and landscape characteristics surrounding the killing site. Results Deer ked infestation prevalence was 100%, but infestation intensity varied from 0.001 to 1.405 keds/cm2. Ked intensity was highest in male yearlings (~1.5 years and positively associated with longitude and Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris dominated habitat and negatively associated with bogs and latitude. Moose population density during autumn showed a tendency to be positively associated, while altitude tended to be negatively associated with ked intensity. Conclusions Deer keds exploit the whole moose population within our study area, but are most prevalent in areas dominated by Scots pine. This is probably a reflection of Scots pine being the preferred winter browse for moose in areas with highest moose densities in winter. Ked intensity decreases towards the northwest and partly with increasing altitude, probably explained by the direction of dispersal and reduced temperature, respectively. Abundant deer ked harm humans and domestic animals. Moose management authorities should therefore be aware of the close relationship between moose, deer ked and habitat, using the

  3. Osteonecrosis of the jaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Ian R.; Cundy, Tim [University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2009-01-15

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) was first reported in the dental literature in 2003. The term was coined to describe a spectrum of dental problems seen in cancer patients treated with high doses of intravenous bisphosphonates for the prevention of skeletal-related events. By consensus, the syndrome is now defined by the presence of exposed bone in the mouth which fails to heal after appropriate intervention over a period of 6 or 8 weeks. It is most common in patients with breast or prostate cancers, or multiple myeloma treated with bisphosphonates, of whom about 5% develop the condition. In patients receiving the much lower drug doses used in osteoporosis, the incidence appears to be {proportional_to}1/100,000 patient-years, probably comparable to that in the general population. It is likely that ONJ results from direct drug toxicity to cells of bone and soft tissue. The bone in ONJ lesions does not appear to be 'frozen' but rather there is very active bone resorption taking place, which is likely to be responsible for the local release at high concentrations of bisphosphonates. Infection probably plays a pivotal role in driving this resorption, so its active management is critical. Obvious abnormalities are apparent with a variety of radiologic modalities, and it is not clear that radiographs are inferior to other approaches. Most authors favor a conservative approach to surgical debridement of the lesions. (orig.)

  4. The origin and early phylogenetic history of jawed vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, Martin D; Friedman, Matt

    2015-04-23

    Fossils of early gnathostomes (or jawed vertebrates) have been the focus of study for nearly two centuries. They yield key clues about the evolutionary assembly of the group's common body plan, as well the divergence of the two living gnathostome lineages: the cartilaginous and bony vertebrates. A series of remarkable new palaeontological discoveries, analytical advances and innovative reinterpretations of existing fossil archives have fundamentally altered a decades-old consensus on the relationships of extinct gnathostomes, delivering a new evolutionary framework for exploring major questions that remain unanswered, including the origin of jaws.

  5. Jaw lift causes less laryngeal interference during lightwand-guided intubation than combined jaw and tongue traction applied by single operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Goneppanavar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightwand-guided intubation is a semi-blind technique that takes advantage of the anterior location of the trachea in relation to the oesophagus. Fibreoptic evaluation of lightwand-guided intubation has revealed a possibility of laryngeal interference and epiglottic distortion. Jaw lift, tongue traction or a combination of both have been used to assist in lightwand-guided intubation. This study fibreoptically evaluates lightwand-guided intubation using jaw lift and combined jaw and tongue traction. Eighty four patients with normal airway undergoing general anaesthesia were studied. This randomised, double blinded, cross over study was done in two phases. First phase - after achieving adequate depth of anaesthesia, a fibrescope was advanced nasally, and lightwand-guided intubation was carried out under direct fibreoptic visualisation with the aid of either jaw lift or combined jaw and tongue traction. Second phase - Extubation followed by reintubation using the other manoeuvre. Interference with laryngeal structures during intubation and position of the epiglottis at the end of intubation were noted. Epiglottic distortion (deviated to one side/infolded into trachea was observed in 6 patients with jaw lift and 17 patients with combined jaw and tongue traction (P=0.003. Laryngeal interference was significantly higher (P=0.012 with combined manoeuvre (30/78 than with jaw lift alone (9/81. Although lightwand-guided intubation can be performed quickly and easily, interference with laryngeal structures and distortion of the epiglottis can occur. Jaw lift manoeuvre causes less laryngeal interference than combined jaw and tongue traction applied by a single operator.

  6. Contrasting responses of two passerine bird species to moose browsing

    OpenAIRE

    Mathisen, Karen Marie; Pedersen, Simen; Nilsen, Erlend Birkeland; Skarpe, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Large herbivores may modify the ecosystem in a way that affects habitat quality and resource availability for other fauna. The increase in wild ungulate abundance in many areas may therefore lead to ecosystem changes, affecting distribution and reproduction of other species. Moose (Alces alces) in Scandinavia is a good example of a herbivore that has recently increased in abundance, and has the potential to affect the ecosystem. In this study we investigated how different levels o...

  7. Plasma Simulation in the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment MOOSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Steven; Lindsay, Alex; Graves, David; Icenhour, Casey; Peterson, David; White, Scott

    2016-09-01

    MOOSE is an open source multiphysics solver developed by Idaho National Laboratory that is primarily used for the simulation of fission reactor systems; the framework is also well suited for the simulation of plasma systems given the development of appropriate modules not currently developed in the framework such as electromagnetic solvers, Boltzmann solvers, etc. It is structured for user development of application specific modules and is intended for both workstation level and high performance massively parallel environments. We have begun the development of plasma modules in the MOOSE environment and carried out preliminary simulation of the plasma/liquid interface to elucidate coupling mechanisms between these states using a fully coupled multiphysics model; these results agree well with PIC simulation of the same system and show strong response of plasma parameters with respect to electron reflection at the liquid surface. These results will be presented along with an overview of MOOSE and ongoing module development to extend capabilities to a broader set of research challenges in low temperature plasmas, with particular focus on RF and pulsed RF driven systems.

  8. Relationship of deer and moose populations to previous winters' snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L.D.; McRoberts, R.E.; Peterson, R.O.; Page, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    (1) Linear regression was used to relate snow accumulation during single and consecutive winters with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn:doe ratios, mosse (Alces alces) twinning rates and calf:cow ratios, and annual changes in deer and moose populations. Significant relationships were found between snow accumulation during individual winters and these dependent variables during the following year. However, the strongest relationships were between the dependent variables and the sums of the snow accumulations over the previous three winters. The percentage of the variability explained was 36 to 51. (2) Significant relationships were also found between winter vulnerability of moose calves and the sum of the snow accumulations in the current, and up to seven previous, winters, with about 49% of the variability explained. (3) No relationship was found between wolf numbers and the above dependent variables. (4) These relationships imply that winter influences on maternal nutrition can accumulate for several years and that this cumulative effect strongly determines fecundity and/or calf and fawn survivability. Although wolf (Canis lupus L.) predation is the main direct mortality agent on fawns and calves, wolf density itself appears to be secondary to winter weather in influencing the deer and moose populations.

  9. Extent, causes and timing of moose calf mortality on the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge: 1988 progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the extent, causes and timing of moose calf mortality on the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge. 46 neonatal moose calves from the 1988 cohort were...

  10. Neuromuscular interaction of jaw and neck muscles during jaw clenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Hellmann, Daniel; Schmitter, Marc; Krüger, Bastian; Hauser, Thomas; Schindler, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that jaw muscles and specific neck muscles, ie, levator scapulae, trapezius, sternocleidomastoideus, and splenius capitis, co-contract at the different submaximum bite forces usually generated during jaw clenching and tooth grinding, and for different bite force directions. Bite-force transducers that measured all three spatial force components were incorporated in 11 healthy subjects. The test persons developed feedback-controlled submaximum bite forces in a variety of bite-force directions. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of the levator scapulae, splenius capitis, and trapezius muscles was recorded, at the level of the fifth cervical vertebra, by use of intramuscular wire electrodes. The activity of the sternocleidomastoideus and masseter muscles was recorded by surface electrodes. For normalization of the EMG data, maximum-effort tasks of the neck muscles were conducted in eight different loading directions by means of a special force-transducer system. Differences between neck-muscle activity during chewing, maximum biting in intercuspation, and the force-controlled motor tasks were compared with the baseline activity of the various muscles by one-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. The results confirmed the hypothesis. Co-contractions of the neck muscles in the range of 3% to 10% of maximum voluntary contraction were observed. Significant (P < .05) activity differences were recorded as a result of the different force levels and force directions exerted by the jaw muscles. Long-lasting action potential trains of single motor units triggered by jaw clenching tasks were also detected. The findings support the assumption of a relationship between jaw clenching and the neck muscle activity investigated. The low level of co-contraction activity, however, requires further study to elucidate possible pathophysiological interactions at the level of single motor units.

  11. In the Jaws of Death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clasen, Mathias

    The horror film Jaws (Spielberg, 1975) terrified millions of movie-goers and continues to resonate with audiences, despite its implausible premise and zoologically dubious depiction of a vengeful great white shark. An evolutionary approach explains why the film captured audiences’ imaginations an...

  12. Potential Vertical Transmission of Winter Ticks (Dermacentor albipictus) from Moose (Alces americanus) Dams to Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severud, William J; DelGiudice, Glenn D

    2016-01-01

    North American moose (Alces americanus) frequently become infested with winter ticks (Dermacentor albipictus). During capture of neonatal moose in northeastern Minnesota, US, in May-June 2013 and 2014, we recovered adult ticks from neonates, presumably vertically transferred from dams, heretofore, not documented. Infestations on neonates may have population-level implications.

  13. Depression of belowground respiration rates at simulated high moose population densities in boreal forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Nilsson, Mats B; Pastor, John; Eriksson, Tobias; Bergström, Roger; Danell, Kjell

    2009-10-01

    Large herbivores can affect the carbon cycle in boreal forests by changing productivity and plant species composition, which in turn could ultimately alter litter production, nutrient cycling, and the partitioning between aboveground and belowground allocation of carbon. Here we experimentally tested how moose (Alces alces) at different simulated population densities affected belowground respiration rates (estimated as CO2 flux) in young boreal forest stands situated along a site productivity gradient. At high simulated population density, moose browsing considerably depressed belowground respiration rates (24-56% below that of no-moose controls) except during June, where the difference only was 10%. Moose browsing depressed belowground respiration the most on low-productivity sites. Soil moisture and temperature did not affect respiration rates. Impact of moose on belowground respiration was closely linked to litter production and followed Michaelis-Menten dynamics. The main mechanism by which moose decrease belowground respiration rates is likely their effect on photosynthetic biomass (especially decreased productivity of deciduous trees) and total litter production. An increased productivity of deciduous trees along the site productivity gradient causes an unequal effect of moose along the same gradient. The rapid growth of deciduous trees may offer higher resilience against negative effects of moose browsing on litter production and photosynthate allocation to roots.

  14. 9 CFR 81.2 - Identification of deer, elk, and moose in interstate commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...-resistant ear tag, or other device approved by APHIS. One of the animal identifications must be an official... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of deer, elk, and moose... ANIMAL PRODUCTS CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN DEER, ELK, AND MOOSE § 81.2 Identification of deer, elk, and...

  15. Sarcocystis in moose (Alces alces): molecular identification and phylogeny of six Sarcocystis species in moose, and a morphological description of three new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Stina S; Gjerde, Bjørn

    2008-06-01

    Muscle tissues from 34 moose from Southeastern Norway and two moose from Canada were examined. Sarcocysts were excised and morphologically classified by light microscopy, and some cysts were further examined by scanning electron microscopy or DNA amplification and sequencing at the small subunit (ssu) rRNA gene. In Norwegian moose, three sarcocyst types were recognized, yet five Sarcocystis species were found by sequence analysis. New names were proposed for three species which could be characterised by both morphological and molecular methods, i.e., Sarcocystis alces, Sarcocystis ovalis, and Sarcocystis scandinavica. S. alces was the most prevalent species, whereas S. scandinavica and the two unnamed species were rare and might either use another principal intermediate host or a rare definitive host. The five species in Norwegian moose were different from Sarcocystis alceslatrans isolated from a Canadian moose. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete ssu rRNA gene sequences revealed a close relationship between the six Sarcocystis species from moose and species from reindeer and Sika deer. We conclude that molecular methods are necessary for unequivocal species identification, as different cervid hosts harbour morphologically indistinguishable sarcocysts.

  16. Signatures of the Minimal Moose Model With Exact Parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A.; Schwaller, P.; Wyler, D.

    2010-03-01

    In the popular littlest Higgs model, T-parity can be broken by Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms induced by a strongly coupled UV completion. On the other hand, certain models with multiple scalar multiplets (called moose models) permit the implementation of T-parity such that it is not broken by the WZW terms. Here we present a concrete realization of such a model, and discuss the phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider, in particular differences with respect to the littlest Higgs model.

  17. Jaw locking after maxillofacial trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David B. Kamadjaja

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this report is to present two cases of jaw locking with two different etiologies. In case #1, jaw locking occured 5.5 months after a surgical reduction and internal fixation on the fractured maxilla and mandible. Some plain radiographic x-ray were made but failed to give adequate information in establishing the cause of trismus. The three dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT was finally made and able to help guide the pre-operative diagnosis and treatment. Two-steps gap arthroplasty were done comprising a gap arthroplasty leading to acceptable outcome. An adult patient in case #2 with a history of trauma at his childhood and bird-like face apprearance clinically, was unable to open the mouth since the time of accident. The patient was diagnosed with bilateral ankylosis of temporomandibular joints. One side (right gap arthroplasty was done and resulted in normal mouth opening.

  18. Range Expansion of Moose in Arctic Alaska Linked to Warming and Increased Shrub Habitat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken D Tape

    Full Text Available Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni and Eurasia (A. a. alces. Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators.

  19. Testing the risk of predation hypothesis: the influence of recolonizing wolves on habitat use by moose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Kerry L; Milleret, Cyril; Månsson, Johan; Sand, Håkan

    2014-09-01

    Considered as absent throughout Scandinavia for >100 years, wolves (Canis lupus) have recently naturally recolonized south-central Sweden. This recolonization has provided an opportunity to study behavioral responses of moose (Alces alces) to wolves. We used satellite telemetry locations from collared moose and wolves to determine whether moose habitat use was affected by predation risk based on wolf use distributions. Moose habitat use was influenced by reproductive status and time of day and showed a different selection pattern between winter and summer, but there was weak evidence that moose habitat use depended on predation risk. The seemingly weak response may have several underlying explanations that are not mutually exclusive from the long term absence of non-human predation pressure: intensive harvest by humans during the last century is more important than wolf predation as an influence on moose behavior; moose have not adapted to recolonizing wolves; and responses may include other behavioral adaptations or occur at finer temporal and spatial levels than investigated.

  20. Range Expansion of Moose in Arctic Alaska Linked to Warming and Increased Shrub Habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, Ken D; Gustine, David D; Ruess, Roger W; Adams, Layne G; Clark, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators.

  1. Hair-loss epizootic in moose (Alces alces) associated with massive deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madslien, Knut; Ytrehus, Bjørnar; Vikøren, Turid; Malmsten, Jonas; Isaksen, Ketil; Hygen, Hans Olav; Solberg, Erling J

    2011-10-01

    Deer keds (Lipoptena cervi) are blood-sucking flies in the family Hippoboscidae; moose (Alces alces) are their main host in Scandinavia. There are no detailed reports of the negative impacts of deer keds on moose. In 2006 and 2007, hunters in southeastern Norway and midwestern Sweden found several moose cadavers with severe alopecia; numerous moose had extensive hair loss. Between February 2006 and June 2007, materials from 23 moose were submitted for laboratory examination and large numbers of deer keds were found in the coat of most animals. The body condition of the moose varied but was poor in animals with severe alopecia. The findings of enormous numbers of deer keds in the coat of the majority of the affected animals and a consistent histologic image (acute to chronic, multifocal to coalescing, eosinophilic to lymphocytic dermatitis), concurrent with the absence of any other lesions, trace element deficiencies, or dermal infections which are known to cause alopecia, suggest that the hair-loss epizootic was linked to massive infestations with deer keds. The emergence of this hair-loss syndrome implies that the dynamics between parasite and host have been disrupted by a currently unknown environmental or ecological factor. A high moose density, combined with extraordinarily mild weather June 2006-June 2007 and a particularly long period with the absence of night-frost in autumn of 2006, may have been ideal for deer ked development, survival, and optimal host acquisition.

  2. Mobility of moose-comparing the effects of wolf predation risk, reproductive status, and seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikenros, Camilla; Balogh, Gyöngyvér; Sand, Håkan; Nicholson, Kerry L; Månsson, Johan

    2016-12-01

    In a predator-prey system, prey species may adapt to the presence of predators with behavioral changes such as increased vigilance, shifting habitats, or changes in their mobility. In North America, moose (Alces alces) have shown behavioral adaptations to presence of predators, but such antipredator behavioral responses have not yet been found in Scandinavian moose in response to the recolonization of wolves (Canis lupus). We studied travel speed and direction of movement of GPS-collared female moose (n = 26) in relation to spatiotemporal differences in wolf predation risk, reproductive status, and time of year. Travel speed was highest during the calving (May-July) and postcalving (August-October) seasons and was lower for females with calves than females without calves. Similarly, time of year and reproductive status affected the direction of movement, as more concentrated movement was observed for females with calves at heel, during the calving season. We did not find support for that wolf predation risk was an important factor affecting moose travel speed or direction of movement. Likely causal factors for the weak effect of wolf predation risk on mobility of moose include high moose-to-wolf ratio and intensive hunter harvest of the moose population during the past century.

  3. Assessing and modeling moose (Alces alces) habitats with airborne laser scanning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, M.; Packalén, P.; Matala, J.; Mehtätalo, L.; Pusenius, J.

    2013-08-01

    In the analysis of forest resources, the use of ALS (airborne laser scanning) enables detailed three dimensional (3D) descriptions of forests and their vegetation. Simultaneously, ecologists have recognized that 3D information on vegetation is highly important in analyzing the habitat suitability of a given site. Recently, animals’ habitat preferences have been analyzed, for example, with GPS-collared animals. This has resulted in detailed knowledge about the animals’ movements both spatially and temporally. This study combines 3D information on vegetation obtained from ALS data with information about animal locations from GPS data. The aim was to map and analyze the habitat preferences of moose. The study area was located on the west coast of Finland. The data consisted of 18 GPS-collared moose (monitored from 2009 to 2010) and ALS data collected in 2010. We investigated how habitat structure changes as a function of distance to observed moose locations and how observed moose locations differ from randomly selected locations in terms of 3D structure. We also created a model-based habitat suitability map and tested it against moose occurrences. The results suggested that there are clear differences between the areas occupied and not occupied by moose and that these differences can be detected from ALS data. More importantly, ALS proved its potential in linking 3D descriptions of vegetation directly to observed moose locations without any proxy variables. These observations strongly support future studies.

  4. Caesium 137 in northern Swedish moose: The first year after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danell, K.; Nelin, P. (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Science, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Wildlife Ecology); Wickman, G. (Umeaa Univ. (Sweden). Radiation Physics Dept.)

    1989-01-01

    Levels of /sup 137/ caesium were monitored in northern Sweden during the first year after the Chernobyl accident (April 1986). Samples were collected from 3661 moose in an area where the deposited /sup 137/ caesium ranged from two to 60 kilo-becquerel per m/sup 2/. Concentrations of caesium in moose muscle correlated positively with the ground deposition of caesium. On average, the caesium levels found in moose after Chernobyl were about 470 Bq per kg fresh mass for calves and close to 300 for older animals. The average level in moose before the accident was 33 Bq per kg. Among moose older than one year, higher concentrations were found in females than in the males. There was a pronounced seasonal variation in the /sup 137/ caesium concentration found in moose. Within the investigation area the presence of caesium in moose resulted in a minor proportion of the hunters discarding the animals shot and/or terminating the hunt before the end of the season.

  5. Experimental moose reduction lowers wolf density and stops decline of endangered caribou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Serrouya

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of moose into southern British Columbia caused the decline and extirpation of woodland caribou due to their shared predators, a process commonly referred to as apparent competition. Using an adaptive management experiment, we tested the hypothesis that reducing moose to historic levels would reduce apparent competition and therefor recover caribou populations. Nested within this broad hypothesis were three specific hypotheses: (1 sport hunting could be used to substantially reduce moose numbers to an ecological target; (2 wolves in this ecosystem were primarily limited by moose abundance; and (3 caribou were limited by wolf predation. These hypotheses were evaluated with a before-after control-impact (BACI design that included response metrics such as population trends and vital rates of caribou, moose, and wolves. Three caribou subpopulations were subject to the moose reduction treatment and two were in a reference area where moose were not reduced. When the moose harvest was increased, the moose population declined substantially in the treatment area (by 70% but not the reference area, suggesting that the policy had the desired effect and was not caused by a broader climatic process. Wolf numbers subsequently declined in the treatment area, with wolf dispersal rates 2.5× greater, meaning that dispersal was the likely mechanism behind the wolf numerical response, though reduced recruitment and starvation was also documented in the treatment area. Caribou adult survival increased from 0.78 to 0.88 in the treatment area, but declined in the reference. Caribou recruitment was unaffected by the treatment. The largest caribou subpopulation stabilized in the treatment area, but declined in the reference area. The observed population stability is comparable to other studies that used intensive wolf control, but is insufficient to achieve recovery, suggesting that multiple limiting factors and corresponding management tools must be

  6. MOOSE2-A toolbox for least-costly application-oriented input design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annergren, Mariette; Larsson, Christian A.

    MOOSE2 is a MATLAB®-based toolbox for solving least-costly application-oriented input design problems in system identification. MOOSE2 provides the spectrum of the input signal to be used in the identification experiment made to estimate a linear parametric model of the system. The objective is to find a spectrum that minimizes experiment cost while fulfilling constraints imposed in the experiment and on the obtained model. The constraints considered by MOOSE2 are: frequency or power constraints on the signal spectra in the experiment, and application or quality specifications on the obtained model.

  7. MOOSE2—A toolbox for least-costly application-oriented input design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Annergren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MOOSE2 is a MATLAB®-based toolbox for solving least-costly application-oriented input design problems in system identification. MOOSE2 provides the spectrum of the input signal to be used in the identification experiment made to estimate a linear parametric model of the system. The objective is to find a spectrum that minimizes experiment cost while fulfilling constraints imposed in the experiment and on the obtained model. The constraints considered by MOOSE2 are: frequency or power constraints on the signal spectra in the experiment, and application or quality specifications on the obtained model.

  8. CORRECTION OF VIOLATION TEMPLE-LOWER-JAW JOINT IN MESIAL DISPLACEMENT OF LOWER JAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.B. Fischev

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of temple-lower-jaw joints was provided among patients with defects of teeth row, complicated with mesial displacement of lower jaw. The defenite changes of temple-lower-jaw joint were found and the possibility of correction of these changes was defined.

  9. Seroprevalence, isolation, first genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii, and possible congenital transmission in wild moose from Minnesota, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shiv K; Carstensen, Michelle; Calero-Bernal, Rafael; Moore, Seth A; Jiang, Tiantian; Su, Chunlei; Dubey, Jitender P

    2016-02-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infections are widespread in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) but little is known of its prevalence in other cervids in the USA. Moose (Alces alces) is a popular large game animal, hunted for its meat and trophy antlers. Here, we report seroprevalence, isolation, and genetic characterization of T. gondii from moose from Minnesota. Antibodies against T. gondii were detected in 8 of 79 (10%) moose tested by the modified agglutination test (MAT 1:25 or higher). The myocardium of 68 moose was bioassayed individually in mice, irrespective of serological status. T. gondii was detected in three moose (2 adults, 1 3 weeks old). The parasite from 2 adults was further propagated in cell culture. PCR-RFLP genotyping of cell culture derived tachyzoites using 10 genetic markers, SAG1, SAG2 (5′ and 3′ SAG2, and alt.SAG2), SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, and Apico revealed two different ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotypes (#5, designated TgMooseUS1, and #7, TgMooseUS2). The mice inoculated with myocardium of the juvenile moose developed antibodies against T. gondii, and DNA extracted from infected mouse brain was only partially characterized by PCR-RFLP genotyping, which suggests a potential new genotype. Result documented prevalence of T. gondii in moose, and its possible transplacental/transmammary transmission of T. gondii in moose.

  10. Where wolves kill moose: the influence of prey life history dynamics on the landscape ecology of predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Robert A; Vucetich, John A; Roloff, Gary J; Bump, Joseph K; Peterson, Rolf O

    2014-01-01

    The landscape ecology of predation is well studied and known to be influenced by habitat heterogeneity. Little attention has been given to how the influence of habitat heterogeneity on the landscape ecology of predation might be modulated by life history dynamics of prey in mammalian systems. We demonstrate how life history dynamics of moose (Alces alces) contribute to landscape patterns in predation by wolves (Canis lupus) in Isle Royale National Park, Lake Superior, USA. We use pattern analysis and kernel density estimates of moose kill sites to demonstrate that moose in senescent condition and moose in prime condition tend to be wolf-killed in different regions of Isle Royale in winter. Predation on senescent moose was clustered in one kill zone in the northeast portion of the island, whereas predation on prime moose was clustered in 13 separate kill zones distributed throughout the full extent of the island. Moreover, the probability of kill occurrence for senescent moose, in comparison to prime moose, increased in high elevation habitat with patches of dense coniferous trees. These differences can be attributed, at least in part, to senescent moose being more vulnerable to predation and making different risk-sensitive habitat decisions than prime moose. Landscape patterns emerging from prey life history dynamics and habitat heterogeneity have been observed in the predation ecology of fish and insects, but this is the first mammalian system for which such observations have been made.

  11. Where wolves kill moose: the influence of prey life history dynamics on the landscape ecology of predation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Montgomery

    Full Text Available The landscape ecology of predation is well studied and known to be influenced by habitat heterogeneity. Little attention has been given to how the influence of habitat heterogeneity on the landscape ecology of predation might be modulated by life history dynamics of prey in mammalian systems. We demonstrate how life history dynamics of moose (Alces alces contribute to landscape patterns in predation by wolves (Canis lupus in Isle Royale National Park, Lake Superior, USA. We use pattern analysis and kernel density estimates of moose kill sites to demonstrate that moose in senescent condition and moose in prime condition tend to be wolf-killed in different regions of Isle Royale in winter. Predation on senescent moose was clustered in one kill zone in the northeast portion of the island, whereas predation on prime moose was clustered in 13 separate kill zones distributed throughout the full extent of the island. Moreover, the probability of kill occurrence for senescent moose, in comparison to prime moose, increased in high elevation habitat with patches of dense coniferous trees. These differences can be attributed, at least in part, to senescent moose being more vulnerable to predation and making different risk-sensitive habitat decisions than prime moose. Landscape patterns emerging from prey life history dynamics and habitat heterogeneity have been observed in the predation ecology of fish and insects, but this is the first mammalian system for which such observations have been made.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics Home Health Conditions hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome Enable Javascript to view the ... boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome is a condition characterized by ...

  13. Waterfowl population and habitat study, Kenai National Moose Range, Kenai, Alaska: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — During the period between May 27 and August 28, 1961, a waterfowl population and habitat study was conducted on the Kenai National Moose Range by personnel of the...

  14. Status of the Trumpeter Swan on the Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report, which discusses the occurrence of Trumpeter swans on Kenai National Moose Range, was presented at The Sixth Trumpeter Swan Society Conference. The...

  15. Prey specialization and morphological conformation of wolves associated with woodland caribou and moose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M.A. Wiwchar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Morphological analysis of wolves associated with woodland caribou in late succession boreal coniferous forests north of the commercial cut line and those associated with moose in early succession boreal deciduous forests south of the commercial cut line were studied in Ontario. Socalled “moose-wolves” could readily be distinguished from “caribouwolves” in both genders using a few morphological measurements. Wolves associated with woodland caribou were significantly smaller in most measurements, and increased in size within seven years post-harvest as moose totally replaced caribou in the ecosystem. Whether this change in wolf morphology is related to micro-evolutionary change, the migration of larger “moose-wolves” into the area, or both, remains unclear.

  16. Refuge narrative report : May-August, 1960 : Kenai National Moose Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1960. The report begins by summarizing the weather...

  17. Factors influencing furbearer populations and harvest on the Kenai National Moose Range, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Natural factors have influenced several furbearer populations on the 691,000 ha Kenai National Moose Range wildlife refuge in southcentral Alaska. The 1964...

  18. Annual Narrative Report : Calendar year 1979 : Kenai National Moose Range, Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1979 calendar year. The report...

  19. Refuge narrative report 1972 : Kenai National Moose Range & Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1972 calendar year. The...

  20. Moose Population Survey in the Upper Tanana Valley Game Management Unit 12, Alaska, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We conducted an aerial moose (Alces alces) survey on Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge and the northeast corner of Game Management Unit (GMU) 12 from 6 – 22 November...

  1. Recreation Outputs for Kenai National Moose Range I&R Programs

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In the past six months, several new techniques and programs for managing public use have been enacted on the Kenai National Moose Range. They include: backcountry...

  2. North Slope Moose Surveys Within and Adjacent to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Fall 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial moose surveys were conducted on the north slope from the Sagavanirktok River to the Canning River during 17-19 October 1988. Two aircraft based from Galbraith...

  3. Structural variation in the nasal bone region of European moose (Alces alces L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygrén, K; Paatsama, S; de Gritz, B

    1990-01-01

    The ontogeny of typical (normal) nasal bone region of the European moose (Alces alces L.) and the 3 variants of the pattern, was studied. The variants, named as "extra bone type", "punctured type" and "open type" referring the morphology of the internasal suture, were originally observed in Finnish male and female moose skulls in 1971. All of the variants were later found in hunting trophy exhibitions presenting male moose trophies from Sweden, Norway, Baltic Republics of USSR and Poland. The frequencies of the variants showed regional differences. By using histological, radiological and OTC bone labelling methods, all of the nasal bone types were observed in this study in embryonal (N = 36), newborn (N = 21), juvenile (N = 38) and adult (N = 12) moose. Two twin embryos showed different nasal bone structure. The variation is considered to be of congenital origin.

  4. Refuge narrative report 1969 : Kenai National Moose Range & Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The...

  5. Refuge narrative report 1970 : Kenai National Moose Range & Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1970 calendar year. The...

  6. Energy expenditure of moose on the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge: Annual progress report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of this work unit is to measure the energy requirements of moose during different seasons and for different sex and age classes. Techniques employed...

  7. Refuge narrative report 1975 : Kenai National Moose Range, Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Kenai National Moose Range and Tuxedni National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The...

  8. Alaska Department of Fish and Game Juneau, Alaska: South Central Moose Population Studies

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study aiming to delineate populations and subpopulations of moose on the west side of the lower Susitna Valley and to assess their seasonal movement patterns

  9. Consumption guideline concerning cadmium in moose meat in northern British Columbia, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Andrew; Joseph-Quinn, Kelly M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction. Disturbed by reports of high concentrations of cadmium in large land mammals in Arctic Canada, community members wondered if they should eat less moose (Alces alces). Study design. Risk assessment modelling. Methods. We measured cadmium concentrations in moose tissues donated by food hunters. As a conservative assumption, we took the upper limits of the 95% confidence intervals for the means. Cadmium intake from other sources we estimated using risk assessment models. Assuming a...

  10. Demonstration of finite element simulations in MOOSE using crystallographic models of irradiation hardening and plastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patra, Anirban [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wen, Wei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martinez Saez, Enrique [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-31

    This report describes the implementation of a crystal plasticity framework (VPSC) for irradiation hardening and plastic deformation in the finite element code, MOOSE. Constitutive models for irradiation hardening and the crystal plasticity framework are described in a previous report [1]. Here we describe these models briefly and then describe an algorithm for interfacing VPSC with finite elements. Example applications of tensile deformation of a dog bone specimen and a 3D pre-irradiated bar specimen performed using MOOSE are demonstrated.

  11. Deconstructing six dimensional gauge theories with strongly coupled moose meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, T; Gregoire, Thomas; Wacker, Jay G.

    2002-01-01

    It has recently been realized that five dimensional theories can be generated dynamically from asymptotically free, QCD-like four dimensional dynamics via ``deconstruction.'' In this paper we generalize this construction to six dimensional theories using a moose mesh with alternating weak and strong gauge groups. A new ingredient is the appearance of self couplings between the higher dimensional components of the gauge fields that appear as a potential for pseudo-Goldstone bosons in the deconstructed picture. We show that, in the limit where the weak gauge couplings are made large, such potentials are generated with appropriate size from finite one loop correction. Our construction has a number of applications, in particular to the constructions of ``little Higgs'' models of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  12. Short-term digestible energy intake in captive moose (Alces alces) on different diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Marcus; Kohlschein, Gina-Marie; Peemöller, Andreas; Hummel, Jürgen; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces) are regularly described as problematic animals in captivity, mainly because of their particular digestive physiology and resulting feeding demands. According to the literature, moose regularly reject non-browse forages offered in captivity, which may indirectly lead to an overproportional ingestion of easily digestible feeds and thus chronic acidosis, which may in turn be the cause of their low life expectancy in captivity. By feeding experiments in four animals, this study aimed at testing whether maintaining moose on roughage-only diets appears feasible. The diets used consisted of the typical zoo ration with mixed feeds (including alfalfa hay), and exclusive diets of alfalfa hay, combinations of alfalfa hay and grass hay, alfalfa hay and grass hay and dried browse leaves, and dried browse leaves only. Whereas results confirmed that moose do not ingest grass hay in relevant amounts, digestible energy (DE) intake on alfalfa hay was, at 0.67 ± 0.15 DE MJ kg(-0.75) day(-1), above the estimated maintenance requirement of 0.6, and higher on the browse diets. At least for short-time periods, results contradict previous reports in the literature that alfalfa hay only is not a suitable maintenance diet for moose. At the same time the results promote feeding moose in captivity forage-based diets.

  13. Voluntary control of human jaw stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiller, Douglas M; Houle, Guillaume; Ostry, David J

    2005-09-01

    Recent studies of human arm movement have suggested that the control of stiffness may be important both for maintaining stability and for achieving differences in movement accuracy. In the present study, we have examined the voluntary control of postural stiffness in 3D in the human jaw. The goal is to address the possible role of stiffness control in both stabilizing the jaw and in achieving the differential precision requirements of speech sounds. We previously showed that patterns of kinematic variability in speech are systematically related to the stiffness of the jaw. If the nervous system uses stiffness control as a means to regulate kinematic variation in speech, it should also be possible to show that subjects can voluntarily modify jaw stiffness. Using a robotic device, a series of force pulses was applied to the jaw to elicit changes in stiffness to resist displacement. Three orthogonal directions and three magnitudes of forces were tested. In all conditions, subjects increased the magnitude of jaw stiffness to resist the effects of the applied forces. Apart from the horizontal direction, greater increases in stiffness were observed when larger forces were applied. Moreover, subjects differentially increased jaw stiffness along a vertical axis to counteract disturbances in this direction. The observed changes in the magnitude of stiffness in different directions suggest an ability to control the pattern of stiffness of the jaw. The results are interpreted as evidence that jaw stiffness can be adjusted voluntarily, and thus may play a role in stabilizing the jaw and in controlling movement variation in the orofacial system.

  14. Evolution of the vertebrate jaw from developmental perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuratani, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Attainment of the biting jaw is regarded as one of the major novelties in the early history of vertebrates. Based on a comparison between lamprey and gnathostome embryos, evolutionary developmental studies have tried to explain this novelty as changes in the developmental patterning of the mandibular arch, the rostralmost pharyngeal arch, at the molecular and cellular levels. On the other hand, classical theories in the field of comparative morphology assumed the involvement of hypothetical premandibular arch(es) that ancestral animals would have possessed rostral to the mandibular arch, in the transition from agnathan to gnathostome states. These theories are highly biased toward the segmental scheme of the vertebrate head, and the concept of premandibular "arches" is no longer accepted by the current understanding. Instead, the premandibular domain has now become of interest in the understanding of cranial development, especially in its rostral part. As newer theories that consider involvement of the premandibular domain, the neoclassical and heterotopy theories are here compared from evolutionary developmental perspectives, in conjunction with the development of nasal and hypophyseal placodes, in the context of the evolutionary acquisition of the jaw. Given recent advances in understanding of the lamprey development, evolution of the Dlx code is also discussed together with the evolutionary scenario of jaw acquisition. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Nutritional Balancing Act of a Large Herbivore: An Experiment with Captive Moose (Alces alces L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Annika M; Felton, Adam; Raubenheimer, David; Simpson, Stephen J; Krizsan, Sophie J; Hedwall, Per-Ola; Stolter, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The nutrient balancing hypothesis proposes that, when sufficient food is available, the primary goal of animal diet selection is to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet. This hypothesis can be tested using the Geometric Framework for nutrition (GF). The GF enables researchers to study patterns of nutrient intake (e.g. macronutrients; protein, carbohydrates, fat), interactions between the different nutrients, and how an animal resolves the potential conflict between over-eating one or more nutrients and under-eating others during periods of dietary imbalance. Using the moose (Alces alces L.), a model species in the development of herbivore foraging theory, we conducted a feeding experiment guided by the GF, combining continuous observations of six captive moose with analysis of the macronutritional composition of foods. We identified the moose's self-selected macronutrient target by allowing them to compose a diet by mixing two nutritionally complementary pellet types plus limited access to Salix browse. Such periods of free choice were intermixed with periods when they were restricted to one of the two pellet types plus Salix browse. Our observations of food intake by moose given free choice lend support to the nutrient balancing hypothesis, as the moose combined the foods in specific proportions that provided a particular ratio and amount of macronutrients. When restricted to either of two diets comprising a single pellet type, the moose i) maintained a relatively stable intake of non-protein energy while allowing protein intakes to vary with food composition, and ii) increased their intake of the food item that most closely resembled the self-selected macronutrient intake from the free choice periods, namely Salix browse. We place our results in the context of the nutritional strategy of the moose, ruminant physiology and the categorization of food quality.

  16. Reproductive failure in moose (Alces alces) due to embryonic mortality and unfertilized oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmsten, Jonas; Dalin, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge on reproductive success is vital for successful management of large ungulates and is often measured by means of observing surviving offspring. In harvested ungulates, postmortem investigations of reproductive organs are used to estimate reproductive potential by obtaining ovulation rates and fetus numbers. However, there are differences in numbers of offspring observed, fetal/embryo counts, and ovulation rates. We hypothesize that the discrepancy between estimated reproductive potential and reproductive outcome in large ungulates is not only due to ova loss but also due to embryonic mortality. We investigated reproductive status in early pregnancy by sampling hunter-harvested moose (Alces alces) in southern Sweden from 2007 to 2011. In all, 213 reproductive organs were examined postmortem, and in confirmed pregnant moose (n = 53), 25 % (19 of 76) embryos were nonviable and 6 % of ova was unfertilized. The discrepancy between the ovulation rate of all pregnant moose (1.49) and the number of expected offspring per pregnant female, when embryonic mortality and unfertilized oocytes were accounted for (1.08), was 27.5 %. An association between inflammation of the inner mucous membrane (endometritis) of the moose's uterus and embryonic mortality was observed. This is the first comprehensive report of embryonic mortality and endometritis in moose. The observed discrepancy between ovulation rates and early embryonic development/survival shows that ovulation rates are indicative but not accurate estimates of moose reproductive rate. The use of ovulation rates as a sole estimator of future offspring rates may lead to an overharvest of a managed moose population.

  17. Moose, caribou, and grizzly bear distribution in relation to road traffic in Denali National Park, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, A.C.; Wright, R.G.

    2001-01-01

    Park managers are concerned that moose (Alces alces), caribou (Rangifer tarandus), and grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) may be avoiding areas along the 130 km road through Denali National Park as a result of high traffic volume, thus decreasing opportunities for visitors to view wildlife. A wildlife monitoring system was developed in 1996 that used 19 landscape level viewsheds, stratified into four sections based on decreasing traffic along the road corridor. Data were collected from 22 samplings of all viewsheds during May-August in 1996 and 1997. In 1997, nine backcountry viewsheds were established in three different areas to determine whether density estimates for each species in the backcountry were higher than those for the same animals in similar road-corridor areas. Densities higher than those in the road corridor were found in one backcountry area for moose and in two backcountry areas for grizzly bears. None of the backcountry areas showed a higher density of caribou. We tested hypotheses that moose, caribou, and grizzly bear distributions were unrelated to the road and traffic. Moose sightings were lower than expected within 300 m of the road. More caribou and grizzly bears than expected occurred between 601 and 900 m from the road, while more moose and fewer caribou than expected occurred between 900 and 1200 m from the road. Bull moose in stratum 1 were distributed farther from the road than bulls and cows in stratum 4; cows in stratum 1 and bulls in stratum 2 were distributed farther from the road than cows in stratum 4. Grizzly bears in stratum 2 were distributed farther from the road than bears in stratum 3. The distribution of moose sightings suggests traffic avoidance, but the spatial pattern of preferred forage may have had more of an influence. Caribou and grizzly bear distributions indicated no pattern of traffic avoidance.

  18. The Nutritional Balancing Act of a Large Herbivore: An Experiment with Captive Moose (Alces alces L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika M Felton

    Full Text Available The nutrient balancing hypothesis proposes that, when sufficient food is available, the primary goal of animal diet selection is to obtain a nutritionally balanced diet. This hypothesis can be tested using the Geometric Framework for nutrition (GF. The GF enables researchers to study patterns of nutrient intake (e.g. macronutrients; protein, carbohydrates, fat, interactions between the different nutrients, and how an animal resolves the potential conflict between over-eating one or more nutrients and under-eating others during periods of dietary imbalance. Using the moose (Alces alces L., a model species in the development of herbivore foraging theory, we conducted a feeding experiment guided by the GF, combining continuous observations of six captive moose with analysis of the macronutritional composition of foods. We identified the moose's self-selected macronutrient target by allowing them to compose a diet by mixing two nutritionally complementary pellet types plus limited access to Salix browse. Such periods of free choice were intermixed with periods when they were restricted to one of the two pellet types plus Salix browse. Our observations of food intake by moose given free choice lend support to the nutrient balancing hypothesis, as the moose combined the foods in specific proportions that provided a particular ratio and amount of macronutrients. When restricted to either of two diets comprising a single pellet type, the moose i maintained a relatively stable intake of non-protein energy while allowing protein intakes to vary with food composition, and ii increased their intake of the food item that most closely resembled the self-selected macronutrient intake from the free choice periods, namely Salix browse. We place our results in the context of the nutritional strategy of the moose, ruminant physiology and the categorization of food quality.

  19. Range expansion of moose in arctic Alaska linked to warming and increased shrub habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tape, Ken D.; Gustine, David D.; Reuss, Roger W.; Adams, Layne G.; Clark, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Twentieth century warming has increased vegetation productivity and shrub cover across northern tundra and treeline regions, but effects on terrestrial wildlife have not been demonstrated on a comparable scale. During this period, Alaskan moose (Alces alces gigas) extended their range from the boreal forest into tundra riparian shrub habitat; similar extensions have been observed in Canada (A. a. andersoni) and Eurasia (A. a. alces). Northern moose distribution is thought to be limited by forage availability above the snow in late winter, so the observed increase in shrub habitat could be causing the northward moose establishment, but a previous hypothesis suggested that hunting cessation triggered moose establishment. Here, we use recent changes in shrub cover and empirical relationships between shrub height and growing season temperature to estimate available moose habitat in Arctic Alaska c. 1860. We estimate that riparian shrubs were approximately 1.1 m tall c. 1860, greatly reducing the available forage above the snowpack, compared to 2 m tall in 2009. We believe that increases in riparian shrub habitat after 1860 allowed moose to colonize tundra regions of Alaska hundreds of kilometers north and west of previous distribution limits. The northern shift in the distribution of moose, like that of snowshoe hares, has been in response to the spread of their shrub habitat in the Arctic, but at the same time, herbivores have likely had pronounced impacts on the structure and function of these shrub communities. These northward range shifts are a bellwether for other boreal species and their associated predators.

  20. Oral bisphosphanates and osteonecrosis of the jaws

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph I. Helman

    2008-01-01

    @@ Bisphosphanate Related Osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) induced by the intravenous administration or oral intake of bisphosphanates represents a potential significant morbidity associated with the medical management of bone metastasis, mostly due to Breast Cancer, Multiple Myeloma and Prostate Cancer.

  1. Drug induced osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamadeh, Issam S; Ngwa, Bridget A; Gong, Yan

    2015-05-01

    Despite the widespread use of bisphosphonates and their unequivocal efficacy for the treatment of various disease states, osteonecrosis of the jaw remains one of the most feared complications associated with their use. Current evidence, however, suggests that there is also a relationship between occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw and use of other classes of pharmacotherapies namely RANKL inhibitors as well as angiogenesis inhibitors. Although these drugs have different mechanisms of action than bisphosphonates, they all seem to interfere with the bone remodeling process i.e. alter the balance between bone resorption and bone formation which may be the most plausible explanation for pathogenesis of osteonecrosis of the jaw. The main objective of this review is to introduce the readership to a number of relatively new medications that may cause osteonecrosis of the jaw. Accordingly, we will summarize latest findings from clinical studies, meta analyses and case reports published in medical literature on this topic. For some of these medications, the evidence may not appear as robust as that for bisphosphonates; yet, the possibility of this adverse event occurring with these non bisphosphonate drugs should never be precluded unless proven otherwise. Thus, it is imperative that health care providers implement preventive measures so as to circumvent the incidence of osteonecrosis of the jaw. In this day of age where medical care is becoming personalized, we will highlight some of significant findings from studies seeking to identify genetic markers that may potentially play a role in development of osteonecrosis of the jaw.

  2. A geographic cluster of malignant catarrhal fever in moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikøren, Turid; Klevar, Siv; Li, Hong; Hauge, Anna Germundsson

    2015-04-01

    Three cases of lethal sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) were diagnosed in Lesja, Norway, December 2008-February 2010. The diagnosis was based on PCR identification of ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2) DNA (n = 3) and typical histopathologic lesions (n = 1). To study the possibility of subclinical or latent MCF virus (MCFV) infection in this moose population and in red deer (Cervus elaphus), we examined clinically normal animals sampled during hunting in Lesja 2010 by serology and PCR. Sera from 63 moose and 33 red deer were tested for antibodies against MCFV by competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To test for MCFVs, a consensus PCR for herpesviral DNA was run on spleen samples from 23 moose and 17 red deer. All samples were antibody and PCR negative. Thus, there is no evidence of previous exposure, subclinical infection, or latent infection in this sample. This seasonal cluster of SA-MCF cases (2008-10) may be attributable to exposure of moose to lambs when OvHV-2 shedding is presumed to be maximal, compounded by an unusual extended grazing period by sheep in the autumn.

  3. Moose body mass variation revisited: disentangling effects of environmental conditions and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, Ivar; Haanes, Hallvard; Solberg, Erling J; Røed, Knut H; Høgda, Kjell Arild; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2014-02-01

    Large-scale geographical variation in phenotypic traits within species is often correlated to local environmental conditions and population density. Such phenotypic variation has recently been shown to also be influenced by genetic structuring of populations. In ungulates, large-scale geographical variation in phenotypic traits, such as body mass, has been related to environmental conditions and population density, but little is known about the genetic influences. Research on the genetic structure of moose suggests two distinct genetic lineages in Norway, structured along a north-south gradient. This corresponds with many environmental gradients, thus genetic structuring provides an additional factor affecting geographical phenotypic variation in Norwegian moose. We investigated if genetic structure explained geographical variation in body mass in Norwegian moose while accounting for environmental conditions, age and sex, and if it captured some of the variance in body mass that previously was attributed to environmental factors. Genetic structuring of moose was the most important variable in explaining the geographic variation in body mass within age and sex classes. Several environmental variables also had strong explanatory power, related to habitat diversity, environmental seasonality and winter harshness. The results suggest that environmental conditions, landscape characteristics, and genetic structure should be evaluated together when explaining large-scale patterns in phenotypic characters or life history traits. However, to better understand the role of genetic and environmental effects on phenotypic traits in moose, an extended individual-based study of variation in fitness-related characters is needed, preferably in an area of convergence between different genetic lineages.

  4. Sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimanis, Aleksija S; Hill, Janet E; Jardine, Claire M; Bollinger, Trent K

    2009-01-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a sporadic disease of artiodactyls caused by several viruses in the Gammaherpesvirinae. We report two cases of MCF in free-living moose (Alces alces) from Saskatchewan. One was a thin, dehydrated, adult male found recumbent in 2006. At necropsy, ulcers were found in the intestine, bladder, and corneas. Microscopically, there was lymphocytic vasculitis and perivasculitis in many organs with infrequent fibrinoid necrosis. Ovine herpes virus-2 (OHV-2) was identified by polymerase chain reaction. A segment of the herpesviral DNA polymerase gene was 99% identical to published OHV-2 sequences. During a retrospective search of earlier cases, a female moose with lymphoplasmacytic meningoencephalitis examined in 2003 was identified and OHV-2 was amplified from paraffin-embedded tissues from this animal. We believe this to be the first description of MCF in free-ranging moose in North America. Infection requires contact with infected sheep or goats, and MCF in moose may become more prevalent as moose distribution continues to expand into agricultural prairie.

  5. Effects of interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors on moose resource selection and environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Fryxell, John M; Liu, Hui; Dou, Hongliang; Ma, Yingjie; Jiang, Guangshun

    2017-01-27

    Resource selection of herbivores is a complex ecological process that operates in relation to biological or non-biological factors, which may affect the feeding and movement, and subsequently their spatial distribution and environmental stress. Here, we estimated moose (Alces alces cameloides) resource selection for habitat variables and the effect of interspecific interactions related to roe deer (Capreolus pygargus bedfordi) on its population distribution and environmental stress in the Khingan Mountain region of northeast China at local and regional scales. Different response patterns of moose resource selection, spatial distribution, and environmental stress to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors were shown at the two scales. A general ecological chain, response of moose to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors, was exhibited at the regional scale, and at the local scale, heterogeneous responses, linkages of habitat selection and environmental stress of moose population might be driven by different interspecific interaction patterns. Our study firstly suggested that moose resource selection, food availability, diet quality, population density and environmental stress indicators were impacted by interactions with the distribution of other sympatric herbivore species and showed differences in ecological response chains at various spatial scales. These findings are useful for sympatric herbivore assembly conservation, habitat quality monitoring and management.

  6. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION AND MOLECULAR DIVERSITY OF BARTONELLA SPP. INFECTIONS IN MOOSE (ALCES ALCES) IN FINLAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Vera, Cristina; Aaltonen, Kirsi; Spillmann, Thomas; Vapalahti, Olli; Sironen, Tarja

    2016-04-28

    Moose, Alces alces (Artiodactyla: Cervidae) in Finland are heavily infested with deer keds, Lipoptena cervi (Diptera: Hippoboschidae). The deer ked, which carries species of the genus Bartonella, has been proposed as a vector for the transmission of bartonellae to animals and humans. Previously, bartonella DNA was found in deer keds as well as in moose blood collected in Finland. We investigated the prevalence and molecular diversity of Bartonella spp. infection from blood samples collected from free-ranging moose. Given that the deer ked is not present in northernmost Finland, we also investigated whether there were geographic differences in the prevalence of bartonella infection in moose. The overall prevalence of bartonella infection was 72.9% (108/148). Geographically, the prevalence was highest in the south (90.6%) and lowest in the north (55.9%). At least two species of bartonellae were identified by multilocus sequence analysis. Based on logistic regression analysis, there was no significant association between bartonella infection and either age or sex; however, moose from outside the deer ked zone were significantly less likely to be infected (Pmoose hunted within the deer ked zone.

  7. Applications of resilience theory in management of a moose-hunter system in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey L. Brown

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated wildfire-related effects on a slow ecological variable, i.e., forage production, and fast social-ecological variables, i.e., seasonal harvest rates, hunter access, and forage offtake, in a moose-hunter system in interior Alaska. In a 1994 burn, average forage production increased slightly (5% between 2007 and 2013; however, the proportional removal across all sites declined significantly (10%. This suggests that moose are not utilizing the burn as much as they have in the past and that, as the burn has aged, the apparent habitat quality has declined. Areas with a greater proportion of accessible burned area supported both high numbers of hunters and harvested moose. Our results suggest that evaluating ecological variables in conjunction with social variables can provide managers with information to forecast management scenarios. We recommend that wildlife managers monitor fast variables frequently, e.g., annually, to adapt and keep their management responsive as resources fluctuate; whereas slower variables, which require less frequent monitoring, should be actively incorporated into long-term management strategies. Climate-driven increases in wildfire extent and severity and economically driven demographic changes are likely to increase both moose density and hunting pressure. However, the future resilience of this moose-hunter system will depend on integrated management of wildfire, hunter access, and harvest opportunities.

