WorldWideScience

Sample records for monthly sea surface

  1. 2002 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  2. 2003 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  3. 1996 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  4. 2000 Average Monthly Sea Surface Temperature for California

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA/ NASA AVHRR Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature data are derived from the 5-channel Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) on board the...

  5. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) Monthly Analysis, Version 3b

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Version 3b (v3b) of the Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a monthly SST analysis on a 2-degree global grid based on the International...

  6. Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature state-space components

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — State-Space Decomposition of Monthly version of HadISST sea surface temperature component (1-degree). See Rayner, N. A., Parker, D. E., Horton, E. B., Folland, C....

  7. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Monthly, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has monthly Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  8. A global database of sea surface dimethylsulfide (DMS) measurements and a procedure to predict sea surface DMS as a function of latitude, longitude, and month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, A. J.; Andreae, M. O.; Amouroux, D.; Andreae, T. W.; Bates, T. S.; Berresheim, H.; Bingemer, H.; Boniforti, R.; Curran, M. A. J.; Ditullio, G. R.; Helas, G.; Jones, G. B.; Keller, M. D.; Kiene, R. P.; Leck, C.; Levasseur, M.; Malin, G.; Maspero, M.; Matrai, P.; McTaggart, A. R.; Mihalopoulos, N.; Nguyen, B. C.; Novo, A.; Putaud, J. P.; Rapsomanikis, S.; Roberts, G.; Schebeske, G.; Sharma, S.; Simó, R.; Staubes, R.; Turner, S.; Uher, G.

    1999-06-01

    A database of 15,617 point measurements of dimethylsulfide (DMS) in surface waters along with lesser amounts of data for aqueous and particulate dimethylsulfoniopropionate concentration, chlorophyll concentration, sea surface salinity and temperature, and wind speed has been assembled. The database was processed to create a series of climatological annual and monthly 1°×1° latitude-longitude squares of data. The results were compared to published fields of geophysical and biological parameters. No significant correlation was found between DMS and these parameters, and no simple algorithm could be found to create monthly fields of sea surface DMS concentration based on these parameters. Instead, an annual map of sea surface DMS was produced using an algorithm similar to that employed by Conkright et al. [1994]. In this approach, a first-guess field of DMS sea surface concentration measurements is created and then a correction to this field is generated based on actual measurements. Monthly sea surface grids of DMS were obtained using a similar scheme, but the sparsity of DMS measurements made the method difficult to implement. A scheme was used which projected actual data into months of the year where no data were otherwise present.

  9. Monthly Composite Raster Images for Sea Surface Temperature in the Gulf of Maine for Stellwagen Bank NMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This personal geodatabase contains raster images of sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Maine. These raster images are monthly composites, and were...

  10. 4 km AVHRR Pathfinder v5.0 Global Day-Night Sea Surface Temperature Monthly and Yearly Averages, 1985-2009 (NODC Accession 0077816)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains a set of monthly and yearly global day-night sea surface temperature averages, derived from the AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5 sea surface...

  11. Monthly sea surface temperature records reconstructed by δ18O of reef-building coral in the east of Hainan Island,South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE; Xuexian(何学贤); LIU; Dunyi(刘敦一); PENG; Zicheng(彭子成); LIU; Weiguo(刘卫国)

    2002-01-01

    Stable oxygen isotopic compositions of a coral colony of Porites lutea obtained on a core allowed the reconstruction of a 56-a (1943-1998) proxy record of the sea surface temperatures. This coral δ18O data are from the east of Hainan Island water (22°20′N, 110°39′E), South China Sea. The relationship between δ18O in the skeletal aragonite carbonate and the sea surface temperature (SST) is SST = -5.36 δ18OPDB-3.51 (r = 0.73, n = 470), dδ18O/d(SST) = -0.187‰/ ℃; and the thermometer was set at monthly resolution. The 56-a (1943-1998) proxy record of the sea surface temperatures reflected the same change trend in the northern part of South China Sea as the air temperature change trend in China.

  12. Monthly Maps of Sea Surface Height in the North Atlantic and Zonal Indices for the Gulf Stream Using TOPEX/Poseidon Altimeter Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandipa; Kelly, Kathryn A.

    1997-01-01

    Monthly Maps of sea surface height are constructed for the North Atlantic Ocean using TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data. Mean sea surface height is reconstructed using a weighted combination of historical, hydrographic data and a synthetic mean obtained by fitting a Gaussian model of the Gulf Stream jet to altimeter data. The resultant mean shows increased resolution over the hydrographic mean, and incorporates recirculation information that is absent in the synthetic mean. Monthly maps, obtained by adding the mean field to altimeter sea surface height residuals, are used to derive a set of zonal indices that describe the annual cycle of meandering as well as position and strength of the Gulf Stream.

  13. Role of sea surface temperature anomalies in the tropical Indo-Pacific region in the northeast Asia severe drought in summer 2014: month-to-month perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiqing; Fan, Ke; Wang, HuiJun

    2017-09-01

    The severe drought over northeast Asia in summer 2014 and the contribution to it by sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies in the tropical Indo-Pacific region were investigated from the month-to-month perspective. The severe drought was accompanied by weak lower-level summer monsoon flow and featured an obvious northward movement during summer. The mid-latitude Asian summer (MAS) pattern and East Asia/Pacific teleconnection (EAP) pattern, induced by the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) and western North Pacific summer monsoon (WNPSM) rainfall anomalies respectively, were two main bridges between the SST anomalies in the tropical Indo-Pacific region and the severe drought. Warming in the Arabian Sea induced reduced rainfall over northeast India and then triggered a negative MAS pattern favoring the severe drought in June 2014. In July 2014, warming in the tropical western North Pacific led to a strong WNPSM and increased rainfall over the Philippine Sea, triggering a positive EAP pattern. The equatorial eastern Pacific and local warming resulted in increased rainfall over the off-equatorial western Pacific and triggered an EAP-like pattern. The EAP pattern and EAP-like pattern contributed to the severe drought in July 2014. A negative Indian Ocean dipole induced an anomalous meridional circulation, and warming in the equatorial eastern Pacific induced an anomalous zonal circulation, in August 2014. The two anomalous cells led to a weak ISM and WNPSM, triggering the negative MAS and EAP patterns responsible for the severe drought. Two possible reasons for the northward movement of the drought were also proposed.

  14. Forecasting monthly precipitation in Central Chile: a self-organizing map approach using filtered sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Diego; Lillo, Mario; Uvo, Cintia B.; Billib, Max; Arumí, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Western South America is subject to considerable inter-annual variability due to El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) so forecasting inter-annual variations associated with ENSO would provide an opportunity to tailor management decisions more appropriately to the season. On one hand, the self-organizing maps (SOM) method is a suitable technique to explore the association between sea surface temperature and precipitation fields. On the other hand, Wavelet transform is a filtering technique, which allows the identification of relevant frequencies in signals, and also allows localization on time. Taking advantage of both methods, we present a method to forecast monthly precipitation using the SOM trained with filtered SST anomalies. The use of the SOM to forecast precipitation for Chillan showed good agreement between forecasted and measured values, with correlation coefficients ( r 2) ranging from 0.72 to 0.91, making the combined use filtered SST fields and SOM a suitable tool to assist water management, for example in agricultural water management. The method can be easily tailored to be applied in other stations or to other variables.

