WorldWideScience

Sample records for monthly time reporting

  1. Monthly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-06-01

    This monthly report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the principal results concerning the surveillance of radioactivity in the environment: atmospheric dusts(air at ground level, high altitude air), rainwater, surface water, underground water, irrigation water, drinking water, food chain (milk, plants, cattle, fish), sea water around nuclear plant sites and other sites. The activities of various radioisotopes are presented in tables ( 7 Be, 95 Zr and 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 106 Rh, 226 Ra, 54 Mn, U and T). A monthly bibliographic selection is also presented [fr

  2. Monthly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-03-01

    This monthly report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the principal results concerning the surveillance of radioactivity in the environment: atmospheric dusts (air at ground level, high altitude air), rainwater, surface water, underground water, irrigation water, drinking water, food chain (milk, plants, cattle, fish), sea water around nuclear plant sites and other sites. The activities of various radioisotopes are presented in tables ( 7 Be, 95 Zr and 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 106 Rh, 226 Ra, 54 Mn, U and T). A monthly bibliographic selection is also presented [fr

  3. Monthly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    This monthly report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the principal results concerning the surveillance of radioactivity in the environment: atmospheric dusts (air at ground level, high altitude air), rainwater, surface water, underground water, irrigation water, drinking water, food chain (milk plants, cattle, fish), seawater around nuclear plant sites and other sites. The activities of various radioisotopes are presented in tables ( 7 Be, 95 Zr and 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 106 Rh, 226 Ra, 54 Mn U and T). A monthly bibliographic selection is also presented [fr

  4. Monthly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This monthly report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the principal results concerning the surveillance of radioactivity in the environment: atmospheric dusts (air at ground level, high altitude air), rainwater, surface water, underground water, irrigation water, drinking water, food chain (milk, plants, cattle, fish), sea water around nuclear plant sites and other sites. The activities of various radioisotopes are presented in tables ( 7 Be, 95 Zr and 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 106 Rh, 226 Ra, 54 Mn, U and T). A monthly bibliographic selection is also presented [fr

  5. Monthly progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-02-01

    This monthly report of the SCPRI exposes an interpretation of the principal results concerning the surveillance of radioactivity in the environment: atmospheric dusts (air at ground level, high altitude air), rainwater, surface water, underground water, irrigation water, drinking water, food chain (milk, plants, cattle, fish), sea water around nuclear plant sites and other sites. The activities of various radioisotopes are presented in tables ( 7 Be, 95 Zr and 95 Nb, 103 Ru, 131 I, 137 Cs, 140 Ba and 140 La, 90 Sr, 106 Ru and 106 Rh, 226 Ra, 54 Mn, U and T). A monthly bibliographic selection is also presented [fr

  6. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Illness Prevention and Sun Safety. “Sun Safety.” https:// phc.amedd.army.mil/ topics /discond/hipss/Pages/ SunSafety.aspx. Accessed on 7 December 2016. 22...febrile illness; however, after its wide- spread introduction into immunologically MSMR Vol. 23 No. 12 December 2016 Page 8 naïve populations, a...October 2016 (data as of 22 November 2016) MSMR’s Invitation to Readers Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) invites readers to submit topics for

  7. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  8. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  9. Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR) replaces the Cost Distribution Report (CDR). The MPCR provides summary information about Veterans Affairs operational costs,...

  10. Monthly report, November, 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1966-12-15

    This report gives summaries for the reactor plant operations, fuel and target fabrication, technical activities, advanced concepts and planning, and irradiation services. A feature report is included which describes the following: (1) the safety and control rod systems of the production reactors; (2) the problems which have developed with them; and (3) the corrective rod channel renovation and rod modification work which has been accomplished.

  11. ULTRAPLATE 30 month management report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    In the period from month 24 to month 30 focus has been on the work-package 3 activities concerning optimisation of the newly developed ULTRAPLATE technology towards specific industrial applications. Three main application areas have been pursued: 1) High- speed plating of lead free solder contacts...

  12. Periodic progress report, 12 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the first 12 months of the project started with the establishment of the cutting theory for the cutting of heavy sections (phase 1). Phase 2 comprises the design of the first laboratory version cutting head with optics, nozzle systems and interfaces for the various...

  13. Periodic progress report, 6 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    This is the first progress report of the BriteEuram project named "High Power Laser Cutting for Heavy Industry" ("Powercut"). The report contains a summary of the objectives of the first period, an overview of the technical progress, a comparison between the planed and the accomplished work...

  14. SRTC monthly report, May 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    This report from the Savannah River Technology Center contains brief summaries of many projects ongoing at the center. Various aspects of tritium processing, separations work, environmental projects, and waste management are described. An in depth Executive Summary clearly analyzes current projects

  15. SRTC monthly report, May 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1995-05-01

    This report from the Savannah River Technology Center contains brief summaries of many projects ongoing at the center. Various aspects of tritium processing, separations work, environmental projects, and waste management are described. An in depth Executive Summary clearly analyzes current projects.

  16. Fuels Preparation Department monthly report, May 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This report describes the operation of the fuels preparation department for the month of May, 1958. Manufacturing employee relations, process development, plant improvements, and financial operations are discussed.

  17. Hanford Works monthly report, October 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1950-11-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of October 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  18. Hanford Works monthly report, December 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-01-22

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of December 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  19. Hanford Works monthly report, May 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1950-06-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of May 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  20. Hanford Works monthly report, July 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1950-08-18

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of July 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  1. Hanford Works monthly report, March 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1952-04-18

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of April 1952. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  2. Hanford Works monthly report, April 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1952-05-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of April 1952. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  3. Hanford Works monthly report, July 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1952-08-15

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of July 1952. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  4. Hanford Works monthly report, January 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1952-02-21

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of January 1952. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  5. Hanford Works monthly report, September 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1950-10-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of September 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  6. Hanford Works monthly report, July 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-08-24

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of July 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  7. Hanford Works monthly report, March 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-04-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of March 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  8. Hanford Works monthly report, June 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1951-07-20

    This is a progress report of the production on the Hanford Reservation for the month of June 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  9. Hanford works monthly report, September 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-10-19

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of September 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  10. Hanford Works monthly report, May 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-06-21

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of May 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  11. Hanford Works monthly report, June 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1950-07-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of June 1950. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  12. Hanford Works monthly report, November 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-12-21

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of November 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  13. Hanford Works monthly report, August 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1951-09-24

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of August 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  14. Hanford Works monthly report, August 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1950-09-18

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of August 1950. This report takes each division (e.g. manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  15. Hanford Works monthly report, November 1950

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1950-12-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of November 1950. This report takes each division (e.g. manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  16. Hanford Works monthly report, February 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-03-20

    This is a progress report of the production on the Hanford Reservation for the month of February 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  17. Hanford Works monthly report, December 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1952-01-22

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of December 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  18. Hanford Works monthly report, January 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-02-16

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of January 1951. This report takes each division (e.g. manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  19. Hanford Works monthly report, April 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1951-05-21

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of April 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  20. Hanford Works monthly report, March 1949

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prout, G.R.

    1949-04-19

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of March 1949. This report takes each division (e.g. manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month. (MB)

  1. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, November 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research.

  2. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, March 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-04-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation March 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  3. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, December 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-01-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, December 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, and applied mathematics, and programming operations are discussed.

  4. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, October 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  5. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, January 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-02-14

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, January 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, applied mathematics, programming operation, and radiation protection are discussed.

  6. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, August 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-09-16

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  7. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, May 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-06-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, applied mathematics, programming operation, and radiation protection are discussed.

  8. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, January 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-02-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation January 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  9. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, September 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  10. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, July 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  11. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, May 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-06-14

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, and applied mathematics, and programming operation are discussed.

  12. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, February 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-03-16

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February, 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation process, reactor technology financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, applied mathematics, programming, and radiation protection are discussed.

  13. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, June 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-07-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June 1963. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  14. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, April 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-05-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, applied mathematics, programming operation, and radiation protection are discussed.

  15. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, July 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-08-14

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, applied mathematics, programming operation, and radiation protection are discussed.

  16. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, March 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-04-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, and applied mathematics operation, and programming operations are discussed.

  17. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, April, 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-05-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April, 1963. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, applied mathematics operation, programming, and radiation protection operation discussed.

  18. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, August 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-09-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, and applied mathematics, and programming operations are discussed.

  19. Hanford Laboratories monthly activities report, October 1964

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-11-16

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1964. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, and applied mathematics operations are discussed.

  20. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, January 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-02-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of January, 1961. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; Financial Operation; and NPR Project.

  1. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, May 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-06-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of May, 1961. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and NPR Reactor.

  2. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, April 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-05-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of April, 1961. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; Financial Operation; and NPR project.

  3. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, June 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-07-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of June 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: research and engineering operations; production and reactor operations; facilities engineering operation; employee relations operation; and financial operation.

  4. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, December 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-01-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of December 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  5. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, April 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-05-13

    This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of August, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  6. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, August 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-09-12

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of August, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor operations; Facilities Engineering operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  7. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, May 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1960-06-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of May, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  8. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, March 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-04-12

    This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of August, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  9. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, July 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-08-12

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of July, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  10. 45 CFR 233.28 - Monthly reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ELIGIBILITY IN FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 233.28 Monthly reporting. (a) State plans specifying... information requested on the form, and provides a telephone number for this purpose; (4) Includes a statement, to be signed by the recipient, that he or she understands that the information he or she provides may...

  11. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, May 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-06-21

    The May, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.(MB)

  12. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-10-22

    The September, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.

  13. Monthly progress report: Heat source technology program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.G. [comp.

    1993-05-01

    This monthly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses.

  14. Reactor Operations informal monthly report December 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    Reactor operations at the MRR and HFBR reactors at Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented for December 1994. Reactor run-time and power levels, instrumentation, mechanical maintenance, occurrence reports, and safety information are included

  15. Hanford Works monthly report, October 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-11-20

    this document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer works for October 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  16. Hanford Works monthly report, February 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-03-18

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for February 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Service departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  17. Hanford Works monthly report, August 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-09-24

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for August 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department` section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical,Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  18. Hanford Works monthly report, September 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-10-20

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for September 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  19. Hanford Works monthly report, October 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1951-11-21

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for October 1951. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  20. Hanford Works monthly report, December 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-01-23

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for December 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  1. Hanford Engineer Works monthly report, July 1944

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1944-08-08

    This progress report discusses activities at Hanford Engineer Works for the month of July, 1944. The organization size increased rapidly in July, jumping from 1384 to 1886, an increase of 502 employees. Shortages existed on special lines such as electricians, instrument mechanics, and power operators. The opportunities to interview and employ Construction personnel improved as the Construction, organization moved past its peak employment figure. 269 houses were completed in Richland and 370 occupancies were reported, reducing the backlog of empty houses due to slow furniture movements. A total of 1530 houses or 35.6% of the village is now occupied. The overall canning yield increased from 63% to 75% while production leveled off at approximately two-thirds of design capacity. The metal machining operation and the test pile operated on a one shift-six day per week basis. The portion of the 100-B Area from the pump house through the filter plant and including the Power House was taken over by Operations on July 25. The Power House in the 200-W Area was started and flushing of process lines with water and steam got under way in the canyon. A new department was formed to control the Protection activities of the plant.

  2. Reported Church Attendance at the Time of Entry into HIV Care is Associated with Viral Load Suppression at 12 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wagoner, Nicholas; Elopre, Latesha; Westfall, Andrew O; Mugavero, Michael J; Turan, Janet; Hook, Edward W

    2016-08-01

    The Southeast has high rates of church attendance and HIV infection rates. We evaluated the relationship between church attendance and HIV viremia in a Southeastern US, HIV-infected cohort. Viremia (viral load ≥200 copies/ml) was analyzed 12 months after initiation of care. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models were fit for variables potentially related to viremia. Of 382 patients, 74 % were virally suppressed at 12 months. Protective variables included church attendance (AOR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.2, 0.9), being on antiretroviral therapy (AOR 0.01; 95 % CI 0.004, 0.04), CD4(+) T lymphocyte count 200-350 cells/mm(3) at care entry (AOR 0.3; 95 % 0.1, 0.9), and education (AOR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.2, 0.9). Variables predicting viremia included black race (AOR 3.2; 95 % CI 1.4, 7.4) and selective disclosure of HIV status (AOR 2.7; 95 % CI 1.2, 5.6). Church attendance may provide needed support for patients entering HIV care for the first time. El Sur Este de los Estados Unidos tiene tasas altas de visitas a iglesias y de infección por VIH. Evaluamos la relación entre visitas a iglesias y viremia por VIH en una cohorte de pacientes infectados con VIH en el Sur Este de los EEUU. La viremia (carga viral ≥ 200 copias/ml) fue analizada a los 12 meses de iniciar el cuidado médico. Los modelos de regresión logística univariado y multivariado fueron ajustados para variables potencialmente relacionadas a viremia. De 382 pacientes, 75 % tuvieron supresión virológica a los 12 meses. Variables que ofrecieron protección fueron visitas a iglesias (AOR 0.5; IC95 % 0.2-0.9), recibir terapia antiretroviral (AOR 0.01; IC95 % 0.004,0.04), recuento de linfocitos T CD4 + 200-350 al iniciar cuidado médico (AOR 0.3; IC95 % 0.1,09), y educación (AOR 0.5; IC95 % 0.2,0.9). Las variables que predijeron viremia incluyeron raza negra (AOR 3.2; IC95 % 1.4,7.4) y la comunicación selectiva del diagnóstico de VIH a otras personas (AOR 2.7; 95 % IC 1

  3. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  4. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  5. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  6. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  7. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  8. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  9. Oxide production program monthly report - December 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Evelyn A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whitworth, Julia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lloyd, Jane Alexandria [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hampton, David Earl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Benavidez, Amelia A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A summary of the major activities, accomplishments, milestones, financial summary, project performance and issues facing the ARIES Oxide Production Program for the month of December 2014 is presented in this Executive Summary.

  10. 9 CFR 206.3 - Monthly report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the close of business on the 15th of each month, beginning at least 45 days after the initial... the close of the next business day following the 15th. (c) What information do I need to provide in... in § 206.1. (4) Expansion clauses. Any conditions or circumstances specified by clauses in any...

  11. Self-reported moderate-to-vigorous leisure time physical activity predicts less pain and disability over 12 months in chronic and persistent low back pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto, R Z; Ferreira, P H; Kongsted, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Physical deconditioning in combination with societal and emotional factors has been hypothesized to compromise complete recovery from low back pain (LBP). However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies designed to specifically investigate physical activity as an independent prognostic factor. We...... conducted a prognostic study to investigate whether levels of leisure time physical activity are independently associated with clinical outcomes in people seeking care for chronic and persistent LBP....

  12. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J. F.; Johnson, W. E.; Reinker, P. H.; Warren, J. H.; McCullugh, R. W.; Harmon, M. K.; Gartin, W. J.; LaFollette, T. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Frank, W. S.; Grim, K. G.; Warren, J. H.

    1963-11-21

    This report, for October 1963 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and safety and security.

  13. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-07-22

    This report for June 1958, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  14. Chemical Processing Division monthly report, November 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, P.E.

    1966-12-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for November 1966, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee-relations, and waste management.

  15. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, March 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-04-21

    This report for March 1961, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  16. Chemical Processing Division monthly report, January 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, P.E.

    1966-02-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for January 1966, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  17. SNAP Participants? Eating Patterns over the Benefit Month: A Time Use Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hamrick, Karen S.; Andrews, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Individuals receiving monthly benefits through the U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) often fall short of food at the end of the month and some report feelings of hunger. To investigate this situation, we used time diaries from the 2006-08 American Time Use Survey and Eating & Health Module to identify the timing of days where respondents reported no eating occurrences. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, a logit model, and a simulated benefit month. We found that SNA...

  18. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-11-22

    Record highs were set for Pu output in separations plants and for amount of U processed in Purex. UO{sub 3} production and shipments exceeded schedules. Fabrication of 200 and 250 Model assemblies is reported. Unfabricated Pu production was 8.5% short. Nitric acid recovery in Purex and Redox is reported. Prototype anion exchange system for Pu was tested in Purex. Hinged agitator arms with shear pin feature was installed in UO{sub 3} plant H calciner. Operation of continuous type Task I, II facility improved. DBBP is considered for Recuplex. Methods for Pu in product solutions agreed to within 0. 10%. Purex recycle dock shelter is complete. Other projects are reported.

  19. EASYTRACK 30 month Progress Report from DTU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Savio, Enrico

    This report is made as a part of the project Easytrac, an EU project under the programme: Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No: G6RD-CT-2000-00188 coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines. The Cen....... The Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM) at the Technical University of Denmark collaborates with DIMEG, University of Padova, Italy....

  20. USCIS Applications for Immigration Benefits and Naturalization Monthly Statistical Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The 'Application for Immigration Benefits' monthly charts provide data on applications and petitions received by USCIS for immigration benefits. The report exclude...

  1. Soil moisture memory at sub-monthly time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoll, K. A.; Entekhabi, D.

    2017-12-01

    For soil moisture-climate feedbacks to occur, the soil moisture storage must have `memory' of past atmospheric anomalies. Quantifying soil moisture memory is, therefore, essential for mapping and characterizing land-atmosphere interactions globally. Most previous studies estimate soil moisture memory using metrics based on the autocorrelation function of the soil moisture time series (e.g., the e-folding autocorrelation time scale). This approach was first justified by Delworth and Manabe (1988) on the assumption that monthly soil moisture time series can be modelled as red noise. While this is a reasonable model for monthly soil moisture averages, at sub-monthly scales, the model is insufficient due to the highly non-Gaussian behavior of the precipitation forcing. Recent studies have shown that significant soil moisture-climate feedbacks appear to occur at sub-monthly time scales. Therefore, alternative metrics are required for defining and estimating soil moisture memory at these shorter time scales. In this study, we introduce metrics, based on the positive and negative increments of the soil moisture time series, that can be used to estimate soil moisture memory at sub-monthly time scales. The positive increments metric corresponds to a rapid drainage time scale. The negative increments metric represents a slower drying time scale that is most relevant to the study of land-atmosphere interactions. We show that autocorrelation-based metrics mix the two time scales, confounding physical interpretation. The new metrics are used to estimate soil moisture memory at sub-monthly scales from in-situ and satellite observations of soil moisture. Reference: Delworth, Thomas L., and Syukuro Manabe. "The Influence of Potential Evaporation on the Variabilities of Simulated Soil Wetness and Climate." Journal of Climate 1, no. 5 (May 1, 1988): 523-47. doi:10.1175/1520-0442(1988)0012.0.CO;2.

  2. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, February 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F.K.

    1954-03-23

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of February 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  3. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, April 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F.K.

    1953-05-20

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of April 1951. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  4. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, January 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F.K.

    1954-02-25

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of January 1954. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes the accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  5. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, March 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F.K.

    1953-04-22

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of March 1953. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  6. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, April 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F.K.

    1954-05-21

    This is a progress report of the production reactors on the Hanford Reservation for the month of April 1954. This report takes each division (e.g., manufacturing, medical, accounting, occupational safety, security, reactor operations, etc.) of the site and summarizes its accomplishments and employee relations for that month.

  7. SNAP Participants' Eating Patterns over the Benefit Month: A Time Use Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen S Hamrick

    Full Text Available Individuals receiving monthly benefits through the U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP often fall short of food at the end of the month and some report feelings of hunger. To investigate this situation, we used time diaries from the 2006-08 American Time Use Survey and Eating & Health Module to identify the timing of days where respondents reported no eating occurrences. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, a logit model, and a simulated benefit month. We found that SNAP participants were increasingly more likely than nonparticipants to report a day with no eating occurrences over the benefit issuance cycle. This supports the view that there is a monthly cycle in food consumption associated with the SNAP monthly benefit issuance policy.

  8. SNAP Participants’ Eating Patterns over the Benefit Month: A Time Use Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Individuals receiving monthly benefits through the U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) often fall short of food at the end of the month and some report feelings of hunger. To investigate this situation, we used time diaries from the 2006–08 American Time Use Survey and Eating & Health Module to identify the timing of days where respondents reported no eating occurrences. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, a logit model, and a simulated benefit month. We found that SNAP participants were increasingly more likely than nonparticipants to report a day with no eating occurrences over the benefit issuance cycle. This supports the view that there is a monthly cycle in food consumption associated with the SNAP monthly benefit issuance policy. PMID:27410962

  9. SNAP Participants' Eating Patterns over the Benefit Month: A Time Use Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Karen S; Andrews, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Individuals receiving monthly benefits through the U.S. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) often fall short of food at the end of the month and some report feelings of hunger. To investigate this situation, we used time diaries from the 2006-08 American Time Use Survey and Eating & Health Module to identify the timing of days where respondents reported no eating occurrences. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, a logit model, and a simulated benefit month. We found that SNAP participants were increasingly more likely than nonparticipants to report a day with no eating occurrences over the benefit issuance cycle. This supports the view that there is a monthly cycle in food consumption associated with the SNAP monthly benefit issuance policy.

  10. Relations and Utilities Operation monthly report, September, 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.M.

    1956-10-24

    This document contains the September 1956 management and operations statistics of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation (HAPO) for their ``Relations and Utilities Operations.`` This is a monthly report. (BN)

  11. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-09-14

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation August 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  12. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-03-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February, 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  13. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for March 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-04-20

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March, 1956. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology; financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, pile technology, safety and radiological sciences are discussed.

  14. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for February 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-02-21

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February, 1956. Metallurgy, reactors fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations are discussed.

  15. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-04-16

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation March 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  16. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-03-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, and programming are discussed.

  17. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, April 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-05-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  18. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-01-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, December 1962. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  19. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation July 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  20. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, January 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-02-24

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Atomic Laboratories Products Operation, February, 1956. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  1. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-04-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  2. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July, 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  3. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-06-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  4. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  5. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-07-16

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation June 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  6. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for June 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-07-28

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Atomic Products Operation, June, 1955. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  7. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-06-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation process, reactor technology employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, and radiation protection are discussed.

  8. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-10-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, and programming are discussed.

  9. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation October 1962. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  10. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  11. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaugh, E.W.

    1957-04-15

    This is the monthly report of the Hanford Laboratories Operation, March, 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  12. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, February 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-03-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, February 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  13. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October, 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  14. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, October 1959. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  15. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1969. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  16. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-09-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August, 1959. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, and operations research and synthesis operation are discussed.

  17. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, January 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-02-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, January 1961. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  18. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-07-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July 1957. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  19. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-01-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, January 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  20. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation October 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  1. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-12-14

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1962. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  2. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, W.

    1960-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1960. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, visits, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, and employee relations are discussed.

  3. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-09-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation August 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis, programming, and radiation protection operation are discussed.

  4. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, September 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1959-10-22

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of September, 1959. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  5. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, August 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-09-19

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of August, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  6. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-10-19

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for September 1956.

  7. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, November 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-21

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operations research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for November, 1956.

  8. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for October 1958.

  9. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, May 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of May 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  10. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, November 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-12-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for November 1957.

  11. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, December 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-19

    This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of December 1956. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  12. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, November 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-12-19

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of November 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: research and engineering operation; production and reactor operations; facilities engineering operation; employee relations operations; and financial operation.

  13. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, July 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-08-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of July, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  14. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, October 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-11-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for October 1957.

  15. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, January 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-02-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for January 1957.

  16. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, July 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-08-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of July 1959. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: research and engineering operations; facilities engineering operation; employee relations operation; and financial operation.

  17. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, March 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-04-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for March 1960.

  18. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, October 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-11-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of October, 1956. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  19. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, March 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1959-04-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of March, 1959. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  20. Irradiation Processing Department, monthly record report, February, 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-03-22

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department at the Hanford Reservation during the month of February, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operation; Manufacturing Operation; Facilities Engineering Operation; Relations Practices Operation; Financial Operation; and NPR operation.

  1. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, November 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of November 1956. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: research and engineering operations; production and reactor operations; facilities engineering operation; employee relations operation; and financial operation.

  2. Hanford Laboratories operation monthly activities report, February 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-03-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for February 1958.

  3. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, March 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-04-19

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of March, 1957. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  4. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-01-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation. Metallurgy, reactor fuels, physics and instrumentation, reactor technology, chemistry, separation processes, biology, financial activities, employee relations, laboratories auxiliaries, radiation protection, operation research, inventions, visits, and personnel status are discussed. This report is for December 1957.

  5. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, January 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1959-02-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of January 1959. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  6. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, August 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-09-15

    This is the monthly report of the Hanford Laboratories Operation, August 1958. Reactor fuels, chemistry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, plutonium recycling, programming, radiation protection, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and inventions are discussed.

  7. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-07-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June, 1958. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics, instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research, synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation are discussed.

  8. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, November 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-12-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, November 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and technical administration operation are discussed.

  9. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, December 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1962-01-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and technical administration operation are discussed.

  10. 27 CFR 31.160 - Monthly summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... documents regarding the receipt and disposition of distilled spirits that have a direct role in determining... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monthly summary report. 31.160 Section 31.160 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU...

  11. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, June 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-07-15

    The monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, June 1961. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, and physics and instrumentation research, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, laboratory auxiliaries operation, and professional placement and relations practices are discussed.

  12. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, April 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-05-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, April, 1959. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities. Biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation are discussed.

  13. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-08-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, July, 1958. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation area discussed.

  14. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-06-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May, 1959. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation area discussed.

  15. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, May 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, May 1958. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology, financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation area discussed.

  16. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, September 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-10-15

    This is the monthly report for the Hanford Laboratories Operation, September, 1958. Reactor fuels, chemistry, dosimetry, separation processes, reactor technology financial activities, biology operation, physics and instrumentation research, employee relations, 4000 program research and development, operations research and synthesis operation, programming, radiation protection, and laboratory auxiliaries operation are discussed.

  17. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  18. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of September 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-0161, Instructions for Preparation of Data Entry Sheets for Licensee Event Reports. For these events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73 -- Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System -- Description of Systems and Guidelines for Reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule. The LER summaries in this report are arranged alphabetically by facility name and then chronologically by event data for each facility. Component, system, keyword, and component vendor indexes follow the summaries. Vendors are those identified by the utility when the LER form is initiated; the keywords for the component, system, and general keyword indexes are assigned by the computer using correlation tables from the Sequence Coding and Search System

  19. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of August 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-0161, Instructions for Preparation of Data Entry Sheets for Licensee Event Reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 5.073 -- Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System -- Description of Systems and Guidelines for Reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule. The LER summaries in this report are arranged alphabetically by facility name and then chronologically by event date for each facility. Component, system, keyword, and component vendor indexes follow the summaries. Vendors are those identified by the utility when the LER form is initiated; the keywords for the component, system, and general keyword indexes are assigned by the computer using correlation tables from the Sequence Coding and Search System

  20. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of October 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-0161, Instructions for Preparation of Data Entry Sheets for Licensee Event Reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73 -- Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983.NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System -- Description of Systems and Guidelines for Reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule

  1. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of October 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-1061, Instructions for Preparation of Data Entry Sheets for Licensee Event Reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73--Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System--Description of Systems and Guidelines for Reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule

  2. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of August 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-0161, Instructions for Preparation of Data Entry Sheets for Licensee Event Reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73 -- Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System -- Description of Systems and Guidelines for Reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule

  3. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of March 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one-month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERS, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-1061, Instructions for preparation of data entry sheets for licensee event reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73 - Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System - Description of systems and guidelines for reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule

  4. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to these events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-0161, Instructions for Preparation of Data Entry Sheets for Licensee Event Reports. For those events occurring on and after January 1, 1984, LERs are being submitted in accordance with the revised rule contained in Title 10 Part 50.73 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50.73 -- Licensee Event Report System) which was published in the Federal Register (Vol. 48, No. 144) on July 26, 1983. NUREG-1022, Licensee Event Report System -- Description of Systems and Guidelines for Reporting, provides supporting guidance and information on the revised LER rule

  5. Heat source technology programs. Monthly progress report, March 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlinson, L.J.

    1996-02-01

    This monthly report describes activities performed in support of Cassini fueled-clad production and studies related to the use of 238 PuO 2 in radioisotope power systems carried out for the Office of Special Applications of the US Department of Energy (DOE) by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Most of the activities described are ongoing; the results and conclusions described may change as the work progresses

  6. Canadian petroleum industry: 1991 monitoring report. First six months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report describes the financial performance of the oil and gas industry in Canada during the first 6 months of 1991. The report is based on data from 145 companies accounting for ca 90% of total revenues of the petroleum industry. The report lists noteworthy happenings in the industry, gives highlights of the 6-month period, then details financial performance, sources and uses of funds, comparative performance with other industries, international flows of funds compared to the previous year, capital structures compared to the previous year, and gives income tax-related data for the current and previous years. New chapters on employment levels within the upstream part of the industry for the period 1985 to 1990 and on selected financial results of the petroleum industry for the third quarter and the first nine months of 1991 have been included. Compared to the first 6 months of 1990, industry cash flow dropped 15% to $3.4 billion and net income fell $1.1 billion from a profit of $815 million to a loss of $260 million. Both upstream and downstream segments of the industry recorded lower net income and cash flow. Higher operating costs in the upstream segment and significantly lower downstream margins were major causes of the poor financial performance of the petroleum industry. As a result, the rate of return on average shareholder's equity was an annualized negative 1.2%. The industry increased overall capital expenditures by 19% to $4.6 billion, largely on the strength of commitments to major projects such as the Caroline gas field development, Hibernia, Cohasset/Panuke and the Bi-Provincial Upgrader. This increase, together with the drop in cash flow, resulted in a reinvestment rate of 134%. 24 figs., 66 tabs

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory monthly activities report, November 1967

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albaugh, F.W.

    1967-12-01

    Calculated temperatures permitted in the Columbia River under various suggested regulations were plotted and reported in support of AEC studies. Mechanisms of Environmental Exposure. Measurements of radioactivity were completed in 362 pupils and 5 teachers at Emerson School on November 17. Measurements will begin at the third Pasco elementary school on December 5. Lectures were given at Mark Twain School to the teaching staff on November 20, and to 23 classroom son November 27 through December 1. A lecture was also given to the PTA meeting the evening of November 20 at Robert Frost elementary school in Pasco. Modifications were made to the electronic equipment and to the mobile whole-body counter van to improve the performance of the facility to further protect the NaI crystal from potential cold weather damage. Errors found inn the computer-calculated environmental doses were being corrected at month`s end, and the doses will be recalculated in December.

  8. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, July 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-08-26

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for July 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  9. Hanford Atomic Products for Operation monthly report, February 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-03-18

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for February 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  10. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, October 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-11-30

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer works for October, 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  11. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, May 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-06-23

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for May 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  12. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, May 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-06-22

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for May 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Science, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  13. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, September 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-10-27

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for September 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  14. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, October 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-11-24

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for October 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  15. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, June 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-07-22

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for June 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  16. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, August 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-09-18

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for August, 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  17. Monthly report Hanford Atomic Products Operation, July 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-08-20

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for July 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services Departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  18. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, August 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-09-27

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for August 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Sciences, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  19. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, May 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-06-19

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for May 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  20. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C.A.