  8. Pathogens, nutritional deficiency, and climate influences on a declining moose population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D.L.; Cox, E.W.; Ballard, W.B.; Whitlaw, H.A.; Lenarz, M.S.; Custer, T.W.; Barnett, T.; Fuller, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    Several potential proximate causes may be implicated in a recent (post-1984) decline in moose (Alces alces andersoni) numbers at their southern range periphery in northwest Minnesota, USA. These causes include deleterious effects of infectious pathogens, some of which are associated with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), negative effects of climate change, increased food competition with deer or moose, legal or illegal hunting, and increased predation by gray wolves (Canis lupus) and black bears (Ursus americanus). Long-standing factors that may have contributed to the moose decline include those typically associated with marginal habitat such as nutritional deficiencies. We examined survival and productivity among radiocollared (n = 152) adult female and juvenile moose in northwest Minnesota during 1995–2000, and assessed cause of death and pathology through carcass necropsy of radiocollared and non-radiocollared animals.Aerial moose surveys suggested that hunting was an unlikely source of the numerical decline because the level of harvest was relatively low (i.e., approx. 15% / 2 yr) and the population usually grew in years following a hunt. The majority of moose mortalities (up to 87% of radiocollared moose [n = 76] and up to 65% of non-radiocollared moose [n = 84]) were proximally related to pathology associated with parasites and infectious disease. Liver fluke (Fascioloides magna) infections apparently constituted the greatest single source of mortality and caused significant pathology in the liver, thoracic and peritoneal cavities, pericardial sac, and lungs. Mortality due to meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) was less prevalent and was manifested through characteristic neurological disease. Several mortalities apparently were associated with unidentified infectious disease, probably acting in close association with malnutrition. Bone-marrow fat was lower for moose dying of natural causes than those dying of anthropogenic factors or

  9. Electroweak Corrections and Unitarity in Linear Moose Models

    CERN Document Server

    Chivukula, R S; Kurachi, M; Simmons, E H; Tanabashi, M; He, Hong-Jian; Kurachi, Masafumi; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the form of the corrections to the electroweak interactions in the class of Higgsless models which can be "deconstructed'' to a chain of SU(2) gauge groups adjacent to a chain of U(1) gauge groups, and with the fermions coupled to any single SU(2) group and to any single U(1) group along the chain. The primary advantage of our technique is that the size of corrections to electroweak processes can be directly related to the spectrum of vector bosons ("KK modes"). In Higgsless models, this spectrum is constrained by unitarity. Our methods also allow for arbitrary background 5-D geometry, spatially dependent gauge-couplings, and brane kinetic energy terms. We find that, due to the size of corrections to electroweak processes in any unitary theory, Higgsless models with localized fermions are disfavored by precision electroweak data. Although we stress our results as they apply to continuum Higgsless 5-D models, they apply to any linear moose model including those with only a few extra vector bosons....

  10. [The role of the Urals in the genetic diversity of the European moose subspecies (Alces alces alces)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodova, M V; Korytin, N S; Bol'shakov, V N

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of the Uralian moose population and the role of the Ural region in the phylogeographic structure of the European moose were evaluated based on sequence polymorphisms of the mtDNA control region. The nucleotide diversity of the Ural moose was low, whereas haplotype diversity was rather high. It was found that the haplotype pool of the Ural moose reflects both the unique features of their mitochondrial lineages and their connection with Alces alces alces populations of Europe and West Siberia. The structure of median networks and the territorial haplotype distribution support the hypothesis that the mitochondrial lineages typical for this part of the European moose area originate from a late Pleistocene refugium that was located in the Urals.

  11. Age structure of moose (Alces alces) killed by gray wolves (Canis lupus) in northeastern Minnesota, 1967-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Nelson, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The age structure of Moose (Alces alces) killed by gray Wolves (Canis lupus) is available from only two national parks in the united States where hunting by people is not allowed and from three areas in Alaska where Moose are hunted (Mech 1966; Peterson et al.1984; Ballard et al. 1987; Mech et al. 1998). The samples of Moose killed by gray Wolves from each hunted area are relatively small (47–117), given that Moose live to 20 or more years (Passmore et al. 1955). This article adds age data from another 77 Moose killed by gray Wolves from a fourth (lightly) human-hunted area and assesses the age structure of all the samples.

  12. Re-evaluating the northeastern Minnesota moose decline and the role of wolves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Fieberg, John

    2014-01-01

    We re-evaluated findings from Lenarz et al. (2009) that adult moose (Alces alces) survival in northeastern Minnesota was related to high January temperatures and that predation by wolves (Canis lupus) played a minor role. We found significant inverse relationships between annual wolf numbers in part of the moose range and various moose demographics from 2003 to 2013 that suggested a stronger role of wolves than heretofore believed. To re-evaluate the temperature findings, we conducted a simulation study, mimicking the approach taken by Lenarz et al. (2009), to explore the potential for concluding a significant relationship exists between temperature and survival, when no association exists. We found that the high R2s and low probabilities associated with the regression models in Lenarz et al. (2009) should be viewed cautiously in light of the large number of fitted models (m = 45) and few observations (n = 6 for each of 5 response variables).

  13. Hematology and serum chemistry reference ranges of free-ranging moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostal, Melinda K; Evans, Alina L; Solberg, Erling J; Arnemo, Jon M

    2012-07-01

    Baseline reference ranges of serum chemistry and hematology data can be important indicators for the status of both individuals or populations of wild animals that are affected by emerging pathogens, toxicants, or other causes of disease. Frequently, reference ranges for these values are not available for wildlife species or subspecies. We present hematologic and serum chemistry reference ranges for moose (Alces alces) adults, yearlings, and calves in Norway sampled from 1992-2000. Additionally, we demonstrated that both induction time and chase time were correlated with initial rectal temperature, although they were not significantly correlated with cortisol, aspartate aminotransferase, glucose, or creatine kinase. Overall, the reference ranges given here are similar to those given for American moose, with a few differences that can be attributed to environment, testing methodology, or subspecies or species status. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of reference ranges for moose in Norway.

  14. Long term behavior of radiocaesium in moose: conclusions from 25 years of monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weimer, R.; Sonesten, L.; Goedkoop, W. [Department of Aquatic Sciences and Assessment (Sweden); Sundell-Bergman, S.; Rosen, K. [Department of Soil and Environment (Sweden); Wikenros, C. [Department of Ecology (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) deposited after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986, still persist in forest ecosystems in parts of Sweden at relatively high concentrations. In the forest, radiocaesium is assumed to be reversibly bound to the soil, which facilitates its uptake by plant roots and fungal mycelia thus making it available, as fodder, to wild animals. Even today this leads to contaminated meat from moose (Alces alces) and other game species. Around 100 000 moose, approximately 1/3 of the whole population, are shot each year in Sweden which makes moose the main source of consumed game meat. Hence understanding the long-term behavior of radiocaesium in forest ecosystems is important for the evaluation of future potential health risks to consumers. The two municipalities of Heby and Uppsala, in east-central Sweden, experienced relatively large deposition in 1986 (5 - 100 kBq/m{sup 2}). Monitoring of the {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in meat from moose hunted in these areas was initiated already in autumn 1986 and is still continuing. Muscle samples from front leg of the slaughtered moose are received from local hunters during the hunting season and more than 3500 samples have been collected during the years. The samples are adjoined with a sampling protocol containing information on estimated age, sex and weight, as well as where and when each moose was shot. Gamma spectrometry of the {sup 137}Cs- activities is performed on fresh or frozen moose muscle samples using HPGe detectors. The main part of all the samples analyzed since 1986 are from the northern part of Heby municipality. This study area covers approximately 400 km{sup 2} and received a mean ground deposition of approximately 35 kBq/m{sup 2} of {sup 137}Cs in 1986. The area is dominated by managed coniferous forests, but also includes large parts of agricultural land. A database of > 3 500 moose samples collected from hunts between 1986 and 2010 was used in this study. The results of the

  15. Postmortal radiographic diagnosis of laminitis in a captive European moose (Alces alces).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, M; Keller, A; Peemöller, A; Nygrén, K; Hatt, J-M; Nuss, K

    2009-11-01

    A five year-old bull moose (Alces alces) was culled due to chronic hoof overgrowth that required frequent intervention. Radiographic examination revealed changes in phalangeal bone structure usually considered indicative for laminitis in domestic cattle; similar changes were absent in the hooves of a free-ranging moose of similar age. The captive animal had been maintained in exhibits whose flooring were much harder than the soil in natural moose habitat, and on a diet with a high proportion of easily fermentable carbohydrates. These findings indicate that chronic laminitis should be considered as a potential underlying factor for hoof overgrowth, and that measures aimed at reducing the incidence of laminitis in domestic cattle, such as the use of softer flooring and diets with a higher proportion of fibre, might have prophylactic potential in captive wild ruminants.

  16. High risk of lead contamination for scavengers in an area with high moose hunting success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legagneux, Pierre; Suffice, Pauline; Messier, Jean-Sébastien; Lelievre, Frédérick; Tremblay, Junior A; Maisonneuve, Charles; Saint-Louis, Richard; Bêty, Joël

    2014-01-01

    Top predators and scavengers are vulnerable to pollutants, particularly those accumulated along the food chain. Lead accumulation can induce severe disorders and alter survival both in mammals (including humans) and in birds. A potential source of lead poisoning in wild animals, and especially in scavengers, results from the consumption of ammunition residues in the tissues of big game killed by hunters. For two consecutive years we quantified the level lead exposure in individuals of a sentinel scavenger species, the common raven (Corvus corax), captured during the moose (Alces alces) hunting season in eastern Quebec, Canada. The source of the lead contamination was also determined using stable isotope analyses. Finally, we identified the different scavenger species that could potentially be exposed to lead by installing automatic cameras targeting moose gut piles. Blood lead concentration in ravens increased over time, indicating lead accumulation over the moose-hunting season. Using a contamination threshold of 100 µg x L(-1), more than 50% of individuals were lead-contaminated during the moose hunting period. Lead concentration was twice as high in one year compared to the other, matching the number of rifle-shot moose in the area. Non-contaminated birds exhibited no ammunition isotope signatures. The isotope signature of the lead detected in contaminated ravens tended towards the signature from lead ammunition. We also found that black bears (Ursus americanus), golden eagles and bald eagles (Aquila chrysaetos and Haliaeetus leucocephalus, two species of conservation concern) scavenged heavily on moose viscera left by hunters. Our unequivocal results agree with other studies and further motivate the use of non-toxic ammunition for big game hunting.

  17. Response of moose hunters to predation following wolf return in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Wikenros

    Full Text Available Predation and hunter harvest constitute the main mortality factors affecting the size and dynamics of many exploited populations. The re-colonization by wolves (Canis lupus of the Scandinavian Peninsula may therefore substantially reduce hunter harvest of moose (Alces alces, the main prey of wolves.We examined possible effects of wolf presence on hunter harvest in areas where we had data before and after wolf establishment (n = 25, and in additional areas that had been continuously exposed to wolf predation during at least ten years (n = 43. There was a general reduction in the total number of moose harvested (n = 31,827 during the ten year study period in all areas irrespective of presence of wolves or not. However, the reduction in hunter harvest was stronger within wolf territories compared to control areas without wolves. The reduction in harvest was larger in small (500-800 km2 compared to large (1,200-1,800 km2 wolf territories. In areas with newly established wolf territories moose management appeared to be adaptive with regard to both managers (hunting quotas and to hunters (actual harvest. In these areas an instant reduction in moose harvest over-compensated the estimated number of moose killed annually by wolves and the composition of the hunted animals changed towards a lower proportion of adult females.We show that the re-colonization of wolves may result in an almost instant functional response by another large predator-humans-that reduced the potential for a direct numerical effect on the density of wolves' main prey, the moose. Because most of the worlds' habitat that will be available for future colonization by large predators are likely to be strongly influenced by humans, human behavioural responses may constitute a key trait that govern the impact of large predators on their prey.

  18. High risk of lead contamination for scavengers in an area with high moose hunting success.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Legagneux

    Full Text Available Top predators and scavengers are vulnerable to pollutants, particularly those accumulated along the food chain. Lead accumulation can induce severe disorders and alter survival both in mammals (including humans and in birds. A potential source of lead poisoning in wild animals, and especially in scavengers, results from the consumption of ammunition residues in the tissues of big game killed by hunters. For two consecutive years we quantified the level lead exposure in individuals of a sentinel scavenger species, the common raven (Corvus corax, captured during the moose (Alces alces hunting season in eastern Quebec, Canada. The source of the lead contamination was also determined using stable isotope analyses. Finally, we identified the different scavenger species that could potentially be exposed to lead by installing automatic cameras targeting moose gut piles. Blood lead concentration in ravens increased over time, indicating lead accumulation over the moose-hunting season. Using a contamination threshold of 100 µg x L(-1, more than 50% of individuals were lead-contaminated during the moose hunting period. Lead concentration was twice as high in one year compared to the other, matching the number of rifle-shot moose in the area. Non-contaminated birds exhibited no ammunition isotope signatures. The isotope signature of the lead detected in contaminated ravens tended towards the signature from lead ammunition. We also found that black bears (Ursus americanus, golden eagles and bald eagles (Aquila chrysaetos and Haliaeetus leucocephalus, two species of conservation concern scavenged heavily on moose viscera left by hunters. Our unequivocal results agree with other studies and further motivate the use of non-toxic ammunition for big game hunting.

  19. Vole preference of bilberry along gradients of simulated moose density and site productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Simen; Andreassen, Harry P; Persson, Inga-Lill; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Danell, Kjell; Skarpe, Christina

    2011-12-01

    Browsing by large herbivores might either increase or decrease preference for the plant by other herbivores, depending on the plant response. Using a cafeteria test, we studied the preference by root voles (Microtus oeconomus [Pallas, 1776]) for bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) previously subjected to 4 levels of simulated moose (Alces alces [Linnaeus, 1758]) density. The different levels of moose density were simulated at population densities relevant for Fennoscandian conditions, in exclosures situated along a site productivity gradient. We expected: (i) voles to prefer bilberry from high productivity sites over low productivity sites; (ii) voles to prefer browsed bilberry, if plants allocate resources to compensatory growth or to avoid browsed bilberry if plants allocate resources to defense; (iii) these effects to increase with increasing simulated moose density; and (iv) the concentration of plant chemicals and the plant morphology to explain vole preference. Specifically, we predicted that voles would prefer: (i) plants with high nitrogen content; (ii) plants with low content of defensive substances; and (iii) tall plants with long shoots. Voles preferred bilberry from the high productivity sites compared to the low productivity sites. We also found an interaction between site productivity and simulated moose density, where voles preferred unbrowsed plants at low productivity sites and intermediate levels of browsing at high productivity sites. There was no effect of plant chemistry or morphology on vole preference. We conclude that moose browsing impacts the food preference of voles. With the current high densities of moose in Fennoscandia, this could potentially influence vole food selection and population dynamics over large geographical areas.

  20. Antler stiffness in moose (Alces alces): correlated evolution of bone function and material properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blob, Richard W; Snelgrove, Jason M

    2006-09-01

    The material properties of bone can vary considerably among skeletal elements from different parts of the body that serve different functions. However, functional demands placed on a specific type of skeletal element also can vary at a variety of scales, such as between different parts of the element, among individuals of a species, and across species. Variation in bone material properties might be correlated with differing functional demands at any of these scales. In this study we performed three-point bending tests on bone specimens extracted from antlers of moose (Alces alces) to test for three types of variation in bone material stiffness (Young's modulus): within the antler structure, between populations of moose, and between moose and other deer species. Because superficial portions of the antler are exposed to greater bending stress and strain than deeper portions, and because the antler beam (the basal shaft that attaches to the skull) is subjected to greater bending moments than more distal parts of the antler, we predicted that superficial bone and bone from the beam would be stiffer than bone from other parts of the antler. Instead, we identified no significant differences in these comparisons. There were also no significant differences in antler stiffness between moose from Michigan and the Yukon, even though the rapid growth required of antlers from northern latitudes like the Yukon has the potential to compromise bone material properties. However, moose have significantly stiffer antlers (11.6 +/- 0.45 GPa, mean +/- SE) than any other deer in the odocoileine lineage. Moreover, phylogenetic reconstructions of the evolution of antler stiffness in deer indicate a strong potential that high antler stiffness is a derived feature of moose. The unusual palmate shape of moose antlers likely subjects their antler beams to higher bending moments than found in other odocoileines, a factor that may have contributed to the evolutionary divergence of moose antler

  1. Osteonecrosis of the Jaw in Patients Receiving Bone-Targeted Therapies: An Overview--Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Drudge-Coates, Lawrence; Ali, Sacha; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Ali, Enamul; Cheng, Leo; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Urologic patients receiving bone-targeted therapies are at risk of developing osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). ONJ has historically been associated with bisphosphonate therapy. More recently, RANK-Ligand inhibitors (denosumab) have also been used to reduce the risk of skeletal-related events in patients who have advanced cancers with bone metastases. More than 65% of men with metastatic prostate cancer and nearly 75% of women with metastatic breast cancer are affected by bone metastases. The literature has described ONJ associated with bisphosphonate therapy as bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ). However, with evidence also linking the use of RANK-Ligand inhibitors with osteonecrosis of the jaw, we advocate use of the term "anti-bone resorption therapy-related osteonecrosis of the jaw" (ABRT-ONJ). The term "medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw" (MRONJ) is now becoming more widespread. There is not a universally accepted definition of ABRT-ONJ, which may have hindered recognition and reporting of the condition. In Part I of this article, a review of current knowledge around the etiology of ABRT-ONJ and incidence data are provided. In Part II, we provide an audit of ONJ in a nurse consultant-led bone support clinic. In the article, we refer to zoledronic acid because this is the bisphosphonate of choice for use in men with prostate cancer in the United Kingdom.

  2. Non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in dogs: 14 cases (1996 - 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago ePeralta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the jaws is an entity of major clinical impact characterized by chronically exposed necrotic mandibular or maxillary bone. Its clinicopathological characteristics and possible inciting or risk factors are well described in humans but only anecdotally reported in dogs. Treatment modalities and outcome vary depending on the inciting factors involved and the extent and severity of the lesions. The objectives of this study were to retrospectively describe the clinicopathological features of non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws in a series of 14 dogs, identify possible inciting or risk factors, and report on the surgical treatment and outcome. For all patients, the medical records were used to collect information regarding signalment, clinical signs, characteristics of the oral, jaw and dental lesions, diagnostic imaging findings, histopathological and microbiological analysis, treatment performed and outcome. The data collected showed that non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws appears to be an infrequent clinical entity but of significant impact in dogs; that a history of systemic antibiotics and dental disease is common among affected dogs; that previous dental extractions are commonly associated with ONJ sites; that using a systematic diagnostic approach is essential for diagnosis; and that thorough surgical débridement combined with a course of oral antibiotics was effective in the described dogs affected by advanced non-radiation related osteonecrosis of the jaws.

  3. Cytogenetics of jaw cysts - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Esther; Brennan, Peter A; Bodner, Lipa

    2012-07-01

    The pathogenesis of cysts that arise in the jaws is still not certain, and the underlying mechanisms of epithelial proliferation are not fully understood. Cysts of the jaw may involve a reactive, inflammatory, or neoplastic process. Cytogenetics, the study of the number and structure of chromosomes, has provided valuable information about the diagnosis, prognosis, and targeted treatment in many cancers, including oral squamous cell carcinoma. Cytogenetics can also provide information about the possible aetiology or neoplastic potential of a lesion, though to our knowledge no studies of this technique have been used for cysts in the jaws. In this pilot study we used cytogenetics in a series of 10 cysts (3 radicular, 4 dentigerous, 2 of the nasopalatine duct, and 1 dermoid). In all cases we found normal karyotypes. Further work and larger numbers are needed for a definitive study, but we can hypothesise from this pilot study that these cysts do not have cytogenetic aberrations and so have no neoplastic potential.

  4. Effects of experimental pain on jaw muscle activity during goal-directed jaw movements in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sae-Lee, Daraporn; Whittle, Terry; Forte, Anna R C; Peck, Christopher C; Byth, Karen; Sessle, Barry J; Murray, Greg M

    2008-08-01

    To study the effects of masseter muscle pain on jaw muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during goal-directed tasks. Mandibular movement was tracked and EMG activity was recorded from bilateral masseter, and right posterior temporalis, anterior digastric, and inferior head of lateral pterygoid muscles in 22 asymptomatic subjects at postural jaw position, and during three tasks: (a) protrusion, (b) contralateral (left), (c) open jaw movement. Tasks were performed during three conditions: control (no infusion), test 1 [continuous infusion into right masseter of 4.5% hypertonic saline to achieve 30-60 mm pain intensity on 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS)], and test 2 (isotonic saline infusion; in 16 subjects only); the sequence of hypertonic and isotonic saline was randomized. The average EMG root-mean-square values at 0.5 mm increments of mid-incisor-point displacement were analysed using linear mixed effects model statistics (significance: P jaw displacement. Hypertonic saline infusion had no significant effect on postural EMG activity in any of the recorded jaw muscles. The data suggest that under constrained goal-directed tasks, the pattern of pain-induced changes in jaw muscle EMG activity is not clear cut, but can vary with the task performed, jaw displacement magnitude, and the subject being studied.

  5. Morphine application to peripheral tissues modulates nociceptive jaw reflex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Hu, J.W.; Sessle, B.J.

    1998-01-01

    antinociceptive effects, jaw muscle activity, morphine, mustard oil naloxone, peripheral opioid receptors, temporomandibular joint......antinociceptive effects, jaw muscle activity, morphine, mustard oil naloxone, peripheral opioid receptors, temporomandibular joint...

  6. Warthog: A MOOSE-Based Application for the Direct Code Coupling of BISON and PROTEUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaskey, Alexander J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Slattery, Stuart [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Billings, Jay Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program from the Department of Energy s Office of Nuclear Energy provides a robust toolkit for the modeling and simulation of current and future advanced nuclear reactor designs. This toolkit provides these technologies organized across product lines: two divisions targeted at fuels and end-to-end reactor modeling, and a third for integration, coupling, and high-level workflow management. The Fuels Product Line and the Reactor Product line provide advanced computational technologies that serve each respective field well, however, their current lack of integration presents a major impediment to future improvements of simulation solution fidelity. There is a desire for the capability to mix and match tools across Product Lines in an effort to utilize the best from both to improve NEAMS modeling and simulation technologies. This report will detail a new effort to provide this Product Line interoperability through the development of a new application called Warthog. This application couples the BISON Fuel Performance application from the Fuels Product Line and the PROTEUS Core Neutronics application from the Reactors Product Line in an effort to utilize the best from all parts of the NEAMS toolkit and improve overall solution fidelity of nuclear fuel simulations. To acheive this, Warthog leverages as much prior work from the NEAMS program as possible, and in doing so, enables interoperability between the disparate MOOSE and SHARP frameworks, and the libMesh and MOAB mesh data formats. The remainder of this report will describe this work in full. We will begin with a detailed look at the individual NEAMS framework technologies used and developed in the various Product Lines, and the current status of their interoperability. We will then introduce the Warthog application: its overall architecture and the ways it leverages the best existing tools from accross the NEAMS toolkit to enable BISON-PROTEUS integration

  7. Warthog: A MOOSE-Based Application for the Direct Code Coupling of BISON and PROTEUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaskey, Alexander J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Slattery, Stuart [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Billings, Jay Jay [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program from the Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy provides a robust toolkit for the modeling and simulation of current and future advanced nuclear reactor designs. This toolkit provides these technologies organized across product lines: two divisions targeted at fuels and end-to-end reactor modeling, and a third for integration, coupling, and high-level workflow management. The Fuels Product Line and the Reactor Product line provide advanced computational technologies that serve each respective field well, however, their current lack of integration presents a major impediment to future improvements of simulation solution fidelity. There is a desire for the capability to mix and match tools across Product Lines in an effort to utilize the best from both to improve NEAMS modeling and simulation technologies. This report details a new effort to provide this Product Line interoperability through the development of a new application called Warthog. This application couples the BISON Fuel Performance application from the Fuels Product Line and the PROTEUS Core Neutronics application from the Reactors Product Line in an effort to utilize the best from all parts of the NEAMS toolkit and improve overall solution fidelity of nuclear fuel simulations. To achieve this, Warthog leverages as much prior work from the NEAMS program as possible, and in doing so, enables interoperability between the disparate MOOSE and SHARP frameworks, and the libMesh and MOAB mesh data formats. This report describes this work in full. We begin with a detailed look at the individual NEAMS framework technologies used and developed in the various Product Lines, and the current status of their interoperability. We then introduce the Warthog application: its overall architecture and the ways it leverages the best existing tools from across the NEAMS toolkit to enable BISON-PROTEUS integration. Furthermore, we show how

  8. Moose: An Open-Source Framework to Enable Rapid Development of Collaborative, Multi-Scale, Multi-Physics Simulation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaughter, A. E.; Permann, C.; Peterson, J. W.; Gaston, D.; Andrs, D.; Miller, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL)-developed Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE; www.mooseframework.org), is an open-source, parallel computational framework for enabling the solution of complex, fully implicit multiphysics systems. MOOSE provides a set of computational tools that scientists and engineers can use to create sophisticated multiphysics simulations. Applications built using MOOSE have computed solutions for chemical reaction and transport equations, computational fluid dynamics, solid mechanics, heat conduction, mesoscale materials modeling, geomechanics, and others. To facilitate the coupling of diverse and highly-coupled physical systems, MOOSE employs the Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method when solving the coupled nonlinear systems of equations arising in multiphysics applications. The MOOSE framework is written in C++, and leverages other high-quality, open-source scientific software packages such as LibMesh, Hypre, and PETSc. MOOSE uses a "hybrid parallel" model which combines both shared memory (thread-based) and distributed memory (MPI-based) parallelism to ensure efficient resource utilization on a wide range of computational hardware. MOOSE-based applications are inherently modular, which allows for simulation expansion (via coupling of additional physics modules) and the creation of multi-scale simulations. Any application developed with MOOSE supports running (in parallel) any other MOOSE-based application. Each application can be developed independently, yet easily communicate with other applications (e.g., conductivity in a slope-scale model could be a constant input, or a complete phase-field micro-structure simulation) without additional code being written. This method of development has proven effective at INL and expedites the development of sophisticated, sustainable, and collaborative simulation tools.

  9. Moose as a vector for non-indigenous plant species in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    White sweetclover and narrowleaf hawksbeard are non-indigenous invasive plant species in Alaska that are rapidly spreading, including into areas that are otherwise free of non-indigenous plants. There has been concern that native moose could be dispersing viable seed from these plants after ingestio...

  10. White Sweetclover (Melilotus albus) and Narrowleaf Hawksbeard (Crepis tectorum) Seed Germination after Passing Through Moose

    Science.gov (United States)

    White sweetclover and narrowleaf hawksbeard are non-indigenous invasive plant species in Alaska that are rapidly spreading, including into areas that are otherwise free of non-indigenous plants. There has been concern that native moose could be dispersing viable seed from these plants after ingestio...

  11. Temporal patterns of moose-vehicle collisions with and without personal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Milla; Rolandsen, Christer M; Neumann, Wiebke; Kukko, Tuomas; Tiilikainen, Raisa; Pusenius, Jyrki; Solberg, Erling J; Ericsson, Göran

    2017-01-01

    Collisions with wild ungulates are an increasing traffic safety issue in boreal regions. Crashes involving smaller-bodied deer species usually lead to vehicle damage only, whereas collisions with a large animal, such as the moose, increase the risk of personal injuries. It is therefore important to understand both the factors affecting the number of moose-vehicle collisions (MVCs) and the underlying causes that turn an MVC into an accident involving personal injuries or fatalities. As a basis for temporal mitigation measures, we examined the annual and monthly variation of MVCs with and without personal injuries. Using a 22-year-long (1990-2011) time series from Finland, we tested the effect of moose population density and traffic volume on the yearly number of all MVCs and those leading to personal injuries. We also examined the monthly distribution of MVCs with and without personal injuries, and contrasted the Finnish findings with collision data from Sweden (years 2008-2010) and Norway (years 2008-2011). Both moose population abundance indices and traffic volume were positively related to the yearly variation in the number of MVCs in Finland. The proportion of MVCs involving personal injuries decreased during our 22-year study period. The monthly distribution of all MVCs peaked during the autumn or winter depending on country, while MVCs involving personal injury peaked in summer. Our study indicates that efforts to reduce MVCs involving personal injuries need to address driver awareness and attitudes during summer, despite most MVCs occurring in autumn or winter.

  12. Gastrointestinal nematodes of moose (Alces alces) in relation to supplementary feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Jos M; Wedul, Sari J; Laaksonen, Sauli; Oksanen, Antti

    2013-01-01

    Winter supplementary feeding of wildlife is controversial because it may promote parasite and disease transmission by host aggregation. We investigated the effect of winter supplemental feeding of Scandinavian moose (Alces alces) on gastrointestinal (GI) parasite infection in two counties of southern Norway by comparing fecal egg counts of moose using, and not using, feeding stations between January 2007 and March 2010. We identified three different GI nematodes based on egg morphology. All three were found in Hedmark county while in Telemark county we found only Trichuris sp. (prevalence 33%). Prevalence of Trichostrongylidae (65%) and Nematodirus sp. (26%) in Hedmark was not affected by feeding station use. However, the probability of infection varied significantly between years sampled (Trichostrongylidae) and age class (Nematodirus sp.). Fecal egg counts (FEC), a proxy for intensity of infection, of Trichostrongylidae were higher in the year when winter weather conditions were more challenging and prevalence was higher, and decreased with increasing body mass. Adult moose had higher FECs than did juvenile moose, and female juveniles had lower abundances than did male juveniles. Use of feeding stations did not affect probability of infection with any of the nematodes or intensity of infection with Trichostrongylidae. We discuss our findings in terms of parasite life histories and recommend that parasitologic surveillance be included in the monitoring of feeding programs.

  13. The first detection of species of Babesia Starcovici, 1893 in moose, Alces alces (Linnaeus), in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puraite, Irma; Rosef, Olav; Radzijevskaja, Jana; Lipatova, Indre; Paulauskas, Algimantas

    2016-04-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging zoonotic disease and various wildlife species are reservoir hosts for zoonotic species of Babesia Starcovici, 1893. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence and prevalence of Babesia spp. in moose Alces alces (Linnaeus) in two regions of Norway. A total of 99 spleen samples were collected from animals of various ages from an area with the occurrence of the tick Ixodes ricinus (Linnaeus, 1758), and from an area where the ticks are known to be absent. Infection was detected by the amplification of different regions of the 18S rRNA gene by using two different PCR primer sets specific of Babesia. Babesia spp. were found in the spleen samples of four moose. All Babesia-infected animals were from an area where ticks occur, with an infection rate of 6% (4 of 70). Babesia-positive samples were obtained from a five-month old moose calf and three adults. Two Babesia species, Babesia capreoli (Enigk et Friedhoff, 1962) and a B. odocoilei-like, were identified. Co-infection with Anaplasma phagocytophilum was obtained in two animals. This is the first report of the occurrence of B. capreoli and B. odocoilei-like species in moose.

  14. Introducing ``The MOOSE,'' the Menu of Outreach Opportunities for Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraknoi, A.

    2015-11-01

    The Astronomical Society of the Pacific has been working with the American Astronomical Society to develop a new program of outreach training called “AAS Astronomy Ambassadors. ” We describe a key on-line resource from this project, which is now freely available for everyone doing astronomy education and outreach at http://aas.org/outreach/moose.

  15. 75 FR 54085 - Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 171 (Friday, September 3, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 54085] [FR Doc No: 2010-22037] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Divide Ranger District, Rio Grande National Forest; Colorado; Big Moose Vegetation Management Project AGENCY: Forest Service, Rio...

  16. Bartonella infections in deer keds (Lipoptena cervi) and moose (Alces alces) in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duodu, Samuel; Madslien, Knut; Hjelm, Eva; Molin, Ylva; Paziewska-Harris, Anna; Harris, Philip D; Colquhoun, Duncan J; Ytrehus, Bjørnar

    2013-01-01

    Infections with Bartonella spp. have been recognized as emerging zoonotic diseases in humans. Large knowledge gaps exist, however, relating to reservoirs, vectors, and transmission of these bacteria. We describe identification by culture, PCR, and housekeeping gene sequencing of Bartonella spp. in fed, wingless deer keds (Lipoptena cervi), deer ked pupae, and blood samples collected from moose, Alces alces, sampled within the deer ked distribution range in Norway. Direct sequencing from moose blood sampled in a deer ked-free area also indicated Bartonella infection but at a much lower prevalence. The sequencing data suggested the presence of mixed infections involving two species of Bartonella within the deer ked range, while moose outside the range appeared to be infected with a single species. Bartonella were not detected or cultured from unfed winged deer keds. The results may indicate that long-term bacteremia in the moose represents a reservoir of infection and that L. cervi acts as a vector for the spread of infection of Bartonella spp. Further research is needed to evaluate the role of L. cervi in the transmission of Bartonella to animals and humans and the possible pathogenicity of these bacteria for humans and animals.

  17. A geographical cluster of malignant catarrhal fever in Moose (Alces alces)in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three cases of lethal sheep-associated malignant catarrhal fever (SA-MCF) in free-ranging moose (Alces alces) were diagnosed in Lesja, Norway, December 2008 – February 2010. The diagnosis was based on PCR identification of ovine herpesvirus 2 DNA (n=3) and typical histopathological lesions (n=1). To...

  18. Meningoencephalitis associated with disseminated sarcocystosis in a free-ranging moose (Alces alces) calf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Madhu; Patel, Jagdish; Pybus, Margo; Coleman, James K; Childress, April L; Wellehan, James F X

    2015-08-01

    A wild moose (Alces alces) calf was presented for necropsy due to severe neurologic signs. Histopathologic examination revealed multisystemic inflammation with intralesional mature and immature schizonts. Schizonts in the brain reacted positively to Sarcocystis spp. polyclonal antibodies. Gene sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA identified the species as Sarcocystis alceslatrans.

  19. Scat-detection dogs survey low density moose in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidi Kretser; Michale Glennon; Alice Whitelaw; Aimee Hurt; Kristine Pilgrim; Michael Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty of collecting occurrence and population dynamics data in mammalian populations of low density poses challenges for making informed management decisions. We assessed the use of scat-detection dogs to search for fecal pellets in a low density moose (Alces alces) population in the Adirondack Park in New York State, and the success rate of DNA...

  20. Conflict resolution through ecosystem-based management: the case of Swedish moose management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Sandström

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Swedish moose (Alces alces management has over the years transformed from a situation similar to what Hardin (1968 defined as a tragedy of the commons – i.e. where open access and unrestricted demands lead to over-exploitation – into a situation characterized by an abundance of moose. While high numbers of moose are preferred by hunters, they damage forests through grazing, causing conflicts between hunters and forest owners. In an attempt to resolve these disputes, the Swedish government is introducing a new local ecosystem-based management system. This paper analyzes this shift from managing a single resource to the broader perspective of ecosystem management and discusses to what extent it will contribute to conflict resolution. The results suggest that some of the problems highlighted may be solved through the implementation of an ecosystem management system. However, several challenges remain to be tackled, such as how to establish robust partnerships between forest owners and hunters for managing moose on land with a fragmented property rights structure. This can lead to different and conflicting objectives and, consequently, difficulties in reaching collective action.

  1. Chemical and structural composition of Atlantic Canadian moose (Alces alces) incisors with patterns of high breakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Cynthia S Kendall; Clough, Michael J; Broders, Hugh G; Tubrett, Mike

    2011-11-15

    Analysis of mammalian teeth can provide information regarding local environmental conditions. For example, a high incidence of breakage and wear within a population may indicate poor food quality. Individuals consuming a diet causing high mechanical stress on their teeth, and/or lacking the appropriate minerals for proper development, could experience degradation of tooth condition. Previously, we documented a high rate of incisor tooth breakage, with age, in two genetically distinct moose populations in Atlantic Canada. In this study, multi-element (11B, 63Cu, 64Zn, 75As, 85Rb, 88Sr, 111Cd, 118Sn, 137Ba, 208Pb, 232Th, and 238U) analyses using laser ablation ICP-MS were performed on moose incisors from multiple North American regions. The purpose was to determine whether the elemental composition of moose incisors varies among regions, and whether that variation is related to tooth degradation among Atlantic Canadian populations. A principal components analysis revealed that nearly 50% of the elemental variation in the inner enamel matrix of moose teeth was explained by three groupings of elements. The element groupings revealed differences among geographic regions, but did not explain the variation between incisors that were broken and those that were not. Regression models indicate that the elemental group which includes Cu, Pb, and Zn is related to decreases in incisal integrity. It is likely that other environmental factors contribute to the occurrence of increased incisor breakage in affected populations. The relationship between food resource quantity and quality, as a function of moose density, is hypothesized to explain loss of tooth integrity.

  2. Jaw musculature of Cyclarhis gujanensis (Aves: Vireonidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DM. Previatto

    Full Text Available AbstractCyclarhis gujanensis is a little bird which feeds on high number of large preys, such frogs, lizards, snakes, bats and birds. As there are few studies on the cranial anatomy of this species, we aimed to describe the cranial myology to contribute to the anatomical knowledge of this species and to make some assumptions about functional anatomy. Thus, we described the muscles from the jaw apparatus (external and internal adductor muscles, the muscles of the pterygoid system and the depressor muscles of the mandible. The adductor system is the greatest and multipinulated, particularly in its origin in the caudal portion of the temporal fossa. The depressor jaw muscles systems are enlarged with many components in complexity. The most of jaw apparatus muscles are short, but the strength (biting or crushing forces from short feeding apparatus fibers probably is increased by high number of components and pinnulation. These anatomical aspects of the muscles indicate a considerable force in the jaws, without which C. gujanensis probably could not cut their prey into smaller pieces. However, functional approaches to analysis of forces of the muscle fibers are needed to corroborate / refute the hypotheses mentioned above.

  3. Jaw adductor muscles across lepidosaurs: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Juan Diego; Diogo, Rui; Johnston, Peter; Abdala, Virginia

    2011-10-01

    The exact homologies of tetrapod jaw muscles remain unresolved, and this provides a barrier for phylogenetic analysis and tracing character evolution. Here, lepidosaur jaw muscles are surveyed using direct examination of species from 23 families and published descriptions of species from 10 families. A revised nomenclature is applied according to proposed homologies with Latimeria. Among lepidosaurs, variation was found in many aspects of jaw muscle anatomy. The superficial layers mm. levator and retractor anguli oris (LAO and RAO) are present in Sphenodon but not all squamates. The external jaw adductor muscles universally present in lepidosaurs are homologous with the main adductor muscle, A2, of Latimeria and include four layers: superficialis (A2-SUP), medialis (A2-M), profundus (A2-PRO), and posterior (A2-PVM). The A2-SUP appears divided in Agamidae, Gekkota, Xantusiidae, and Varanidae. The A2-M is layered lateromedial in lizards but anteroposterior in snakes. The names pseudotemporalis (PS) and pterygomandibularis (PTM) are recommended for subdivisions of the internal adductors of reptiles and amphibians, because the homology of this muscle with the A3' and A3 ″ of Latimeria remains inconclusive. The intramandibularis of lepidosaurs and Latimeria (A-ω) are homologous. The distribution of six jaw muscle characters was found to plot more parsimoniously on phylogenies based on morphological rather than and molecular data. Character mapping indicates that Squamata presents reduction in the divisions of the A2-M, Scincoidea presents reduction or loss of LAO, and two apomorphic features are found for the Gekkota. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Moose (Alces alces) reacts to high summer temperatures by utilizing thermal shelters in boreal forests - an analysis based on airborne laser scanning of the canopy structure at moose locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Markus; Matala, Juho; Mehtätalo, Lauri; Tiilikainen, Raisa; Tikkanen, Olli-Pekka; Maltamo, Matti; Pusenius, Jyrki; Packalen, Petteri

    2014-04-01

    The adaptation of different species to warming temperatures has been increasingly studied. Moose (Alces alces) is the largest of the ungulate species occupying the northern latitudes across the globe, and in Finland it is the most important game species. It is very well adapted to severe cold temperatures, but has a relatively low tolerance to warm temperatures. Previous studies have documented changes in habitat use by moose due to high temperatures. In many of these studies, the used areas have been classified according to how much thermal cover they were assumed to offer based on satellite/aerial imagery data. Here, we identified the vegetation structure in the areas used by moose under different thermal conditions. For this purpose, we used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data extracted from the locations of GPS-collared moose. This provided us with detailed information about the relationships between moose and the structure of forests it uses in different thermal conditions and we were therefore able to determine and differentiate between the canopy structures at locations occupied by moose during different thermal conditions. We also discovered a threshold beyond which moose behaviour began to change significantly: as day temperatures began to reach 20 °C and higher, the search for areas with higher and denser canopies during daytime became evident. The difference was clear when compared to habitat use at lower temperatures, and was so strong that it provides supporting evidence to previous studies, suggesting that moose are able to modify their behaviour to cope with high temperatures, but also that the species is likely to be affected by warming climate.

  5. Moose population estimate, trend, and distribution survey on Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 23, 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Our moose population estimate for the surveyed area was calculated to be 1,864 ±1911. This included a low stratum estimate of 241, a medium stratum estimate of...

  6. Estimation of Moose Abundance using the Geospatial Population Estimator combined with a Sightability Model on Togiak National Wildlife Refuge products

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Moose (Alces alces gigas) have recently expanded their range into the boundaries of Togiak National Wildlife Refuge and BLM Goodnews Block (TGK; Aderman et al....

  7. Passive resistance increases differentially in various jaw displacement directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansma, H J; Langenbach, G E J; Koolstra, J H; Van Eijden, T M G J

    2006-08-01

    In the present study, the passive resistance of the human jaw system was quantified in relation to the three-dimensional jaw displacement and the Posselt-envelope, using both in vivo measurements and computer simulation. In eight subjects, the jaw was passively displaced with a step-wise increasing force in three orthogonal directions. Muscle relaxation was monitored using electromyography (EMG) with visual feedback. A biomechanical model of an average human system was used to examine the contributions of the jaw muscles. The largest excursion was found for the vertical direction. Protrusive and lateral directions were more restricted. In protrusive and lateral directions, the jaw could generally move beyond the Posselt-envelope. The stiffness of the jaw increased with proceeding jaw displacement in all directions. The stiffness was larger in the protrusive direction than in the vertical and lateral directions. The model's predictions of stiffness were comparable to the in vivo measurements. However, in protrusive direction, the maximum jaw displacement was larger than in vivo. The estimated passive muscle forces showed that vertical displacement was mainly restricted by the complete group of closing muscles, while protrusive and lateral jaw displacement was restricted by selective individual muscles. The human jaw system has larger motion range in the protrusive and lateral directions than can be exploited by active muscle use. Stiffness of jaw displacement is higher in the protrusive direction compared to the vertical and lateral directions.

  8. Babbling and Chewing: Jaw Kinematics from 8 to 22 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeve, Roger W

    2010-07-01

    Empirical gaps remain regarding infant mandibular kinematics observed during naturally occurring episodes of chewing and pre-linguistic vocalizations during the first 2-years of life. Vertical jaw displacement was measured from a typically developing infant from 8 to 22 months. Infant jaw kinematics was measured for vowel babble, non-variegated and variegated babble, and chewing. Results indicated that measures of kinematic variability were significantly less for chewing than all babble categories. These measures changed across age for chewing: (a) peak vertical jaw elevation decreased in variability, while (b) jaw displacement and (c) speed of movement increased in variability. Kinematics for vowel babble were characterized as exhibiting less jaw displacement with higher average vertical jaw position than other babble types and chewing. Developmentally, jaw kinematics for babble changed for jaw displacement and average vertical jaw position. These changes were related to decreased episodes for vowel babble productions and increased episodes for variegated babble and reduplicative syllables. These results suggest that developmental processes such as non-overlapping task-demands likely differentiate trajectories of jaw movement for infant chewing and babble. Infant jaw kinematics for babble cannot be predicted from observations of adult speakers or from non-speech behaviors observed for infants or adults.

  9. Prevalence of antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmsten, Jonas; Jakubek, Eva-Britt; Björkman, Camilla

    2011-05-11

    Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum are two coccidian parasites with a worldwide distribution. T. gondii is one of the more common parasitic zoonoses in the world and in young children and immunocompromised persons, infection can lead to severe disease and death. N. caninum is an important cause of abortions in cattle. Wildlife have been identified as reservoirs and transmitters for both parasites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the seroprevalences of T. gondii, and N. caninum in moose (Alces alces), and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Sweden. Blood samples were collected from 417 moose during 2000-2005 and from 199 roe deer during 1990-2007. The samples were investigated for presence of antibodies by a T. gondii direct agglutination test and a N. caninum iscom ELISA. Because the iscom ELISA has not been validated for moose or roe deer, sera that gave a positive result were further investigated by immunoblot analysis to verify presence of antibodies. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 85 (20%) and 68 (34%) moose and roe deer sera, respectively. In moose the seroprevalence was higher in south and central Sweden than in the north, whereas there was no difference between the regions for roe deer. Adult moose and roe deer had higher odds of being seropositive than young animals but there were no difference in seroprevalence between males and females. One roe deer was positive by immunoblotting and was regarded as N. caninum positive, whereas all moose sera were negative. The results show that T. gondii infection is widely spread in the Swedish moose and roe deer populations. Precautions should therefore be taken when handling internal organs and carcasses of harvested cervids. Proper handling and cooking of game meat also is important to prevent toxoplasmosis in humans.

  10. The effects of an abundant ectoparasite, the deer ked (Lipoptena cervi), on the health of moose (Alces alces) in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paakkonen, Tommi; Mustonen, Anne-Mari; Käkelä, Reijo; Laaksonen, Sauli; Solismaa, Milla; Aho, Jari; Puukka, Katri; Nieminen, Petteri

    2012-09-01

    The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi, Diptera, Hippoboscidae) is a haematophagous parasitic fly of the moose (Alces alces) and other cervids, and it is very common in southern and central parts of Finland. The aim of this study was to determine how the intensive parasitism caused by the deer ked affects the health and welfare of the moose. Moose blood samples (n = 78) were collected from deer ked-infested and ked-free regions at 62-68° N and analysed for haematology and clinical chemistry. In addition, tissue samples of moose (n = 23) were collected from a deer ked-infested region at 62° N to determine how the parasite load correlates to several physiological variables of the host. The differences in the blood and plasma values between the deer ked-free and ked-infested animals were minor. In the infested regions, the moose had higher mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentrations unlikely to have been caused by the parasitism. The intensities of deer keds had no consistent correlations with the values of plasma clinical chemistry, endocrinology, amino acids, tissue enzyme activities or body energy stores. However, the hepatic percentages of several individual n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the n-3 PUFA sum correlated inversely with the intensity and density of deer keds. Although a wide array of physiological variables was determined, only minor effects caused by the heavy deer ked parasitism could be detected, suggesting that the moose might tolerate this parasite relatively well.

  11. Declines in moose population density at Isle Royle National Park, MI, USA and accompanied changes in landscape patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, N. R.; Pastor, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ungulate herbivores create patterns of forage availability, plant species composition, and soil fertility as they range across large landscapes and consume large quantities of plant material. Over time, herbivore populations fluctuate, producing great potential for spatio-temporal landscape dynamics. In this study, we extend the spatial and temporal extent of a long-term investigation of the relationship of landscape patterns to moose foraging behavior at Isle Royale National Park, MI. We examined how patterns of browse availability and consumption, plant basal area, and soil fertility changed during a recent decline in the moose population. We used geostatistics to examine changes in the nature of spatial patterns in two valleys over 18 years and across short-range and long-range distance scales. Landscape patterns of available and consumed browse changed from either repeated patches or randomly distributed patches in 1988-1992 to random point distributions by 2007 after a recent record high peak followed by a rapid decline in the moose population. Patterns of available and consumed browse became decoupled during the moose population low, which is in contrast to coupled patterns during the earlier high moose population. Distributions of plant basal area and soil nitrogen availability also switched from repeated patches to randomly distributed patches in one valley and to random point distributions in the other valley. Rapid declines in moose population density may release vegetation and soil fertility from browsing pressure and in turn create random landscape patterns. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009.

  12. Osteonecrosis of jaw associated with bisphosphonate use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashu Rastogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are associated with osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ that is defined as an area of exposed, nonvital bone in the maxilla or mandible persisting over 6-8 weeks. We describe a case of 55-year-old female who developed ONJ after tooth extraction and had been receiving oral ibandronate for osteoporosis. Diagnosis of ONJ was confirmed on CT scan. The patient was managed conservatively as she denied teriparatide therapy because of cost constraints.

  13. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) subsidize gray wolves (Canis lupus) during a moose (Alces americanus) decline: A case of apparent competition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon; Mech, L. David

    2016-01-01

    Moose (Alces americanus) in northeastern Minnesota have declined by 55% since 2006. Although the cause is unresolved, some studies have suggested that Gray Wolves (Canis lupus) contributed to the decline. After the Moose decline, wolves could either decline or switch prey. To determine which occurred in our study area, we compared winter wolf counts and summer diet before and after the Moose decline. While wolf numbers in our study area nearly doubled from 23 in winter 2002 to an average of 41 during winters 2011–2013, calf:cow ratios (the number of calves per cow observed during winter surveys) in the wider Moose range more than halved from 0.93 in 2002 to an average of 0.31 during 2011–2013. Compared to summer 2002, wolves in summers 2011–2013 consumed fewer Moose and more White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus). While deer densities were similar during each period, average vulnerability, as reflected by winter severity, was greater during 2011–2013 than 2002, probably explaining the wolf increase. During the wolf increase Moose calves remained a summer food item. These findings suggest that in part of the Moose range, deer subsidized wolf numbers while wolves also preyed on Moose calves. This contributed to a Moose decline and is a possible case of apparent competition and inverse-density-dependent predation.

  14. [Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanes-Bonome, P; Atanes-Bonome, A; Ríos-Lage, P; Atanes-Sandoval, A D

    2014-04-01

    The bisphosphonates are stable inorganic pyrophosphate analogs that have demonstrated their efficacy in treatment of osteolytic lesions associated with bony metastases, and multiple myeloma, malignant hypercalcemia, Paget's disease, and osteoporosis. Several publications within the last few years have suggested that osteonecrosis of the jaw is associated with bisphosphonate therapy. The diagnosis and management strategies of the patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw is very difficult. It is important for patients to be informed of the risk of this complication, so that they have the opportunity to assess the need for dental treatment before starting therapy. Preventive measures must be taken before, during, and after treatment with bisphosphonates. If osteonecrosis of the jaw is present, management should be conservative: oral chlorhexidine and antibiotics. Surgical treatment should be reserved for those patients who are symptomatic. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Clinical study on osteoradionecrosis of the jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Atsuo; Kato, Joji

    1988-07-01

    In the present study osteoradionecrosis which had developed after radiotherapy for malignant tumor was studied clinically and therapeutically and the following results were obtained. 1. The subjects were 28 patients with squamous cell carcinoma and 2 patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma aged 38 to 72. The ratio of male: female was 3.3 : 1. The time of manifestation was 1 month-14 years after irradiation. The main symptoms were pain and exposed bone mainly in the region of mandibular molar tooth. 2. Osteoradionecrosis was observed in 10 cases supposed to be induced by tooth extraction but also in 5 edentulous cases. 3. When the osteoradionecrosis cases were classified into limited area type and wide range type on the basis of clinical findings. X-ray of the jaws showed the presence of bone resorption and induration together in many wide range type cases. 4. Scintigram of bone showed widespread accumulation of radiation even in clinically limited area type, and the picture of some loss of bone and the intensity of the accumulation were considered to be extremely useful as an index in making therapeutical plans and decisions on the prognosis of tumor of the jaws. 5. As the method of treatment, sequestrectomy was performed in 14 of 19 cases of the limited area type and 4 of 11 cases of the wide range type and excision of the jaws in 4 cases. 6. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was carried out in 3 cases and had good effect. (J.P.N.).