  15. Diagnostic model of 3-D circulation in the Arabian Sea and western equatorial Indian Ocean: Results of monthly mean sea surface topography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Shaji, C.

    -frog numerical scheme, the sea surface topography equation is solved by successive over-relaxation technique. Model has 18 levels in the vertical with a maximum depth of 900 meters, a resolution of 1 degrees in the latitute and longitude directions and is forced...

  16. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a global monthly sea surface temperature analysis derived from the International Comprehensive...

  17. Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST), Version 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Extended Reconstructed Sea Surface Temperature (ERSST) dataset is a global monthly sea surface temperature analysis on a 2x2 degree grid derived from the...

  18. Inter-annual variability of sea surface temperature, wind speed and sea surface height anomaly over the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.; Pankajakshan, T.; Sathe, P.V.

    have made an attempt to study the annual and inter-annual variability of certain prominent processes occurring over the tropical Indian Ocean. The monthly mean values of Wind Speed (FSU), Sea Surface Temperature (REYNOLDS) and Sea Surface Height Anomaly...

  19. On the spectra and coherence of some surface meteorological parameters in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Fernandes, A.A.

    Spectra and cross-spectra of monthly time series of the surface meteorological parameters, sea surface temperature, air temperature, cloudiness, wind speed and sea level pressure were computed for the period 1948-1972 over the Arabian Sea...

  20. Monthly morphometric data on captive loggerhead sea turtles 1995-present

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database contains monthly measurements taken on captive reared sea turtles. Measurements include: straight carapace length nuchal notch to carapace tip, straight...

  1. Sea Surface Temperature Climate Data Record for the North Sea and Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Jacob L.; Karagali, Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    A 30-yr climate data record (CDR) of sea surface temperature (SST) has been produced with daily gap-free analysis fields for the North Sea and the Baltic Sea region from 1982 to 2012 by combining the Pathfinder AVHRR satellite data record with the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) Reprocessing...... observations on average. Validation against independent in situ observations shows a very stable performance of the data record, with a mean difference of -0.06 °C compared to moored buoys and a 0.46 °C standard deviation of the differences. The mean annual biases of the SST CDR are small for all years......, with a negligible temporal trend when compared against drifting and moored buoys. Analysis of the SST CDR reveals that the monthly anomalies for the North Sea, the Danish straits, and the central Baltic Sea regions show a high degree of correlation for interannual and decadal time scales, whereas the monthly...

  2. COBE-SST2 Sea Surface Temperature and Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A new sea surface temperature (SST) analysis on a centennial time scale is presented. The dataset starts in 1850 with monthly 1x1 means and is periodically updated....

  3. Sea-surface salinity: the missing measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Erich F.; Koblinsky, Chester

    2003-04-01

    Even the youngest child knows that the sea is salty. Yet, routine, global information about the degree of saltiness and the distribution of the salinity is not available. Indeed, the sea surface salinity measurement is a key missing measurement in global change research. Salinity influences circulation and links the ocean to global change and the water-cycle. Space-based remote sensing of important global change ocean parameters such as sea-surface temperature and water-cycle parameters such as precipitation have been available to the research community but a space-based global sensing of salinity has been missing. In July 2002, the National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) announced that the Aquarius mission, focused on the global measurement of sea surface salinity, is one of the missions approved under its ESSP-3 program. Aquarius will begin a risk-reduction phase during 2003. Aquarius will carry a multi-beam 1.4 GHz (L-band) radiometer used for retrieving salinity. It also will carry a 1.2 GHz (L-band) scatterometer used for measuring surface roughness. Aquarius is tentatively scheduled for a 2006 launch into an 8-day Sun-synchronous orbit. Aquarius key science data product will be a monthly, global surface salinity map at 100 km resolution with an accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units. Aquarius will have a 3 year operational period. Among other things, global salinity data will permit estimates of sea surface density, or buoyancy, that drives the ocean's three-dimensional circulation.

  4. Physicochemical Studies of the Sea Surface Microlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhengbin; Liansheng; Zhijian; Jun; Haibing

    1998-08-15

    The sea surface microlayer and its thickness are theoretically analyzed. A multiple-layer model of the sea surface microlayer is proposed. Through in situ and laboratory imitation experiments using glass plate, rotating drum, screen, and funnel samplers, the relationships between pH, surface tension, the concentrations of dissolved trace metals Cu and Pb, phosphate, and particulate and sampling thicknesses are carefully investigated. The apparent sampling thickness of the sea surface microlayer is determined to be 50 +/- 10 µm, which is basically consistent with the mean thickness of the liquid boundary film in the models of gas exchange across the sea surface. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  5. NOAA NDBC SOS - sea_floor_depth_below_sea_surface

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA NDBC SOS server is part of the IOOS DIF SOS Project. The stations in this dataset have sea_floor_depth_below_sea_surface data. Because of the nature of SOS...

  6. Monthly Ensembles in Algal Bloom Predictions on the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, Petra; Westerlund, Antti; Stipa, Tapani

    2010-05-01

    In this work we explore the statistical features of monthly ensembles and their capability to predict biogeochemical conditions in the Baltic Sea. Operational marine environmental modelling has been considered hard, and consequently there are very few operational ecological models. Operational modelling of harmful algal blooms is harder still, since it is difficult to separate the algal species in models, and in general, very little is known of HAB properties. We present results of an ensemble approach to HAB forecasting in the Baltic, and discuss the applicability of the forecasting method to biochemical modelling. It turns out that HABs are indeed possible to forecast with useful accuracy. For modelling the algal blooms in Baltic Sea we used FMI operational 3-dimensional biogeochemical model to produce seasonal ensemble forecasts for different physical, chemical and biological variables. The modelled variables were temperature, salinity, velocity, silicate, phosphate, nitrate, diatoms, flagellates and two species of potentially toxic filamentous cyanobacteria nodularia spumigena and aphanizomenon flos-aquae. In this work we concentrate to the latter two. Ensembles were produced by running the biogeochemical model several times and forcing it on every run with different set of seasonal weather parameters from ECMWF's mathematically perturbed ensemble prediction forecasts. The ensembles were then analysed by statistical methods and the median, quartiles, minimum and maximum values were calculated for estimating the probable amounts of algae. Validation for the forecast method was made by comparing the final results against available and valid in-situ HAB data.

  7. Sea Surface Salinity : Research Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, David; Lagerloef, Gary; Font, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) can be important in regulating sea surface temperature (SST). Two technological breakthrough satellite SSS missions, Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS), are currently producing high-quality SSS data. This paper provides an overview of the importance of SSS for weather and climate applications and describes the Aquarius and SMOS missions. The newness of adequately sampled SSS data prompted a first-time at-sea field campaign devoted to improved understanding of SSS variations.

  8. Sea surface temperature anomalies in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.

    . Further analysis has shown that the sea surface anomalies are well correlated to the anomalies of air temperature and latent heat flux values; whereas they are least correlated to the anomalies of wind stress and net radiation values, except over...

  9. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; De Schepper, Stijn; McClymont, Erin L.