    1960-08-15

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for July, 1969. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services Departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  1. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, April 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-05-21

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for April 1956. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the technical, design and project sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the financial department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Service departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  2. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, August 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-09-28

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for August 1956. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Sciences, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  3. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, December 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-01-25

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for December 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  4. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for May 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-06-21

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for May, 1956. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  5. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, March 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-04-23

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for March 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Service departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  6. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, April 1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reas, W.H.

    1962-05-15

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for April, 1962. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services Departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  7. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, June 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-07-26

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for June 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  8. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, August 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-09-17

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for August 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department report plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities, and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  9. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, January 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-02-21

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for January 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  10. Hanford Atomic Products Operation, monthly report, July 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-08-23

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for July, 1956. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  11. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, March 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-04-20

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for March 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  12. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, November 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-12-30

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for November 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  13. Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Monthly Report March 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Formerly: Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report February 2015 Highlights; Jim Cole attended the OECD NEA Expert Group on Innovative Structural Materials meeting in Paris, France; Jim Lane and Doug Copsey of Writers Ink visited PNNL to prepare an article for the NSUF annual report; Brenden Heidrich briefed the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee-Facilities Subcommittee on the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database project and provided them with custom reports for their upcoming visits to Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and University of California-Berkeley Principal Investigator Mehdi Balooch visited PNNL to observe measurements and help finalize plans for completing the desired suite of analyses. His visit was coordinated to coincide with the visit of Jim Lane and Doug Copsey.

  14. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, July 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, H.M.

    1957-08-15

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for July, 1957. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services Departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  15. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for April 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1955-05-23

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for April 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  16. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, July 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-08-20

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for July 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  17. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, October 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-11-20

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for October 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services. Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Service departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  18. Hanford Laboratories Operation, monthly activities report, January 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, H.M.

    1958-02-15

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for January, 1958. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services Departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  19. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for September 1954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-10-25

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for September 1954. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  20. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report, December 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1954-01-22

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for December 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  1. Hanford Atomic Products Operation monthly report for December 1955

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-01-30

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for December 1955. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  2. Mixed Waste Management Facility, monthly report June 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.

    1994-07-01

    This monthly report for June 1994 presents general progress in the development of the MWMF including bugetary considerations. During June, the outstanding issues of Project guidance and OPEX/CENRTC funding were essentially resolved. A letter from DOE/OAK on June 28 provided the KD-1 decision and provided revised scope and budget guidance for the Project. Prior to this, during June, an agreement with DOE for release of funds to mitigate the OPEX/CENRTC funding levels was also completed. In response to KD-1 guidance, work to provide a revised Project schedule and budget profile began. Preliminary design activities have been on hold since May 1

  3. Traumatic Maculopathy 6 Months after Injury: A Clinical Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Mendes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to report a case of traumatic maculopathy in a 12-year-old male following blunt trauma in his left eye (LE who presented 6 months after injury. Methods: Retrospective and descriptive case report based on data from clinical records, patient observation and analysis of diagnostic tests. Results: A previously healthy, 12-year-old male presented for a routine visit with complaints of a 2-month history of decreased visual acuity in his LE. Six months before the initial visit, he suffered blunt trauma to the LE during a struggle and had no medical observation. At the visit, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA in the LE was counting fingers and in the right eye, it was 20/20. Fundus examination of the LE showed a central macular lesion of 1 disc diameter with fibrosis, increased retinal thickness and intraretinal hemorrhage. Optical coherence tomography showed disruption of the inner/outer segment (IS/OS photoreceptor junction, increased reflectivity, cell infiltration of the retinal wall and retinal pigment epithelium detachment. Retinal thickness was 289 μm at the site of the lesion. A fluorescein angiogram revealed early impregnation and late diffusion. High-dose steroid pulse therapy (intravenous methylprednisolone 500 mg for 3 days and oral prednisolone 30 mg, tapering for 10 days was done. LE BCVA increased to 20/200, and retinal thickness decreased by 71 μm 1 week after treatment. Off-label intravitreal triamcinolone (IVTA; 0.05 ml/2 mg was administered 2 weeks after oral treatment in an attempt to achieve additional improvement. Three weeks after IVTA, LE BCVA improved to 20/150 and retinal thickness decreased by 10 μm. Three months after the initial visit, LE BCVA was 20/125 and retinal thickness 208 μm. Conclusion: We present a case of commotio retinae caused by an ocular blunt trauma 6 months before, with loss of BCVA. BCVA improved after oral steroids and IVTA. Nevertheless, fibrosis and disruption of the IS

  4. 17 CFR 31.16 - Monthly reporting requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of business on the last business day of the month for: (i) All customer accounts, and (ii) Separately... National Futures Association, by the tenth business day of the month following the month covered by the... customers during the month for: (i) All customer accounts, and (ii) Separately for commercial leverage...

  5. Rehabilitation status three months after first-time myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjær; Vestergaard, Mogens; Søndergaard, Jens

    2011-01-01

    (76.4%) clopidogrel, 756 (83.3%) statins, and 735 (81.0%) beta-blockers. Conclusion. After three months, there is a considerable potential for further rehabilitation of MI patients. In particular, the long-term CR should focus on mental health, smoking cessation, and cardioprotective drugs....... less than 10 years of education. Upwards of half (58.5%) of the patients stated that they had participated in hospital-based rehabilitation shortly after admission. A total of 262 (29.2%) were identifi ed with anxiety or depressive disorder or both, according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression...

  6. The Mixed Waste Management Facility monthly report, April 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    During late April, we modified the budget and work plan for FY95 to reflect a $2000K funding reduction for this fiscal year. These changes incorporate both the delayed start and slow ramp-up due to DOE funding uncertainties, as well as new and real reductions in Project activities. Due to the significant budgeting impact, this report reflects the resulting budget changes (for April). Scope and schedule impact, however, will be documented in the May report due to the additional effort involved in assessing schedule impact. We will combine the May Monthly Report and the Revised FY95 Plan for cost efficiency; we will submit the FY95 Plan Rebaseline for approval by DOE in May. Technical progress continued during April, but was redirected toward the new FY95 Plan. Key changes in the revised plan are to delete MEO from Project scope and wrap up work to date, defer further major procurements for the Project from FY95, delete MSO staff additions (with milestones), and defer work and milestones in other WBS elements. Engineering development, preliminary design, and peer reviews continued in preparation for the Project Preliminary Design Review. The budget reduction is executed to delay the Project Preliminary Design Review until Ql of FY96

  7. The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, September 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    A continuing concern over the last few months was resolved with the approval of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and signing of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This was completed in time to allow approval of the DWTF Phase 1 KD-3 and subsequent award of the construction contract for this phase (site preparation). The Project continues to make progress toward the Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR), scheduled for November 15-16, 1995. We completed the conventional feed preparation and solid feed preparation demonstration technologies (telerobotic sorting) and conducted a prereview of the Analytical Services element. Molten Salt is scheduled for October 3-4, with Water Treatment and Analytical Services completing the reviews by October 12. While a number of design issues have been raised and are being tracked, the general level of engineering progress is consistent with completing the PDR on schedule. No show-stoppers have been identified, and all items requiring resolution before PDR will be competed

  8. The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, September 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-10-01

    A continuing concern over the last few months was resolved with the approval of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and signing of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This was completed in time to allow approval of the DWTF Phase 1 KD-3 and subsequent award of the construction contract for this phase (site preparation). The Project continues to make progress toward the Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR), scheduled for November 15-16, 1995. We completed the conventional feed preparation and solid feed preparation demonstration technologies (telerobotic sorting) and conducted a prereview of the Analytical Services element. Molten Salt is scheduled for October 3-4, with Water Treatment and Analytical Services completing the reviews by October 12. While a number of design issues have been raised and are being tracked, the general level of engineering progress is consistent with completing the PDR on schedule. No show-stoppers have been identified, and all items requiring resolution before PDR will be competed.

  9. Time series analysis of monthly pulpwood use in the Northeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Bones

    1980-01-01

    Time series analysis was used to develop a model that depicts pulpwood use in the Northeast. The model is useful in forecasting future pulpwood requirements (short term) or monitoring pulpwood-use activity in relation to past use patterns. The model predicted a downturn in use during 1980.

  10. Nursing infant with acquired toxoplasmosis in the first months of life - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Hanstter Hallison Alves; Storchilo, Heloísa Ribeiro; Lima, Jaqueline Ataíde Silva; Gomes, Antônio Roberto; Gomes, Taynara Cristina; Souza, Jéssica Yonara de; Avelino, Mariza Martins; Amaral, Waldemar Naves do; Vinaud, Marina Clare; Castro, Ana Maria de

    2017-08-24

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by Toxoplasma gondii and the probability of this infection occurring in the first months of life is usually low because its transmission is related to eating habits. A 6-month-old nursing infant was diagnosed with acute toxoplasmosis, which was identified through anti- T. gondii IgA, IgM and low-avidity IgG serologic assays, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and mouse bioassay test although its mother was seronegative. This serological divergence between mother and child led us to interview the mother regarding epidemiological factors. During this interview, she reported that she had given her 2-month-old baby a piece of undercooked beef to suck on. After some time, the baby presented fever and cervical lymphadenitis. This report emphasizes the importance of serological surveys of toxoplasmosis in nursing infants presenting with fever and lymphadenitis, in view of the possible acquisition of toxoplasmosis in the first months of life.

  11. Defense.gov Special Report: African American History Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    in Military and Business Tuskegee Airman Shares History Soldier's Life Provides Example for West Department of Defense Submit Search During National African-American History Month, we celebrate the rich In honor of African-American History Month, Fred Moore, the first African-American Tomb Guard

  12. The mixed waste management facility. Monthly report, October 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-11-01

    A continuing concern over the last few months was resolved with the approval of the Environmental Assessment (EA) and signing of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This was completed in time to allow approval of the DWTF Phase 1 KD-3 and subsequent award of the construction contract for this phase (site preparation). The Project continues to make progress toward the Project Preliminary Design Review (PDR), scheduled for November 15-16, 1995. We completed the conventional feed preparation and solid feed preparation demonstration technologies (telerobotic sorting) and conducted a prereview of the Analytical Services element. Molten Salt is scheduled for October 3-4, with Water Treatment and Analytical Services completing the reviews by October 12. While a number of design issues have been raised and are being tracked, the general level of engineering progress is consistent with completing the PDR on schedule. No show-stoppers have been identified, and all items requiring resolution before PDR will be completed. We completed the initial iteration of the cost roll-ups for the preliminary design and have developed a plan consistent with the guidance issued for the Project (level funding at ∼$10M/yr, reduced scope, integrated with the DWTF). This was accomplished by staging the completion of various elements (e.g., MSO in FY98, Telerobotics in FY99), and reducing to the extent possible project support functions. Two significant modifications will be noted in the Project Baseline Revision 2.0-Preliminary Design (PB2.0) relative to previous estimates: (1) the cost of the MSO system has increased due to a better understanding of the system needs (relative to CDR assessment), and (2) project management has increased owing to a restructuring of how LLNL distributes facility charge costs. However, both these increases have been offset by reduction in other elements and by a general lowering of Project contingency

  13. Environmental monitoring six month report for the Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yager, R.E.; Furnari, J.A.; Craig, P.M.

    1989-05-01

    The Fiscal Year 1989 Six Month Report is the fourth in a series of semi-annual Tumulus Disposal Demonstration Project (TDDP) data summary reports. This data summary spans the time from start of operations in June 1987 through the end of March 1989 with particular emphasis on the last six months: October 1988 through March 1989. The environmental data collected include run-off water quality and quantity, groundwater quality and levels, soil sampling and hydrometeorological data. These data are being used and analyzed here to demonstrate the environmental performance objectives for the TDDP as part of the overall performance assessment. Comparisons are made between pre- and post-operational data and data collected during size month period ending March 31, 1989. No significant environmental impacts have been found since operations have begun. 13 refs., 28 figs., 12 tabs

  14. Waste Tank Summary Report for Month Ending February 28 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HANLON, B.M.

    2001-01-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 63 smaller miscellaneous underground storage tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 435.I (DOE-RL, July 1999, Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm tanks

  15. WASTE TANK SUMMARY REPORT FOR MONTH ENDING 01/2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HANLON, B.M.

    2004-01-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 60 smaller miscellaneous underground storage tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1 (DOE-HQ, August 28,2001, Radioactive Waste Management, U.S. Department of Energy-Washington, D.C.) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for the Hanford Site Tank Farm tanks

  16. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for July 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F. K.; Johnson, W. E.; MacCready, W. K.; Warren, J. H.; Schroeder, O. C.; Groswith, C. T.; Mobley, W. N.; LaFollette, T. G.; Grim, K. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Richards, R. B.; Roberts, D. S.

    1957-08-22

    This report, for July 1957 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following; Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  17. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for December 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-01-21

    This report for December 1958, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  18. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-03-21

    This report from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation, purex operation, redox operation, finished products operation, power and general maintenance operation, financial operation, facilities engineering operation, research and engineering operation, and employee relations operation.

  19. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for September 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-10-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for September 1963, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations, facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and power and crafts operation.

  20. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-03-20

    This report for February 1959, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  1. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  2. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-10-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  3. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report May 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-06-21

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  4. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report June 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-07-13

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  5. ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report July 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voyles, JW

    2010-08-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  6. Pacific Northwest Laboratory monthly activities report, April 1965

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-05-14

    This report discusses research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory on topics relating to hanford production reactors. The topic deal with: reactor and material technology; reactor physics and instruments; chemistry; biology and medicine; applied mathematics; radiation protection; and test reactor and engineering services.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory monthly activities report, August 1966

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, R.S.

    1966-09-01

    This document reports on: direct AEC sponsored programs (mainly Columbia River studies and exposure mechanisms), assistance to Douglas United Nuclear (production reactors), assistance to General Electric N-Reactor department, assistance to Isochem (processing), assistance to Hanford occupational health foundation, and technical assistance to Hanford Plant (environment, dosimetry).

  8. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report, July 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Progress is reported in the context of: tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general affairs. Emphasized topics include: metal hydrides, valves, sampling, water contamination, Par pond, F and H canyon tanks, tritium transport models, landfill stabilization, pumps, waste storage, and chemical analyzers.

  9. Battelle-Northwest monthly activities report, February 1965

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1964-03-15

    Activities for each of the following departments are discussed in this report: Reactor and Materials Technology Dept.; Physics and Instruments Dept.; Chemistry Dept.; Biology Dept.; Applied Mathematics Dept.; Radiation Protection Dept.; and the Test Reactor and Engineering Services Dept.. Activities are in support of Hanford reactors (production reactors, N-reactor, PRTR reactor, etc) and reprocessing and radioactive waste management efforts at Hanford.

  10. Hanford Laboratories Operation monthly activities report, January 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-02-15

    R and D is reported in the following: Reactor and Fuels (PRTR, Pu fabrication pilot plant, KER, NPR, materials); Chemical R and D (Pm recovery, fission products, Purex column, non-production fuels reprocessing, Salt Cycle process); Physics and Instrument R and D (PCTR, NPR, critical experiments, PRTR); and Biology (monitoring, irradiation experiments).

  11. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 16, Number 7, July 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    a zoonotic tick-borne disease that is caused by infection with a spirochetal bacterium of the genus Borrelia. It has a worldwide distribution and is...pollution (indoor and outdoor), infestation-related allergens (e.g., cockroaches, mice, rats), and stress (e.g., violence ).12 This report suggests that

  12. 48 CFR 1552.211-72 - Monthly progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., display the expended direct labor hours and costs broken out by EPA contract labor hour category for the... cumulative contract life display: the negotiated, expended and remaining direct labor hours and costs broken... consultant. (iv) Display the estimated direct labor hours and costs to be expended during the next reporting...

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 22, Number 10, October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Th e virus was fi rst identifi ed in Tanza- nia in 1953, but epidemics of illnesses resem- bling chikungunya fever were reported at least as early as...523 38 2,994 July 2010–June 2011 423 33 95 92 9 652 July 2011–June 2012 312 33 87 67 6 505 July 2012–June 2013 311 25

  14. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 17, Number 5, May 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    associated Lyme disease Malaria Chlamydia Gonorrhea Syphilis Cold c Heatc Q Fever Tuberculosis 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010...Chlamydia Gonorrhea Syphilis Cold c Heatc Q Fever Tuberculosis 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009 2010 2009...5 16 22 5 5 Reporting location Arthropod-borne Sexually transmitted Environmental Travel associated Lyme disease Malaria Chlamydia Gonorrhea

  15. Canadian petroleum industry: 1988 monitoring report. First six months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Petroleum Monitoring Agency was established in 1980 to provide the federal government with comprehensive and objective information on and analysis of the financial performance of the petroleum industry in Canada. The Agency publishes a semi-annual and an annual report based on information received directly from all but the smallest oil and gas companies. Data published are mainly aggregate data derived from survey schedules prescribed by regulations. This report presents a summary and highlights of the activities of the first half of 1988. Information is presented on corporate mergers and acquisitions; financial performance by sector (upstream, downstream, foreign) and total operations as seen by net income and cash flow; sources and uses of funds; a comparative performance by the petroleum and other industries as seen by net income and capital expenditures; ownership and control trends; international flows of funds; capital structures; and data related to income taxes. New features added in this report include expansion of the table representing the financial performance and profit margins of the refining/marketing segment to incorporate net income as a component of the analysis; analysis of the industry's use of exploration and investment tax credits; and a chart showing Canadian crude oil acquisition costs vs petroleum product prices. 12 figs., 63 tabs

  16. Gait Biomechanics in Participants, Six Months after First-time Lateral Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2016-06-01

    No research currently exists predicating a link between the injury-affiliated sensorimotor deficits of acute ankle sprain and those of chronic ankle instability during gait. This analysis evaluates participants with a 6-month history of ankle sprain injury to affirm this link. 69 participants with a 6-month history of acute first-time lateral ankle sprain were divided into subgroups ('chronic ankle instability' and 'coper') based on their self-reported disability and compared to 20 non-injured participants during a gait task. Lower extremity kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-heel strike (period 1) and from 200 ms pre- to 200 ms post-toe off (period 2). The 'chronic ankle instability' subgroup (who reported greater disability) displayed increased knee flexion during period 1. During period 2, this subgroup exhibited greater total displacement at their ankle joint and greater extensor dominance at their knee. That many of these features are present, both in individuals with acute ankle sprain and those with chronic ankle instability may advocate a link between acute deficits and long-term outcome. Clinicians must be aware that the sensorimotor deficits of ankle sprain may persevere beyond the acute stage of injury and be cognizant of the capacity for impairments to pervade proximally. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Defense.gov Special Report: Warrior Care Month - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operation Base Shank, Afghanistan, May 6, 2012. Story Vice Chairman Joins Warriors for Softball Classic Navy single during his final time at bat during the third annual Wounded Warriors Celebrity Softball Classic Wounded Warriors Celebrity Softball Classic in Washington D.C. Story Army Vice Chief, Warriors Share Their

  18. The Mixed Waste Management Facility, monthly report, February 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streit, R.D.

    1995-03-01

    Technical progress continued in general accordance with the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) FY95 Plan. Engineering development and design continued in support of preliminary design of MWMF major subsystems. Peer reviews have begun in preparation for system preliminary design reviews. Procurements in support of engineering design/development have continued to increase. Significant effort to provide technical and cost trade-off information for the Project Baseline Revision 1.2 (PB1.2) and FY97 Validation was completed. Management focus during February centered upon addressing the rebaseline for MWMF for the FY97 Validation in March, and upon completing the permitting strategy. We completed a consistent baseline plan for Validation that satisfied the DOE constraints of integration with DWTF, schedule stretchout, overall Project cost, and FY cost profiles. The revised permitting strategy was completed and reviewed by a number of stakeholders (LLNL, DOE, State). The proposed strategy involves no RCRA RD ampersand D permit, since all technology demonstrations can be done with surrogates and using limited treatability studies. The expenses for February continue to run somewhat below the plan due to the limited new hiring. This is a result of uncertain DOE funding and guidance to keep personnel to a minimum. However, the spending rate is picking up due to initiation of procurements for engineering development and a minimum of essential new hires. A significant imbalance in the OPEX/CENRTC funding split for FY95 exists (about $2.1M); DOE/OAK began to seek resolution this month. Critical-path items are DWTF construction, NEPA, and permitting (for both MWMF and DWTF). Contractual issues have delayed award of the A ampersand E contract for DWTF, but work-arounds are in progress to avoid schedule impact. NEPA and permitting issues are discussed below. Progress on preliminary design for MWMF is close to schedule

  19. Department of Veterans Affairs - Monthly Report to Congress of Data Incidents (April 2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This is a monthly report that the VA Office of Information Technology provides to congress about data incidents that took place during the month (April 2014). The...

  20. Battelle-Northwest monthly activities report, March 1965

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1965-04-15

    This report covers progress in the following areas: production reactor support; plutonium recycle program; PRTR HPD core; corrosion and water quality; PRTR pressure tubes; reactor components development; plutonium ceramics research; ceramics (uranium) fuel research; swelling studies; irradiation damage to reactor materials; ATR gas loop studies; graphite studies; metallic fuel development; plutonium and U-233 fueling of a fast compact reactor; FFTF studies; radiation effects on metals; customer work (support of HTLTR and EBWR); physics and instruments; chemistry; biology; radiation protection; and technical and other services.

  1. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 20, Number 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Drone-pilot burnout . New York Times, 12 Dec 2008. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/14/ magazine/14Ideas-Section2-B-t-001.html?_r=0. Accessed on 15...confi dence intervals Abbreviations: MH, mental health; RPA, remotely piloted aircraft D ia gn os es C ou ns el in g 0.5 (0.2-1.5) 4.8 (1.5-15.6) 2.4

  2. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 20, Number 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    excess in male hormones (i.e., androgens). In adolescence , the most common manifestation of PCOS is infre- quent or prolonged menstrual periods, but... adolescence to adult age. Ann NY Acad Sci. 2006;1092:158-174. 3. Ehrmann DA, Barnes RB, Rosenfi eld RL, Cavaghan MK, Imperial J. Prevalence of...exposure to more breast cancer risk factors (e.g., chemical exposures, long term use of oral contraceptives , and night time shift work).3 In

  3. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for April 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, J.H.

    1958-05-21

    The separations plants operated on schedule, and Pu production exceeded commitment. UO{sub 3} production and shipments were also ahead of schedule. Purex operation under pseudo two-cycle conditions (elimination of HS and 1A columns, co-decontamination cycle concentrator HCP) was successful. Final U stream was 3{times} lower in Pu than ever before; {gamma} activity in recovered HNO{sub 3} was also low. Four of 6 special E metal batches were processed through Redox and analyzed. Boric acid is removed from solvent extraction process via aq waste. The filter in Task II hydrofluorinator was changed from carbon to Poroloy. Various modifications to equipment were made.

  4. National Ignition Facility monthly status report-January 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, E

    2000-01-01

    The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Safety: On January 13, 2000, a worker received a back injury when a 42-in.-diameter duct fell during installation. He was taken by helicopter to the hospital and released on January 16, 2000. All work in the area was suspended, and the construction contractors went through a thorough safety review before work was started. A DOE occurrence report was filed. An independent LLNL Incident Analysis Team is reviewing the cause of the accident and will report out on March 1. A Project management review team is reviewing construction line management and safety support and will also report out on March 1. Several changes in work planning and site management have been incorporated to increase site safety. Technical Status: The general status of the technologies underlying the NIF Project remains satisfactory. The issues currently being addressed are (1) cleanliness for installation, assembly, and activation of the laser system by Systems Engineering; (2) laser glass--a second pilot run at one of the two commercial suppliers is ongoing; and (3) operational costs associated with final optics assembly (FOA) optics components--methods are being developed to mitigate 3 ωdamage and resolve beam rotation issues. Schedule: The completion of the Title II design of laser equipment is now approximately 80% complete. The Beampath Infrastructure System is

  5. The Canadian petroleum industry 1992 monitoring report: First six months

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report provides financial aspects of activity in the Canadian petroleum and natural gas industry. Data are given in graphic and tabular form on revenues, sources and destinations of funds (including financing, incentives, dividend payments, capital and operational expenditures); on comparisons with other industries; on how revenues are shared between the industry and various levels of government; and on principal trends observed. Data are broken down by various industry sectors where applicable. Highlights of the year include opening of the Lloydminster, Saskatchewn By-Provincial Upgrader, substantial changes in Alberta's oil and natural gas royalty system, and the rescinding of the Oil and Gas Acquisitions Policy which did not allow sale of Canadian controlled oil and gas assets valued in excess of $5 million unless the companies were in financial difficulty. 20 figs., 21 tabs

  6. 238Pu fuel form processes. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    Progress in the Savannah River 238 Pu fuel form program is summarized. Suspended solids observed in the technical-grade oxalic acid solution used in H-Area B-Line had no significant effect on particle size or morphology. A small but significant increase in product purity was noted with the use of reagent-grade oxalic acid. The density of hot-pressed LCHP pellets made from both problem and standardized feed decreased with longer milling times as was observed for multi-hundred watt (MHW) pellets. The LCHP pellets (greater than 90 percent theoretical density) generally cracked following final heat treatment. Cold-pressing studies indicate the anticipated pressure variation during cold pressing in the PuFF facility will have negligible effect on the density of MHW spheres. Construction of the plutonium experimental facility is 72 percent complete

  7. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. V. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION CANDIDATES IN THE FIRST SIXTEEN MONTHS FROM POLYNOMIAL MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Ragozzine, Darin; Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Gautier, Thomas N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ibrahim, Khadeejah A.; Uddin, Kamal [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans, E-mail: eford@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); and others

    2012-09-10

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during the first sixteen months of Kepler observations. We present 39 strong TTV candidates based on long-term trends (2.8% of suitable data sets). We present another 136 weaker TTV candidates (9.8% of suitable data sets) based on the excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurrence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased ({approx}68%) for planet candidates transiting stars with multiple transiting planet candidates when compared to planet candidates transiting stars with a single transiting planet candidate.

  8. Secret Sauce and Snake Oil: Writing Monthly Reports in a Highly Contingent Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinuzzi, Clay

    2010-01-01

    At a search marketing company, each search engine optimization (SEO) specialist writes up to 10 to 12 complex 20-page monthly reports in the first ten business days of each month. These SEO specialists do not consider themselves to be writers, yet they generate these structurally and rhetorically complex reports as a matter of course, while…

  9. 17 CFR 270.30b1-7 - Monthly report for money market funds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monthly report for money... money market funds. (a) Report. Every registered open-end management investment company, or series thereof, that is regulated as a money market fund under § 270.2a-7 must file with the Commission a monthly...

  10. Dynamic linear modeling of monthly electricity demand in Japan: Time variation of electricity conservation effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Keita; Shiraki, Hiroto; Ashina, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

    After the severe nuclear disaster in Fukushima, which was triggered by the Great East Japan earthquake in March 2011, nuclear power plants in Japan were temporarily shut down for mandatory inspections. To prevent large-scale blackouts, the Japanese government requested companies and households to reduce electricity consumption in summer and winter. It is reported that the domestic electricity demand had a structural decrease because of the electricity conservation effect (ECE). However, quantitative analysis of the ECE is not sufficient, and especially time variation of the ECE remains unclear. Understanding the ECE is important because Japan's NDC (nationally determined contribution) assumes the reduction of CO2 emissions through aggressive energy conservation. In this study, we develop a time series model of monthly electricity demand in Japan and estimate time variation of the ECE. Moreover, we evaluate the impact of electricity conservation on CO2 emissions from power plants. The dynamic linear model is used to separate the ECE from the effects of other irrelevant factors (e.g. air temperature, economic production, and electricity price). Our result clearly shows that consumers' electricity conservation behavior after the earthquake was not temporary but became established as a habit. Between March 2011 and March 2016, the ECE on industrial electricity demand ranged from 3.9% to 5.4%, and the ECE on residential electricity demand ranged from 1.6% to 7.6%. The ECE on the total electricity demand was estimated at 3.2%-6.0%. We found a seasonal pattern that the residential ECE in summer is higher than that in winter. The emissions increase from the shutdown of nuclear power plants was mitigated by electricity conservation. The emissions reduction effect was estimated at 0.82 MtCO2-2.26 MtCO2 (-4.5% on average compared to the zero-ECE case). The time-varying ECE is necessary for predicting Japan's electricity demand and CO2 emissions after the earthquake.

  11. Time-course of exercise and its association with 12-month bone changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vainionpää Aki

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise has been shown to have positive effects on bone density and strength. However, knowledge of the time-course of exercise and bone changes is scarce due to lack of methods to quantify and qualify daily physical activity in long-term. The aim was to evaluate the association between exercise intensity at 3, 6 and 12 month intervals and 12-month changes in upper femur areal bone mineral density (aBMD and mid-femur geometry in healthy premenopausal women. Methods Physical activity was continuously assessed with a waist-worn accelerometer in 35 healthy women (35-40 years participating in progressive high-impact training. To describe exercise intensity, individual average daily numbers of impacts were calculated at five acceleration levels (range 0.3-9.2 g during time intervals of 0-3, 0-6, and 0-12 months. Proximal femur aBMD was measured with dual x-ray absorptiometry and mid-femur geometry was evaluated with quantitative computed tomography at the baseline and after 12 months. Physical activity data were correlated with yearly changes in bone density and geometry, and adjusted for confounding factors and impacts at later months of the trial using multivariate analysis. Results Femoral neck aBMD changes were significantly correlated with 6 and 12 months' impact activity at high intensity levels (> 3.9 g, r being up to 0.42. Trochanteric aBMD changes were associated even with first three months of exercise exceeding 1.1 g (r = 0.39-0.59, p r = 0.38-0.52, p Conclusion The number of high acceleration impacts during 6 months of training was positively associated with 12-month bone changes at the femoral neck, trochanter and mid-femur. These results can be utilized when designing feasible training programs to prevent bone loss in premenopausal women. Trial registration Clinical trials.gov NCT00697957

  12. Six-month storage-time evaluation of one-bottle adhesive systems to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Marcelo; Seixas, Carla Alessandra Marcelino; Reis, Andre Figueiredo; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the 1-week, 3-month, and 6-month performance of eight commercially available one-bottle adhesive systems to dentin. Lingual and buccal surfaces from human third molars were ground wet on 600-grit SiC paper to obtain a flat dentinal surface. The specimens were randomly divided into 24 groups (n = 10), which were established to measure the shear bond strengths of Bond-1 (B1), ONE-STEP (OS), OptiBond SOLO (OP), Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB), Single Bond (SB), STAE (ST), Syntac Sprint (SS), and Tenure Quick (TQ) after 1-week, 3-month, and 6-month water storage at 37 degrees C. One-bottle adhesives were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and Z100 composite cylinders were applied on the bonded dentinal surfaces. The 3-month water-storage groups were thermocycled for 1500 cycles at 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C and 6-month groups for 3000 cycles. After storage periods, specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance and Tukey test. Results: The changes in shear bond strengths were not uniform over time. Over the test period, OS, PB, SB, and SS exhibited bond strength stability, however, SS presented low bond strengths on all tested periods. A significant decrease in bond strength was observed for B1, OP, ST, and TQ after the 6-month storage period.