  16. The characters of Palaeozoic jawed vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, Martin D; Friedman, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Newly discovered fossils from the Silurian and Devonian periods are beginning to challenge embedded perceptions about the origin and early diversification of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes). Nevertheless, an explicit cladistic framework for the relationships of these fossils relative to the principal crown lineages of the jawed vertebrates (osteichthyans: bony fishes and tetrapods; chondrichthyans: sharks, batoids, and chimaeras) remains elusive. We critically review the systematics and character distributions of early gnathostomes and provide a clearly stated hierarchy of synapomorphies covering the jaw-bearing stem gnathostomes and osteichthyan and chondrichthyan stem groups. We show that character lists, designed to support the monophyly of putative groups, tend to overstate their strength and lack cladistic corroboration. By contrast, synapomorphic hierarchies are more open to refutation and must explicitly confront conflicting evidence. Our proposed synapomorphy scheme is used to evaluate the status of the problematic fossil groups Acanthodii and Placodermi, and suggest profitable avenues for future research. We interpret placoderms as a paraphyletic array of stem-group gnathostomes, and suggest what we regard as two equally plausible placements of acanthodians: exclusively on the chondrichthyan stem, or distributed on both the chondrichthyan and osteichthyan stems. PMID:25750460

  17. Neurological disorder in two moose calves ( Alces alces L. naturally infected with Elaphostrongylus alces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Steen

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Two months old moose calves exhibiting neurological signs were videotaped, killed and necropsied. The parasite Elaphostrongylus alces (Steen et al 1989 was found epidurally along the meninges of the spinal cord, and in the muscle faciae of the thoracic and lumbar regions. Progressive inflammatory processes were present in the epineurium, perineurium and endoneurium. Accumulations of inflammatory cells, eosinophils, lymfocytes and macrophages, were found around eggs and larvae and frequently, around regional blood wessels. The neurological disturbances in the moose calves were pronounced, with locomotive abnormalities and ataxia. They showed weakness in the hindquarters, with uncoordinated and swaying movements of the hind legs. In addition, one of the calves was lame on the left forelimb. The muscles of the leg were visibly atrophic. The lesions produced by E. alces at the lumbar nerve roots and in the cauda equina are suggested to be the cause of the clinical signs observed.

  18. Reducing Moose-Vehicle Collisions through Salt Pool Removal and Displacement: an Agent-Based Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D. Grosman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Between 1990 and 2002, more than 200 moose-vehicle collisions occurred each year in Quebec, including about 50/yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve. One cause is the presence of roadside salt pools that attract moose near roads in the spring and summer. Using the computer simulation technique of agent-based modeling, this study investigated whether salt pool removal and displacement, i.e., a compensatory salt pool set up 100 to 1500 m away from the road shoulder, would reduce the number of moose-vehicle collisions. Moose road crossings were used as a proxy measure. A GPS telemetry data set consisting of approximately 200,000 locations of 47 moose over 2 yr in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve was used as an empirical basis for the model. Twelve moose were selected from this data set and programmed in the model to forage and travel in the study area. Five parameters with an additional application of stochasticity were used to determine moose movement between forest polygons. These included food quality; cover quality, i.e., protection from predators and thermal stress; proximity to salt pools; proximity to water; and slope. There was a significant reduction in road crossings when either all or two thirds of the roadside salt pools were removed, with and/or without salt pool displacement. With 100% salt pool removal, the reduction was greater (49% without compensatory salt pools than with them (18%. When two thirds of the salt pools were removed, the reduction was the same with and without compensatory salt pools (16%. Although moose-vehicle collisions are not a significant mortality factor for the moose population in the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, in areas with higher road densities, hunting pressure, and/or predator densities it could mean the difference between a stable and a declining population, and salt pool removal could be part of a good mitigation plan to halt population declines. This model can be used, with improvements such as

  19. Endoparasites in a Norwegian moose (Alces alces) population - Faunal diversity, abundance and body condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca K; Ličina, Tina; Gorini, Lucrezia; Milner, Jos M

    2015-04-01

    Many health surveillance programs for wild cervids do not include routine parasite screening despite evidence that gastrointestinal parasites can affect wildlife population dynamics by influencing host fecundity and survival. Slaughter weights of moose in some regions of Norway have been decreasing over recent decades but any role of parasites has not yet been considered. We investigated parasite faunal diversity of moose in Hedmark, SE Norway, by faecal analysis and identification of adult abomasal and caecal nematodes during the autumn hunting season. We related parasite prevalence and abundance to estimates of body condition, gender and age. We identified 11 parasite groups. Moose had high abomasal gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) burdens and all individuals were infected. Ostertagia antipini and Spiculopteragia alcis were the most prevalent abomasal GINs identified. O. leptospicularis and Telodorsagia circumcincta were also identified in the abomasa while a range of other GIN and Moniezia sp. eggs, and coccidia, Dictyocaulus sp. and Protostrongylid larvae were found in faeces. Female moose had higher mean abomasal nematode counts than males, particularly among adults. However, adult males had higher faecal egg counts than adult females which may reflect reduction in faecal volume with concentration of eggs among males during the rut. We found no strong evidence for the development of acquired immunity to abomasal nematodes with age, although there was a higher Protostrongylid and Moniezia infection prevalence in younger animals. High burdens of several parasites were associated with poor body condition in terms of slaughter weight relative to skeletal size but unrelated to visually evaluated fat reserves. Given findings from earlier experimental studies, our results imply sub-clinical effects of GI parasite infection on host condition. Managers should be aware that autumn faecal egg counts and field assessments of fat reserves may not be reliable indicators of

  20. Cost of migration in moose (Alces alces) with regard to mortality risk and locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Tollefsen, Zandra Margareta

    2011-01-01

    Summary1. Migration is present in all animal taxa and is defined as a periodic movement pattern between given ranges. Migratory individuals generally move more directional and with higher speed than stationary individuals during the migration seasons. It is suggested that migratory individuals in these periods encounter more risk factors, and therefore experience a higher mortality.2. I studied the variation in the speed of movement and the number of times migratory and stationary moose were ...

  1. Parasitism of the deer ked, Lipoptena cervi, on the moose, Alces alces, in eastern Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paakkonen, T; Mustonen, A-M; Roininen, H; Niemelä, P; Ruusila, V; Nieminen, P

    2010-12-01

    The deer ked, Lipoptena cervi L. (Diptera: Hippoboscidae), is an ectoparasitic fly that spread to Finland in the early 1960s from the southeast across the Soviet border. It is currently a common parasite of the moose, Alces alces (Artiodactyla: Cervidae), in the southern part of the country and its area of distribution is gradually spreading to Finnish Lapland, where it will come into contact with another potential cervid host, the semi-domesticated reindeer, Rangifer tarandus tarandus. The aim of this study was to determine the intensity of deer ked parasitism on the moose in eastern Finland. Whole skins of 23 moose were examined for the presence of deer keds, which were extracted and their total numbers estimated. The intensity of deer ked parasitism was correlated to the age, sex, skin area and anatomical region of the host. Bulls had the highest total number of keds (10616 ± 1375) and the highest deer ked density (35.7 ± 4.4 keds/dm(2) of skin). Cows had a higher total number of keds than calves (3549 ± 587 vs. 1730 ± 191), but ked densities on cows and calves were roughly equal (11.8 ± 1.7 vs. 9.4 ± 1.1 keds/dm(2) of skin). The density of keds was highest on the anterior back, followed by the posterior back, front limbs, abdomen, head and hind limbs. The sex ratio of deer keds was close to equal (male : female, 1.0 : 1.1). After they had consumed blood, male keds were heavier than females. As the total numbers and densities of deer keds were higher than reported previously on moose or for any other louse fly species, the effects of parasitism on the health of the host species should be determined.

  2. Low major histocompatibility complex class II diversity in European and North American moose.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode cell surface proteins whose function is to bind and present intracellularly processed peptides to T lymphocytes of the immune system. Extensive MHC diversity has been documented in many species and is maintained by some form of balancing selection. We report here that both European and North American populations of moose (Alces alces) exhibit very low levels of genetic diversity at an expressed MHC class II DRB locus. The observed polymorphi...

  3. Protostrongylid nematodes in caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou and moose (Alces alces of Newfoundland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray W. Lankester

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Two species of protostrongylid nematodes with dorsal-spined, first-stage larvae, are present in caribou and moose of Newfoundland. Elaphostrongyius rangiferi Mitskevich, 1958, a parasite introduced from Scandinavia, causes periodic epizootics of a severe neurological disease in caribou. Sick animals exhibiting signs of cerebrospinal elaphostrongylosis (CSE were particularly noticeable in central Newfoundland each winter between 1981 and 1985. Those collected for examinarion were mostly male calves. The disease again became prominent in caribou on the Avalon Peninsula in the winters of 1996 and 1997; it may have spread to that isolated part of the province as recently as 1990. E. rangiferi was also found in moose but no cases of neurologic disease have been reported in this host. Parelapbostrongylus andersoni Prestwood, 1972, was found in caribou, both in central Newfoundland and on the Avalon Peninsula. Moose may also be infected. Of 1407 terrestrial gastropod intermediate hosts examined, 9 (0.6% contained infective, third-stage, protostrongylid larvae resembling those of E. rangiferi and P. andersoni which are indistinguishable. The small dark slug, Deroceras laeve, dominated gastropod collections and was the only species infected.

  4. Detection of antibodies to Neospora caninum in moose (Alces alces): the first report in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskwa, Bozena; Goździk, Katarzyna; Bień, Justyna; Kornacka, Aleksandra; Cybulska, Aleksandra; Reiterová, Katarína; Cabaj, Władysław

    2014-02-01

    Neospora caninum Dubey, Carpenter, Speer, Topper et Uggla, 1988 is a protozoan parasite originally reported as a major cause of bovine abortions worldwide. It is documented that the parasite is widely spread among non-carnivorous cervids. The purpose of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of N. caninum in moose (Alces alces Linnaeus). Blood samples collected in 2010 and 2012 in the northeastern Poland were tested for antibodies to N. caninum by agglutination test (NAT), a commercial competitive screening enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA) and enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA). Sera that gave a positive result were further investigated by western blot (WB) analysis to verify the presence of antibodies. Antibodies to N. caninum were detected in one of seven moose. The antibody titer was confirmed by NAT (1 : 1 280), cELISA (I = 91%) and ELISA (OD = 0.736). The main immunodominant antigens detected by WB were 120, 70, 55, 35 and 16 kDa proteins. This is the first evidence of N. caninum seropositivity in moose living in a natural environment in Europe.

  5. Insight into the bacterial gut microbiome of the North American moose (Alces alces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishaq Suzanne L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The work presented here provides the first intensive insight into the bacterial populations in the digestive tract of the North American moose (Alces alces. Eight free-range moose on natural pasture were sampled, producing eight rumen samples and six colon samples. Second generation (G2 PhyloChips were used to determine the presence of hundreds of operational taxonomic units (OTUs, representing multiple closely related species/strains (>97% identity, found in the rumen and colon of the moose. Results A total of 789 unique OTUs were used for analysis, which passed the fluorescence and the positive fraction thresholds. There were 73 OTUs, representing 21 bacterial families, which were found exclusively in the rumen samples: Lachnospiraceae, Prevotellaceae and several unclassified families, whereas there were 71 OTUs, representing 22 bacterial families, which were found exclusively in the colon samples: Clostridiaceae, Enterobacteriaceae and several unclassified families. Overall, there were 164 OTUs that were found in 100% of the samples. The Firmicutes were the most dominant bacteria phylum in both the rumen and the colon. Microarray data available at ArrayExpress, accession number E-MEXP-3721. Conclusions Using PhyloTrac and UniFrac computer software, samples clustered into two distinct groups: rumen and colon, confirming that the rumen and colon are distinct environments. There was an apparent correlation of age to cluster, which will be validated by a larger sample size in future studies, but there were no detectable trends based upon gender.

  6. Low major histocompatibility complex class II diversity in European and North American moose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikko, S; Andersson, L

    1995-05-09

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes encode cell surface proteins whose function is to bind and present intracellularly processed peptides to T lymphocytes of the immune system. Extensive MHC diversity has been documented in many species and is maintained by some form of balancing selection. We report here that both European and North American populations of moose (Alces alces) exhibit very low levels of genetic diversity at an expressed MHC class II DRB locus. The observed polymorphism was restricted to six amino acid substitutions, all in the peptide binding site, and four of these were shared between continents. The data imply that the moose have lost MHC diversity in a population bottleneck, prior to the divergence of the Old and New World subspecies. Sequence analysis of mtDNA showed that the two subspecies diverged at least 100,000 years ago. Thus, viable moose populations with very restricted MHC diversity have been maintained for a long period of time. Both positive selection for polymorphism and intraexonic recombination have contributed to the generation of MHC diversity after the putative bottleneck.

  7. A genetic discontinuity in moose (Alces alces) in Alaska corresponds with fenced transportation infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert E.; Farley, Sean D.; McDonough, Thomas J.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Barboza, Perry S.

    2015-01-01

    The strength and arrangement of movement barriers can impact the connectivity among habitat patches. Anthropogenic barriers (e.g. roads) are a source of habitat fragmentation that can disrupt these resource networks and can have an influence on the spatial genetic structure of populations. Using microsatellite data, we evaluated whether observed genetic structure of moose (Alces alces) populations were associated with human activities (e.g. roads) in the urban habitat of Anchorage and rural habitat on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. We found evidence of a recent genetic subdivision among moose in Anchorage that corresponds to a major highway and associated infrastructure. This subdivision is most likely due to restrictions in gene flow due to alterations to the highway (e.g. moose-resistant fencing with one-way gates) and a significant increase in traffic volume over the past 30 years; genetic subdivision was not detected on the Kenai Peninsula in an area not bisected by a major highway. This study illustrates that anthropogenic barriers can substructure wildlife populations within a few generations and highlights the value of genetic assessments to determine the effects on connectivity among habitat patches in conjunction with behavioral and ecological data..

  8. A comparative study of hepatic trace element levels in wild moose, roe deer, and reindeer from Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikoren, Turid; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Lierhagen, Syverin; Handeland, Kjell

    2011-07-01

    Liver samples from 422 wild moose (Alces alces), 280 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), and 73 reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) collected by hunters in various localities in Norway, 2002-2003, were analyzed for the essential trace elements cobalt, copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), molybdenum, selenium (Se), and zinc. Significant differences in hepatic concentrations among species were found for all elements except for Mn, and considerable individual and geographic variations were seen. Roe deer had statistically significant lower Se levels (median: 0.51 μg Se/g dry weight) than did moose (0.77 μg Se/g) and reindeer (0.85 μg Se/g). Moose from two coastal municipalities with high precipitation had considerably higher Se concentrations than those from the other localities studied. Seventy-nine roe deer (28%) and 36 moose (9%) had Se concentrations below that regarded as deficient in domestic ruminants. The Se status in roe deer was lower than previously reported in Europe. Moose had a significantly higher Cu (222 μg Cu/g dw) than did roe deer (112 μg Cu/g) and reindeer (105 μg Cu/g). The Cu status of moose and roe deer in Norway are among the highest reported in Europe. However, a suboptimal Se and Cu status was found in moose from Tvedestrand, a population which has suffered from a reduced condition and productivity. The variability in trace element status among hunted cervids, with no apparent signs of deficiency or toxicity, probably reflects adaptations in these wild ruminant species to cope with this. However, subtle clinical signs and lesions are difficult to detect and further research is needed.

  9. High prevalence of hepatitis e virus in Swedish moose--a phylogenetic characterization and comparison of the virus from different regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Lin

    Full Text Available Hepatitis E virus (HEV infects a range of species, including humans, pigs, wild boars and deer. Zoonotic transmission may contribute to the high HEV seroprevalence in the human population of many countries. A novel divergent HEV from moose (Alces alces in Sweden was recently identified by partial genome sequencing. Since only one strain was found, its classification within the HEV family, prevalence in moose and zoonotic potential was unclear. We therefore investigated samples from 231 moose in seven Swedish counties for HEV, and sequenced a near complete moose HEV genome. Phylogenetic analysis to classify this virus within the family Hepeviridae and to explore potential host specific determinants was performed.The HEV prevalence of moose was determined by PCR (marker for active infection and serological assays (marker of past infection of sera and 51 fecal samples from 231 Swedish moose. Markers of active and past infection were found in 67 (29% animals, while 34 (15% were positive for HEV RNA, 43 (19% were seropositive for anti-HEV antibodies, and 10 (4% had both markers. The number of young individuals positive for HEV RNA was larger than for older individuals, and the number of anti-HEV antibody positive individuals increased with age. The high throughput sequenced moose HEV genome was 35-60% identical to existing HEVs. Partial ORF1 sequences from 13 moose strains showed high similarity among them, forming a distinct monophyletic clade with a common ancestor to HEV genotype 1-6 group, which includes members known for zoonotic transmission.This study demonstrates a high frequency of HEV in moose in Sweden, with markers of current and past infection demonstrated in 30% of the animals. Moose is thus an important animal reservoir of HEV. The phylogenetic relationship demonstrated that the moose HEV belonged to the genotype 1-6 group, which includes strains that also infect humans, and therefore may signify a potential for zoonotic transmission

  10. [Studies on the standardization of parameters for jaw movement analysis--6 degree-of-freedom jaw movements analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hisahiro; Bando, Eiichi; Abe, Susumu

    2008-07-01

    To establish standardized evaluating methods for jaw movements analysis. In this paper, we investigated evaluating parameters for 6 degree-of-freedom jaw movements data. Recorded data of jaw border movements from 20 male adults were employed as basic samples. The main parameters were as follows: 1. The displacement of an intercondylar midpoint: the length of a straight line between 2 positions of this point, the intercuspal position and other jaw position. 2. The angle of intercondylar axes: the angle between 2 position of the intercondylar axis, the intercuspal position and other jaw position. 3. The angle of incisal-condylar planes: the angle between 2 position of the plane, the intercuspal position and other jaw position (this plane was defined with the incisal point and condylar points of both sides 4. The mandibular motion range index: quantitative values calculated with 2 of 3 parameters described above. The mandibular motion range index showed a close correlation with respective projected areas of the incisal paths, with the projected area of sagittal border movements on the sagittal plane r = 0.82 (p jaw movements data and relative relationship between the intercuspal position and other jaw position. They were independent of reference coordinate systems and could measure jaw movement quantitatively.

  11. High-throughput DNA sequencing of the ruminal bacteria from moose (Alces alces) in Vermont, Alaska, and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Suzanne L; Wright, André-Denis

    2014-08-01

    In the present study, the rumen bacteria of moose (Alces alces) from three distinct geographic locations were investigated. Moose are large, browsing ruminants in the deer family, which subsist on fibrous, woody browse, and aquatic plants. Subspecies exist which are distinguished by differing body and antler size, and these are somewhat geographically isolated. Seventeen rumen samples were collected from moose in Vermont, Alaska, and Norway, and bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes were sequenced using Roche 454 pyrosequencing with titanium chemistry. Overall, 109,643 sequences were generated from the 17 individual samples, revealing 33,622 unique sequences. Members of the phylum Bacteroidetes were dominant in samples from Alaska and Norway, but representatives of the phylum Firmicutes were dominant in samples from Vermont. Within the phylum Bacteroidetes, Prevotellaceae was the dominant family in all three sample locations, most of which belonged to the genus Prevotella. Within the phylum Firmicutes, the family Lachnospiraceae was the most prevalent in all three sample locations. The data set supporting the results of this article is available in the Sequence Read Archive (SRA), available through NCBI [study accession number SRP022590]. Samples clustered by geographic location and by weight and were heterogenous based on gender, location, and weight class (p moose may have been isolated long enough to preclude a core microbiome among moose. Other potential factors discussed include differences in climate, food quality and availability, gender, and life cycle.

  12. Characteristics of spermatozoa and reproductive organs in relation to age and body weight in Swedish moose (Alces alces).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmsten, Jonas; Söderquist, Lennart; Thulin, Carl-Gustaf; Dalin, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-01

    Knowledge of the reproductive biology of game species is vital for sustainable management. In moose (Alces alces), research in reproductive characteristics has focused on the female, whereas there are few studies in male moose. The aim of the present study was to investigate sperm morphology and chromatin integrity (SCSA), and their relationships with testicular and epididymal features, as well as temporal aspects with respect to the hunting season. In total, 143 male moose aged 1.5-11.5 years were sampled from 2008 to 2011. The proportion of normal spermatozoa (PNS) ranged from 1.5% to 82.0%, with a mean of 51%, and the %DFI (DNA fragmentation index) ranged from 2.5% to 36.7% (mean 9.5). PNS decreased temporally, and was positively associated with carcass and testes weight. Body weight and testes weight had positive effect on PNS regardless of age. No effect of any explanatory variables was observed on the DFI. The testis/body weight ratio of moose (0.033%) is among the lowest reported among mammals, indicating a less polygynous mating system than in roe deer and red deer. For reproduction success in moose, a high body weight in males is favorable, as is a balanced sex ratio. Thus, males should not be harvested prior to the time when the majority of females have passed their first oestrus of the season.

  13. Dosimetric comparison between jaw tracking and static jaw techniques in intensity-modulated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhongsu; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yibao; Zhang, Yunjun; Cheng, Jinsheng; Su, Xu

    2015-01-27

    To compare the dosimetric differences between jaw tracking technique (JTT) and static jaw technique (SJT) in dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (d-IMRT) and assess the potential advantages of jaw tracking technique. Two techniques, jaw tracking and static jaw, were used respectively to develop the d-IMRT plans for 28 cancer patients with various lesion sites: head and neck, lungs, esophageal, abdominal, prostate, rectal and cervical. The dose volume histograms (DVH) and selected dosimetric indexes for the whole body and for organs at risk (OARs) were compared. A two dimensional ionization chamber Array Seven29 (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) and OCTAVIUS Octagonal phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) were used to verify all the plans. For all patients, the treatment plans using both techniques met the clinical requirements. The V5, V10, V20, V30, V40 (volumes receiving 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 Gy at least, respectively), mean dose (Dmean) for the whole body and V5, V10, V20, Dmean for lungs in the JTT d-IMRT plans were significantly less than the corresponding values of the SJT d-IMRT plans (p < 0.001). The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited lower maximum dose (Dmax) to the lens, eyes, brainstem, spinal cord, and right optic nerve, the doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 2.2% to 28.6%. The JTT d-IMRT plans deposited significantly lower Dmean to various OARs (all p values < 0.05), the mean doses reductions for these OARs ranged from 1.1% to 31.0%, and the value reductions depend on the volume and the location of the OARs. The γ evaluation method showed an excellent agreement between calculation and measurement for all techniques with criteria of 3%/3 mm. Both jaw tracking and static jaw d-IMRT plans can achieve comparable target dose coverage. JTT displays superior OARs sparing than SJT plans. These results are of clinical importance, especially for the patients with large and complex targets but close to some highly radio-sensitive organs to spare, and for patients

  14. Jaw thrust can deteriorate upper airway patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ungern-Sternberg, B S; Erb, T O; Frei, F J

    2005-04-01

    Upper airway obstruction is a frequent problem in spontaneously breathing children undergoing anesthesia or sedation procedures. Failure to maintain a patent airway can rapidly result in severe hypoxemia, bradycardia, or asystole, as the oxygen demand of children is high and oxygen reserve is low. We present two children with cervical masses in whom upper airway obstruction exaggerated while the jaw thrust maneuver was applied during induction of anesthesia. This deterioration in airway patency was probably caused by medial displacement of the lateral tumorous tissues which narrowed the pharyngeal airway.

  15. ANN-Models for Jaw-Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Recently [5], the Peck-Langenbach-Hannam ( PLH ) dynamic model has been developed at U.B.C for the human jaw. It is based on published musculoskele- tal...of Abstract UU Number of Pages 4 Table 1: 3 sets from a 59–set of steady–state measurements of T(m;i) from the PLH simulator. m Set i=1 Set i=2 Set...Training sets can be obtained from the PLH model. The training sets will have special interest be- cause we want the network to generalize by predicting near

  16. Solitary peripheral osteomas of the jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Talita Ribeiro Tenorio de; Gueiros, Luiz Alcino Monteiro; Castro, Jurema Freire Lisboa de; Leao, Jair Carneiro; Cruz Perez, Danyel Elias da [Oral Pathology Unit, Federal University of Pernambuco, Recife (Brazil); Catunda, Ivson [Hospital Geral de Areas, Recife (Brazil)

    2012-06-15

    Osteoma is a benign osteogenic tumor composed of cancellous or compact bone, classified as peripheral, central, or extraskeletal. Peripheral osteomas are uncommon. Excluding the maxillary sinuses, the maxilla is a rare site for osteomas. The purpose of this report was to describe clinicopathological and radiological features of two peripheral osteomas occurring in the jaws, one located in the mandible and another in the edentulous maxillary alveolar ridge. The tumors were asymptomatic and were fully excised without any complications or recurrence. The lesions were submitted to histopathological analysis and diagnosed as peripheral osteoma, compact type.

  17. 21 CFR 872.2060 - Jaw tracking device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorders and associated orofacial pain is a nonpowered or... information to be considered with data from other diagnostic components. (2) Classification. Class II (special...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.2060 Jaw tracking device. (a) Jaw tracking...

  18. Evolutionary Trends in the Jaw Adductor Mechanics of Ornithischian Dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Jaw mechanics in ornithischian dinosaurs have been widely studied for well over a century. Most of these studies, however, use only one or few taxa within a given ornithischian clade as a model for feeding mechanics across the entire clade. In this study, mandibular mechanical advantages among 52 ornithischian genera spanning all subclades are calculated using 2D lever arm methods. These lever arm calculations estimate the effect of jaw shape and difference in adductor muscle line of action on relative bite forces along the jaw. Results show major instances of overlap between taxa in tooth positions at which there was highest mechanical advantage. A relatively low bite force is seen across the tooth row among thyreophorans (e.g., stegosaurs and ankylosaurs), with variation among taxa. A convergent transition occurs from a more evenly distributed bite force along the jaw in basal ornithopods and basal marginocephalians to a strong distal bite force in hadrosaurids and ceratopsids, respectively. Accordingly, adductor muscle vector angles show repeated trends from a mid-range caudodorsal orientation in basal ornithischians to a decrease in vector angles indicating more caudally oriented jaw movements in derived taxa (e.g., derived thyreophorans, basal ornithopods, lambeosaurines, pachycephalosaurs, and derived ceratopsids). Analyses of hypothetical jaw morphologies were also performed, indicating that both the coronoid process and lowered jaw joint increase moment arm length therefore increasing mechanical advantage of the jaw apparatus. Adaptive trends in craniomandibular anatomy show that ornithischians evolved more complex feeding apparatuses within different clades as well as morphological convergences between clades.

  19. Fetal jaw movement affects condylar cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, H; Hatta, T; Udagawa, J; Zhang, L; Yoshimura, Y; Otani, H

    2005-05-01

    Using a mouse exo utero system to examine the effects of fetal jaw movement on the development of condylar cartilage, we assessed the effects of restraint of the animals' mouths from opening, by suture, at embryonic day (E)15.5. We hypothesized that pre-natal jaw movement is an important mechanical factor in endochondral bone formation of the mandibular condyle. Condylar cartilage was reduced in size, and the bone-cartilage margin was ill-defined in the sutured group at E18.5. Volume, total number of cells, and number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive cells in the mesenchymal zone were lower in the sutured group than in the non-sutured group at E16.5 and E18.5. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were larger, whereas fewer apoptotic chondrocytes and osteoclasts were observed in the hypertrophic zone in the sutured group at E18.5. Analysis of our data revealed that restricted fetal TMJ movement influences the process of endochondral bone formation of condylar cartilage.

  20. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates constitute a group of drugs capable of modulating bone turnover and reduce its remodeling when an excessive resorption occurs. This is why they are indicated in a large group of bone diseases like postmenopausal osteoporosis or osteolysis associated with breast cancer or multiple myeloma. Over the last few years and due to their extensive use, many cases of complications associated with their use have been published. Among the most important possible adverse effects are the oral ones, with the appearance of ulcerations and, especially, osteonecrosis of the jaws associated with this therapy. In this paper, we have analyzed the general characteristics of these drugs and their mechanisms of action as well as the described adverse effects, especially oral and maxillofacial, have been made special reference, regarding the prevention of osteonecrosis of the jaws, heightened by cases described in the medical and odontological literature. The preventive protocol backs up the fundamental role of the odontologist in the effective prevention of this process before, during and after the treatment.

  1. Jaw muscles of New World squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, S S; Roth, V L

    1995-06-01

    The jaw, suprahyoid, and extrinsic tongue muscles are described for eight species of New World squirrels, spanning more than an order of magnitude in body mass. Anatomical differences are discussed in the light of body size, natural history, and phylogeny. The relative sizes of different muscles, their orientations, and the shapes and positions of their areas of attachment vary but show few trends in relation to body size. The anatomical differences are likewise not readily explained by the mechanical requirements of the animals' diets, which are similar. The most marked anatomical differences occur in Sciurillus (the pygmy tree squirrel), as well as those genera--Glaucomys (the flying squirrel) and Tamias (the chipmunk)--that are taxonomically most distinct from the tree squirrels. Sciurillus is noteworthy for its unusually small temporalis and an anterior deep masseter that is oriented to assist in retraction of the jaw. Tamias has a more vertically oriented temporalis and greater inclination in the anterior masseter muscles than the other squirrels, features that may be associated with its large diastema and relatively posteriorly situated cheek teeth, which in turn may relate to its having cheek pouches. Our results form a valuable database of information to be used in further studies of functional morphology and phylogeny.

  2. Habitat partitioning between woodland caribou and moose in Ontario: the potential role of shared prédation risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.G. Cumming

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores mechanisms of coexistence for woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou and moose (Akes alces preyed upon by gray wolves (Canis lupus in northern Ontario. Autocorrelation analysis of winter track locations showed habitat partitioning by caribou and moose. Numbers of Delaunay link edges for moose-wolves did not differ significantly from what would be expected by random process, but those for caribou-wolves were significantly fewer. Thus, habitat partitioning provided implicit refuges that put greater distances between caribou and wolves, presumably decreasing predation on the caribou. Yet, direct competition cannot be ruled out; both apparent and direct competition may be involved in real-life situations. A synthesis including both explanations fits ecological theory, as well as current understanding about caribou ecology.

  3. Radiologic appearance of primary jaw lesions in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Malini; Kaste, Sue C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Hopkins, Kenneth P. [Department of Surgery, Division of Dentistry, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Background: The jaw (an unusual site of primary tumors in children and adolescents) has lesions often found incidentally by dentists on routine panoramic radiographs or during examination of a child who has swelling or tooth pain. Objective: This pictorial seeks to familiarize pediatric radiologists with the radiographic appearance of a variety of primary jaw lesions. Materials and methods: We retrospectively searched institutional records for cases of primary jaw lesions in children and adolescents. Jaw lesions were characterized as: I, well-circumscribed radiolucent lesions; II, lesions with mixed or variable appearance; III, poorly circumscribed radiolucent lesions; and IV, radiopaque lesions. Results: Although most oral and maxillofacial lesions in children are benign, a broad spectrum of tumors was identified; lesions may occur in patients with unrelated prior malignancy. Conclusion: Because radiologic studies may identify jaw lesions and direct further care, familiarity with the appearance of these entities is prudent. (orig.)

  4. Summer dietary nitrogen availability as a potential bottom-up constraint on moose in south-central Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArt, Scott H; Spalinger, Donald E; Collins, William B; Schoen, Erik R; Stevenson, Timothy; Bucho, Michele

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the growth and fecundity of northern ungulates may be coupled to their summer nutrition. Here, we compare summer dietary nitrogen availability of the five major browse plants (comprising approximately 79% of the diet) of moose (Alces alces) in Denali National Park and Nelchina Basin, Alaska, USA. In recent years the productivity of Denali moose has been significantly higher than that of Nelchina moose, prompting this comparison. We examined the phenological progression of leaf nitrogen concentration, tannin-protein precipitation capacity, and digestible protein over three summers in both regions. We then modeled the potential nutritional consequences for a cow moose consuming representative diets on each range, predicting both net protein intake (NPI) and lean body mass accumulation each year. We found that leaf nitrogen and digestible protein decreased, while tannin-protein precipitation capacity increased throughout the summer for all forages. There was 23% more digestible protein in Denali leaves than Nelchina leaves on average, and this difference was significant in all three years. Tannins accounted for a large (mean = 46%) reduction in protein availability, suggesting a key role of these secondary compounds in the nitrogen balance of moose in these regions. Finally, our NPI model predicted that Denali cows were in positive protein balance 17 days longer than Nelchina cows and accumulated 18 kg more lean body mass over the summer, on average. We conclude that summer dietary nitrogen availability may act as a nutritional constraint on moose and suggest that more emphasis be placed on elucidating its role in population dynamics and conservation of northern ungulates.

  5. Biochemical and mechanical characterization of Nereis worm jaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broomell, Christopher C.

    The ultimate goal of biomimetics is to elucidate the design principles governing performance in biological materials and apply them to engineering systems. Successful transfer of these principles will require a thorough understanding of the complex interplay between molecular composition, organization and mechanical properties of the material. This dissertation describes the mechanical and biochemical characterization of jaws from the marine polychaete Nereis virens. Nereid jaws possess remarkable mechanical properties considering their predominantly organic composition. Hardness and stiffness are comparable to human dentin. However, in stark contrast to dentin, in Nereis these properties are achieved without mineralization. The role of metal ions in jaw sclerotization is addressed. In the pristine state, Zn ions are concentrated at the tip and toothed-edge of the jaw and are critical for hardness and modulus; both properties are reduced by ˜70% following Zn removal by treatment with EDTA. Furthermore, metal content in the jaw can be manipulated by soaking Zn-depleted samples in metal solutions; the comparative effects of treatment with alternative transition metals under both dry and hydrated conditions are described. The molecular composition of the jaw is also addressed. Protein comprises ˜90% of the jaw mass; amino acid analysis indicates that histidine is increased in the hardened, Zn-rich tip. The major protein component in Nereid jaw extracts is purified and characterized by partial peptide mapping and isolation of a partial clone from a jaw pulp cDNA library. Nvjp-1 is a 38 kDa glycine- histidine-rich protein and is believed to be the principle structural protein in the hardened jaw tip. The effects of selected environmental factors on Nvjp-1 structure and assembly are described. Transition from low to high pH is accompanied by changes in secondary structure and a significant molecular elongation. Furthermore, exposure to transition metals, notably Zn and

  6. Changes in jaw-jerk on different levels of jaw closure and teeth-clenching in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, E; Fujita, Y; Soma, K

    2000-11-01

    We investigated how the jaw-jerk in the human masseter muscle is modulated in relation to the level of jaw closure (JC) and teeth clenching. Electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded with surface electrodes. Background EMG activity of the masseter muscle was kept at three low teeth clenching levels with visual feedback. The level of JC was changed in six steps along the habitual path of closure relative to the mean maximal jaw opening during gum chewing by inserting a bite block between the upper and lower molars. The jaw-jerk was evoked by applying mechanical stimulation of about 20 N with a hammer to the bite-fork placed on the lower molars on one side in each condition of combination of a level of JC with a level of teeth-clenching. At the resting condition the excitability of the jaw-jerk increased with JC, while at weak voluntary teeth clenching it then decreased and increased again as the jaw was progressively closed. It is suggested that the excitability of the jaw-jerk would increase toward the occlusal position, which in turn would contribute to smooth masticatory movements. In addition, the mode of modulation of the jaw-jerk was studied in a subject with skeletal malocclusion.

  7. Summer kill rates and predation pattern in a wolf-moose system: can we rely on winter estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sand, Håkan; Wabakken, Petter; Zimmermann, Barbara; Johansson, Orjan; Pedersen, Hans C; Liberg, Olof

    2008-05-01

    So far the vast majority of studies on large carnivore predation, including kill rates and consumption, have been based on winter studies. Because large carnivores relying on ungulates as prey often show a preference for juveniles, kill rates may be both higher and more variable during the summer season than during the rest of the year leading to serious underestimates of the total annual predation rate. This study is the first to present detailed empirical data on kill rates and prey selection in a wolf-moose system during summer (June-September) as obtained by applying modern Global Positioning System-collar techniques on individual wolves (Canis lupus) in Scandinavia. Moose (Alces alces) was the dominant prey species both by number (74.4%) and biomass (95.6%); 89.9% of all moose killed were juveniles, representing 76.0% of the biomass consumed by wolves. Kill rate in terms of the kilogram biomass/kilogram wolf per day averaged 0.20 (range: 0.07-0.32) among wolf territories and was above, or well above, the daily minimum food requirements in most territories. The average number of days between moose kills across wolf territories and study periods was 1.71 days, but increased with time and size of growing moose calves during summer. Over the entire summer (June-September, 122 days), a group (from two to nine) of wolves killed a total of 66 (confidence interval 95%; 56-81) moose. Incorporation of body growth functions of moose calves and yearlings and wolf pups over the summer period showed that wolves adjusted their kill rate on moose, so the amount of biomass/kilogram wolf was relatively constant or increased. The kill rate was much higher (94-116%) than estimated from the winter period. As a consequence, projecting winter kill rates to obtain annual estimates of predation in similar predator-prey systems may result in a significant underestimation of the total number of prey killed.

  8. A linear moose model with pairs of degenerate gauge boson triplets

    CERN Document Server

    Casalbuoni, R; De Curtis, S; Dominici, D

    2007-01-01

    The possibility of the existence of a strongly interacting electroweak symmetry breaking sector, as opposed to the weakly interacting light Higgs of the Standard Model, is not yet ruled out by experiments. In this paper we make an extensive study of a deconstructed model (or ``moose'' model) providing a possible effective description of such a strong symmetry breaking sector, and show its compatibility with experimental data for a wide portion of the model parameters space. The model is a direct generalization of the previously proposed D-BESS model.

  9. Top-Higgs and Top-pion phenomenology in the Top Triangle Moose model

    CERN Document Server

    Chivukula, R Sekhar; Logan, Heather E; Martin, Adam; Simmons, Elizabeth H

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the deconstructed version of a topcolor-assisted technicolor model wherein the mechanism of top quark mass generation is separated from the rest of electroweak symmetry breaking. The minimal deconstructed version of this scenario is a "triangle moose" model, where the top quark gets its mass from coupling to a top-Higgs field, while the gauge boson masses are generated from a Higgsless sector. The spectrum of the model includes scalar (top-Higgs) and pseudoscalar (top-pion) states. In this paper, we study the properties of these particles, discuss their production mechanisms and decay modes, and suggest how best to search for them at the LHC.

  10. Simulated moose (Alces alces L.) browsing increases accumulation of secondary metabolites in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Inga-Lill; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Bergström, Roger; Wallgren, Märtha; Suominen, Otso; Danell, Kjell

    2012-10-01

    We have addressed the impact of moose (Alces alces L.) on accumulation of secondary metabolites, lignin, and nitrogen in bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) along gradients of habitat productivity and solar radiation. The study was conducted within a long-term research project on direct and indirect impacts of moose on the ecosystem. In the experiment, browsing, defecation, and urination corresponding to four different moose densities were simulated for eight years before bilberry tissue was collected and analyzed. Some quantitatively dominant flavonoids were affected by the simulated moose browsing and by habitat productivity and light. The content of flavonoids increased with increasing moose density and light, and decreased with increasing habitat productivity. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in bilberry from nutrient-poor sites may have resulted from the increased photosynthesis relative to growth, which facilitated secondary metabolism. The higher concentration of secondary metabolites in plants subjected to simulated moose- herbivory might have been caused in part by loss of biomass. In addition, in areas with high biomass loss, i.e., high moose density, a more open canopy was created and more solar radiation could have induced secondary metabolism.

  11. Does Predation Influence the Seasonal and Diel Timing of Moose Calving in Central Ontario, Canada?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brent R; Mills, Kenneth J; Middel, Kevin R; Benson, John F; Obbard, Martyn E

    2016-01-01

    Birth synchrony is well documented among ungulates and is hypothesised to maximize neonate survival, either by minimizing the risk of predation through predator swamping or by synchronising birthing with increased seasonal food availability. We used encapsulated vaginal implant transmitters to locate and capture neonatal moose calves and document the seasonal and diel timing of parturition in two adjacent study areas with different predation pressure in central Ontario, Canada. We tested the hypothesis that predation promotes earlier and more synchronous birth of moose calves. Across both areas, proportionately more births occurred during the afternoon and fewer than expected occurred overnight. Mean date of calving averaged 1.5 days earlier and calving was also more synchronous in the study area with heavier predation pressure, despite average green-up date and peak Normalized Difference Vegetation Index date occurring 2 days later in this study area than in the area receiving lighter predation pressure. We encourage analysis of data on timing of parturition from additional study areas experiencing varying degrees of predation pressure to better clarify the influence of predation in driving seasonal and diel timing of parturition in temperate ungulates.

  12. Continuous Integration for Concurrent MOOSE Framework and Application Development on GitHub

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E. Slaughter

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available For the past several years, Idaho National Laboratory’s MOOSE framework team has employed modern software engineering techniques (continuous integration, joint application/framework source code repos- itories, automated regression testing, etc. in developing closed-source multiphysics simulation software (Gaston et al., 'Journal of Open Research Software' vol. 2, article e10, 2014. In March 2014, the MOOSE framework was released under an open source license on GitHub, significantly expanding and diversifying the pool of current active and potential future contributors on the project. Despite this recent growth, the same philosophy of concurrent framework and application development continues to guide the project’s development roadmap. Several specific practices, including techniques for managing multiple repositories, conducting automated regression testing, and implementing a cascading build process are discussed in this short paper. Special attention is given to describing the manner in which these practices naturally synergize with the GitHub API and GitHub-specific features such as issue tracking, Pull Requests, and project forks.

  13. Necropsy findings in 62 opportunistically collected free-ranging moose (Alces alces) from Minnesota, USA (2003-13).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschmann, Arno; Armien, Anibal G; Butler, Erika; Schrage, Mike; Stromberg, Bert; Bender, Jeff B; Firshman, Anna M; Carstensen, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The Minnesota, US moose population has declined dramatically since the 1990s. All 54 carcasses of moose that died of unknown cause or were euthanized by gun shot by tribal or Department of Natural Resources personnel because of perceived signs of illness between 2003 and 2013 and eight carcasses of moose that died from vehicular accidents between 2009 and 2013 were submitted to the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory and included in our study. The majority of the animals were underweight or cachectic (n = 53; 85%). Neural migration presumably by Parelaphostrongylus tenuis was a common finding (n = 28; 45%). Moderate to marked Dermacentor albipictus ("winter tick") ectoparasitism with widespread alopecia was the cause or a contributing cause of death in 14 (23%) cases in which grossly apparent anemia was associated with exhaustion of hepatic iron stores. Hepatic lesions associated with Fascioloides magna were common (n = 37; 60%) but were unlikely to be the cause of death. Environmental factors favoring winter tick survival, habitat expansion of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and the survival of terrestrial and aquatic snails (serving as intermediate hosts for P. tenuis and F. magna), might contribute to the seemingly severe parasitic burden in Minnesota's moose population.

  14. Kill rate of wolves on moose in a low density prey population: results from eastern interior Alaska.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A study to estimate the kill rate of wolves on moose was initiated in eastern interior Alaska. This study is the first to examine kill rates in a system with such a...

  15. Physiological evaluation of free-ranging moose (Alces alces immobilized with etorphine-xylazine-acepromazine in Northern Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Alina L

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evaluation of physiology during capture and anesthesia of free-ranging wildlife is useful for determining the effect that capture methods have on both ecological research results and animal welfare. This study evaluates capture and anesthesia of moose (Alces alces with etorphine-xylazine-acepromazine in Northern Sweden. Methods Fifteen adult moose aged 3–15 years were darted from a helicopter with a combination of 3.37 mg etorphine, 75 mg xylazine, and 15 mg acepromazine. Paired arterial blood samples were collected 15 minutes apart with the first sample at 15–23 minutes after darting and were analyzed immediately with an i-STAT®1 Portable Clinical Analyzer. Results All animals developed hypoxemia (PaO2 2 5.5-8 kPa. All moose were acidemic (ph2, 14 moose had mild hypercapnia (PaCO2 6-8 kPa and two had marked hypercapnia (PaCO2>8 kPa. Pulse, respiratory rate, pH and HCO3 increased significantly over time from darting whereas lactate decreased. Conclusions The hypoxemia found in this study is a strong indication for investigating alternative drug doses or combinations or treatment with supplemental oxygen.

  16. Jaw-muscle architecture and mandibular morphology influence relative maximum jaw gapes in the sexually dimorphic Macaca fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terhune, Claire E; Hylander, William L; Vinyard, Christopher J; Taylor, Andrea B

    2015-05-01

    Maximum jaw gape is a performance variable related to feeding and non-feeding oral behaviors, such as canine gape displays, and is influenced by several factors including jaw-muscle fiber architecture, muscle position on the skull, and jaw morphology. Maximum gape, jaw length, and canine height are strongly correlated across catarrhine primates, but relationships between gape and other aspects of masticatory apparatus morphology are less clear. We examine the effects of jaw-adductor fiber architecture, jaw-muscle leverage, and jaw form on gape in an intraspecific sample of sexually dimorphic crab-eating macaques (Macaca fascicularis). As M. fascicularis males have relatively larger maximum gapes than females, we predict that males will have muscle and jaw morphologies that facilitate large gape, but these morphologies may come at some expense to bite force. Male crab-eating macaques have relatively longer jaw-muscle fibers, masseters with decreased leverage, and temporomandibular joint morphologies that facilitate the production of wide gapes. Because relative canine height is correlated with maximum gape in catarrhines, and males have relatively longer canines than females, these results support the hypothesis that male M. fascicularis have experienced selection to increase maximum gape. The sexes do not differ in relative masseter physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA), but males compensate for a potential trade-off between muscle excursion versus muscle force with increased temporalis weight and PCSA. This musculoskeletal configuration is likely functionally significant for behaviors involving aggressive canine biting and displays in male M. fascicularis and provides additional evidence supporting the multifactorial nature of the catarrhine masticatory apparatus. Our results have implications for the evolution of craniofacial morphology in catarrhine primates and reinforce the importance of evaluating additional factors other than feeding behavior and diet

  17. Design Documentation for JaWE2Openflow Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, N; Barter, R H

    2004-07-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has chosen CIGNEX Technologies, Inc. (CIGNEX) to design and develop the JaWE2Openflow conversion software. This document was created by CIGNEX as a project deliverable.

  18. Jaw morphology and ontogeny in five species of Ophryothrocha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macnaughton, Martin Oliver; Worsaae, Katrine; Eibye-Jacobsen, Danny

    2010-01-01

    Detailed scanning electron microscopy of jaws within the genus Ophryotrocha (Dorvilleidae, Annelida) was performed on 871 jaw parts. The investigations resulted in new understandings of the ontogeny and jaw morphology and have systematic implications for the family. Five species in the genus...... (Ophryotrocha alborana, O. diadema, O. gracilis, O. hartmanni, and O. labronica pacifica) were kept in culture, and the development of the jaws was studied by sampling throughout their life history. Ophryotrocha species have mandibular plates that remain the same throughout ontogeny, whereas the posterior...... shafts elongate. Both mandibular plate morphology and shaft ontogeny have species-specific distinctions. In Ophryotrocha, the maxillae can be assigned to three to four distinct types, which are replaced by moulting. The maxillary morphology and developmental stages at which moults occur are species...

  19. Homology of the jaw muscles in lizards and snakes-a solution from a comparative gnathostome approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Homology or shared evolutionary origin of jaw adductor muscles in lizards and snakes has been difficult to establish, although snakes clearly arose within the lizard radiation. Lizards typically have temporal adductors layered lateral to medial, and in snakes the muscles are arranged in a rostral to caudal pattern. Recent work has suggested that the jaw adductor group in gnathostomes is arranged as a folded sheet; when this theory is applied to snakes, homology with lizard morphology can be seen. This conclusion revisits the work of S.B. McDowell, J Herpetol 1986; 20:353-407, who proposed that homology involves identity of m. levator anguli oris and the loss of m. adductor mandibulae externus profundus, at least in "advanced" (colubroid) snakes. Here I advance the folded sheet hypothesis across the whole snake tree using new and literature data, and provide a solution to this homology problem.

  20. Antiresorptive agent-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: Position Paper 2017 of the Japanese Allied Committee on Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hagino, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Toshitsugu; Ohta, Hiroaki; Takahashi, Shunji; Soen, Satoshi; Taguchi, Akira; Nagata, Toshihiko; Urade, Masahiro; Shibahara, Takahiko; Toyosawa, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Antiresorptive agent-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (ARONJ) is an intractable, though rare, complication in cancer patients with bone metastases and patients with osteoporosis who are treated with antiresorptive agents, including bisphosphonates and denosumab. Despite the more than 10 years that have passed since the first cases of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) were reported, our understanding of the epidemiology and pathophysiology of ARONJ remains limited, and data supported by evidence-based medicine are still sparse. However, the diagnosis and staging of ARONJ, identification of risk factors, and development of preventive and therapeutic approaches have advanced significantly over the past decade. The Position Paper 2017 is an updated version of the Position Paper 2010 of the Japanese Allied Committee on Osteonecrosis of the Jaw, which now comprises six Japanese academic societies. The Position Paper 2017 describes a new diagnostic definition for ARONJ, as proposed by the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS), summarizes our current understanding of the pathophysiology of ARONJ based on a literature search, and suggests methods for physicians and dentists/oral surgeons to manage the disease. In addition, the appropriateness of discontinuing antiresorptive medications (drug holiday) before, during, and after invasive dental treatments is discussed extensively. More importantly, the manuscript also proposes, for the first time, the importance of interactive communication and cooperation between physicians and dentists/oral surgeons for the successful treatment of ARONJ. The Position Paper 2017 is intended to serve as a guide for improving the management of ARONJ patients in Japan.

  1. Road and Rail Side Vegetation Management Implications of Habitat Use by Moose Relative to Brush Cutting Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rea, Roy V.; Child, Kenneth N.; Spata, David P.; MacDonald, Douglas

    2010-07-01

    Plants cut at different times produce resprouts that vary in their nutritional value relative to when they are cut. To determine how vegetation management in transportation (road and rail) corridors at different times of the year could influence browse quality in the years following cutting, and how this could potentially influence encounters between herbivores and vehicles, we undertook a 3-year study. In 2001, at a wildlife viewing area near Prince George, British Columbia, Canada, we established a control area and treatment areas where shrubs and trees that are used as food by moose ( Alces alces) were cut at the beginning of June, July, August, September, and October. In the fall, moose were most often observed browsing the resprouts of plants cut in August (years 1 and 2 post-treatment) and September (year 3). Cumulative winter track counts were highest in the uncut control area in the years following cutting. Spring pellet counts revealed that most pellets were deposited in the uncut (years 1 and 2) and August-cut (year 3) areas during winter. With the exception of the first year after cutting, browse removal by moose was highest for plants cut later in the growing season. Overall, our findings suggest that following cutting, plants cut later in the year are selected more often by moose relative to those cut earlier. To reduce browse use of corridor vegetation in areas where concerns for moose-vehicle collisions exist, we recommend that vegetation maintenance activities be conducted in the early summer months of June and July.

  2. Modelling (137)Cs concentrations in moose (1986-2012) from areas highly contaminated by the Chernobyl fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Robert N; Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve; Sonesten, Lars; Wikenros, Camilla; Rosén, Klas

    2016-08-01

    Data from long term annual monitoring of (137)Cs concentrations in harvested moose (Alces alces) were empirically modelled by applying multivariate data analysis that is able to from relatively raw datasets show how the many various impact variables are related (Principal component analysis, PCA). In the later stage regression modelling (Partial least squares, PLS) was applied to analyse which environmental and physiological factors were significant (i.e. of predictive value) based on the measured (X) activity concentrations in moose meat. The data sets originate from two different forest dominated areas in Sweden. One area is located inland (Heby municipality) and the other borders to the Baltic Sea (Gävle municipality). In inland with 20% farmland, GIS-software was used to calculate the proportion of different habitat types and (137)Cs deposition around individual killing spots. This model reveals that the proportions of farmland and forest around the killing spot were significant parameters, second to deposition and years since fallout. Significance was also obtained for the proportions of mire and water bodies, the amount of rain in summer and the age of the moose. In the other model based on data from the coastal area with only about 4% farmland, the coordinates of the moose killing spots were not recorded in the data sets. In the resulting model the temperature in July was the most important parameter, second to years since fallout. Significance was also found for the following parameters: temperature and rainfall in several summer months, the approximate north- and eastward location of the killing spot and to which age category (adult/calf) the harvested moose belonged.