    2017-09-01

    The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial-interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST) and ice-rafted debris (IRD) in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  10. The Pacific sea surface temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglass, David H., E-mail: douglass@pas.rochester.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States)

    2011-12-05

    The Pacific sea surface temperature data contains two components: N{sub L}, a signal that exhibits the familiar El Niño/La Niña phenomenon and N{sub H}, a signal of one-year period. Analysis reveals: (1) The existence of an annual solar forcing F{sub S}; (2) N{sub H} is phase locked directly to F{sub S} while N{sub L} is frequently phase locked to the 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of F{sub S}. At least ten distinct subharmonic time segments of N{sub L} since 1870 are found. The beginning or end dates of these segments have a near one-to-one correspondence with the abrupt climate changes previously reported. Limited predictability is possible. -- Highlights: ► El Niño/La Niña consists of 2 components phase-locked to annual solar cycle. ► The first component N{sub L} is the familiar El Niño/La Niña effect. ► The second N{sub H} component has a period of 1 cycle/year. ► N{sub L} can be phase-locked to 2nd or 3rd subharmonic of annual cycle. ► Ends of phase-locked segments correspond to abrupt previously reported climate changes.

  11. Monthly Near-Surface Air Temperature Averages

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global surface temperatures in 2010 tied 2005 as the warmest on record. The International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) was established in 1982 as part...

  12. Sea surface temperature development of the Baltic Sea in the period 1990-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Siegel

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea Surface Temperature (SST maps derived from NOAA weathersatellites for the period 1990-2004 were used to investigateseasonal and inter-annual variations in the Baltic Sea. A comparison between monthly mean SST and in situ measurements at the MARNET station "Arkona Sea" showed goodagreement with differences in July and August. Monthly means reflect strong seasonal and inter-annualvariations. The yearly means show a slight positive trend withan increase of 0.8 K in 15 years. In particular, summer and autumnmonths contribute to this positive trend, with stronger trendsin the northern than in the southern Baltic. The winters arecharacterised by a slightly negative trend. The winter minimumSST in the Arkona Sea correlates best with the WIBIX climateindex derived for the Baltic region.

  13. Sea surface temperature and Ekman transport in the Persian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available   The wind drift motion of the water which is produced by the stress of the wind exerted upon the surface of the ocean is described by Ekmans theory (1905. Using the mean monthly values for the wind stress and SST, seasonal Ekman transport for the Persian Gulf was computed and contoured. The geostrophic winds have combined with the SST to estimate the effect of cooling due to Ekman transport of colder northern waters and inflow from the Oman Sea. The monthly SST mainly obtained from the 10 10 grided data of Levitus atlas and Hormuz Cruis Experiment for 1997.   Analyses show a NW to SE Ekman transport due to wind stress and significant interannual variability of SST on sea surface in the Persian Gulf. The seasonal variation of SST shows a continental pattern due to severe interaction between the land and sea. But these variations somehow moderates because of Ekman transport in Persian Gulf.

  14. Highly variable Pliocene sea surface conditions in the Norwegian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Bachem

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pliocene was a time of global warmth with small sporadic glaciations, which transitioned towards the larger-scale Pleistocene glacial–interglacial variability. Here, we present high-resolution records of sea surface temperature (SST and ice-rafted debris (IRD in the Norwegian Sea from 5.32 to 3.14 Ma, providing evidence that the Pliocene surface conditions of the Norwegian Sea underwent a series of transitions in response to orbital forcing and gateway changes. Average SSTs are 2 °C above the regional Holocene mean, with notable variability on millennial to orbital timescales. Both gradual changes and threshold effects are proposed for the progression of regional climate towards the Late Pliocene intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. Cooling from 4.5 to 4.3 Ma may be linked to the onset of poleward flow through the Bering Strait. This cooling was further intensified by a period of cool summers due to weak obliquity forcing. A 7 °C warming of the Norwegian Sea at 4.0 Ma suggests a major increase in northward heat transport from the North Atlantic, leading to an enhanced zonal SST gradient in the Nordic Seas, which may be linked to the expansion of sea ice in the Arctic and Nordic Seas. A warm Norwegian Sea and enhanced zonal temperature gradient between 4.0 and 3.6 Ma may have been a priming factor for increased glaciation around the Nordic Seas due to enhanced evaporation and precipitation at high northern latitudes.

  15. Sea Surface Temperature Average_SST_Master

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea surface temperature collected via satellite imagery from http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/data/gridded/data.noaa.ersst.html and averaged for each region using ArcGIS...

  16. OW NOAA GOES Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite. The data is...

  17. Sea Surface Temperature (14 KM North America)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Product shows local sea surface temperatures (degrees C). It is a composite gridded-image derived from 8-km resolution SST Observations. It is generated every 48...

  18. Analysed foundation sea surface temperature, global

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The through-cloud capabilities of microwave radiometers provide a valuable picture of global sea surface temperature (SST). To utilize this, scientists at Remote...

  19. SMOS Sea Surface Salinity Validation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Li, Xiaoming; Dong, Qing

    2013-01-01

    In November 2009, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched the first soil moisture and ocean salinity (SMOS) satellite, which represented the first use of spaceborne remote sensing tools to probe global sea surface salinity (SSS). The SMOS satellite carries a microwave imaging radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) for detection in the microwave L-band as the only payload. The MIRAS instrument is expected to provide a global SSS distribution with a spatial resolution of approximately 100 km and an accuracy of 0.1-0.2 practical salinity units (psu). The South China Sea is semi-enclosed, and the sea conditions are relatively complex. The suitability of ESA SMOS salinity products for the South China Sea has not been validated. Therefore, using SSS data measured during an expedition in the South China Sea, which was sponsored by China Natural Science Foundation and conducted in the fall of 2011, this paper validated the SSS products released by ESA, which were retrieved using three sea surface roughness models. To analyze the effect of the spatial resolution on the weekly average SMOS SSS distribution, the weekly average salinity data were averaged to reduce the spatial resolution to 0.25 ° x 0.25°. These average data were then compared to the measured data, followed by an analysis of the error variation. In addition, the effects of the orbital track (ascending or descending) on the SSS retrieval were analyzed.

  20. Meteorological fields variability over the Indian seas in pre and summer monsoon months during extreme monsoon seasons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    U C Mohanty; R Bhatla; P V S Raju; O P Madan; A Sarkar

    2002-09-01

    In this study, the possible linkage between summer monsoon rainfall over India and surface meteorological fields (basic fields and heat budget components) over monsoon region (30° E-120°E, 30°S-30°N) during the pre-monsoon month of May and summer monsoon season (June to September) are examined. For this purpose, monthly surface meteorological fields anomaly are analyzed for 42 years (1958-1999) using reanalysis data of NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research). The statistical significance of the anomaly (difference) between the surplus and deficient monsoon years in the surface meteorological fields are also examined by Student's t-test at 95% confidence level. Significant negative anomalies of mean sea level pressure are observed over India, Arabian Sea and Arabian Peninsular in the pre-monsoon month of May and monsoon season. Significant positive anomalies in the zonal and meridional wind (at 2m) in the month of May are observed in the west Arabian Sea off Somali coast and for monsoon season it is in the central Arabian Sea that extends up to Somalia. Significant positive anomalies of the surface temperature and air temperature (at 2m) in the month of May are observed over north India and adjoining Pakistan and Afghanistan region. During monsoon season this region is replaced by significant negative anomalies. In the month of May, significant positive anomalies of cloud amount are observed over Somali coast, north Bay of Bengal and adjoining West Bengal and Bangladesh. During monsoon season, cloud amount shows positive anomalies over NW India and north Arabian Sea. There is overall reduction in the incoming shortwave radiation flux during surplus monsoon years. A higher magnitude of latent heat flux is also found in surplus monsoon years for the month of May as well as the monsoon season. The significant positive anomaly of latent heat flux in May, observed over southwest Arabian Sea, may be considered

  1. Variability of surface meteorological parameters over the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Fernandes, A.A.