  13. Monthly Rainfall Erosivity: Conversion Factors for Different Time Resolutions and Regional Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panos Panagos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As a follow up and an advancement of the recently published Rainfall Erosivity Database at European Scale (REDES and the respective mean annual R-factor map, the monthly aspect of rainfall erosivity has been added to REDES. Rainfall erosivity is crucial to be considered at a monthly resolution, for the optimization of land management (seasonal variation of vegetation cover and agricultural support practices as well as natural hazard protection (landslides and flood prediction. We expanded REDES by 140 rainfall stations, thus covering areas where monthly R-factor values were missing (Slovakia, Poland or former data density was not satisfactory (Austria, France, and Spain. The different time resolutions (from 5 to 60 min of high temporal data require a conversion of monthly R-factor based on a pool of stations with available data at all time resolutions. Because the conversion factors show smaller monthly variability in winter (January: 1.54 than in summer (August: 2.13, applying conversion factors on a monthly basis is suggested. The estimated monthly conversion factors allow transferring the R-factor to the desired time resolution at a European scale. The June to September period contributes to 53% of the annual rainfall erosivity in Europe, with different spatial and temporal patterns depending on the region. The study also investigated the heterogeneous seasonal patterns in different regions of Europe: on average, the Northern and Central European countries exhibit the largest R-factor values in summer, while the Southern European countries do so from October to January. In almost all countries (excluding Ireland, United Kingdom and North France, the seasonal variability of rainfall erosivity is high. Very few areas (mainly located in Spain and France show the largest from February to April. The average monthly erosivity density is very large in August (1.67 and July (1.63, while very small in January and February (0.37. This study addresses

  14. Predictability of monthly temperature and precipitation using automatic time series forecasting methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papacharalampous, Georgia; Tyralis, Hristos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the predictability of monthly temperature and precipitation by applying automatic univariate time series forecasting methods to a sample of 985 40-year-long monthly temperature and 1552 40-year-long monthly precipitation time series. The methods include a naïve one based on the monthly values of the last year, as well as the random walk (with drift), AutoRegressive Fractionally Integrated Moving Average (ARFIMA), exponential smoothing state-space model with Box-Cox transformation, ARMA errors, Trend and Seasonal components (BATS), simple exponential smoothing, Theta and Prophet methods. Prophet is a recently introduced model inspired by the nature of time series forecasted at Facebook and has not been applied to hydrometeorological time series before, while the use of random walk, BATS, simple exponential smoothing and Theta is rare in hydrology. The methods are tested in performing multi-step ahead forecasts for the last 48 months of the data. We further investigate how different choices of handling the seasonality and non-normality affect the performance of the models. The results indicate that: (a) all the examined methods apart from the naïve and random walk ones are accurate enough to be used in long-term applications; (b) monthly temperature and precipitation can be forecasted to a level of accuracy which can barely be improved using other methods; (c) the externally applied classical seasonal decomposition results mostly in better forecasts compared to the automatic seasonal decomposition used by the BATS and Prophet methods; and (d) Prophet is competitive, especially when it is combined with externally applied classical seasonal decomposition.

  15. Chondrodysplasia punctata after warfarin. Case report with 18-month follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamburrini, O.; Bartolomeo-De Iuri, A.; Di Guglielmo, G.L.

    1987-05-01

    Administration of warfarin during pregnancy may cause a rare syndrome characterized by nasal hypoplasia, usually associated with stippled epiphyseal and extraepiphyseal calcifications ressembling chondrodysplasia punctata. A case of chondrodysplasia punctata after warfarin with 18 months follow-up is reported.

  16. Effects of Long-Term Storage Time and Original Sampling Month on Biobank Plasma Protein Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Enroth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The quality of clinical biobank samples is crucial to their value for life sciences research. A number of factors related to the collection and storage of samples may affect the biomolecular composition. We have studied the effect of long-time freezer storage, chronological age at sampling, season and month of the year and on the abundance levels of 108 proteins in 380 plasma samples collected from 106 Swedish women. Storage time affected 18 proteins and explained 4.8–34.9% of the observed variance. Chronological age at sample collection after adjustment for storage-time affected 70 proteins and explained 1.1–33.5% of the variance. Seasonal variation had an effect on 15 proteins and month (number of sun hours affected 36 proteins and explained up to 4.5% of the variance after adjustment for storage-time and age. The results show that freezer storage time and collection date (month and season exerted similar effect sizes as age on the protein abundance levels. This implies that information on the sample handling history, in particular storage time, should be regarded as equally prominent covariates as age or gender and need to be included in epidemiological studies involving protein levels.

  17. Dynamic linear modeling of monthly electricity demand in Japan: Time variation of electricity conservation effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Honjo

    Full Text Available After the severe nuclear disaster in Fukushima, which was triggered by the Great East Japan earthquake in March 2011, nuclear power plants in Japan were temporarily shut down for mandatory inspections. To prevent large-scale blackouts, the Japanese government requested companies and households to reduce electricity consumption in summer and winter. It is reported that the domestic electricity demand had a structural decrease because of the electricity conservation effect (ECE. However, quantitative analysis of the ECE is not sufficient, and especially time variation of the ECE remains unclear. Understanding the ECE is important because Japan's NDC (nationally determined contribution assumes the reduction of CO2 emissions through aggressive energy conservation. In this study, we develop a time series model of monthly electricity demand in Japan and estimate time variation of the ECE. Moreover, we evaluate the impact of electricity conservation on CO2 emissions from power plants. The dynamic linear model is used to separate the ECE from the effects of other irrelevant factors (e.g. air temperature, economic production, and electricity price. Our result clearly shows that consumers' electricity conservation behavior after the earthquake was not temporary but became established as a habit. Between March 2011 and March 2016, the ECE on industrial electricity demand ranged from 3.9% to 5.4%, and the ECE on residential electricity demand ranged from 1.6% to 7.6%. The ECE on the total electricity demand was estimated at 3.2%-6.0%. We found a seasonal pattern that the residential ECE in summer is higher than that in winter. The emissions increase from the shutdown of nuclear power plants was mitigated by electricity conservation. The emissions reduction effect was estimated at 0.82 MtCO2-2.26 MtCO2 (-4.5% on average compared to the zero-ECE case. The time-varying ECE is necessary for predicting Japan's electricity demand and CO2 emissions after the

  18. Dynamic linear modeling of monthly electricity demand in Japan: Time variation of electricity conservation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Hiroto; Ashina, Shuichi

    2018-01-01

    After the severe nuclear disaster in Fukushima, which was triggered by the Great East Japan earthquake in March 2011, nuclear power plants in Japan were temporarily shut down for mandatory inspections. To prevent large-scale blackouts, the Japanese government requested companies and households to reduce electricity consumption in summer and winter. It is reported that the domestic electricity demand had a structural decrease because of the electricity conservation effect (ECE). However, quantitative analysis of the ECE is not sufficient, and especially time variation of the ECE remains unclear. Understanding the ECE is important because Japan’s NDC (nationally determined contribution) assumes the reduction of CO2 emissions through aggressive energy conservation. In this study, we develop a time series model of monthly electricity demand in Japan and estimate time variation of the ECE. Moreover, we evaluate the impact of electricity conservation on CO2 emissions from power plants. The dynamic linear model is used to separate the ECE from the effects of other irrelevant factors (e.g. air temperature, economic production, and electricity price). Our result clearly shows that consumers’ electricity conservation behavior after the earthquake was not temporary but became established as a habit. Between March 2011 and March 2016, the ECE on industrial electricity demand ranged from 3.9% to 5.4%, and the ECE on residential electricity demand ranged from 1.6% to 7.6%. The ECE on the total electricity demand was estimated at 3.2%–6.0%. We found a seasonal pattern that the residential ECE in summer is higher than that in winter. The emissions increase from the shutdown of nuclear power plants was mitigated by electricity conservation. The emissions reduction effect was estimated at 0.82 MtCO2–2.26 MtCO2 (−4.5% on average compared to the zero-ECE case). The time-varying ECE is necessary for predicting Japan’s electricity demand and CO2 emissions after the

  19. Multivariate stochastic analysis for Monthly hydrological time series at Cuyahoga River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    zhang, L.

    2011-12-01

    Copula has become a very powerful statistic and stochastic methodology in case of the multivariate analysis in Environmental and Water resources Engineering. In recent years, the popular one-parameter Archimedean copulas, e.g. Gumbel-Houggard copula, Cook-Johnson copula, Frank copula, the meta-elliptical copula, e.g. Gaussian Copula, Student-T copula, etc. have been applied in multivariate hydrological analyses, e.g. multivariate rainfall (rainfall intensity, duration and depth), flood (peak discharge, duration and volume), and drought analyses (drought length, mean and minimum SPI values, and drought mean areal extent). Copula has also been applied in the flood frequency analysis at the confluences of river systems by taking into account the dependence among upstream gauge stations rather than by using the hydrological routing technique. In most of the studies above, the annual time series have been considered as stationary signal which the time series have been assumed as independent identically distributed (i.i.d.) random variables. But in reality, hydrological time series, especially the daily and monthly hydrological time series, cannot be considered as i.i.d. random variables due to the periodicity existed in the data structure. Also, the stationary assumption is also under question due to the Climate Change and Land Use and Land Cover (LULC) change in the fast years. To this end, it is necessary to revaluate the classic approach for the study of hydrological time series by relaxing the stationary assumption by the use of nonstationary approach. Also as to the study of the dependence structure for the hydrological time series, the assumption of same type of univariate distribution also needs to be relaxed by adopting the copula theory. In this paper, the univariate monthly hydrological time series will be studied through the nonstationary time series analysis approach. The dependence structure of the multivariate monthly hydrological time series will be

  20. 76 FR 39474 - Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Semiannual Cost of Funds Index (SCOF), and other related cost of funds ratios currently published monthly in... discussed in this notice, please contact Jim Caton, Managing Director--Economic and Industry Analysis, at... Thrift Financial Report (TFR): \\2\\ \\2\\ Copies of the reporting forms and instructions for the TFR (OMB No...

  1. Stress hormones predict hyperbolic time-discount rates six months later in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Taiki; Shinada, Mizuho; Inukai, Keigo; Tanida, Shigehito; Takahashi, Chisato; Mifune, Nobuhiro; Takagishi, Haruto; Horita, Yutaka; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Yokota, Kunihiro; Kameda, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Toshio

    2010-01-01

    Stress hormones have been associated with temporal discounting. Although time-discount rate is shown to be stable over a long term, no study to date examines whether individual differences in stress hormones could predict individuals' time-discount rates in the relatively distant future (e.g., six month later), which is of interest in neuroeconomics of stress-addiction association. We assessed 87 participants' salivary stress hormone (cortisol, cortisone, and alpha-amylase) levels and hyperbolic discounting of delayed rewards consisting of three magnitudes, at the time-interval of six months. For salivary steroid assays, we employed a liquid chromatography/ mass spectroscopy (LC/MS) method. The correlations between the stress hormone levels and time-discount rates were examined. We observed that salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) levels were negatively associated with time-discount rates in never-smokers. Notably, salivary levels of stress steroids (i.e., cortisol and cortisone) negatively and positively related to time-discount rates in men and women, respectively, in never-smokers. Ever-smokers' discount rates were not predicted from these stress hormone levels. Individual differences in stress hormone levels predict impulsivity in temporal discounting in the future. There are sex differences in the effect of stress steroids on temporal discounting; while there was no sex defference in the relationship between sAA and temporal discounting.

  2. Time-variable gravity fields and ocean mass change from 37 months of kinematic Swarm orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lück, Christina; Kusche, Jürgen; Rietbroek, Roelof; Löcher, Anno

    2018-03-01

    Measuring the spatiotemporal variation of ocean mass allows for partitioning of volumetric sea level change, sampled by radar altimeters, into mass-driven and steric parts. The latter is related to ocean heat change and the current Earth's energy imbalance. Since 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission has provided monthly snapshots of the Earth's time-variable gravity field, from which one can derive ocean mass variability. However, GRACE has reached the end of its lifetime with data degradation and several gaps occurred during the last years, and there will be a prolonged gap until the launch of the follow-on mission GRACE-FO. Therefore, efforts focus on generating a long and consistent ocean mass time series by analyzing kinematic orbits from other low-flying satellites, i.e. extending the GRACE time series. Here we utilize data from the European Space Agency's (ESA) Swarm Earth Explorer satellites to derive and investigate ocean mass variations. For this aim, we use the integral equation approach with short arcs (Mayer-Gürr, 2006) to compute more than 500 time-variable gravity fields with different parameterizations from kinematic orbits. We investigate the potential to bridge the gap between the GRACE and the GRACE-FO mission and to substitute missing monthly solutions with Swarm results of significantly lower resolution. Our monthly Swarm solutions have a root mean square error (RMSE) of 4.0 mm with respect to GRACE, whereas directly estimating constant, trend, annual, and semiannual (CTAS) signal terms leads to an RMSE of only 1.7 mm. Concerning monthly gaps, our CTAS Swarm solution appears better than interpolating existing GRACE data in 13.5 % of all cases, when artificially removing one solution. In the case of an 18-month artificial gap, 80.0 % of all CTAS Swarm solutions were found closer to the observed GRACE data compared to interpolated GRACE data. Furthermore, we show that precise modeling of non-gravitational forces

  3. FedEx Gasoline Hybrid Electric Delivery Truck Evaluation: 6-Month Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnitt, R.

    2010-05-01

    This interim report presents partial (six months) results for a technology evaluation of gasoline hybrid electric parcel delivery trucks operated by FedEx in and around Los Angeles, CA. A 12 month in-use technology evaluation comparing in-use fuel economy and maintenance costs of GHEVs and comparative diesel parcel delivery trucks was started in April 2009. Comparison data was collected and analyzed for in-use fuel economy and fuel costs, maintenance costs, total operating costs, and vehicle uptime. In addition, this interim report presents results of parcel delivery drive cycle collection and analysis activities as well as emissions and fuel economy results of chassis dynamometer testing of a gHEV and a comparative diesel truck at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) ReFUEL laboratory. A final report will be issued when 12 months of in-use data have been collected and analyzed.

  4. A different outlook on time: visual and auditory month names elicit different mental vantage points for a time-space synaesthete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarick, Michelle; Dixon, Mike J; Stewart, Mark T; Maxwell, Emily C; Smilek, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Synaesthesia is a fascinating condition whereby individuals report extraordinary experiences when presented with ordinary stimuli. Here we examined an individual (L) who experiences time units (i.e., months of the year and hours of the day) as occupying specific spatial locations (January is 30 degrees to the left of midline). This form of time-space synaesthesia has been recently investigated by Smilek et al. (2007) who demonstrated that synaesthetic time-space associations are highly consistent, occur regardless of intention, and can direct spatial attention. We extended this work by showing that for the synaesthete L, her time-space vantage point changes depending on whether the time units are seen or heard. For example, when L sees the word JANUARY, she reports experiencing January on her left side, however when she hears the word "January" she experiences the month on her right side. L's subjective reports were validated using a spatial cueing paradigm. The names of months were centrally presented followed by targets on the left or right. L was faster at detecting targets in validly cued locations relative to invalidly cued locations both for visually presented cues (January orients attention to the left) and for aurally presented cues (January orients attention to the right). We replicated this difference in visual and aural cueing effects using hour of the day. Our findings support previous research showing that time-space synaesthesia can bias visual spatial attention, and further suggest that for this synaesthete, time-space associations differ depending on whether they are visually or aurally induced.

  5. Non-linear modelling of monthly mean vorticity time changes: an application to the western Mediterranean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Finizio

    Full Text Available Starting from a number of observables in the form of time-series of meteorological elements in various areas of the northern hemisphere, a model capable of fitting past records and predicting monthly vorticity time changes in the western Mediterranean is implemented. A new powerful statistical methodology is introduced (MARS in order to capture the non-linear dynamics of time-series representing the available 40-year history of the hemispheric circulation. The developed model is tested on a suitable independent data set. An ensemble forecast exercise is also carried out to check model stability in reference to the uncertainty of input quantities.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics · General circulation ocean-atmosphere interactions · Synoptic-scale meteorology

  6. Global Precipitation Analyses at Time Scales of Monthly to 3-Hourly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Curtis, Scott; Bolvin, David; Nelkin, Eric; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Global precipitation analysis covering the last few decades and the impact of the new TRMM precipitation observations are discussed. The 20+ year, monthly, globally complete precipitation analysis of the World Climate Research Program's (WCRP/GEWEX) Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) is used to explore global and regional variations and trends and is compared to the much shorter TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) tropical data set. The GPCP data set shows no significant trend in precipitation over the twenty years, unlike the positive trend in global surface temperatures over the past century. Regional trends are also analyzed. A trend pattern that is a combination of both El Nino and La Nina precipitation features is evident in the Goodyear data set. This pattern is related to an increase with time in the number of combined months of El Nino and La Nina during the Goodyear period. Monthly anomalies of precipitation are related to ENRON variations with clear signals extending into middle and high latitudes of both hemispheres. The GPCP daily, 1 degree latitude-longitude analysis, which is available from January 1997 to the present is described and the evolution of precipitation patterns on this time scale related to El Nino and La Nina is described. Finally, a TRMM-based Based analysis is described that uses TRMM to calibrate polar-orbit microwave observations from SSM/I and geosynchronous OR observations and merges the various calibrated observations into a final, Baehr resolution map. This TRMM standard product will be available for the entire TRMM period (January Represent). A real-time version of this merged product is being produced and is available at 0.25 degree latitude-longitude resolution over the latitude range from 50 deg. N -50 deg. S. Examples will be shown, including its use in monitoring flood conditions.

  7. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of March 1986. Volume 5, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This monthly report contains Licensee Event Report (LER) operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during the one month period identified on the cover of the document. The LERs, from which this information is derived, are submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by nuclear power plant licensees in accordance with federal regulations. Procedures for LER reporting for revisions to those events occurring prior to 1984 are described in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.16 and NUREG-1061. The LER summaries in this report are arranged alphabetically by facility name and then chronologically by event date for each facility. Component, system, keyword, and component vendor indexes follow the summaries. Vendors are those identified by the utility when the LER form is initiated; the keywords for the component, system, and general keyword indexes are assigned by the computer using correlation tables from the Sequence Coding and Search System

  8. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA AT GOFFSTOWN, NH SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Orchard Highlands Subdivision site at Goffstown, NH. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effect...

  9. Licensee Event Report (LER) compilation for month of February 1984. Vol. 3, No. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    This monthly report contains LER operational information that was processed into the LER data file of the Nuclear Safety Information Center (NSIC) during this period. The LER summaries are arranged alphabetically by facility name and then chronologically by event date for each facility. Component, system, keyword, and component vendor indexes follow the summaries.

  10. Cassini RTG Program. Monthly technical progress report, 27 November--31 December 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This monthly technical progress report provided information on the following tasks: spacecraft integration and liaison; engineering support; safety analysis; qualified unicouple fabrication; ETG fabrication, assembly, and test; ground support equipment (GSE); RTG shipping and launch support; designs, reviews, and mission applications; project management, quality assurance, and reliability, and contractor acquired government owned (CAGO) property acquisition

  11. Predicting hepatitis B monthly incidence rates using weighted Markov chains and time series methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahdoust, Maryam; Sadeghifar, Majid; Poorolajal, Jalal; Javanrooh, Niloofar; Amini, Payam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B (HB) is a major global mortality. Accurately predicting the trend of the disease can provide an appropriate view to make health policy disease prevention. This paper aimed to apply three different to predict monthly incidence rates of HB. This historical cohort study was conducted on the HB incidence data of Hamadan Province, the west of Iran, from 2004 to 2012. Weighted Markov Chain (WMC) method based on Markov chain theory and two time series models including Holt Exponential Smoothing (HES) and SARIMA were applied on the data. The results of different applied methods were compared to correct percentages of predicted incidence rates. The monthly incidence rates were clustered into two clusters as state of Markov chain. The correct predicted percentage of the first and second clusters for WMC, HES and SARIMA methods was (100, 0), (84, 67) and (79, 47) respectively. The overall incidence rate of HBV is estimated to decrease over time. The comparison of results of the three models indicated that in respect to existing seasonality trend and non-stationarity, the HES had the most accurate prediction of the incidence rates.

  12. Report on maternal anxiety 16 months after the great East Japan earthquake disaster: anxiety over radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Hatsumi; Saito, Hidemitsu; Kikuchi, Saya; Ueno, Takashi; Sato, Kineko

    2014-06-25

    The Great East Japan Earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011. The tsunami caused extensive damage to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, resulting in a level 7 nuclear accident. Among those affected by this combined disaster were many pregnant and parturient women. Sixteen months after the earthquake, we conducted a questionnaire survey on anxiety among 259 women who gave birth around the time of the earthquake in Miyagi Prefecture, one of the affected areas. Participants reported 12 categories of anxiety, including anxiety over radioactivity. This study aimed to determine anxiety over radioactivity among this specific population and to record measures for future study. Anxiety over radiation was classified into seven subcategories: food safety, outdoor safety, effects on the fetuses of pregnant women, effects on children, radiation exposure, economic problems, and distrust of information disclosed. This study confirmed that concrete types of anxiety over radiation were keenly felt by mothers who had experienced the disaster who were currently raising children. The findings suggest the need to provide accurate information to these mothers, who are otherwise inundated with miscellaneous confusing information.

  13. Healthcare Coinsurance Elasticity Coefficient Estimation Using Monthly Cross-sectional, Time-series Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggins, John F; Weinberg, Daniel A

    2017-06-01

    Published estimates of the healthcare coinsurance elasticity coefficient have typically relied on annual observations of individual healthcare expenditures even though health plan membership and expenditures are traditionally reported in monthly units and several studies have stressed the need for demand models to recognize the episodic nature of healthcare. Summing individual healthcare expenditures into annual observations complicates two common challenges of statistical inference, heteroscedasticity, and regressor endogeneity. This paper estimates the elasticity coefficient using a monthly panel data model that addresses the heteroscedasticity and endogeneity problems with relative ease. Healthcare claims data from employees of King County, Washington, during 2005 to 2011 were used to estimate the mean point elasticity coefficient: -0.314 (0.015 standard error) to -0.145 (0.015 standard error) depending on model specification. These estimates bracket the -0.2 point estimate (range: -0.22 to -0.17) derived from the famous Rand Health Insurance Experiment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Transit timing observations from Kepler. V. Transit timing variation candidates in the first sixteen months from polynomial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ford, E.B.; Ragozzine, D.; Holman, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during...... that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We...

  15. 75 FR 27572 - Monthly Report of Excess Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... permitted to retain Excess Income for projects under terms and conditions established by HUD. Owners must request to retain some or all of their Excess Income. The request must be submitted through http://www.pay...

  16. A trabecular metal implant 4 months after placement: clinical-histologic case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinato, Sergio; Zaffe, Davide; Felice, Pietro; Checchi, Luigi; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this case report was to histologically evaluate the behavior of a trabecular metal (TM) implant composed of titanium and spatial 3-dimensional tantalum (Ta) trabeculae. This study is the first human histologic case report of this implant. A TM implant was placed in a 54-year-old woman exhibiting moderate chronic periodontitis. After periodontal treatment, the implant was inserted under favorable clinical conditions. Patient was not seen for 4 months because of unrelated breast reduction surgery. At the surgical reopening, periimplant inflammation affecting the coronal third of the implant was observed 4 months after implant placement. With patient's consent, the implant was removed for histologic analysis. Histology highlighted a greater amount of bone in close contact with Ta trabeculae than titanium surfaces. The finding of bone formation around the Ta trabeculae suggests that trabecular metal material promotes bone ingrowth for secondary implant stability. Additional evidence is needed to confirm this observation.

  17. A long-term randomised trial on tenoxicam and piroxicam in osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a 24-month interim report focusing on the 12-24 month interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, B; Andersen, R B; Fossgreen, J

    1987-01-01

    The long-acting antiphlogistics tenoxicam (Ro 12-0068, Tilcotil) and piroxicam in single daily oral doses of 20 mg are compared in a double-blind, group-comparative, randomised trial planned to last for five years. Results of 12 months' treatment of 108 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip...... or knee have been reported. This interim analysis focuses mainly on the 12 to 24 month interval. The clinical improvements obtained within the first 12 months persisted during the second year in the 55 patients remaining on treatment. After 24 months, 53 patients had been withdrawn prematurely, three......-quarters because of inefficacy or intolerance. Only six patients were withdrawn between 12 and 24 months, three for lack of efficacy, two for side-effects and one for reasons unrelated to therapy. There was no difference between the treatment groups with regard to incidence, time or reason for withdrawal, and only...

  18. 17 CFR 1.18 - Records for and relating to financial reporting and monthly computation by futures commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... financial reporting and monthly computation by futures commission merchants and introducing brokers. 1.18... UNDER THE COMMODITY EXCHANGE ACT Minimum Financial and Related Reporting Requirements § 1.18 Records for and relating to financial reporting and monthly computation by futures commission merchants and...

  19. Diastasis recti abdominis during pregnancy and 12 months after childbirth: prevalence, risk factors and report of lumbopelvic pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennfjord, Merete Kolberg; Hilde, Gunvor; Ellström-Engh, Marie; Bø, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Background/aim Diastasis recti abdominis (DRA) is defined as a separation of the 2 muscle bellies of rectus abdominis. To date there is scant knowledge on prevalence, risk factors, and consequences of the condition. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of DRA during pregnancy and post partum, presence of possible risk factors, and the occurrence of lumbopelvic pain among women with and without DRA. Methods This prospective cohort study followed 300 first-time pregnant women from pregnancy till 12 months post partum. Data were collected by electronic questionnaire and clinical examinations. DRA was defined as a palpated separation of ≥2 fingerbreadths either 4.5 cm above, at or 4.5 cm below the umbilicus. Women with and without DRA were compared with independent samples Student's t-test and χ2/Fisher exact test, and OR with significance level >0.05. Results Prevalence of DRA was 33.1%, 60.0%, 45.4%, and 32.6% at gestation week 21, 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months post partum, respectively. No difference in risk factors was found when comparing women with and without DRA. OR showed a greater likelihood for DRA among women reporting heavy lifting ≥20 times weekly (OR 2.18 95% CI 1.05 to 4.52). There was no difference in reported lumbopelvic pain (p=0.10) in women with and without DRA. Conclusions Prevalence of mild DRA was high both during pregnancy and after childbirth. Women with and without DRA reported the same amount of lumbopelvic pain 12 months post partum. PMID:27324871

  20. A comparison of performance of several artificial intelligence methods for forecasting monthly discharge time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Chuan; Chau, Kwok-Wing; Cheng, Chun-Tian; Qiu, Lin

    2009-08-01

    SummaryDeveloping a hydrological forecasting model based on past records is crucial to effective hydropower reservoir management and scheduling. Traditionally, time series analysis and modeling is used for building mathematical models to generate hydrologic records in hydrology and water resources. Artificial intelligence (AI), as a branch of computer science, is capable of analyzing long-series and large-scale hydrological data. In recent years, it is one of front issues to apply AI technology to the hydrological forecasting modeling. In this paper, autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) models, artificial neural networks (ANNs) approaches, adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) techniques, genetic programming (GP) models and support vector machine (SVM) method are examined using the long-term observations of monthly river flow discharges. The four quantitative standard statistical performance evaluation measures, the coefficient of correlation ( R), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient ( E), root mean squared error (RMSE), mean absolute percentage error (MAPE), are employed to evaluate the performances of various models developed. Two case study river sites are also provided to illustrate their respective performances. The results indicate that the best performance can be obtained by ANFIS, GP and SVM, in terms of different evaluation criteria during the training and validation phases.

  1. Testing for seasonal unit roots in monthly panels of time series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Kunst (Robert); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe consider the problem of testing for seasonal unit roots in monthly panel data. To this aim, we generalize the quarterly CHEGY test to the monthly case. This parametric test is contrasted with a new nonparametric test, which is the panel counterpart to the univariate RURS test that

  2. Title list of documents made publicly available: [Monthly report], January 1-31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    The Title List of Documents Made Publicly Available is a monthly publication. It contains descriptions of the information received and generated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. As used here, docketed does not refer to Court dockets; it refers to the system by which NRC maintains its regulatory records. This series of documents is indexed by a Personal Author Index, a Corporate Source Index, and a Report Number index

  3. Improving Autopsy Report Turnaround Times by Implementing Lean Management Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Susan; Chiasson, David A; Cassidy, Debra; Somers, Gino R

    2018-01-01

    The autopsy is an integral part of the service of a large academic pathology department. Timely reporting is central to providing good service and is beneficial for many stakeholders, including the families, the clinical team, the hospital, and the wider community. The current study aimed to improve hospital-consented autopsy reporting times (turnaround time, TAT) by using lean principles modified for a healthcare setting, with an aim of signing out 90% of autopsies in 90 days. An audit of current and historical TATs was performed, and a working group incorporating administrative, technical, and professional staff constructed a value stream map documenting the steps involved in constructing an autopsy report. Two areas of delay were noted: examination of the microscopy and time taken to sign-out the report after the weekly autopsy conference. Several measures were implemented to address these delays, including visual tracking using a whiteboard and individualized tracking sheets, weekly whiteboard huddles, and timelier scheduling of clinicopathologic conference rounds. All measures resulted in an improvement of TATs. In the 30 months prior to the institution of lean, 37% of autopsies (53/144) were signed out in 90 days, with a wide variation in reporting times. In the 30 months following the institution of lean, this improved to 74% (136/185) ( P lean; 63 days post-lean). The application of lean principles to autopsy sign-out workflow can significantly improve TATs and reduce variability, without changing staffing levels or significantly altering scheduling structure.