  3. Assessment of Exposure to Chlorinated Organics through the Ingestion of Moose Meat for a Canadian First Nation Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire McAuley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Moose is an important traditional food for members of the Swan River First Nation (SRFN, located in northern Alberta, Canada. As industrial development is encroaching on First Nations’ traditional territories in northern Alberta, community members are growing increasingly concerned for the sustainability and safety of their traditional foods. The Alberta Special Waste Treatment Centre (ASWTC is an industrial incineration facility located in the core of SRFN’s traditional territory. An accidental release at the ASWTC in 1996 resulted in a significant discharge of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs to the environment. In addition to this accident, the ongoing operation of the ASWTC is linked to routine low-level emissions of PCBs, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/Fs. Since the 1996 release, levels of PCBs and PCDD/Fs have been measured in wild game tissues and the provincial government has issued consumption advisories. This study was undertaken to provide answers to the community regarding food safety and was designed to address concerns regarding PCB and PCDD/F concentrations in moose tissues. Samples of moose muscle (n=15, liver (n=13 and kidney (n=14 were collected as part of regular food harvesting activities of the SRFN in the summer and fall of 2015 and generously shared by the SRFN hunters and harvesters to allow for their inclusion into the study. A risk assessment approach was used to evaluate the potential risks to human health using hazard quotients (HQ. All HQs were below the benchmark level of 0.2 for a single pathway exposure. The results show that PCB and PCDD/F concentrations in moose tissues were low and comparable to those of meats available in Canadian supermarkets. Based on results from this study, community exposure to PCBs and PCDD/Fs from the consumption of moose tissue is low and consumption may continue at quantities documented in regional studies.

  4. Prototyping artificial jaws for the robotic dental testing simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemzadeh, K; Raabe, D

    2008-11-01

    This paper presents a robot periphery prototyped for the six-degrees-of-freedom robotic dental testing simulator, simulating the wear of materials on dental components, such as individual teeth, crowns, bridges, or a full set of teeth. The robot periphery consists of the artificial jaws and compliance module. The jaws have been reverse engineered and represent a human-like mandible and maxilla with artificial teeth. Each clinically fabricated tooth consists of a crown and glass ceramic roots which are connected using resin cement. Normal clinical occlusion of the artificial jaws assembly was emulated by a dental articulator based on 'Andrew's six keys to occlusion'. The radii of the von Spee curve, the Monson curve, and the Wilson curve were also measured as important jaw characteristic indicators to aid normal occlusion. A compliance module had to be built between the lower jaw and the robot platform to sustain the fluctuating forces that occur during normal chewing in the occlusal contact areas, where these high bite forces are major causes of dental component failure. A strain gauge force transducer has been integrated into the machined lower jaw, underneath the second molars, to measure axial biting forces applied to the posterior teeth. The experiments conducted have shown that the sensor is able to sense small changes in the compression force satisfactorily, when applied perpendicular to the occlusal surfaces of the teeth.

  5. Jaw muscles of Old World squirrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorington, R W; Darrow, K

    1996-11-01

    The jaw, suprahyoid, and extrinsic tongue muscles were studied in 11 genera, belonging to five tribes, of Old World squirrels. Significant variation in most of the adductor muscles is evident. The most primitive state of sciuromorphy is seen in the African tree squirrels Paraxerus and Funisciurus, especially as reflected in the anterior deep masseter. A derived state of sciuromorphy is found in five genera of Old World squirrels and perhaps evolved independently in each. Reduction of the temporalis muscle was observed in three genera, distantly related to one another. A unique arrangement of the superficial masseter is reported in the Asian giant tree squirrels, Ratufa. The arrangement of the masseter in the African pygmy squirrel, Myosciurus, is very similar to that of the South American pygmy squirrel, Sciurillus. We present hypotheses about the functional significance of these differences. In the derived state of sciuromorphy, which is found in three cases in squirrels that feed extensively on hard fruits, the anterior deep masseter is well positioned to increase the strength of the power stroke of the incisor bite. Among the pygmy squirrels, the position of the anterior deep masseter suggests that it plays a more significant role in molar chewing.

  6. A study of biological chemistry on the nature of jaw cysts. On the maintainance of homoeostasis in jaw cyst fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M

    1975-06-01

    Jaw cyst lining cells have an active transporting mechanism for Na+ ion and K+ion, a secreting mechanism and a selecting mechanism, and they allow permeation of electrolytes, lipids and protein into cysts. The components within the cysts have a controlling metabolism, and keep the system stable. Tumour wall cells of cystic ameloblastoma have only a passive transporting mechanism for various substances. Their nature differs from that of jaw cyst lining cells.

  7. Margaretha Stéen; Elaphystrongylosis. A clinical, pathological and taxono-mical study with special emphasis on the infection in moose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Skjenneberg (ed.

    1992-10-01

    Full Text Available Margareta Steen defended her PhD thesis Elaphystrongylosis. A clinical, pathological and taxono-mical study with special emphasis on the infection in moose at the Swedish University of Agriculture, Uppsala, Sweden on December 13, 1991.

  8. Driving behaviour responses to a moose encounter, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message determined in a factorial simulator study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägerbrand, Annika K; Antonson, Hans

    2016-01-01

    In a driving simulator study, driving behaviour responses (speed and deceleration) to encountering a moose, automatic speed camera, wildlife warning sign and radio message, with or without a wildlife fence and in dense forest or open landscape, were analysed. The study consisted of a factorial experiment that examined responses to factors singly and in combination over 9-km road stretches driven eight times by 25 participants (10 men, 15 women). The aims were to: determine the most effective animal-vehicle collision (AVC) countermeasures in reducing vehicle speed and test whether these are more effective in combination for reducing vehicle speed; identify the most effective countermeasures on encountering moose; and determine whether the driving responses to AVC countermeasures are affected by the presence of wildlife fences and landscape characteristics. The AVC countermeasures that proved most effective in reducing vehicle speed were a wildlife warning sign and radio message, while automatic speed cameras had a speed-increasing effect. There were no statistically significant interactions between different countermeasures and moose encounters. However, there was a tendency for a stronger speed-reducing effect from the radio message warning and from a combination of a radio message and wildlife warning sign in velocity profiles covering longer driving distances than the statistical tests. Encountering a moose during the drive had the overall strongest speed-reducing effect and gave the strongest deceleration, indicating that moose decoys or moose artwork might be useful as speed-reducing countermeasures. Furthermore, drivers reduced speed earlier on encountering a moose in open landscape and had lower velocity when driving past it. The presence of a wildlife fence on encountering the moose resulted in smaller deceleration.

  9. Unitarity sum rules, three site moose model, and the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, Tomohiro; Okawa, Shohei; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    We investigate $W'$ interpretations for the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies. The roles of the unitarity sum rules, which ensure the perturbativity of the longitudinal vector boson scattering amplitudes, are emphasized. We find the unitarity sum rules and the custodial symmetry relations are powerful enough to predict various nontrivial relations among $WWZ'$, $WZW'$, $WWh$, $WW'h$ and $ZZ'h$ coupling strengths in a model independent manner. We also perform surveys in the general parameter space of $W'$ models and find the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies may be interpreted as a $W'$ particle of the three site moose model, i.e., a Kaluza-Klein like particle in a deconstructed extra dimension model. It is also shown that the non SM-like Higgs boson is favored by the present data to interpret the ATLAS diboson anomalies as the consequences of the $W'$ and $Z'$ bosons.

  10. Harvest-induced phenotypic selection in an island population of moose, Alces alces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalnes, Thomas; Saether, Bernt-Erik; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Engen, Steinar; Solberg, Erling J

    2016-07-01

    Empirical evidence strongly indicates that human exploitation has frequently led to rapid evolutionary changes in wild populations, yet the mechanisms involved are often poorly understood. Here, we applied a recently developed demographic framework for analyzing selection to data from a 20-year study of a wild population of moose, Alces alces. In this population, a genetic pedigree has been established all the way back to founders. We demonstrate harvest-induced directional selection for delayed birth dates in males and reduced body mass as calf in females. During the study period, birth date was delayed by 0.81 days per year for both sexes, whereas no significant changes occurred in calf body mass. Quantitative genetic analyses indicated that both traits harbored significant additive genetic variance. These results show that selective harvesting can induce strong selection that oppose natural selection. This may cause evolution of less favorable phenotypes that become maladaptive once harvesting ceases.

  11. SUSY Moose Runs and Hops: An extra dimension from a broken deformed CFT

    CERN Document Server

    Erlich, J; Erlich, Joshua; Tan, Jong Anly

    2006-01-01

    We find a class of four dimensional deformed conformal field theories which appear extra dimensional when their gauge symmetries are spontaneously broken. The theories are supersymmetric moose models which flow to interacting conformal fixed points at low energies, deformed by superpotentials. Using a-maximization we give strong nonperturbative evidence that the hopping terms in the resulting latticized action are relevant deformations of the fixed point theories. These theories have an intricate structure of RG flows between conformal fixed points. Our results suggest that at the stable fixed points each of the bulk gauge couplings and superpotential hopping terms is turned on, in favor of the extra dimensional interpretation of the theory. However, we argue that the higher dimensional gauge coupling is generically small compared to the size of the extra dimension. In the presence of a brane the topology of the extra dimension is determined dynamically and depends on the numbers of colors and bulk and brane ...

  12. An erosive/ulcerative alimentary disease of undetermined etiology in Swedish moose (AIces alces L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareta Stéen

    1993-12-01

    Full Text Available During the years 1985 to 1987, 689 moose (Alces alces L. collected throughout Sweden were necrop-sied at the National Veterinary Institute in Uppsala, Sweden. Sixty-eight of those investigated had catarrhal to hemorrhagic enteritis, atrophied lymphoid organs, and/or numerous erosive, uclerative, necrotizing lesions of the digestive mucosa. Histopathology of the mucous membranes revealed marked inter- and intracellular oedema, erosions, ulcers and intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies. Neither Bovine Virus Diarrhoea/Mucosal Disease (BVD/MD or Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR virus could be isolated from the diseased animals. It is suggested that the syndrome resembling BVD/MD complex, may have been caused by an yet unidentified virus.

  13. Molecular detection of Bartonella spp. in deer ked pupae, adult keds and moose blood in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, E M; Pérez Vera, C; Pulliainen, A T; Sironen, T; Aaltonen, K; Kortet, R; Härkönen, L; Härkönen, S; Paakkonen, T; Nieminen, P; Mustonen, A-M; Ylönen, H; Vapalahti, O

    2015-02-01

    The deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) is a haematophagous ectoparasite of cervids that harbours haemotrophic Bartonella. A prerequisite for the vector competence of the deer ked is the vertical transmission of the pathogen from the mother to its progeny and transstadial transmission from pupa to winged adult. We screened 1154 pupae and 59 pools of winged adult deer keds from different areas in Finland for Bartonella DNA using PCR. Altogether 13 pupa samples and one winged adult deer ked were positive for the presence of Bartonella DNA. The amplified sequences were closely related to either B. schoenbuchensis or B. bovis. The same lineages were identified in eight blood samples collected from free-ranging moose. This is the first demonstration of Bartonella spp. DNA in a winged adult deer ked and, thus, evidence for potential transstadial transmission of Bartonella spp. in the species.

  14. Experimental infection of reindeer, sheep and goats with Elaphostrongylus spp. (Nematoda, Protostrongylidae from moose and reindeer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarets Stéen

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Six reindeer (Rangifer tarandus, five sheep and six goats (Ovis ovis and Capra hircus were experimentally infected with the nematode Elaphostrongylus alces. Additionally, one sheep was infected with E. rangiferi. Reindeer infected with E. alces showed no neurological signs. Sheep and goats infected with the same parasite also remained clinically healthy; however, the sheep infected with E. rangiferi showed severe neurological signs and became paralysed. Pathological lesions were minimal in reindeer and domestic ruminants infected with E. alces, but were prominent in the lamb infected with E. rangiferi. Our results indicate that keeping and transferring sheep and goats into ateas inhabited by moose, which is a natural host of E. alces may not harm the livestock, while keeping sheep in areas inhabited by reindeer infected with E. rangiferi may result in petiodic outbreaks of cerebrospinal elaphostrongylosis in sheep.

  15. [Traditional concept of madness and therapeutic difficulties in the Moose of Kadiogo.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouango, J G; Karfo, K; Kere, M; Ouedraogo, M; Kabore, G; Ouedraogo, A

    1998-01-01

    The practice of psychiatry in the south of the Sahara in Africa collides with many problems of acceptability of care for the ill and their families. The frequent rejection of the psychiatrist's therapeutic approach can often be explained by the inadaptation of the etiopathogenic approach. Indeed, in black Africa, responsibility of illness differs according to the fact that one has been schooled or not. The western world teaches minorities having the chance to live there or learn about it, that the human body can be assaulted by bacteria, viruses, mycoses or be self-assaulted by changes of its own physiology. Traditional education, for its part, regards the body as a mysterious entity susceptible of being penetrated or eaten by geniuses and anthrophagic sorcerers following a mystico-religious mechanism linked to beliefs and customs. In the majority of the Moose of the Moaga plateau in Burkina Faso, especially regarding madness, these assailants are ancestral geniuses or geniuses from the bush. Psychological suffering caused by a family, social or intrapsychic conflict independent of the invisible world is ultimately delirious for them thus provoking a resistance to give up complete charge of their mentally ill to psychiatric care. For us, an analysis of probable causes of this resistance appeared necessary. Interviews have shown that the psychiatric institution is experienced by the Moose of Kadiogo as a stage in the therapeutic itinerary of their mentally ill, a stage in the course of which their demand for care is reduced to the elimination of inconvenient symptoms. For them, the elimination of the cause derives from a knowledge that psychiatry does not possess, which renders the therapeutic relationship frustrating for both parties.

  16. Surgical treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in "Krokodil" drug addicted patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Yuri M; Hakobyan, Koryun A; Poghosyan, Anna Yu; Avetisyan, Eduard K

    2014-12-01

    Retrospective study of jaw osteonecrosis treatment in patients using the "Krokodil" drug from 2009 to 2013. On the territory of the former USSR countries there is widespread use of a self-produced drug called "Krokodil". Codeine containing analgesics ("Sedalgin", "Pentalgin" etc), red phosphorus (from match boxes) and other easily acquired chemical components are used for synthesis of this drug, which used intravenously. Jaw osteonecrosis develops as a complication in patients who use "Krokodil". The main feature of this disease is jawbone exposure in the oral cavity. Surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". 40 "Krokodil" drug addict patients with jaw osteonecrosis were treated. Involvement of maxilla was found in 11 patients (27.5%), mandible in 21 (52.5%), both jaws in 8 (20%) patients. 35 Lesions were found in 29 mandibles and 21 lesions in 19 maxillas. Main factors of treatment success are: cessation of "Krokodil" use in the pre- (minimum 1 month) and postoperative period and osteonecrosis area resection of a minimum of 0.5 cm beyond the visible borders of osteonecrosis towards the healthy tissues. Surgery was not delayed until sequestrum formation. In the mandible marginal or segmental resection (with or without TMJ exarticulation) was performed. After surgery recurrence of disease was seen in 8 (23%) cases in the mandible, with no cases of recurrence in the maxilla. According to our experience in this case series, surgery is the main method for the treatment of jaw osteonecrosis in patients using "Krokodil". Cessation of drug use and jaw resection minimize the rate of recurrences in such patients.

  17. Resource selection of moose (Alces alces cameloides) and their response to human disturbances in the northwestern slope of Lesser Khingan Mountains, northeastern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Su-xian; JIANG Guang-shun; MA Jian-zhang; ZHANG Ming-hai; LIU Hui

    2013-01-01

    Moose (Alces alces cameloides) is typically representative of the fauna of the frigid temperate zone and has been put on the Chinese second priority list of protected animals. The moose of northeast China is on the southern most edge of its distribution in Asia. To study resource selection characteristics of moose and their response to human distur-bances and forest resource variables, the field work was conducted in Heilongjiang Provincial Shengshan Forestry Farm, which is located in the northwestern slope of Lesser Khingan Mountains, northeastern China, from January to March in both 2006 and 2007. A total of 428 plots were examined within the study area. Signs of moose use were found in 19 plots. Based on the analysis of resource selection function, we found that moose selected areas with higher densities of mixed deciduous broadleaf patch and mixed coniferous and broad leaf patch, and a higher NDVI value. Moose avoided settlement 6 km away and remained low probability of occurrence within 3 km from roads, whereas higher within 4 km from trails. Our results suggested that the behavior of avoidance for human disturbance (i.e. settlement and roads) may indirectly pose habitat loss. Therefore, resource selection function models and corresponding graphs of important habitat disturbances can be used to guide and evaluate future development plans.

  18. The Effects of a Self-Adapted, Jaw Repositioning Mouthpiece and Jaw Clenching on Muscle Activity during Vertical Jump and Isometric Clean Pull Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Allen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a self-adapted, jaw repositioning mouthpiece and jaw clenching on muscle activity during the countermovement vertical jump (CMVJ and isometric mid-thigh clean pull (MTCP. Methods:  Thirty-six healthy, recreationally trained males (n=36; age, 23 ± 2.8 years; height, 178.54 ± 9.0 cm; body mass, 83.09 ± 7.8 kg completed maximal CMVJ and MTCP assessments under six experimental conditions:  jaw repositioning mouthpiece plus clenching (MP+C, jaw repositioning mouthpiece with jaw relaxed (MP, traditional mouthguard plus clenching (MG+C, traditional mouthguard with jaw relaxed (MG, no mouthpiece plus clenching (NoMP+C and no mouthpiece with jaw relaxed (NoMP while muscle activity of the dominant leg medial gastrocnemius (G, medial hamstring (H, vastus medialis (VMO, and erector spinae (ES was recorded. Results:  Repeated measures ANOVA revealed no changes in MTCP muscle activation for any mouthpiece or clench condition. Jaw clenching, regardless of mouthpiece condition, significantly improved prime mover muscle activation during CMVJ (p .05. Conclusion:  These findings support jaw clenching as a viable technique to elicit concurrent activation potentiation (CAP of prime mover muscle activity during dynamic but not isometric physical activity. Keywords: jaw repositioning mouthpiece, jaw clenching, concurrent activation potentiation, muscle activation

  19. Fossil jawless fish from China foreshadows early jawed vertebrate anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gai, Zhikun; Donoghue, Philip C J; Zhu, Min; Janvier, Philippe; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-08-17

    Most living vertebrates are jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes), and the living jawless vertebrates (cyclostomes), hagfishes and lampreys, provide scarce information about the profound reorganization of the vertebrate skull during the evolutionary origin of jaws. The extinct bony jawless vertebrates, or 'ostracoderms', are regarded as precursors of jawed vertebrates and provide insight into this formative episode in vertebrate evolution. Here, using synchrotron radiation X-ray tomography, we describe the cranial anatomy of galeaspids, a 435-370-million-year-old 'ostracoderm' group from China and Vietnam. The paired nasal sacs of galeaspids are located anterolaterally in the braincase, and the hypophyseal duct opens anteriorly towards the oral cavity. These three structures (the paired nasal sacs and the hypophyseal duct) were thus already independent of each other, like in gnathostomes and unlike in cyclostomes and osteostracans (another 'ostracoderm' group), and therefore have the condition that current developmental models regard as prerequisites for the development of jaws. This indicates that the reorganization of vertebrate cranial anatomy was not driven deterministically by the evolutionary origin of jaws but occurred stepwise, ultimately allowing the rostral growth of ectomesenchyme that now characterizes gnathostome head development.

  20. The evolutionary origin of jaw yaw in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossnickle, David M

    2017-03-21

    Theria comprises all but three living mammalian genera and is one of the most ecologically pervasive clades on Earth. Yet, the origin and early history of therians and their close relatives (i.e., cladotherians) remains surprisingly enigmatic. A critical biological function that can be compared among early mammal groups is mastication. Morphometrics and modeling analyses of the jaws of Mesozoic mammals indicate that cladotherians evolved musculoskeletal anatomies that increase mechanical advantage during jaw rotation around a dorsoventrally-oriented axis (i.e., yaw) while decreasing the mechanical advantage of jaw rotation around a mediolaterally-oriented axis (i.e., pitch). These changes parallel molar transformations in early cladotherians that indicate their chewing cycles included significant transverse movement, likely produced via yaw rotation. Thus, I hypothesize that cladotherian molar morphologies and musculoskeletal jaw anatomies evolved concurrently with increased yaw rotation of the jaw during chewing cycles. The increased transverse movement resulting from yaw rotation may have been a crucial evolutionary prerequisite for the functionally versatile tribosphenic molar morphology, which underlies the molars of all therians and is retained by many extant clades.

  1. The aesthetic jaw line: management of the aging jowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Edward M; Rohrich, Rod J

    2008-01-01

    The lower third of the face is often an afterthought in aesthetic plastic surgery. Aging across the mandibular border may be described by several mechanisms: fat atrophy and volume loss; shifting of subcutaneous fat compartments; and mandibular septum dehiscence with submandibular fat hypertrophy. Accurate diagnosis of the apparent mechanism of jaw line aging is critical to successful facial rejuvenation. Diagnosis directs the plastic surgeon as to which key anatomic components in this region to manipulate to optimize rejuvenation. The senior author's technique for facial rejuvenation across the mandibular border is described with an algorithm for facial rejuvenation of the jaw line. Several consistent patterns of facial aging are apparent and a theory of their mechanism is suggested: (1) patients with thin skin and minimal jowling resulting from fat atrophy; (2) jowl ptosis with normal skin and loss of submalar hollow and midface fullness, caused by displacement of fat compartments; and (3) cascading confluent fat over the mandible, produced by septum dehiscence. Fat atrophy is treated with fat replacement, either injectable or autologous fat. Jowl ptosis is treated with septum release and superficial musculoaponeurotic system elevation to restore jaw line definition. Confluent fat is treated by septum release, superficial musculoaponeurotic system elevation, and direct excision of fat over the mandible. Application of techniques without proper analysis and definition may lead to an operated look with a swept jaw line. Undertreatment may not achieve jaw line definition.

  2. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in caribou, moose, and wolf scat samples from three areas of the Alberta oil sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Jessica I; Riffell, Jeffrey A; Wasser, Samuel K

    2015-11-01

    Impacts of toxic substances from oil production in the Alberta oil sands (AOS), such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), have been widely debated. Studies have been largely restricted to exposures from surface mining in aquatic species. We measured PAHs in Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou), moose (Alces americanus), and Grey wolf (Canis lupus) across three areas that varied in magnitude of in situ oil production. Our results suggest a distinction of PAH level and source profile (petro/pyrogenic) between study areas and species. Caribou samples indicated pyrogenic sourced PAHs in the study area previously devastated by forest fire. Moose and wolf samples from the high oil production area demonstrated PAH ratios indicative of a petrogenic source and increased PAHs, respectively. These findings emphasize the importance of broadening monitoring and research programs in the AOS.

  3. Jaw-opening accuracy is not affected by masseter muscle vibration in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, B; Häggman-Henrikson, B; Wänman, A; Lindkvist, M; Hellström, F

    2014-11-01

    There is a functional integration between the jaw and neck regions with head extension-flexion movements during jaw-opening/closing tasks. We recently reported that trigeminal nociceptive input by injection of hypertonic saline into the masseter muscle altered this integrated jaw-neck function during jaw-opening/closing tasks. Thus, in jaw-opening to a predefined position, the head-neck component increased during pain. Previous studies have indicated that muscle spindle stimulation by vibration of the masseter muscle may influence jaw movement amplitudes, but the possible effect on the integrated jaw-neck function is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of masseter muscle vibration on jaw-head movements during a continuous jaw-opening/closing task to a target position. Sixteen healthy men performed two trials without vibration (Control) and two trials with bilateral masseter muscle vibration (Vibration). Movements of the mandible and the head were registered with a wireless three-dimensional optoelectronic recording system. Differences in jaw-opening and head movement amplitudes between Control and Vibration, as well as achievement of the predefined jaw-opening target position, were analysed with Wilcoxon's matched pairs test. No significant group effects from vibration were found for jaw or head movement amplitudes, or in the achievement of the target jaw-opening position. A covariation between the jaw and head movement amplitudes was observed. The results imply a high stability for the jaw motor system in a target jaw-opening task and that this task was achieved with the head-neck and jaw working as an integrated system.

  4. Predicting masticatory jaw movements from chin movements using multivariate linear methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Geoffrey E; Lafia, Carmen; Lin, Dennis

    2005-10-01

    Previously, we have used bivariate correlations of maximum and minimum displacement, velocity and acceleration variables to compare masticatory chin and jaw movements (J. Prosthet. Dent. 81 (1999) 179). This previous study represented a first step in exploring the hypothesis that the chin contained useful information regarding jaw kinematics. The current study extends our understanding of the relationship between masticatory chin and jaw movements by: (1) reconstructing and evaluating a more continuous trajectory of chin and jaw movements, and (2) performing multivariate correlations comparing chin and jaw movements at discrete points along the trajectory in order to gain insight into the coupling of chin and jaw movements during a chewing cycle. Results indicated that chin and jaw movement trajectories were visually similar in the lateral, vertical, and anteroposterior axes. The adjusted R(2) results in the lateral, vertical, and anteroposterior dimensions averaged 0.74, 0.78, and 0.89, respectively. Within chewing cycles, the lowest correlations between chin and jaw movements in the lateral and vertical dimensions occurred when the jaw was relatively closed, whereas the lowest correlations between chin and jaw movements in the anteroposterior dimension occurred while the jaw was opening from a closed position. The results indicated that jaw and chin movements were qualitatively similar and that at least 74% of the variation in jaw movements could be accounted for by multivariate linear models of chin movement.

  5. MOOSE: A Multi-Spectral Observatory Of Sensitive EMCCDs for innovative research in space physics and aeronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Hampton, D. L.; Trondsen, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Multi-Spectral Observatory Of Sensitive EMCCDs (MOOSE) consists of 5 imaging systems and is the result of an NSF-funded Major Research Instrumentation project. The main objective of MOOSE is to provide a resource to all members of the scientific community that have interests in imaging low-light-level phenomena, such as aurora, airglow, and meteors. Each imager consists of an Andor DU-888 Electron Multiplying CCD (EMCCD), combined with a telecentric optics section, made by Keo Scientific Ltd., with a selection of available angular fields of view. During the northern hemisphere winter the system is typically based and operated at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska, but any or all imagers can be shipped anywhere in individual stand-alone cases. We will discuss the main components of the MOOSE project, including the imagers, optics, lenses and filters, as well as the Linux-based control software that enables remote operation. We will also discuss the calibration of the imagers along with the initial deployments and testing done. We are requesting community input regarding operational modes, such as filter and field of view combinations, frame rates, and potentially moving some imagers to other locations, either for tomography or for larger spatial coverage. In addition, given the large volume of auroral image data already available, we are encouraging collaborations for which we will freely distribute the data and any analysis tools already developed. Most significantly, initial science highlights relating to aurora, airglow and meteors will be discussed in the context of the creative and innovative ways that the MOOSE observatory can be used in order to address a new realm of science topics, previously unachievable with traditional single imager systems.

  6. Scaling the effects of moose browsing on forage distribution, from the geometry of plant canopies to landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, N. R.; Pastor, J.; Hodgson, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    Landscape heterogeneity influences large herbivores by altering their feeding rates, but as herbivores attempt to maximize feeding rates they also create spatial heterogeneity by altering plant growth. Herbivore feeding rates thus provide a quantitative link between the causes and consequences of spatial heterogeneity in herbivore-dominated ecosystems. The fractal geometry of plant canopies determines both the density and mass of twigs available to foraging herbivores. These properties determine a threshold distance between plants (d*) that distinguishes the mechanisms regulating herbivore intake rates. When d* is greater than the actual distance between plants (d), intake is regulated by the rate of food processing in the mouth. But when d* moose browsing from 2001 to 2005 at Isle Royale National Park, Michigan, USA. For aspen saplings, fractal dimension of bite density, bite mass, and forage biomass responded quadratically to increasing moose browsing and were greatest at -3-4 g-g.m-2.yr"1 consumption. For balsam fir, in contrast, these same measures declined steadily with increasing moose browsing. The different responses of plant canopies to increased browsing altered d* around plants. In summer, d* > d for aspen saplings at all prior consumption levels. Food processing therefore regulated summer moose feeding rates across our landscapes. In winter, changes in bite mass due to past browsing were sufficient to cause d* < d for aspen and balsam fir. Therefore, travel velocity and food processing jointly regulated intake rate during winter. Browsing-induced changes in the small-scale geometry of plant canopies can determine intake rate at larger spatial scales by changing d* relative to d and, hence, which mechanisms determine intake rate, essentially altering how herbivores sense the distribution of their food resources. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  7. The Effects of Moose (Alces alces) Browsing on Boreal Tree Species in Norway and Quebec

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The circumpolar boreal forest is important for recreational purposes, timber harvesting, game meat and as a CO2-storage. Biodiversity is important for maintaining these ecosystem services. Many boreal forests are experiencing an increase in the cervid populations. Densities of moose Alces alces not seen before in modern history have been reported several places. Knowledge about the interactions between this selective browser and the regenerating forest is therefore of importance for both the ...

  8. The Jaw Adductor Resultant and Estimated Bite Force in Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. G. Perry

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We reconstructed the jaw adductor resultant in 34 primate species using new data on muscle physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA and data on skull landmarks. Based on predictions by Greaves, the resultant should (1 cross the jaw at 30% of its length, (2 lie directly posterior to the last molar, and (3 incline more anteriorly in primates that need not resist large anteriorly-directed forces. We found that the resultant lies significantly posterior to its predicted location, is significantly posterior to the last molar, and is significantly more anteriorly inclined in folivores than in frugivores. Perhaps primates emphasize avoiding temporomandibular joint distraction and/or wide gapes at the expense of bite force. Our exploration of trends in the data revealed that estimated bite force varies with body mass (but not diet and is significantly greater in strepsirrhines than in anthropoids. This might be related to greater contribution from the balancing-side jaw adductors in anthropoids.

  9. Reflex control of human jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Kemal S

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss what is known about the reflex control of the human masticatory system and to propose a method for standardized investigation. Literature regarding the current knowledge of activation of jaw muscles, receptors involved in the feedback control, and reflex pathways is discussed. The reflexes are discussed under the headings of the stimulation conditions. This was deliberately done to remind the reader that under each stimulation condition, several receptor systems are activated, and that it is not yet possible to stimulate only one afferent system in isolation in human mastication experiments. To achieve a method for uniform investigation, we need to set a method for stimulation of the afferent pathway under study with minimal simultaneous activation of other receptor systems. This stimulation should also be done in an efficient and reproducible way. To substantiate our conviction to standardize the stimulus type and parameters, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of mechanical and electrical stimuli. For mechanical stimulus to be delivered in a reproducible way, the following precautions are suggested: The stimulus delivery system (often a probe attached to a vibrator) should be brought into secure contact with the area of stimulation. To minimize the slack between the probe, the area to be stimulated should be taken up by the application of pre-load, and the delivered force should be recorded in series. Electrical stimulus has advantages in that it can be delivered in a reproducible way, though its physiological relevance can be questioned. It is also necessary to standardize the method for recording and analyzing the responses of the motoneurons to the stimulation. For that, a new technique is introduced, and its advantages over the currently used methods are discussed. The new method can illustrate the synaptic potential that is induced in the motoneurons without the errors that are unavoidable in the current

  10. Bone and Soft Tissue Changes after Two-Jaw Surgery in Cleft Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Sang Yun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOrthognathic surgery is required in 25% to 35% of patients with a cleft lip and palate, for whom functional recovery and aesthetic improvement after surgery are important. The aim of this study was to examine maxillary and mandibular changes, along with concomitant soft tissue changes, in cleft patients who underwent LeFort I osteotomy and sagittal split ramus osteotomy (two-jaw surgery.MethodsTwenty-eight cleft patients who underwent two-jaw surgery between August 2008 and November 2013 were included. Cephalometric analysis was conducted before and after surgery. Preoperative and postoperative measurements of the bone and soft tissue were compared.ResultsThe mean horizontal advancement of the maxilla (point A was 6.12 mm, while that of the mandible (point B was -5.19 mm. The mean point A-nasion-point B angle was -4.1° before surgery, and increased to 2.5° after surgery. The mean nasolabial angle was 72.7° before surgery, and increased to 88.7° after surgery. The mean minimal distance between Rickett's E-line and the upper lip was 6.52 mm before surgery and 1.81 mm after surgery. The ratio of soft tissue change to bone change was 0.55 between point A and point A' and 0.93 between point B and point B'.ConclusionsPatients with cleft lip and palate who underwent two-jaw surgery showed optimal soft tissue changes. The position of the soft tissue (point A' was shifted by a distance equal to 55% of the change in the maxillary bone. Therefore, bone surgery without soft tissue correction can achieve good aesthetic results.

  11. Bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws: report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jin Woo [College of Dentistry, Gangneung Wonju National University, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    Bisphosphonates are compounds used to treat osteoporosis and malignant bone metastasis. Despite the benefits related to the use of these medications, osteonecrosis of the jaws is a significant complication in a subset of patients receiving these drugs. This complication occurs either spontaneously or after a simple dento-alveolar surgery. Recently there were two patients who showed the features of bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ) in Gangneung Wonju National University Dental Hospital. The patients revealed the clinical and radiological features of classical osteomyelitis. This report presents two cases of BRONJ which were examined by plain radiography and computed tomography.

  12. On The Evolution of Human Jaws and Teeth: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat Yalcin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The jaws and teeth of Homo sapiens have evolved, from the last common ancestor of chimpanzee and men to their current form. Many factors such as the foods eaten and the processing of foods by fire and tools have effected this evolution course. The evolution of the masticatory complex is related to other anatomical features such as brain size and bipedal posture, and leads to important proceedings like the formation of speech and language. In this review, the evolution of human jaws and teeth and its impact on the general course of human evolution is discussed.

  13. Complex patterns of population genetic structure of moose, Alces alces, after recent spatial expansion in Poland revealed by sex-linked markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisłocka, Magdalena; Czajkowska, Magdalena; Duda, Norbert; Danyłow, Jan; Owadowska-Cornil, Edyta; Ratkiewicz, Mirosław

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, human activity directly and indirectly influenced the demography of moose in Poland. The species was close to extinction, and only a few isolated populations survived after the Second World War; then, unprecedented demographic and spatial expansions had occurred, possibly generating a very complex pattern of population genetic structure at the present-day margins of the species range in Poland. Over 370 moose from seven populations were collected from Poland, and partial sequences of the mitochondrial control region (mtDNA-cr; 607 bp) were obtained. In addition, the entire mtDNA cytochrome b gene (1,140 bp) and Y-chromosome markers (1,982 bp in total) were studied in a chosen set of individuals. Twelve mtDNA haplotypes that all belonged to the European moose phylogroup were recorded. They could be divided into two distinct clades: Central Europe and the Ural Mountains. The first clade consists of three distinct groups/branches: Biebrza, Polesie, and Fennoscandia. The Biebrza group has experienced spatial and demographic expansion in the recent past. Average genetic differentiation among moose populations in Poland at mtDNA-cr was great and significant (ΦST = 0.407, p moose that colonized Poland from the east (Lithuania, Belarus, and Ukraine) and the north (former East Prussia). Among all the sequenced Y-chromosome markers, polymorphisms were found in the DBY14 marker in three populations only; four haplotypes were recorded in total. No significant differentiation was detected for this Y-linked marker among moose populations in Poland. Our mtDNA study revealed that a variety of different factors-bottleneck, the presence of relict, autochthonous populations, translocations, limited female dispersal, and the colonization from the east and north-are responsible for the observed complex pattern of population genetic structure after demographic and spatial expansion of moose in Poland.

  14. A previously unidentified Chorioptes species infesting outer ear canals of moose (Alces alces: characterization of the mite and the pathology of infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattsson Roland

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the past decade, Chorioptes mites occupying the outer ear canals have been a common finding at routine necropsies of moose (Alces alces in Sweden, but neither the taxonomy of the mites nor lesions from the infestation have been investigated. In this study, the mites are characterized by morphological and molecular techniques, and the histopathology of the skin of the outer ear canal is described. Methods External auditory meatuses from 53 necropsied moose were examined for the presence of Chorioptes, and samples from outer ear canals were taken for histopathological and microbiological examination. A proportion of the mites from each moose was identified to species. The DNA was extracted from mites from three moose, and their ITS-2 sequences were determined; these sequences were compared phylogenetically to sequences from other Chorioptes taxa. Results Chorioptes mites were found in 43 (81% of the 53 moose. The mites had morphological and genetic characteristics distinct from those of C. texanus and C. bovis, the two species generally accepted within the genus. Morphology also did not argue for a diagnosis as C. crewei, C. mydaus or C. panda. On histopathology, lesions were characterized by a hyperplastic perivascular to interstitial dermatitis with epidermal hyperkeratosis and crust formation. Dermal inflammatory infiltrates were composed of mixed T- and B-lymphocytes, plasma cells and macrophages, whereas eosinophils were notably uncommon. Staphylococcus aureus was grown from the infested epidermis of five of 14 examined moose. Conclusion Chorioptes mite infestation was frequently detected in the outer ear canals of moose in Sweden. The mites were evidently pathogenic, being associated with inflammatory lesions of the external auditory meatus. Our studies indicate infestations with a previously undescribed Chorioptes species.

  15. The relationships among jaw-muscle fiber architecture, jaw morphology, and feeding behavior in extant apes and modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2013-05-01

    The jaw-closing muscles are responsible for generating many of the forces and movements associated with feeding. Muscle physiologic cross-sectional area (PCSA) and fiber length are two architectural parameters that heavily influence muscle function. While there have been numerous comparative studies of hominoid and hominin craniodental and mandibular morphology, little is known about hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture. We present novel data on masseter and temporalis internal muscle architecture for small- and large-bodied hominoids. Hominoid scaling patterns are evaluated and compared with representative New- (Cebus) and Old-World (Macaca) monkeys. Variation in hominoid jaw-muscle fiber architecture is related to both absolute size and allometry. PCSAs scale close to isometry relative to jaw length in anthropoids, but likely with positive allometry in hominoids. Thus, large-bodied apes may be capable of generating both absolutely and relatively greater muscle forces compared with smaller-bodied apes and monkeys. Compared with extant apes, modern humans exhibit a reduction in masseter PCSA relative to condyle-M1 length but retain relatively long fibers, suggesting humans may have sacrificed relative masseter muscle force during chewing without appreciably altering muscle excursion/contraction velocity. Lastly, craniometric estimates of PCSAs underestimate hominoid masseter and temporalis PCSAs by more than 50% in gorillas, and overestimate masseter PCSA by as much as 30% in humans. These findings underscore the difficulty of accurately estimating jaw-muscle fiber architecture from craniometric measures and suggest models of fossil hominin and hominoid bite forces will be improved by incorporating architectural data in estimating jaw-muscle forces.

  16. Lead concentration in meat from lead-killed moose and predicted human exposure using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindboe, M; Henrichsen, E N; Høgåsen, H R; Bernhoft, A

    2012-01-01

    Lead-based hunting ammunitions are still common in most countries. On impact such ammunition releases fragments which are widely distributed within the carcass. In Norway, wild game is an important meat source for segments of the population and 95% of hunters use lead-based bullets. In this paper, we have investigated the lead content of ground meat from moose (Alces alces) intended for human consumption in Norway, and have predicted human exposure through this source. Fifty-two samples from different batches of ground meat from moose killed with lead-based bullets were randomly collected. The lead content was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The lead intake from exposure to moose meat over time, depending on the frequency of intake and portion size, was predicted using Monte Carlo simulation. In 81% of the batches, lead levels were above the limit of quantification of 0.03 mg kg(-1), ranging up to 110 mg kg(-1). The mean lead concentration was 5.6 mg kg(-1), i.e. 56 times the European Commission limit for lead in meat. For consumers eating a moderate meat serving (2 g kg(-1) bw), a single serving would give a lead intake of 11 µg kg(-1) bw on average, with maximum of 220 µg kg(-1) bw. Using Monte Carlo simulation, the median (and 97.5th percentile) predicted weekly intake of lead from moose meat was 12 µg kg(-1) bw (27 µg kg(-1) bw) for one serving per week and 25 µg kg(-1) bw (45 µg kg(-1) bw) for two servings per week. The results indicate that the intake of meat from big game shot with lead-based bullets imposes a significant contribution to the total human lead exposure. The provisional tolerable weekly intake set by the World Health Organization (WHO) of 25 µg kg(-1) bw is likely to be exceeded in people eating moose meat on a regular basis. The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has recently concluded that adverse effects may be present at even lower exposure doses. Hence, even occasional consumption of big game meat with lead levels as

  17. Improved robustness of the LHC collimation system by operating with a jaw-beam angle

    CERN Document Server

    Lari, L; Rossi, A; Cauchi, M; Faus-Golfe, A

    2012-01-01

    The robustness of the Phase I collimation system could be improved playing with the angular orientation of each single jaw. A preliminary study on the asymmetric misalignment of the collimator jaws, scanning through different jaw angles and varying beam sizes and energy, have been carried out, aiming at minimizing the energy deposited on metallic collimators, following an asynchronous dump.

  18. Daily activity of the rabbit jaw muscles during early postnatal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wessel, T.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Brugman, P.; Korfage, J.A.M.; van Eijden, T.M.G.J.

    2006-01-01

    Early postnatal development of the jaw muscles is characterized by the transition from suckling to chewing behavior. As chewing develops the jaw closing muscles become more powerful compared with the jaw openers. These changes are likely to affect the amount of daily muscle activity. Therefore, the

  19. Large carnivores, moose, and humans: A changing paradigm of predator management in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Charles C.; Swenson, J.E.; Miller, Sterling D.

    2003-01-01

    We compare and contrast the evolution of human attitudes toward large carnivores between Europe and North America. In general, persecution of large carnivores began much earlier in Europe than North America. Likewise, conservation programs directed at restoration and recovery appeared in European history well before they did in North America. Together, the pattern suggests there has been an evolution in how humans perceive large predators. Our early ancestors were physically vulnerable to large carnivores and developed corresponding attitudes of respect, avoidance, and acceptance. As civilization evolved and man developed weapons, the balance shifted. Early civilizations, in particular those with pastoral ways, attempted to eliminate large carnivores as threats to life and property. Brown bears (Ursus arctos) and wolves (Canis lupus) were consequently extirpated from much of their range in Europe and in North America south of Canada. Efforts to protect brown bears began in the late 1880s in some European countries and population reintroductions and augmentations are ongoing. They are less controversial than in North America. On the other hand, there are no wolf introductions, as has occurred in North America, and Europeans have a more negative attitude towards wolves. Control of predators to enhance ungulate harvest varies. In Western Europe, landowners own the hunting rights to ungulates. In the formerly communistic Eastern European countries and North America, hunting rights are held in common, although this is changing in some Eastern European countries. Wolf control to increase harvests of moose (Alces alces) occurs in parts of North America and Russia; bear control for similar reasons only occurs in parts of North America. Surprisingly, bears and wolves are not controlled to increase ungulates where private landowners have the hunting rights in Europe, although wolves were originally exterminated from these areas. Both the inability of scientific research to

  20. Central mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the jaws: report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lei; JIANG Xiao-zhong; ZHAO Liang-yu; LIU Yuan; WANG Guo-dong; ZHAO Yun-fu

    2007-01-01

    Central mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the jaws (CMCJ) is an extremely rare neoplasm.The clinical manifestation of CMCJ is nonspecific,which includes swelling,pain,mobile teeth and bleeding,etc.To develop the diagnosis and treatment of CMCJ,this article presents 2 cases of CMCJ treated in our hospital.Their clinical data,treatment and prognosis were analyzed retrospectively.

  1. Osteosarcoma of the jaws. An analytical study of 13 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuyama, T.; Horiuchi, J.; Shibuya, H.; Suzuki, S. (Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Takeda, M.

    1982-03-01

    The clinical features and roentgenographic findings were analyzed in a series of 13 cases of osteosarcoma of the jaws treated at Tokyo Medical and Dental University Hospital during a period of 14 years from 1962 to 1975. In contrast with osteosarcomas located elsewhere, the ages in the present series were distributed from 23 to 59 years, with an average of 35.8 years. There seemed to be no predilection for sex distribution. Some patients had complaints of numbness in lips and odontalgia. Regional lymph node metastasis as well as lung metastasis could not be observed in 12 cases at the first visit to the hospital but metastasis to submandibular lymph node from osteosarcoma of mandible was noted in the remaining case. Three of 13 cases were classified as osteosclerotic, 6 osteolytic and 4 mixed type by roentgenographic findings of the jaws. Four among 13 cases were treated by surgical removal alone and the other 9 cases were treated by a combination of surgery and radiation therapy. Good results were obtained in the cases treated by surgery with or without preoperative irradiation. Two-year, 5-year and 10-year survival rates of all 13 cases were 69%, 69% and 44%, respectively. Local control may provide a reasonable chance of curing patients with osteosarcoma of jaws, since metastasis, especially hematogenous, is much less frequent in the group of jaws than other sites.

  2. Spectral characteristics of speech with fixed jaw displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Nancy P.; Makashay, Matthew J.; Munson, Benjamin

    2004-05-01

    During speech, movements of the mandible and the tongue are interdependent. For some research purposes, the mandible may be constrained to ensure independent tongue motion. To examine specific spectral characteristics of speech with different jaw positions, ten normal adults produced sentences with multiple instances of /t/, /s/, /squflg/, /i/, /ai/, and /squflgi/. Talkers produced stimuli with the jaw free to vary, and while gently biting on 2- and 5-mm bite blocks unilaterally. Spectral moments of /s/ and /squflg/ frication and /t/ bursts differed such that mean spectral energy decreased, and diffuseness and skewness increased with bite blocks. The specific size of the bite block had minimal effect on these results, which were most consistent for /s/. Formant analysis for the vocoids revealed lower F2 frequency in /i/ and at the end of the transition in /ai/ when bite blocks were used; F2 slope for diphthongs was not sensitive to differences in jaw position. Two potential explanations for these results involve the physical presence of the bite blocks in the lateral oral cavity, and the oromotor system's ability to compensate for fixed jaw displacements. [Work supported by NIDCD R03-DC06096.

  3. The Sequential Development of Jaw and Lip Control for Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.; Reilly, Kevin J.

    2010-01-01

    Vertical displacements of the upper lip, lower lip, and jaw during speech were recorded for groups of 1-, 2-, and 6-year-olds and adults to examine if control over these articulators develops sequentially. All movement traces were amplitude- and time-normalized. The developmental course of upper lip, lower lip, and jaw control was examined by quantifying age-related changes in the similarity of each articulator's movement patterns to those produced by adult subjects and by same-age peers. In addition, differences in token-to-token stability of articulatory movement were assessed among the different age groups. The experimental findings revealed that 1- and 2-year-old children's jaw movements were significantly more adult-like than their upper and lower lip movements, which were more variable. In contrast, upper and lower lip movement patterns became more adult-like with maturation. These findings suggest that the earliest stages of speech motor development are constrained by the nonuniform development of articulatory control, with the jaw preceding the lips. The observed developmental patterns suggest that the properties of the oral motor control system significantly influence the pattern of speech sound acquisition. PMID:14748639

  4. Modulation of human exteroceptive jaw reflexes during simulated mastication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; Sowman, P.F.; Türker, K.S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes in synaptic input from lower lip afferents to human jaw muscle motoneurons during simulated mastication. Methods: The lower lip of 14 subjects was stimulated electrically under static and dynamic conditions. In the static condition, subjects bit at mid-open position

  5. Tongue-jaw kinematic correlates of /s/ spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, James S.; Crumb, Richard K.

    2004-05-01

    Frequencies of spectral peaks for fricatives are determined by the size of the resonating cavity anterior to the place of articulatory constriction in the upper vocal tract. For /s/, this cavity size may be altered through anterior-posterior (a-p) movements of the tongue blade forming the constriction, changes of jaw height, and degree of lip protrusion. With respect to intensity, modeling studies suggest that intensity of fricative spectral peaks may be related to degree of articulatory constriction. These spectral-kinematic relationships have been little studied in natural speech. This study used data from the University of Wisconsin X-Ray Microbeam Database to examine the relationship between spectral peaks and movements of the tongue and jaw in the /s/ productions of one normal speaker. Results showed no relationship between a-p tongue position and frequency of spectral peaks. However, a significant inverse correlation related peak between frequency and jaw opening. Thus, for this speaker jaw height appeared a more important determinant of spectral variability for /s/ than tongue position. Additional results showed a significant relationship between peak intensity and distance of the tongue blade from the palate. These natural speech data will be discussed with respect to models and theories of fricative production.

  6. The adaptative response of jaw muscles to varying functional demands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grünheid, T.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Korfage, J.A.M.; Zentner, A.; van Eijden, T.M.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    Jaw muscles are versatile entities that are able to adapt their anatomical characteristics, such as size, cross-sectional area, and fibre properties, to altered functional demands. The dynamic nature of muscle fibres allows them to change their phenotype to optimize the required contractile function

  7. [Assessment of upper jaw extraction versus upper and lower jaw extraction treatment for class II division 1 malocclusion using peer assessment rating index].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tong-Tong; Mi, Yu-Jing

    2006-06-01

    To assess the outcome of orthodontic treatment with upper jaw or upper and lower jaw extraction for Class II division 1 malocclusion using the peer assessment rating (PAR) index. 28 patients with Class II division 1 were extracted two first premolars or second premolars of upper jaw, and 24 patients were extracted four premolars of upper and lower jaw N. The PAR was applied on pre-and post-orthodontic treatment dental casts for the fifty-two cases. The upper and lower jaw extraction groups had significantly higher initial PAR scores and the weighted PAR total scores (P0.05). The upper and lower jaw extraction cases showed more severe dental displacement. Both treatment can acquire successful results.

  8. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls in semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) and wild moose (Alces alces) meat in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suutari, Anniina; Ruokojärvi, Päivi; Hallikainen, Anja; Kiviranta, Hannu; Laaksonen, Sauli

    2009-05-01

    Semi-domesticated reindeer and wild moose meat samples were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Both calves and adults were studied. Individual reindeer and moose meat samples and pooled reindeer calf meat samples were collected from the northern, the middle, and the southern reindeer herding regions in Finland. Samples represented the edible parts of carcasses. In individual samples of reindeer the fat based WHO-PCDD/F-PCB-TEQ concentration was on average 3.2pgg(-1) in calves and 2.3pgg(-1) in adults. In moose calves the fat based WHO-PCDD/F-PCB-TEQ concentration (1.9pgg(-1)) was lower than in reindeer calves. WHO-PCDD/F-PCB-TEQ concentration in the adult moose samples was equal as in the adult reindeer samples. The mean fat based WHO-PCDD/F-PCB-TEQ concentration was highest in reindeer calf samples from the middle region. These samples contained also the highest content of fat. Individual samples of reindeer contained on average more WHO-PCB-TEQ than WHO-PCDD/F-TEQ, while the opposite was true for moose samples, and also samples of adult reindeer from the southern area. The contributions of PCDD/Fs and PCBs to the total TEQ were similar in the reindeer calves' pooled samples which were collected from more western regions than individual samples.

  9. Polymorphisms and variants in the prion protein sequence of European moose (Alces alces), reindeer (Rangifer tarandus), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and fallow deer (Dama dama) in Scandinavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wik, Lotta; Mikko, Sofia; Klingeborn, Mikael; Stéen, Margareta; Simonsson, Magnus; Linné, Tommy

    2012-07-01

    The prion protein (PrP) sequence of European moose, reindeer, roe deer and fallow deer in Scandinavia has high homology to the PrP sequence of North American cervids. Variants in the European moose PrP sequence were found at amino acid position 109 as K or Q. The 109Q variant is unique in the PrP sequence of vertebrates. During the 1980s a wasting syndrome in Swedish moose, Moose Wasting Syndrome (MWS), was described. SNP analysis demonstrated a difference in the observed genotype proportions of the heterozygous Q/K and homozygous Q/Q variants in the MWS animals compared with the healthy animals. In MWS moose the allele frequencies for 109K and 109Q were 0.73 and 0.27, respectively, and for healthy animals 0.69 and 0.31. Both alleles were seen as heterozygotes and homozygotes. In reindeer, PrP sequence variation was demonstrated at codon 176 as D or N and codon 225 as S or Y. The PrP sequences in roe deer and fallow deer were identical with published GenBank sequences.