    The trends and periodicities of surface meteorological parameters (sea surface temperature, air temperature, cloudiness, wind speed and sea level pressure) over the western, central, eastern and southern Arabian Sea regions are studied...

  2. Microwave Radiometric Measurement of Sea Surface Salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-04-01

    potential problems of polution and urban water sup- plies. Although salinity can be measured from a surface vessel, economic consider- ations advocate...Washington, DC 20350 Commander Naval Sea System Commandaa ComAinder ATTN: Mr. C. Smith, NAVSEA 63R* Nval Air Development Center "’-’. "Washington, DC...20362 ATTN: Mr. R. Bollard, Code 2062% .’* Warminster, PA 18974 • .’.Commander CNaval Sea System CommandCoimCander Headquarters Naval Air Systems

  3. Sea surface temperatures and salinities from platforms in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and the South China Sea (Nan Hai) from 1896-1950 (NODC Accession 0000506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface temperatures and salinities were collected in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and South China Sea (Nan Hai)...

  4. Sea surface microplastics in Slovenian part of the Northern Adriatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajšt, Tamara; Bizjak, Tine; Palatinus, Andreja; Liubartseva, Svitlana; Kržan, Andrej

    2016-12-15

    Plastics are the most common material of marine litter and have become a global pollution concern. They are persistent in the environment where they gradually degrade into increasingly smaller particles-microplastics (MP). Our study presents results of sea-surface monitoring for MP in the Slovenian part of the Trieste Bay in the Northern Adriatic Sea. In 17 trawls conducted over a 20-month period we found a high average concentration of 406×10(3)MPparticles/km(2). Over 80% of the particles were identified as polyethylene. The significant variability of MP concentrations obtained on different sampling dates is explained by use of surface current maps and a recently developed Markov chain marine litter distribution model for the Adriatic Sea.

  5. Barents Sea heat – transport, storage and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ø. Skagseth

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of the Barents Sea to variation in ocean heat transport and surface fluxes is explored using a 1-D column model. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force model results that reproduce the observed winter convection and surface warming and freshening well. Model results are compared to existing estimates of the ocean to air heat fluxes and horizontally averaged profiles for the southern and northern Barents Sea. Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production. The northern Barents Sea, the major part of the area, receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss in the north, the balance is achieved by long wave loss removing most of the solar heating, and the model also suggests a positive sensible heat gain. During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. Despite large changes the Barents Sea heat loss remains robust, the temperature adjusts, and the yearly cycle remains. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport probably leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  6. Mean Sea Surface (mss) Model Determination for Malaysian Seas Using Multi-Mission Satellite Altimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Musa, T. A.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Omar, A. H.; Tugi, A.; Yazid, N. M.; Abdullah, N. M.; Wahab, M. I. A.

    2016-09-01

    The advancement of satellite altimeter technology has generated many evolutions to oceanographic and geophysical studies. A multi-mission satellite altimeter consists with TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2, ERS-2, Envisat-1, CryoSat-2 and Saral are extracted in this study and has been processed using Radar Altimeter Database System (RADS) for the period of January 2005 to December 2015 to produce the sea surface height (hereinafter referred to SSH). The monthly climatology data from SSH is generated and averaged to understand the variation of SSH during monsoon season. Then, SSH data are required to determine the localised and new mean sea surface (MSS). The differences between Localised MSS and DTU13 MSS Global Model is plotted with root mean square error value is 2.217 metres. The localised MSS is important towards several applications for instance, as a reference for sea level variation, bathymetry prediction and derivation of mean dynamic topography.

  7. MEAN SEA SURFACE (MSS MODEL DETERMINATION FOR MALAYSIAN SEAS USING MULTI-MISSION SATELLITE ALTIMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Z. Yahaya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of satellite altimeter technology has generated many evolutions to oceanographic and geophysical studies. A multi-mission satellite altimeter consists with TOPEX, Jason-1 and Jason-2, ERS-2, Envisat-1, CryoSat-2 and Saral are extracted in this study and has been processed using Radar Altimeter Database System (RADS for the period of January 2005 to December 2015 to produce the sea surface height (hereinafter referred to SSH. The monthly climatology data from SSH is generated and averaged to understand the variation of SSH during monsoon season. Then, SSH data are required to determine the localised and new mean sea surface (MSS. The differences between Localised MSS and DTU13 MSS Global Model is plotted with root mean square error value is 2.217 metres. The localised MSS is important towards several applications for instance, as a reference for sea level variation, bathymetry prediction and derivation of mean dynamic topography.

  8. SEASONAL REVERSE OF SEA SURFACE SLOPE IN THE NORTHERN YELLOW SEA AND ITS DYNAMIC RELATION WITH MONSOON EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PU Shu-zhen; CHENG Jun; ZHANG Yi-jun; SHI Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Based on the monthly average sea level data from the tide gauge measurement(1999-2001),the seasonal variability of the sea level in the Northern and Middle Yellow Sea is studied to reveal that the sea surface height at all the tide gauges becomes higher in summer than that in winter.In addition,the sea surface height of the Northern Yellow Sea is higher than the one of the Middle Yellow Sea with a slope downward from the north to the south in summer,while it is lower with a reversed slope in winter.The seasonal reverse of the sea surface slope can be attributed to the monsoon effects i.e.the annual reverse of the monsoon direction and the annual variation of the monsoon rainfall.A set of equations are established in light of the dynamic principles to expound how the monsoon forcing and the sea surface slope generate a summer outflow and a winter inflow in the Yellow Sea.

  9. Trend patterns in global sea surface temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, S.M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2009-01-01

    Isolating long-term trend in sea surface temperature (SST) from El Nino southern oscillation (ENSO) variability is fundamental for climate studies. In the present study, trend-empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis, a robust space-time method for extracting trend patterns, is applied...

  10. Monthly morphometric data on captive Kemps ridley sea turtles 1995-2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The database contains monthly measurements taken on captive reared sea turtles. Measurements include: straight carapace length nuchal notch to carapace tip, straight...

  11. Satellite monitoring of sea surface pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, G.; Telfer, D. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Image processing techniques developed are well adapted to the exploration and isolation of local areas which exhibit small temperature differences between themselves and their surroundings. In the worst case of imagery of small areal extent of sea surface having no coastal boundary in the area, there is yet no method of distinguishing unambiguously an oil spill from fog, cloud, the effect produced by shallow sediments, or the effects of naturally occuring thermal fronts. In the case of uniform slicks of liquid North Sea oil in still air, laboratory simulation experiments show that, for oil thicknesses in excess of 1 or 2 mm, there is, under equilibrium conditions, little dependence of oil surface temperature on the thickness of the oil layer. The surface temperature of oil is consistently higher than that of water, the difference being about 1 K at low values of relative humidity, but tending to increase as the relative humidity increases.