  4. Elevated background TV exposure over time increases behavioural scores of 18-month-old toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chonchaiya, Weerasak; Sirachairat, Chalermpol; Vijakkhana, Nakul; Wilaisakditipakorn, Tanaporn; Pruksananonda, Chandhita

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether trends of TV exposure from age six to 18 months and adult TV programmes were associated with behavioural concerns of 18-month-old Thai toddlers. There were 194 healthy infants recruited at age six months and followed up until 18 months of age in this present cohort. TV exposure variables were assessed by interviewing in depth at both six- and 18-month-old visits. A mother of each participant rated the child's behaviours using the Child Behaviour Checklist. Infants who were increasingly exposed to TV from age six to 18 months with adult programmes since six months of age had higher pervasive developmental problems and oppositional defiant behaviours scores. Exposure to adult TV programmes at age six months was also associated with emotionally reactive problems, aggression and externalising behaviours in the final regression models. To promote appropriate toddlers' behaviours at age 18 months, elevated background TV exposure over time should be discouraged. Furthermore, paediatricians should emphasise such effects of TV exposure on child behaviours with parents at health supervision visits. As such, parents will be aware of the detrimental effect of increased background TV exposure over time on their children's behaviours. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Natural gas monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  6. Cle Elum and Supplementation Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report October 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

    2008-12-11

    FISH PRODUCTION: On October 7th the 2008 spawning season was completed. 823 adults were transferred to the facility for the 2008 season. The overall adult mortality was 6.9% (1.3% pre-spawning mortality and 5.6% encountered after sorting). Wild/natural salmon collected included 278 females, 173 males, and 29 jacks for a total 480 fish for the 2008 brood. Supplemented brood stock collected included 149 adults (85 females, 35 males and 29 jacks). Hatchery control brood collected for research included 194 adults (91 females, 68 males and 35 jacks). Eggs will be inventoried in November with an actual summary of eggs numbers to be submitted for the November report. The estimated egg takes (production) for the 2008 season was 1,375,146 eggs with 1,006,063 comprising of W x W crosses and 250,755 eggs of H x H crosses with 118,328 supplement crosses. Total fish on hand for the 2007 brood is 768,751 with an average fish per pound of 30.6 f/lb. FISH CULTURE: The marking and pit-tagging operation started on October 13th. The pit-tagging portion was completed on October 23rd. A total 40,000 juveniles were pit-tagged (2,000 from each of the production ponds and 4,000 each for the hatchery juvenile ponds 9 & 10). Cle Elum staff began shocking, sorting, counting and splitting eggs in incubation. Shocking eggs will separate live eggs from dead eggs. Eggs are treated with formalin three times a week to control fungus. The focus for the culturists during the month of October entail completing the final spawn (egg take) on the 7th, pond cleaning, keeping the marking trailers supplied with fish and end of month sampling. The adult holding ponds were power washed and winterized for the shut down period. Facility crew members Greg Strom and Mike Whitefoot assisted Joe Blodgett and his crew with fish brood collection on the 22nd of October. Fall Chinook and Coho salmon were seined up and put in tanker trucks from Chandler canal and transported to holding ponds for later spawning. Charlie

  7. Malignant Transformation Six Months after Removal of Intracranial Epidermoid Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayçal Lakhdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial epidermoid cysts are uncommon benign tumors of developmental origin; malignant transformation of benign epidermoid cysts is rare, and their prognosis remains poor. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in the cerebellopontine angle. A 52-year-old man presented with left facial paralysis and cerebellar ataxia. He had undergone total removal of a benign epidermoid cyst six months previously. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a heterogeneous and cystic lesion in the left cerebellopontine angle with hydrocephalus. The cyst wall was enhanced by gadolinium. He underwent ventricle-peritoneal shunt and removal again; the histopathological examination revealed a squamous cell carcinoma possibly arising from an underlying epidermoid cyst. This entity is being reported for its rarity. The presence of contrast enhancement at the site of an epidermoid cyst combined with an acute, progressive neurological deficit should alert the neurosurgeon to the possibility of a malignant transformation.

  8. Healing with Incomplete Root Development After Forty Months Following: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merve Erkmen Almaz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the concept of revascularization has been developed that employs the use of a mixture of antibacterial drugs for disinfection of infected root canals. The clinical and radiographic examinations showed deep coronal caries, immature root, and periapical radiolucency in mandibular second premolar (#35 of a 13-year-old girl. The exam findings suggested revascularization treatment. Revascularization with triantibiotic mix was administered for 2 weeks. Then, a blood clot was created in the canal, over which mineral trioxide aggregate was placed. Coronal sealing was performed with composite resin. After 40 months follow-up, the tooth was asymptomatic with a positive response to the pulp test and periapical radiolucency was healed. However, no evidence of root development was observed. In spite of numerous reports of revascularization treatment, no incomplete root development was reported after long-term follow-up. Despite incomplete root development, positive response to the pulp test is controversial.

  9. Retrospectively reported month-to-month variation in sleeping problems of people naturally exposed to high-amplitude annual variation in daylength and/or temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcady A. Putilov

    Full Text Available Compared to literature on seasonal variation in mood and well-being, reports on seasonality of trouble sleeping are scarce and contradictive. To extend geography of such reports on example of people naturally exposed to high-amplitude annual variation in daylength and/or temperature. Participants were the residents of Turkmenia, West Siberia, South and North Yakutia, Chukotka, and Alaska. Health and sleep-wake adaptabilities, month-to-month variation in sleeping problems, well-being and behaviors were self-assessed. More than a half of 2398 respondents acknowledged seasonality of sleeping problems. Four of the assessed sleeping problems demonstrated three different patterns of seasonal variation. Rate of the problems significantly increased in winter months with long nights and cold days (daytime sleepiness and difficulties falling and staying asleep as well as in summer months with either long days (premature awakening and difficulties falling and staying asleep or hot nights and days (all 4 sleeping problems. Individual differences between respondents in pattern and level of seasonality of sleeping problems were significantly associated with differences in several other domains of individual variation, such as gender, age, ethnicity, physical health, morning-evening preference, sleep quality, and adaptability of the sleep-wake cycle. These results have practical relevance to understanding of the roles playing by natural environmental factors in seasonality of sleeping problems as well as to research on prevalence of sleep disorders and methods of their prevention and treatment in regions with large seasonal differences in temperature and daylength.

  10. Knowing what to expect, forecasting monthly emergency department visits: A time-series analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergs, Jochen; Heerinckx, Philipe; Verelst, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate an automatic forecasting algorithm in order to predict the number of monthly emergency department (ED) visits one year ahead. We collected retrospective data of the number of monthly visiting patients for a 6-year period (2005-2011) from 4 Belgian Hospitals. We used an automated exponential smoothing approach to predict monthly visits during the year 2011 based on the first 5 years of the dataset. Several in- and post-sample forecasting accuracy measures were calculated. The automatic forecasting algorithm was able to predict monthly visits with a mean absolute percentage error ranging from 2.64% to 4.8%, indicating an accurate prediction. The mean absolute scaled error ranged from 0.53 to 0.68 indicating that, on average, the forecast was better compared with in-sample one-step forecast from the naïve method. The applied automated exponential smoothing approach provided useful predictions of the number of monthly visits a year in advance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mothers' self-reports of parenthood across the first 6 months postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, J T

    1993-12-01

    A postpartum measure, What Being the Parent of a New Baby is Like, was administered to explore the development of maternal role for mothers (N = 76) at 1, 3, 4 1/2, and 6 months postpartum. Individual differences were relatively stable across time and accounted for much more variance than time effects. Mean scores on the Centrality (of baby) and Help (with parenting tasks) subscales decreased over time, and Evaluation (satisfaction with role performance) and Lifechange subscale scores increased. Primiparas demonstrated the steepest mean increase in Evaluation scores over time. Mean Evaluation scores for first- (n = 29) and second-time mothers (n = 33) were similar, but mothers of three or more children (n = 14) had significantly higher scores. Parity was also related inversely to amount of life change, and maternal education was related inversely to Evaluation and Centrality scores. Demographic, subscale, and contextual variable interrelationships were generally consistent with maternal role adaptation theory. Findings also suggest that parity effects are more complex than a dichotomous primipara/multipara representation.

  12. time series analysis of monthly rainfall in nigeria with emphasis on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Monthly rainfall data of twenty-one years (1980 – 2000) were analyzed for the six regions of. Nigeria using the rescaled range (R/S) statistic, the standard fluctuation analysis (FA) and the detrended fluctuation ... 2011 Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) .... starting from the beginning, and s non-.

  13. Monthly Rainfall Erosivity: Conversion Factors for Different Time Resolutions and Regional Assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagos, Panos; Borrelli, Pasquale; Spinoni, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    , for the optimization of land management (seasonal variation of vegetation cover and agricultural support practices) as well as natural hazard protection (landslides and flood prediction). We expanded REDES by 140 rainfall stations, thus covering areas where monthly R-factor values were missing (Slovakia, Poland...

  14. Shopping Behaviors of Low-income Families during a 1-Month Period of Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darko, Janice; Eggett, Dennis L.; Richards, Rickelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore food shopping behaviors among low-income families over the course of the month. Design: Two researchers conducted 13 90-minute focus groups. Setting: Two community organizations serving low-income populations and a university campus. Participants: Low-income adults (n = 72) who were the primary household food shoppers and who…

  15. Women's experiences of their osteoporosis diagnosis at the time of diagnosis and 6 months later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carrinna; Konradsen, Hanne; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a phenomenological hermeneutic study of experiences of women who were recently diagnosed with osteoporosis. The research objective was to investigate women's experiences of living with osteoporosis during the first 6 months after diagnosis when treatment was first prescribed...

  16. Transport month is a time to tackle issues in the industry

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ittmann, HW

    2008-10-09

    Full Text Available October marls National Transport month, giving rise to opportunities to focus on and draw attention to a variety of aspects associated with transport. Everyone in the country is affected by transport in one way or another, with those in metropolitan...

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis with toxic shock syndrome in 5 month old baby: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Al-Ramzi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is considered to be a severe form of soft-tissue infection that is accompanied with rapidly progressive necrosis to the subcutaneous tissue layer and the superficial fascia. It is also characterized by early development of systemic toxicity. The invasive Streptococcus pyogenes is the most often encountered species as a cause of this disease. The delay in diagnosing is common as the differentiation of the evolving necrotizing fasciitis from cellulitis can be very difficult. Treatments include rapid radical debridement and administration of appropriate antibiotics. However, even with proper treatment, the mortality rate is considered to be high. We reported a 5-month-old girls with fatal necrotizing fasciitis associated with toxic shock–like syndrome due to Streptococcal infection.

  18. Long-Term Retention in 3.5-Month-Olds: Familiarization Time and Individual Differences in Attentional Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courage, Mary L.; Howe, Mark L.

    2001-01-01

    Examined effect of familiarization on 3.5-month-olds' retention of visual stimuli with varying delay times. Found support for retention models in which direction of attentional preferences (novel, familiar, or null) depends on memory accessibility. Short lookers showed better retention over time than long lookers, indicating that much of the…

  19. A Conditionally Beta Distributed Time-Series Model With Application to Monthly US Corporate Default Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thor Pajhede

    2017-01-01

    We consider an observation driven, conditionally Beta distributed model for variables restricted to the unit interval. The model includes both explanatory variables and autoregressive dependence in the mean and precision parameters using the mean-precision parametrization of the beta distribution...... the monthly default rate. (3) There is evidence for volatility clustering beyond what is accounted for by the inherent mean-precision relationship of the Beta distribution in the default rate data....

  20. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea-ice variability on monthly to annual time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, Folmer; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2015-04-01

    The strong decrease in Arctic sea-ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea-ice predictions on seasonal to decadal time scales. Hence, it is key to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. The authors report on an analysis of natural variability of Arctic sea-ice from an energy budget perspective, using 15 CMIP5 climate models, and comparing these results to atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses data. We quantify the persistence of sea ice anomalies and the cross-correlation with the surface and top energy budget components. The Arctic energy balance components primarily indicate the important role of the seasonal sea-ice albedo feedback, in which sea-ice anomalies in the melt season reemerge in the growth season. This is a robust anomaly reemergence mechanism among all 15 climate models. The role of ocean lies mainly in storing heat content anomalies in spring, and releasing them in autumn. Ocean heat flux variations only play a minor role. The role of clouds is further investigated. We demonstrate that there is no direct atmospheric response of clouds to spring sea-ice anomalies, but a delayed response is evident in autumn. Hence, there is no cloud-ice feedback in late spring and summer, but there is a cloud-ice feedback in autumn, which strengthens the ice-albedo feedback. Anomalies in insolation are positively correlated with sea-ice variability. This is primarily a result of reduced multiple-reflection of insolation due to an albedo decrease. This effect counteracts the sea-ice albedo effect up to 50%. ERA-Interim and ORAS4 confirm the main findings from the climate models.

  1. Technical, economic, environmental and social follow-up of innovating farm-based small methanization plants: BIOGAZ PLUS - Report after a 12-month follow-up; Installation: EARL Guilbaud - Report after a 15-month follow-up; Installation: GAEC Des Buissons - Report after a 12-month follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalanne, Mathieu; Cordelier, Marine; Pouech, Philippe; Thual, Julien; Bastide, Guillaume; Faure, Benoit; Faure, Jean-Marie; Bousquet, Dominique; El Habti, Audrey; L'Heriau, Germain; Guianvarch, David; Farcy, Alexandre; Banville, Sandrine; Chauvin, Damien; Frederic, Sylvain; Haumont, Francois; Guilbaud, Gerard; Leroux, Yannick; Tronc, Jean-Sebastien; Menard, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    This document contains three follow-up reports, each concerning a small farm-based methanization unit. For each one, the report proposes a technical description (operation, provisional exploitation assessment, process principle and implementation, installed instrumentation), describes the status of production (noticed dysfunctions and identified causes, returns on experience), an operation assessment after 12 or 15 months in terms of biological performance (composition of input mixture, methane generation potential, organic load) and energetic performance (biogas, electric, thermal and energetic assessments), an assessment of environmental and social performance (time spent, energy efficiency, greenhouse gas assessment, integration of the installation within the farm, risk and pollution assessment), an economic assessment in terms of investment, of operating statements and of indicators of financial profitability. Results of composition measurements performed on input materials and digestates are provided

  2. Factors associated with presenteeism among employed Australian adults reporting lifetime major depression with 12-month symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocker, Fiona; Martin, Angela; Scott, Jenn; Venn, Alison; Otahal, Petr; Sanderson, Kristy

    2011-12-01

    Employees experiencing depression can take a sickness absence or continue working ('presenteeism'). However, little is known about the factors associated with these behaviors within this population. This study aimed to determine the relative importance of socio-demographic, financial, work and health-related factors associated with presenteeism. The 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing provided data from employed individuals reporting lifetime major depression with 12-month symptoms (N=320). Survey adjusted multivariable logistic regression assessed classification of 12-month, depression-related presenteeism on the basis of socio-demographic, financial, work and health factors. Acceptable classification of cases was 70% or greater. Classification of cases based on socio-demographic factors, age, sex and marital status, was reasonable (62%). Adding work factors (work hours and occupation type) produced a 1% increase in successfully classified cases (63%). Health factors further increased correctly classified cases (67%). Marital status, housing tenure and co-morbid mental disorders were important indicators of presenteeism behavior. Work-related variables were restricted to available measures. Potentially important psychosocial work environment factors were unavailable. Cross-sectional data precluded causal inference. Using available factors, model discrimination did not reach an acceptable level i.e. 70% of presenteeism cases successfully classified. This highlighted the contribution of unmeasured factors to presenteeism behavior. Future research should explore the relative importance of psychosocial work environment and personality factors such as work demands, effort/reward imbalance and conscientiousness. The identified associations between socio-demographic, financial and health factors on work attendance behaviors could inform disease management guidelines for employers via recognition of employees at risk of presenteeism. Copyright

  3. Practical reporting times for environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4 degrees C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions

  4. Practical reporting times for environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

    1993-02-01

    Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

  5. Conducting an acute intense interval exercise session during the Ramadan fasting month: what is the optimal time of the day?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Abdul Rashid; Chia, Michael Yong Hwa; Low, Chee Yong; Slater, Gary John; Png, Weileen; Teh, Kong Chuan

    2012-10-01

    This study examines the effects of Ramadan fasting on performance during an intense exercise session performed at three different times of the day, i.e., 08:00, 18:00, and 21:00 h. The purpose was to determine the optimal time of the day to perform an acute high-intensity interval exercise during the Ramadan fasting month. After familiarization, nine trained athletes performed six 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) cycle bouts followed by a time-to-exhaustion (T(exh)) cycle on six separate randomized and counterbalanced occasions. The three time-of-day nonfasting (control, CON) exercise sessions were performed before the Ramadan month, and the three corresponding time-of-day Ramadan fasting (RAM) exercise sessions were performed during the Ramadan month. Note that the 21:00 h session during Ramadan month was conducted in the nonfasted state after the breaking of the day's fast. Total work (TW) completed during the six WAnT bouts was significantly lower during RAM compared to CON for the 08:00 and 18:00 h (p effect size [d] = .55 [small] and .39 [small], respectively) sessions, but not for the 21:00 h (p = .03, d = .18 [trivial]) session. The T(exh) cycle duration was significantly shorter during RAM than CON in the 18:00 (p Ramadan fasting had a small to moderate, negative impact on quality of performance during an acute high-intensity exercise session, particularly during the period of the daytime fast. The optimal time to conduct an acute high-intensity exercise session during the Ramadan fasting month is in the evening, after the breaking of the day's fast.

  6. Citation Analysis of Hepatitis Monthly by Journal Citation Report (ISI), Google Scholar, and Scopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Seyyed Mohammad; Raoofi, Azam; Heidari, Zahra

    2012-09-01

    Citation analysis as one of the most widely used methods of bibliometrics can be used for computing the various impact measures for scholars based on data from citation databases. Journal Citation Reports (JCR) from Thomson Reuters provides annual report in the form of impact factor (IF) for each journal. We aimed to evaluate the citation parameters of Hepatitis Monthly by JCR in 2010 and compare them with GS and Sc. All articles of Hepat Mon published in 2009 and 2008 which had been cited in 2010 in three databases including WoS, Sc and GS gathered in a spreadsheet. The IFs were manually calculated. Among the 104 total published articles the accuracy rates of GS and Sc in recording the total number of articles was 96% and 87.5%. There was a difference between IFs among the three databases (0.793 in ISI [Institute for Scientific Information], 0.945 in Sc and 0.85 GS). The missing rate of citations in ISI was 4% totally. Original articles were the main cited types, whereas, guidelines and clinical challenges were the least ones. None of the three databases succeed to record all articles published in the journal. Despite high sensitivity of GS comparing to Sc, it cannot be a reliable source for indexing since GS has lack of screening in the data collection and low specificity. Using an average of three IFs is suggested to find the correct IF. Editors should be more aware on the role of original articles in increasing IF and the potential efficacy of review articles in long term impact factor.

  7. Rabies in a Vaccinated 9-Month-Old German Shepherd Dog, Akure, 2010: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After the onset of symptoms, the clinical course of rabies is almost invariably fatal. Rabies has traditionally been associated with dogs more than any other animal, and in parts of the world where domestic animal control and vaccination programs are limited, dogs remain the most important reservoir of the disease. We report a case of canine rabies in a vaccinated 9-month-old German shepherd female dog. The presenting clinical sign was jaw muscle paralysis with a hanging bronze color like tongue without salivation. Following encephalectomy, a rabies positive diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescent antibody technique at the Rabies Laboratory, National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom. The epidemiology of the rabies case is not understood. This case is of public health significance because of the at-risk population including animal health care service provider and animals. The following were recommended, (a a reinvigorated control measure that includes the awareness program on prevention, responsible dog ownership with dog registration at veterinary hospitals, and registered veterinary clinics by the government and (b a yearly rabies vaccination campaign that must be improved through the veterinary public health and other health departments collaborating.

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, Dan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  9. LIS/OTD 2.5 DEGREE LOW RESOLUTION MONTHLY TIME SERIES (LRMTS) V2.3.2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The product is a 2.5 deg x 2.5 deg gridded composite of total (IC+CG) lightning bulk production, expressed as a flash rate density (fl/km2/yr) Monthly Time Series....

  10. Savannah River Plant, Works Technical Department monthly progress report for March 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1956-01-01

    This document details activities of the Works Technical Department during the month of March 1956. It covers reactor technology, separations technology, engineering assistance and heavy water technology

  11. Developmentally Delayed Male with Mincer Blade Obstructing the Oesophagus for a Period of Time Suspected to Be 6 Months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Grønhøj Larsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Sharp, retained foreign bodies in the oesophagus are associated with severe complications. Developmentally delayed patients are especially subject to foreign objects. We describe a 37-year-old, developmentally delayed male with a mincer blade obstructing the oesophagus. Six months prior to surgical intervention, the patient was hospitalized in a condition of sepsis and pneumonia where the thoracic X-ray reveals a foreign body in the proximal oesophagus. When rehospitalized 6 months later, a mincer blade of the type used in immersion blenders was surgically removed. During these 6 months the patient’s main symptoms were dysphagia, weight loss, and diarrhoea. When developmentally delayed patients present with dysphagia, we strongly encourage the awareness of the possible presence of foreign bodies. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a mincer blade in the oesophagus.

  12. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea ice variability on monthly-to-annual time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, F.; Hazeleger, W.

    2015-01-01

    The large decrease in Arctic sea ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea ice predictions on seasonal-to-decadal time scales. Hence, it is important to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. This study

  13. US stock market efficiency over weekly, monthly, quarterly and yearly time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, E.; Aguilar-Cornejo, M.; Femat, R.; Alvarez-Ramirez, J.

    2014-11-01

    In financial markets, the weak form of the efficient market hypothesis implies that price returns are serially uncorrelated sequences. In other words, prices should follow a random walk behavior. Recent developments in evolutionary economic theory (Lo, 2004) have tailored the concept of adaptive market hypothesis (AMH) by proposing that market efficiency is not an all-or-none concept, but rather market efficiency is a characteristic that varies continuously over time and across markets. Within the AMH framework, this work considers the Dow Jones Index Average (DJIA) for studying the deviations from the random walk behavior over time. It is found that the market efficiency also varies over different time scales, from weeks to years. The well-known detrended fluctuation analysis was used for the characterization of the serial correlations of the return sequences. The results from the empirical showed that interday and intraday returns are more serially correlated than overnight returns. Also, some insights in the presence of business cycles (e.g., Juglar and Kuznets) are provided in terms of time variations of the scaling exponent.

  14. MiDAS ENCORE: Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Report of 6-Month Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Peter S; Benyamin, Ramsin M

    2016-02-01

    Patients suffering from neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) often experience moderate to severe pain and significant functional disability. Neurogenic claudication results from progressive degenerative changes in the spine, and most often affects the elderly. Both the MILD® procedure and epidural steroid injections (ESIs) offer interventional pain treatment options for LSS patients experiencing neurogenic claudication refractory to more conservative therapies. MILD provides an alternative to ESIs via minimally invasive lumbar decompression. Prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled clinical trial. Twenty-six US interventional pain management centers. To compare patient outcomes following treatment with either MILD (treatment group) or ESIs (active control group) in LSS patients with neurogenic claudication and verified ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. This prospective, multi-center, randomized controlled clinical trial includes 2 study arms with a 1-to-1 randomization ratio. A total of 302 patients were enrolled, with 149 randomized to MILD and 153 to the active control. Six-month follow-up has been completed and is presented in this report. In addition, one year follow-up will be conducted for patients in both study arms, and supplementary 2 year outcome data will be collected for patients in the MILD group only. Outcomes are assessed using the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) and Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ). Primary efficacy is the proportion of ODI responders, tested for statistical superiority of the MILD group versus the active control group. ODI responders are defined as patients achieving the validated Minimal Important Change (MIC) of =10 point improvement in ODI from baseline to follow-up. Similarly, secondary efficacy includes proportion of NPRS and ZCQ responders using validated MIC thresholds. Primary safety is the incidence of device or procedure-related adverse events in each

  15. How Robust Are the Surface Temperature Fingerprints of the Atlantic Overturning Meridional Circulation on Monthly Time Scales?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Turner, R.; Ortega, P.; Robson, J. I.

    2018-04-01

    It has been suggested that changes in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) can drive sea surface temperature (SST) on monthly time scales (Duchez et al., 2016, https://doi.org/10.1002/2017GB005667). However, with only 11 years of continuous observations, the validity of this result over longer, or different, time periods is uncertain. In this study, we use a 120 yearlong control simulation from a high-resolution climate model to test the robustness of the AMOC fingerprints. The model reproduces the observed AMOC seasonal cycle and its variability, and the observed 5-month lagged AMOC-SST fingerprints derived from 11 years of data. However, the AMOC-SST fingerprints are very sensitive to the particular time period considered. In particular, both the Florida current and the upper mid-ocean transport produce highly inconsistent fingerprints when using time periods shorter than 30 years. Therefore, several decades of RAPID observations will be necessary to determine the real impact of the AMOC on SSTs at monthly time scales.

  16. Empirical behavior of a world stock index from intra-day to monthly time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breymann, W.; Lüthi, D. R.; Platen, E.

    2009-10-01

    Most of the papers that study the distributional and fractal properties of financial instruments focus on stock prices or foreign exchange rates. This typically leads to mixed results concerning the distributions of log-returns and some multi-fractal properties of exchange rates, stock prices, and regional indices. This paper uses a well diversified world stock index as the central object of analysis. Such index approximates the growth optimal portfolio, which is demonstrated under the benchmark approach, it is the ideal reference unit for studying basic securities. When denominating this world index in units of a given currency, one measures the movements of the currency against the entire market. This provides a least disturbed observation of the currency dynamics. In this manner, one can expect to disentangle, e.g., the superposition of the two currencies involved in an exchange rate. This benchmark approach to the empirical analysis of financial data allows us to establish remarkable stylized facts. Most important is the observation that the repeatedly documented multi-fractal appearance of financial time series is very weak and much less pronounced than the deviation of the mono-scaling properties from Brownian-motion type scaling. The generalized Hurst exponent H(2) assumes typical values between 0.55 and 0.6. Accordingly, autocorrelations of log-returns decay according to a power law, and the quadratic variation vanishes when going to vanishing observation time step size. Furthermore, one can identify the Student t distribution as the log-return distribution of a well-diversified world stock index for long time horizons when a long enough data series is used for estimation. The study of dependence properties, finally, reveals that jumps at daily horizon originate primarily in the stock market while at 5min horizon they originate in the foreign exchange market. The principal message of the empirical analysis is that there is evidence that a diffusion model

  17. Oregon department of transportation small business group twice-monthly payments pilot project : summary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) recently completed a pilot study on small business payment practices. In the study, three pilot projects were tested where payments to small business contractors were changed from a monthly payment to twice-...

  18. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  19. Essure insert expulsion after 3-month hysterosalpingogram confirmation of bilateral tubal occlusion and bilateral correct placement: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Amy L; Lewis, Rae M; Sloan, Anita Lee

    2013-01-01

    Essure hysteroscopic sterilization is an effective permanent contraception option for women, with a 99.83% effectiveness rate. To date, more than 600,000 Essure procedures have been performed worldwide. This case report describes bilateral Essure insert placement, after which the left insert was subsequently expelled after hysterosalpingogram (HSG)-confirmed correct bilateral insert placement and bilateral tubal occlusion. Although insert expulsion has been reported before a 3-month post-procedure HSG, this is the first published report of expulsion after a confirmatory 3-month post-procedure HSG. Because there now exists documentation of Essure insert expulsion after a 3-month confirmatory HSG, physicians and patients should be informed of this rare occurrence. Further investigation into the causes of such an event is warranted. Copyright © 2013 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. STATUS REPORT ON THE SIX-MONTH STUDY ON HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KING, B.J.

    2001-01-01

    The structure, study topics, straw-man muon collider parameter sets and technical challenges for ''Six-Month Study on High Energy Muon Colliders: Oct'00-Apr'0l'' have been summarized at one month from completion of the study. The extremely high constituent particle energies and luminosities of the parameter sets presented in table 1 continue to suggest that muon colliders could play a central role in exploring and extending the HEP energy frontier. The study has already resulted in encouraging progress in areas such as the final focus lattice design and cost-efficient acceleration

  1. Alkaptonuria diagnosed in a 4-month-old baby girl: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Asok K; Mandal, Syamali; Dasgupta, Anindya; Ghosh, Tarun K

    2008-01-01

    The mother of a four month old female baby attended in the well baby clinic with the complaint of black staining of the diaper after few minutes of urination. The baby was born of a non consanguineous marriage, healthy and breast fed. Mother noticed that stain first at the age of two and half month. The urine when kept in a test tube for two hours turned black. Laboratory examination of urine revealed increased concentration of homogentisic acid. The patient was diagnosed as alkaptonuria. PMID:19014543

  2. 10-Month-Old Infants Are Sensitive to the Time Course of Perceived Actions: Eye-Tracking and EEG Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathleen Bache

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Research has shown that infants are able to track a moving target efficiently – even if it is transiently occluded from sight. This basic ability allows prediction of when and where events happen in everyday life. Yet, it is unclear whether, and how, infants internally represent the time course of ongoing movements to derive predictions. In this study, 10-month-old crawlers observed the video of a same-aged crawling baby that was transiently occluded and reappeared in either a temporally continuous or non-continuous manner (i.e., delayed by 500 ms vs. forwarded by 500 ms relative to the real-time movement. Eye movement and rhythmic neural brain activity (EEG were measured simultaneously. Eye movement analyses showed that infants were sensitive to slight temporal shifts in movement continuation after occlusion. Furthermore, brain activity associated with sensorimotor processing differed between observation of continuous and non-continuous movements. Early sensitivity to an action’s timing may hence be explained within the internal real-time simulation account of action observation. Overall, the results support the hypothesis that 10-month-old infants are well prepared for internal representation of the time course of observed movements that are within the infants’ current motor repertoire.