  10. Population genetic structure of moose (Alces Alces) of South-central Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert E.; McDonough, John T.; Barboza, Perry S.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Farley, Sean D.

    2015-01-01

    The location of a population can influence its genetic structure and diversity by impacting the degree of isolation and connectivity to other populations. Populations at range margins areoften thought to have less genetic variation and increased genetic structure, and a reduction in genetic diversity can have negative impacts on the health of a population. We explored the genetic diversity and connectivity between 3 peripheral populations of moose (Alces alces) with differing potential for connectivity to other areas within interior Alaska. Populations on the Kenai Peninsula and from the Anchorage region were found to be significantly differentiated (FST= 0.071, P < 0.0001) with lower levels of genetic diversity observed within the Kenai population. Bayesian analyses employing assignment methodologies uncovered little evidence of contemporary gene flow between Anchorage and Kenai, suggesting regional isolation. Although gene flow outside the peninsula is restricted, high levels of gene flow were detected within the Kenai that is explained by male-biased dispersal. Furthermore, gene flow estimates differed across time scales on the Kenai Peninsula which may have been influenced by demographic fluctuations correlated, at least in part, with habitat change.

  11. The adaptive response of jaw muscles to varying functional demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünheid, Thorsten; Langenbach, Geerling E J; Korfage, Joannes A M; Zentner, Andrej; van Eijden, Theo M G J

    2009-12-01

    Jaw muscles are versatile entities that are able to adapt their anatomical characteristics, such as size, cross-sectional area, and fibre properties, to altered functional demands. The dynamic nature of muscle fibres allows them to change their phenotype to optimize the required contractile function while minimizing energy use. Changes in these anatomical parameters are associated with changes in neuromuscular activity as the pattern of muscle activation by the central nervous system plays an important role in the modulation of muscle properties. This review summarizes the adaptive response of jaw muscles to various stimuli or perturbations in the orofacial system and addresses general changes in muscles as they adapt, specific adaptive changes in jaw muscles under various physiologic and pathologic conditions, and their adaptive response to non-surgical and surgical therapeutic interventions. Although the jaw muscles are used concertedly in the masticatory system, their adaptive changes are not always uniform and vary with the nature, intensity, and duration of the stimulus. In general, stretch, increases neuromuscular activity, and resistance training result in hypertrophy, elicits increases in mitochondrial content and cross-sectional area of the fibres, and may change the fibre-type composition of the muscle towards a larger percentage of slow-type fibres. In contrast, changes in the opposite direction occur when neuromuscular activity is reduced, the muscle is immobilized in a shortened position, or paralysed. The broad range of stimuli that affect the properties of jaw muscles might help explain the large variability in the anatomical and physiological characteristics found among individuals, muscles, and muscle portions.

  12. Jaw-muscle fiber architecture in tufted capuchins favors generating relatively large muscle forces without compromising jaw gape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrea B; Vinyard, Christopher J

    2009-12-01

    Tufted capuchins (sensu lato) are renowned for their dietary flexibility and capacity to exploit hard and tough objects. Cebus apella differs from other capuchins in displaying a suite of craniodental features that have been functionally and adaptively linked to their feeding behavior, particularly the generation and dissipation of relatively large jaw forces. We compared fiber architecture of the masseter and temporalis muscles between C. apella (n=12) and two "untufted" capuchins (C. capucinus, n=3; C. albifrons, n=5). These three species share broadly similar diets, but tufted capuchins occasionally exploit mechanically challenging tissues. We tested the hypothesis that tufted capuchins exhibit architectural properties of their jaw muscles that facilitate relatively large forces including relatively greater physiologic cross-sectional areas (PCSA), more pinnate fibers, and lower ratios of mass to tetanic tension (Mass/P(0)). Results show some evidence supporting these predictions, as C. apella has relatively greater superficial masseter and temporalis PCSAs, significantly so only for the temporalis following Bonferroni adjustment. Capuchins did not differ in pinnation angle or Mass/P(0). As an architectural trade-off between maximizing muscle force and muscle excursion/contraction velocity, we also tested the hypothesis that C. apella exhibits relatively shorter muscle fibers. Contrary to our prediction, there are no significant differences in relative fiber lengths between tufted and untufted capuchins. Therefore, we attribute the relatively greater PCSAs in tufted capuchins primarily to their larger muscle masses. These findings suggest that relatively large jaw-muscle PCSAs can be added to the suite of masticatory features that have been functionally linked to the exploitation of a more resistant diet by C. apella. By enlarging jaw-muscle mass to increase PCSA, rather than reducing fiber lengths and increasing pinnation, tufted capuchins appear to have

  13. Imaging in Patients with Bisphosphonate-Associated Osteonecrosis of the Jaws (MRONJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britt-Isabelle Berg

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ/BP-ONJ/BRONJ is a commonly seen disease. During recent decades, major advances in diagnostics have occurred. Once the clinical picture shows typical MRONJ features, imaging is necessary to determine the size of the lesion. Exposed bone is not always painful, therefore a thorough clinical examination and radiological imaging are essential when MRONJ is suspected. Methods: In this paper we will present the latest clinical update on the imaging options in regard to MRONJ: X-ray/Panoramic Radiograph, Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT and Computed Tomography (CT, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Nuclear Imaging, Fluorescence-Guided Bone Resection. Conclusion: Which image modality is chosen depends not only on the surgeon’s/practitioner’s preference but also on the available imaging modalities. A three-dimensional imaging modality is desirable, and in severe cases necessary, for extended resections and planning of reconstruction.

  14. Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi in Ixodes ricinus ticks collected from moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in southern Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjelland, Vivian; Ytrehus, Bjørnar; Stuen, Snorre; Skarpaas, Tone; Slettan, Audun

    2011-06-01

    As part of a larger survey, ears from 18 roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) and 52 moose (Alces alces) shot in the 2 southernmost counties in Norway were collected and examined for Ixodes ricinus ticks. Seventy-two adult ticks, 595 nymphs, and 267 larvae from the roe deer, and 182 adult ticks, 433 nymphs, and 70 larvae from the moose were investigated for infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (s.l.). The results showed the presence of B. burgdorferi s.l. DNA in 2.9% of the nymphs collected from roe deer and in 4.4% of the nymphs and 6.0% of the adults collected from moose. The spirochetes were not detected in adult ticks from roe deer, or in larvae feeding on roe deer or moose. In comparison, the mean infection prevalences in questing I. ricinus collected from the same geographical area were 0.5% infection in larvae, 24.5% in nymphs, and 26.9% in adults. The most prevalent B. burgdorferi genospecies identified in ticks collected from roe deer was B. afzelii (76.5%), followed by B. garinii (17.6%), and B. burgdorferi sensu stricto (5.9%). Only B. afzelii (76.7%) and B. garinii (23.3%) were detected in ticks collected from moose. The present study indicates a lower prevalence of B. burgdorferi infection in I. ricinus ticks feeding on roe deer and moose compared to questing ticks. This is the first study to report B. burgdorferi s.l. prevalence in ticks removed from cervids in Norway.

  15. Physical characteristics of rumen contents in four large ruminants of different feeding type, the addax (Addax nasomaculatus), bison (Bison bison), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and moose (Alces alces).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, Marcus; Fritz, Julia; Bayer, Dorothee; Nygren, Kaarlo; Hammer, Sven; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Südekum, Karl-Heinz; Hummel, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    Based on morphological and physiological observations, it has been suggested that differences exist in the degree that reticuloruminal (RR) contents are stratified between various ruminant species. However, the occurrence of stratification has hardly been measured in non-domestic species. Forestomach contents of free-ranging moose (n=22) and red deer (24) shot during regular hunting procedures, and of captive (but 100% forage fed) addax (6) and bison (10) culled for commercial or management purposes were investigated. There was no difference between the species in the degree by which RR ingesta separated according to size due to buoyancy characteristics in vitro. However, RR fluid of moose was more viscous than that of the other species, and no difference in moisture content was evident between the dorsal and the ventral rumen in moose, in contrast to the other species. Hence, the RR milieu in moose appears less favourable for gas or particle separation due to buoyancy characteristics. These findings are in accord with notable differences in RR papillation between the species. In moose, particle separation is most likely restricted to the reticulum, whereas in the other species, the whole rumen may pre-sort particles in varying degrees; a possible explanation for this pattern is a hypothetically lesser saliva production and fluid throughput in moose. The results suggest that differences in RR physiology may occur across ruminant species. The RR sorting mechanism should be considered a dynamic process that is better measured by its result--the significantly smaller particle size in the distal digestive tract when compared to the RR--than by regional differences in particle size within the RR.

  16. The Redox Balance in Erythrocytes, Plasma, and Periosteum of Patients with Titanium Fixation of the Jaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Borys

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium miniplates and screws are commonly used for fixation of jaw fractured or osteotomies. Despite the opinion of their biocompatibility, in clinical practice symptoms of chronic inflammation around the fixation develop in some patients, even many years after the application of miniplates and screws. The cause of these complications is still an unanswered question. Taking into account that oxidative stress is one of the toxic action of titanium, we have evaluated the antioxidant barrier as well as oxidative stress in the erythrocytes, plasma and periosteum covering the titanium fixation of the jaw. The study group was composed of 32 patients aged 20–30 with inserted miniplates and screws. The antioxidant defense: catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1, uric acid (UA, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, as well as oxidative damage products: advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, advanced glycation end products (AGE, dityrosine, kynurenine, N-formylkynurenine, tryptophan, malondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, total oxidant status (TOS, and oxidative status index (OSI were evaluated. SOD1 activity (↓37%, and tryptophan levels (↓34% showed a significant decrease while AOPP (↑25%, TOS (↑80% and OSI (↑101% were significantly elevated in maxillary periosteum of patients who underwent bimaxillary osteotomies as compared to the control group. SOD-1 (↓55%, TAC (↓58.6%, AGE (↓60% and N-formylkynurenine (↓34% was statistically reduced while AOPP (↑38%, MDA (↑29%, 4-HNE (↑114%, TOS (↑99%, and OSI (↑381% were significantly higher in the mandibular periosteum covering miniplates/screw compared with the control tissues. There were no correlations between antioxidants and oxidative stress markers in the periosteum of all patients and the blood. As exposure to the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy leads to disturbances of redox balance in the periosteum surrounding titanium implants of the maxilla

  17. Effect of head and jaw position on respiratory-related motion of the genioglossus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingshu; Brown, Elizabeth C; Hatt, Alice; Cheng, Shaokoon; Bilston, Lynne E

    2016-04-01

    Head and jaw position influence upper airway patency and electromyographic (EMG) activity of the main upper airway dilator muscle, the genioglossus. However, it is not known whether changes in genioglossus EMG activity translate into altered muscle movement during respiration. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of head and jaw position on dilatory motion of the genioglossus in healthy adult men during quiet breathing by measuring the displacement of the posterior tongue in six positions--neutral, head extension, head rotation, head flexion, mouth opening, and mandibular advancement. Respiratory-related motion of the genioglossus was imaged with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM) in 12 awake male participants. Tissue displacement was quantified with harmonic phase (HARP) analysis. The genioglossus moved anteriorly beginning immediately before or during inspiration, and there was greater movement in the oropharynx than in the velopharynx in all positions. Anterior displacements of the oropharyngeal tongue varied between neutral head position (0.81 ± 0.41 mm), head flexion (0.62 ± 0.45 mm), extension (0.39 ± 0.19 mm), axial rotation (0.39 ± 0.2 mm), mouth open (1.24 ± 0.72 mm), and mandibular advancement (1.08 ± 0.65 mm). Anteroposterior displacement increased in the mouth-open position and decreased in the rotated position relative to cross-sectional area (CSA) (P = 0.002 and 0.02, respectively), but CSA did not independently predict anteroposterior movement overall (P = 0.057). The findings of this study suggest that head position influences airway dilation during inspiration and may contribute to variation in airway patency in different head positions. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Spatio-temporal dynamics in the response of woodland caribou and moose to the passage of grey wolf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latombe, Guillaume; Fortin, Daniel; Parrott, Lael

    2014-01-01

    Predators impact prey populations not only by consuming individuals, but also by altering their behaviours. These nonlethal effects can influence food web properties as much as lethal effects. The mechanisms of nonlethal effects include chronic and temporary anti-predator behaviours, the nature of which depends on the spatial dynamics of predators and the range over which prey perceive risk. The relation between chronic and ephemeral responses to risk determines predator-prey interactions, with consequences that can ripple across the food web. Nonetheless, few studies have quantified the spatio-temporal scales over which prey respond to predation threat, and how this response varies with habitat features. We evaluated the reaction of radio-collared caribou and moose to the passage of radio-collared wolves, by considering changes in movement characteristics during winter and summer. We used an optimization algorithm to identify the rate at which the impact of prior passage of wolves decreases over time and with the predator's distance. The spatial and temporal scales of anti-predator responses varied with prey species and season. Caribou and moose displayed four types of behaviour following the passage of wolves: lack of response, increased selection of safe land cover types, decreased selection of risky cover types and increased selection of food-rich forest stands. For example, moose increased their avoidance of open conifer stands with lichen in summer, which are selected by wolves in this season. Also in winter, caribou increased their selection of conifer stands with lichen for nearly 10 days following a wolf's passage. This stronger selection for food-rich patches could indicate that the recent passage of wolves informs caribou on the current predator distribution and reveals the rate at which this information become less reliable over time. Caribou and moose used anti-predator responses that combine both long- and short-term behavioural adjustments. The

  19. Multiple Compond Odontomas in the Jaws: A Rare Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjar, Pavan Kumar; Sahni, Priya; Pereira, Treville; Zingade, Jyoti

    2015-12-01

    Odontomas are tumours of odontogenic origin. In these tumours both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells undergo differentiation to form enamel and dentin with variable amounts of cementum and pulp tissue. The odontomas represent a hamartoma rather than a neoplasm. When the enamel and dentin are laid down in an organized manner it is termed as a compound odontoma wherein the tumour forms a collection of small structures resembling teeth. On the other hand, an irregular mass with no similarity to teeth is termed as a complex odontoma. There are cases of extensive and multiple compound odontomas which have been identified in either of the jaws. The present case is rare with multiple compound odontomas involving both the jaws of 45-year-old male patient. A review of seven such cases reported so far has been presented.

  20. Effect of Repeated Food Morsel Splitting on Jaw Muscle Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A, Kumar; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Mastication is a complex motor task often initiated by splitting of the food morsel between the anterior teeth. Training of complex motor tasks has consistently been shown to trigger neuroplastic changes in corticomotor control and optimization of muscle function. It is not known if training...... and repeated food morsel splitting lead to changes in jaw muscle function. Objective: To investigate if repeated splitting of food morsels in participants with natural dentition changes the force and jaw muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity. Methods: Twenty healthy volunteers (mean age = 26.2 ± 3.9 years......) participated in a single one-hour session divided into six series. Each series consisted of ten trials of a standardized behavioral task (total of 60 trials). The behavioral task was to hold and split a food morsel (8 mm, 180 mg placebo tablet) placed on a bite force transducer with the anterior teeth...

  1. Neural crest patterning and the evolution of the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, C B; Miller, C T; Keynes, R J

    2001-01-01

    Here we present ideas connecting the behaviour of the cranial neural crest during development with the venerable, perhaps incorrect, view that gill-supporting cartilages of an ancient agnathan evolved into the skeleton of an early gnathostome's jaw. We discuss the pattern of migration of the cranial neural crest ectomesenchyme in zebrafish, along with the subsequent arrangement of postmigratory crest and head mesoderm in the nascent pharyngeal segments (branchiomeres), in diverse gnathostomes and in lampreys. These characteristics provide for a plausible von Baerian explanation for the problematic inside-outside change in topology of the gills and their supports between these 2 major groups of vertebrates. We consider it likely that the jaw supports did indeed arise from branchiomeric cartilages.

  2. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalini Kapoor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are potent inhibitors of osteoclast activity that reduce bone turnover and re-establish the balance between bone resorption and formation. They are effective in multiple clinical settings including postmenopausal osteoporosis, low bone mass in men, and drug-induced bone loss. Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of jaws (BRONJ may result in serious oral complications, such as osteomyelitis and chronic exposure of necrotic bone. Dentists must be familiar with this disorder and pay special attention to all patients on bisphosphonate therapy due to their defective osteoclast function and reduced osseous tissue vascularity, leading to impaired wound healing and progressive necrosis of jaw bones. The purpose of this article is to review the history and pathogenesis of BRONJ, provide guidance to dentists on possible measures to prevent and manage patients with BRONJ.

  3. Reduction of jaw opening (trismus) in giant cell arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir-Paz, R; Gross, A; Chajek-Shaul, T

    2002-01-01

    Methods: the prevalence of such symptoms in patients with GCA was evaluated by performing a retrospective analysis of all patients with GCA and polymyalgia rheumatica who were diagnosed during admission to Hadassah University Hospital. Ten patients reported previously in the literature were also evaluated. Results: Six patients out of 88 (6.8%) had complaints of reduction in jaw opening. These six patients seemed to have a much more abrupt onset of disease with shorter duration until diagnosis, higher prevalence of eye involvement (50% v 27%), and a higher rate of positive pathology (100%). Conclusions: Reduction in jaw opening in the appropriate setting may indicate the presence of GCA. This sign should not be overlooked in the presence of the claudication sign as it seems to reflect more severe GCA disease. PMID:12176811

  4. Multiple Compond Odontomas in the Jaws: A Rare Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahni, Priya; Pereira, Treville; Zingade, Jyoti

    2015-01-01

    Odontomas are tumours of odontogenic origin. In these tumours both the epithelial and mesenchymal cells undergo differentiation to form enamel and dentin with variable amounts of cementum and pulp tissue. The odontomas represent a hamartoma rather than a neoplasm. When the enamel and dentin are laid down in an organized manner it is termed as a compound odontoma wherein the tumour forms a collection of small structures resembling teeth. On the other hand, an irregular mass with no similarity to teeth is termed as a complex odontoma. There are cases of extensive and multiple compound odontomas which have been identified in either of the jaws. The present case is rare with multiple compound odontomas involving both the jaws of 45-year-old male patient. A review of seven such cases reported so far has been presented. PMID:26816995

  5. BISPHOSPHONATE-RELATED OSTEONECROSIS OF THE JAW AND DENTAL IMPLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Hassan A. Qamheya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonate (BP is one of the possible riskfactors in the osteonecrosis of the jaw (ON J. Surgical interventions during or after the course of treatment by using BPs may expose the patient under this risk. Animal studies, human studies, case reports, and systematic reviews are used to show the relationship between the use of bisphosphonates and dental implants. In this review data about bisphosphonaterelated osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRON J: incidence, prevention and treatment modalities for the patients who are scheduled for dental implant treatment plan and who have been already treated by dental implants will be investigated. Various views for the relationship between dental implants and bisphosphonates will be analyzed depending on the multifactors: duration, route of uptake, dosage of the drug and patient’s other medications that affect the effects of bisphosphonate. All patients treated with this drug must be informed about the risk of implant loss or possibility of osteonecrosis.

  6. Clinico-radiological study of cyst of the jaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tae Won [Department of Oral Radiology, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-11-15

    The author analyzed 243 cases clinically and radiographically which were diagnosed as odontogenic cyst in SNUH during 10 years (1974. 1-1983. 12). The obtained results were as follows: 1. This cyst occurred more frequently in male than in female and the incidence was the highest in the 3rd decade. 2. Maxilla was more frequently affected than mandible. 3. Most of the odontogenic cysts were unilocular type (236 cases, 97.1%), showing distinct border (242 cases, 99.6%) with smooth margin (222 cases, 91.7%). 4. The adjacent teeth showed root resorption in 57 cases (23.5%), and root divergence in 52 cases (21.4%) 5. The cyst in lower jaw caused the displacement of the mandibular canal wall in 30 cases (31.2%). 6. The cyst in upper jaw extended to the maxillary sinus in 61 cases (41.5%).

  7. Multiple jaw cysts not associated with basal cell nevus syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Suk Ja; Kang, Byung Cheol [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-15

    We present two cases of multiple jaw cysts not associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Case 1 : a nine year-old boy visited CNU Hospital for orthodontic treatment and his radiographs showed cystic lesions surrounding the crowns of teeth 13 and 17 respectively, which were diagnosed as dentigerous cysts. Subsequently, two more cysts were found on his follow-up radiographs in 12 and 15 months. The two cysts were determined to be odontogenic keratocysts. The boy had no skeletal abnormalities and no skin lesions associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Case 2: a fifty-eight year old man had three impacted third molars with pericoronal radiolucencies, which were diagnosed as dentigerous cysts. He had no additional abnormalities associated with basal cell nevus syndrome. Multiple jaw cysts can occur at any age, and periodic radiographic surveillance may be needed for any cases of impacted tooth.

  8. Intracystic negative pressure may promote bone formation around jaw cysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yi; HAN Qi-bing; LIU Bing

    2011-01-01

    The growth and enlargement of jaw cysts are associated with raised intracystic pressure and bone resorption surrounding the cysts. The major bone-resorbing cells are the osteoclasts. They are acting under the influence of local bone-resorbing factors: prostaglandins, proteinases and cytokines. It was found that positive pressure enhanced the expression of IL-1αmRNA and protein in epithelial cells of odontogenic keratocyst, and increased the secretion of matrix metalloproteinase and PGE in a co-culture of odontogenic keratocyst fibroblasts and epithelial cells. However, the signal intensities for IL-1α mRNA and protein in the epithelium were significantly decreased after marsupialization which relived intracystic pressure. Experimental study indicated that intermittent negative pressure could promote osteogenesis in human bone marrow-derived stroma cells (BMSCs) in vitro. We propose a hypothesis that bone formation around the cyst of the jaws would be stimulated by intracystic negative pressure.

  9. Mosses as indicators of polluted ecosystems; Moose als Indikatoren oekosystemarer Schadstoffbelastungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruns, I.; Sutter, K.; Krauss, G.J. [Halle Univ. (Germany). Fachbereich Biochemie/Biotechnologie; Friese, K. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Magdeburg (Germany). Sektion Gewaesserforschung; Schumann, H. [Landesamt fuer Umweltschutz Sachsen-Anhalt, Halle (Germany). Abt. Umweltplanung/Umweltanalytik; Jung, K. [UFZ - Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Sektion Chemische Oekotoxikologie

    2000-07-01

    Heavy metal accumulation in terrestrial mosses collected in Sachsen-Anhalt and the response of the mosses were investigated. The studies were supplemented by laboratory experiments with the water moss Fontinalis antipyretica. The parameters investigated were the changes in the concentration of thiol compounds and in {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotope ratios. The studies were the first ever to investigate whether this specific stress response is an indication of heavy metal pollution in the sense of biomonitoring. It was found that the biochemical reaction in mosses differs significantly from the heavy metal stress response of higher plants. Further biochemical and molecular biological investigations will be required for a more detailed picture. The stress response of thiol peptide is unsuitable for bioindication while the isotope ratio is promising for indicating nitrogen pollution. [German] Im Projekt wurden Untersuchungen zur Akkumulation von Schwermetallen in Moosen sowie die physiologisch-biochemischen Reaktion dieser Pflanzen auf die Umweltbelastung durchgefuehrt. Objekte fuer Freiland-Untersuchungen waren terrestrische Moose (vorwiegend Scleropodium purum), die an verschiedenen Standorten Sachsen-Anhalts gesammelt wurden. Die Studien wurden durch Laborversuche ergaenzt, wobei insbesondere das Wassermoos Fontinalis antipyretica als Modellorganismus fuer Experimente zur biochemischen Schwermetallstressantwort diente. Die Untersuchungen am Moos-Objekt waren auf Veraenderungen im Gehalt thiolhaltiger Verbindungen und auf die Bestimmung von {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N-Isotopenverhaeltnissen beschraenkt. Das Anliegen war, Aussagen darueber zu erhalten, ob diese spezielle Stressantwort Rueckschluesse auf die Schwermetallbelastung dieser Pflanzen im Sinne eines Biomonitoring ermoeglichen koennte. Die vorgelegten Studien sind die ersten, die in diesem Umfang durchgefuehrt wurden. Wir konnten zeigen, dass die biochemische Reaktion von Moosen auf Schwermetallstress von der hoeherer

  10. Electrophysiological analysis of rhythmic jaw movements in the freely moving mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masayuki; Masuda, Yuji; Fujimoto, Yoshiyuki; Matsuya, Tokuzo; Yamamura, Kensuke; Yamada, Yoshiaki; Maeda, Norihiko; Morimoto, Toshifumi

    2002-03-01

    Although rhythmic jaw movement in feeding has been studied in mammals, such as rats, rabbits and monkeys, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying it are not well understood. Transgenic and gene-targeting technologies enable direct control of the genetic makeup of the mouse, and have led to the development of a new category of reagents that have the potential to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of neural networks. The present study attempts to characterize rhythmic jaw movements in the mouse and to demonstrate its relevance to rhythmic jaw movements found in higher mammals using newly developed jaw-tracking systems and electromyograms of the masticatory muscles. The masticatory sequence of the mouse during feeding was classified into two stages, incision and chewing. Small and rapid (8 Hz) open-close jaw movements were observed during incision, while large and slow (5 Hz) open-close jaw movements were observed during chewing. Integrated electromyograms of the masseteric and digastric muscles were larger during chewing than those observed during incision. Licking behavior was associated with regular (8 Hz), small open-close jaw movements with smaller masseteric activity than those observed during mastication. Grooming showed variable patterns of jaw movement and electromyograms depending on the grooming site. These results suggest that there are neuronal mechanisms producing different frequencies of rhythmic jaw movements in the mouse, and we conclude that the mouse is useful for understanding rhythmic jaw movements in higher mammals.

  11. An Endocrine Jaw Lesion: Dentist Perspective in Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapala, Lavanya; Babburi, Suresh; Venigalla, Aparna; Pinisetti, Soujanya; Ganipineni, Kiranmai

    2016-01-01

    Brown tumor is a rare nonneoplastic focal giant cell lesion that occurs in hyperparathyroidism patients with a prevalence rate of 0.1% in jaws. We report an extremely rare case of brown tumor in mandible of a 40-year-old female patient that presented as the first clinical manifestation of hyperparathyroidism. Dentist played a pivotal role in the present case by the early diagnosis of lesion and its intervention. PMID:27974979

  12. Clinicopathological study of jaw cysts in southeast region of Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirkol, Mehmet; Ege, Bilal; Yanik, Saim; Aras, M Hamdi; Ay, Sinan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze clinic and radiologic features and the prevalence of jaw cysts in southeast region of Turkey. This study was carried out in 149 cysts of the jaw diagnosed among 407 individuals who were taken biopsy in our department from October 2008 to December 2012. All cysts were treated by enucleation, marsupialization, or combination, and all cases were histologically examined. One-hundred-and-forty-eight cases were classified odontogenic, one was non-odontogenic. There were 89 cysts (59.7%) in men, 60 (40.3%) in women. The mean age was 32.72 years. We found 80 cysts (35 F, 45 M) in the maxillary and 69 (28 F, 41 M) in mandible. It is observed that 94 were radicular cysts (63%), 40 were dentigerous cysts (26.9%), 9 were odontogenic keratocysts (OKC) (6.1%), 5 were residual radicular cysts (3.4%), and 1 was nasopalatine cyst (0.6%). In radicular cysts, 56 of them (59.5%) were located in the anterior region of the jaws; 18 dentigerous cysts and 2 OKCs were found in the posterior region of mandible. Clinically, the chief complaint of patients was expansion and pain. Radiographically, scalloping of the lesion between the teeth was found in 1 case, root resorption was seen in 3 cases, and displacement of the teeth and follicles was observed in 16 cases. We found similar prevalence of jaw cysts that reported in the literature, in which most odontogenic cysts (OCs) were inflammatory origin.

  13. An Electromyographic Study of Jaw and Tongue Reflexes in Frogs

    OpenAIRE

    熊井, 敏文; 野村, 浩道

    1983-01-01

    Electromyographic activities of jaw and tongue muscles produced reflexly by mechanical and chemical stimulation of various loci of orofacial region were studied in the frog, Rana nigromaculata. Temporal muscle activity occurred when mechanical stimuli were applied to the palatal ridge, lower lip, root of tongue and pharynx. Electromyograms of the masseter muscle were similar to that of the temporal muscle, but the masseter muscle activity was occurred ipsilaterally and was not occurred by the...

  14. Sella size and jaw bases - Is there a correlation???

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sella turcica is an important cephalometric structure and attempts have been made in the past to correlate its dimensions to the malocclusion. However, no study has so far compared the size of sella to the jaw bases that determine the type of malocclusion. The present study was undertaken to find out any such correlation if it exists. Materials and Methods: Lateral cephalograms of 110 adults consisting of 40 Class I, 40 Class II, and 30 Class III patients were assessed for the measurement of sella length, width, height, and area. The maxillary length, mandibular ramus height, and body length were also measured. The sella dimensions were compared among three malocclusion types by one-way ANOVA. Pearson correlation was calculated between the jaw size and sella dimensions. Furthermore, the ratio of jaw base lengths and sella area were calculated. Results and Conclusion: Mean sella length, width and area were found to be greatest in Class III, followed by Class I and least in Class II though the results were not statistically significant. 3 out of 4 measured dimensions of sella, correlated significantly with mandibular ramus and body length each. However, only one dimension of sella showed significant correlation with maxilla. The mandibular ramus and body length show a nearly constant ratio to sella area (0.83–0.85, 0.64–0.65, respectively in all the three malocclusions. Thus, mandible has a definite and better correlation to the size of sella turcica.

  15. Midsagittal jaw movements as a sleep/wake marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senny, Frédéric; Destiné, Jacques; Poirrier, Robert

    2009-02-01

    The seriousness of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome is measured by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), the number of sleep apneas and hypopneas over the total sleep time (TST). Cardiorespiratory signals are used to detect respiratory events while the TST is usually assessed by the analysis of electroencephalogram traces in polysomnography (PSG) or wrist actigraphy trace in portable monitoring. This paper presents a sleep/wake automatic detector that relies on a wavelet-based complexity measure of the midsagittal jaw movement signal and multilayer perceptrons. In all, 63 recordings were used to train and test the method, while 38 recordings constituted an independent evaluation set for which the sensitivity, the specificity, and the global agreement of sleep recognition, respectively, reached 85.1%, 76.4%, and 82.9%, compared with the PSG data. The AHI computed automatically and only from the jaw movement analysis was significantly improved (p < 0.0001) when considering this sleep/wake detector. Moreover, a sensitivity of 88.6% and a specificity of 83.6% were found for the diagnosis of the sleep apnea syndrome according to a threshold of 15. Thus, the jaw movement signal is reasonably accurate in separating sleep from wake, and, in addition to its ability to score respiratory events, is a valuable signal for portable monitoring.

  16. Osteosarcoma of the jaws: demographic and CT imaging features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Shi, H; Yu, Q

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the patient demographic and CT imaging findings of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. Methods 88 primary osteosarcomas of the jaws histopathologically diagnosed during 1997–2007 were reviewed. 21 cases of CT images were reviewed. Results Of 88 patients, 51 (58%) had tumours in the mandible and 37 (42%) in the maxilla. The mean age was 37.8 years (range 9–80 years). The male-to-female ratio was 1.32:1. The mean age of patients with mandibular lesions was 41.04 years and in those with maxillary lesions it was 33.3 years. CT imaging findings were available in 21 patients. In the maxilla (n = 9), all tumours (100%) arose from the alveolar ridge. In the mandible (n = 12), most tumours (9 cases, 75%), arose from the ramus and/or condyle. All except two lesions had the epicentrum within the medullary cavity of the involved bone. The presence of periosteal reaction was demonstrated in 13 cases (62%). Soft-tissue extension was present in 18 lesions (86%), with calcification identified in 13 (72%). Conclusions This study provides age, sex distribution, location and CT imaging features of primary osteosarcoma of the jaws. PMID:22074870

  17. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motazavi, Hamed; Bharvand, Maryam [Dept. of Oral Medicine, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as 'jaw lesion', 'jaw disease', 'impacted tooth', and 'unerupted tooth'. More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs.

  18. The feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in edentulous jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, Anders; Smeets, Ralf; Wahidi, Aria; Kluwe, Lan; Kornmann, Frank; Heiland, Max; Gerlach, Till

    2016-08-01

    Immediate loading of dental implants has been proved to be feasible in partially edentulous jaws. The purpose of this retrospective investigation was to assess the feasibility of immediately loading dental implants in fully edentulous jaws. A total of 24 patients aged between 53 and 89 years received a total of 154 implants in their edentulous maxillae or mandibles. Among the implants, 45 were set in fresh extracted sockets and 109 in consolidated alveolar bones. The implants were provisionally managed with chair-side made provisional resin bridges and exposed to immediate loading. Implants were followed up for 1-8 years, including radiographic imaging. Marginal bone levels were evaluated based on radiographic imaging. A total of 148 out of the 154 implants survived over the follow-up period of 1 to 8 years, giving a survival rate of 96%. The time or region of the implantation, the pre-implant augmentation, and the length and diameter of the implants had no statistically significant influence on the survival or the success rate. The marginal bone level remained stable with only minimal loss of 0.3 mm after 60 months of loading. Within the limitations of this study, immediate loading is feasible for dental implants in edentulous jaws.

  19. Contingent negative variation elicited before jaw and tongue movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Iizuka, T

    2005-12-01

    Contingent negative variation (CNV) is a negative brain potential occurring between two successive stimuli when the first stimulus is a warning and the second stimulus requires a motor response. The CNV is interpreted as an expression of the cognitive processes in preparation for a response directed to a purpose. Using 19 electrodes we recorded CNVs for mouth opening, closing and lateral movements, tongue protrusion and hand extension in 10 healthy subjects. The aim of the study was to examine the motor control mechanism underlying jaw and tongue movements in a cognitive paradigm. The first stimulus (S1) served as a preparatory warning signal for the imperative stimulus (S2) 2 s after the S1. The subject performed the experimental tasks after the S2. The grand average CNVs for jaw and tongue movements showed a bilaterally widespread negativity with the maximum in the vertex region (Cz). The early CNV was identified about 400 ms after the S1 and its amplitude was highest at the midline-frontal area. The late CNV started approximately 1000 ms after the S1 with the maximum at Cz. The mean amplitude was significantly lower for hand extension than for the other tasks, and significantly higher for lateral movement than for mouth closing, suggesting that the CNV amplitude can be affected by the complexity of the task. The CNV recording may provide a means to study the neuronal activity necessary for the sensorimotor integration of jaw and tongue movements.

  20. Prognosis of teeth in the line of jaw fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulakh, Kamaldeep K; Gumber, Tejinder Kaur; Sandhu, Sumeet

    2017-04-01

    The decision as to whether teeth in the line of jaw fractures should be extracted or retained remains a controversial issue. The aim of this study was to assess the prognosis of teeth directly in the line of, and adjacent to, jaw fracture sites. The study consisted of 50 patients with facial fractures in the dentate region, the diagnosis of which was made on the basis of clinical and radiographic examinations. A total of 124 teeth were present in 69 fracture sites (50 patients), of which 89 teeth were evaluated both, clinically (tooth mobility, pocket depth, pulp sensibility) and with periapical radiographs (degree of fracture displacement, marginal bone loss, root resorption). The results revealed that 61.9% of teeth in directly in the line of fractures showed no response to electric pulp testing compared with 48.9% teeth adjacent to fractures. The maximum frequency of non-responsive teeth was observed in Type I fractures followed by Type II fractures. Response to pulp tests was highly significant at postoperative 3- and 6-month periods (Wilcoxon's test). There was continuous reduction in the measurement for mean pocket depth at both test and control sites of teeth. The measurement of marginal bone levels of teeth in the line of fractures revealed a significant reduction (P jaw fractures should not be removed on a prophylactic basis and should be followed up clinically and radiographically to determine any treatment needs. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Structural optimization for a jaw using iterative Kriging metamodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Il Kwon; Han, Dong Seop; Han, Geun Jo; Lee, Kwon Hee [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    Rail clamps are mechanical components installed to fix the container crane to its lower members against wind blast or slip. Rail clamps should be designed to survive harsh wind loading conditions. In this study, a jaw structure, which is a part of a wedge-typed rail clamp, is optimized with respect to its strength under a severe wind loading condition. According to the classification of structural optimization, the structural optimization of a jaw is included in the category of shape optimization. Conventional structural optimization methods have difficulties in defining complex shape design variables and preventing mesh distortions. To overcome the difficulties, a metamodel using the Kriging interpolation method is introduced to replace the true response by an approximate one. This research presents the shape optimization of a jaw using iterative Kriging interpolation models and a simulated annealing algorithm. The new Kriging models are iteratively constructed by refining the former Kriging models. This process is continued until the convergence criteria are satisfied. The optimum results obtained by the suggested method are compared with those obtained by the DOE (design of experiments) and VT (variation technology) methods built in ANSYS WORKBENCH

  2. Jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth: A radiographic diagnostic guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    This review article aimed to introduce a category of jaw lesions associated with impacted tooth. General search engines and specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, MedLine Plus, Science Direct, Scopus, and well-recognized textbooks were used to find relevant studies using keywords such as "jaw lesion", "jaw disease", "impacted tooth", and "unerupted tooth". More than 250 articles were found, of which approximately 80 were broadly relevant to the topic. We ultimately included 47 articles that were closely related to the topic of interest. When the relevant data were compiled, the following 10 lesions were identified as having a relationship with impacted tooth: dentigerous cysts, calcifying odontogenic cysts, unicystic (mural) ameloblastomas, ameloblastomas, ameloblastic fibromas, adenomatoid odontogenic tumors, keratocystic odontogenic tumors, calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors, ameloblastic fibro-odontomas, and odontomas. When clinicians encounter a lesion associated with an impacted tooth, they should first consider these entities in the differential diagnosis. This will help dental practitioners make more accurate diagnoses and develop better treatment plans based on patients' radiographs. PMID:27672610

  3. Imaging of jaw with dental CT software program: Normal Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myong Gon; Seo, Kwang Hee; Jung, Hak Young; Sung, Nak Kwan; Chung, Duk Soo; Kim, Ok Dong [School of Medicine, Taegu Catholic University, Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Hwan [Taegu Armed Forces General Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    Dental CT software program can provide reformatted cross-sectional and panoramic images that cannot be obtained with conventional axial and direct coronal CT scan. The purpose of this study is to describe the method of the technique and to identify the precise anatomy of jaw. We evaluated 13 mandibles and 7 maxillae of 15 subjects without bony disease who were being considered for endosseous dental implants. Reformatted images obtained by the use of bone algorithm performed on GE HiSpeed Advantage CT scanner were retrospectively reviewed for detailed anatomy of jaw. Anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(mandibular foramen, inferior alveolar canal, mental foramen, canal for incisive artery, nutrient canal, lingual foramen and mylohyoid groove), muscular insertion(mylohyoid line, superior and inferior genial tubercle and digastric fossa) and other anatomy(submandibular fossa, sublingual fossa, contour of alveolar process, oblique line, retromolar fossa, temporal crest and retromolar triangle) were well delineated in mandible. In maxilla, anatomy related to neurovascular bundle(greater palatine foramen and groove, nasopalatine canal and incisive foramen) and other anatomy(alveolar process, maxillary sinus and nasal fossa) were also well delineated. Reformatted images using dental CT software program provided excellent delineation of the jaw anatomy. Therefore, dental CT software program can play an important role in the preoperative assessment of mandible and maxilla for dental implants and other surgical conditions.

  4. Computer Simulation Methods for Crushing Process in an Jaw Crusher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'ich Beloglazov, Ilia; Andreevich Ikonnikov, Dmitrii

    2016-08-01

    One of the trends at modern mining enterprises is the application of combined systems for extraction and transportation of the rock mass. Given technology involves the use the conveyor lines as a continuous link of combined technology. The application of a conveyor transport provides significant reduction of costs for energy resources, increase in labor productivity and process automation. However, the use of a conveyor transport provides for certain requirements for the quality of transported material. The maximum size of the rock mass pieces is one of the basic parameters for it. The crushing plants applies as a coarse crushing followed by crushing the material to the maximum size of piece which possible to use for conveyor transport. It is often represented by jaw crushers. Modelling of crushing process in jaw crushers allows to maximally optimize workflow and increase efficiency of the equipment at the further transportation and processing of rocks. We studied the interaction between walls of the jaw crusher and bulk material by using discrete element method (DEM) in this paper. The article examines the process of modeling by stages. It includes design of the crusher construction in solid and surface modeling system. Modelling of the crushing process based on the experimental data received via the crushing unit BOYD. The process of destruction and particle size distribution in the study was done. Analysis of research results shows a comparability of actual experiment and modeling process.

  5. [Studies on the standardization of parameters for jaw movement analysis--jaw movement analysis at the incisal point].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hisahiro; Bando, Eiichi; Abe, Susumu

    2008-07-01

    To establish standardized evaluating methods for jaw movements analysis independently of the reference coordinate system. In this paper, we focused on the analysis of incisor point paths of border movements. Then we investigated parameters that are independent of the reference coordinate system and can be utilized among different systems. Recorded data of jaw border movements from 20 healthy male adults were employed as basic samples. First, the effects of changes of the reference coordinate systems on the analysis were investigated. Second, the line between incisor points at the intercuspal position and the maximal mandibular opening position was used as the reference line. Then the area index of incisor paths was calculated with the length of the perpendicular line dropped from the incisor point to the reference line and the displacement of the foot of the perpendicular. Changes of the spatial relation between a reference plane of the coordinate system and border movements pathways had an effect on a measured area of projected pathways, about 2% - 5% differences of projected area on the frontal plane with 10 degrees rotation around a horizontal axis. The area index of incisor paths showed close correlation with the actual area of a 3-dimensional plane bounded by the incisor path [sagittal border movement: r = 0.53 (p = 0.016), left border opening pathway: r = 0.97 (p jaw border movements quantitatively independent of the reference coordinate system.

  6. The coupling of the neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE to the nuclear fuels performance application BISON under the MOOSE framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleicher, Frederick N.; Williamson, Richard L.; Ortensi, Javier; Wang, Yaqi; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Novascone, Stephen R.; Hales, Jason D.; Martineau, Richard C.

    2014-10-01

    The MOOSE neutron transport application RATTLESNAKE was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the self-adjoint angular flux equations) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate on unstructured meshes. RATTLESNAKE solves self-adjoint angular flux transport equation and provides a sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux with resonance treatment during burnup or a fast transient. BISON solves the coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter scale. Both applications are able to solve their respective systems on aligned and unaligned unstructured finite element meshes. The power density and local burnup was transferred from RATTLESNAKE to BISON with the MOOSE Multiapp transfer system. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from RATTLESNAKE to BISON. The eigenvalues are shown to agree well with values obtained from the lattice physics code DRAGON. The one-way data transfer of power density is shown to agree with the power density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON.

  7. Fast and efficient DNA-based method for winter diet analysis from stools of three cervids: moose, red deer, and roe deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czernik, Marta; Taberlet, Pierre; Swisłocka, Magdalena; Czajkowska, Magdalena; Duda, Norbert; Ratkiewicz, Mirosław

    2013-01-01

    Effects of cervid browsing on timber production, especially during winter, lead to economic losses in forest management. The aim of this study was to present an efficient DNA-based method which allows qualitative assessment of the winter diet from stools of moose (Alces alces), roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), and red deer (Cervus elaphus). The preliminary results of the diet composition of the three cervids from Poland were also presented with a special emphasis on moose. The electropherograms of the chloroplast intron trnL (UAA) P6 loop amplification products using g (fluorescence-labeled) and h primers revealed differences in the length of PCR products among various plant species eaten by these herbivores. In addition, the usage of species-specific primers allowed unambiguous identification of different gymnosperms and angiosperms. The preliminary moose diet analysis, based on winter fecal samples from the entire range of moose occurrence in Poland, revealed the presence of 15 to 24 tree, shrub, and herbaceous species. This fast, cost-efficient, and simple method proved also to be reliable for the diet analysis of red deer and roe deer. It may be a valuable tool in forest and conservation management, as well as a way of enhancing ecological studies focusing on the impact of herbivores on the ecosystems and their possible food niche overlap.

  8. The red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and the arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) are definitive hosts of Sarcocystis alces and Sarcocystis hjorti from moose (Alces alces).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Stina S; Gjerde, Bjørn

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether foxes might act as definitive hosts of Sarcocystis alces in moose. In 2 experiments, 6 silver foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and 6 blue foxes (Vulpes lagopus) were fed muscle tissue from moose containing numerous sarcocysts of S. alces, and euthanazed 7-28 days post-infection (p.i.). Intestinal mucosal scrapings and faecal samples were screened microscopically for Sarcocystis oocysts/sporocysts, which were identified to species by means of species-specific primers and sequence analysis targeting the ssu rRNA gene. All foxes in both experiments became infected with Sarcocystis; the oocysts were fully sporulated by 14 days p.i., containing sporocysts measuring 14-15 x 10 microm. Molecular identification revealed that the oocysts/sporocysts belonged to 2 species, S. alces and Sarcocystis hjorti, although sarcocysts of S. hjorti were only identified in moose subsequent to the infection of foxes. In the first experiment, all 8 foxes also became infected with a Hammondia sp. derived from moose, shedding unsporulated, subspherical oocysts, measuring 10-12 microm in diameter, from 6-7 days p.i. onwards. The study proved that canids (the red fox and arctic fox) are definitive hosts for S. alces and S. hjorti, as had been inferred from the phylogenetic position of these species.

  9. Defining parasite biodiversity at high latitudes of North America: new host and geographic records for Onchocerca cervipedis (Nematoda: Onchocercidae in moose and caribou

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verocai Guilherme G

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Onchocerca cervipedis is a filarioid nematode of cervids reported from Central America to boreal regions of North America. It is found primarily in subcutaneous tissues of the legs, and is more commonly known as ‘legworm’. Blackflies are intermediate hosts and transmit larvae to ungulates when they blood-feed. In this article we report the first records of O. cervipedis from high latitudes of North America and its occurrence in previously unrecognized host subspecies including the Yukon-Alaska moose (Alces americanus gigas and the Grant’s caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti. Methods We examined the subcutaneous connective tissues of the metacarpi and/or metatarsi of 34 moose and one caribou for parasitic lesions. Samples were collected from animals killed by subsistence hunters or animals found dead in the Northwest Territories (NT, Canada and Alaska (AK, USA from 2005 to 2012. Genomic DNA lysate was prepared from nematode fragments collected from two moose. The nd5 region of the mitochondrial DNA was amplified by PCR and sequenced. Results Subcutaneous nodules were found in 12 moose from the NT and AK, and one caribou from AK. Nematodes dissected from the lesions were identified as Onchocerca cervipedis based on morphology of female and male specimens. Histopathological findings in moose included cavitating lesions with multifocal granulomatous cellulitis containing intralesional microfilariae and adults, often necrotic and partially mineralized. Lesions in the caribou included periosteitis with chronic cellulitis, eosinophilic and lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, and abundant granulation associated with intralesional adult nematodes and larvae. Sequences of the nd5 region (471bp, the first generated for this species, were deposited with Genbank (JN580791 and JN580792. Representative voucher specimens were deposited in the archives of the United States National Parasite Collection. Conclusions The geographic range of O

  10. A feasibility study on the use of the MOOSE computational framework to simulate three-dimensional deformation of CANDU reactor fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, Kyle A., E-mail: Kyle.Gamble@inl.gov [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 13 General Crerar Crescent, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7K 7B4 (Canada); Williams, Anthony F., E-mail: Tony.Williams@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Fuel and Fuel Channel Safety, 1 Plant Road, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Chan, Paul K., E-mail: Paul.Chan@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 13 General Crerar Crescent, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7K 7B4 (Canada); Wowk, Diane, E-mail: Diane.Wowk@rmc.ca [Royal Military College of Canada, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 13 General Crerar Crescent, Kingston, Ontario, Canada K7K 7B4 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • This is the first demonstration of using the MOOSE framework for modeling CANDU fuel. • Glued and frictionless contact algorithms behave as expected for 2D and 3D cases. • MOOSE accepts and correctly interprets functions of arbitrary form. • 3D deformation calculations accurately compare against analytical solutions. • MOOSE is a viable simulation tool for modeling accident reactor conditions. - Abstract: Horizontally oriented fuel bundles, such as those in CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors present unique modeling challenges. After long irradiation times or during severe transients the fuel elements can laterally deform out of plane due to processes known as bow and sag. Bowing is a thermally driven process that causes the fuel elements to laterally deform when a temperature gradient develops across the diameter of the element. Sagging is a coupled mechanical and thermal process caused by deformation of the fuel pin due to creep mechanisms of the sheathing after long irradiation times and or high temperatures. These out-of-plane deformations can lead to reduced coolant flow and a reduction in coolability of the fuel bundle. In extreme cases element-to-element or element-to-pressure tube contact could occur leading to reduced coolant flow in the subchannels or pressure tube rupture leading to a loss of coolant accident. This paper evaluates the capability of the Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) framework developed at the Idaho National Laboratory to model these deformation mechanisms. The material model capabilities of MOOSE and its ability to simulate contact are also investigated.

  11. Basal jawed vertebrate phylogenomics using transcriptomic data from Solexa sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Chen

    Full Text Available The traditionally accepted relationships among basal jawed vertebrates have been challenged by some molecular phylogenetic analyses based on mitochondrial sequences. Those studies split extant gnathostomes into two monophyletic groups: tetrapods and piscine branch, including Chondrichthyes, Actinopterygii and sarcopterygian fishes. Lungfish and bichir are found in a basal position on the piscine branch. Based on transcriptomes of an armored bichir (Polypterus delhezi and an African lungfish (Protopterus sp. we generated, expressed sequences and whole genome sequences available from public databases, we obtained 111 genes to reconstruct the phylogenetic tree of basal jawed vertebrates and estimated their times of divergence. Our phylogenomic study supports the traditional relationship. We found that gnathostomes are divided into Chondrichthyes and the Osteichthyes, both with 100% support values (posterior probabilities and bootstrap values. Chimaeras were found to have a basal position among cartilaginous fishes with a 100% support value. Osteichthyes were divided into Actinopterygii and Sarcopterygii with 100% support value. Lungfish and tetrapods form a monophyletic group with 100% posterior probability. Bichir and two teleost species form a monophyletic group with 100% support value. The previous tree, based on mitochondrial data, was significantly rejected by an approximately unbiased test (AU test, p = 0. The time of divergence between lungfish and tetrapods was estimated to be 391.8 Ma and the divergence of bichir from pufferfish and medaka was estimated to be 330.6 Ma. These estimates closely match the fossil record. In conclusion, our phylogenomic study successfully resolved the relationship of basal jawed vertebrates based on transtriptomes, EST and whole genome sequences.

  12. Fibro-osseous lesions of jaws: Analysis of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durgadevi Pancharethinam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibro-osseous lesions (FOL represent a varied group of entities in which the normal bone is replaced by cellular fibrous tissue containing mineralized foci that may vary in amount and appearance.These group of lesions predominantly affects the jaws and craniofacial bones. According to Waldron 1993, FOL includes three major groups namely fibrous dysplasia, cemento-osseous dysplasia, and ossifying fibroma. FOL show considerable overlapping in the clinical, radiographic and histological features, and so a thorough knowledge of these lesions is mandatory for interpretation and appropriate diagnosis. This article documents the clinical, radiographic and histological features of three cases of FOL and discusses the considerations related to diagnosis.

  13. Benign fibrous histiocytoma: A rare case involving jaw bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitesh Shoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH is a soft tissue neoplasm which occurs mostly on the skin of extremities. BFH rarely occurs in bone and may affect femur, tibia, and pelvic bone. Jaw bone involvement is very unusual with only 11 cases reported till date. This report describes a case of BFH occurring in a 30-year-old female patient affecting left mandibular posterior region. Computed tomography revealed a well-defined expansile lytic lesion in the posterior mandible. Gross examination of the tumor revealed an admixture of fibroblasts and histiocytes in a fascicular and storiform pattern. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD68.