  12. Heat in the Barents Sea: transport, storage, and surface fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. H. Smedsrud

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A column model is set up for the Barents Sea to explore sensitivity of surface fluxes and heat storage from varying ocean heat transport. Mean monthly ocean transport and atmospheric forcing are synthesised and force the simulations. Results show that by using updated ocean transports of heat and freshwater the vertical mean hydrographic seasonal cycle can be reproduced fairly well.

    Our results indicate that the ~70 TW of heat transported to the Barents Sea by ocean currents is lost in the southern Barents Sea as latent, sensible, and long wave radiation, each contributing 23–39 TW to the total heat loss. Solar radiation adds 26 TW in the south, as there is no significant ice production.

    The northern Barents Sea receives little ocean heat transport. This leads to a mixed layer at the freezing point during winter and significant ice production. There is little net surface heat loss annually in the north. The balance is achieved by a heat loss through long wave radiation all year, removing most of the summer solar heating.

    During the last decade the Barents Sea has experienced an atmospheric warming and an increased ocean heat transport. The Barents Sea responds to such large changes by adjusting temperature and heat loss. Decreasing the ocean heat transport below 50 TW starts a transition towards Arctic conditions. The heat loss in the Barents Sea depend on the effective area for cooling, and an increased heat transport leads to a spreading of warm water further north.

  13. GHRSST Level 4 DMI_OI North Sea and Baltic Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the Danish...

  14. Biogeochemical patchiness at the sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, A.; Campbell, J. W.

    2002-10-01

    The surface distributions of many tracers in the ocean are highly correlated in time and space on meso (~100 km) and smaller scales (refid="fig01" type="media">Figure 1). However, their characteristic scales of variability differ. Some variables like sea surface chlorophyll (Chl) are very fine-scaled or patchy, while others like sea surface temperature (SST) are not. We characterize the patchiness of a distribution quantitatively by the dependence of the variance V on the length scale L as V ~ Lp; smaller p corresponds to greater patchiness. Using scaling and a numerical model we show that patchiness, p, varies with the characteristic response time τ of the tracer to processes that alter its concentration in the upper ocean as p ~ log τ. This suggests that sea surface Chl is more patchy (has smaller p) than SST at mesoscales because the characteristic time scale of phytoplankton growth in response to the availability of nutrients is less than that for the equilibration of temperature in response to heat fluxes. Similarly, sea surface dissolved oxygen (O2) exhibits more fine-scaled variability than total dissolved inorganic carbon (TCO2) because O2 equilibrates with the atmosphere much more rapidly than TCO2. Tracers that are more patchy require higher resolution to model and sample; the sampling or model grid spacing required scales as exp(-1/log τ). The quantitative relationship between p and τ can be used to relate various biogeochemical distributions, particularly to those that are remotely sensed, and to deduce biogeochemical response times of various tracers or plankton species from the characteristics of their distributions in space or time.

  15. Temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furevik, Tore; Bentsen, Mats; Drange, Helge; Johannessen, Johnny A.; Korablev, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    In this paper, the temporal and spatial variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Nordic Seas is investigated. The data include a Russian hydrographical database for the Nordic Seas and daily to weekly observations of salinity at Ocean Weather Station Mike (OWSM) (located at 66°N, 2°E in the Norwegian Sea). In addition, output from a medium-resolution version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM), forced with daily National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis data, is used to complement the analysis of the temporal and spatial fields constructed from the observational data sets. The Nordic Seas show a strong seasonal variability in the vertical density stratification and the mixed layer (ML) depth, with a weak stratification and a several hundred meters deep ML during winter and a well-defined shallow ML confined to the upper few tens of meters during summer. The seasonal variability strongly influences the strength of the high-frequency variability and to what extent subsurface anomalies are isolated from the surface. High-frequency variability has been investigated in terms of standard deviation of daily SSS, calculated for the different months of the year. From observations at OWSM, typical winter values range from 0.03 to 0.04 psu and summer values range from 0.06 to 0.07 psu. Results from the model simulation show that highest variability is found in frontal areas and in areas with strong stratification and lowest variability in the less stratified areas in the central Norwegian Sea and south of Iceland. Investigation of the interannual variability over the last 50 years shows a marked freshening of the Atlantic Water in the Norwegian and Greenland Seas. Moreover, the strength of the southern sector of the Polar front, as defined by the 34.8-35.0 psu isohalines along the western boundary of the inflowing Atlantic Water, undergoes significant interannual variability

  16. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Mediterranean Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  17. GHRSST Level 4 EUR Mediterranean Sea Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily by Ifremer/CERSAT (France) using optimal...

  18. [Multiple scattering of visible and infrared light by sea fog over wind driving rough sea surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xian-Ming; Wang, Hai-Hua; Lei, Cheng-Xin; Shen, Jin

    2013-08-01

    The present paper is concerned with computing the multiple scattering characteristics of a sea fog-sea surface couple system within this context. The single scattering characteristics of sea fog were studied by Mie theory, and the multiple scattering of sunlight by single sea fog layer was studied by radiative transfer theory. The reflection function of a statistically rough ocean surface was obtained using the standard Kirchhoff formulation, with shadowing effects taken into account. The reflection properties of the combined sea fog and ocean surface were obtained employing the adding method, and the results indicated that the reflected light intensity of sea fog increased with the sea background.

  19. Summer Monsoon and Annual Variability of Sea Surface Slope and Their Effects on Alongshore Current near Qingdao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲书箴; 程军; 张义钧; 石强; 骆敬新; 范文静

    2004-01-01

    Based on the monthly mean sea level data obtained from 3 years′ (1999-2001) tide-gauge measurements, the annual variability of the sea level near Qingdao and Jiaozhou Bay is studied and discussed in this paper. Results show that the sea surface height at all the tide gauges becomes higher in summer than that in winter,with an obvious seasonal variability.Furthermore the sea surface height measured at a short distance outside the bay is lower than that in thebay, showing a sea surface slope downward from north to south. The reasons for the formation of the slope are explained as well, The dynamic action ofthe summer monsoon and the sea surface slope, and their effects on the monthly mean current are studied by means of dynamics principles. The importance of the summer monsoon and the pressure gradient generated by the sea surface slope, with their effects on the alongshore current, is pointed out and emphasized in this paper.