  3. Defense.gov Special Report: Asian-American Pacific Islander Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niumatalolo was named head coach of the U.S. Naval Academy's football team, making him the first Samoan Heritage Month History U.S. Army Military District of Washington Bases Hold Educational, Cultural Events Veterans History Project: Stories of Asian Pacific Americans Department of Veterans Affairs- Center for

  4. Single-leg drop landing movement strategies 6 months following first-time acute lateral ankle sprain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, C; Bleakley, C; Hertel, J; Caulfield, B; Ryan, J; Delahunt, E

    2015-12-01

    No research exists predicating a link between acute ankle sprain injury-affiliated movement patterns and those of chronic ankle instability (CAI) populations. The aim of the current study was to perform a biomechanical analysis of participants, 6 months after they sustained a first-time acute lateral ankle sprain (LAS) injury to establish this link. Fifty-seven participants with a 6-month history of first-time LAS and 20 noninjured participants completed a single-leg drop landing task on both limbs. Three-dimensional kinematic (angular displacement) and sagittal plane kinetic (moment of force) data were acquired for the joints of the lower extremity, from 200 ms pre-initial contact (IC) to 200 ms post-IC. Individual joint stiffnesses and the peak magnitude of the vertical component of the ground reaction force (GRF) were also computed. LAS participants displayed increases in hip flexion and ankle inversion on their injured limb (P < 0.05); this coincided with a reduction in the net flexion-extension moment at the hip joint, with an increase in its stiffness (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the magnitude of the peak vertical GRF for either limb compared with controls. These results demonstrate that altered movement strategies persist in participants, 6 months following acute LAS, which may precipitate the onset of CAI. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Time-variable gravity fields and ocean mass change from 37 months of kinematic Swarm orbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lück

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the spatiotemporal variation of ocean mass allows for partitioning of volumetric sea level change, sampled by radar altimeters, into mass-driven and steric parts. The latter is related to ocean heat change and the current Earth's energy imbalance. Since 2002, the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE mission has provided monthly snapshots of the Earth's time-variable gravity field, from which one can derive ocean mass variability. However, GRACE has reached the end of its lifetime with data degradation and several gaps occurred during the last years, and there will be a prolonged gap until the launch of the follow-on mission GRACE-FO. Therefore, efforts focus on generating a long and consistent ocean mass time series by analyzing kinematic orbits from other low-flying satellites, i.e. extending the GRACE time series. Here we utilize data from the European Space Agency's (ESA Swarm Earth Explorer satellites to derive and investigate ocean mass variations. For this aim, we use the integral equation approach with short arcs (Mayer-Gürr, 2006 to compute more than 500 time-variable gravity fields with different parameterizations from kinematic orbits. We investigate the potential to bridge the gap between the GRACE and the GRACE-FO mission and to substitute missing monthly solutions with Swarm results of significantly lower resolution. Our monthly Swarm solutions have a root mean square error (RMSE of 4.0 mm with respect to GRACE, whereas directly estimating constant, trend, annual, and semiannual (CTAS signal terms leads to an RMSE of only 1.7 mm. Concerning monthly gaps, our CTAS Swarm solution appears better than interpolating existing GRACE data in 13.5 % of all cases, when artificially removing one solution. In the case of an 18-month artificial gap, 80.0 % of all CTAS Swarm solutions were found closer to the observed GRACE data compared to interpolated GRACE data. Furthermore, we show that precise modeling of non

  6. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 2, Number 11, November 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Gonorrhea 098.xx once per 120 days 1 inpatient, 1 outpatient H. Infl uenzae, invasive 038.41, 041.5, 320.0, 464.0, 482.2, 711.0 once per 360 days 1 inpatient...10,554 cases, 34.7% reported), chla- mydia (10,346 cases, 89.7% reported), and gonorrhea (5,159 cases, 76.9% reported). Table 4 displays the notifi able...cases, 64.6% reported), heat injury (4,618 cases, 29.1% reported), and gonorrhea (1,556 cases, 49.5% reported). Th e incident cases of notifi able med

  7. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 15, Number 1, January 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    108.8 138.3 1.26 22.34 Idaho 60 99.8 51.9 1.16 13.40 Montana 69 119.5 49.9 1.38 33.13 New Mexico 72 78.6 79.1 0.91 -7.78 Nevada 96 142.3...May 2004. Note: Completeness and timeliness of reporting vary by facility. Shigella Hepatitis B Varicella Reporting locations Number of reports all... Varicella Reporting locations Number of reports all events† Food-borne Vaccine preventable Campylo- bacter Giardia Salmonella 24 VOL. 15 / NO. 1

  8. Tubal endometriosis diagnosed within one month after menarche: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Mitsuhashi, Y; Takaike, T; Takase, K; Hoshiai, H; Noda, K

    1997-03-01

    A 13-year-old nulligravida girl, 158.5 cm in height and 76.0 kg in body weight, came to our department complaining of continuous right lower abdominal pain. One month earlier, an ovarian cyst in the right ovary, about 3 cm in diameter, was found when she underwent appendectomy at another hospital, but was left untreated. Menarche occurred at the age of 13 years and 1 month, which was after the appendectomy and 24 days before the present operation. Right hematosalpinx with peripheral obstruction and a para-ovarian serous cyst on the same side were diagnosed, and therefore right salpingectomy with para-ovarian cyst resection was performed. The bilateral ovaries and uterus were completely normal by inspection. The post operative histological examination confirmed hematosalpinx and revealed tubal endometriosis.

  9. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA -- USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT ROLLINSFORD, NH, SIX MONTH EVALUTION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Rollinsford Water and Sewer District facility in Rollinsford, NH. The objectives of the project are to...

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VALLEY VISTA, AZ SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Arizona Water Company (AWC) facility in Sedona, AZ, commonly referred to as Valley Vista. The main objective of the...

  11. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA, USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RIMROCK, AZ, SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Rimrock, AZ. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of AdEdge Arsenic Package Uni...

  12. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTION MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BROWN CITY, MI SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project in Brown City, MI. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiveness of Severn Trent Services (...

  13. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CLIMAX, MN SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Climax, MN site. The objectives of the project are to evaluate (1) the effectiveness of Kinetico’s Macrolite®...

  14. Savannah River Plant Works Technical Department monthly progress report for May 1958: Deleted Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This progress report by the Atomic Energy Division of the Savannah River Plant covers: Reactor Technology; Separation Technology; Engineering Assistance; Health Physics; and General Laboratory Work. (JT)

  15. Wills Plasma Physics Department thirty sixth 6-monthly progress report, July 1 to December 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following ares: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, rotating plasmas, magnetohydrodynamics, laser diagnostics and far infrared interferometry

  16. Wills plasma physics department thirty fifth 6-monthly progress report, Jan 1 to Jun 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-07-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following areas: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, rotating plasmas, magnetohydrodyamics, laser diagnostics, and far infrared interferometry

  17. Wills Plasma Physics Department thirty seventh 6-monthly progress report, January 1 to June 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-07-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following areas: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, magnetohydrodynamics, laser diagnostics and far infrared interferometry

  18. Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for July 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGNILD, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    River Protection Project (RPP) performance for the month of July 2000 was very good. The most significant accomplishments that occurred during the month include the following: The Interim Stabilization Project pumped approximately 30,000 gallons from four tanks. Project-to-date (since June 1998) volume pumped is approximately 808,000 gallons. Five tanks have been interim stabilized this fiscal year, and tanks 241-S-106,241-U-103, and 241-U-105 are being evaluated to determine if the stabilization criteria have been met. Out of the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs), 124 tanks have been stabilized. Pumping this waste from the single-shell tanks to more secure double-shell tanks (DSTs) supports stabilization of the waste tanks and mitigates leakage to the environment. The Interim Stabilization Project is planned to complete by September 2004. Waste Characterization obtained one grab sample in the month of July 2000. A total of 14 core samples, 12 grab samples, and 6 vapor samples have been taken fiscal year-to-date (FYTD) in support of three key FY 2000 sampling milestones. The Waste Treatment Plant Design and Operation organizations have been developed and staffed, including transitioning BNFL Inc./Bechtel National Inc. employees to CHG. Since the termination of the BNFL contract, CHG has temporarily assumed the work scope for design and operation of the Waste Treatment Plant. A new waste treatment facility will be built at the Hanford Site in which highly radioactive waste from the tanks will be turned into glass and permanently stored. Approval of the Notice of Construction (NOC) for the AN Farm tank retrieval system was received from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency on July 21,2000. This is a significant step forward for Project W-211, ''Initial Tank Retrieval Systems'' in preparing waste for delivery to the Waste Treatment Plant

  19. Intussusception secondary to Meckel's diverticulum in a 3-month-old girl. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Camacho-Guerrero

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient is presented, with ileo-ileal intussusception secondary to Meckel's diverticulum. The patient underwent emergency surgery due to a diagnosis of intestinal obstruction secondary to intussusception. Resumen: Se reporta caso de paciente femenino de 3 meses de edad, con una intususcepción intestinal íleo-ileal secundario a divertículo de Meckel, intervenida quirúrgicamente de urgencia por diagnóstico de obstrucción intestinal secundario a una invaginación intestinal. Keywords: Intussusception, Meckel's diverticulum, Palabras clave: Intususcepción intestinal, Divertículo Meckel

  20. Waste Tank Summary Report for Month Ending 04/30/2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HANLON, B.M.

    2002-01-01

    This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 60 smaller miscellaneous underground storage tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US. Department of Energy Order 435.1 (DOE-HQ, August 28, 2001, Radioactive Waste Management, US. Department of Energy-Washington, D.C.) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for the Hanford Site Tank Farm tanks

  1. Surgical management of arrested hydrocephalus: Case report, literature review, and 18-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jennifer; Barrena, Benjamin G; Lollis, S Scott; Bauer, David F

    2016-12-01

    Arrested hydrocephalus is stable ventriculomegaly without evidence of neurologic deterioration or symptoms. Management of arrested hydrocephalus in asymptomatic adults is controversial, with little clinical data. This case highlights the potential for decompensation in adults with arrested hydrocephalus and reviews the literature regarding pathophysiology and management of this clinical entity. A 39 year-old gentleman with arrested hydrocephalus incidentally found during work-up for new-onset seizure and managed conservatively for ten years presented with increasing headache, memory loss, gait instability and urinary and fecal incontinence. Stable massive triventriculomegaly was documented on serial brain imaging, and ophthalmologic exam revealed no papilledema. The patient underwent endoscopic third ventriculostomy with immediate post-operative improvement of headache, resolution of incontinence, and cessation of seizures. At 15 months after surgery, neuropsychiatric testing demonstrated improvement in visuomotor skills, problem solving, verbal fluency and cognitive flexibility compared to his pre-operative baseline. At 18 months after surgery he remained seizure free with full continence and significant improvement in headaches. Early recognition of arrested hydrocephalus and its potential for decompensation may prompt surgical treatment and prevent neurologic deterioration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Fatal Case of Lithium Battery Ingestion in a 2-Month-Old Child: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiza Safi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ingestion of batteries by children became more frequent in recent years, due to the increasing accessibility of electronic toys and devices to children. We report a fatal evolution of battery ingestion in a 2-month-old boy.Lithium battery ingestion is a serious condition with high risk of life-threatening complications in childhood and it can be fatal especially in extreme age, under 6 months. Urgent endoscopic removal is the best treatment to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality.

  3. Tracking of maternal self-efficacy for limiting young children's television viewing and associations with children's television viewing time: a longitudinal analysis over 15-months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatiuk, Jill A; Salmon, Jo; Campbell, Karen J; Ridgers, Nicola D; Hesketh, Kylie D

    2015-05-30

    Mothers' self-efficacy for limiting their children's television viewing is an important correlate of this behaviour in young children. However, no studies have examined how maternal self-efficacy changes over time, which is potentially important during periods of rapid child development. This study examined tracking of maternal self-efficacy for limiting young children's television viewing over 15-months and associations with children's television viewing time. In 2008 and 2010, mothers (n = 404) from the Melbourne InFANT Program self-reported their self-efficacy for limiting their child's television viewing at 4- and 19-months of age. Tertiles of self-efficacy were created at each time and categorised into: persistently high, persistently low, increasing or decreasing self-efficacy. Weighted kappa and multinomial logistic regression examined tracking and demographic and behavioural predictors of change in self-efficacy. A linear regression model examined associations between tracking categories and children's television viewing time. Tracking of maternal self-efficacy for limiting children's television viewing was low (kappa = 0.23, p television viewing time at 19-months (β = -35.5; 95 % CI = -54.4,-16.6 and β = 37.0; 95 % CI = -54.4,-19.7, respectively). Mothers of children with difficult temperaments were less likely to have persistently high self-efficacy. Mothers who met adult physical activity guidelines had 2.5 greater odds of increasing self-efficacy. Interventions to increase and maintain maternal self-efficacy for limiting children's television viewing time may result in lower rates of this behaviour amongst toddlers. Maternal and child characteristics may need to be considered when tailoring interventions.

  4. Cassini RTG program. Monthly technical progress report, September 29, 1997--October 26, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-24

    This report describes work on the contract to provide Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) and Ancillary Activities in support of the Cassini Spacecraft launch. The craft was successfully launched on October 15, 1997. Early telemetry results show excellent performance from the three launched RTG modules. A major share of this report describes safety analyses for contamination radii in the event of launch failures and generator destruction, as well as launch related activities.

  5. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 3, Number 2, March 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    1997 Total number Environmental Injuries Viral Hepatitis Malaria Varicella Reporting of reports Active Duty CO Active Active Other MTF/Post...113.5 -25.5 -22.5% .05 New Mexico 48 65.9 -17.9 -27.1% .05 North Dakota 22 34.5 -12.5 -36.3% .05 Minnesota 114 138.1 -24.1 -17.5% .05 Table 1

  6. The Effect of a Leisure Time Physical Activity Intervention Delivered via a Workplace: 15-Month Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Skogstad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In line with recommendations from both the World Health Organization and the European Union some employers encourage workplace health promotion through physical activity (PA facilities and leisure time PA-initiatives. The current study describes a 15-month follow-up after an 8-week workplace delivered PA-initiative, investigates if improvements in cardiovascular risk status are sustainable, and elucidates differences according to educational level. One hundred and twenty one employees (43 women were examined before and after the 8-week PA-initiative and 94 at the 15-month follow-up. PA-levels, blood pressure, resting heart rate, lipids, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, C-reactive protein (CRP, and selected markers of inflammation were registered at baseline, immediately after the 8-week PA-initiative, and 15 months after baseline. At the end of follow-up (15-month, PA-levels—increased during the 8-week intervention—had returned to baseline values. None of the five improvements in cardiovascular markers (total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL, P-selectin, CD40Ligand (CD40L and Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 seen at the 8-week follow-up were sustained. At the 15-month follow-up as compared to baseline HbA1c, CRP (log and interleukin-6 (IL-6 were reduced by 0.06 mmol/L (95% CI −0.11,−0.01, 0.25 mg/L (95% CI −0.46,−0.04 and 0.39 pg/mL (95% CI −0.75, −0.04, respectively. At baseline, there were differences in cardiovascular risk factors comparing men with low versus high levels of education. No differences in changes in outcomes between these groups of men were found during follow-up. In this study highly educated men generally have lower levels of cardiovascular risk factors, but the effect of PA on such markers in this group do not differ from the effects seen in less educated men.

  7. SDG and E - ERDA Geothermal Loop, Experimental Facility. Bi-monthly report, November-December 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bishop, H.K.; Bricarello, J.R.; Enos, F.L.; Hodgdon, N.C.; Li, K.K.; Lombard, G.L.; Mulliner, D.K.; Swanson, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    Four continuous operation runs, including the completion of one started in October, were carried out using geothermal brine from Magmamax No. 1 and Woolsey No. 1 wells. Special problems encountered during these operations were noted and corrective actions were taken. System chemistry continued to be monitored and reported. Data management of the GLEF is also included.

  8. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 21, Number 10, October 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Rev. 2002; 6(2): 97–111. 5. M cLay RN, Klam WP, Volkert SL. Insomnia is the most commonly reported symptom and predicts other symptoms of post...eat a large meal close to bedtime. Also, empty your bladder before you go to bed, so that the urge to urinate does not disrupt your sleep. The

  9. Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O.

    1995-04-01

    This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed

  10. 45 CFR 233.37 - How monthly reports are treated and what notices are required (AFDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and one-third, child care, and work expenses) will be applied to any earnings which are not reported... OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT... eligible (without the applicable earned income disregards if the State agency determines no good cause...

  11. Reported and observed controlling feeding practices predict child eating behavior after 12 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmeier, Heidi J; Skouteris, Helen; Haycraft, Emma; Haines, Jess; Hooley, Merrilyn

    2015-06-01

    Controlling feeding practices are linked to children's self-regulatory eating practices and weight status. Maternal reports of controlling feeding practices are not always significantly related to independently rated mealtime observations. However, prior studies only assessed 1 mealtime observation, which may not be representative of typical mealtime settings or routines. The first aim was to examine associations between reported and observed maternal pressure to eat and restriction feeding practices at baseline (T1) and after ∼ 12 mo (T2). The second aim was to evaluate relations between maternal and child factors [e.g., concern about child weight, child temperament, child body mass index (BMI)-for-age z scores (BMIz)] at T1 and reported and observed maternal pressure to eat and restriction feeding practices (T1 and T2). The third aim was to assess prospective associations between maternal feeding practices (T1) and child eating behaviors (T2) and child BMIz (T2). A sample of 79 mother-child dyads in Victoria, Australia, participated in 2 lunchtime home observations (T1 and T2). BMI measures were collected during the visits. Child temperament, child eating behaviors, maternal parenting styles, and maternal feeding practices were evaluated at T1 and T2 via questionnaires. Associations were assessed with Pearson's correlation coefficients, paired t tests, and hierarchical regressions. Reported restriction (T1) was inversely associated with observed restriction at T1 (r = -0.24, P controlling strategies. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Rumeno-splenitis in a thirty-month old Heifer: a case report | Awoniyi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postmortem examination revealed hardware disease which was not the conventional reticulo-pericarditis reported by earlier workers/investigators because of the peculiar extensive splenic involvement; which was traced to adhesion of the rumen and diaphragm as a result of the penetration of a metal. The authors suggest a ...

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report MSMR). Volume 4, Number 7, October/November 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    from main and satellite clinics. Not all sites reporting. ** Other STDs: (a) Chancroid (b) Granuloma Inguinale (c) Lymphogranuloma Venereum (d...Vaccine advrs event 0 4 5 9 Lyme disease 4 10 18 32 Varicella,adult only 73 30 1 104 Lymphogranuloma Vnrm 0 0 0 0 Yellow fever 0 0 0 0 Total

  14. Inter-joint coordination strategies during unilateral stance 6-months following first-time lateral ankle sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-02-01

    Longitudinal analyses of participants with a history of lateral ankle sprain are lacking. This investigation combined measures of inter-joint coordination and stabilometry to evaluate eyes-open (condition 1) and eyes-closed (condition 2) static unilateral stance performance in a group of participants, 6-months after they sustained an acute, first-time lateral ankle sprain in comparison to a control group. Sixty-nine participants with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain and 20 non-injured controls completed three 20-second unilateral stance task trials in conditions 1 and 2. An adjusted coefficient of multiple determination statistic was used to compare stance limb 3-dimensional kinematic data for similarity in the aim of establishing patterns of lower-limb inter-joint coordination. The fractal dimension of the stance limb centre of pressure path was also calculated. Between-group analyses revealed significant differences in stance limb inter-joint coordination strategies for conditions 1 and 2, and in the fractal dimension of the centre-of-pressure path for condition 2 only. Injured participants displayed increases in ankle-hip linked coordination compared to controls in condition 1 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.15 [0.14] vs 0.06 [0.04]; η(2)=.19; sagittal/transverse plane: 0.14 [0.11] vs 0.09 [0.05]; η(2)=0.14) and condition 2 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.15 [0.12] vs 0.08 [0.06]; η(2)=0.23), with an associated decrease in the fractal dimension of the centre-of-pressure path (injured limb: 1.23 [0.13] vs 1.36 [0.13]; η(2)=0.20). Participants with a 6-month history of first-time lateral ankle sprain exhibit a hip-dominant coordination strategy for static unilateral stance compared to non-injured controls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Coca-Cola Refreshments Class 8 Diesel Electric Hybrid Tractor Evaluation: 13-Month Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowicz, K.; Lammert, M.; Curran, P.

    2012-08-01

    This 13-month evaluation used five Kenworth T370 hybrid tractors and five Freightliner M2106 standard diesel tractors at a Coca Cola Refreshments facility in Miami, Florida. The primary objective was to evaluate the fuel economy, emissions, and operational field performance of hybrid electric vehicles when compared to similar-use conventional diesel vehicles. A random dispatch system ensures the vehicles are used in a similar manner. GPS logging, fueling, and maintenance records and laboratory dynamometer testing are used to evaluate the performance of these hybrid tractors. Both groups drive similar duty cycles with similar kinetic intensity (0.95 vs. 0.69), average speed (20.6 vs. 24.3 mph), and stops per mile (1.9 vs. 1.5). The study demonstrated the hybrid group had a 13.7% fuel economy improvement over the diesel group. Laboratory fuel economy and field fuel economy study showed similar trends along the range of KI and stops per mile. Hybrid maintenance costs were 51% lower per mile; hybrid fuel costs per mile were 12% less than for the diesels; and hybrid vehicle total cost of operation per mile was 24% less than the cost of operation for the diesel group.

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Plutonium Sustainment Monthly Program Report - March 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaughlin, Anastasia Dawn; Storey, Bradford G.; Bowidowicz, Martin; Robertson, William G.; Hobson, Beverly F.

    2012-01-01

    In March of 2012 the Plutonium Sustainment program at LANL completed or addressed the following high-level activities: (1) Delivered Revision 2 of the Plutonium Sustainment Manufacturing Study, which incorporated changes needed due to the release of the FY2013 President's Budget and the delay in the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement Nuclear Facility (CMRRNF). (2) W87 pit type development activities completed a detailed process capability review for the flowsheet in preparation for the Engineering Development Unit Build. (3) Completed revising the Laser Beam Welding schedule to address scope and resource changes. (4) Completed machining and inspecting the first set of high-fidelity cold parts on Precitech 2 for Gemini. (5) The Power Supply Assembly Area started floor cutting with a concrete saw and continued legacy equipment decommissioning. There are currently no major issues associated with achieving MRT L2 Milestones 4195-4198 or the relevant PBIs associated with Plutonium Sustainment. There are no budget issues associated with FY12 final budget guidance. Table 1 identifies all Baseline Change Requests (BCRs) that were initiated, in process, or completed during the month. The earned value metrics overall for LANL are within acceptable thresholds, so no high-level recovery plan is required. Each of the 5 major LANL WBS elements is discussed in detail.

  17. A 15-Month-Old Boy With Respiratory Distress and Parapharyngeal Abscess: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behdad Gharib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal abscess is a life-threatening disease. Upper respiratory tract infection is the main cause in children. We present a 15-month-old boy admitted to the emergency ward with the chief complaint of difficulty in breathing caused by parapharyngealabscess. His condition deteriorated gradually, and he transferred to the operation theater quickly for abscess drainage and because of the difficulty in orotracheal intubation; a tracheostomy was performed. His respiratory condition deteriorated 2 days after PICU admission, and the medical team noticed an unexplainable respiratory distress. A chest x ray obtained and showed a right side pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema around theneck area. The case presented here, had not been diagnosed at the first examination; however, there were enough clinical clues (such as respiratory distress, drooling, torticollis, bulging of theneck, previous viral respiratory infection, possible pharyngeal trauma. The story of this case reminds us the importance of the precise physical exam and history taking which could be life-saving.

  18. [National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] monthly progress report, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Accomplishments for the month of July are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuel Research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplement Government Program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; development of methods for mapping distribution of clays in petroleum reservoirs; summary of geological and production characteristics of class 1. unstructured, deltaic reservoirs; third international reservoir characterization technical conference; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; analysis of the US oil resource base and estimate of future recoverable oil; DOE education initiative project; and technology transfer to independent producers.

  19. (National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research) monthly progress report, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Accomplishments for the month of July are described briefly under tasks for: Energy Production Research; Fuels Research; and Supplemental Government Program. Energy Production Research includes: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; development of improved microbial flooding methods; surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; gas flood performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; three-phase relative permeability research; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; and imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media. Fuel Research includes: development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes; and thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds. Supplement Government Program includes: microbial-enhanced waterflooding field project; feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the midcontinent region--Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri; surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project; development of methods for mapping distribution of clays in petroleum reservoirs; summary of geological and production characteristics of class 1. unstructured, deltaic reservoirs; third international reservoir characterization technical conference; process-engineering property measurements on heavy petroleum components; development and application of petroleum production technologies; upgrade BPO crude oil data base; simulation analysis of steam-foam projects; analysis of the US oil resource base and estimate of future recoverable oil; DOE education initiative project; and technology transfer to independent producers.

  20. A giant mesenteric lipoblastoma in an 18-month old infant: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foteini Gentimi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantile lipoma (or lipoblastoma of the mesentery is an extremely rare benign tumor of embryonal fat, with 15 cases reported in the English literature until today and only three of them arise from the ileum mesentery. We report an 18-month old boy presenting with a palpable intraabdominal mass arising from the ileum mesentery. Histopathologic and cytogenetic studies confirmed the diagnosis of mesenteric lipoblastoma (or infantile lipoma. Complete excision of the mass was performed. A follow-up examination consisting of physical examination and an abdominal ultrasound at 30 months postoperatively revealed no recurrence. We also present a review of the English literature regarding the presentation and management of mesenteric lipoblastomas in children.

  1. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 12, Number 7, October 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    region 1) were Alaska, Arizona, California, Idaho, New Mexico , Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, and Washington. The ACIP also recommended that...2724-9. 7. Struewing JP, Hyams KC, Tueller JE, Gray GC. The risk of measles, mumps, and varicella among young adults: a serosurvey of US Navy and... Varicella Sentinel reportable events for all beneficiaries1 at U.S. Army medical facilities, MSMR 33Vol. 12/No. 7 2005 2006 2005 2006 2005 2006 2005

  2. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 14, Number 2, May 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-01

    portable insulated food containers. Desserts and green salads were prepackaged in individual and large serving sizes, respectively. Soldiers could...MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release ; distribution unlimited...which includes post-traumatic stress disorder) (Table 2). Among these cohorts, service members who redeployed between January and June 2003

  3. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 20, Number 2, February 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    transmitted diseases (STDs) syphilis and gonorrhea had to be broadened to include Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and human papillomavi- rus (HPV) infections...last remaining class of eff ective antimicrobials and the only antibiotics recommended for gonorrhea treatment, have been reported in Asia and...654. Accessed: 20 February 2012 22. Kirkcaldy RD, Bolan GA, Wasserheit JN. Cephalosporin-resistant gonorrhea in North America. JAMA. 2013;309:185

  4. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 17, Number 08, August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Gonorrhea Syphilis AUGUST 2010 3 p-yrs, respectively; the rate of syphilis was much lower than the rates of the other STIs considered here (overall...were among 20-24 year olds (Figures 2b,c). Gonorrhea Rates of gonorrhea were relatively stable throughout the period (range: 221.9 to 239.5 cases...notifi able medical event reports that included diagnostic codes (ICD-9-CM) indicative of chlamydia, gonorrhea , syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV

  5. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 19, Number 9, September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    naturally occur- ring fungi found primarily in the soil of large areas of the southwestern United States and Central and South America . Approximately...34 en vary between data sources.7 # is report underestimates the num- bers of noncombat ! rearm-related deaths and injuries among U.S. military mem...Eastern equine encephalitis, dengue , and Chikungunya viruses.4,11 Ochlerotatus japonicus " eobald: Och- lerotatus japonicus " eobald was intro- duced

  6. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 19, Number 2, February 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Audiology 22 1.1 290 1.5 50 1.5 Immediate care 21 1.1 629 3.2 73 2.1 Neurology 18 0.9 203 1.0 54 1.6 referents), outpatient visit rates were most... article on page 7) and the results of this report to identify indi- viduals that should be screened for suicide risk. Suicide risk screening for high-risk

  7. Energy Report. State of the art in the market for consumers. First six months of 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-09-01

    Based on a number of key indicators, the market outcomes and market structure of the consumer market for energy are mapped, including the behavior of consumers. This report is limited to displaying a number of figures and facts, relating to the demand for products, prices, concentrations, switching, satisfaction and confidence of consumers in the energy market and information from ConsuWijzer, a Dutch governmental consumer protection organization. [nl

  8. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 19, Number 1, January 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    conditions (ICD-9-CM: 287), or malaria complicating pregnancy (ICD- 9-CM: 647.4) in any diagnostic position; or (5) a hospitalization record with a non...variability of estimates of case counts of malaria in relation to characteristics of sur- veillance case defi nitions. In particular, the report...subsequent diagnostic positions (with no malaria -specifi c or associated diagno- ses in the primary diagnostic position); ii) records of malaria - related

  9. Parents' reports of the body shape and feeding habits of 36-month-old children: an investigation of gender differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm-Denoma, Jill M; Lewinsohn, Peter M; Gau, Jeffrey M; Joiner, Thomas E; Striegel-Moore, Ruth; Otamendi, Ainhoa

    2005-11-01

    The current study examined parental perception of offspring body shape, differential reporting of offspring eating behaviors by mothers and fathers, and gender-specific patterns of offspring feeding habits. Parents of a community sample of 36-month-old children (N = 93) completed measures regarding their offspring's feeding patterns and body shape. Results revealed noteworthy correlates (e.g., concerns about their child's appetite) of parental perception of offspring weight status. They further suggested that mothers and fathers often differed in their accounts of their child's eating habits, and that parents report certain eating behaviors differently depending on the gender of their child. Clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  10. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 21, Number 12, December 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    of the tests were indicated according to U.S. Army policy at the time, but only 7% according to CDC guidelines. Category Fort Drum Fort Benning...disease have identifi ed pro- grammatic issues in need of improvement in the areas of case management and pub- lic health practice.2 No CDC performance...demographic categories from 2007 through 2013. Reserve component A total of 188 incident cases of Cam- pylobacter infection were identifi ed among

  11. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 20, Number 12, December 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    identifi ed from records of outpatient medical encounters rather than hospi- talizations. Cellulitis accounted for half (50.9%) of all cases of...Vietnam.2-4 In recent times, outbreaks of cellulitis and other bacterial skin infections (including some caused by methicillin-resistant Staphy...exclusively caused by beta-hemolytic Streptococcus. Cellulitis is similar, but involves deeper skin tissue layers and has poorly demarcated borders

  12. The use of bevacizumab in a multilevel retinal hemorrhage secondary to retinal macroaneurysm: a 39-month follow-up case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsakpinis D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dimitrios Tsakpinis1, Mayssa B Nasr1,2, Paris Tranos3, Nikos Krassas1, Theodoros Giannopoulos2, Chrysanthos Symeonidis1, Stavros A Dimitrakos1, Anastasios GP Konstas212nd University Department of Ophthalmology, Papageorgiou Hospital; 2Glaucoma Unit, 1st University, Department of Ophthalmology, AHEPA Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Retina Eye Center, Thessaloniki, GreecePurpose: The evaluation of long-term visual outcome after the use of bevacizumab for the management of multilevel hemorrhage due to retinal arterial macroaneurysm (MA.Case report: A 71-year-old hypertensive female presented with sudden reduction of visual acuity in her left eye (OS. Fundoscopy revealed an arterial macroaneurysm with preretinal and subretinal hemorrhage in the eye. Due to significant macular involvement, the patient received two intravitreal injections of bevacizumab within 2 months.Results: Significant visual and anatomical recovery was observed 2 months later, which was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. At the end of a follow-up period (39 months visual acuity and visual field were at normal levels.Conclusion: Retinal MA is a relatively rare condition. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy appears a safe and effective treatment option for selected symptomatic individuals that may offer faster visual rehabilitation. Herein we report, for the first time, a 39-month follow-up of a retinal MA treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy.Keywords: arterial retinal macroaneurysm, anti-VEGF, bevacizumab, multilevel hemorrhage

  13. The use of bevacizumab in a multilevel retinal hemorrhage secondary to retinal macroaneurysm: a 39-month follow-up case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakpinis, Dimitrios; Nasr, Mayssa B; Tranos, Paris; Krassas, Nikos; Giannopoulos, Theodoros; Symeonidis, Chrysanthos; Dimitrakos, Stavros A; Konstas, Anastasios GP

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The evaluation of long-term visual outcome after the use of bevacizumab for the management of multilevel hemorrhage due to retinal arterial macroaneurysm (MA). Case report A 71-year-old hypertensive female presented with sudden reduction of visual acuity in her left eye (OS). Fundoscopy revealed an arterial macroaneurysm with preretinal and subretinal hemorrhage in the eye. Due to significant macular involvement, the patient received two intravitreal injections of bevacizumab within 2 months. Results Significant visual and anatomical recovery was observed 2 months later, which was confirmed by fluorescein angiography. At the end of a follow-up period (39 months) visual acuity and visual field were at normal levels. Conclusion Retinal MA is a relatively rare condition. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy appears a safe and effective treatment option for selected symptomatic individuals that may offer faster visual rehabilitation. Herein we report, for the first time, a 39-month follow-up of a retinal MA treated with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. PMID:22069349

  14. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care: Perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning after 12 months of preventive monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eLay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory re-hospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. Methods: The program consists of individualized psycho-education, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatric inpatients who had had compulsory admission(s during the past 24 months were included in the trial. T1-assessment 12 months after baseline was achieved for 182 patients. Results: Study participants reported lower levels of perceived coercion, negative pressures and process exclusion, a higher level of optimism, and a lesser degree of distress due to symptoms, interpersonal relations and social role functioning (significant time effects. However, improvements were not confined to the intervention group, but seen also in the TAU group (no significant group or interaction effects. Altered perceptions were linked to older age, shorter illness duration, female sex, non-psychotic disorder, and compulsory hospitalization not due to risk of harm to others. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that changes in the subjective perspective were fuelled primarily by participation in this study, rather than by having received the specific intervention. The study contributes to a better understanding of the interaction between 'objective' measures (compulsory readmissions and patients’ perceptions and highlights the need for treatment approaches promoting empowerment in individuals with a history of involuntary psychiatric hospitalizations.