  14. Benign fibrous histiocytoma: A rare case involving jaw bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoor, Hitesh; Pai, Keerthilatha M; Shergill, Ankur Kaur; Kamath, Abhay Taranath

    2015-09-01

    Benign fibrous histiocytoma (BFH) is a soft tissue neoplasm which occurs mostly on the skin of extremities. BFH rarely occurs in bone and may affect femur, tibia, and pelvic bone. Jaw bone involvement is very unusual with only 11 cases reported till date. This report describes a case of BFH occurring in a 30-year-old female patient affecting left mandibular posterior region. Computed tomography revealed a well-defined expansile lytic lesion in the posterior mandible. Gross examination of the tumor revealed an admixture of fibroblasts and histiocytes in a fascicular and storiform pattern. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD68.

  15. Bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaws: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Anil Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BPs have been recommended for the use in patients with various bony lesions such as Paget′s disease, hypercalcemia, osteoporosis, and multiple myeloma. Despite the increasing use and various benefits, bisphosphonate related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ is a significant complication with significant morbidity. A search of PUBMED journal databases from January 2000 to April 2012 was conducted with the objective of identifying publications regarding BRONJ. Based on the available data current concepts in the diagnosis and management of BRONJ are discussed in this article.

  16. Postoperative myocardial infarction in an orthognatic jaw surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Marques, F; Montenegro Sá, F; Lapa, T; Simões, I

    2017-07-29

    Cardiovascular complications, in particular perioperative myocardial infarctions, are central contributors to morbidity and mortality after non-cardiac surgery. We present a case of a 41-year-old male, smoker and dyslipidemic, who underwent bimaxillary orthognathic jaw surgery with the development of an acute coronary syndrome in the immediate postoperative period. We managed to early diagnose the myocardial infarction and promptly performed a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, resulting in a positive outcome. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. CONGENITAL EPULIS: A RARE BENIGN JAW TUMOR OF NEWBORN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahavir Singh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A congenital epulis is a rare benign jaw tumor of neonate and is also known as “congenital gingival granular cell tumor”. The Greek word ‘‘epulis’’ means ‘‘swelling of the gingiva’’. It was first described in 1871 by Neumann; hence the alternative name is Neumann’s Tumor. It usually presents at birth with an obvious mass arising from the gingival mucosa of the maxilla or mandible. It commonly presents in neonates, although prenatal diagnosis with ultrasound has been reported as early as 26 weeks gestation.

  18. CONGENITAL EPULIS: A RARE BENIGN JAW TUMOR OF NEWBORN

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    A congenital epulis is a rare benign jaw tumor of neonate and is also known as “congenital gingival granular cell tumor”. The Greek word ‘‘epulis’’ means ‘‘swelling of the gingiva’’. It was first described in 1871 by Neumann; hence the alternative name is Neumann’s Tumor. It usually presents at birth with an obvious mass arising from the gingival mucosa of the maxilla or mandible. It commonly presents in neonates, although prenatal diagnosis with ultrasound has been reported as early as 26 we...

  19. [Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia of the jaws].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzou, S; Boulaadas, M; El Ayoubi, A; Nazih, N; Essakalli, L; Kzadri, M

    2011-06-01

    Florid cemento-osseous dysplasia is a benign and rare tumor of the jaws. It is more commonly seen in middle-aged black women. Most cases are asymptomatic and are found during routine radiographic examination. We report two complicated cases of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia, one with facial deformity and the other with chronic osteitis. The diagnosis of florid cemento-osseous dysplasia is based on clinical and radiological features. The lesions are commonly bilateral and symmetrical. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  20. Multiple fibromyxomas of the jaws: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayet, Mohamed Khalifa; Eiid, Salma Belal [Dept. of Oral Radiology, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-09-15

    Fibromyxoma of the jaw is a rare benign mesenchymal odontogenic tumor with locally aggressive behavior. In the present report, a 13-year-old female patient presented to our university hospital with delayed eruption of some of her teeth. A panoramic radiograph taken at the initial examination revealed four pericoronal radiolucencies related to the four third molars. Thereafter, a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination was performed. After the surgical removal of these molars, the microscopic examination diagnosed the four lesions as fibromyxomas. Here, we have discussed the clinical, panoramic radiography, MRI, and histopathological findings of the case.

  1. 3D-model building of the jaw impression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Moumen T.; Yamany, Sameh M.; Hemayed, Elsayed E.; Farag, Aly A.

    1997-03-01

    A novel approach is proposed to obtain a record of the patient's occlusion using computer vision. Data acquisition is obtained using intra-oral video cameras. The technique utilizes shape from shading to extract 3D information from 2D views of the jaw, and a novel technique for 3D data registration using genetic algorithms. The resulting 3D model can be used for diagnosis, treatment planning, and implant purposes. The overall purpose of this research is to develop a model-based vision system for orthodontics to replace traditional approaches. This system will be flexible, accurate, and will reduce the cost of orthodontic treatments.

  2. Age Changes of Jaws and Soft Tissue Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmaja Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related changes of jaws and soft tissue profile are important both for orthodontists and general dentists. Mouth profile is the area which is manipulated during dental treatment. These changes should be planned in accordance with other components of facial profile to achieve ultimate aim of structural balance, functional efficacy, and esthetic harmony. Through this paper, the authors wish to discuss age changes of the hard and soft tissues of human face which would help not only the orthodontists but also oral surgeons, prosthodontists, pedodontists, and general dentists.

  3. Antiresorptive drug-related osteonecrosis of the jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanne, Jettie; Calhoun, Colonya C; Le, Anh D

    2014-04-01

    Nitrogen-containing and non-nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates have been implicated in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), a condition termed bisphosphonate-related OHJ. Other antiresorptive drugs have been implicated in the development of OHJ, hence the new term antiresorptive drug-related ONJ. The underlying pathogenesis remains unclear, and no definite diagnosis or cure has been established for this debilitating condition. This article reviews some of the most common antiresorptive drugs with their associated risks of ONJ and the current understanding of the pathogenesis ONJ, and summarizes current clinical guidelines.

  4. [Benign odontogenic tumor in the lower jaw: A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, Renzo; Tomasetti, Patrick; Crameri, Manuel; Kuttenberger, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Odontomas are classified within the group of odontogenic epithelial tumors with odontogenic ectomesenchyme with or without hard tissue formation. Together with ameloblastomas and keratocystic odontogenic tumors they are counted among the most common odontogenic tumors. Their growth is self-limiting and mostly, they are discovered accidentally as part of a x-ray examination. A common finding is that odontomas are associated with an unerupted permanent tooth. The aim of the present case report is to present the step-by-step procedure of a surgical odontoma removal in the lingual premolar/canine area of the lower jaw.

  5. An examination of the degrees of freedom of human jaw motion in speech and mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostry, D J; Vatikiotis-Bateson, E; Gribble, P L

    1997-12-01

    The kinematics of human jaw movements were assessed in terms of the three orientation angles and three positions that characterize the motion of the jaw as a rigid body. The analysis focused on the identification of the jaw's independent movement dimensions, and was based on an examination of jaw motion paths that were plotted in various combinations of linear and angular coordinate frames. Overall, both behaviors were characterized by independent motion in four degrees of freedom. In general, when jaw movements were plotted to show orientation in the sagittal plane as a function of horizontal position, relatively straight paths were observed. In speech, the slopes and intercepts of these paths varied depending on the phonetic material. The vertical position of the jaw was observed to shift up or down so as to displace the overall form of the sagittal plane motion path of the jaw. Yaw movements were small but independent of pitch, and vertical and horizontal position. In mastication, the slope and intercept of the relationship between pitch and horizontal position were affected by the type of food and its size. However, the range of variation was less than that observed in speech. When vertical jaw position was plotted as a function of horizontal position, the basic form of the path of the jaw was maintained but could be shifted vertically. In general, larger bolus diameters were associated with lower jaw positions throughout the movement. The timing of pitch and yaw motion differed. The most common pattern involved changes in pitch angle during jaw opening followed by a phase predominated by lateral motion (yaw). Thus, in both behaviors there was evidence of independent motion in pitch, yaw, horizontal position, and vertical position. This is consistent with the idea that motions in these degrees of freedom are independently controlled.

  6. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Eun Young, E-mail: eyhan@uams.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States); Moros, Eduardo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Corry, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  7. Effects of tree species richness and composition on moose winter browsing damage and foraging selectivity: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Harriet T; Koricheva, Julia

    2013-07-01

    The optimal foraging theory, the nutrient balance hypothesis, and the plant association theories predict that foraging decisions and resulting tree damage by large mammalian browsers may be influenced by the species richness and species composition of forest stands. This may lead to either associational susceptibility (increased damage on a focal plant in a mixed stand) or associational resistance (reduced damage in a mixed stand). Better understanding of the mechanisms and the relative importance of tree species richness and composition effects on foraging by mammalian browsers is needed to support sustainable management of forests and mammal populations. However, existing knowledge of forest diversity effects on foraging by large mammalian browsers comes largely from observational studies while experimental evidence is limited. We analysed winter browsing by moose (Alces alces L.) in a long-term, large-scale experiment in Finland, which represents a tree species richness gradient from monocultures to 2-, 3- and 5-species mixtures composed of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.), Siberian larch (Larix sibirica Ledeb.), silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) and black alder (Alnus glutinosa L.). The intensity of browsing per plot increased with tree species richness while browsing selectivity decreased with tree species being targeted more equally in species-rich mixtures. Tree species composition of a plot was also an important determinant of intensity of browsing. The greatest browsing occurred in plots containing preferred species (pine and birch) while intermediate preference species (larch and alder) experienced associational susceptibility when growing with pine and birch compared with their monocultures or mixtures without pine and birch. In contrast, we found no evidence of associational resistance; the presence of a least preferred species (spruce) in a mixture had no significant effect on moose browsing on other tree species. We

  8. Evaluation of INL Supplied MOOSE/OSPREY Model: Modeling Water Adsorption on Type 3A Molecular Sieve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompilio, L. M. [Syracuse University; DePaoli, D. W. [ORNL; Spencer, B. B. [ORNL

    2014-08-29

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate Idaho National Lab’s Multiphysics Object-Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE) software in modeling the adsorption of water onto type 3A molecular sieve (3AMS). MOOSE can be thought-of as a computing framework within which applications modeling specific coupled-phenomena can be developed and run. The application titled Off-gas SeParation and REcoverY (OSPREY) has been developed to model gas sorption in packed columns. The sorbate breakthrough curve calculated by MOOSE/OSPREY was compared to results previously obtained in the deep bed hydration tests conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coding framework permits selection of various options, when they exist, for modeling a process. For example, the OSPREY module includes options to model the adsorption equilibrium with a Langmuir model or a generalized statistical thermodynamic adsorption (GSTA) model. The vapor solid equilibria and the operating conditions of the process (e.g., gas phase concentration) are required to calculate the concentration gradient driving the mass transfer between phases. Both the Langmuir and GSTA models were tested in this evaluation. Input variables were either known from experimental conditions, or were available (e.g., density) or were estimated (e.g., thermal conductivity of sorbent) from the literature. Variables were considered independent of time, i.e., rather than having a mass transfer coefficient that varied with time or position in the bed, the parameter was set to remain constant. The calculated results did not coincide with data from laboratory tests. The model accurately estimated the number of bed volumes processed for the given operating parameters, but breakthrough times were not accurately predicted, varying 50% or more from the data. The shape of the breakthrough curves also differed from the experimental data, indicating a much wider sorption band. Model modifications are needed to improve its utility and

  9. Benefits of migration in relation to nutritional condition and predation risk in a partially migratory moose population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kevin S; Barten, Neil L; Crouse, Stacy; Crouse, John

    2014-01-01

    The costs and benefits of alternative migratory strategies are often framed in the context of top-down and bottom-up effects on individual fitness. This occurs because migration is considered a costly behavioral strategy that presumably confers explicit benefits to migrants in the form of either decreased predation risk (predation risk avoidance hypothesis) or increased nutrition (forage maturation hypothesis). To test these hypotheses, we studied a partially migratory moose (Alces alces) population and contrasted explicit measures of predation risk (i.e., offspring survival) and nutrition (i.e., accumulation of endogenous energy reserves) between resident and migratory subpopulations. We relied on data collected from migratory and nonmigratory radio-marked moose (n = 67) that inhabited a novel study system located in coastal Alaska between 2004 and 2010. In this area, 30% of the population resides year-round on a coastal foreland area, while 48% migrate to either a small island archipelago or a subalpine ridge system (the remainder exhibited one of six different low-occurrence strategies). Overall, we determined that accumulation of body fat during the growing season did not differ between migratory or resident modalities. However, calf survival was 2.6-2.9 times higher for individuals that migrated (survival, islands = 0.49 +/- 0.16 [mean +/- SE], n = 35; ridge = 0.52 +/- 0.16, n = 33) than those that did not (survival, resident = 0.19 +/- 0.08, n = 57). Our results support the predation risk avoidance hypotheses, and suggest that migration is a behavioral strategy that principally operates to reduce the risk of calf predation and does not confer explicit nutritional benefits. We did not directly detect trade-offs between predation risk and nutrition for migratory individuals. Yet we identify an indirect life history mechanism that may mildly dampen the apparent fitness benefits of migration. The proximate factors accounting for differences in migration

  10. 双膦酸盐和下颌骨坏死%Bisphosphonates and jaw osteonecrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李彦博; 刘霏霏

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Understanding the physical and chemical properties of bisphosphonates and their pharmacological features and the situation of bisphosphonate - related osteonecrosis of the jaws ( BRONJ). Methods: To present a literature review on bisphosphonates, focusing on their pharmacological features and their reported association with jaw osteonecrosis. Results: Bisphosphonates have been widely prescribed for treatment of diseases characterized by intense bone resorption. These drugs have also been associated with a serious side effect, avascular osteonecrosis of the jaws. The morbidity and lack of treatment response of this condition are serious facts to be considered when prescribing bisphosphonate therapy. The risk -benefit relationship needs to be seriously analyzed, and the treatment pros and cons should be explained to the patient. If the therapy with bisphosphonate is indicated, rigorous oral health adequacy must be performed and periodic evaluation of oral conditions is mandatory. Conlousiotl; Considering the seriousness of the potential occurrence of bisphosphonate - related osteonecrosis of the jaws, caution in prescribing these drugs and careful observation of patients being treated with them seems to be indicated. Lesion prevention in patients undergoing bisphosphonate therapy is essential to prevent and control morbidity associated with advanced destructive lesions.%目的:了解双膦酸盐的理化性质和药理学特性以及与其相关的下颌骨坏死的有关情况.方法:综述双膦酸盐和与其相关的下颌骨坏死的文献.结果:双膦酸盐已经被广泛用于治疗以骨吸收为特点的疾病.这些药物也越来越与下颌骨缺血性坏死这种严重的副作用联系在一起.考虑到下颌骨坏死的发生和对其缺乏有效治疗措施的事实,计划使用双膦酸盐治疗时,应认真分析风险-效益的关系,并向病人说明治疗的利弊.如果要使用双膦酸盐治疗,必须进行严谨的口腔卫生

  11. ANWR progress report number FY84-4: Population size, composition, and distribution of moose along the Canning and Kongakut Rivers within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, fall 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys to determine the population size, composition, and distribution of moose (Alces alces) along the Canning and Kongakut River drainages were conducted...

  12. Orofacial pain, jaw function, and temporomandibular disorders in adult women with a history of juvenile chronic arthritis or persistent juvenile chronic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, M.; Zak, M.; Jensen, B.L.;

    2001-01-01

    Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis......Orofacial pain, jaw function, temporomandibular disorders, adult women persistent juvenil chronic arthritis...

  13. Phasic bursts of the antagonistic jaw muscles during REM sleep mimic a coordinated motor pattern during mastication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    T. Kato; N. Nakamura; Y. Masuda; A. Yoshida; T. Morimoto; K. Yamamura; S. Yamashita; F. Sato

    2013-01-01

    .... In this study, jaw-closing and -opening muscle electromyographic (EMG) activities and jaw movements were quantified to characterize phenotypes of motor patterns during sleep in freely moving and head-restrained guinea pigs...

  14. JAWS: Just Add Water System - A device for detection of nucleic acids in Martian ice caps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders J.; Willerslev, Eske; Mørk, Søren

    2002-01-01

    The design of a device for nucleic acid detection in the Martian ice caps is presented; the Just Add Water System (JAWS). It is based on fiber-optic PNA (peptide nucleic acid) light up probe random microsphere universal array technology. JAWS is designed to be part of a larger system with a regul...

  15. Electronic speckle-pattern interferometry (ESPI) applied to the study of mechanical behavior of human jaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Juan F.; Moreno de las Cuevas, Vincente; Salgueiro, Jose R.; Suarez, David; Fernandez, Paula; Gallas, Mercedes; Blanchard, Alain

    1996-01-01

    The study of the mechanical behavior of the human jaw during chewing is helpful in several specific medical fields that cover the maxillo-facial area. In this work, electronic speckle pattern interferometry has been applied to study dead jaw bones under external stress which simulates the deformations induced during chewing. Fringes obtained after subtraction of two images of the jaw, the image of the relaxed jaw and that of the jaw under stress, give us information about the most stressed zones. The interferometric analysis proposed here is attractive as it can be done in real time with the jaw under progressive stress. Image processing can be applied for improving the quality of fringes. This research can be of help in orthognathic surgery, for example in diagnosis and treatment of fractured jaws, in oral surgery, and in orthodontics because it would help us to know the stress dispersion when we insert an osseointegrated implant or place an orthodontic appliance, respectively. Studying fragments of human jaw some results about its elasticity and flexibility were obtained.

  16. Comparison of nonexposed and exposed bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiodt, Morten; Reibel, Jesper; Oturai, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Nonexposed osteonecrosis of the jaws (NE-ONJ) does not fit into the current definition of osteonecrosis, which requires exposed bone. A modification of the classification of bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ) is proposed. This study aimed to test proposed criteria for NE-ONJ a...

  17. Relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics in healthy elderly subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Hiromichi; Tohara, Haruka; Matsubara, Mariko; Inokuchi, Nobuhiro; Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Nakane, Ayako; Wakasugi, Yoko; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics and resting position in elderly individuals based on gender. Subjects were 36 healthy elderly individuals aged ≥65 years without dysphagia (16 men and 20 women; mean age 75.5 years, range 65-88 years). Videofluorographic images during the swallowing of 10 mL of 40% (w/v) barium sulfate were obtained and the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone and maximum/resting hyoid position were evaluated. Jaw opening force was measured three times using a jaw opening force sthenometer; the mean of these three measurements was used for analysis. In men, there was a positive correlation between jaw opening force and resting hyoid position and negative correlations among all the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone. In women, there was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and any of the measurement items. There was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and maximum hyoid position in either men or women. Our findings suggest that low jaw opening force leads to low resting hyoid position only in elderly men, and a lower hyoid position in healthy elderly men results in a larger total amount of hyoid displacement during swallowing. Moreover, a maximum hyoid position in healthy individuals of either gender does not differ depending on their jaw opening force.

  18. Biomechanical analysis of the influence of friction in jaw joint disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolstra, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Increased friction due to impaired lubrication in the jaw joint has been considered as one of the possible causes for internal joint disorders. A very common internal disorder in the jaw joint is an anteriorly dislocated articular disc. This is generally considered to contribute to the ons

  19. The riddle of the large loss in bite force after fast jaw-closing movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slager, GEC; Nagashima, T; van Willigen, JD

    In unloading experiments (in which the resistance to a forceful static bite is suddenly removed); it is shown that the residual bite force (when the jaw system is arrested shortly after the unloading) is remarkably small. For example, of a 100-N initial bite force, only 18 N is left after a jaw

  20. Epidemiology of ameloblastomas of the jaws; a report from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A.E.M. Oomens; I. van der Waal

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To provide epidemiological data of ameloblastomas of the jaws in the Netherlands over a 25-year time period (1985-2010) and to compare these data with data from other parts of the world. Material and Methods: The data of all patients diagnosed with a primary ameloblastoma of the jaws in

  1. Provocation of delayed-onset muscle soreness in the human jaw-closing muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Türker, K.S.; Koutris, M.; Sümer, N.C.; Atis, E.S.; Linke, I.R.; Lobbezoo, F.; Naeije, M.

    2010-01-01

    Eccentric contractions of jaw-closing muscles are difficult to perform. This may explain why fatigue-inducing experiments performed so far suggest the jaw-closing muscles to be fatigue resistant. Aim of this study was to construct an apparatus that can impose intense eccentric contractions to the ja

  2. Osteonecrosis of the jaw-a bone site - specific effect of bisphosphonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, J.A.F.; Renders, G.A.P.; Everts, V.

    2016-01-01

    A known complication that can occur in patients using bisphosphonates (BPs) is osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). ONJ features bone exposure that may be associated with severe pain, swelling, local infection, and pathological fracture of the jaw. Current literature indicates that a complex combination

  3. Effect of Jaw Thrust on Transesophageal Echocardiography Probe Insertion and Concomitant Oropharyngeal Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jee-Eun; Min, Seong-Won; Kim, Chong-Soo; Lee, Jung-Man; No, Hyunjoung; Hwang, Jin-Young

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of jaw thrust on transesophageal echocardiography probe insertion and concomitant oropharyngeal injury. A prospective, randomized study Medical center governed by a university hospital Forty-two adult patients undergoing cardiovascular surgery were included. After the induction of anesthesia, a transesophageal echocardiography probe was inserted using an anterior jaw lift technique (conventional group, n = 21) or a jaw thrust-assisted technique (jaw thrust group, n = 21). The incidence of oropharyngeal injury, number of insertion attempts, blood on the probe tip, and presence of persistent oropharyngeal bleeding were evaluated. In the conventional group, oropharyngeal injury occurred more frequently than in the jaw-thrust group (52.4% v 9.5%, respectively; p = 0.006). Regarding transesophageal echocardiography probe insertion, the conventional group required more attempts than the jaw-thrust group (p = 0.043). The incidence of blood on the probe tip was higher in the conventional group than in the jaw-thrust group (p = 0.020), but the presence of persistent oropharyngeal bleeding was similar between the 2 groups. The jaw-thrust maneuver facilitated the insertion of the transesophageal echocardiography probe and reduced concomitant oropharyngeal injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidemiology of ameloblastomas of the jaws; a report from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.M.; van der Waal, I.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To provide epidemiological data of ameloblastomas of the jaws in the Netherlands over a 25-year time period (1985-2010) and to compare these data with data from other parts of the world. Material and Methods: The data of all patients diagnosed with a primary ameloblastoma of the jaws in

  5. LigaSure small jaws versus cold knife dissection in superficial parotidectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hahn, Christoffer Holst; Sørensen, Christian Hjort

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of LigaSure small jaws in superficial parotidectomy for blood loss, operative time and facial nerve function. This was a prospective non-randomized study of 35 patients with a benign parotid tumor. Sixteen patients had LigaSure small jaws paroti...

  6. [Problems of an infectious jaw cyst in the mixed dentition. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhoft, C H

    1978-06-01

    The article describes the complicated treatment of a jaw cyst, caused by an infected temporary tooth. The genesis and the clinical characteristics of jaw cysts in young patients, as well as the importance of due time extraction of the strongly ruined temporary teeth is discussed.

  7. Robust 3D reconstruction system for human jaw modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamany, Sameh M.; Farag, Aly A.; Tazman, David; Farman, Allan G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a model-based vision system for dentistry that will replace traditional approaches used in diagnosis, treatment planning and surgical simulation. Dentistry requires accurate 3D representation of the teeth and jaws for many diagnostic and treatment purposes. For example orthodontic treatment involves the application of force systems to teeth over time to correct malocclusion. In order to evaluate tooth movement progress, the orthodontists monitors this movement by means of visual inspection, intraoral measurements, fabrication of plastic models, photographs and radiographs, a process which is both costly and time consuming. In this paper an integrate system has been developed to record the patient's occlusion using computer vision. Data is acquired with an intraoral video camera. A modified shape from shading (SFS) technique, using perspective projection and camera calibration, is used to extract accurate 3D information from a sequence of 2D images of the jaw. A new technique for 3D data registration, using a Grid Closest Point transform and genetic algorithms, is used to register the SFS output. Triangulization is then performed, and a solid 3D model is obtained via a rapid prototype machine.

  8. Craniofacial pain and jaw-muscle activity during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachida, W; Castrillon, E E; Baad-Hansen, L; Jensen, R; Arima, T; Tomonaga, A; Ohata, N; Svensson, P

    2012-06-01

    This study compared the jaw-muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep in patients with craniofacial pain (n = 63) or no painful conditions (n = 52) and between patients with tension-type headache (TTH: n = 30) and healthy control individuals (n = 30). All participants used a portable single-channel EMG device (Medotech A/S) for four nights. There was no significant difference in EMG activity between craniofacial pain (24.5 ± 17.9 events/hr) and no painful conditions (19.7 ± 14.5), or between TTH (20.8 ± 15.0) and healthy control individuals (15.2 ± 11.6, p >.050). There were positive correlations between EMG activity and number of painful muscles (r = 0.188; p = 0.044), characteristic pain intensity (r = 0.187; p = 0.046), McGill Pain Questionnaire (r = 0.251; p = 0.008), and depression scores (r = 0.291; p = 0.002). Patients with painful conditions had significantly higher night-to-night variability compared with pain-free individuals (p craniofacial pain conditions and pain-free individuals in terms of jaw-muscle EMG activity recorded with a single-channel EMG device during sleep. However, some associations may exist between the level of EMG activity and various parameters of craniofacial pain. Longitudinal studies are warranted to further explore the relationship between sleep bruxism and craniofacial pain.

  9. Microbiota associated with chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic osteomyelitis of maxilla and mandible is rare in industrialized countries and its occurrence in developing countries is associated with trauma and surgery, and its microbial etiology has not been studied thoroughly. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the microbiota associated with osteomyelitis of mandible or maxilla from some Brazilian patients. After clinical and radiographic evaluation, samples of bone sequestra, purulent secretion, and biopsies of granulomatous tissues from twenty-two patients with chronic osteomyelitis of mandible and maxilla were cultivated and submitted for pathogen detection by using a PCR method. Each patient harbored a single lesion. Bacterial isolation was performed on fastidious anaerobe agar supplemented with hemin, menadione and horse blood for anaerobes; and on tryptic soy agar supplemented with yeast extract and horse blood for facultative bacteria and aerobes. Plates were incubated in anaerobiosis and aerobiosis, at 37ºC for 14 and 3 days, respectively. Bacteria were cultivated from twelve patient samples; and genera Actinomyces, Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, and Staphylococcus were the most frequent. By PCR, bacterial DNA was detected from sixteen patient samples. The results suggest that cases of chronic osteomyelitis of the jaws are usually mixed anaerobic infections, reinforcing the concept that osteomyelitis of the jaws are mainly related to microorganisms from the oral environment, and periapical and periodontal infections may act as predisposing factors.

  10. A study on the mixed jaw lesions associated with teeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nah, Kyung Soo [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    1. Retrospectively evaluate the accuracy of tentative diagnosis or impression from the clinico-radiographic materials of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth. 2. To observe the diagnostic importance of the calcified part of the lesions which appear as radiopaque areas. 14 cases of jaw lesions which showed mixed lesions associated with teeth were reviewed. These lesions were mostly diagnosed as adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (6 cases) or calcifying odontogenic cysts with (4 cases) or without odontomas (4 cases). The calcified elements of the lesions which demonstrated various sizes and patterns of radiopaque shadows resembled odontoid tissues in some cases but could not be defined in some other cases radiographically. The final histopathologic diagnosis confirmed adenomatoid odontogenic tumors in 4 of the 6 cases. The remaining 2 cases turned out to be odontoma and ameloblastic fibroodontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts with odontomas were correct in 3 cases but remaining 1 case was just odontoma. The 4 cases of calcifying odontogenic cysts were proved to be odontogenic keratocyst, calcified peripheral fibroma, unicystic ameloblastoma and squamous cell carcinoma. The diagnostic accuracy of the adenomatoid odontogenic tumors and calcifying odontogenic cysts were high when the lesions show typical appearance. The calcifications which show radiopaque areas could be odontomas or dystrophic calficifations or remnants of bone fragments from resorption.

  11. DENOSUMAB-RELATED OSTEONECROSIS OF THE JAWS: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Petkova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates are potent and effective drugs frequently used to prevent the skeletal complications associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis in women, to manage patients with multiple myeloma, hypercalcemia, and metastasis of cancer to the bone. The search for new medications with the same therapeutic effectiveness as the bisphosphonates but fewer side effects has resulted in the discovery of Denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator for nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL, therefore inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and function. Denosumab is a class of drugs that are entirely different from the traditional antiresorptive drugs, the bisphosphonates. Denosumab has several advantages, including better tolerability, ease of subcutaneous injection, a shorter half-life, and a reduced incidence of nephrotoxicity. Patients receiving bisphosphonates are at risk to develop a severe devastating complication - osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ - which is challenging to treat. Since 2010 there have been reports of ONJ in patients taking denosumab. In the 2014 position paper of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the nomenclature “bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw” was changed to “medication related osteonecrosis of the jaw” (MRONJ. The change is justified to accommodate the growing number of osteonecrosis cases involving the maxilla and mandible associated with other antiresorptive (denosumab and antiangiogenic therapies. Here we report a development of denosumab-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (DRONJ - a new type of bony necrosis- in patient with bone metastases of breast cancer on Denosumab therapy. The patient has no previous history of taking bisphosphonates.

  12. Posterior partially edentulous jaws, planning a rehabilitation with dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Douglas R; Silva, Emily V F; Pellizzer, Eduardo P; Filho, Osvaldo Magro; Goiato, Marcelo C

    2015-01-16

    To discuss important characteristics of the use of dental implants in posterior quadrants and the rehabilitation planning. An electronic search of English articles was conducted on MEDLINE (PubMed) from 1990 up to the period of March 2014. The key terms were dental implants and posterior jaws, dental implants/treatment planning and posterior maxilla, and dental implants/treatment planning and posterior mandible. No exclusion criteria were used for the initial search. Clinical trials, randomized and non randomized studies, classical and comparative studies, multicenter studies, in vitro and in vivo studies, case reports, longitudinal studies and reviews of the literature were included in this review. One hundred and fifty-two articles met the inclusion criteria of treatment planning of dental implants in posterior jaw and were read in their entirety. The selected articles were categorized with respect to their context on space for restoration, anatomic considerations (bone quantity and density), radiographic techniques, implant selection (number, position, diameter and surface), tilted and pterygoid implants, short implants, occlusal considerations, and success rates of implants placed in the posterior region. The results derived from the review process were described under several different topic headings to give readers a clear overview of the literature. In general, it was observed that the use of dental implants in posterior region requires a careful treatment plan. It is important that the practitioner has knowledge about the theme to evaluate the treatment parameters. The use of implants to restore the posterior arch presents many challenges and requires a detailed treatment planning.

  13. Monitoring of Infant Feeding Behavior Using a Jaw Motion Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid weight gain during infancy increases the risk of obesity. Given that infant feeding may contribute to rapid weight gain, it would be useful to develop objective tools which can monitor infant feeding behavior. This paper presents an objective method for examining infant sucking count during meals. A piezoelectric jaw motion sensor and a video camera were used to monitor jaw motions of 10 infants during a meal. Videotapes and sensor signals were annotated by two independent human raters, counting the number of sucks in each 10 second epoch. Annotated data were used as a gold standard for the development of the computer algorithms. The sensor signal was de-noised and normalized prior to computing the per-epoch sucking counts. A leave-one-out cross-validation scheme resulted in a mean error rate of -9.7% and an average intra-class correlation coefficient value of 0.86 between the human raters and the algorithm.

  14. Medication-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaws (MRONJ: Etiological Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Tenore

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ is an uncommon but severe bone disease, can be related to various medicaments (MRONJ including bisphosphonates (BRONJ, antiangiogenic and antiresorptive medicaments such as Denosumab (DRONJ, human monoclonal antibody to the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kB ligand. The rise in number in the latest years can be explained with many patients treated with all these drugs, assumed for osteometabolic (i.e osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta or neoplastic diseases (multiple myeloma, metastatic breast, prostate and renal cancer. The onset mechanism of MRONJ is not entirely understood, probably different mechanisms are involved, such as inhibition of the osteoclasts differentiation and function, decrease of the angiogenesis and inflammation/infection of the jaw bones. Some pathogenetic mechanisms are different according to the drugs, for example the cases of the RANK-ligand inhibitor related ONJ may occur without considering the period of medication intake; also the risk of ONJ manifestation after bisphosphonates (BF is not significantly diminished after interrupting the drug therapy, because BF bind to the bone matrix for many years. Drugs currently implicated in osteonecrosis pathology are various, therefore the term ONJ was currently replaced by MRONJ; it is necessary that the anamnestic phase and management of the patients to be more detailed and correct, not only to prevent osteonecrosis but also to plan all necessary treatments before start of the drug therapy.

  15. Jaw Musculature of the Picini (Aves: Piciformes: Picidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo José Donatelli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Picini tribe comprises 25 Old World woodpecker species grouped into seven genera that are widely distributed in Asia and include several representatives from the Eurasian region. Given the absence of detailed anatomical studies of Picini in the literature, the purposes of this study were to describe the jaw musculature of 14 species of Picini in detail and to compare the musculature patterns of these species. The results of this analysis indicate the following: (1 there is a clear association between the ventralis lateralis and dorsalis lateralis muscles through fleshy fibers that are connected in all species, (2 the jaw musculature of the genus Picus differs from that of other Picini genera in terms of the poor development of the protractor muscle system of the quadrate (M. protractor quadrati and M. protractor pterygoidei, (3 generally, the M. pseudotemporalis superficialis originates in the ventrocaudal region of the laterosphenoid (the lower part of the orbit, with the only noteworthy exception being an origin in the upper part of the orbit in Dinopium javanense, and (4 the protractor pterygoidei muscle is more developed in Blythipicus rubiginosus, Dinopium rafflesii, and D. javanense than in the other species.

  16. Evolution and etiopathogenesis of bisphosphonates induced osteonecrosis of the jaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonates (BPs is widely used as the first line of treatment choice for osteoporosis, Paget′s disease of bone, bone cancer metastasis and hypercalcemia of malignancy. BPs induced osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ is a relatively rare but severe clinical condition cited in English literature since 2003 while exact pathogenesis of BPs induced ONJ is not known until today, but numerous hypotheses were described in recent literature that promote and interlinked the development of BPs induced ONJ. These hypotheses indicate multifactorial nature of its development and factors responsible for that are; long term administration of intravenous nitrogen containing BPs in cancer patients, biological behavior of jaw, antiangiogenic property of BPs and by soft-tissue toxicity etc., All these factors are compounded by the presence of infection that are responsible for lower the pH of the oral cavity, other drugs like administration of corticosteroid, pathologies that cause hypo-calcification of bone, compromised immune response that alters normal healing such as renal transplantation followed by long term oral BPs therapy or chronic diabetic patients receiving BPs therapy and any dentoalveolar trauma. All literature in this review article is search from PubMed, Med-know and Google search engines.

  17. Human masticatory muscle activity and jaw position under experimental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C-M; Chou, S-L; Gale, E N; McCall, W D

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether stress induced a consistent pattern of increased electromyographic (EMG) activity in different masticatory muscles, and whether stress produced changes in jaw position. Thirty-five dental students at Taipei Medical College volunteered for this study. Mental arithmetic was used to create a stress condition and relaxation instruction was used to help relax the subjects. Subjects were asked to evaluate the stress they felt under each experimental condition with a visual analogue scale (VAS). Surface electrodes were used to monitor the EMG activities of the right masseter, right posterior temporalis and suprahyoid muscles. A kinesiograph was used to observe the jaw position. Data collected before mental arithmetic or relaxation monitored the baseline level. The VAS means were significantly increased during the stress condition and significantly decreased following relaxation, compared with the baseline. There was also a significant increase in EMG activity of all three muscles during mental arithmetic compared with baseline; different patterns of increased EMG activity were noticed in the three muscles under a continuous stress condition. Under stress, the incidence of tooth contact at intercuspal position was also increased.

  18. A comparison of animal jaws and bite mark patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murmann, Denise C; Brumit, Paula C; Schrader, Bruce A; Senn, David R

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the jaw shapes and bite mark patterns of wild and domestic animals to assist investigators in their analysis of animal bite marks. The analyses were made on 12 species in the Order Carnivora housed in the Mammalian Collection at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois. In addition to metric analysis, one skull from each species was photographed as a representative sample with an ABFO No. 2 scale in place. Bite patterns of the maxillary and mandibular dentition were documented using foamed polystyrene exemplars, which were also photographed. A total of 486 specimens were examined to analyze the jaw and bite mark patterns. A modified technique for measuring intercanine distances was developed to more accurately reflect the characteristics seen in animal bite marks. In it, three separate areas were measured on the canines, rather than just the cusp tip. This was to maximize the amount of information acquired from each skull, specifically to accommodate variances in the depth of bite injuries.

  19. Convergent evolution of hemoglobin switching in jawed and jawless vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfing, Kim; Stuhlmann, Friederike; Docker, Margaret F; Burmester, Thorsten

    2016-02-01

    During development, humans and other jawed vertebrates (Gnathostomata) express distinct hemoglobin genes, resulting in different hemoglobin tetramers. Embryonic and fetal hemoglobin have higher oxygen affinities than the adult hemoglobin, sustaining the oxygen demand of the developing organism. Little is known about the expression of hemoglobins during development of jawless vertebrates (Agnatha). We identified three hemoglobin switches in the life cycle of the sea lamprey. Three hemoglobin genes are specifically expressed in the embryo, four genes in the filter feeding larva (ammocoete), and nine genes correspond to the adult hemoglobin chains. During the development from the parasitic to the reproductive adult, the composition of hemoglobin changes again, with a massive increase of chain aHb1. A single hemoglobin chain is expressed constitutively in all stages. We further showed the differential expression of other globin genes: Myoglobin 1 is most highly expressed in the reproductive adult, myoglobin 2 expression peaks in the larva. Globin X1 is restricted to the embryo; globin X2 was only found in the reproductive adult. Cytoglobin is expressed at low levels throughout the life cycle. Because the hemoglobins of jawed and jawless vertebrates evolved independently from a common globin ancestor, hemoglobin switching must also have evolved convergently in these taxa. Notably, the ontogeny of sea lamprey hemoglobins essentially recapitulates their phylogeny, with the embryonic hemoglobins emerging first, followed by the evolution of larval and adult hemoglobins.

  20. ECM remodelling components regulated during jaw periosteal cell osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dorothea; Ardjomandi, Nina; Munz, Adelheid; Friedrich, Björn; Reinert, Siegmar

    2011-10-01

    Human JPCs (jaw periosteal cells) are a promising source for the engineering of cell-based osteoinductive grafts in oral surgery. For this purpose, cell characteristics of this stem cell source should be elucidated in detail. Analysis of gene expression profiles may help us to evaluate key factors and cellular targets of JPC osteogenesis. Because little is known about the interplay of osteogenic-related components, we analysed the expression of different collagen types reflecting important players for extracellular matrix assembly and of TIMPs (tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases) responsible for the inhibition of matrix degradation. Gene expression analyses using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) during JPC osteogenesis revealed the induction of several collagen types' expression (VII, VIII, XI and XII), and some of them (types I, VIII and XI) seemed to be susceptible to BMP-2 (bone morphogenetic protein-2) that is known to be a potent osteogenic inducer of periosteal cells. Among the TIMPs, only TIMP-4 and RECK (reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with Kazal motifs) expressions were strongly up-regulated during JPC osteogenesis. Proteome profiler analysis of supernatants from untreated and differentiated JPCs confirmed the gene expression data in terms of TIMP expression. In summary, we identified new collagen types and TIMPs that seem to play important roles during the osteogenesis of jaw periosteal progenitor cells.

  1. Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Jaw Periosteal Cell Mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauchle, Eva; Carvajal Berrio, Daniel; Rieger, Melanie; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Reinert, Siegmar; Alexander, Dorothea

    2017-01-01

    To achieve safer patient treatments, serum-free cell culture conditions have to be established for cell therapies. In previous studies, we demonstrated that serum-free culture favored the proliferation of MSCA-1(+) osteoprogenitors derived from the jaw periosteum. In this study, the in vitro formation of bone-specific matrix by MSCA-1(+) jaw periosteal cells (JPCs, 3 donors) was assessed and compared under serum-free and serum-containing media conditions using the marker-free Raman spectroscopy. Based on a standard fluorescence assay, JPCs from one patient were not able to mineralize under serum-containing culture conditions, whereas the other cells showed similar mineralization levels under both conditions. Raman spectra from mineralizing MSCA-1(+) JPCs revealed higher levels of hydroxyapatite formation and higher mineral to matrix ratios under serum-free culture conditions. Higher carbonate to phosphate ratios and higher crystallinity in JPCs cultured under serum-containing conditions indicated immature bone formation. Due to reduced collagen production under serum-free conditions, we obtained significant differences in collagen maturity and proline to hydroxyproline ratios compared to serum-free conditions. We conclude that Raman spectroscopy is a useful tool for the assessment and noninvasive monitoring of in vitro mineralization of osteoprogenitor cells. Further studies should extend this knowledge and improve JPC mineralization by optimizing culture conditions.

  2. Osteosarcoma of the jaws: case report on synchronous multicentric osteosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Shengnan; Li, Binbin

    2014-06-01

    Research has shown that osteosarcomas display high potential for metastasis to the lungs, pleurae and bones. Mandible, on the other hand, is an uncommon site for metastatic tumour cell colonization. Nevertheless, a metastatic tumour to mandible might be the first indication of an undiscovered malignancy at a distant site. This case report presents a case of a 61-year-old female patient. An osteosarcoma metastasized to her mandible shortly after the curettage of her jaw cyst. Both the metastatic osteosarcoma and the jaw cyst were confirmed by pathology. Initially, bilateral well-defined radiolucent lesions were shown in her panoramic X-ray image. Also, the diagnosis of a dentigerous cyst was made, based on histology. Two months later, a mixed radiolucent-radio opaque mass, which was confirmed as an osteosarcoma by pathology later, occupied the site of the previously enucleated dentigerous cyst, in her right mandible. Then, an identical osteosarcoma was found in the left pelvis on further doing overall radiological and pathological examinations. The pathologic hypotheses, treatment modality and follow-up of this case have also been presented.

  3. Unitarity sum rules, three-site moose model, and the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Nagai, Ryo; Okawa, Shohei; Tanabashi, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    We investigate W' interpretations for the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies. The roles of the unitarity sum rules, which ensure the perturbativity of the longitudinal vector boson scattering amplitudes, are emphasized. We find the unitarity sum rules and the custodial symmetry are powerful enough to predict various nontrivial relations among W W Z', W Z W', W W h , W W'h and Z Z'h coupling strengths in a model independent manner. We also perform surveys in the general parameter space of W' models and find the ATLAS 2 TeV diboson anomalies may be interpreted as a W' particle of the three-site moose model, i.e., a Kaluza-Klein like particle in a deconstructed extra dimension model. It is also shown that the nonstandard-model-like Higgs boson is favored by the present data to interpret the ATLAS diboson anomalies as the consequences of the W' and Z' bosons.

  4. IMPLEMENTATION OF THE IMPROVED QUASI-STATIC METHOD IN RATTLESNAKE/MOOSE FOR TIME-DEPENDENT RADIATION TRANSPORT MODELLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachary M. Prince; Jean C. Ragusa; Yaqi Wang

    2016-02-01

    Because of the recent interest in reactor transient modeling and the restart of the Transient Reactor (TREAT) Facility, there has been a need for more efficient, robust methods in computation frameworks. This is the impetus of implementing the Improved Quasi-Static method (IQS) in the RATTLESNAKE/MOOSE framework. IQS has implemented with CFEM diffusion by factorizing flux into time-dependent amplitude and spacial- and weakly time-dependent shape. The shape evaluation is very similar to a flux diffusion solve and is computed at large (macro) time steps. While the amplitude evaluation is a PRKE solve where the parameters are dependent on the shape and is computed at small (micro) time steps. IQS has been tested with a custom one-dimensional example and the TWIGL ramp benchmark. These examples prove it to be a viable and effective method for highly transient cases. More complex cases are intended to be applied to further test the method and its implementation.

  5. Morphological and molecular characteristics of four Sarcocystis spp. in Canadian moose (Alces alces), including Sarcocystis taeniata n. sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, Bjørn

    2014-04-01

    Individual sarcocysts were isolated from fresh or alcohol-fixed muscle samples of two moose from Alberta, Canada, and examined by light (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and molecular methods, comprising polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and sequencing of the complete18S rRNA gene and the partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I gene (cox1). By LM, four sarcocyst types were recognized, and the sequencing results showed that each type represented a distinct species, i.e. Sarcocystis alces, Sarcocystis alceslatrans, Sarcocystis ovalis and Sarcocystis taeniata n. sp. The finding of S. alceslatrans and S. ovalis has been reported briefly previously, but further details are provided here, including the ultrastructure of sarcoysts of S. alceslatrans as seen by SEM. The species S. alces was found for the first time in Canadian moose, whereas the finding of S. taeniata is the first record of this species in any host. The sarcocysts of S. taeniata were sac-like and about 1,000-1,100 × 60-80 μm in size. By LM, the cysts had a thin and smooth wall with no visible protrusions, whereas SEM revealed that the cyst surface had sparsely but regularly distributed, thin ribbon-like protrusions, about 2 μm long and 0.2 μm wide, lying flat against the surface and leaving most of the cyst surface naked. Similar protrusions have previously been reported from Sarcocystis grueneri in reindeer, which was found by sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses to be the species most closely related to S. taeniata. The phylogenetic analyses further suggested that S. taeniata, like S. alces and S. alceslatrans, use canids as definitive hosts, whereas corvid birds are known definitive hosts for S. ovalis. In contrast to the three other species found, S. taeniata displayed considerable intra-specific and intra-isolate sequence variation (substitutions, insertions/deletions) in certain regions of the 18S rRNA gene.

  6. Effects of climate and plant phenology on recruitment of moose at the southern extent of their range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Kevin L; Klaver, Robert W; Hersey, Kent R; Holland, A Andrew; Thomas, Timothy P; Kauffman, Matthew J

    2015-08-01

    Climate plays a fundamental role in limiting the range of a species, is a key factor in the dynamics of large herbivores, and is thought to be involved in declines of moose populations in recent decades. We examined effects of climate and growing-season phenology on recruitment (8-9 months old) of young Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) over three decades, from 18 herds, across a large geographic area encompassing much of the southern extent of their range. Recruitment declined in 8 of 18 herds during 1980-2009, whereas others did not exhibit a temporal trend (none showed a positive trend). During those three decades, seasonal temperatures increased, spring-summer precipitation decreased, and spring occurred earlier, became shorter in duration, and green-up occurred faster. Recruitment was influenced negatively by warm temperatures during the year before young were born, but only for herds with declining recruitment. Dry spring-summers of the previous year and rapid rates of spring green-up in the year of birth had similar negative influences across declining and stable herds. Those patterns indicate both direct (year(t)) and delayed (year(t-1)) effects of weather and plant phenology on recruitment of young, which we hypothesize was mediated through effects on maternal nutritional condition. Suppressed nutrition could have been induced by (1) increased thermoregulatory costs associated with warming temperatures and (2) shortened duration of availability of high-quality forage in spring. Progressive reductions in net energetic gain for species that are sensitive to climate may continue to hamper individual fitness and population dynamics.

  7. Effects of climate and plant phenology on recruitment of moose at the southern extent of their range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteith, Kevin L.; Klaver, Robert W.; Hersey, Kent; Holland, A. Andrew; Thomas, Timothy P.; Kauffman, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Climate plays a fundamental role in limiting the range of a species, is a key factor in the dynamics of large herbivores, and is thought to be involved in declines of moose populations in recent decades. We examined effects of climate and growing-season phenology on recruitment (8–9 months old) of young Shiras moose (Alces alces shirasi) over three decades, from 18 herds, across a large geographic area encompassing much of the southern extent of their range. Recruitment declined in 8 of 18 herds during 1980–2009, whereas others did not exhibit a temporal trend (none showed a positive trend). During those three decades, seasonal temperatures increased, spring–summer precipitation decreased, and spring occurred earlier, became shorter in duration, and green-up occurred faster. Recruitment was influenced negatively by warm temperatures during the year before young were born, but only for herds with declining recruitment. Dry spring–summers of the previous year and rapid rates of spring green-up in the year of birth had similar negative influences across declining and stable herds. Those patterns indicate both direct (year t ) and delayed (year t−1) effects of weather and plant phenology on recruitment of young, which we hypothesize was mediated through effects on maternal nutritional condition. Suppressed nutrition could have been induced by (1) increased thermoregulatory costs associated with warming temperatures and (2) shortened duration of availability of high-quality forage in spring. Progressive reductions in net energetic gain for species that are sensitive to climate may continue to hamper individual fitness and population dynamics.

  8. Visualization and analysis of occlusion for human jaws using a "functionally generated path"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myszkowski, Karol; Herder, Jens; Kunii, Tosiyasu L.; Ibusuki, Masumi

    1996-03-01

    Dynamic characteristics of occlusion during lower jaw motion are useful in the diagnosis of jaw articulation problems and in computer-aided design/ manufacture of teeth restorations. The Functionally Generated Path (FGP), produced as a surface which envelops the actual occlusal surface of the moving opponent jaw, can be used for compact representation of dynamic occlusal relations. In traditional dentistry FGP is recorded as a bite impression in a patient's mouth. We propose an efficient computerized technique for FGP reconstruction and validate it through implementation and testing. The distance maps between occlusal surfaces of jaws, calculated for multiple projection directions and accumulated for mandibular motion, provide information for FGP computation. Rasterizing graphics hardware is used for fast calculation of the distance maps. Real-world data are used: the scanned shape of teeth and the measured motion of the lower jaw. We show applications of FGP to analysis of the occlusion relations and occlusal surface design for restorations.

  9. Development of 4D jaw movement visualization system for dental diagnosis support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yoshimitsu; Terajima, Masahiko; Nakasima, Akihiko

    2004-10-01

    A person with an asymmetric morphology of maxillofacial skeleton reportedly possesses an asymmetric jaw function and the risk to express temporomandibular disorder is high. A comprehensive analysis from the point of view of both the morphology and the function such as maxillofacial or temporomandibular joint morphology, dental occlusion, and features of mandibular movement pathways is essential. In this study, the 4D jaw movement visualization system was developed to visually understand the characteristic jaw movement, 3D maxillofacial skeleton structure, and the alignment of the upper and lower teeth of a patient. For this purpose, the 3D reconstructed images of the cranial and mandibular bones, obtained by computed tomography, were measured using a non-contact 3D measuring device, and the obtained morphological images of teeth model were integrated and activated on the 6 DOF jaw movement data. This system was experimentally applied and visualized in a jaw deformity patient and its usability as a clinical diagnostic support system was verified.

  10. 6 MV photon beam modeling for Varian Clinac iX using GEANT4 virtual jaw

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Byung Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Baek, Jong Geun; Moon, Su Ho; Rho, Gwang Won; Kang, Jeong Ku; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Most virtual source models (VSM) use beam modeling, with the exception of the patient-dependent secondary collimator (jaw). Unlike other components of the treatment head, the jaw absorbs many photons generated by the bremsstrahlung, which decreases the efficiency of the simulation. In the present study, a new method of beam modeling using a virtual jaw was applied to improve the calculation efficiency of VSM. The results for the percentage depth dose and profile of the virtual jaw VSM calculated in a homogeneous water phantom agreed with the measurement results for the CC13 cylinder type ion chamber within an error rate of 2%, and the 80 to 20% penumbra width agreed with the measurement results within an error of 0.6 mm. Compared with the existing VSM, in which a great number of photons are absorbed, the calculation efficiency of the VSM using the virtual jaw was expected to increase by approximately 67%.