  20. Seasonal Variability of the Yellow Sea/East China Sea Surface Fluxes and Thermohaline Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter CHU; CHEN Yuchun; Akira KUNINAKA

    2005-01-01

    We use the U.S. Navy's Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) for the Yellow Sea/East China Sea (YES) to investigate the climatological water mass features and the seasonal and non-seasonal variabilities of the thermohaline structure, and use the Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (COADS) from 1945 to 1989 to investigate the linkage between the fluxes (momentum, heat, and moisture) across the air-ocean interface and the formation of the water mass features. After examining the major current systems and considering the local bathymetry and water mass properties, we divide YES into five regions: East China Sea (ECS) shelf, Yellow Sea (YS) Basin, Cheju bifurcation (CB) zone, Taiwan Warm Current (TWC) region, Kuroshio Current (KG) region. The long term mean surface heat balance corresponds to a heat loss of 30 W m-2 in the ESC and CB regions, a heat loss of 65 W m-2 in the KG and TWC regions, and a heat gain of 15 W m-2 in the YS region. The surface freshwater balance is defined by precipitation minus evaporation. The annual water loss from the surface for the five subareas ranges from 1.8 to 4 cm month-1. The fresh water loss from the surface should be compensated for from the river run-off. The entire water column of the shelf region (ECS, YS, and CB) undergoes an evident seasonal thermal cycle with maximum values of temperature during summer and maximum mixed layer depths during winter. However, only the surface waters of the TWC and KG regions exhibit a seasonal thermal cycle.We also found two different relations between surface salinity and the Yangtze River run-off, namely, out-of-phase in the East China Sea shelf and in-phase in the Yellow Sea. This may confirm an earlier study that the summer fresh water discharge from the Yangtze River forms a relatively shallow, low salinity plume-like structure extending offshore on average towards the northeast.

  1. Space-based observation of chlorophyll, sea surface temperature, nitrate, and sea surface height anomaly over the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, R. K.; Devi, K. Nanthini

    2017-01-01

    Monthly chlorophyll and sea surface temperature (SST) images were generated using MODIS-Aqua data sets during 2014 and 2015 in the Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea. The in situ data-based nitrate algorithm was used to generate nitrate images by using the satellite-derived chlorophyll and SST images. To link ocean productivity with the sea surface features and sea level anomaly, the Indo-French altimeter mission SARAL-ALTIKA-derived sea surface height anomaly (SSHa) data sets were processed and maps were generated. The monthly average chlorophyll concentration ranged from 0.001 to 3.0 mg m-3, SST ranged from 24 to 32 °C, nitrate concentration ranged from 0.01 to 6.0 μM, and overall SSH anomaly ranged from -52 to +40 cm. Nitrate concentration was observed to be high (3-5 μM) during December-January, possibly due to convective eddies and winter cooling as well as atmospheric aerosols and dust inducing ocean productivity. The nitrate concentration was observed to be associated more with chlorophyll than SST, as nitrate inherently enhances the ocean chlorophyll and productivity, acting as proxy. The SSH anomaly showed irregular features and depicting few eddies, upwelling, and ocean circulation features. The low SSHa was mostly due to high chlorophyll concentration. It was observed that the low SST (∼24-26 °C) is attributed to high chlorophyll concentration (1.5-3.0 mg m-3) over the study area. The lag phase and enhancement in chlorophyll mean during September was due to the decrease in average SST during August. The SSHa showed seasonal trend over the study area during the monsoon period with observation of negative anomaly. Arabian Sea was found to have more negative SSH anomaly monthly mean values than Bay of Bengal. The impact and interrelationship of SSHa indicated better relationship with chlorophyll than with nitrate and SST, as observed from multiple regression analysis. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) results between the 2-year monthly data showed that the

  2. Sea Surface Temperature from EUMETSAT Including Sentinel-3 SLSTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Bonekamp, Hans; Montagner, Francois; Santacesaria, Vincenzo; Tomazic, Igor

    2015-12-01

    The paper gives an overview of sea surface temperature (SST) activities at EUMETSAT including information on SST planned from the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR). Operational oceanography activities within the Marine Applications group at EUMETSAT continue with a focus on SST, sea surface winds, sea-ice products, radiative fluxes, significant wave height and sea surface topography. These are achieved through the mandatory, optional and third-party programmes, and for some products with the EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF). Progress towards products from sea-ice surface temperature, ocean colour products, turbidity and aerosol optical depth over water continue. Information on oceanography products from EUMETSAT can be found through the product navigator (http://navigator.eumetsat.int). EUMETSAT have been collaborating with ESA for a number of years on the development of SST for SLSTR.

  3. Observed variability of sea surface salinity and thermal inversions in the Lakshadweep Sea during contrast monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Johnson, Z.; Salgaonkar, G.; Nisha, K.; Rajan, C.K.; Rao, R.R.

    The sea surface salinity (SSS) of the Lakshadweep Sea (LS) shows large seasonal variability due to horizontal advection of low (high) salinity waters from south (north) during winter (summer) monsoon. The measurements made in the LS during...

  4. The lowering of sea surface temperature in the east central Arabian sea associated with a cyclone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, D.P.; Sastry, J.S.

    An analysis of thermal Structure in the East Central Arabian Sea associated with a moderate cyclone is presented. The heat storage and the heat budget components have been computed. Under the influence of the cyclone the Sea Surface Temperature (SST...

  5. Analysis of characteristics in the sea surface temperature variability in the East/Japan Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Sang-Wook; Park, Young-Gyu; Min, HongSik; Kim, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hak

    2010-06-01

    We examine the characteristics of sea surface temperature (SST) variability in the East/Japan Sea (EJS) for the period of 1891-2005 using 1°×1° latitude and longitude resolution datasets from the Japan Meteorological Agency and the Hadley Centre. A significant warming trend that manifests itself more strongly over the southern part of the sea is observed. In addition, it is found in the EJS that warming during the boreal winter is more significant than that during the summer. The EJS SST index, obtained from the time series of monthly SST anomaly averaged over the western half of the EJS, where large SST anomaly standard deviation is observed, has a primary spectral density at a frequency longer than a decade and a secondary peak at the annual frequency band. The variability of the low-frequency EJS SST, which is mostly explained by that during winter, is characterized by significant warming from the early 1940s to the late 1940s and from the mid-1980s to the present. Between the two warming periods, the EJS SST variability is dominated by decadal fluctuations. Finally, we discuss possible mechanisms of the low frequency EJS SST variability in conjunction with atmospheric variability. When the northwesterly winter monsoon becomes weaker (stronger), less (greater) amount of cold air is advected to the EJS. Sensible heat loss from the sea to the air becomes smaller (greater) producing a warm (cold) SST anomaly.

  6. Statistical Seasonal Sea Surface based Prediction Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Roberto; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Diouf, Ibrahima

    2014-05-01

    The interannual variability of the sea surface temperature (SST) plays a key role in the strongly seasonal rainfall regime on the West African region. The predictability of the seasonal cycle of rainfall is a field widely discussed by the scientific community, with results that fail to be satisfactory due to the difficulty of dynamical models to reproduce the behavior of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). To tackle this problem, a statistical model based on oceanic predictors has been developed at the Universidad Complutense of Madrid (UCM) with the aim to complement and enhance the predictability of the West African Monsoon (WAM) as an alternative to the coupled models. The model, called S4CAST (SST-based Statistical Seasonal Forecast) is based on discriminant analysis techniques, specifically the Maximum Covariance Analysis (MCA) and Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). Beyond the application of the model to the prediciton of rainfall in West Africa, its use extends to a range of different oceanic, atmospheric and helth related parameters influenced by the temperature of the sea surface as a defining factor of variability.

  7. Comparison among four kinds of data of sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢强; 王卫强; 毛庆文

    2002-01-01

    By using remote sensing (ERS) data, FSU data, GOADS data and Hellerman & Rcsenstein objective analysis data to analyze the sea surface wind stress in the South China Sea, it is found that the remote sensing data have higher resolution and more reasonable values. Therefore we suggest that remote sensing data be chosen in the study of climatological features of sea surface wind stress and its seasonal variability in the South China Sea, especially in the study of small and middle scale eddies.