  15. Patient characteristics and surgery-related factors associated with patient-reported recovery at 1 and 6 months after colorectal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsson, J; Idvall, E; Kumlien, C

    2017-11-01

    Predictors for postoperative recovery after colorectal cancer surgery are usually investigated in relation to length of stay (LoS), readmission, or 30-day morbidity. This study describes patient characteristics and surgery-related factors associated with patient-reported recovery 1 and 6 months after surgery. In total, 153 consecutively included patients who were recovering from colorectal cancer surgery reported their level of recovery using the Postoperative Recovery Profile. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to calculate associations with recovery, defined as good or poor, divided into five recovery dimensions: physical symptoms, physical functions, psychological, social and activity. Better preoperative health predicted good recovery regarding three dimensions 1 month after surgery. Regarding all dimensions 1 month after surgery, poor recovery was predicted by a poor recovery on the day of discharge within corresponding dimensions. Higher age was associated with good recovery 6 months after surgery, while chemotherapy showed negative associations. Overall, a majority of factors had a negative impact on recovery, but without any obvious relation to one specific dimension or point in time. Those factors were: high Body Mass Index, comorbidity, abdominoperineal resection, loop ileostomy, colostomy and LoS. This study illustrates the complexity of postoperative recovery and a need for individualised follow-up strategies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Santander Atlantic Time-Series Station (SATS): A Time Series combination of a monthly hydrographic Station and The Biscay AGL Oceanic Observatory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Alicia; Somavilla, Raquel; Cano, Daniel; Rodriguez, Carmen; Gonzalez-Pola, Cesar; Viloria, Amaia; Tel, Elena; Ruiz-Villareal, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Long-Term Time Series Stations have been developed in order to document seasonal to decadal scale variations in key physical and biogeochemical parameters. Long-term time series measurements are crucial for determining the physical and biological mechanisms controlling the system. The Science and Technology Ministers of the G7 in their Tsukuba Communiqué have stated that 'many parts of the ocean interior are not sufficiently observed' and that 'it is crucial to develop far stronger scientific knowledge necessary to assess the ongoing changes in the ocean and their impact on economies.' Time series has been classically obtained by oceanographic ships that regularly cover standard sections and stations. From 1991, shelf and slope waters of the Southern Bay of Biscay are regularly sampled in a monthly hydrographic line north of Santander to a depth of 1000 m in early stages and for the whole water column down to 2580 m in recent times. Nearby, in June 2007, the IEO deployed an oceanic-meteorological buoy (AGL Buoy, 43° 50.67'N; 3° 46.20'W, and 40 km offshore, www.boya-agl.st.ieo.es). The Santander Atlantic Time Series Station is integrated in the Spanish Institute of Oceanography Observing Sistem (IEOOS). The long-term hydrographic monitoring has allowed to define the seasonality of the main oceanographic facts as the upwelling, the Iberian Poleward Current, low salinity incursions, trends and interannual variability at mixing layer, and at the main water masses North Atlantic Central Water and Mediterranean Water. The relation of these changes with the high frequency surface conditions recorded by the Biscay AGL has been examined using also satellite and reanalysis data. During the FIXO3 Project (Fixed-point Open Ocean Observatories), and using this combined sources, some products and quality controled series of high interest and utility for scientific purposes has been developed. Hourly products as Sea Surface Temperature and Salinity anomalies, wave significant

  17. Chair time saving method for treatment of an impacted maxillary central incisor with 15-month follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Noorollahian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Maxillary permanent incisors have a major role in facial esthetics. Impaction of them has great adverse effect on smile and causes serious concerns in patient and parents. Physical barriers (e.g., overretained primary teeth, supernumerary teeth, and pathologic lesions, space problems, developmental abnormalities, altered eruption sequence, trauma, palatal clefts, and genetics can act as etiologic factors. Currently, the conventional technique to treatment of impacted teeth consists of a combined orthodontic and surgical approach, to guide the impacted teeth in a constant position and surrounded by normal hard and soft tissues. Treatment is challenging because of some limitations such as patient's age, cooperation, anchorage, and mechanotherapy possibilities. Hence, sophisticated treatment planning is crucial. A 9-year-old girl with horizontally impacted maxillary left central incisor treated with surgical exposure and closed orthodontic forced eruption with 2 × 4 partial setup fixed appliances. Force was applied with 0.014 inch nickel–titanium wire as elastic overlay and handmade ligated bracket. To save chair time in each appointment, the overlay was activated by twisting of ligature wire extensions around it. After 16-month treatment, impacted incisor emerged in oral cavity, with accepted alignment and inclination. Handmade ligated bracket with ligature wire extensions is useful for the treatment of impacted teeth. Due to easy activation of overlay in this method, chair time become short in each appointment.

  18. Performance of data acceptance criteria over 50 months from an automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanovas, R.; Morant, J.J.; Lopez, M.; Hernandez-Giron, I.; Batalla, E.; Salvado, M.

    2011-01-01

    The automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network of Catalonia (Spain) comprises two subnetworks; one with 9 aerosol monitors and the other with 8 Geiger monitors together with 2 water monitors located in the Ebre river. Since September 2006, several improvements were implemented in order to get better quality and quantity of data, allowing a more accurate data analysis. However, several causes (natural causes, equipment failure, artificial external causes and incidents in nuclear power plants) may produce radiological measured values mismatched with the own station background, whether spurious without significance or true radiological values. Thus, data analysis for a 50-month period was made and allowed to establish an easily implementable statistical criterion to find those values that require special attention. This criterion proved a very useful tool for creating a properly debugged database and to give a quick response to equipment failures or possible radiological incidents. This paper presents the results obtained from the criterion application, including the figures for the expected, raw and debugged data, percentages of missing data grouped by causes and radiological measurements from the networks. Finally, based on the discussed information, recommendations for the improvement of the network are identified to obtain better radiological information and analysis capabilities. - Highlights: → Causes producing data mismatching with the own stations background are described. → Causes may be natural, equipment failure, external or nuclear plants incidents. → These causes can produce either spurious or true radiological data. → A criterion to find these data was implemented and tested for a 50-month period. → Recommendations for the improvement of the network are identified.

  19. Daddy Months

    OpenAIRE

    Volker Meier; Helmut Rainer

    2014-01-01

    We consider a bargaining model in which husband and wife decide on the allocation of time and disposable income. Since her bargaining power would go down otherwise more strongly, the wife agrees to having a child only if the husband also leaves the labor market for a while. The daddy months subsidy enables the couple to overcome a hold-up problem and thereby improves efficiency. However, the same ruling harms cooperative couples and may also reduce welfare in an endogenous taxation framework.

  20. Self-Reported Executive Functioning in Everyday Life in Parkinson's Disease after Three Months of Subthalamic Deep Brain Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Uyen Ha Gia; Andersson, Stein; Toft, Mathias; Pripp, Are Hugo; Konglund, Ane Eidahl; Dietrichs, Espen; Malt, Ulrik Fredrik; Skogseid, Inger Marie; Haraldsen, Ira Ronit Hebolt; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Studies on the effect of subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) on executive functioning in Parkinson's disease (PD) are still controversial. In this study we compared self-reported daily executive functioning in PD patients before and after three months of STN-DBS. We also examined whether executive functioning in everyday life was associated with motor symptoms, apathy, and psychiatric symptoms. Method. 40 PD patients were examined with the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version (BRIEF-A), the Symptom Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R), and the Apathy Evaluation Scale (AES-S). Results. PD patients reported significant improvement in daily life executive functioning after 3 months of STN-DBS. Anxiety scores significantly declined, while other psychiatric symptoms remained unchanged. The improvement of self-reported executive functioning did not correlate with motor improvement after STN-DBS. Apathy scores remained unchanged after surgery. Only preoperative depressed mood had predictive value to the improvement of executive function and appears to prevent potentially favorable outcomes from STN-DBS on some aspects of executive function. Conclusion. PD patients being screened for STN-DBS surgery should be evaluated with regard to self-reported executive functioning. Depressive symptoms in presurgical PD patients should be treated. Complementary information about daily life executive functioning in PD patients might enhance further treatment planning of STN-DBS.

  1. 75 FR 30846 - Monthly Report of Excess Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income (Correction)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ... Income and Annual Report of Uses of Excess Income (Correction) AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information.... Project owners are permitted to retain Excess Income for projects under terms and conditions established by HUD. Owners must request to retain some or all of their Excess Income. The request must be...

  2. Monthly use of a real-time continuous glucose monitoring system as an educational and motivational tool for poorly controlled type 1 diabetes adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowińska-Olszewska, B; Tobiaszewska, M; Łuczyński, W; Bossowski, A

    2013-01-01

    Experience with the use of real-time continuous glucose monitoring systems (RT-CGMS) in teenagers with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is limited. We aimed to assess the possibility of glycaemic control improvement and to characterize the group of adolescents, who may gain long-term benefits from the use of the RT-CGMS. Forty T1DM patients, aged 14.6 ± 2.1 years, with diabetes duration 7.4 ± 3.6 years and initial HbA₁c 9.3 ± 1.5% were recruited. The analysis was based on one-month glucose sensors use, combined with the thorough family support. Patients were analysed in groups according to baseline HbA₁c: below and above 7.5%, and 10.0%. Comparison between patients with or without improvement in HbA₁c after 3-month follow-up was also performed. Patients' satisfaction based on the questionnaire was assessed. HbA₁c level in entire study group decreased after three months, from 9.3 ± 1.0% to 8.8 ± 1.6% (P10% did not achieve significant improvement: 11.2 ± 0.5% vs. 10.9 ± 1.1 (P=0.06). In satisfaction questionnaire the lowest scores (negative opinion) were reported by group of patients with initial HbA₁c above 10%, while the highest scores (positive opinion) were found in the group with improvement of HbA₁c after 3 month follow-up. Short-term use of CGMS RT, united with satisfaction questionnaire, performed in poorly controlled teenagers with T1DM, can be useful in defining the group of young patients, who can benefit from long-term CGMS RT use in metabolic control improvement.

  3. Natural gas monthly, August 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-24

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature article is on US Natural Gas Imports and Exports 1994.

  4. Self-reported physical activity and lung function two months after cardiac surgery--a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Marcus; Urell, Charlotte; Emtner, Margareta; Westerdahl, Elisabeth

    2014-03-28

    Physical activity has well-established positive health-related effects. Sedentary behaviour has been associated with postoperative complications and mortality after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery often suffer from impaired lung function postoperatively. The association between physical activity and lung function in cardiac surgery patients has not previously been reported. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery were followed up two months postoperatively. Physical activity was assessed on a four-category scale (sedentary, moderate activity, moderate regular exercise, and regular activity and exercise), modified from the Swedish National Institute of Public Health's national survey. Formal lung function testing was performed preoperatively and two months postoperatively. The sample included 283 patients (82% male). Two months after surgery, the level of physical activity had increased (p < 0.001) in the whole sample. Patients who remained active or increased their level of physical activity had significantly better recovery of lung function than patients who remained sedentary or had decreased their level of activity postoperatively in terms of vital capacity (94 ± 11% of preoperative value vs. 91 ± 9%; p = 0.03), inspiratory capacity (94 ± 14% vs. 88 ± 19%; p = 0.008), and total lung capacity (96 ± 11% vs. 90 ± 11%; p = 0.01). An increased level of physical activity, compared to preoperative level, was reported as early as two months after surgery. Our data shows that there could be a significant association between physical activity and recovery of lung function after cardiac surgery. The relationship between objectively measured physical activity and postoperative pulmonary recovery needs to be further examined to verify these results.

  5. Office of River Protection (ORP) Monthly Performance Report for September 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WAGNILD, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    transfers and back-dilutions that remediated the flammable gas hazards and closed the surface level growth Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) associated with the tank. CHG transitioned from the Basis for Interim Operation to the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) in October 1999. The High Heat Safety Issue on tank 241-C-106 was resolved, including the removal of the tank from the watch list. Several cross-site waste transfers were completed to support saltwell pumping efforts. In addition, Evaporator Campaign 00-1 began in April 2000, resulting in an estimated waste volume reduction of 600,000 gallons. Final sluicing operations of tank 241-C-106 were completed on October 6, 1999. The sludge recovery goal of 95 percent was exceeded. The total sludge transfer from tank 241-C-106 to 241-AY-102 was 67.8 inches (186,500 gallons). The successful test of the AZ-101 mixer pump was completed, proving that CHG has the technology necessary to retrieve tank waste for treatment. Approval of the Notice of Construction (NOC) for the AN Farm tank retrieval system was received from the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency on July 21,2000. This is a significant step forward for Project W-211, ''Initial Tank Retrieval Systems'' in preparing waste for delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

  6. Effect of voice recognition on radiologist reporting time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, S.N.; Coblentz, C.L.; Norman, G.R.; Ali, S.H.

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect that voice recognition (VR) has on radiologist reporting efficiency in a clinical setting and to identify variables associated with faster reporting time. Five radiologists were observed during the routine reporting of 402 plain radiograph studies using either VR (n 217) or conventional dictation (CD) (n = 185). Two radiologists were observed reporting 66 computed tomography (CT) studies using either VR (n - 39) or CD (n - 27). The time spent per reporting cycle, defined as the radiologist's time spent on a study from report finalization to the subsequent report finalization, was compared. As well, characteristics about the radiologist and their reporting style were collected and correlated against reporting time. For plain radiographs, radiologists took 134% (P = 0.048) more time to produce reports using VR, but there was significant variability between radiologists. Significant association with faster reporting times using VR included: English as a first language (r-0.24), use of a template (r -0.34), use of a headset microphone (r -0.46), and increased experience with VR (r -0.43). Experience as a staff radiologist and having previous study for comparison did not correlate with reporting time. For CT, there was no significant difference in reporting time identified between VR and CD (P 0.61). Overall, VR slightly decreases the reporting efficiency of radiologists. However, efficiency may be improved if English is a first language, a headset microphone, and macros and templates are use. (author)

  7. Esophageal Foreign Body: A Case Report of a Refractory Croup in a 20-Month-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    sevil Nasirmohtaram

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Foreign body ingestion is common among children and more common in boys and in children under the age of 3. It can present with a wide variety of symptoms like dysphagia and drooling or symptoms related to the upper aerodigestive tract.   Case Report: A 20-month-old male presented with refractory croup and poor feeding since 2 weeks. Bronchoscopy and esophagoscopy was performed due to suspicious history of eating loquat. The core of the fruit was found in the esophagus.   Conclusion:  Physicians should be aware of the variability of esophageal foreign body presentations to prevent serious complications due to delay in diagnosis.

  8. Title list of documents made publicly available, February 1-29, 1980. Volume 2, Number 2. Monthly report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    The document is a monthly publication containing descriptions of information received and generated by the U.S. NRC. This information includes (1) docketed material associated with civilian nuclear power plants and other uses of radioactive materials and (2) nondocketed material received and generated by NRC pertinent to its role as a regulatory agency. The docketed information includes information formerly issued through U.S. Department of Energy's Technical Information Center under the title Power Reactor Docket Information (PRDI). This document replaces PRDI, which will no longer be prepared. It is indexed by a Personal Author Index, Corporate Source Index, and Report Number Index

  9. Line-focus solar central power systems, Phase I. Monthly technical progress report, 31 January 1979-28 February 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slemmons, A J

    1979-03-01

    The work performed during the fifth month of the Phase I study of the High Temperature Line-Focus Solar Central Power System is summarized. During the reporting period, the optical and receiver computer analysis programs and parametricized data have been combined in a computer program to give the projected annualized Bus Bar Energy Costs for a specified design. Although some of the data are incomplete or need further refinement, the program has been used to examine the sensitivity of some parameters, and to make preliminary optimizations.

  10. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    symptoms, health care visits, and absenteeism among Iraq War veterans. Am J Psychiatry. 2007;164(1):150–153. 20. Stein M, McAllister TW. Exploring the...complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), are terms used to describe a diverse group of practices and products with a history of use or origins outside...Contributing Editors John F. Brundage, MD, MPH Leslie L. Clark, PhD, MS Writer/Editor Valerie F. Williams, MA, MS Managing/ Production Editor Elizabeth J

  11. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    through such means as protective clothing, shelter, physical activity, and nutrition . Military training or mission require- ments in cold and wet...weather may place service members in situations where they may be unable to be physically active, find warm shelter, or change wet or damp cloth

  12. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    disorders 106 12.3 Epilepsy 96 11.1 Migraine 75 8.7 Other conditions of brain 41 4.8 Skin and subcutaneous tissue (ICD-9: 680–709) 933 Other cellulitis ...and abscess 694 74.4 Pilonidal cyst 65 7.0 Cellulitis and abscess of fi nger and toe 57 6.1 Contact dermatitis and other eczema 22 2.4 Disorders...ICD-10: L00–L99) 258 Cellulitis and acute lymphangitis of other parts of limb 109 42.2 Cutaneous abscess, furuncle and carbuncle of limb 16 6.2

  13. Trajectories of 12-Month Usage Patterns for Two Smoking Cessation Websites: Exploring How Users Engage Over Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricker, Jonathan B; Sridharan, Vasundhara; Zhu, Yifan; Mull, Kristin E; Heffner, Jaimee L; Watson, Noreen L; McClure, Jennifer B; Di, Chongzhi

    2018-04-20

    Little is known about how individuals engage with electronic health (eHealth) interventions over time and whether this engagement predicts health outcomes. The objectives of this study, by using the example of a specific type of eHealth intervention (ie, websites for smoking cessation), were to determine (1) distinct groups of log-in trajectories over a 12-month period, (2) their association with smoking cessation, and (3) baseline user characteristics that predict trajectory group membership. We conducted a functional clustering analysis of 365 consecutive days of log-in data from both arms of a large (N=2637) randomized trial of 2 website interventions for smoking cessation (WebQuit and Smokefree), with a primary outcome of 30-day point prevalence smoking abstinence at 12 months. We conducted analyses for each website separately. A total of 3 distinct trajectory groups emerged for each website. For WebQuit, participants were clustered into 3 groups: 1-week users (682/1240, 55.00% of the sample), 5-week users (399/1240, 32.18%), and 52-week users (159/1240, 12.82%). Compared with the 1-week users, the 5- and 52-week users had 57% higher odds (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, 95% CI 1.13-2.17; P=.007) and 124% higher odds (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.45-3.43; Pusers were clustered into 3 groups: 1-week users (645/1309, 49.27% of the sample), 4-week users (395/1309, 30.18%), and 5-week users (269/1309, 20.55%). Compared with the 1-week users, 5-week users (but not 4-week users; P=.99) had 48% higher odds (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.05-2.07; P=.02) of being abstinent at 12 months. In general, the WebQuit intervention had a greater number of weekly log-ins within each of the 3 trajectory groups as compared with those of the Smokefree intervention. Baseline characteristics associated with trajectory group membership varied between websites. Patterns of 1-, 4-, and 5-week usage of websites may be common for how people engage in eHealth interventions. The 5-week usage of either website, and 52-week

  14. Natural gas monthly, October 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  15. Natural gas monthly, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  16. Natural gas monthly, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  17. Natural gas monthly, August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-24

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  18. Natural gas monthly, November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground state data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information

  19. A Case Report of Mania and Psychosis Five Months after Traumatic Brain Injury Successfully Treated Using Olanzapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano F. Cittolin-Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are few published pharmacologic trials for the treatment of acute mania following traumatic brain injury (TBI. To our knowledge, we present the first case report of an individual being treated and stabilized with olanzapine monotherapy for this condition. Case Presentation. We describe the case of a 53-year-old African American male admitted to an inpatient psychiatric hospital with one month of behavioral changes including irritability, decreased need for sleep, hyperverbal speech, hypergraphia, and paranoia five months after TBI. Using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5 criteria, he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder due to traumatic brain injury, with manic features. He was serially evaluated with clinical rating scales to measure symptom severity. The Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS score upon admission was 31, and the Clinician-Rated Dimensions of Psychosis Symptom Severity (CRDPSS score was initially 9. After eight days of milieu treatment and gradual titration of olanzapine to 15 mg nightly, his symptoms completely abated, with YMRS and CRDPSS scores at zero on the day of discharge. Conclusion. Olanzapine was effective and well tolerated for the treatment of mania following TBI.

  20. [Pineal anlage tumor in a 8-month-old boy. The first case reported in Spanish language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Velasco, Alicia; Ramírez-Reyes, Alma Griselda

    2014-01-01

    The pineal anlage tumor is a very infrequent malign neoplasm. Even though it has been documented in literature, it is not listed yet in the World Health Organization's last nervous system classification (2007). It is a primitive pineal tumor with neuroepithelial and ectomesenchyme differentiation. Due to its low frequency, the understanding of its biological behavior and a suitable treatment are incomplete. In a search performed in PubMed with the term pineal anlage tumor, only seven informed cases were identified between 1989 and 2011. An 8-month-old infant was brought to medical attention because he had a progressive enlargement of the cephalic perimeter, and convergent strabismus of two months of evolution. A pineal tumor was identified. The histology showed glial tissue, ganglia cells, pigmented neuroepithelium and striate muscle cells. A ventriculoperitoneal derivation was done to diminish hydrocephalic pressure and also to led the complete surgical resection. The patient was treated with two courses of chemotherapy with carboplatine, ifosfamide and mesna. One year after the treatment, the patient is asymptomatic. This is the first case reported in Spanish language. Given that it is a really infrequent tumor, it could be misdiagnosed as teratome, melanotic or mesoblastic medulloblastoma, or a melanotic neuroectodermal tumor of childhood (melanotic prognoma).

  1. Cholestasis caused by panhypopituitarism and acquired cytomegalovirus infection in a 2-month-old male infant: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, U; Chan, Wai-Tao; Ting, Wei-Hsin; Ho, Che-Sheng; Liu, Hsi-Che; Lee, Hung-Chang

    2017-04-01

    Septo-optic dysplasia (SOD) is a rare congenital disorder that may cause jaundice in infants. However, it is usually prone to neglect and misdiagnosis in infants with cholestasis because endocrine disorder such as panhypopituitarism is rare in the cause of infantile cholestasis. We report a case of SOD concurrent with acquired cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, who presented with prolonged jaundice as the first clinical sign. The patient was a 2-month-old male infant who presented with cholestasis, combined with fever and panhypopituitarism. He was diagnosed with SOD and acquired CMV infection. He was treated with hormone replacement therapy and ganciclovir. After correction of the pituitary hormone deficiency and ganciclovir treatment, significant improvements of cholestasis, retinal lesions, and growth rate were seen in our patient. Although an endocrine disorder such as panhypopituitarism is rare in the cause of neonatal or infantile cholestasis, we must keep this reason in mind.

  2. Remarkable Improvement of Nail Changes in Alopecia Areata Universalis with 10 Months of Treatment with Tofacitinib: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sineida Berbert Ferreira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alopecia areata (AA is a chronic, autoimmune disease. The main symptom is massive hair loss, localized or diffuse, in the scalp and the whole body. However, nails may also be involved, and brittleness, fragility and pitting can be signs of nail dystrophy in AA patients. Here, we report the case of a male patient with AA refractory to various treatments, including oral, topical and intralesional corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, cyclosporin and PUVA (oxoralen plus ultraviolet light, all interrupted due to side effects. The patient’s nails had erythematous blotches (striated lunulae with regular and superficial pitting as well as fragility (trachyonychia, and he could no longer play the guitar because of these symptoms. With patient consent, we introduced tofacitinib (5 mg twice daily, which resulted in remarkable improvements not only regarding hair regrowth but also nail changes, with function recovery within 10 months.

  3. FUNCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT UP TO SIX MONTHS AFTER TOTAL KNEE ARTHROPLASTY: MEASURED BY KNEE RANGE OF MOTION AND SELF-REPORTED QUESTIONNAIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Kocić

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of this study was to assess knee range of motion (ROM as well as patients’ reported pain, stiffness and function up to six months after total knee arthroplasty (TKA. The secondary aim was to analyze the extent to which knee ROM correlates with patient-rated outcome. A prospective study included 60 patients with primary TKA for osteorthritis, admitted at Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinic from April 2009 to October 2014. The patients were evaluated at 4 time points: at admission and at discharge, as well as at follow-up at 3 and at 6 months after surgery. The outcome parameters included: active knee ROM, as well as pain, stiffness and function according to self reported Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC questionnaire. Statistically highly significant improvement in flexion and extension was observed from admission to all other assessment time points (p<0.001. Also, statistically significant improvement of all three WOMAC subscales (pain, stiffness and function was found between all assessments points (p<0.001. According to values of Spearman correlation coefficient, there was significant negative correlation of flexion with all WOMAC subscales at all assessment points, whereas correlation of extension with any assessed outcome parameter was without significance. It can be concluded that in TKA patients all outcome measures improved significantly from admission to 6 months follow-up. Knee flexion ROM negatively and moderately to strongly correlated with pain, stiffness and function, whereas correlation of extension with any assessed outcome measure was without significance.

  4. Developmentally Delayed Male with Mincer Blade Obstructing the Oesophagus for a Period of Time Suspected to Be 6 Months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Charabi, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    prior to surgical intervention, the patient was hospitalized in a condition of sepsis and pneumonia where the thoracic X-ray reveals a foreign body in the proximal oesophagus. When rehospitalized 6 months later, a mincer blade of the type used in immersion blenders was surgically removed. During these 6...

  5. Improving Reports Turnaround Time: An Essential Healthcare Quality Dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mustafa; Khalid, Parwaiz; Al-Said, Youssef; Cupler, Edward; Almorsy, Lamia; Khalifa, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Turnaround time is one of the most important healthcare performance indicators. King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia worked on reducing the reports turnaround time of the neurophysiology lab from more than two weeks to only five working days for 90% of cases. The main quality improvement methodology used was the FOCUS PDCA. Using root cause analysis, Pareto analysis and qualitative survey methods, the main factors contributing to the delay of turnaround time and the suggested improvement strategies were identified and implemented, through restructuring transcriptionists daily tasks, rescheduling physicians time and alerting for new reports, engaging consultants, consistent coordination and prioritizing critical reports. After implementation; 92% of reports are verified within 5 days compared to only 6% before implementation. 7% of reports were verified in 5 days to 2 weeks and only 1% of reports needed more than 2 weeks compared to 76% before implementation.

  6. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  7. Natural gas monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  8. An unusual localization of seven months delayed pelvic lymphocele following radical retropubic prostatectomy: Case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berk Hazır

    Full Text Available Introduction: A pelvic lymphocele is a collection of lymphatic fluid that develops after extensive lymphadenectomies in surgeries such as urological malignancies or renal transplantation. Pelvic lymphoceles may cause complications such as fever, abdominal pain, leg swelling, genital swelling and flank pain. This report summarizes the management of a pelvic lymphocele after open radical retropubic prostatectomy with bilateral lymphadenectomy. Presentation of case: Herein, we present a case in which a pelvic lymphocele developed seven months post-radical open retropubic prostatectomy and through this patient we discussed the lymphocele following radical prostatectomy. The pelvic lymphocele occurred along the sciatic nerve from the sciatica foramen to the intergluteal muscles. The patient was treated with three drainage catheters. This localization is an atypical and unusual for lymphocele after radical retropubic prostatectomy. Discussion: Lymphocele formation that leads to major complications after radical prostatectomy is rare. Lymphocele formation is most commonly seen in the early postoperative period, but it should be considered in patients with fever, abdominal pain or leg swelling during the late postoperative period. Lymphocele formation was the most common cause of hospital readmission after radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: Lymphocele formation can be seen in atypical regions and can lead to unexpected complications after radical prostatectomy. Therefore, it should be brought to mind when complaints such as fever and lower extremity swelling occurred in patients underwent extensive lymph node dissection. Surgical treatment options are available, but percutaneous interventions can also be used. Keywords: Radical retropubic prostatectomy, Pelvic lymphocele, Percutaneous drainage, Prostate cancer, Case-report

  9. Anesthesia preparation time is not affected by the experience level of the resident involved during his/her first month of adult cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, David M; Couch, Michael C

    2011-10-01

    This study was designed to answer the question of whether the experience level of the resident on his/her first month of adult cardiothoracic anesthesiology has an impact on operating room efficiency in a large academic medical center. Traditionally, the resident's 1st month of cardiac anesthesia had been reserved for the clinical anesthesia (CA)-2 year of training. This study analyzed the impact on operating room efficiency of moving the 1st month of cardiac anesthesia into the CA-1 year. The authors hypothesized that there would be no difference in anesthesia preparation times (defined as the interval between "in-room" and "anesthesia-ready" times) between CA-1 and CA-2 residents on their 1st month of cardiac anesthesia. This study was retrospective and used an electronic anesthesia information management system database. This study was conducted on care provided at a single 450-bed academic medical center. This study included 12 residents in their 1st month of cardiac anesthesia. The anesthesia preparation time (defined as the interval between "in-room" and "anesthesia-ready" times) was measured for cases involving residents on their first month of cardiac anesthesia. Anesthesia preparation times for 6 CA-1 resident months and 6 CA-2 resident months (100 adult cardiac procedures in total) were analyzed (49 for the CA-1 residents and 51 for the CA-2s). There were no differences in preparation time between CA-1 and CA-2 residents as a group (p = 0.8169). The CA-1 residents had an unadjusted mean (±standard error) of 51.1 ± 3.18 minutes, whereas the CA-2 residents' unadjusted mean was 50.2 ± 2.41 minutes. Adjusting for case mix (valves v coronary artery bypass graft surgery), the CA-1 mean was 49.1 ± 5.22 minutes, whereas the CA-2 mean was 49.1 ± 4.54 minutes. These findings suggest that operating room efficiency as measured by the anesthesia preparation time may not be affected by the level of the resident on his/her 1st month of adult cardiac anesthesia

  10. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT RICHMOND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL IN SUSANVILLE, CA SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the performance evaluation study of the Aquatic Treatment Systems, Inc. (ATS) adsorptive media arsenic removal system at Richmond Elementary School in Susanville, Californi...