  11. Effects of an Open Jaw Posture on Vowel Perception in the Aging Voice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, Helene D

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to verify through an auditory-perceptual approach, whether an "open jaw" posture would result in improved speech quality for older adults. Forty normal-hearing listeners (20 males; 20 females) aged between 18 and 47 listened to vowel segments and performed two separate tasks: identifying vowels and comparing vowel clarity. Stimuli included vowels segmented from a sentence ("We saw two cars.") produced using a normal and an open jaw posture by 40 individuals aged between 30s and 80s. Three types of stimuli were presented: variable length and intensity, fixed length and variable intensity, and fixed length and normalized intensity. Mixed model analyses of variance were used to determine whether there was a jaw posture effect on the percentage of correct vowel identification. Chi-square tests were used to determine whether vowels produced with an open jaw posture were more likely to be identified as being "clearer." Open jaw posture resulted in higher rates of correct vowel identification, and vowels from contrast pairs were consistently judged as being "clearer" than vowels produced in normal jaw posture. Investigations on the effect of stimulus type revealed that the jaw-related improvement in speech quality was not solely due to an increase in intensity or length induced by an open jaw posture. Listeners assessing vowel identification and clarity in the aging voice were able to better differentiate among vowels spoken using an open jaw posture, and a greater number of vowels produced in an open jaw posture were perceived as sounding clearer. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Consistency and sealing of advanced bipolar tissue sealers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekan, Edward G; Davison, Mark A; Singleton, David W; Mennone, John Z; Hinoul, Piet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two commonly used advanced bipolar devices (ENSEAL(®) G2 Tissue Sealers and LigaSure™ Blunt Tip) for compression uniformity, vessel sealing strength, and consistency in bench-top analyses. Compression analysis was performed with a foam pad/sensor apparatus inserted between closed jaws of the instruments. Average pressures (psi) were recorded across the entire inside surface of the jaws, and over the distal one-third of jaws. To test vessel sealing strength, ex vivo pig carotid arteries were sealed and transected and left and right (sealed) halves of vessels were subjected to burst pressure testing. The maximum bursting pressures of each half of vessels were averaged to obtain single data points for analysis. The absence or presence of tissue sticking to device jaws was noted for each transected vessel. Statistically higher average compression values were found for ENSEAL(®) instruments (curved jaw and straight jaw) compared to LigaSure™, Pbench-top testing, ENSEAL(®) G2 sealers produced more uniform compression, stronger and more consistent vessel sealing, and reduced tissue sticking relative to LigaSure™.

  13. [Adsorption therapy for acute suppurative periostitis of the jaw].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭborodin, I V; Liubarskiĭ, M S; Loĭko, E R

    2002-01-01

    Capillaries and tissue leukocyte cytograms in soft gingival tissues were examined by optic microscopy in patients with acute purulent periostitis of the jaws treated by different methods. Disorders in the lymph outflow from gingival tissues were detected, which were due to dilatation of the lymph vessels and interstitial spaces in the mucosal lamina propria and stasis with leukocyte aggregation and purulent clots in the lumina of many lymph vessels. Less pronounced dilatation of interstitial spaces and lymph vessels, higher counts of lymphocytes, monocytes, and macrophages in the tissues of the gingival mucosa lamina propria, observed 2 days after the beginning of adsorption therapy of the subperiosteal abscess cavity, indicate that this therapy is more effective in acute purulent periostitis than traditional treatment.

  14. Standard test method for jaw crusher gouging abrasion test

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a laboratory procedure to determine the relative gouging abrasion resistance of materials. Materials homogeneous in structure and properties are the most appropriate test materials; however, surface-treated and composite materials can also be tested. The test involves a small laboratory jaw crusher that crushes presized hard rock materials, such as a hard morainal gravel, or some other crushable substance. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (See 8.1 on Safety Precautions.)

  15. Fibro-osseous lesions of the face and jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald-Jankowski, D.S

    2004-01-01

    Maxillofacial fibro-osseous lesions (FOL) consists of lesions that differ, with the exception of fibrous dysplasia, to those found in the rest of the skeleton. FOLs of the face and jaws are cemento-ossifying dysplasia, fibrous dysplasia and cemento-ossifying fibroma. Radiology is central to their diagnosis because the pathology for all FOLs is similar, although they range widely in behaviour, from dysplasia, hamartoma to benign neoplasia with occasional recurrence. Furthermore, once diagnosed the management of each is different. For cemento-ossifying dysplasia, this may mean doing nothing, simply because no treatment is generally appropriate. Almost all cemento-ossifying fibromas should be treated surgically, whereas cases of fibrous dysplasia are treated according to their clinical presentation, ranging from review and follow-up to surgery necessary to save the patient's sight or reduce deformity. The most important and frequent features of the FOLs differential diagnosis is discussed with assistance of a flow-chart.

  16. Multiple jaw cysts-unveiling the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Manjima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is a comparatively rare syndrome characterized by basal cell nevi, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based on the major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria. Dentist plays a major role in the diagnosis of this disease due to the oral and maxillofacial manifestations of the syndrome. In some cases, jaw cysts are diagnosed by routine radiographs advised by the dentists. Odontogenic keratocysts in such syndromic patients will be multiple and extensive and in some cases results in cortical expansion and facial disfigurement. Thorough clinical examination and investigations prompt an early confirmation of the syndrome, which is very essential to avoid morbidity associated with the syndrome. Here, we report a case of multiple odontogenic cysts in a 16-year-old patient which later was diagnosed as a case of Gorlin Goltz syndrome.

  17. Multiple jaw cysts-unveiling the Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjima, S; Naik, Zameera; Keluskar, Vaishali; Bagewadi, Anjana

    2015-03-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is a comparatively rare syndrome characterized by basal cell nevi, odontogenic keratocysts, and skeletal anomalies. Diagnosis is based on the major and minor clinical and radiographic criteria. Dentist plays a major role in the diagnosis of this disease due to the oral and maxillofacial manifestations of the syndrome. In some cases, jaw cysts are diagnosed by routine radiographs advised by the dentists. Odontogenic keratocysts in such syndromic patients will be multiple and extensive and in some cases results in cortical expansion and facial disfigurement. Thorough clinical examination and investigations prompt an early confirmation of the syndrome, which is very essential to avoid morbidity associated with the syndrome. Here, we report a case of multiple odontogenic cysts in a 16-year-old patient which later was diagnosed as a case of Gorlin Goltz syndrome.

  18. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siri Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (BRONJ is a severe complication that has recently emerged in patients treated with intravenous bisphosphonates for malignant diseases. This complication usually presents after a minor local trauma during a dental treatment. Several etiopathogenic mechanisms of this pathological condition have been proposed, but no model can explain all morphological changes observed at the macroscopic and microscopic level. BRONJ is likely to be related to direct toxicity in the bone and soft tissue cells, due to nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates. This review elucidates the clinical indications and mechanism of action of bisphosphonates, reports some clinical diagnostic criteria for BRONJ, describe the histopathological criteria for BRONJ diagnosis, the potential triggering pathways and the available treatment strategies.

  19. Effect of Repeated Food Morsel Splitting on Jaw Muscle Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A, Kumar; Svensson, Krister G; Baad-Hansen, Lene

    2014-01-01

    Mastication is a complex motor task often initiated by splitting of the food morsel between the anterior teeth. Training of complex motor tasks has consistently been shown to trigger neuroplastic changes in corticomotor control and optimization of muscle function. It is not known if training......) participated in a single one-hour session divided into six series. Each series consisted of ten trials of a standardized behavioral task (total of 60 trials). The behavioral task was to hold and split a food morsel (8 mm, 180 mg placebo tablet) placed on a bite force transducer with the anterior teeth......: There was no evident optimization of jaw motor function in terms of reduction in the variability of bite force values and muscle activity, when this simple task was repeated up to sixty times, in participants with normal intact periodontium....

  20. Osteonecrosis of the jaws and bisphosphonates. Report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor-Zuazaga, Daniel; Garatea-Crelgo, Joaquín; Martino-Gorbea, Raúl; Etayo-Pérez, Amaya; Sebastián-López, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are recently acquiring increasing relevance in the treatment of several diseases. In line with the increased use of these compounds, cases of mandibular osteonecrosis, and to a lesser extent, maxillary osteonecrosis, are being reported. This necrosis is difficult to treat in patients who usually have a previously limited quality of life. A surgical performance carried out by oral and maxillofacial surgeons, stomatologists and odontologists might lead to bone exposure. A treatment based on conservation and as harmless as possible seems to be the most advisable way of acting with these patients in order to minimize the incidence and treat the complications, once the lesions have been ascertained. We report three cases treated in our service of osteonecrosis of the jaws after exodontics. This side effect should be remembered before starting any surgical treatment in these patients.

  1. Optical metrology analysis of the lower jaw deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasić, Ivan; Sojić, Ljiljana Tihacek; Lemić, Aleksandra Milić

    2011-04-01

    New optical stereometric methods based on both contact and noncontact mechanisms for displacement measurement have become common methods in biomechanical behavior research of biomaterials, bone and soft tissue. The aim of this study was to register and measure possible deformations of the lower jaw (mandible) with the intact dental arch using optical metrology method. The system for full field measurement of deformations (strains) comprised of two digital cameras for a synchronized stereoview of the specimen, and the Aramis software. The maximum mandibular bone strains were measured in the regions of the lower first premolar and the lower second molar. In the action force of 500 N simulated in the region of the first lower premolar the intensity of deformation was 86 microm. The value of maximum strain in the bone around the molars was 24 microm for the force of 500 N acting on the second lower molar. When it comes to premolars, 3-5 times stronger deformation was observed in the region of the first lower premolar, compared to the deformation values of the second lower premolar area. Under loading of the applied forces the measured strains were in the elastic deformation area, meanning that the dependence of force and deformity is linear. The highest values of strain measurements obtained by the optical method were found in the jaw bone tissue around the loading teeth, and the bony regions of the triangle and mental region. According to the obtained results from the Aramis processing software it can be concluded that this method is applicable in a variety of biomedical research.

  2. Optical metrology analysis of the lower jaw deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasić Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. New optical stereometric methods based on both contact and noncontact mechanisms for displacement measurement have become common methods in biomechanical behavior research of biomaterials, bone and soft tissue. The aim of this study was to register and measure possible deformations of the lower jaw (mandible with the intact dental arch using optical metrology method. Methods. The system for full field measurement of deformations (strains comprised of two digital cameras for a synchronized stereoview of the specimen, and the Aramis software. Results. The maximum mandibular bone strains were measured in the regions of the lower first premolar and the lower second molar. In the action force of 500 N simulated in the region of the first lower premolar the intensity of deformation was 86 μm. The value of maximum strain in the bone around the molars was 24 μm for the force of 500 N acting on the second lower molar. When it comes to premolars, 3-5 times stronger deformation was observed in the region of the first lower premolar, compared to the deformation values of the second lower premolar area. Conclusion. Under loading of the applied forces the measured strains were in the elastic deformation area, meanning that the dependence of force and deformity is linear. The highest values of strain measurements obtained by the optical method were found in the jaw bone tissue around the loading teeth, and the bony regions of the triangle and mental region. According to the obtained results from the Aramis processing software it can be concluded that this method is applicable in a variety of biomedical research.

  3. The moose throat bot fly Cephenemyia ulrichii larvae (Diptera: Oestridae found developing in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus for the first time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksanen Antti

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract About fifty larvae of Cephenemyia ulrichii Brauer (Diptera: Oestridae, some of them nearly full-grown third instars, were found in the throat of a roe deer (Capreolus capreolus in June 2007 near Helsinki in Finland. The parasite is considered to be host specific, occurring only in the moose (Alces alces, and this paper is apparently the first report of a successful infestation in an aberrant host.

  4. Relationship between Cd and Zn concentration in the kidneys, liver, and muscles of moose (Alces alces) from north-eastern Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibniewski, Michał; Skibniewska, Ewa M; Kośla, Tadeusz; Olbrych, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the cadmium and zinc content in the kidneys and liver of moose from north-eastern Poland. Animals were divided with respect to their age. The mean concentration of cadmium in the kidneys of moose studied was 11.31 mg kg(-1), while in the liver it amounted to 2.68 mg kg(-1). Age had a significant effect on the content of cadmium in both organs. In the muscles of most animals studied, the cadmium concentrations were below the detection limit. Elevated concentrations were found in three individuals only. Older animals had over six times higher concentrations of cadmium in both kidneys and liver than younger individuals. The cadmium content in kidneys increased with animals' age while no such relationship was found for zinc. Although older animals had higher mean concentrations of zinc in kidneys, liver, and muscles, the two age groups did not differ significantly. The mean concentration of zinc in the kidneys of moose studied was 38.83 mg kg(-1), while in the liver it amounted to 29.03 mg kg(-1). The cadmium concentration in the kidneys was significantly correlated with the cadmium concentration in the liver (r = 0.53, p ≤ 0.01) and with the zinc concentration in the kidneys (r = 0.52, p ≤ 0.01). The data obtained within study correspond with analyses results of the organs of healthy moose in Sweden.

  5. Forces resisting jaw displacement in relaxed humans: a predominantly viscous phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, C C; Sooch, A S; Hannam, A G

    2002-02-01

    Forces opening the relaxed human jaw are resisted by intrinsic restraints, including passive tensions in the jaw-closing muscles. These muscle tensions have been modelled as viscoelastic elements, and static measurements suggest their elastic portions contribute approximately a total of 5 N resistance at wide gape. As the viscous damping properties of muscles which affect the jaw's dynamic behaviour are unknown, we measured the jaw opening force required to reach maximum gape during fast and slow opening in six relaxed subjects. These data were then incorporated in a dynamic mathematical jaw model to determine the damping properties of the masticatory system. During the 3 and 8 s opening trials, forces increased with gape (6.7 +/- 3.3 and 3.9 +/- 2.3 N, respectively, at 50% gape) and reached their maxima at wide gape (19.9 +/- 4.5 and 13.2 +/- 4.4 N, respectively). The muscle damping constant needed by the model to emulate these results was 150 Nsm(-1), approximately 25% lower than the calculated critical damping constant. This study suggests low forces are required to open the jaw in relaxed humans, and that jaw viscosity, not elasticity, provides the major resistance to motion.

  6. Mechanical analysis on individualized finite element of temporal-mandibular joint under overlarge jaw opening status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingxu; Yang, Jianjun; Zhou, Ruizhi; Li, Ningyi; Xia, Junnan; Gu, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Analyze the stress status of temporal-mandibular joint (TMJ) of a healthy volunteer under the overlarge jaw opening status through the finite element method, with the purpose of clarifying the loading features of each structure in the joint area, and achieving further understanding of the pathogenesis of the temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Collect the CBCT and MRI data of a volunteer respectively under the maximum jaw opening, establish the finite element model (FEM) of TMJ under the maximum jaw opening status through a series of software, image segmentation, rectification, meshing, material evaluation and other related processing, simulate the mechanical environment of this joint area under this status, and analyze the stress status of the articular disc, condyle cartilage, and condyle process. Based on CT and MRI image data, build 3D model and FEM of TMJ, fully simulate the mechanical environment under the large jaw opening status, and calculate the stress value of the articular disc, condyle process and condylar cartilage. This research result reminds us that the normal people's articular disc are easy to generate stress concentration under large jaw opening, but its stress is far less than the one under the tight biting status. Perhaps the TMJ symptom induced under the large jaw opening status is mainly caused by the displacement of the articular disc. Under the large jaw opening status, the condylar cartilage plays a vital role in dispersing the stress. This method can be applied for carrying out individualized mechanical analysis on the patients with TMD.

  7. Molecular and cellular changes associated with the evolution of novel jaw muscles in parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokita, Masayoshi; Nakayama, Tomoki; Schneider, Richard A; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2013-02-01

    Vertebrates have achieved great evolutionary success due in large part to the anatomical diversification of their jaw complex, which allows them to inhabit almost every ecological niche. While many studies have focused on mechanisms that pattern the jaw skeleton, much remains to be understood about the origins of novelty and diversity in the closely associated musculature. To address this issue, we focused on parrots, which have acquired two anatomically unique jaw muscles: the ethmomandibular and the pseudomasseter. In parrot embryos, we observe distinct and highly derived expression patterns for Scx, Bmp4, Tgfβ2 and Six2 in neural crest-derived mesenchyme destined to form jaw muscle connective tissues. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis reveals that cell proliferation is more active in the cells within the jaw muscle than in surrounding connective tissue cells. This biased and differentially regulated mode of cell proliferation in cranial musculoskeletal tissues may allow these unusual jaw muscles to extend towards their new attachment sites. We conclude that the alteration of neural crest-derived connective tissue distribution during development may underlie the spatial changes in jaw musculoskeletal architecture found only in parrots. Thus, parrots provide valuable insights into molecular and cellular mechanisms that may generate evolutionary novelties with functionally adaptive significance.

  8. The Rise of Jaw Protrusion in Spiny-Rayed Fishes Closes the Gap on Elusive Prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellwood, David R; Goatley, Christopher H R; Bellwood, Orpha; Delbarre, Daniel J; Friedman, Matt

    2015-10-19

    Jaw protrusion is one of the most important innovations in vertebrate feeding over the last 400 million years [1, 2]. Protrusion enables a fish to rapidly decrease the distance between itself and its prey [2, 3]. We assessed the evolution and functional implications of jaw protrusion in teleost fish assemblages from shallow coastal seas since the Cretaceous. By examining extant teleost fishes, we identified a robust morphological predictor of jaw protrusion that enabled us to predict the extent of jaw protrusion in fossil fishes. Our analyses revealed increases in both average and maximum jaw protrusion over the last 100 million years, with a progressive increase in the potential impact of fish predation on elusive prey. Over this period, the increase in jaw protrusion was initially driven by a taxonomic restructuring of fish assemblages, with an increase in the proportion of spiny-rayed fishes (Acanthomorpha), followed by an increase in the extent of protrusion within this clade. By increasing the ability of fishes to catch elusive prey [2, 4], jaw protrusion is likely to have fundamentally changed the nature of predator-prey interactions and may have contributed to the success of the spiny-rayed fishes, the dominant fish clade in modern oceans [5].

  9. Osteonecrosis of the jaws: a review and update in etiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Guilherme H; Chrun, Emanuely S; Dutra, Kamile L; Daniel, Filipe I; Grando, Liliane J

    2017-06-24

    Osteonecrosis of the jaws can result either from radiation, used in radiotherapy for treatment of malignant tumors, or medications used for bone remodeling and anti-angiogenesis such as bisphosphonates. These conditions can be associated with triggering factors such as infection, trauma and decreased vascularity. The management of patients with osteonecrosis of the jaws requires caution since there is no specific treatment that acts isolated and decidedly. However, different treatment modalities can be employed in an associated manner to control and stabilize lesions. To review the current knowledge on etiology and management of osteonecrosis of the jaws, both radio-induced and medication-related, aiming to improve knowledge of professionals seeking to improve the quality of life of their patients. Literature review in PubMed as well as manual search for relevant publications in reference list of selected articles. Articles in English ranging from 1983 to 2017, which assessed osteonecrosis of the jaws as main objective, were selected and analyzed. Infections, traumas and decreased vascularity have a triggering role for osteonecrosis of the jaws. Prophylactic and/or stabilizing measures can be employed in association with therapeutic modalities to properly manage osteonecrosis of the jaws patients. Selecting an appropriate therapy for osteonecrosis of the jaws management based on current literature is a rational decision that can help lead to a proper treatment plan. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Morphology does not predict performance: jaw curvature and prey crushing in durophagous stingrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmann, Matthew A; Crofts, Stephanie B; Dean, Mason N; Summers, Adam P; Lovejoy, Nathan R

    2015-12-01

    All stingrays in the family Myliobatidae are durophagous, consuming bivalves and gastropods, as well as decapod crustaceans. Durophagous rays have rigid jaws, flat teeth that interlock to form pavement-like tooth plates, and large muscles that generate bite forces capable of fracturing stiff biological composites (e.g. mollusk shell). The relative proportion of different prey types in the diet of durophagous rays varies between genera, with some stingray species specializing on particular mollusk taxa, while others are generalists. The tooth plate module provides a curved occlusal surface on which prey is crushed, and this curvature differs significantly among myliobatids. We measured the effect of jaw curvature on prey-crushing success in durophagous stingrays. We milled aluminum replica jaws rendered from computed tomography scans, and crushed live mollusks, three-dimensionally printed gastropod shells, and ceramic tubes with these fabricated jaws. Our analysis of prey items indicate that gastropods were consistently more difficult to crush than bivalves (i.e. were stiffer), but that mussels require the greatest work-to-fracture. We found that replica shells can provide an important proxy for investigations of failure mechanics. We also found little difference in crushing performance between jaw shapes, suggesting that disparate jaws are equally suited for processing different types of shelled prey. Thus, durophagous stingrays exhibit a many-to-one mapping of jaw morphology to mollusk crushing performance. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. The influence of jaw's curvature on the results of the Brazilian disc test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch.F. Markides

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The general contact problem of a disc squeezed between jaws of arbitrary curvature is considered employing Muskhelishvili's complex potentials. Taking advantage of the general solution introduced, the closed-form expressions for the stresses along strategic loci (loaded rim, loaded diameter, disc's center are obtained, in terms of the ratio ρ of the disc's to the jaw's curvature. Then, the effect of ρ (as well as that of the relative stiffness of the disc's and jaw's materials dictating the contact arc on the stress distribution along these loci is explored. It is concluded that, for both smooth contact (zero friction and contact with friction, the role of the jaw's curvature is significant not only along the disc-jaw contact arc (as it could be expected, but also all along the loaded diameter. On the other hand, it is indicated that the stress field at the disc's center is more or less insensitive to the jaw's curvature assuming that ρ lies within the range (0, 0.67 or in other words within the limits defined by the two standardized suggestions, i.e. that of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM (plane loading platens with ρ = 0 and that of International Society for Rock Mechanics (ISRM (curved jaws with ρ = 0.67. The upper limit of this range is a kind of compromise between the need to make the stress field at the disc's center independent of the boundary conditions while keeping at the same time the contact angle large enough to reduce the stress concentration and the risk for premature fracture initiation far from the disc's center. For jaws with radius of curvature exceeded by that suggested by ISRM, the stress field at the disc's center is significantly influenced. Especially for jaws with radius approaching that of the disc, the stress field at the disc's center is dramatically distorted rendering Hondros' formula inapplicable and the test results erroneous.

  12. Anti-Brucella Antibodies in Moose (Alces alces gigas), Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and Plains Bison (Bison bison bison) in Alaska, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nymo, Ingebjørg Helena; Beckmen, Kimberlee; Godfroid, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    We used an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA) and the rose bengal test (RBT) to test for anti-Brucella antibodies in moose (Alces alces gigas), muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus), and plains bison (Bison bison bison) from various game management units (GMUs) in Alaska, US, sampled from 1982 to 2010. A portion of the sera had previously been tested with the standard plate test (SPT), the buffered Brucella antigen (BBA) card test, and the card test (CARD). No antibody-positive plains bison were identified. Anti-Brucella antibodies were detected in moose (iELISA, n=4/87; RBT, n=4/87; SPT, n=4/5; BBA, n=4/4) from GMU 23 captured in 1992, 1993, and 1995 and in muskoxen (iELISA, n=4/52; RBT, n=4/52; CARD, n=4/35) from GMUs 26A and 26B captured in 2004, 2006, and 2007. A negative effect of infection on the health of individuals of these species is probable. The presence of antibody-positive animals from 1992 to 2007 suggests presence of brucellae over time. The antibody-positive animals were found in northern Alaska, an area with a historically higher prevalence of Brucella-positive caribou, and a spillover of Brucella suis biovar 4 from caribou may have occurred. Brucella suis biovar 4 causes human brucellosis, and transmission from consumption of moose and muskoxen is possible.

  13. Extensive jaw mobility in suckermouth armored catfishes (Loricariidae): a morphological and kinematic analysis of substrate scraping mode of feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, Dominique; Geerinckx, Tom; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Herrel, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Loricariidae, or suckermouth armored catfishes, possess upper and lower jaws that are ventrally oriented and that bear teeth that touch the substrate from which algae and other food items are scraped. The ventral orientation and the highly specialized morphology of the jaws, characterized by protrusible upper jaws and left-right decoupled lower jaws, are observed in Pterygoplichthys disjunctivus, the species investigated here. Kinematic data of the scraping feeding movements, obtained by external high-speed and x-ray recordings, are used to quantify jaw movement, especially to test for upper jaw mobility and versatility during substrate scraping. Our results show that the mobility of the jaws is indeed high compared with what is standard for catfishes. The upper jaw's ability to perform a substantial degree of rostrocaudal movement is quite unique for catfishes. The ventromedially oriented lower jaws, with the teeth and the coronoid process at opposite sides, display an extensive mobility: they rotate around the suspensorial articulation and around their longitudinal axis, resulting in an extended scraping movement and thereby covering a large surface area. The lower jaws also show a left-right asymmetry in their movements during scraping. Thus, our results suggest that the extreme morphological specializations of the jaws in loricariid catfishes are linked to an increased mobility and functional versatility, allowing these animals to efficiently scrape algae from substrates with irregular surfaces.

  14. Osteonecrosis of the jaws. Clinicopathologic and radiologic characteristics, preventive and therapeutic Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vassiliou, Vassilios [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Bank of Cyprus Oncology Centre, Nicosia (Cyprus); Tselis, Nikolaos [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum Offenbach (Germany); Kardamakis, Dimitrios [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Patras Medical School (Greece)

    2010-07-15

    Background: bisphosphonate (BP) use has increased dramatically in recent years, becoming an integral part of the overall antineoplastic management of patients with metastatic bone disease. Even though their application has shown to be effective in reducing pain and minimizing the risk of skeletal-related events, their administration may bring also adverse events such osteonecrosis of the jaws (ONJ). Methods: after a thorough review of the literature, important aspects of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of ONJ are presented. Results: ONJ is evident in up to 10% of patients receiving intravenous BP treatment. Despite the fact that its exact pathophysiology is unknown, it is characterized by bone necrosis that can occur either spontaneously or after dental surgery or tooth extraction. Panoramic radiographs are useful for the diagnosis and routine assessment of patients and computed tomography can differentiate between ONJ and metastatic disease. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging depicts local disease extension readily, and scintigraphy is the most sensitive imaging modality for detecting early involvement. Preventive measures and routine dental evaluations are essential components of the overall patient management. In the event of ONJ, stage I or II should be managed conservatively, whereas more advanced stages (III and IV) should be treated surgically. Conclusion: ONJ is a well-defined clinical entity that all medical and dental doctors should be aware of, since if it is not dealt with readily and effectively, it may deteriorate the clinical status and quality of life of affected patients. (orig.)

  15. Multiplanar CT reconstruction of the jaw: a new way for implant diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursky, S.; Wittek, Werner; Wilke, Walter; Schulz, H.; Lieberenz, S.

    1990-11-01

    For preoperative planning of dental implantations pictorial representations are required that permit to evaluate the size of teeth holes, size and structure of jaw bones, position of the mandibular channel and of the alveolar nerve. Since normal transaxial. CT images do not meet these requirements special secondary reconstructions adapted to jaw anatomy are necessary: -panoramic secondary cuts The cut line follows jaw curvature and represents a similar view as orthopantomographic pictures. (see Fig.1) -oblique secondary cuts That are plane cuts perpendicular to the panoramic cut line. (see Fig.2)

  16. The Role of Antiangiogenic Therapy in the Development of Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantasia, John E

    2015-11-01

    There is an increasing use of established and newer medications that have antiangiogenic properties. Inhibition of angiogenesis likely has either a primary or secondary role in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). These medications are being used in the treatment of various cancers and in the treatment of several non-oncologic conditions. Antiangiogenic medications when used in combination with antiresorptive medications, such as nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates or denosumab, seem to increase the likelihood of osteonecrosis of the jaw. This review highlights the role of inhibitors of angiogenesis and their role in the development of osteonecrosis of the jaws.

  17. Spontaneous jaw muscle activity in patients with acquired brain injuries - preliminary findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothari, Mohit; Madsen, Vibeke Louise Funch; Castrillon, Eduardo E.

    2017-01-01

    High or excessive parafunctional jaw muscle activity is a frequent complication of acquired brain injury (ABI) and may have some similarities to bruxism. Bruxism has been associated with increased tooth wear, masseter hypertrophy and headaches. The aim of this observational study was to identify...... the levels of jaw muscle activity from fourteen ABI patients having different functional and cognitive levels in their early phase of neurological rehabilitation (according to their Ranchos Los Amigos Scale (RLAS) score). Nine patients were severely cognitive impairement (RLAS score 1-3): with no or little...... (EMG) device was used to assess the jaw muscle EMG activity in ABI patients for two hours continuously at two different days....

  18. Nonodontogenic Cysts of the Jaws and Treatment in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Richard Scott; Dillon, Jasjit

    2016-02-01

    Nonodontogenic cysts within the jaws are not a common presentation in the pediatric population. Cysts within the pediatric population tend to be developmental and odontogenic in nature. Although nonodontogenic cysts of the jaws are relatively uncommon, it is imperative the clinician understand their clinical behavior and management because failure to do so can result in increased patient morbidity. The nonodontogenic cysts of the jaws that are most often encountered are the central giant cell granuloma, traumatic bone cavity, aneurysmal bone cyst, nasopalatine duct cyst, and nasolabial cyst. This article reviews common clinical findings, radiographic features, histopathologic features, and current treatments of nonodontogenic cysts.

  19. BISPHOSPHONATE-INDUCED OSTEONECROSIS OF THE JAW AND GUIDELINES FOR DIAGNOSIS, STAGING AND DENTAL MANAGEMENT: REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw, often abbreviated as BON, BON of the jaw or even BRONJ, is a recently discovered dental phenomenon that may lead to surgical complication in the form of impaired wound healing following oral or periodontal surgery or endodontic therapy. 1 In 2003, the first reports describing osteonecrosis of the jaw in patients receiving bisphosphonates were published. About 95% of these cases occurred among cancer patients receiving high-dose intravenous bisphosphonates. Approximately 5% of the reported cases have been in osteoporosis patients receiving low-dose bisphosphonate therapy

  20. Patterns and causes of demographic variation in a harvested moose population: evidence for the effects of climate and density-dependent drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Glen S

    2011-11-01

    1. Better understanding of the mechanisms affecting demographic variation in ungulate populations is needed to support sustainable management of harvested populations. While studies of moose Alces alces L. populations have previously explored temporal variation in demographic processes, managers responsible for populations that span large heterogeneous landscapes would benefit from an understanding of how demography varies across biogeographical gradients in climate and other population drivers. Evidence of thresholds in population response to manageable and un-manageable drivers could aid resource managers in identifying limits to the magnitude of sustainable change. 2. Generalized additive models (GAMs) were used to evaluate the relative importance of population density, habitat abundance, summer and winter climatic conditions, primary production, and harvest intensity in explaining spatial variation in moose vital rates in Ontario, Canada. Tree regression was used to test for thresholds in the magnitudes of environmental predictor variables that significantly affected population vital rates. 3. Moose population growth rate was negatively related to moose density and positively related to the abundance of mixed deciduous habitat abundant in forage. Calf recruitment was negatively related to a later start of the growing season and calf harvest. The ratio of bulls to cows was related to male harvest and hunter access, and thresholds were evident in predictor variables for all vital rate models. 4. Findings indicate that the contributions of density-dependent and independent factors can vary depending on the scale of population process. The importance of density dependence and habitat supply to low-density ungulate populations was evident, and management strategies for ungulates may be improved by explicitly linking forest management and harvest. Findings emphasize the importance of considering summer climatic influences to ungulate populations, as

  1. Fibrous dysplasia of the jaws associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whi, Jung Hyun; Kim, Young Joo; Chun, Kyung Ah; Kim, Ki Tae; Chang, Eun Deok; Kim, Young Ok; Lee, Won [The Catholic University of Korea, Uijongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-06-15

    There have been few reports on fibrous dyplasia associated with secondary hyperparathyroidism. We report a case of a hemodialysis patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism concomitant with fibrous dysplasia of the jaws causing an abnormal deformity.

  2. The inhibitory effect of a chewing task on a human jaw reflex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maillou, P.; Cadden, S.W.; Lobbezoo, F.

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate whether an inhibitory jaw reflex could be modulated by experimentally controlled conditions that mimicked symptoms of temporomandibular disorders. Reflecting on previous work, we anticipated that these conditions might suppress the reflex. Electromyographic r

  3. Autonomic cardiac modulation in obstructive sleep apnea: effect of an oral jaw-positioning appliance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coruzzi, Paolo; Gualerzi, Massimo; Bernkopf, Edoardo; Brambilla, Lorenzo; Brambilla, Valerio; Broia, Vanna; Lombardi, Carolina; Parati, Gianfranco

    2006-01-01

    ... with other therapeutic approaches. The aim of our study was to investigate the responses of autonomic indexes of neural cardiac control to another type of OSA treatment based on an oral jaw-positioning appliance...

  4. Free radicals and SOD activity of jaw cyst. Direct measurement and spin trapping studies by ESR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, H; Simodate, H; Suzuki, M

    1990-01-01

    Free radicals produced in the fluid of jaw cysts were directly measured at room temperature using ESR. With these samples, SOD activity of the cyst fluid was measured by the ESR spin trapping method with DMPO as a trapping agent. Freeze-dried samples of cyst fluid showed a broad ESR signal at g = 2.005. Relative signal intensity of samples from jaw cysts with inflammation was higher than jaw cysts without inflammation. SOD activity of cyst fluid with high viscosity showed higher values than that of cyst fluid with low viscosity. We suggest that free radicals produced in jaw cyst damage tissues while higher SOD activity of cyst fluid play a role in a self-defense mechanism against free radicals.

  5. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang, Xin; Yan, Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  6. Jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia secondary to Wilson's Disease treated with botulinum toxin type A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We have reported a case series of five patients with jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia secondary to Wilson's disease (WD, in which the patients were treated with botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A. In all cases, dystonia score was partially reduced three weeks after injections. The most common side effect was transient mild dysphagia. This preliminary study showed that jaw-opening oromandibular dystonia in WD may be partially responsive to the use of BTX-A.

  7. Computed tomography and partial coronoidectomy for open-mouth jaw locking in two cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, Jason W; Snyder, Christopher J; Gengler, William R

    2009-01-01

    Open-mouth jaw locking in the cat has traditionally been minimally evaluated with diagnostic imaging. Multiple methods have been described for surgical management of this problem. This report describes the use of computed tomography to diagnose open-mouth jaw locking in 2 cats secondary to ventrolateral displacement of the coronoid process in relation to the zygomatic arch. In these 2 cases, a previously unreported surgical approach whereby the coronoid was not reduced before partial coronoidectomy was used with successful outcomes.

  8. Relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics in healthy elderly subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinozaki H

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hiromichi Shinozaki, Haruka Tohara, Mariko Matsubara, Nobuhiro Inokuchi, Yasuhiro Yamazaki, Ayako Nakane, Yoko Wakasugi, Shunsuke Minakuchi Department of Gerodontology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan Purpose: This study aimed to examine the relationship between jaw opening force and hyoid bone dynamics and resting position in elderly individuals based on gender. Subjects and methods: Subjects were 36 healthy elderly individuals aged ≥65 years without dysphagia (16 men and 20 women; mean age 75.5 years, range 65–88 years. Videofluorographic images during the swallowing of 10 mL of 40% (w/v barium sulfate were obtained and the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone and maximum/resting hyoid position were evaluated. Jaw opening force was measured three times using a jaw opening force sthenometer; the mean of these three measurements was used for analysis. Results: In men, there was a positive correlation between jaw opening force and resting hyoid position and negative correlations among all the degrees of anterior, superior, and hypotenuse displacements of the hyoid bone. In women, there was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and any of the measurement items. There was no statistically significant correlation between jaw opening force and maximum hyoid position in either men or women. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that low jaw opening force leads to low resting hyoid position only in elderly men, and a lower hyoid position in healthy elderly men results in a larger total amount of hyoid displacement during swallowing. Moreover, a maximum hyoid position in healthy individuals of either gender does not differ depending on their jaw opening force. Keywords: aging, deglutition disorders, dysphasia, gender differences

  9. Bone metabolism and clinical study of 44 patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws

    OpenAIRE

    Bocanegra Pérez, Sacramento; Vicente Barrero, Mario; Sosa Henríquez, Manuel; Rodríguez Bocanegra, Eduardo; Limiñana Cañal, José María; López Márquez, Ariadna; Pérez Plasencia, D.; Ramos Macías, Ángel

    2012-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaws is a clinical entity described and linked to treatment with bisphosphonates in 2003. Its real incidence is unknown and it could increase due to the large number of patients treated with these drugs, and its cumulative effect on the bone. State of the art knowledge regarding its etiopathogeny, clinical course and suitable treatments is limited. Objectives: To study the clinical characteristics of 44 patients with bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws and th...

  10. Analyzing surface EMG signals to determine relationship between jaw imbalance and arm strength loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Quang Dang Khoa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study investigated the relationship between dental occlusion and arm strength; in particular, the imbalance in the jaw can cause loss in arm strength phenomenon. One of the goals of this study was to record the maximum forces that the subjects can resist against the pull-down force on their hands while biting a spacer of adjustable height on the right or left side of the jaw. Then EMG measurement was used to determine the EMG-Force relationship of the jaw, neck and arms muscles. This gave us useful insights on the arms strength loss due to the biomechanical effects of the imbalance in the jaw mechanism. Methods In this study to determine the effects of the imbalance in the jaw to the strength of the arms, we conducted experiments with a pool of 20 healthy subjects of both genders. The subjects were asked to resist a pull down force applied on the contralateral arm while biting on a firm spacer using one side of the jaw. Four different muscles – masseter muscles, deltoid muscles, bicep muscles and trapezoid muscles – were involved. Integrated EMG (iEMG and Higuchi fractal dimension (HFD were used to analyze the EMG signals. Results The results showed that (1 Imbalance in the jaw causes loss of arm strength contra-laterally; (2 The loss is approximately a linear function of the height of the spacers. Moreover, the iEMG showed the intensity of muscle activities decreased when the degrees of jaw imbalance increased (spacer thickness increased. In addition, the tendency of Higuchi fractal dimension decreased for all muscles. Conclusions This finding indicates that muscle fatigue and the decrease in muscle contraction level leads to the loss of arm strength.

  11. Jaw-thrust induces sympathetic responses during induction of general anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Bum Soo; Jee, Dae-Lim

    2013-08-01

    Jaw-thrust is a noxious stimulus that might induce sympathetic responses. The purpose of this study, was to evaluate the effects of jaw-thrust on sympathetic responses. We investigated seventy three patients. Patients who received general anesthesia were randomly divided into a control group (maintenance of combined airway maneuver with head tilt, open mouth by mouthpiece, and chin-lift, n = 30) and jaw-thrust group (maintenance of head tilt, open mouth and jaw-thrust, n = 30). In the jaw-thrust group, four minutes of endoscopy-guided force to the mandible to get the best laryngeal view were applied. For the control group, the combined airway maneuver was maintained during the same period. Arterial blood pressure (AP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded at predetermined time points (1 min before anesthesia induction, 2 min after fiberoptic bronchoscopy placement, and thereafter 1 min-interval during each airway maneuver) during jaw-thrust and chin-lift maneuver. The force amplitude applied for best laryngeal view during jaw-thrust was also measured. Peak systolic and diastolic AP increased 39.0 ± 17.6 and 39.9 ± 22.8 mmHg from the baseline (P thrust group. HR was also 32.5 ± 19.4 beats/min from the baseline (P thrust group. These remained high at all time points, compared with the control group (P thrust was not correlated to the AP and HR changes (P > 0.05). Performing the jaw-thrust maneuver induces significant sympathetic responses, irrespective of the force magnitude.

  12. [De novo (type 3) primary intraosseous carcinoma of the jaws].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, A C; Foletti, J M; Graillon, N; Guyot, L; Chossegros, C

    2016-12-01

    Primary intraosseous carcinoma (PIOC) of the jaws is a rare epidermoid carcinoma from epithelial origin and initially strictly localized within the bone. Histologically, type 3 PIOC (PIOC3) is a de novo primary intraosseous carcinoma. Because of the rarity of this illness, we propose an analysis of a personal case and a revue of the literature. Two search engines (Pubmed(®), Sciencedirect(®)) were questioned over the period 1976-February 2016 by using following keywords carcinoma, intraosseous, jaws, squamous cell carcinoma. Articles reporting proven PIOC3 and mentioning a precise treatment were selected. Thirty articles concerning 54 patients (sex ratio: 2.4; mean age: 56.8; extreme: 24-78) met the inclusion criterions. The most common symptoms were swelling (53%), pain (44.9%) and infra-alveolar nerve paresthesia (30.6%). The time to diagnosis was 13 weeks. Classification of Zwetyenga et al. showed more than 80% of T2 and T3 stages. The lesions were predominantly mandibular (85.2%) and posterior. Less than a third of patients had lymph node and 10% had distant metastasis. Treatment consisted mostly in a combination of surgery and radiotherapy. With a mean follow-up of 74.8 months, 70.8% were in remission with no evidence of recurrence. We report the case of a 58-year-old patient, with no medical history, complaining since several months about periodontitis with teeth mobility in the right mandibular area. The panoramic X-ray showed a bone lysis at the place of tooth No. 46. In the absence of alveolar healing after extraction and antibiotherapy, a biopsy was made that diagnosed a differentiated keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. CT scan and MRI showed a mandibular cortical bone loss with involvement of adjacent structures and lymphadenopathy in the ipsilateral IB area. The patient was treated with a combination of chemotherapy and surgery. Postoperative chemo- and radiotherapy is still going on. The PIOC3 is a rare tumor, mainly arising in males around 50

  13. Evolution of anthropoid jaw loading and kinematic patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravosa, M J; Vinyard, C J; Gagnon, M; Islam, S A

    2000-08-01

    Major transformations in the skull and masticatory system characterized the evolution of crown anthropoids. To offer further insight into the phylogenetic and arguably adaptive significance of specific primate mandibular loading and kinematic patterns, allometric analyses of metric parameters linked to masticatory function are performed within and between 47 strepsirhine and 45 recent anthropoid species. When possible, basal anthropoids are considered. These results are subsequently integrated with prior experimental and morphological work on primate skull form. As compared to strepsirhines, crown anthropoids have a vertically longer ascending ramus linked to a glenoid and condyle positioned relatively higher above the occlusal plane. Interestingly, anthropoids and strepsirhines do not exhibit different mean ratios of condylar to glenoid height, which suggests that both clades are similar in their ability to evenly distribute occlusal contacts and perhaps forces along the postcanine teeth. Thus, given the considerable suborder differences in the scaling of both glenoid and condylar height, we argue that much of this variation in jaw-joint height is linked to suborder differences in relative facial height due in turn to increased encephalization, basicranial flexion, and facial kyphosis in anthropoids. Due to a more elongate ascending ramus, anthropoids evince more vertically oriented masseters than like-sized strepsirhines. Having a relatively longer ramus and a more medially displaced lateral pterygoid plate, crown anthropoids exhibit medial pterygoids oriented similar to those of strepsirhines, but with a variably longer lever arm. As anthropoid masseters are less advantageously placed to effect transverse movements/forces, we argue that balancing-side deep-masseter activity underlying a wishboning loading regime serves to increase, or at least maintain, transverse levels of jaw movement and occlusal force at the end of the masticatory power stroke. Crown

  14. The Feasibility of Ultrasonography in Defining the Size of Jaw Osseous Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoaleh Shahidi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Jaw bone lesions are common pathologic conditions. The role of ultrasonography in evaluation of the extra-osseous lesions is confirmed, however, this imaging modality is not the diagnostic routine for the intra-osseous jaw lesions. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of ultrasonography in diagnosis of intra-osseous jaw lesions concerning their size and content and also to study its correlation with the histopathological findings. Materials and Method: For this study, 15 patients with intra-osseous jaw lesions in the maxilla and mandible were selected from those referred to the Department of Oral Surgery. Panoramic imaging, computed tomography (CT or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT and ultrasonography (USG were performed for all the lesions. The size of the lesions was measured by USG and then compared with CT or CBCT. Moreover, the correlation amongst the echographic patterns and histopathologic results was evaluated. Results: In 12 cases, size values were in complete agreement with CT or CBCT. The size of 3 lesions could not be measured by the radiologist due to the thickness of buccal cortical plate. Conclusion: Findings of this study suggested that USG might be feasible in estimating the size of intra-osseous jaw lesions with little underestimation. This study also confirmed that ultrasound imaging was a very useful imaging technique which could provide significant diagnostic information regarding the content of jaw bone lesions where the buccal bone thickness was thin enough.

  15. Jaw thrust as a predictor of insertion conditions for the proseal laryngeal mask airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Russell; Brimacombe, Joseph; Keller, Christian; Wenzel, Volker; Herff, Holger

    2009-02-01

    We test the hypothesis that the response to jaw thrust is an effective predictor of insertion conditions for the ProSeal laryngeal mask airway (ProSeal LMA). One hundred and sixty patients (ASA grade 1-3, aged >18 yr) were studied. Five anesthetists blinded to the response to jaw thrust participated in the study, each performed >30 insertions. Induction of anesthesia was with propofol titrated to loss of lash reflex and apnea. A standard amount of jaw thrust was applied and any motor response noted by three observers. The ProSeal LMA was inserted using the standard digital technique. Insertion conditions were considered optimal if there was no motor or upper airway reflex response to insertion. There was no response to jaw thrust in 86% (137/160) of patients and insertion was optimal in 76% (121/160) of patients. A response to jaw thrust predicted suboptimal insertion conditions in 74% (17/23) and a lack of response predicted optimal insertion conditions in 84% (115/137). The accuracy, sensitivity and specificity were 0.82, 0.95 and 0.44, respectively. We conclude thatjaw thrust is a reliable predictor of insertion conditions for the ProSeal LMA with the digital insertion technique after induction of anesthesia with propofol. We suggest that clinicians learn how to apply the correct amount of jaw thrust and perform this test routinely.

  16. Latest Pleistocene paleoecology of Jefferson's ground sloth ( Megalonyx jeffersonii) and elk-moose ( Cervalces scotti) in northern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Blaine W.; Graham, Russell Wm.; McDonald, H. Gregory; Grimm, Eric C.; Stafford, Thomas W., Jr.

    2004-03-01

    New records of Jefferson's ground sloth ( Megalonyx jeffersonii) and elk-moose ( Cervalces scotti) from Lang Farm provide the first precise temporal correlation of these taxa with the specific environments inhabited by them near the time of their extinction. Six AMS 14C measurements establish an age of 11,405 ± 50 14C yr B.P. for Lang Farm Cervalces and an age of 11,430 ± 60 or 11,485 ± 40 14C yr B.P. for the Megalonyx. These measurements represent the youngest 14C dates for these two genera based on direct dating. Comparison of the dates with pollen data from northern Illinois indicates that these species inhabited a nonanalog environment that was transitional from mid-latitude tundra to mixed conifer and deciduous woodland. Although spruce ( Picea sp.) was dominant, it was less abundant than prior to 12,500 14C yr B.P. The presence of black ash ( Fraxinus nigra) and fir ( Abies sp.) indicates a wet climate and heavy winter precipitation. This may have been the preferred habitat for Cervalces because of its narrow geographic range. However, this habitat type was only one of many occupied by Megalonyx as indicated by its broad geographic distribution.

  17. Use of larder beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) to deflesh human jaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charabidze, D; Colard, T; Becart, A; Hedouin, V

    2014-01-01

    We describe new experimental data for the defleshing of human bones using larder beetles (Dermestes haemorrhoidalis) (Küster, 1852). Although the ability of larder beetles to feed on vertebrate remains has been, and still is, used by taxidermists to deflesh skulls and bones, this method has never been documented from a quantitative perspective and has over time become ignored in most forensic anthropology or odontology laboratories. To promote the rational and efficient use of this method, we performed experiments to estimate the quantity of food consumed by larvae. From the 2nd instar to nymphosis, each larva consumed a mean of 0.13±0.03 g of dry beef muscle. We then used 100±50 D. haemorrhoidalis adults and 100±50 larvae to deflesh human maxillae and mandibles sampled within a forensic context (victim identification). Each sample was weighed and photographed before, during and after the experiment. According to our experiments, 20-25 days were sufficient to completely deflesh all of the samples. We concluded that a small number of larder beetles can be used to efficiently deflesh human jaws. According to this result, the use of larder beetles appears to be an inexpensive, simple and efficient way to clean mandibles and maxillae. Furthermore, this method is DNA-safe (compared to usual maceration techniques) and thus allows the samples to be used for subsequent DNA and drug analyses.

  18. A clinical and radiologic consideration of Ameloblastoma of the jaw

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Seo; Kim, Kee Deog [Dept. of Dental Radiology, College of Dentistry, Yensei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-02-15

    A clinical and radiologic study of 46 intrabony ameloblastomas were undertaken from the files of the Department Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dental Hospital, Yonsei University for the years January 1979 through December 1993. The following results were obtained; 1. In the clinical findings, the mean age of patients was 34 years, with no sex predilection noted and the most frequent sign was swelling of the face or jaw. 2. In the radiological findings, the majority of tumors, 97.8% involved the mandible with the posterior regions favored, and 56.5% of the lesions were multilocular type. Radiologic types had no correlation with the age of patients. 3. In the histologic findings, 23.9% of lesions were follicular or mixed type. Histologic types had no correlation between the unicystic type and first decade of age was found by X2 test (P<0.05). 4. Among the qualified 18 patients treated with radical or conservative surgery, the recurrence rate was 33.3%. The difference of recurrent rate between the multilocular type (36.4%) and the unilocular type (28.6%)was not much. Conclusively, more detailed clinical and radiologic parameters should be added to clearly predict the biologic behavior of ameloblastoma.

  19. Analysis of Dental Maturation in Relation to Sagittal Jaw Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durka-Zając, Magdalena; Derwich, Marcin; Mituś-Kenig, Maria; Łoboda, Magdalena; Pawłowska, Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background The degree of mineralization of permanent tooth germs in dental age assessment has been an area of interest among many authors for years. However, only recently have researchers attempted to determine the potential interdependencies between dental age and jaw relationships. The aim of this work was to compare dental maturation in patients with skeletal Class II to patients with skeletal Classes I and III. Material/Methods The study involved 150 patients who sought orthodontic treatment. Dental age was assessed from panoramic radiographs using the Demirjian’s method. Skeletal class was evaluated according to the value of the ANPg angle from the Björk’s analysis. We used the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Student’s t-test. Results The mean dental age in patients with skeletal Class III was significantly higher than the mean dental age in patients with skeletal Class II (p<0.0005). A correlation between the dental age and chronological age was established. The weakest correlation was seen between the dental age and skeletal Class II. Among patients with skeletal Class II, the strongest correlation was found between chronological age and the formation of the germ of the second lower premolar (r=0.67; p<0.001). Conclusions Dental age among patients with skeletal Class II was the lowest. PMID:28203310

  20. The effect of various jaw motor tasks on body sway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Daniel; Giannakopoulos, N N; Blaser, R; Eberhard, L; Schindler, H J

    2011-10-01

    Alterations of body sway caused by isometric contractions of the jaw muscles have been reported previously. The objective of this study was to test if motor tasks of the masticatory system with different control demands affect body posture differently during quiet stance. Position and sway displacements of the center of foot pressure (COP) were measured for 20 healthy subjects who either kept the mandible at rest or performed unilateral and bilateral maximum voluntary teeth clenching, feedback-controlled biting tasks at submaximum bite forces, or unilateral chewing. Two weeks later the measurements were repeated. Compared with quiet stance, the COP results revealed significant changes during the feedback-controlled biting tasks. Robust sway reduction and anterior displacement of the COP were observed under these conditions. Body oscillations were not significantly affected by maximum bites or by unilateral chewing. For most of the variables investigated there were no significant differences between unilateral and bilateral biting. Robust sway reduction during feedback-controlled biting tasks in healthy subjects involved a stiffening phenomenon that was attributed to the common physiological repertoire of posture control, and might optimize the stability of posture under these conditions. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. [The atrophic jaw from the dental surgeon's point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obwegeser, H

    1977-09-01

    A report on 3000 cases of jaw atrophy over a period of 20 years. These cases underwent surgery and the results were obtained on the basis of close collaboration between maxillofacial surgery and prosthetics. Certain deductions could be obtained from these numerous patients over a longe period of observation. It is now possible to separate wistful thinking from reality. Subperiosteal implants have, in spite of chronic infections, functioned over a period of 10 years and more. Enossal implants seem to do the same for partial prosthetics. Complete failure of either form of implant is to be expected in edentulous mouths. Loss of a subperiosteal or enossal implant generally leaves a condition requiring new surgical intervention. The methods of vestibuloplasty, tuberoplasty and lowering of the floor of the mouth have been generally successful, if proper indication, surgical technique and prosthetic rehabilitation are observed by competent professionals. In plastic surgery of the alveolar process the use of ribs has been successful in this clinic. Even though postoperative resorption may destroy 50% and more of the obtained height of the alveolar process, the results justify this kind of surgery. The obtained results suggest that the methods described have justified their due place in maxillofacial surgery, because they may be considered to be results at long term.