  8. Simulation of laser beam reflection at the sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenger, Frédéric; Repasi, Endre

    2011-05-01

    A 3D simulation of the reflection of a Gaussian shaped laser beam on the dynamic sea surface is presented. The simulation is suitable for both the calculation of images of SWIR (short wave infrared) imaging sensor and for determination of total detected power of reflected laser light for a bistatic configuration of laser source and receiver at different atmospheric conditions. Our computer simulation comprises the 3D simulation of a maritime scene (open sea/clear sky) and the simulation of laser light reflected at the sea surface. The basic sea surface geometry is modeled by a composition of smooth wind driven gravity waves. The propagation model for water waves is applied for sea surface animation. To predict the view of a camera in the spectral band SWIR the sea surface radiance must be calculated. This is done by considering the emitted sea surface radiance and the reflected sky radiance, calculated by MODTRAN. Additionally, the radiances of laser light specularly reflected at the wind-roughened sea surface are modeled in the SWIR band considering an analytical statistical sea surface BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function). This BRDF model considers the statistical slope statistics of waves and accounts for slope-shadowing of waves that especially occurs at flat incident angles of the laser beam and near horizontal detection angles of reflected irradiance at rough seas. Simulation results are presented showing the variation of the detected laser power dependent on the geometric configuration of laser, sensor and wind characteristics.

  9. Sea surface wind perturbations over the Kashevarov Bank of the Okhotsk Sea: a satellite study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Tarkhova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Sea surface wind perturbations over sea surface temperature (SST cold anomalies over the Kashevarov Bank (KB of the Okhotsk Sea are analyzed using satellite (AMSR-E and QuikSCAT data during the summer-autumn period of 2006–2009. It is shown, that frequency of cases of wind speed decreasing over a cold spot in August–September reaches up to 67%. In the cold spot center SST cold anomalies reached 10.5 °C and wind speed lowered down to ~7 m s−1 relative its value on the periphery. The wind difference between a periphery and a centre of the cold spot is proportional to SST difference with the correlations 0.5 for daily satellite passes data, 0.66 for 3-day mean data and 0.9 for monthly ones. For all types of data the coefficient of proportionality consists of ~0.3 m s−1 on 1 °C.

  10. Interferometric measurements of sea surface temperature and emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Lars; Bakan, Stephan

    1997-09-01

    A new multispectral method to derive sea surface emissivity and temperature by using interferometer measurements of the near surface upwelling radiation in the infrared window region is presented. As reflected sky radiation adds substantial spectral variability to the otherwise spectrally smooth surface radiation, an appropriate estimate of surface emissivity allows the measured upwelling radiation to be corrected for the reflected sky component. The remaining radiation, together with the estimated surface emissivity, yields an estimate of the sea surface temperature. Measurements from an ocean pier in the Baltic Sea in October 1995 indicate an accuracy of about 0.1 K for the sea surface temperature thus derived. A strong sea surface skin effect of about 0.6 K is found in that particular case.

  11. Monthly variation of trace metals in North Sea sediments. From experimental data to modeling calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourino-Cabana, B; Billon, G; Lesven, L; Sabbe, K; Gillan, D-C; Gao, Y; Leermakers, M; Baeyens, W

    2014-10-15

    Seasonal variation in trace metal contamination in surface sediments was studied through high resolution profiles assessed monthly by DGT probes in muddy sediments of the North Sea. General parameters such as pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen and sulfides were also recorded to estimate their role in the speciation of trace metals. Experimental data were included in a thermodynamic equilibrium model to calculate major (geo)chemical processes at the water-sediment interface and to predict the fate of the trace metals in case of (physico-)chemical changes. Results showed lowest Fe, Co, Ni and Cd concentrations in summer, which are most probably due to the very high sulfide concentrations according to our theoretical calculations. Cu and Pb behavior were found to be less influenced by sulfides, since they are also strongly associated to organic matter. The whole set of results clearly indicated that metal speciation in these sediments is controlled by sulfides and OM contents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea-ice variability on monthly to annual time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krikken, Folmer; Hazeleger, Wilco

    2015-04-01

    The strong decrease in Arctic sea-ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea-ice predictions on seasonal to decadal time scales. Hence, it is key to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. The authors report on an analysis of natural variability of Arctic sea-ice from an energy budget perspective, using 15 CMIP5 climate models, and comparing these results to atmospheric and oceanic reanalyses data. We quantify the persistence of sea ice anomalies and the cross-correlation with the surface and top energy budget components. The Arctic energy balance components primarily indicate the important role of the seasonal sea-ice albedo feedback, in which sea-ice anomalies in the melt season reemerge in the growth season. This is a robust anomaly reemergence mechanism among all 15 climate models. The role of ocean lies mainly in storing heat content anomalies in spring, and releasing them in autumn. Ocean heat flux variations only play a minor role. The role of clouds is further investigated. We demonstrate that there is no direct atmospheric response of clouds to spring sea-ice anomalies, but a delayed response is evident in autumn. Hence, there is no cloud-ice feedback in late spring and summer, but there is a cloud-ice feedback in autumn, which strengthens the ice-albedo feedback. Anomalies in insolation are positively correlated with sea-ice variability. This is primarily a result of reduced multiple-reflection of insolation due to an albedo decrease. This effect counteracts the sea-ice albedo effect up to 50%. ERA-Interim and ORAS4 confirm the main findings from the climate models.

  13. Satellite Sensed Skin Sea Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Craig

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative predictions of spatial and temporal changes the global climate rely heavily on the use of computer models. Unfortunately, such models cannot provide the basis for climate prediction because key physical processes are inadequately treated. Consequently, fine tuning procedures are often used to optimize the fit between model output and observational data and the validation of climate models using observations is essential if model based predictions of climate change are to be treated with any degree of confidence. Satellite Sea Surface Temperature (SST) observations provide high spatial and temporal resolution data which is extremely well suited to the initialization, definition of boundary conditions and, validation of climate models. In the case of coupled ocean-atmosphere models, the SST (or more correctly the 'Skin' SST (SSST)) is a fundamental diagnostic variable to consider in the validation process. Daily global SST maps derived from satellite sensors also provide adequate data for the detection of global patterns of change which, unlike any other SST data set, repeatedly extend into the southern hemisphere extra-tropical regions. Such data are essential to the success of the spatial 'fingerprint' technique, which seeks to establish a north-south asymmetry where warming is suppressed in the high latitude Southern Ocean. Some estimates suggest that there is a greater than 80% chance of directly detecting significant change (97.5 % confidence level) after 10-12 years of consistent global observations of mean sea surface temperature. However, these latter statements should be qualified with the assumption that a negligible drift in the observing system exists and that biases between individual instruments required to derive a long term data set are small. Given that current estimates for the magnitude of global warming of 0.015 K yr(sup -1) - 0.025 K yr(sup -1), satellite SST data sets need to be both accurate and stable if such a warming trend is to

  14. Recent advance in Mean Sea Surface estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, M. I.; Gerald, D.; Claire, D.; Raynal, M.; Faugere, Y.; Picot, N.; Guillot, A.