  11. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-06

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  12. Impact of a voice recognition system on report cycle time and radiologist reading time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melson, David L.; Brophy, Robert; Blaine, G. James; Jost, R. Gilbert; Brink, Gary S.

    1998-07-01

    Because of its exciting potential to improve clinical service, as well as reduce costs, a voice recognition system for radiological dictation was recently installed at our institution. This system will be clinically successful if it dramatically reduces radiology report turnaround time without substantially affecting radiologist dictation and editing time. This report summarizes an observer study currently under way in which radiologist reporting times using the traditional transcription system and the voice recognition system are compared. Four radiologists are observed interpreting portable intensive care unit (ICU) chest examinations at a workstation in the chest reading area. Data are recorded with the radiologists using the transcription system and using the voice recognition system. The measurements distinguish between time spent performing clerical tasks and time spent actually dictating the report. Editing time and the number of corrections made are recorded. Additionally, statistics are gathered to assess the voice recognition system's impact on the report cycle time -- the time from report dictation to availability of an edited and finalized report -- and the length of reports.

  13. Refractive lens exchange in younger and older presbyopes: comparison of complication rates, 3 months clinical and patient-reported outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schallhorn, Steven C; Schallhorn, Julie M; Pelouskova, Martina; Venter, Jan A; Hettinger, Keith A; Hannan, Stephen J; Teenan, David

    2017-01-01

    To compare refractive and visual outcomes, patient satisfaction, and complication rates among different age categories of patients who underwent refractive lens exchange (RLE). A stratified, simple random sample of patients matched on preoperative sphere and cylinder was selected for four age categories: 45-49 years (group A), 50-54 years (group B), 55-59 years (group C), and 60-65 years (group D). Each group contained 320 patients. All patients underwent RLE with a multifocal intraocular lens at least in one eye. Three months postoperative refractive/visual and patient-reported outcomes are presented. The percentage of patients that achieved binocular uncorrected distance visual acuity 20/20 or better was 91.6% (group A), 93.8% (group B), 91.6% (group C), 88.8% (group D), P =0.16. Binocularly, 80.0% of patients in group A, 84.7% in group B, 78.9% in group C, and 77.8% in group D achieved 20/30 or better uncorrected near visual acuity ( P =0.13). The proportion of eyes within 0.50 D of emmetropia was 84.4% in group A, 86.8% in group B, 85.7% in group C, and 85.8% in group D ( P =0.67). There was no statistically significant difference in postoperative satisfaction, visual phenomena, dry eye symptoms, distance or near vision activities. Apart from higher rate of iritis in the age group 50-55 years, there was no statistically significant difference in postoperative complication rates. RLE can be safely performed in younger as well as older presbyopes. No significant difference was found in clinical or patient-reported outcomes.

  14. Estimating continuous monthly baseflow time series and their possible applications in the context of the ecological reserve

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smakhtin, VU

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available (river and groundwater) are, therefore, dependent. In this example, the assumption is that IFRs (river reserve flows) determine the extent to which groundwater resources may be impacted in the absence of any surface water resource development (the impacts... (IFRs) are used instead of reference natural streamflow time series. The corresponding groundwater storage time series will then represent the groundwater reserve. These storages may provisionally be called ?IFR driven?. Two component reserve time series...

  15. Faktor-Faktor Yang Mempengaruhi Under-reporting of Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismawati Haribowo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This research examined the influenced of time pressure, audit risk, materiality, locus of control, and turnover intention to underreporting of time. Respondent in this research were the auditors who worked at Public Accounting Firm in DKI Jakarta. The respondences of this research were 120 auditors from 25 Public Accounting Firm. The sampling method in this research was purposive sampling method, while the data analysis method used multiple regression analysis. These result that time pressure, audit risk, and materiality had influence to underreporting of time. Locus of control and turnover intention had no influence to underreporting of time. Therefore, distribution of working time, condusive working environment, close supervision in field work, familial attachment auditor and auditor’s prosperity need to be done in order to avoid audit reporting practice prior to the specified reporting period or underreporting of time.DOI: 10.15408/ess.v4i3.2433

  16. Report: on the border of time and culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Faro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available From essay that takes as a reference part of the specialized bibliography on the topic, the article tries to analyze the double size of the report: how journalistic genre and how narrative practice that transcends the present time. In both conditions, the professional activity reporter reveals elements of culture circular universe, making his work a record the complexity of social processes.

  17. Community Connections. Time Warner Community Responsibility Report, 1998-2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jane; Stein, Carol

    This report highlights efforts by Time Warner personnel to strengthen community connections through various programs and services aimed at supporting: education, the arts, volunteerism, diversity, and business-community action. The report is divided into sections focusing on each of these areas. The first section, Education, describes programs…

  18. Travel Time to Hospital for Childbirth: Comparing Calculated Versus Reported Travel Times in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkington, Hugo; Prunet, Caroline; Blondel, Béatrice; Charreire, Hélène; Combier, Evelyne; Le Vaillant, Marc; Amat-Roze, Jeanne-Marie; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Timely access to health care is critical in obstetrics. Yet obtaining reliable estimates of travel times to hospital for childbirth poses methodological challenges. We compared two measures of travel time, self-reported and calculated, to assess concordance and to identify determinants of long travel time to hospital for childbirth. Methods Data came from the 2010 French National Perinatal Survey, a national representative sample of births (N = 14 681). We compared both travel time measures by maternal, maternity unit and geographic characteristics in rural, peri-urban and urban areas. Logistic regression models were used to study factors associated with reported and calculated times ≥30 min. Cohen's kappa coefficients were also calculated to estimate the agreement between reported and calculated times according to women's characteristics. Results In urban areas, the proportion of women with travel times ≥30 min was higher when reported rather than calculated times were used (11.0 vs. 3.6%). Longer reported times were associated with non-French nationality [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.3 (95% CI 1.0-1.7)] and inadequate prenatal care [aOR 1.5 (95% CI 1.2-2.0)], but not for calculated times. Concordance between the two measures was higher in peri-urban and rural areas (52.4 vs. 52.3% for rural areas). Delivery in a specialised level 2 or 3 maternity unit was a principal determinant of long reported and measured times in peri-urban and rural areas. Conclusions for Practice The level of agreement between reported and calculated times varies according to geographic context. Poor measurement of travel time in urban areas may mask problems in accessibility.

  19. Reporting time of ischemic stroke patients within the time window for thrombolysis in a tertiary care hospital at rawalpindi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tariq, M.; Ishtiaq, S.; Anwar, S.O.

    2014-01-01

    To determine the reporting time of ischemic stroke patients within the time window for thrombolysis at Military Hospital (MH) Rawalpindi. Design: A descriptive study. Place and duration of Study: Military Hospital Rawalpindi over a period of four months from Dec 2013 to Mar 2014. Patients and Methods: Patients admitted to MH Rawalpindi with symptoms suggestive of stroke and having objective focal neurologic deficits consistent with stroke were included in the study. A CT scan of brain was carried out immediately to rule out intracranial bleed. The CT scan of brain was either normal or revealed radiological findings suggestive of an infarct. Results: A total of 86 patients met the inclusion criteria of the study. Only 19 (22%) patients with ischemic stroke presented to the hospital within 4.5 hours after onset of their symptoms. Conclusion: Only a small number of ischemic stroke patients report to the hospital within the therapeutic window for thrombolytic therapy. (author)

  20. Combined risk assessment of nonstationary monthly water quality based on Markov chain and time-varying copula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wei; Xia, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Water quality risk management is a global hot research linkage with the sustainable water resource development. Ammonium nitrogen (NH 3 -N) and permanganate index (COD Mn ) as the focus indicators in Huai River Basin, are selected to reveal their joint transition laws based on Markov theory. The time-varying moments model with either time or land cover index as explanatory variables is applied to build the time-varying marginal distributions of water quality time series. Time-varying copula model, which takes the non-stationarity in the marginal distribution and/or the time variation in dependence structure between water quality series into consideration, is constructed to describe a bivariate frequency analysis for NH 3 -N and COD Mn series at the same monitoring gauge. The larger first-order Markov joint transition probability indicates water quality state Class V w , Class IV and Class III will occur easily in the water body of Bengbu Sluice. Both marginal distribution and copula models are nonstationary, and the explanatory variable time yields better performance than land cover index in describing the non-stationarities in the marginal distributions. In modelling the dependence structure changes, time-varying copula has a better fitting performance than the copula with the constant or the time-trend dependence parameter. The largest synchronous encounter risk probability of NH 3 -N and COD Mn simultaneously reaching Class V is 50.61%, while the asynchronous encounter risk probability is largest when NH 3 -N and COD Mn is inferior to class V and class IV water quality standards, respectively.

  1. Augmenting the impact of technology adoption with financial incentive to improve radiology report signature times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Katherine P; Prevedello, Luciano M; Dufault, Allen; Pezeshk, Parham; Bransfield, Robert; Hanson, Richard; Doubilet, Peter M; Seltzer, Steven E; Khorasani, Ramin

    2010-03-01

    Radiology report signature time (ST) can be a substantial component of total report turnaround time. Poor turnaround time resulting from lengthy ST can adversely affect patient care. The combination of technology adoption with financial incentive was evaluated to determine if ST improvement can be augmented and sustained. This prospective study was performed at a 751-bed, urban, tertiary care adult teaching hospital. Test-site imaging volume approximated 48,000 examinations per month. The radiology department has 100 trainees and 124 attending radiologists serving multiple institutions. Over a study period of 4 years and 4 months, three interventions focused on radiologist signature performance were implemented: 1) a notification paging application that alerted radiologists when reports were ready for signature, 2) a picture archiving and communications systems (PACS)-integrated speech recognition report generation system, and 3) a departmental financial incentive to reward radiologists semiannually for ST performance. Signature time was compared before and after the interventions. Wilcoxon and linear regression statistical analyses were used to assess the significance of trends. Technology adoption (paging plus speech recognition) reduced median ST from >5 to 24 to 15 to 18 hours (P financial incentive further improved 80th-percentile ST to 4 to 8 hours (P Technology interventions coupled with financial incentive can result in synergistic and sustainable improvement in radiologist report-signing behavior. The addition of a financial incentive leads to better performance than that achievable through technology alone.

  2. Intercomparison of PERSIANN-CDR and TRMM-3B42V7 precipitation estimates at monthly and daily time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katiraie-Boroujerdy, Pari-Sima; Akbari Asanjan, Ata; Hsu, Kuo-lin; Sorooshian, Soroosh

    2017-09-01

    In the first part of this paper, monthly precipitation data from Precipitation Estimation from Remotely Sensed Information using Artificial Neural Networks-Climate Data Record (PERSIANN-CDR) and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 algorithm Version 7 (TRMM-3B42V7) are evaluated over Iran using the Generalized Three-Cornered Hat (GTCH) method which is self-sufficient of reference data as input. Climate Data Unit (CRU) is added to the GTCH evaluations as an independent gauge-based dataset thus, the minimum requirement of three datasets for the model is satisfied. To ensure consistency of all datasets, the two satellite products were aggregated to 0.5° spatial resolution, which is the minimum resolution of CRU. The results show that the PERSIANN-CDR has higher Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) than TRMM-3B42V7 for the monthly rainfall estimation, especially in the northern half of the country. All datasets showed low SNR in the mountainous area of southwestern Iran, as well as the arid parts in the southeast region of the country. Additionally, in order to evaluate the efficacy of PERSIANN-CDR and TRMM-3B42V7 in capturing extreme daily-precipitation amounts, an in-situ rain-gauge dataset collected by the Islamic Republic of the Iran Meteorological Organization (IRIMO) was employed. Given the sparsity of the rain gauges, only 0.25° pixels containing three or more gauges were used for this evaluation. There were 228 such pixels where daily and extreme rainfall from PERSIANN-CDR and TRMM-3B42V7 could be compared. However, TRMM-3B42V7 overestimates most of the intensity indices (correlation coefficients; R between 0.7648-0.8311, Root Mean Square Error; RMSE between 3.29mm/day-21.2mm/5day); PERSIANN-CDR underestimates these extremes (R between 0.6349-0.7791 and RMSE between 3.59mm/day-30.56mm/5day). Both satellite products show higher correlation coefficients and lower RMSEs for the annual mean of consecutive dry spells than wet spells. The results show that TRMM-3B42V7

  3. A case-control study of the effectiveness of tissue plasminogen activator on 6 month patients--reported outcomes and health care utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Catherine E; Bland, Marghuretta D; Cheng, Nuo; Corbetta, Maurizio; Lee, Jin-Moo

    2014-01-01

    We examined the benefit of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), delivered as part of usual stroke management, on patient-reported outcomes and health care utilization. Using a case control design, patients who received tPA as part of usual stroke management were compared with patients who would have received tPA had they arrived to the hospital within the therapeutic time window. Data were collected from surveys 6 months after stroke using standardized patient-reported outcome measures and questions about health care utilization. Demographic and medical data were acquired from hospital records. Patients were matched on stroke severity, age, race, and gender. Matching was done with 1:2 ratio of tPA to controls. Results were compared between groups with 1-tailed tests because of a directionally specific hypothesis in favor of the tPA group. The tPA (n = 78) and control (n = 156) groups were matched across variables, except for stroke severity, which was better in the control group; subsequent analyses controlled for this mismatch. The tPA group reported better physical function, communication, cognitive ability, depressive symptomatology, and quality of life/participation compared with the control group. Fewer people in the tPA group reported skilled nursing facility stays, emergency department visits, and rehospitalizations after their stroke compared with controls. Reports of other postacute services were not different between groups. Although it is known that tPA reduces disability, this is the first study to demonstrate the effectiveness of tPA in improving meaningful, patient-reported outcomes. Thus, use of tPA provides a large benefit to the daily lives of people with ischemic stroke. Copyright © 2014 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Refractive lens exchange in younger and older presbyopes: comparison of complication rates, 3 months clinical and patient-reported outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schallhorn SC

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Steven C Schallhorn,1–3 Julie M Schallhorn,1 Martina Pelouskova,3 Jan A Venter,3 Keith A Hettinger,3 Stephen J Hannan,3 David Teenan3 1Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 2Roski Eye Institute, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3Optical Express, Glasgow UK Purpose: To compare refractive and visual outcomes, patient satisfaction, and complication rates among different age categories of patients who underwent refractive lens exchange (RLE. Methods: A stratified, simple random sample of patients matched on preoperative sphere and cylinder was selected for four age categories: 45–49 years (group A, 50–54 years (group B, 55–59 years (group C, and 60–65 years (group D. Each group contained 320 patients. All patients underwent RLE with a multifocal intraocular lens at least in one eye. Three months postoperative refractive/visual and patient-reported outcomes are presented. Results: The percentage of patients that achieved binocular uncorrected distance visual acuity 20/20 or better was 91.6% (group A, 93.8% (group B, 91.6% (group C, 88.8% (group D, P=0.16. Binocularly, 80.0% of patients in group A, 84.7% in group B, 78.9% in group C, and 77.8% in group D achieved 20/30 or better uncorrected near visual acuity (P=0.13. The proportion of eyes within 0.50 D of emmetropia was 84.4% in group A, 86.8% in group B, 85.7% in group C, and 85.8% in group D (P=0.67. There was no statistically significant difference in postoperative satisfaction, visual phenomena, dry eye symptoms, distance or near vision activities. Apart from higher rate of iritis in the age group 50–55 years, there was no statistically significant difference in postoperative complication rates. Conclusion: RLE can be safely performed in younger as well as older presbyopes. No significant difference was found in clinical or patient-reported outcomes. Keywords: refractive lens exchange, multifocal IOLs, younger

  5. ABCD3-I score and the risk of early or 3-month stroke recurrence in tissue- and time-based definitions of TIA and minor stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Lukas; Ferrari, Julia; Krebs, Stefan; Boehme, Christian; Toell, Thomas; Matosevic, Benjamin; Tinchon, Alexander; Brainin, Michael; Gattringer, Thomas; Sommer, Peter; Thun, Peter; Willeit, Johann; Lang, Wilfried; Kiechl, Stefan; Knoflach, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Changing definition of TIA from time to a tissue basis questions the validity of the well-established ABCD3-I risk score for recurrent ischemic cerebrovascular events. We analyzed patients with ischemic stroke with mild neurological symptoms arriving TIA or minor stroke, in the prospective multi-center Austrian Stroke Unit Registry. Patients were retrospectively categorized according to a time-based (symptom duration below/above 24 h) and tissue-based (without/with corresponding brain lesion on CT or MRI) definition of TIA or minor stroke. Outcome parameters were early stroke during stroke unit stay and 3-month ischemic stroke. Of the 5237 TIA and minor stroke patients with prospectively documented ABCD3-I score, 2755 (52.6%) had a TIA by the time-based and 2183 (41.7%) by the tissue-based definition. Of the 2457 (46.9%) patients with complete 3-month followup, corresponding numbers were 1195 (48.3%) for the time- and 971 (39.5%) for the tissue-based definition of TIA. Early and 3-month ischemic stroke occurred in 1.1 and 2.5% of time-based TIA, 3.8 and 5.9% of time-based minor stroke, 1.2 and 2.3% of tissue-based TIA as well as in 3.1 and 5.5% of tissue-based minor stroke patients. Irrespective of the definition of TIA and minor stroke, the risk of early and 3-month ischemic stroke steadily increased with increasing ABCD3-I score points. The ABCD3-I score performs equally in TIA patients in tissue- as well as time-based definition and the same is true for minor stroke patients.

  6. Electric power monthly, March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-20

    This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  7. A Randomized Trial Comparing Part-time Patching with Observation for Intermittent Exotropia in Children 12 to 35 Months of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohney, Brian G; Cotter, Susan A; Chandler, Danielle L; Holmes, Jonathan M; Chen, Angela M; Melia, Michele; Donahue, Sean P; Wallace, David K; Kraker, Raymond T; Christian, Melanie L; Suh, Donny W

    2015-08-01

    To determine the effectiveness of part-time patching for treating intermittent exotropia (IXT) in young children. Multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Two hundred one children 12 to 35 months of age with untreated IXT meeting the following criteria: (1) IXT at distance OR constant exotropia at distance and either IXT or exophoria at near, and (2) 15-prism diopter (Δ) or more exodeviation at distance or near by prism and alternate cover test (PACT) but at least 10 Δ exodeviation at distance by PACT. Participants were assigned randomly to either observation (no treatment for 6 months) or patching prescribed for 3 hours daily for 5 months, followed by 1 month of no patching. The primary outcome was deterioration, defined as constant exotropia measuring at least 10 Δ at distance and near or receipt of nonprotocol treatment for IXT. Of the 177 participants (88%) completing the 6-month primary outcome examination, deterioration occurred in 4.6% (4 of 87) of the participants in the observation group and in 2.2% (2 of 90) of the participants in the patching group (difference, 2.4%; P = 0.27; 95% confidence interval, -3.8% to +9.4%). Motor deterioration occurred in 2.3% (2 of 87) of the observation group and in 2.2% (2 of 90) of the patching group (difference, 0.08%; P = 0.55; 95% confidence interval, -5.8% to +6.1%). For the observation and patching groups, respectively, 6-month mean PACT measurements were 27.9 Δ versus 24.9 Δ at distance (P = 0.02) and 19.3 Δ versus 17.0 Δ at near (P = 0.10); 6-month mean exotropia control scores were 2.8 versus 2.3 points at distance (P = 0.02) and 1.4 versus 1.1 points at near (P = 0.26). Among children 12 to 35 months of age with previously untreated IXT, deterioration over 6 months was uncommon, with or without patching treatment. There was insufficient evidence to recommend part-time patching for the treatment of IXT in children in this age group. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier

  8. Preventing compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient care: Perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning after 12 months of preventive monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara eLay; Barbara eLay; Thekla eDrack; Marco eBleiker; Silke eLengler; Christina eBlank; Wulf eRössler; Wulf eRössler; Wulf eRössler

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of a preventive monitoring program targeted to reduce compulsory re-hospitalization and perceived coercion in patients with severe mental disorder. We analyze patient outcomes in terms of perceived coercion, empowerment and self-reported mental health functioning at 12 months. Methods: The program consists of individualized psycho-education, crisis cards and, after discharge from the psychiatric hospital, a 24-month preventive monitoring. In total, 238 psychiatr...

  9. Electric power monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  10. Electric power monthly, August 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  11. Electric power monthly, July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended.

  12. Electric power monthly, November 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended

  13. Evaluation of changes in periodontal bacteria in healthy dogs over 6 months using quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, N; Mori, A; Shono, S; Oda, H; Sako, T

    2018-03-01

    Porphyromonas gulae, Tannerella forsythia and Campylobacter rectus are considered dominant periodontal pathogens in dogs. Recently, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) methods have been used for absolute quantitative determination of oral bacterial counts. The purpose of the present study was to establish a standardized qRT-PCR procedure to quantify bacterial counts of the three target periodontal bacteria (P. gulae, T. forsythia and C. rectus). Copy numbers of the three target periodontal bacteria were evaluated in 26 healthy dogs. Then, changes in bacterial counts of the three target periodontal bacteria were evaluated for 24 weeks in 7 healthy dogs after periodontal scaling. Analytical evaluation of each self-designed primer indicated acceptable analytical imprecision. All 26 healthy dogs were found to be positive for P. gulae, T. forsythia and C. rectus. Median total bacterial counts (copies/ng) of each target genes were 385.612 for P. gulae, 25.109 for T. forsythia and 5.771 for C. rectus. Significant differences were observed between the copy numbers of the three target periodontal bacteria. Periodontal scaling reduced median copy numbers of the three target periodontal bacteria in 7 healthy dogs. However, after periodontal scaling, copy numbers of all three periodontal bacteria significantly increased over time (pperiodontal bacteria in dogs. Furthermore, the present study has revealed that qRT-PCR method can be considered as a new objective evaluation system for canine periodontal disease. Copyright© by the Polish Academy of Sciences.

  14. Making Preliminary GRBs Real-Time Astronomical Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Castillo-Carrión

    2010-01-01

    analysis and evaluation of GRBs. Recently, analysis and evaluation of GRBs were done without help of semiautomated tools or routines; so the time elapsed from the detection until getting all the information produced (DSS-2 data: Digitized Sky Surveys, elevation diagrams in each observatory, etc. could be 30 minutes. The software presented allows to reduce the time elapsed to 30 seconds, getting an email, web, and sms reports.

  15. Treatment of Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage and Self-Reported Neuropsychological Performance at 6 Months - Results of a Prospective Clinical Pilot Study on Good-Grade Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bründl, Elisabeth; Schödel, Petra; Bele, Sylvia; Proescholdt, Martin; Scheitzach, Judith; Zeman, Florian; Brawanski, Alexander; Schebesch, Karl-Michael

    2018-01-01

    Limited focus has been placed on neuropsychological patient profiles after spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (sSAH). We conducted a prospective controlled study in good-grade sSAH patients to evaluate the time course of treatment-specific differences in cognitive processing after sSAH. Twenty-six consecutive sSAH patients were enrolled (drop out n=5). Nine patients received endovascular aneurysm occlusion (EV), 6 patients were treated microsurgically (MS), and 6 patients with perimesencephalic SAH (pSAH) underwent standardized intensive medical care. No patient experienced serious vasospasm-related ischemic or hemorrhagic complications. All patients were subjected to neuropsychological self-report assessment (36-Item Short Form Health Survey and ICD-10-Symptom-Rating questionnaire) subacutely (day 11 - 35) after the onset of bleeding (t1) and at the 6-month follow-up (FU; t 2 ). From t1 to t 2 , MS and EV patients significantly improved in physical functioning (Pfi; p=.001 each) and the physical component summary (p=.010 vs. p=.015). Bodily pain (Pain; MS p=.034) and general health perceptions (EV p=.014) significantly improved, and nutrition disorder (EV p=.008) worsened. At FU, MS patients reported significantly better Pfi (vs. EV p=.046), less Pain (vs. EV p=.040), and more depression (vs. pSAH p=.035). Group-rate analyses of test differences showed a significant alleviation in nutrition disorder in MS (vs. EV p=.009). All sSAH groups reported a significant deterioration in health. Though both MS and EV patients, improved in several physical items over time, our data suggest a better short-term Pfi, less Pain and improved nutrition disorder in surgically treated patients. pSAH patients performed significantly better in various aspects of physical and psychological functioning than patients with aneurysmal SAH.

  16. Changes in Low Back Pain reporting over time in adult Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Per; Korsholm, Lars; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte

    was to describe changes in low back pain (LBP) reporting over an eight-year period in a cohort of adult Danes. Methods: A cohort of 625 men and women, aged 40, was randomly sampled to be representative of the general population. Questions about LBP were asked at the age of 41, 45, and 48. Two definitions of LBP...... were investigated: “Trivial LBP” (any reported LBP during the past month) and “Non-trivial LBP” (reporting more than 30 days with LBP during the past year with consequences: sick leave, healthcare contacts or limitations in participation). Prevalence rates at the three different times were reported...... and the course of LBP was visualized. Results: The response rate was 66%, 56%, and 47%, respectively. The prevalence rates of different types of LBP did not change significantly across this eight-year period (trivial: 42%, 48%, 40%; non-trivial: 18%, 20%, 20%). Around 50% of those with LBP reported the same type...

  17. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  18. Picture archiving and communication systems lead to sustained improvements in reporting times and productivity: results of a 5-year audit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackinnon, A.D.; Billington, R.A.; Adam, E.J.; Dundas, D.D. [Department of Radiology, St Georges Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Patel, U. [Department of Radiology, St Georges Hospital NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Uday.Patel@stgeorges.nhs.uk

    2008-07-15

    Aim: To evaluate the impact of picture archiving and communications systems (PACS) on reporting times and productivity in a large teaching hospital. Materials and methods: Reporting time, defined as the time taken from patient registration to report availability, and productivity, defined as the number of reports issued per whole time equivalent (WTE) radiologist per month, were studied for 2 years pre- and 3 years post-PACS installation. Mean reporting time was calculated for plain radiographs and specialist radiology techniques [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and nuclear medicine]. Productivity, total department workload, and unreported film rates were also assessed. Pre- and post-PACS findings were compared. Results: Between 2002-2006 the number of radiological patient episodes increased by 30% from 11,531/month to 15,057/month. This was accompanied by a smaller increase in WTE reporting radiologists, from 32 to 37 (15%). Mean reporting times have improved substantially post-PACS, plain radiograph reporting time decreased by 26% (from 6.8 to 5 days; p = 0.002) and specialty modalities by 24% (4.1 to 3.1 days; p < 0.001). Radiologist productivity has increased by 18% (337 films to 407 films/WTE radiologist/month). Unreported films have decreased from 5 to 4% for plain radiographs and are steady for specialty modalities (< 1%). In most areas improvements have been sustained over a 3-year period. Conclusion: Since the introduction of PACS, reporting times have decreased by 25% and the productivity improved by 18%. Sustained improvements are felt to reflect the efficiencies and cultural change that accompanied the introduction of PACS and digital dictation.

  19. Configuring calendar variation based on time series regression method for forecasting of monthly currency inflow and outflow in Central Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Suhartono, Ahmad, Imam Safawi; Rahmawati, Noorgam Ika

    2015-12-01

    Bank Indonesia (BI) as the central bank of Republic Indonesiahas a single overarching objective to establish and maintain rupiah stability. This objective could be achieved by monitoring traffic of inflow and outflow money currency. Inflow and outflow are related to stock and distribution of money currency around Indonesia territory. It will effect of economic activities. Economic activities of Indonesia,as one of Moslem country, absolutely related to Islamic Calendar (lunar calendar), that different with Gregorian calendar. This research aims to forecast the inflow and outflow money currency of Representative Office (RO) of BI Semarang Central Java region. The results of the analysis shows that the characteristics of inflow and outflow money currency influenced by the effects of the calendar variations, that is the day of Eid al-Fitr (moslem holyday) as well as seasonal patterns. In addition, the period of a certain week during Eid al-Fitr also affect the increase of inflow and outflow money currency. The best model based on the value of the smallestRoot Mean Square Error (RMSE) for inflow data is ARIMA model. While the best model for predicting the outflow data in RO of BI Semarang is ARIMAX model or Time Series Regression, because both of them have the same model. The results forecast in a period of 2015 shows an increase of inflow money currency happened in August, while the increase in outflow money currency happened in July.

  20. Creating a monthly time series of the potentiometric surface in the Upper Floridan aquifer, Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida, January 2000-December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terrie M.; Fouad, Geoffrey G.

    2014-01-01

    In Florida’s karst terrain, where groundwater and surface waters interact, a mapping time series of the potentiometric surface in the Upper Floridan aquifer offers a versatile metric for assessing the hydrologic condition of both the aquifer and overlying streams and wetlands. Long-term groundwater monitoring data were used to generate a monthly time series of potentiometric surfaces in the Upper Floridan aquifer over a 573-square-mile area of west-central Florida between January 2000 and December 2009. Recorded groundwater elevations were collated for 260 groundwater monitoring wells in the Northern Tampa Bay area, and a continuous time series of daily observations was created for 197 of the wells by estimating missing daily values through regression relations with other monitoring wells. Kriging was used to interpolate the monthly average potentiometric-surface elevation in the Upper Floridan aquifer over a decade. The mapping time series gives spatial and temporal coherence to groundwater monitoring data collected continuously over the decade by three different organizations, but at various frequencies. Further, the mapping time series describes the potentiometric surface beneath parts of six regionally important stream watersheds and 11 municipal well fields that collectively withdraw about 90 million gallons per day from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Monthly semivariogram models were developed using monthly average groundwater levels at wells. Kriging was used to interpolate the monthly average potentiometric-surface elevations and to quantify the uncertainty in the interpolated elevations. Drawdown of the potentiometric surface within well fields was likely the cause of a characteristic decrease and then increase in the observed semivariance with increasing lag distance. This characteristic made use of the hole effect model appropriate for describing the monthly semivariograms and the interpolated surfaces. Spatial variance reflected in the monthly

  1. Conditioned empirical orthogonal functions for interpolation of runoff time series along rivers: Application to reconstruction of missing monthly records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingqi; Gottschalk, Lars; Krasovskaia, Irina; Xiong, Lihua

    2018-01-01

    Reconstruction of missing runoff data is of important significance to solve contradictions between the common situation of gaps and the fundamental necessity of complete time series for reliable hydrological research. The conventional empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) approach has been documented to be useful for interpolating hydrological series based upon spatiotemporal decomposition of runoff variation patterns, without additional measurements (e.g., precipitation, land cover). This study develops a new EOF-based approach (abbreviated as CEOF) that conditions EOF expansion on the oscillations at outlet (or any other reference station) of a target basin and creates a set of residual series by removing the dependence on this reference series, in order to redefine the amplitude functions (components). This development allows a transparent hydrological interpretation of the dimensionless components and thereby strengthens their capacities to explain various runoff regimes in a basin. The two approaches are demonstrated on an application of discharge observations from the Ganjiang basin, China. Two alternatives for determining amplitude functions based on centred and standardised series, respectively, are tested. The convergence in the reconstruction of observations at different sites as a function of the number of components and its relation to the characteristics of the site are analysed. Results indicate that the CEOF approach offers an efficient way to restore runoff records with only one to four components; it shows more superiority in nested large basins than at headwater sites and often performs better than the EOF approach when using standardised series, especially in improving infilling accuracy for low flows. Comparisons against other interpolation methods (i.e., nearest neighbour, linear regression, inverse distance weighting) further confirm the advantage of the EOF-based approaches in avoiding spatial and temporal inconsistencies in estimated series.