  2. Metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G S Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease involving complex multiple sequential irreversible dysregulated processes showing metastasis that results in morbidity and mortality. Metastasis is a complex biological course that begins with detachment of tumor cells from the primary tumor, spreading into the distant tissues and/or organs, invading through the lymphovascular structures followed by their survival in the circulation. Metastatic tumors to the oro-facial region are uncommon and may occur in the oral soft tissues or jawbones. The clinical presentation of metastatic tumors can be variable, which may lead to erroneous diagnosis or may create diagnostic dilemma. Therefore, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory and reactive lesions that are common to the oral region. Most of the literature on oral metastases involves either single case reports or reviews of these reported cases from scattered geographical areas. Hence this present article is an attempt to provide a detailed review of pathogenesis, epidemiological details including clinical and radiographic presentations, microscopic features and treatment of metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity.

  3. Dental extraction following zoledronate, induces osteonecrosis in rat's jaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Gutiérrez, X; Gómez-Clavel, J-F; Gaitán-Cepeda, L-A

    2017-03-01

    Bisphosphonate-Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (BRONJ) is clinically characterized by the presence of exposed bone in the oral cavity that persists for more than eight weeks. Previous attempts to establish an animal model have not sufficiently considered disease features. Our aim was to establish an inexpensive and replicable animal model that develops BRONJ in a short time. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups: control and experimental. In the experimental group, we administered 0.06mg/kg intraperitoneal dose of zoledronic acid (ZA) 7 and 14 days prior to maxillary second molar extraction. At two, four and six weeks after tooth extraction, the animals were euthanized, and we dissected the maxilla following histological procedures. We stained serial slides with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome. The samples were harvested for macroscopic, radiologic and histological evaluation of bone changes. At two weeks postextraction, we observed exposed necrotic bone in dental socket areas in experimental groups. Radiological analysis revealed osteolytic lesions accompanied by extensive destruction and sequestrum formation in the same group. Histological examination confirmed the absence of necrotic bone in control groups in contrast with the experimental groups. The percentage of empty lacunae and the number of osteoclasts and the necrotic bone area were significantly increased (p<0.05) in the experimental groups. The animal model using ZA administration to prior dental extraction successfully mimicked human BRONJ lesions. Also, the model was easily replicated, inexpensive and showed different features than other previous BRONJ models.

  4. Immunocytochemical expression of growth factors by odontogenic jaw cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Browne, R. M.; Matthews, J. B.

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine the immunocytochemical pattern of expression of transforming growth factor (TGF) alpha, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and TGF beta in the three most common types of odontogenic jaw cyst. METHODS: Growth factor expression was detected in paraffin wax sections of odontogenic cysts (27 odontogenic keratocysts, 10 dentigerous cysts, and 10 radicular cysts) using a streptavidin-biotin peroxidase technique with monoclonal antibodies directed against TGF alpha (clone 213-4.4) and TGF beta (clone TB21) and a polyclonal antibody directed against EGF (Z-12). RESULTS: The epithelial linings of all cysts showed reactivity for TGF alpha which was mainly localised to basal and suprabasal layers. Odontogenic keratocyst linings expressed higher levels of TGF alpha than those of dentigerous and radicular cysts, with 89% (24/27) of odontogenic keratocysts exhibiting a strong positive reaction compared with 50% (five of 10) of dentigerous and radicular cysts, respectively. EGF reactivity was similar in all cyst groups, weaker than that for TGF alpha and predominantly suprabasal. TGF alpha and EGF were also detected in endothelial cells, fibroblasts and inflammatory cells within the cyst walls. The most intense TGF beta staining in odontogenic cysts was extracellular within the fibrous tissue capsules, irrespective of cyst type. CONCLUSIONS: These results, together with previous studies of EGF receptor, indicate differential expression of TGF alpha, EGF and their common receptor between the different types of odontogenic cyst, suggesting that these growth factors (via autocrine or paracrine, or both, pathways) may be involved in their pathogenesis. Images PMID:9208810

  5. Dental implants for severely atrophied jaws due to ectodermal dysplasia

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    Preetha Balaji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to present the successful esthetical and functional rehabilitation of partial anodontia in a case of severe ectodermal dysplasia with complete atrophy of the jaws. A 17-year-old male with Class III malocclusion with partial anodontia sought dental implant treatment. His expectation was that of Class I occlusion. The challenge in the case was to match the expectation, reality, and the clinical possibilities. Ridge augmentation was performed with a combination of rib graft and recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2. Simultaneously, 6 implants (Nobel Biocare™ - Tapered Groovy were placed in maxillary arch and 10 in the mandible. Simultaneous placement ensured faster and better osseointegration though a mild compromise of the primary stability was observed initially. After adequate healing, Customized Zirconia Procera™ system was used to build the framework. Zirconia crown was cemented to the framework. Radiological and clinical evidence of osseointegration was observed in all 16 dental implants. Successful conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion was achieved with the combination of preprosthetic alveolar ridge augmentation, Procera™ Implant Bridge system. Abnormal angulations and or placement of dental implants would result in failure of the implant. Hence conversion of Class III to Class I occlusion needs complete and complex treatment planning so that the entire masticatory apparatus is sufficiently remodeled. Planning should consider the resultant vectors that would otherwise result in failure of framework or compromise the secondary stability of the dental implant during function. A successful case of rehabilitation of complex partial anodontia is presented.

  6. Consistency and sealing of advanced bipolar tissue sealers

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    Chekan EG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Edward G Chekan , Mark A Davison, David W Singleton, John Z Mennone, Piet Hinoul Ethicon, Inc., Cincinnati, OH, USA Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate two commonly used advanced bipolar devices (ENSEAL® G2 Tissue Sealers and LigaSure™ Blunt Tip for compression uniformity, vessel sealing strength, and consistency in bench-top analyses. Methods: Compression analysis was performed with a foam pad/sensor apparatus inserted between closed jaws of the instruments. Average pressures (psi were recorded across the entire inside surface of the jaws, and over the distal one-third of jaws. To test vessel sealing strength, ex vivo pig carotid arteries were sealed and transected and left and right (sealed halves of vessels were subjected to burst pressure testing. The maximum bursting pressures of each half of vessels were averaged to obtain single data points for analysis. The absence or presence of tissue sticking to device jaws was noted for each transected vessel. Results: Statistically higher average compression values were found for ENSEAL® instruments (curved jaw and straight jaw compared to LigaSure™, P<0.05. Moreover, the ENSEAL® devices retained full compression at the distal end of jaws. Significantly higher and more consistent median burst pressures were noted for ENSEAL® devices relative to LigaSure™ through 52 firings of each device (P<0.05. LigaSure™ showed a significant reduction in median burst pressure for the final three firings (cycles 50–52 versus the first three firings (cycles 1–3, P=0.027. Tissue sticking was noted for 1.39% and 13.3% of vessels transected with ENSEAL® and LigaSure™, respectively. Conclusion: In bench-top testing, ENSEAL® G2 sealers produced more uniform compression, stronger and more consistent vessel sealing, and reduced tissue sticking relative to LigaSure™. Keywords: ENSEAL, sealing, burst pressure, laparoscopic, compression, LigaSure

  7. Neural crest-mediated bone resorption is a determinant of species-specific jaw length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ealba, Erin L; Jheon, Andrew H; Hall, Jane; Curantz, Camille; Butcher, Kristin D; Schneider, Richard A

    2015-12-01

    Precise control of jaw length during development is crucial for proper form and function. Previously we have shown that in birds, neural crest mesenchyme (NCM) confers species-specific size and shape to the beak by regulating molecular and histological programs for the induction and deposition of cartilage and bone. Here we reveal that a hitherto unrecognized but similarly essential mechanism for establishing jaw length is the ability of NCM to mediate bone resorption. Osteoclasts are considered the predominant cells that resorb bone, although osteocytes have also been shown to participate in this process. In adults, bone resorption is tightly coupled to bone deposition as a means to maintain skeletal homeostasis. Yet, the role and regulation of bone resorption during growth of the embryonic skeleton have remained relatively unexplored. We compare jaw development in short-beaked quail versus long-billed duck and find that quail have substantially higher levels of enzymes expressed by bone-resorbing cells including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), Matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp13), and Mmp9. Then, we transplant NCM destined to form the jaw skeleton from quail to duck and generate chimeras in which osteocytes arise from quail donor NCM and osteoclasts come exclusively from the duck host. Chimeras develop quail-like jaw skeletons coincident with dramatically elevated expression of TRAP, Mmp13, and Mmp9. To test for a link between bone resorption and jaw length, we block resorption using a bisphosphonate, osteoprotegerin protein, or an MMP13 inhibitor, and this significantly lengthens the jaw. Conversely, activating resorption with RANKL protein shortens the jaw. Finally, we find that higher resorption in quail presages their relatively lower adult jaw bone mineral density (BMD) and that BMD is also NCM-mediated. Thus, our experiments suggest that NCM not only controls bone resorption by its own derivatives but also modulates the activity of mesoderm

  8. [Biomechanics of the jaw apparatus in the horn-shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni = Heterodontus philippi)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobiling, G

    1977-01-01

    The constructional morphology of the jaw apparatus in the horn-shark Heterodontus has been investigated. The origines and insertions of the jaw muscles have been delimited and the lines of action were determined. The individual muscles have been weighed, in order to get on the basis of their masses an estimate of the forces which are exerted by the components of the jaw musculature. The mandibular joints, the occlusion of the jaws, morphological details of the upper and lower jaws as well as the "subodontium" have been subject to macroscopic and microscopic study. The joint between palatoquadrate and mandibular consists of a medial and a lateral compartment. Only hinge movements are possible. If the jaws are closed, the contacts between upper and lower jaws are confined to the large crushing teeth of only one or two tooth families. The teeth are fixed to the jaw cartilage by ligamentous structures. Three layers can be discerned histologically: The uppermost layer, beneath the bases of the teeth, is composed of the fibrae interdentales and of the fibrae subbasales. By these, the individual teeth are firmly connected to form a continuous pavement. - The middle layer is characterised by the great number of cell nuclei. - The fibre system which constitutes the lowermost layer is arranged according to its function. The subdental layer of fibrous tissue grows faster than the one adjacent to the jaws. Thus a particular growth structure is formed. - Two constructive principles are realised: 1. The biting forces or "loads", applied to one or two teeth, are split and distributed on all teeth of the same family which are lingual of the loaded one. 2. As in the thecodont mammals, the compressive biting (= occlusal) force is transformed into a tensile force by the tooth-fixing apparatus and by the shapes of the jaws and this is sustained by fibrous structures. Magnitude and directions of the stresses which appear in the upper and lower jaw during biting are compared with stress

  9. Suppression of jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes during swallowing in the cat.

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    Ono, T; Ishiwata, Y; Kuroda, T; Nakamura, Y

    1999-11-01

    Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes can be evoked by innocuous as well as noxious afferents from intra-oral structures. It has been reported that the amplitude of the jaw-opening reflex evoked by weak electrical stimulation of the upper lip is subject not only to tonic suppression but also to phase-linked modulation during mastication. In this study, we investigated whether the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes are modulated during swallowing. Data were obtained from 8 chloralose-anesthetized cats. Reflexes were monitored by electromyographic activities recorded from the anterior digastric, genioglossus, and styloglossus muscles and, after paralysis, by the efferent discharge in the digastric and hypoglossal nerves. Swallowing was elicited either by water dropped on the tongue or by repetitive stimulation of the superior laryngeal nerve. Jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes were evoked by stimulation of the lingual nerve, and the evoked afferent volley was recorded from the Gasserian ganglion so that the threshold of the lingual nerve could be determined. The following results were obtained: (1) The jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by stimulation of the low-threshold, but not high-threshold, lingual afferents were remarkably suppressed during swallowing; and (2) both the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents were suppressed during fictive swallowing after the animals were paralyzed. We conclude that the jaw-opening and trigemino-hypoglossal reflexes evoked by low-threshold lingual afferents are suppressed during swallowing by a central motor program.

  10. Perspectives of the use of commissure in patients with oblique fractures of the lower jaw

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    Yuri Efimov

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There was carried out an analysis of the results of treatment of 34 patients with oblique fractures of the lower jaw by the method of commissure osteosynthesis that was elaborated by the authors.Aim: to increase the effectiveness of treatment of patients with oblique fractures of the lower jaw at the expense of optimization of commissure osteosynthesis.Methods: there was carried out examination and operative treatment of 34 patients with oblique fractures of lower jaw of the different localization. In the area of the lower jaw angle – 19 (55,88 % patients, in the area of the lower jaw body – 12 (35,29 % persons, the number of patients with fractures of the neck with dislocation of the head of lower jaw was 3 (8,83 %. All patients were the persons of male sex 32–55 years old. The operative treatment was consisted in commissure osteosynthesis according to the method elaborated by the authors.Results: there were not observed any complication in operated patients during postoperative period. There were not observed the secondary displacement of splinters or inflammatory complications. The consolidation of splinters was clinically observed on 21 day after operation. In remote terms (3 month after osteosynthesis patients have no complaints the disorders of dental occlusion did not take place.Conclusions: An offered method of osteosynthesis with wire suture allows:1. Eliminate the horizontal displacement of splinters;2. Eliminate the shortening of the jaw arch and the deviation of occlusion with deformation of the patient’s face;3. Raise the stability of osteosynthesis.The remote results testify the high effectiveness of the method that allows recommend it for the wide use in clinical practice

  11. Morphology and mechanics of the teeth and jaws of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Jason B; Wilga, Cheryl D

    2007-08-01

    The teeth of white-spotted bamboo sharks (Chiloscyllium plagiosum) are used to clutch soft-bodied prey and crush hard prey; however, the dual function is not evident from tooth morphology alone. Teeth exhibit characteristics that are in agreement with a clutching-type tooth morphology that is well suited for grasping and holding soft-bodied prey, but not for crushing hard prey. The dual role of this single tooth morphology is facilitated by features of the dental ligament and jaw joint. Tooth attachment is flexible and elastic, allowing movement in both sagittal and frontal planes. During prey capture spike-like tooth cusps pierce the flesh of soft prey, thereby preventing escape. When processing prey harder than the teeth can pierce the teeth passively depress, rotating inward towards the oral cavity such that the broader labial faces of the teeth are nearly parallel to the surface of the jaws and form a crushing surface. Movement into the depressed position increases the tooth surface area contacting prey and decreases the total stress applied to the tooth, thereby decreasing the risk of structural failure. This action is aided by a jaw joint that is ventrally offset from the occlusal planes of the jaws. The offset joint position allows many teeth to contact prey simultaneously and orients force vectors at contact points between the jaws and prey in a manner that shears or rolls prey between the jaws during a bite, thus, aiding in processing while reducing forward slip of hard prey from the mouth. Together the teeth, dental ligament, and jaws form an integrated system that may be beneficial to the feeding ecology of C. plagiosum, allowing for a diet that includes prey of varying hardness and elusiveness.

  12. IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF CELL CYCLE-ASSOCIATED PROTEINS IN OSTEOSARCOMA OF THE JAWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司晓辉; 刘正; 杨连君

    2002-01-01

    Objective To analyze the expression of cell cycle-associated proteins in osteosarcoma of the jaws. Methods Cyclin D1 , CDK4 , p27, E2F-1 and Ets-1 expression were examined semi-quantitatively in 20 osteosarcoma and 8 osteochondroma of the jaws by immunohistochemical ABC method. Results The positive rates of cyclin D1, CDK4 , p27, E2F-1 and Ets-1 were 65% ( 13 of 20), 60% ( 12 of 20), 20% (4 of 20),70% ( 14 of 20 ) and 55% ( 11 of 20 ) in osteosarcoma of the jaws, respectively. There was no remarkable difference in the expression of these proteins among histopathological types ( P > 0. 05 ). In osteochondroma of t he jaws, the Positi ye ra res of CDK4 and E2F- 1 were both 12.5 % ( 1 of 8 ), whereas t ha t of p27 was 75 % ( 6 of 8). None of osteochondroma was positive for cyclin D1 and Ets-1. The positive rates of cyclin D1, CDK4,E2F-1 and Ets-1 were significantly higher while that of p27 was lower in osteosarcoma than that in osteochondroma of the jaws ( P < 0. 05 ). In addition, the metastatic osteosarcoma of the jaws had higher Positive rate of Ets- 1 than that of the non-metastatic ( P < 0 . 05). Conclusion The results suggest that the dysregulation of cell cycle-asso-ciated proteins may be involved in the occurrence and development of osteosarcoma of the jaws.

  13. Morphology and biomechanics of the pinniped jaw: mandibular evolution without mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Katrina E; Ruff, Christopher B; Goswami, Anjali

    2013-07-01

    Pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) underwent a shift in jaw function away from typical carnivoran mastication to more novel marine behaviors during the terrestrial-aquatic transition. Here we test the effect of aquatic prey capture and male-male combat on the morphological evolution of a mammal jaw that does not masticate. Nine three-dimensional landmarks were taken along the mandible for 25 species (N = 83), and corpus and symphysis external and cortical breadths for a subset of five species (N = 33). Principal components analysis was performed on size-corrected landmark data to assess variation in overall jaw morphology across pinnipeds. Corpus breadths were input to a beam model to calculate strength properties and estimated bite force of specific species with contrasting behaviors (filter feeding, suction feeding, grip-and-tear feeding, and male-male combat). Results indicate that, although phylogenetic signal in jaw shape is strong, function is also important in determining morphology. Filter feeders display an elongate symphysis and a long toothrow that may play a role in filtering krill. Grip-and-tear feeders have a long jaw and large estimated bite force relative to non-biting species. However, the largest estimated bite forces were observed in males of male-male combative species, likely due to the high selection pressure associated with male success in highly polygynous species. The suction feeding jaw is weak in biting but has a different morphology in the two suction feeding taxa. In conclusion, familial patterns of pinniped jaw shape due to phylogenetic relatedness have been modified by adaptations to specialized behavior of individual taxa.

  14. Evaluation of the quantitative accuracy of 3D reconstruction of edentulous jaw models with jaw relation based on reference point system alignment.

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    Weiwei Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To apply contact measurement and reference point system (RPS alignment techniques to establish a method for 3D reconstruction of the edentulous jaw models with centric relation and to quantitatively evaluate its accuracy. METHODS: Upper and lower edentulous jaw models were clinically prepared, 10 pairs of resin cylinders with same size were adhered to axial surfaces of upper and lower models. The occlusal bases and the upper and lower jaw models were installed in the centric relation position. Faro Edge 1.8m was used to directly obtain center points of the base surface of the cylinders (contact method. Activity 880 dental scanner was used to obtain 3D data of the cylinders and the center points were fitted (fitting method. 3 pairs of center points were used to align the virtual model to centric relation. An observation coordinate system was interactively established. The straight-line distances in the X (horizontal left/right, Y (horizontal anterior/posterior, and Z (vertical between the remaining 7 pairs of center points derived from contact method and fitting method were measured respectively and analyzed using a paired t-test. RESULTS: The differences of the straight-line distances of the remaining 7 pairs of center points between the two methods were X: 0.074 ± 0.107 mm, Y: 0.168 ± 0.176 mm, and Z: -0.003± 0.155 mm. The results of paired t-test were X and Z: p >0.05, Y: p <0.05. CONCLUSION: By using contact measurement and the reference point system alignment technique, highly accurate reconstruction of the vertical distance and centric relation of a digital edentulous jaw model can be achieved, which meets the design and manufacturing requirements of the complete dentures. The error of horizontal anterior/posterior jaw relation was relatively large.

  15. Expression of Msx-1 is suppressed in bisphosphonate associated osteonecrosis related jaw tissue-etiopathology considerations respecting jaw developmental biology-related unique features

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    Schlegel Karl A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone-destructive disease treatments include bisphosphonates and antibodies against the osteoclast differentiator, RANKL (aRANKL; however, osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ is a frequent side-effect. Current models fail to explain the restriction of bisphosphonate (BP-related and denosumab (anti-RANKL antibody-related ONJ to jaws. Msx-1 is exclusively expressed in craniofacial structures and pivotal to cranial neural crest (CNC-derived periodontal tissue remodeling. We hypothesised that Msx-1 expression might be impaired in bisphosphonate-related ONJ. The study aim was to elucidate Msx-1 and RANKL-associated signal transduction (BMP-2/4, RANKL in ONJ-altered and healthy periodontal tissue. Methods Twenty ONJ and twenty non-BP exposed periodontal samples were processed for RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. An automated staining-based alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase method was used to measure the stained cells:total cell-number ratio (labelling index, Bonferroni adjustment. Real-time RT-PCR was performed on ONJ-affected and healthy jaw periodontal samples (n = 20 each to quantitatively compare Msx-1, BMP-2, RANKL, and GAPDH mRNA levels. Results Semi-quantitative assessment of the ratio of stained cells showed decreased Msx-1 and RANKL and increased BMP-2/4 (all p Conclusions These results explain the sclerotic and osteopetrotic changes of periodontal tissue following BP application and substantiate clinical findings of BP-related impaired remodeling specific to periodontal tissue. RANKL suppression substantiated the clinical finding of impaired bone remodelling in BP- and aRANKL-induced ONJ-affected bone structures. Msx-1 suppression in ONJ-adjacent periodontal tissue suggested a bisphosphonate-related impairment in cellular differentiation that occurred exclusively jaw remodelling. Further research on developmental biology-related unique features of jaw bone structures will help to elucidate pathologies restricted to

  16. Postsurgical volumetric airway changes in 2-jaw orthognathic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, P Sheamus; McIntyre, Brian P; Kadioglu, Onur; Currier, G Fräns; Sullivan, Steven M; Li, Ji; Shay, Christina

    2015-05-01

    Findings from early cephalometric studies on airway changes after 2-jaw orthognathic surgery have been challenged because the previous anteroposterior interpretation of airway changes can now be evaluated in 3 dimensions. The aims of this study were to use cone-beam computed tomography to quantify the nasopharynx, oropharynx, and total airway volume changes associated with skeletal movements of the maxilla and mandible in a sample of patients undergoing 2-jaw orthognathic surgery for correction of skeletal malocclusion. Skeletal movements and airway volumes of 71 postpubertal patients (31 male, 40 female; mean age, 18.8 years) were measured. They were divided into 2 groups based on ANB angle, overjet, and occlusion (Class II: ANB, >2°; overjet, >1 mm; total, 35 subjects; and Class III: ANB, overjet, <1 mm; total, 36 subjects). Presurgical and postsurgical measurements were collected for horizontal, vertical, and transverse movements of the maxilla and the mandible, along with changes in the nasopharynx, oropharynx, and total airways. Associations between the directional movements of skeletal structures and the regional changes in airway volume were quantified. Changes in the most constricted area were also noted. Horizontal movements of D-point were significantly associated with increases in both total airway (403.6 ± 138.6 mm(3); P <0.01) and oropharynx (383.9 ± 127.9 mm(3); P <0.01) volumes. Vertical movements of the posterior nasal spine were significantly associated with decreases in total airway volume (-459.2 ± 219.9 mm(3); P = 0.04) and oropharynx volume (-639.7 ± 195.3 mm(3); P <0.01), increases in nasopharynx (187.2 ± 47.1 mm(3); P <0.01) volume, and decreases in the most constricted area (-10.63 ± 3.69 mm(2); P <0.01). In the Class III patients only, the vertical movement of D-point was significantly associated with decreases in both total airway (-724.0 ± 284.4 mm(3); P = 0.02) and oropharynx (-648.2 ± 270.4 mm(3); P = 0.02) volumes. A similar

  17. Fibrolytic Bacteria Isolated from the Rumen of North American Moose (Alces alces and Their Use as a Probiotic in Neonatal Lambs.

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    Suzanne L Ishaq

    Full Text Available Fibrolytic bacteria were isolated from the rumen of North American moose (Alces alces, which eat a high-fiber diet of woody browse. It was hypothesized that fibrolytic bacteria isolated from the moose rumen could be used as probiotics to improve fiber degradation and animal production. Thirty-one isolates (Bacillus, n = 26; Paenibacillus, n = 1; and Staphylococcus, n = 4 were cultured from moose rumen digesta samples collected in Vermont. Using Sanger sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, culturing techniques, and optical densities, isolates were identified and screened for biochemical properties important to plant carbohydrate degradation. Five isolates were selected as candidates for use as a probiotic, which was administered daily to neonate lambs for 9 weeks. It was hypothesized that regular administration of a probiotic to improve fibrolysis to neonate animals through weaning would increase the developing rumen bacterial diversity, increase animal production, and allow for long-term colonization of the probiotic species. Neither weight gain nor wool quality was improved in lambs given a probiotic, however, dietary efficiency was increased as evidenced by the reduced feed intake (and rearing costs without a loss to weight gain. Experimental lambs had a lower acetate to propionate ratio than control lambs, which was previously shown to indicate increased dietary efficiency. Fibrolytic bacteria made up the majority of sequences, mainly Prevotella, Butyrivibrio, and Ruminococcus. While protozoal densities increased over time and were stable, methanogen densities varied greatly in the first six months of life for lambs. This is likely due to the changing diet and bacterial populations in the developing rumen.

  18. Linking trade-offs in habitat selection with the occurrence of functional responses for moose living in two nearby study areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabille, Géraldine; Dussault, Christian; Ouellet, Jean-Pierre; Laurian, Catherine

    2012-12-01

    A species may modify its relative habitat use with changing availability, generating functional responses in habitat selection. Functional responses in habitat selection are expected to occur when animals experience trade-offs influencing their habitat selection, but only a few studies to date have explicitly linked functional responses to the underlying trade-offs faced by the animals. We used data from 39 female moose fitted with GPS telemetry collars in two nearby study areas in Canada to investigate if moose (1) were faced with a food/cover trade-off in habitat selection, as typically acknowledged in the literature, and (2) showed a functional response in their use of food/cover-rich habitats. We also examined how habitat selection patterns varied seasonally, and between study areas. The occurrence of functional responses varied strongly between study areas, and could not always be related to a measurable food/cover trade-off. Functional responses were observed more often in the study area where the environmental conditions were more severe (colder temperatures, higher precipitations, and lower food availability). Selection coefficients were also less variable among individuals in that study area, suggesting that severe environmental conditions may constrain individuals to a few selection tactics and promote the development of functional responses. Moose reacted to the availability of different habitat types in different seasons, reflecting the changing trade-offs faced by the animals. We found considerable behavioral differences between individuals from two adjacent study areas, and therefore recommend caution when extrapolating habitat selection results. We advocate for the wider use of functional responses to identify critical habitats for a species from a management or conservation perspective.

  19. Fibrolytic Bacteria Isolated from the Rumen of North American Moose (Alces alces) and Their Use as a Probiotic in Neonatal Lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaq, Suzanne L; Kim, Christina J; Reis, Doug; Wright, André-Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Fibrolytic bacteria were isolated from the rumen of North American moose (Alces alces), which eat a high-fiber diet of woody browse. It was hypothesized that fibrolytic bacteria isolated from the moose rumen could be used as probiotics to improve fiber degradation and animal production. Thirty-one isolates (Bacillus, n = 26; Paenibacillus, n = 1; and Staphylococcus, n = 4) were cultured from moose rumen digesta samples collected in Vermont. Using Sanger sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, culturing techniques, and optical densities, isolates were identified and screened for biochemical properties important to plant carbohydrate degradation. Five isolates were selected as candidates for use as a probiotic, which was administered daily to neonate lambs for 9 weeks. It was hypothesized that regular administration of a probiotic to improve fibrolysis to neonate animals through weaning would increase the developing rumen bacterial diversity, increase animal production, and allow for long-term colonization of the probiotic species. Neither weight gain nor wool quality was improved in lambs given a probiotic, however, dietary efficiency was increased as evidenced by the reduced feed intake (and rearing costs) without a loss to weight gain. Experimental lambs had a lower acetate to propionate ratio than control lambs, which was previously shown to indicate increased dietary efficiency. Fibrolytic bacteria made up the majority of sequences, mainly Prevotella, Butyrivibrio, and Ruminococcus. While protozoal densities increased over time and were stable, methanogen densities varied greatly in the first six months of life for lambs. This is likely due to the changing diet and bacterial populations in the developing rumen.

  20. Influence of the Lower Jaw Position on the Running Pattern.

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    Christian Maurer

    Full Text Available The effects of manipulated dental occlusion on body posture has been investigated quite often and discussed controversially in the literature. Far less attention has been paid to the influence of dental occlusion position on human movement. If human movement was analysed, it was mostly while walking and not while running. This study was therefore designed to identify the effect of lower jaw positions on running behaviour according to different dental occlusion positions.Twenty healthy young recreational runners (mean age = 33.9±5.8 years participated in this study. Kinematic data were collected using an eight-camera Vicon motion capture system (VICON Motion Systems, Oxford, UK. Subjects were consecutively prepared with four different dental occlusion conditions in random order and performed five running trials per test condition on a level walkway with their preferred running shoes. Vector based pattern recognition methods, in particular cluster analysis and support vector machines (SVM were used for movement pattern identification.Subjects exhibited unique movement patterns leading to 18 clusters for the 20 subjects. No overall classification of the splint condition could be observed. Within individual subjects different running patterns could be identified for the four splint conditions. The splint conditions lead to a more symmetrical running pattern than the control condition.The influence of an occlusal splint on running pattern can be confirmed in this study. Wearing a splint increases the symmetry of the running pattern. A more symmetrical running pattern might help to reduce the risk of injuries or help in performance. The change of the movement pattern between the neutral condition and any of the three splint conditions was significant within subjects but not across subjects. Therefore the dental splint has a measureable influence on the running pattern of subjects, however subjects individuality has to be considered when choosing the

  1. Characterization of interstitial collagenases in jaw cyst wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teronen, O; Salo, T; Laitinen, J; Törnwall, J; Ylipaavalniemi, P; Konttinen, Y T; Hietanen, J; Sorsa, T

    1995-06-01

    Neutral salt extracts of 14 specimens of jaw cysts were prepared. Histopathological analysis showed that the specimens consisted of 6 radicular cysts, 6 dentigerous cysts, 1 residual cyst, and 1 odontogenic keratocyst. One periapical granuloma, 1 dental follicle and a sample of clinically healthy oral mucosa were similarly processed and used as controls. Measurement of collagenase activity by monitoring the formation of specific degradation products of type I and II collagen in solution by SDS-PAGE demonstrated that all the cyst extracts contained collagenase, some of which was endogenously activated. Cyst wall collagenase preferably degraded type I over type II collagen, which suggests that the degradation was due to MMP-1 (matrix metalloproteinase-1) rather than the MMP-8 type. This was further supported by the doxycycline-inhibition profile of cyst collagenase, which was similar to that of MMP-1. Part of the cyst wall collagenase was in latent proenzyme form and probably derived, at least in part, from the newly synthesized intracellular collagenase pool. Latent cyst collagenase was efficiently activated with phenylmercuric chloride and to a lesser extent by gold (I) thioglucose and NaOCl. Western-blotting, using specific antibodies against collagenase from human polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (MMP-8) and from fibroblasts (MMP-1), revealed a typical 55/45 kDa doublet; also MMP-8 in the latent 80 kDa form and fragmented to 65 kDa active species were found. These results suggest the presence of MMP-1 and, to a lesser extent, MMP-8 type collagenase in the cyst wall.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. A Discussion on Hassel and Rogers′s Wolves and Moose Model%Hassel and Rogers狼与驼鹿模型讨论

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄永年

    2000-01-01

    Hassel and Rogers′s Wolves and Moose interacting model are studied in continuouscase and in discrete case. It is shown that the discrete model is more reasonable in case oflonger life, overlapping and small population.%分析了连续时间和离散时间的捕食-被捕食模型:Hassel and Rogers的狼与鹿相互作用的模型,发现它们的轨线有一定程度的相似,但从生态意义上讲,离散模型更合适.

  3. APPLICATION OF 3D MODELING IN 3D PRINTING FOR THE LOWER JAW RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Yu. Dikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: improvement of functional and aesthetic results of microsurgery reconstructions of the lower jaw due to the use of the methodology of 3D modeling and 3D printing. Application of this methodology has been demonstrated on the example of treatment of 4 patients with locally distributed tumors of the mouth cavity, who underwent excision of the tumor with simultaneous reconstruction of the lower jaw with revascularized fibular graft.Before, one patient has already undergo segmental resection of the lower jaw with the defect replacement with the avascular ileac graft and a reconstruction plate. Then, a relapse of the disease and lysis of the graft has developed with him. Modeling of the graft according to the shape of the lower jaw was performed by making osteotomies of the bone part of the graft using three-dimensional virtual models created by computed tomography data. Then these 3D models were printed with a 3D printer of plastic with the scale of 1:1 with the fused deposition modeling (FDM technology and were used during the surgery in the course of modeling of the graft. Sterilizing of the plastic model was performed in the formalin chamber.This methodology allowed more specific reconstruction of the resected fragment of the lower jaw and get better functional and aesthetic results and prepare patients to further dental rehabilitation. Advantages of this methodology are the possibility of simultaneous performance of stages of reconstruction and resection and shortening of the time of surgery.

  4. A primitive placoderm sheds light on the origin of the jawed vertebrate face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupret, Vincent; Sanchez, Sophie; Goujet, Daniel; Tafforeau, Paul; Ahlberg, Per E

    2014-03-27

    Extant vertebrates form two clades, the jawless Cyclostomata (lampreys and hagfishes) and the jawed Gnathostomata (all other vertebrates), with contrasting facial architectures. These arise during development from just a few key differences in the growth patterns of the cranial primordia: notably, the nasal sacs and hypophysis originate from a single placode in cyclostomes but from separate placodes in gnathostomes, and infraoptic ectomesenchyme migrates forward either side of the single placode in cyclostomes but between the placodes in gnathostomes. Fossil stem gnathostomes preserve cranial anatomies rich in landmarks that provide proxies for developmental processes and allow the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates to be broken down into evolutionary steps. Here we use propagation phase contrast synchrotron microtomography to image the cranial anatomy of the primitive placoderm (jawed stem gnathostome) Romundina, and show that it combines jawed vertebrate architecture with cranial and cerebral proportions resembling those of cyclostomes and the galeaspid (jawless stem gnathostome) Shuyu. This combination seems to be primitive for jawed vertebrates, and suggests a decoupling between ectomesenchymal growth trajectory, ectomesenchymal proliferation, and cerebral shape change during the origin of gnathostomes.

  5. Evolution of the mammalian middle ear and jaw: adaptations and novel structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthwal, Neal; Joshi, Leena; Tucker, Abigail S

    2013-01-01

    Having three ossicles in the middle ear is one of the defining features of mammals. All reptiles and birds have only one middle ear ossicle, the stapes or columella. How these two additional ossicles came to reside and function in the middle ear of mammals has been studied for the last 200 years and represents one of the classic example of how structures can change during evolution to function in new and novel ways. From fossil data, comparative anatomy and developmental biology it is now clear that the two new bones in the mammalian middle ear, the malleus and incus, are homologous to the quadrate and articular, which form the articulation for the upper and lower jaws in non-mammalian jawed vertebrates. The incorporation of the primary jaw joint into the mammalian middle ear was only possible due to the evolution of a new way to articulate the upper and lower jaws, with the formation of the dentary-squamosal joint, or TMJ in humans. The evolution of the three-ossicle ear in mammals is thus intricately connected with the evolution of a novel jaw joint, the two structures evolving together to create the distinctive mammalian skull.

  6. Jaw Rotation in Dysarthria Measured With a Single Electromagnetic Articulography Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jeff; Kolb, Andrew; Schroeder, James; Johnson, Michael T

    2017-06-22

    This study evaluated a novel method for characterizing jaw rotation using orientation data from a single electromagnetic articulography sensor. This method was optimized for clinical application, and a preliminary examination of clinical feasibility and value was undertaken. The computational adequacy of the single-sensor orientation method was evaluated through comparisons of jaw-rotation histories calculated from dual-sensor positional data for 16 typical talkers. The clinical feasibility and potential value of single-sensor jaw rotation were assessed through comparisons of 7 talkers with dysarthria and 19 typical talkers in connected speech. The single-sensor orientation method allowed faster and safer participant preparation, required lower data-acquisition costs, and generated less high-frequency artifact than the dual-sensor positional approach. All talkers with dysarthria, regardless of severity, demonstrated jaw-rotation histories with more numerous changes in movement direction and reduced smoothness compared with typical talkers. Results suggest that the single-sensor orientation method for calculating jaw rotation during speech is clinically feasible. Given the preliminary nature of this study and the small participant pool, the clinical value of such measures remains an open question. Further work must address the potential confound of reduced speaking rate on movement smoothness.

  7. Zinc and mechanical prowess in the jaws of Nereis, a marine worm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenegger, Helga C; Schöberl, Thomas; Ruokolainen, Janne T; Cross, Julie O; Heald, Steve M; Birkedal, Henrik; Waite, J Herbert; Stucky, Galen D

    2003-08-05

    Higher animals typically rely on calcification to harden certain tissues such as bones and teeth. Some notable exceptions can be found in invertebrates: The fangs, teeth, and mandibles of diverse arthropod species have been reported to contain high levels of zinc. Considerable quantities of zinc also occur in the jaws of the marine polychaete worm Nereis sp. High copper levels in the polychaete worm Glycera dibranchiata recently were attributed to a copper-based biomineral reinforcing the jaws. In the present article, we attempt to unravel the role of zinc in Nereis limbata jaws, using a combination of position-resolved state-of-the-art techniques. It is shown that the local hardness and stiffness of the jaws correlate with the local zinc concentration, pointing toward a structural role for zinc. Zinc always is detected in tight correlation with chlorine, suggesting the presence of a zinc-chlorine compound. No crystalline inorganic phase was found, however, and results from x-ray absorption spectroscopy further exclude the presence of simple inorganic zinc-chlorine compounds in amorphous form. The correlation of local histidine levels in the protein matrix and zinc concentration leads us to hypothesize a direct coordination of zinc and chlorine to the protein. A comparison of the role of the transition metals zinc and copper in the jaws of two polychaete worm species Nereis and Glycera, respectively, is presented.

  8. The interrelationship between bolus breakdown, mandibular first molar displacement and jaw movement during mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomoda, S; Hisano, M; Amemiya, K; Soma, K

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the interrelationship between food bolus breakdown, mandibular first molar displacement and jaw movement during mastication. Finite element models were constructed of the maxillary first molar crown, the mandibular first molar consisting of crown, root, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, as well as the food bolus were constructed. Based on the actual measurement of the jaw movement pattern and the characteristics of food bolus, the patterns of mandibular first molar displacement and bolus breakdown on time course in the progress of mastication were simulated, to investigate the biomechanical significance of tooth displacement and jaw movement during mastication, using finite element non-linear dynamic analysis. The results showed that the patterns of tooth displacement and jaw movement and characteristics of food bolus changed with an interrelationship to each other as mastication progressed. Particularly at the initial phase, it was suggested that the patterns of mandibular first molar displacement and jaw movement worked inter-dependently to accomplish an efficient hard-bolus breakdown.

  9. Association between CYP19A1 genotype and pubertal sagittal jaw growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shushu; Hartsfield, James K.; Guo, Yujiao; Cao, Yang; Wang, Si; Chen, Song

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sagittal jaw growth is influenced during puberty by a ratio of androgens and estrogens. The CYP19A1 (formerly CYP19) gene encodes the cytochrome P450 enzyme aromatase (estrogen synthetase), which converts testosterone to estrogen. Genetic variations including single nucleotide polymorphisms might regulate CYP19A1 gene expression or the function of the aromatase protein and thus influence sagittal jaw growth. Methods The annual sagittal jaw growth in 92 pubertal orthodontic patients was determined by using pretreatment and posttreatment cephalometric radiographs. Single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2470144 and rs2445761 were genotyped and haplotypes constructed. Associations between genotypes or haplotypes and the annual sagittal growth were estimated by using JMP (version 9.0; SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Results Two single nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with average differences in annual sagittal jaw growth in boys. Haplotype analysis demonstrated that haplotypes Trs2470144Trs2445761 and Crs2470144Trs2445761 had significant effects on annual sagittal maxillary growth and on mandibular growth in boys. No association was found in girls. Conclusions A quantitative trait locus that influences male pubertal sagittal jaw growth might exist in the CYP19A1 gene, and single nucleotide polymorphisms rs2470144 and rs2445761 might be inside this quantitative trait locus or be linked to it. PMID:23116507

  10. The oral microbial community of gingivitis and lumpy jaw in captive macropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiabong, John F; Boardman, Wayne; Moore, Robert B; Brown, Melissa H; Ball, Andrew S

    2013-12-01

    Gingivitis and lumpy jaw are diseases of polymicrobial aetiology. Although Fusobacterium necrophorum has been associated with these diseases in macropods, little is known about other organisms associated with these diseases in this animal species. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed the potential pathogens associated with gingivitis and lumpy jaw in macropods. PCR-DGGE profile comparison between the healthy and disease groups indicated a shift in the oral bacterial community structures with similarity coefficients of 48% and 35% for gingivitis and lumpy jaw respectively. Moreover, gingivitis was associated with increase in bacterial diversity (Shannon index = 2.87; PL curve = 45%) while lumpy jaw resulted in a decline in bacterial diversity (Shannon index = 2.47; PL curve = 74%). This study suggest that the establishment of gingivitis and lumpy jaw diseases follows the ecological plaque hypothesis. This forms the basis for an expanded investigation in an epidemiological scale and suggests the need for the appropriate choice of antimicrobial agent(s) and for the effective management and control of polymicrobial diseases.

  11. Radiographic features of large cystic lesions of the jaws in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodner, Lipa; Woldenberg, Yitzhak [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Soroka Medical Center, P.O. Box 151, Beer-Sheva 84101 (Israel); Bar-Ziv, Jacob [Department of Radiology, Hebrew University and Hadassab School of Medicine, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2003-01-01

    The surgical approach to cystic lesions of the jaws is either marsupialisation or enucleation. The treatment of choice is dependent on the size of the lesion, the bony integrity of the cyst and its proximity to anatomical structures.Objectives. To assess large (>2.0 cm) cystic lesions of the jaws using plain film radiography (PFR), CT, multiplanar reconstruction program (MPR) and three-dimensional CT (3D-CT).Patients and methods. Twelve children aged 7-14 years.Results. The classic radiological feature was a unilocular radiolucent area surrounded by a well-defined radio-opaque margin adjacent to the root of a non-viable tooth or associated with the crown of an unerupted tooth. Malposition of teeth and root resorption were more common in dentigerous cysts. The features seen on CT were clear and more precise than those seen on PFR. MPR, by the three-dimensional visualisation of the jaw (axial, panoramic, and bucco-lingual), provided useful information for determining the outline of the cyst and its proximity to adjacent anatomical structures, such as teeth, nerves or maxillary sinus. 3-D CT further and more clearly demonstrated discontinuity in the buccal or palatal/lingual cortices of the jaw bone. PFR was very accurate in determining root resorption.Conclusions. CT with MPR and, ideally, 3-D CT should be used for the comprehensive diagnostic work-up and meticulous surgical management of large cystic lesions of the jaws in children. (orig.)

  12. Effect of jaw thrust and cricoid pressure maneuvers on glottic visualization during GlideScope videolaryngoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corda, David M; Riutort, Kevin T; Leone, Alex J; Qureshi, Mueez K; Heckman, Michael G; Brull, Sorin J

    2012-06-01

    During performance of direct laryngoscopy in the difficult-to-visualize airway, several maneuvers have the potential to impact glottic visualization, including jaw thrust and cricoid pressure. The effect of these maneuvers on glottic visualization during videolaryngoscopy has not been studied. We evaluated the effect of jaw thrust and cricoid pressure maneuvers on both visualization of the glottis and the area of glottic opening visible during GlideScope-aided videolaryngoscopy. One hundred patients were enrolled in this study. After induction of general anesthesia, videolaryngoscopy was followed by jaw thrust and cricoid pressure maneuvers performed in random order. Laryngeal anatomy was recorded continuously and was saved as digital images following the initial laryngoscopy and after each maneuver. Glottis grade [modified Cormack and Lehane (C&L)] was recorded, as was the total glottic area. There was improvement in glottis grade when utilizing jaw thrust maneuver in comparison to GlideScope videolaryngoscopy alone (31% improved, 4% worsened; P thrust maneuver in comparison with videolaryngoscopy alone (P thrust maneuver was superior to videolaryngoscopy alone in improving the modified C&L grade and the visualized glottic area; however, no significant improvement was noted with cricoid pressure. We therefore recommend the use of jaw thrust as a first-line maneuver to aid in glottic visualization and tracheal intubation during GlideScope videolaryngoscopy.

  13. An antiarch placoderm shows that pelvic girdles arose at the root of jawed vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Yu, Xiaobo; Choo, Brian; Wang, Junqing; Jia, Liantao

    2012-01-01

    Almost all gnathostomes or jawed vertebrates (including osteichthyans, chondrichthyans, ‘acanthodians’ and most placoderms) possess paired pectoral and pelvic fins. To date, it has generally been believed that antiarch placoderms (extinct armoured jawed fishes from the Silurian–Devonian periods) lacked pelvic fins. The putative absence of pelvic fins is a key character bearing on the monophyly or paraphyly of placoderms. It also has far-reaching implications for studying the sequence of origin of pelvic girdles versus that of movable jaws in the course of vertebrate evolution. Parayunnanolepis xitunensis represents the only example of a primitive antiarch with extensive post-thoracic preservation, and its original description has been cited as confirming the primitive lack of pelvic fins in early antiarchs. Here, we present a revised description of Parayunnanolepis and offer the first unambiguous evidence for the presence of pelvic girdles in antiarchs. As antiarchs are placed at the base of the gnathostome radiation in several recent studies, our finding shows that all jawed vertebrates (including antiarch placoderms) primitively possess both pectoral and pelvic fins and that the pelvic fins did not arise within gnathostomes at a point subsequent to the origin of jaws. PMID:22219394

  14. Retrospective Audit: Does Prior Assessment by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Reduce the Risk of Osteonecrosis of The Jaw in Patients Receiving Bone-Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Cancers to the Skeleton?--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Bruce; Ali, Sacha; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Ali, Enamul; Cheng, Leo; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Men who receive bone-targeted therapy for metastatic prostate cancer are at increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Development of ONJ has been associated with the administration of bone-targeted therapies in association with other risk factors. ONJ can be distressing for a patient because it can cause pain, risk of jaw fracture, body image disturbance, difficultly eating, and difficulty maintaining good oral hygiene. The aim of this article is to report results of an audit of prior assessment by oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) before initiation of bone-targeted therapies and whether it may reduce the risk of ONJ in patients receiving bone-targeted therapies for advanced cancers.

  15. Effect of muscle relaxants on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes: a double-blind and placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Peter; Wang, Kelun; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2003-01-01

    A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled three-way cross-over study was performed to investigate the effect of two muscle relaxants (tolperisone hydrochloride and pridinol mesilate) on experimental jaw-muscle pain and jaw-stretch reflexes. Fifteen healthy men participated in three randomised sessions separated by at least 1 week. In each session 300 mg tolperisone, 8 mg pridinol mesilate or placebo was administered orally as a single dose. One hour after drug administration 0.3 ml hypertonic saline (5.8%) was injected into the right masseter to produce muscle pain. Subjects continuously rated their perceived pain intensity on an electronic 10-cm visual analogue scale (VAS). The pressure pain threshold (PPT) was measured and short-latency reflex responses were evoked in the pre-contracted (15% maximal voluntary contraction) masseter and temporalis muscles by a standardised stretch device (1 mm displacement, 10 ms ramp time) before (baseline), 1 h after medication (post-drug), during ongoing experimental muscle pain (pain-post-drug), and 15 min after pain had vanished (post-pain). Analysis of variance demonstrated significantly lower VAS peak pain scores (5.9 +/- 0.4 cm) after administration of tolperisone hydrochloride compared with pridinol mesilate (6.8 +/- 0.4 cm) and placebo (6.6 +/- 0.4 cm) (P=0.020). Administration of pridinol mesilate was associated with a significant decrease in PPTs compared with tolperisone hydrochloride and placebo (P=0.002) after medication, but not after experimental jaw-muscle pain. The normalised peak-to-peak amplitude of the stretch reflexes were not significantly influenced by the test medication (P=0.762), but were in all sessions significantly facilitated during ongoing experimental jaw-muscle pain (P=0.034). In conclusion, tolperisone hydrochloride provides a small, albeit significant reduction in the perceived intensity of experimental jaw-muscle pain whereas the present dose had no effect on the short-latency jaw

  16. design and operations challenges of a single toggle jaw crusher

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    1,5 ADVANCED MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMME, JALINGO, ..... capacity; require a small power input per unit of product .... Journal of Application or Innovation in Engineering ... tribological barrier overcoming”, Science of.

  17. A 3D Interactive Model and Atlas of the Jaw Musculature of Alligator mississippiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Casey M.; Tsai, Henry P.; Skiljan, Rebecca J.; George, Ian D.; Pathan, Sami

    2013-01-01

    Modern imaging and dissemination methods enable morphologists to share complex, three-dimensional (3D) data in ways not previously possible. Here we present a 3D interactive model of the jaw musculature of the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis). Alligator and crocodylian jaw musculature is notoriously challenging to inspect and interpret because of the derived nature of the feeding apparatus. Using Iodine-contrast enhanced microCT imaging, a segmented model of jaw muscles, trigeminal nerve, brain and skull are presented as a cross-sectional atlas and 3D, interactive pdf of the rendered model. Modern 3D dissemination methods like this 3D Alligator hold great potential for morphologists to share anatomical information to scientists, educators, and the public in an easily downloadable format. PMID:23762228

  18. A 3D interactive model and atlas of the jaw musculature of Alligator mississippiensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey M Holliday

    Full Text Available Modern imaging and dissemination methods enable morphologists to share complex, three-dimensional (3D data in ways not previously possible. Here we present a 3D interactive model of the jaw musculature of the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis. Alligator and crocodylian jaw musculature is notoriously challenging to inspect and interpret because of the derived nature of the feeding apparatus. Using Iodine-contrast enhanced microCT imaging, a segmented model of jaw muscles, trigeminal nerve, brain and skull are presented as a cross-sectional atlas and 3D, interactive pdf of the rendered model. Modern 3D dissemination methods like this 3D Alligator hold great potential for morphologists to share anatomical information to scientists, educators, and the public in an easily downloadable format.

  19. Dental CT: imaging technique, anatomy, and pathologic conditions of the jaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gahleitner, Andre [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Watzek, G. [Department of Oral Surgery, Dental School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Imhof, H. [Department of Radiology/Osteology, Medical School, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 25a, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2003-02-01

    In addition to conventional imaging methods, dental CT has become an established method for anatomic imaging of the jaws prior to dental implant placement. More recently, this high-resolution imaging technique has gained importance in diagnosing dental-associated diseases of the mandible and maxilla. Since most radiologists have had little experience in these areas, many of the CT findings remain undescribed. The objective of this review article is to present the technique of dental CT, to illustrate the typical appearance of jaw anatomy and dental-related diseases of the jaws with dental CT, and to show where it can serve as an addition to conventional imaging methods in dental radiology. (orig.)

  20. Remote Estimation of Collimator Jaw Damages With Sounds Measurements During Beam Impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Deboy, D; Aberle, O; Carra, F; Cauchi, M; Lendaro, J; Masi, A; Redaelli, S

    2013-01-01

    Irregular hits of high-intensity LHC beams on collimators can lead to severe damage of the collimator jaws. The identification of damaged collimator jaws by observation of beam measurements is challenging: online loss measurements at the moment of the impacts can be tricky and degradation of the overall performance from single collimator damage can be difficult to measure. Visual inspections are excluded because collimator jaws are enclosed in vacuum tanks without windows. However, the sound generated during the beam impact can be used to give an estimate of the damage level. In 2012, high-intensity beam comparable to a full nominal LHC bunch at 7 TeV was shot on a tertiary type LHC collimator at the HiRadMat test facility at CERN. The paper presents results from sound recordings of this experiment.