  2. Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program. Monthly, quarterly and annual progress report, December 1978 and Calender Year 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    A new pilot plant program developed by DOE and the team members, was started on September 20, 1978. Pilot plant success was achieved in obtaining an ash balanced condition for several days with ash agglomeration with a pure coal feed. This was the objective of the first three months of the approved program.

  3. Immediate occlusal loading of Osseotite implants in mandibular edentulous patients: a prospective observational report with 18-month data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Carl J; Lazzara, Richard J

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of treatment consisting of placement and immediate occlusal loading of implants in 27 patients with edentulous mandibles. Twenty-seven patients were treated in two private practice settings. One hundred fifty-one implants were placed and immediately occlusally loaded with fixed implant prostheses (15 cement-retained, 12 screw-retained) on the day of implant placement. The implant-retained prostheses were inserted within 5 hours of implant placement. Patients were followed for at least 18 months. The required criteria for immediate occlusal loading was primary implant stability of at least 30 Ncm of insertion torque. The implant prostheses were removed at least 12 months post-placement and the implants were evaluated for primary clinical stability and radiographic bone apposition to implants. At the 12-month follow-up appointments, cumulative survival rates of 98.0% and 100% were recorded for implants and prostheses, respectively. Three implants failed within 3 months. All other implants were clinically successful. Immediate occlusal loading of multiple, splinted mandibular implants is an effective treatment when implants are stable at insertion and are rigidly splinted with implant-retained prostheses.

  4. Changes in self-reported and parent-reported health-related quality of life in overweight children and adolescents participating in an outpatient training: findings from a 12-month follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finne Emily

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQoL was found to improve in participants of weight management interventions. However, information on moderately overweight youth as well as on maintaining HRQoL improvements following treatment is sparse. We studied the HRQoL of 74 overweight, but not obese participants (32.4% male, mean age = 11.61 ± 1.70 SD of a comprehensive and effective six-month outpatient training at four time-points up to 12 months after end of treatment. Methods HRQoL was measured by self-report and proxy-report versions of the generic German KINDL-R, including six sub domains, and an obesity-specific additional module. Changes in original and z-standardized scores were analyzed by (2×4 doubly multivariate analysis of variance. This was done separately for self- and proxy-reported HRQoL, taking into account further socio-demographic background variables and social desirability. Additionally, correlations between changes in HRQoL scores and changes in zBMI were examined. Results There were significant multivariate time effects for self-reported and proxy-reported HRQoL and a significant time-gender interaction in self-reports revealed (p 2 = 0.14-0.19. Generic HRQoL further increased after end of treatment. The largest effects were found on the dimension self-esteem (partial η2 = 0.08-0.09 for proxy- and self-reported z-scores, respectively. Correlations with changes in weight were gender-specific, and weight reduction was only associated with HRQoL improvements in girls. Conclusions Positive effects of outpatient training on generic and weight-specific HRQoL of moderately overweight (not obese children and adolescents could be demonstrated. Improvements in HRQoL were not consistently bound to weight reduction. While changes in weight-specific HRQoL were more immediate, generic HRQoL further increased after treatment ended. An extended follow-up may therefore be needed to scrutinize HRQo

  5. Reporting Iraqi civilian fatalities in a time of war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olander William E

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In February, 2007, the Associated Press (AP conducted a poll of 1,002 adults in the United States about their attitudes towards the war in Iraq. Respondents were remarkably accurate estimating the current death toll of US soldiers, yet were grossly inaccurate in estimating the current death toll of Iraqi civilians. We conducted a search of newspapers reports to determine the extent of the discrepancy between reporting Coalition and Iraqi civilian deaths, hypothesizing that there would be an over-representation of Coalition deaths compared to Iraqi civilian deaths. Methods We examined 11 U.S. newspapers and 5 non-U.S. newspapers using electronic databases or newspaper web-archives, to record any reports between March 2003 and March 2008 of Coalition and Iraqi deaths that included a numeric indicator. Reports were described as "events" where they described a specific occurrence involving fatalities and "tallies" when they mentioned the number of deaths over a period of time. We recorded the number of events and tallies related to Coalition deaths, Iraqi civilian deaths, and Iraqi combatant deaths Results U.S. newspapers report more events and tallies related to Coalition deaths than Iraqi civilian deaths, although there are substantially different proportions amongst the different U.S. newspapers. In four of the five non-US newspapers, the pattern was reversed. Conclusion This difference in reporting trends may partly explain the discrepancy in how well people are informed about U.S. and Iraqi civilian fatalities in Iraq. Furthermore, this calls into question the role of the media in reporting and sustaining armed conflict, and the extent to which newspaper and other media reports can be used as data to assess fatalities or trends in the time of war.

  6. Effectiveness of employer financial incentives in reducing time to report worker injury: an interrupted time series study of two Australian workers' compensation jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Tyler J; Gray, Shannon; Hassani-Mahmooei, Behrooz; Collie, Alex

    2018-01-05

    Early intervention following occupational injury can improve health outcomes and reduce the duration and cost of workers' compensation claims. Financial early reporting incentives (ERIs) for employers may shorten the time between injury and access to compensation benefits and services. We examined ERI effect on time spent in the claim lodgement process in two Australian states: South Australia (SA), which introduced them in January 2009, and Tasmania (TAS), which introduced them in July 2010. Using administrative records of 1.47 million claims lodged between July 2006 and June 2012, we conducted an interrupted time series study of ERI impact on monthly median days in the claim lodgement process. Time periods included claim reporting, insurer decision, and total time. The 18-month gap in implementation between the states allowed for a multiple baseline design. In SA, we analysed periods within claim reporting: worker and employer reporting times (similar data were not available in TAS). To account for external threats to validity, we examined impact in reference to a comparator of other Australian workers' compensation jurisdictions. Total time in the process did not immediately change, though trend significantly decreased in both jurisdictions (SA: -0.36 days per month, 95% CI -0.63 to -0.09; TAS: 0.35, -0.50 to -0.20). Claim reporting time also decreased in both (SA: -1.6 days, -2.4 to -0.8; TAS: -5.4, -7.4 to -3.3). In TAS, there was a significant increase in insurer decision time (4.6, 3.9 to 5.4) and a similar but non-significant pattern in SA. In SA, worker reporting time significantly decreased (-4.7, -5.8 to -3.5), but employer reporting time did not (-0.3, -0.8 to 0.2). The results suggest that ERIs reduced claim lodgement time and, in the long-term, reduced total time in the claim lodgement process. However, only worker reporting time significantly decreased in SA, indicating that ERIs may not have shortened the process through the intended target of

  7. Restenosis in coronary bare metal stents. Importance of time to follow-up: a comparison of coronary angiograms 6 months and 4 years after implantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Erik; Helqvist, Steffen; Kløvgaard, Lene

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. Angiographic late lumen loss measured 6 to 9 month after bare metal stent implantation in the coronary arteries is a validated restenosis parameter. Design. We performed a second angiographic follow-up after 4 years in event free survivors from the DANSTENT trial cohort. Results......-sectional vessel area and a 39% reduction of the binary restenosis rate over time. Conclusions. Instent late lumen loss in bare metal stents decreases spontaneously over time. Maturation of early hyperplastic tissue reaction after stent implantation with subsequent thinning of fibrotic tissue might explain...

  8. Management of 1½ month old neglected talus neck fracture: A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh R Kale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Undisplaced talus neck fractures are uncommon and difficult to diagnose. We present a case of an 18-year-old female came with the complaints of pain and swelling in the foot following a fall from a bicycle 1½ months back. For the above complaints, she had consulted local doctors who had done X-rays of the foot and no diagnosis was made. She was treated conservatively with medications and compression bandage for swelling and the patient was allowed to walk. On presenting to us, X-ray of the foot was done and minimally displaced talus neck fracture was suspected. Magnetic resonance imaging of the foot was done and the diagnosis was confirmed. Patient was operated with percutaneous screw fixation following which below knee cast was given for 6 weeks followed by partial weight bearing. Patient returned to complete weight bearing and previous activity level without pain at the end of 3 months.

  9. Twelve months of active musical training in 8- to 10-year-old children enhances the preattentive processing of syllabic duration and voice onset time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chobert, Julie; François, Clément; Velay, Jean-Luc; Besson, Mireille

    2014-04-01

    Musical training has been shown to positively influence linguistic abilities. To follow the developmental dynamics of this transfer effect at the preattentive level, we conducted a longitudinal study over 2 school years with nonmusician children randomly assigned to music or to painting training. We recorded the mismatch negativity (MMN), a cortical correlate of preattentive mismatch detection, to syllables that differed in vowel frequency, vowel duration, and voice onset time (VOT), using a test-training-retest procedure and 3 times of testing: before training, after 6 months and after 12 months of training. While no between-group differences were found before training, enhanced preattentive processing of syllabic duration and VOT, as reflected by greater MMN amplitude, but not of frequency, was found after 12 months of training in the music group only. These results demonstrate neuroplasticity in the child brain and suggest that active musical training rather than innate predispositions for music yielded the improvements in musically trained children. These results also highlight the influence of musical training for duration perception in speech and for the development of phonological representations in normally developing children. They support the importance of music-based training programs for children's education and open new remediation strategies for children with language-based learning impairments.

  10. Type II A2 duplication of urethra in an 8-month-old male child: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hanifi Okur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urethral duplication is a rare congenital anomaly, usually found with multiple anatomical variants. In this article was presented a case of urethral duplication in an 8-month-old male child. The malformation was characterized by the presence of continent hypospadic and normal apical urethra. Retrograde urethrogram through both urethral tracts simultaneously revealed the malformation as Effmann Type II A-2. The accessory ventral urethra was excised without complication.

  11. Ectopic pregnancy after two times tubal ligation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Keypour

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tubal sterilization is the permanent and effective contraception method. This can be performed at any time, but at least half are performed in conjunction with cesarean or vaginal delivery and are termed puerperal. The most complication after tubal ligation is ectopic pregnancy. Ectopic pregnancy is the leading cause of maternal death in first trimester.Case presentation: We present a 33 years old woman gravida5, para4, all normal vaginal delivery, presented with complaints of delayed menstrual period, pelvic pain and spotting. She underwent tubal ligation for two times. For the first time she had puerperal Pomeroy tubal sterilization after third child delivery. Intra uterine pregnancy occurred three years later. One day after vaginal delivery of fourth child, she underwent post partum tubal ligation with the Parkland method. Tubal pregnancy occurred nine months later. Physical examination identified acute abdomen. Pelvic ultrasound showed no gestational sac in uterine cavity. The sac with fetal pole was in right adnexa. Beta-HCG was 2840mIU/ml. She underwent laparotomy. Surgical management included salpingectomy with cornual resection in both sides. The surgery identified Ectopic pregnancy.Conclusion: Any symptoms of pregnancy in a woman after tubal ligation must be investigated; an ectopic pregnancy should be excluded. Ectopic pregnancy must be considered, in any woman with lower abdominal pain, missed period and vaginal bleed-ing. Conception after tubal sterilization can be explained by fistula formation and re-canalization of fallopian tube.

  12. Rigid Occipitocervical Instrumented Fusion for Atlantoaxial Instability in an 18-Month-Old Toddler With Brachytelephalangic Chondrodysplasia Punctata: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Hiroki; Takahashi, Jun; Takano, Kyoko; Inaba, Yuji; Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Nishimura, Gen; Kuraishi, Shugo; Shimizu, Masayuki; Ikegami, Shota; Futatsugi, Toshimasa; Uehara, Masashi; Kosho, Tomoki; Kato, Hiroyuki; Uno, Koki

    2017-12-01

    Case report. We report here on an 18-month-old boy with brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata (BCDP), whose atlantoaxial instability was successfully managed with occipitocervical instrumented fusion (OCF) using screw and rod instrumentations. Recently, there have been a number of reports on BCDP with early onset of cervical myelopathy. Surgical OCF is a vital intervention to salvage affected individuals from the life-threatening morbidity. Despite recent advancement of instrumentation techniques, however, rigid OCF is technically demanding in very young children with small and fragile osseous elements. To our best knowledge, this is the first report on application of the instrumentation technique to a toddler patient with BCDP. A 16-month-old boy with BCDP presented with tetraplegia and swallow obstacle. Hypoplasia of the odontoid process and atlantoaxial instability were present in lateral radiographs. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images revealed a high signal region in the spinal cord at the C1-2 and C7-T1 levels. Cervical computed tomography (CT) showed that the pedicles and lateral masses in the cervical spine were small and immature, but the laminae were comparatively thick. One week before surgery, the patient was fitted with a Halo-body jacket. We performed plate-rod placement with occipital cortical screws and C2/C3 interlaminar screws, and added an autogenous bone graft using the right 8 and 9 ribs. Rigid fixation of the occipito-cervical spine was completed successfully without major complications. Postoperative halo-body jacket immobilization was continued for 3 months, after which Aspen collar was fitted. CT confirmed occipitocervical bone fusion at 6 months after surgery. Mild clinical improvements in motor power of the affected muscles and swallowing were witnessed at 1 year postoperatively. Rigid fixation using screw, rod, and occipital plate instrumentation was successful in an 18-month-old toddler with BCDP and atlantoaxial

  13. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY POINT OF USE REVERSE OSMOSIS. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SUNSET RANCH DEVELOPMENT IN HOMEDALE, ID. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the point of use arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Sunset Ranch Development in Homedale, ID. The objectives of the project are to evaluate t...

  14. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT VILLAGE ON THE PONDS IN DELAVAN, WI. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Vintage on the Ponds at Delavan, WI. The objectives of the project are to evaluate: (1) the effectiveness of Kine...

  15. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Iron Removal. U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sabin, MN. Six-Month Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Sabin, MN. The main objective of the project is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Kinetico FM-248-AS ars...

  16. Brief Report: Trends in U.S. National Autism Awareness from 2004 to 2014: The Impact of National Autism Awareness Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVilbiss, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    We sought to evaluate the potential for using historical web search data on autism spectrum disorders (ASD)-related topics as an indicator of ASD awareness. Analysis of Google Trend data suggested that National Autism Awareness Month and televised reports concerning autism are an effective method of promoting online search interest in autism.

  17. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BRUNI, TX, SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) site at Bruni, TX. The main objective of the projec...

  18. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT DUMMERSTON, VT SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months (from June 22, 2005 through December 22, 2005) of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at Charette Mobile Home Park (CMHP) in Dummerston, Vermont. T...

  19. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT SPRING BROOK MOBILE HOME PARK IN WALES, ME SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Spring Brook Mobile Home Park in Wales, ME. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the effectiv...

  20. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BOW, NH , SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the White Rock Water Company (WRWC) public water system, a small residential drinking water facility in Bo...

  1. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Coagulation/Filtration U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Sandusky, MI. Six-Month Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the City of Sandusky, MI facility. The objectives of the project are to evaluate 1) the effectiveness of Siemen...

  2. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT CHATEAU ESTATES MOBILE HOME PARK IN SPRINGFIELD, OH. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed for and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Chateau Estates Mobile Home Park at Springfield, OH. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the ef...

  3. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL AND ADSORPTIVE MEDIA USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT STEWART, MN. SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the EPA arsenic removal technology demonstration project at the Stewart, MN facility. The main objective of the project is to evaluate the effectiveness of Siemens¿ Type II AERALA...

  4. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ION EXCHANGE. U.S. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT FRUITLAND, ID SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed during and the results obtained from the first six months of the performance evaluation of a Kinetico ion exchange (IX) system to remove arsenic (As) and nitrate from source water at the City of Fruitland in Idaho. The 250-gal/min (g...

  5. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY IRON REMOVAL USEPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT BIG SAUK LAKE MOBILE HOME PARK IN SAUK CENTRE, MN. SIX MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Big Sauk Lake Mobile Home Park (BSLMHP) in Sauk Centre, MN. The objectives of the project are to evaluate the...

  6. ARSENIC REMOVAL FROM DRINKING WATER BY ADSORPTIVE MEDIA. EPA DEMONSTRATION PROJECT AT QUEEN ANNES COUNTY, MARYLAND SIX-MONTH EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the first six months of the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the community of Prospect Bay at Grasonville in Queen Anne’s County, MD. The objectives of the project were to ev...

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Monthly Activities Report for August 1966 AEC Division of Reactor Development and Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SL Fawcett

    1966-08-01

    This report has the following sections: Summary; Civilian Power Reactors; Applied and Reactor Physics; Reactor Fuels and Materials; Engineering Development; Plutonium Recycle Program; and Nuclear Safety.

  8. Time on androgen deprivation therapy and adaptations to exercise: secondary analysis from a 12-month randomized controlled trial in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taaffe, Dennis R; Buffart, Laurien M; Newton, Robert U; Spry, Nigel; Denham, James; Joseph, David; Lamb, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2018-02-01

    To explore if duration of previous exposure to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undertaking a year-long exercise programme moderates the exercise response with regard to body composition and muscle performance, and also to explore the moderator effects of baseline testosterone, time since ADT, and baseline value of the outcome. In a multicentre randomized controlled trial, 100 men who had previously undergone either 6 months (short-term) or 18 months (long-term) of ADT in combination with radiotherapy, as part of the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial, were randomized to 6 months supervised exercise, followed by a 6-month home-based maintenance programme, or to printed physical activity educational material for 12 months across 13 university-affiliated exercise clinics in Australia and New Zealand. The participants were long-term survivors of PCa with a mean age of 71.7 ± 6.4 years, and were assessed for lower extremity performance (repeated chair rise), with a subset of men (n = 57) undergoing additional measures for upper and lower body muscle strength and body composition (lean mass, fat mass, appendicular skeletal muscle [ASM]) by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Data were analysed using generalized estimating equations. Time on ADT significantly moderated the exercise effects on chair rise (β interaction = -1.3 s, 95% confidence interval [CI] -2.6 to 0.0), whole-body lean mass (β interaction = 1194 g, 95% CI 234 to 2153) and ASM mass (β interaction = 562 g, 95% CI 49 to 1075), and approached significance for fat mass (β interaction = -1107 g, 95% CI -2346 to 132), with greater benefits for men previously on long-term ADT. At 6 months, the intervention effects on chair rise time -1.5 s (95% CI -2.5 to -0.5), whole-body lean mass 824 g (95% CI 8 to 1640), ASM mass 709 g (95% CI 260 to 1158), and fat mass -1377 g (95% CI -2156 to -598) were significant for men previously on long-term ADT, but not for men on short-term ADT. At 12 months, the

  9. Viability of permanent PMMA spacer with combined free fasciocutaneous tissue transfer for failed charcot reconstruction: A 38 month prospective case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammer Elmarsafi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Charcot Neuroarthropathy is a complex lower extremity pathology which predisposes the afflicted limb to ulcerations, osteomyelitis, and risk of major amputation. Charcot Neuroarthropathy often requires osseous reconstruction, which can be complicated with osteomyelitis and hardware infection. When soft tissue and osseous deficits must be concomitantly addressed, the use of PMMA spacers can be combined with free tissue transfers. Presentation of case: 71 year old Caucasian male with Diabetic Charcot Neuroarthopathy underwent osseous reconstruction with internal hardware. The surgical site was complicated by acute infection, osteomyelitis, exposed hardware requiring removal, and multiple surgical débridement. The degree of soft tissue and osseous deficit post-débridement required complex reconstruction. Discussion: The osseous deficit was addressed with the use of a permanent PMMA cement spacer. The soft tissue deficit was reconstructed with a free tissue transfer. This case report demonstrates the long term viability and utility of the use of permanent cement spacers when combined with free tissue transfer for closure of complex diabetic foot wounds. This case is an example of a multidisciplinary team approach to limb salvage with successful long term outcome; a plantigrade stable functional foot in an ambulatory highly active patient. Follow up time since initial intervention was 38 months. Conclusion: The use of a permanent PMMA cement spacer does not preclude free tissue transfer in complex host lower extremity reconstruction. A multidisciplinary team approach is a vital component to successful salvage outcomes. Keywords: Diabetes, Charcot neuroarthropathy, Ulcer, Cement spacer, Free tissue transfer, Osteomyelitis

  10. A 12-month follow-up of an influenza vaccination campaign based on voluntary adherence: report on upper-respiratory symptoms among volunteers and non-volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Páris Ali Ramadan

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Routine immunization of groups at high risk for influenza has been progressively implemented as a matter of Brazilian public health policy. Although the benefits of the vaccination for healthy young adults are still controversial, it has been offered yearly to hundreds of thousands of Brazilian workers, generally as part of wellness initiatives in the workplace. OBJECTIVE: To study the characteristics of subjects that accepted or refused to be vaccinated against influenza and to report on respiratory symptoms in both groups, one year after the campaign date. DESIGN: A prospective observational study. SETTING: Workers at a subsidiary of an international bank in São Paulo, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 124 persons that did not accept and 145 that voluntarily accepted the vaccine completed 12 months of follow-up. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Data concerning gender, age, tobacco use, and any history of chronic respiratory illness such as asthma, bronchitis, rhinitis, and repetitive upper-respiratory infections, were recorded at the time of vaccination. After that, workers were asked monthly by questionnaire or telephone about respiratory symptoms, days of work lost and medical consultations. RESULTS: The results showed statistically significant differences regarding age (P = 0.004 with the vaccinated group (V being younger than the non-vaccinated (NV one, and with reference to previous repetitive upper-respiratory infections being higher among the V group (P < 0.0001. During the follow-up, the V group reported more occurrences of upper respiratory symptoms (P < 0.0001, due to both non-influenza (P < 0.0001 and influenza-like illness (P = 0.045. Differences were also found between V and NV groups concerning days off work and number of medical consultations due to upper-respiratory symptoms and non-influenza illness. Gender and history of repetitive upper-respiratory infections were the best predictors of influenza-like illness-related events. CONCLUSIONS

  11. Wills plasma physics department thirty second 6-monthly progress report 1st July-31st December 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following topics: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, rotating plasmas, magnetohydrodynamics, laser diagnostics and far infrared interferometry. (J.R.)

  12. Wills Plasma Physics department thirty first 6-monthly progress report 1st January-30th June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported on research programs which are proceeding in the following topics: plasma sources, hydromagnetic shock waves, rotating plasmas, magnetohydrodynamics, laser diagnostics and far infrared interferometry. (R.L.)

  13. Dental Implant Placement with Simultaneous Anterior Maxillary Reconstruction with Block and Particulate Fresh Frozen Allograft Bone: A Case Report with 24-Month Follow-Up Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Vieira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresh frozen allograft bone is routinely used in orthopedic surgery for the reconstruction of large bone defects, and its use in oral and maxillofacial surgery is increasing. The purpose of this case was to demonstrate the installation of dental implants and the use of fresh frozen bone for reconstruction of anterior maxilla in the same surgery. This case report presents the insertion of dental implants followed immediately by a placement of fresh frozen allograft in block and particle for a reconstruction of atrophic anterior maxillary in the same surgery. Ten months subsequent to this procedure, provisional fixed prosthesis was installed on the implants. Four months later (postoperative month 14, the final fixed prosthesis was installed and the clinical success was observed. The insertion of dental implants followed immediately by a placement of fresh frozen allograft is a safe and efficient process that results in the successful return of dental function and aesthetic rehabilitation for the patient.

  14. Scoping reviews: time for clarity in definition, methods, and reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Heather L; Levac, Danielle; O'Brien, Kelly K; Straus, Sharon; Tricco, Andrea C; Perrier, Laure; Kastner, Monika; Moher, David

    2014-12-01

    The scoping review has become increasingly popular as a form of knowledge synthesis. However, a lack of consensus on scoping review terminology, definition, methodology, and reporting limits the potential of this form of synthesis. In this article, we propose recommendations to further advance the field of scoping review methodology. We summarize current understanding of scoping review publication rates, terms, definitions, and methods. We propose three recommendations for clarity in term, definition and methodology. We recommend adopting the terms "scoping review" or "scoping study" and the use of a proposed definition. Until such time as further guidance is developed, we recommend the use of the methodological steps outlined in the Arksey and O'Malley framework and further enhanced by Levac et al. The development of reporting guidance for the conduct and reporting of scoping reviews is underway. Consistency in the proposed domains and methodologies of scoping reviews, along with the development of reporting guidance, will facilitate methodological advancement, reduce confusion, facilitate collaboration and improve knowledge translation of scoping review findings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reports of relationship timing: Missing data and couple agreement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Reimondos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In studying changes in family formation over time, social researchers and demographers have primarily relied on retrospective and prospective marital and cohabitation histories collected from surveys. With the increasing use of these types of retrospective questions in surveys, social researchers have now begun to pay more attention to the quality of the data and the degree of accuracy with which respondents are able to remember past events. The purpose of this paper is to explore the incidence and demographic and socio-economic correlates of recall error and inaccuracy of reporting of marriage and cohabitation dates. In the first part we investigate the degree of precision with which dates are remembered using both descriptive and multivariate analysis. We then compare married and cohabiting partner's reports about when their relationship started in order to check the consistency of with which both partners date the same event.

  16. [Treatment of temporo-mandibular joint closed-lock using intra-articular injection of mepivacaine with immediate resolution durable in time (six months follow-up)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarda Nardini, L; Tito, R; Beltrame, A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of intra-articular fluid injection under pressure, as a technique suggested for temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) closed-lock treatment, and to determine if there is a persisting lock resolution in time. Twelve patients were studied at our centre, with a diagnosis of TMJ closed-lock, not amenable with conventional therapies. All patients underwent a MRI scan, confirming the presence of anteriorly displaced disk. This technique is based on intra-articular injection of anaesthetic (mepivacaine cloridrate) under pressure, using the so called pumping technique, that allows an inferior distraction of the condyle. The study has a six months follow-up. After closed-lock resolution all patients underwent physiotherapy with guided mouth opening, for one month. Mandibular function (maximal mouth opening) increased on average of 20.2 mm after treatment, and of 21.1 mm six months later (p=0.00000; with p<0.005). Pain decreased on average from VAS=6.75 to VAS=0.3 (p=0.00001; with p<0.005). The masticatory efficiency improved from VAS=5.25 to VAS=8.75 (p=0.002; p<0.005). Functional TMJ limitation level is significantly increased (p=0.002; p<0.005). Also, patient's efficacy judgement (mean value 3.58= good) and tolerability judgement (mean value 2.92=good) indicate that this therapy is well accepted. This technique is easy to perform, well tolerated and does not need specific instruments: it permits the resolution of TMJ closed-lock, decreases the pain and improves masticatory efficiency. All these effects persist in time. Subjects with recent closed-lock have an immediate and complete functional recovery while patients with chronic closed-lock do not.

  17. Discriminator/time interval meter system evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Condreva, K.J.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the evaluation of a modular prototype Discriminator/Time Interval Meter data acquisition unit as a useful tool in a digital diagnostics system. The characteristics, operation and calibration of each of the hardware components are discussed in some detail. A discussion of the system calibration, operation, and data ingestion and reduction is also given. System test results to date are given and discussed. Finally, recommendations and conclusions concerning the capabilities of the Discriminator/T.I.M. system based on test and calibration results to date are given

  18. Discriminator/time interval meter system evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condreva, K. J.

    1976-04-12

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the evaluation of a modular prototype Discriminator/Time Interval Meter data acquisition unit as a useful tool in a digital diagnostics system. The characteristics, operation and calibration of each of the hardware components are discussed in some detail. A discussion of the system calibration, operation, and data ingestion and reduction is also given. System test results to date are given and discussed. Finally, recommendations and conclusions concerning the capabilities of the Discriminator/T.I.M. system based on test and calibration results to date are given.

  19. Model to Estimate Monthly Time Horizons for Application of DEA in Selection of Stock Portfolio and for Maintenance of the Selected Portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Claudio Isaias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the selecting of stock portfolios, one type of analysis that has shown good results is Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA. It, however, has been shown to have gaps regarding its estimates of monthly time horizons of data collection for the selection of stock portfolios and of monthly time horizons for the maintenance of a selected portfolio. To better estimate these horizons, this study proposes a model of mathematical programming binary of minimization of square errors. This model is the paper’s main contribution. The model’s results are validated by simulating the estimated annual return indexes of a portfolio that uses both horizons estimated and of other portfolios that do not use these horizons. The simulation shows that portfolios with both horizons estimated have higher indexes, on average 6.99% per year. The hypothesis tests confirm the statistically significant superiority of the results of the proposed mathematical model’s indexes. The model’s indexes are also compared with portfolios that use just one of the horizons estimated; here the indexes of the dual-horizon portfolios outperform the single-horizon portfolios, though with a decrease in percentage of statistically significant superiority.

  20. Progress Report on Alloy 617 Time Dependent Allowables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Julie Knibloe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Time dependent allowable stresses are required in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for design of components in the temperature range where time dependent deformation (i.e., creep) is expected to become significant. There are time dependent allowable stresses in Section IID of the Code for use in the non-nuclear construction codes, however, there are additional criteria that must be considered in developing time dependent allowables for nuclear components. These criteria are specified in Section III NH. St is defined as the lesser of three quantities: 100% of the average stress required to obtain a total (elastic, plastic, primary and secondary creep) strain of 1%; 67% of the minimum stress to cause rupture; and 80% of the minimum stress to cause the initiation of tertiary creep. The values are reported for a range of temperatures and for time increments up to 100,000 hours. These values are determined from uniaxial creep tests, which involve the elevated temperature application of a constant load which is relatively small, resulting in deformation over a long time period prior to rupture. The stress which is the minimum resulting from these criteria is the time dependent allowable stress St. In this report data from a large number of creep and creep-rupture tests on Alloy 617 are analyzed using the ASME Section III NH criteria. Data which are used in the analysis are from the ongoing DOE sponsored high temperature materials program, form Korea Atomic Energy Institute through the Generation IV VHTR Materials Program and historical data from previous HTR research and vendor data generated in developing the alloy. It is found that the tertiary creep criterion determines St at highest temperatures, while the stress to cause 1% total strain controls at low temperatures. The ASME Section III Working Group on Allowable Stress Criteria has recommended that the uncertainties associated with determining the onset of tertiary creep and the lack of significant