    2016-12-01

    Gridded Mean Sea Surface (MSS) estimate is an important issue for precise SLA computation along geodetic orbits. Previous studies emphasized that the error from MSS models older than Jason-1 GM was substantial: on average more than 10 to 15% of the SLA variance for wavelengths ranging from 30 to 150 km. Other MSS have been released this last 2 years, and they use geodetic missions such as CryoSat-2 and Jason-1 GM which strongly contribute to improve their resolution and accuracy.We evaluate in this paper the improvements of the recent MSS. This study, mainly based on spectral approach allows us to quantify the errors at various wavelengths. The use of new missions (e.g. SARAL-DP/AltiKa; Sentinel-3A) with low instrumental noise measurement levels (Ka, SAR) opens new perspectives to understand the MSS errors and improve MSS estimate for wavelengths lower than 100km.

  15. Middle Pliocene sea surface temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowsett, H.J.; Chandler, M.A.; Cronin, T. M.; Dwyer, G.S.

    2005-01-01

    Estimates of sea surface temperature (SST) based upon foraminifer, diatom, and ostracod assemblages from ocean cores reveal a warm phase of the Pliocene between about 3.3 and 3.0 Ma. Pollen records and plant megafossils, although not as well dated, show evidence for a warmer climate at about the same time. Increased greenhouse forcing and altered ocean heat transport are the leading candidates for the underlying cause of Pliocene global warmth. Despite being a period of global warmth, this interval encompasses considerable variability. Two new SST reconstructions are presented that are designed to provide a climatological error bar for warm peak phases of the Pliocene and to document the spatial distribution and magnitude of SST variability within the mid-Pliocene warm period. These data suggest long-term stability of low-latitude SST and document greater variability in regions of maximum warming. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Comparison among sea surface roughness schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Based on the measurements from the US National Data Buoy Center 3-m discus buoy site No.44004 (38.5°N, 70.47°W) from January 1 to March 31 of 2003, with the COARE algorithm (Version 3.0), the results from four parameterization schemes developed recently for sea surface aerodynamic roughness length were compared with each other. Calculations of frictional speed u*, drag coefficient Cd and wind stress τ indicate that the calculated frictional velocities from the four schemes (8.50%-16.20%, the normalized standard error estimate, or NSEE), the computed drag coefficients and wind stress (respectively 15.08%-28.67% and 17.26%-50.59% NSEE) are reasonable. Schemes YT96 and GW03 are consistent. The O02 scheme gives overestimated values for u* and Cd. Schemes TY01 and GW03 display discontinuous characteristics in handling young wave data.

  17. Long term sea surface temperature trends in US Affiliated Pacific Islands from satellite data, 1982-2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Monthly average NOAA satellite-derived Sea Surface Temperature (SST) values from 1982-2003 and their long-term trends are presented for sixteen US affiliated Pacific...

  18. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 2 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  19. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 3 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Global Land Surface Temperature Databank contains monthly timescale mean, maximum, and minimum temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was...

  20. International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI) Global Land Surface Temperature Databank - Stage 1 Monthly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The global land surface temperature databank contains monthly timescale mean, max, and min temperature for approximately 40,000 stations globally. It was developed...

  1. Predicting monsoon rainfall and pressure indices from sea surface temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.

    The relationship between the sea surface temperature (SST) in the Indian Ocean and monsoon rainfall has been examined by using 21 years data set (1967-87) of MOHSST.6 (Met. Office Historical Sea Surface Temperature data set, obtained from U.K. Met...

  2. Estimation of sea surface temperature (SST) using marine seismic data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sinha, S.K.; Dewangan, P.; Sain, K.

    .g. Wu et al. [1999]). However, due to the skin effect, sea surface temperatures as measured by satellites can be very different from temperatures a few centimeters below the sea surface (i.e. in-situ temperatures) [Emery et al., 1994]. Therefore...

  3. Recent trends in sea surface temperature off Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lluch-Cota, S.E.; Tripp-Valdéz, M.; Lluch-Cota, D.B.; Lluch-Belda, D.; Verbesselt, J.; Herrera-Cervantes, H.; Bautista-Romero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in global mean sea surface temperature may have potential negative implications for natural and socioeconomic systems; however, measurements to predict trends in different regions have been limited and sometimes contradictory. In this study, an assessment of sea surface temperature change si

  4. Recent trends in sea surface temperature off Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lluch-Cota, S.E.; Tripp-Valdéz, M.; Lluch-Cota, D.B.; Lluch-Belda, D.; Verbesselt, J.; Herrera-Cervantes, H.; Bautista-Romero, J.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in global mean sea surface temperature may have potential negative implications for natural and socioeconomic systems; however, measurements to predict trends in different regions have been limited and sometimes contradictory. In this study, an assessment of sea surface temperature change

  5. Simulations of The Extreme Precipitation Event Enhanced by Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly over the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakan Doǧan, Onur; Önol, Barış

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul Technical University, Aeronautics and Astronautics Faculty, Meteorological Engineering, Istanbul, Turkey In this study, we examined the extreme precipitation case over the Eastern Black Sea region of Turkey by using regional climate model, RegCM4. The flood caused by excessive rain in August 26, 2010 killed 12 people and the landslides in Rize province have damaged many buildings. The station based two days total precipitation exceeds 200 mm. One of the usual suspects for this extreme event is positive anomaly of sea surface temperature (SST) over the Black Sea where the significant warming trend is clear in the last three decades. In August 2010, the monthly mean SST is higher than 3 °C with respect to the period of 1981-2010. We designed three sensitivity simulations with RegCM4 to define the effects of the Black Sea as a moisture source. The simulation domain with 10-km horizontal resolution covers all the countries bordering the Black Sea and simulation period is defined for entire August 2010. It is also noted that the spatial variability of the precipitation produced by the reference simulation (Sim-0) is consistent with the TRMM data. In terms of analysis of the sensitivity to SST, we forced the simulations by subtracting 1 °C (Sim-1), 2 °C (Sim-2) and 3 °C (Sim-3) from the ERA-Interim 6-hourly SST data (considering only the Black Sea). The sensitivity simulations indicate that daily total precipitation for all these simulations gradually decreased based on the reference simulation (Sim-0). 3-hourly maximum precipitation rates for Sim-0, Sim-1, Sim-2 and Sim-3 are 32, 25, 13 and 10.5 mm respectively over the hotspot region. Despite the fact that the simulations signal points out the same direction, degradation of the precipitation intensity does not indicate the same magnitude for all simulations. It is revealed that 2 °C (Sim-2) threshold is critical for SST sensitivity. We also calculated the humidity differences from the simulation and these

  6. Inter-annual variability of the acoustic propagation in the Yellow Sea identified from a Synoptic Monthly Gridded Database as compared with GDEM

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This research investigates the inter-annual acoustic variability in the Yellow Sea identified from the Synoptic Monthly Gridded-World Ocean Database (SMG-WOD) as compared with the Navy's Global Digital Environmental Model (GDEM). The SMG-WOD has a horizontal resolution of 1˚, 28 vertical levels from the surface to 3000 m depth and one-month temporal increments allowing individual years of acoustic data to be analyzed, whereas GDEM is a...

  7. A model study of the seasonal cycle of the Arabian Sea surface temperature

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shetye, S.R.

    The annual variation of the SST along a zonal strip from the coast of Somalia to the southwest coast of India was simulated using available data (monthly-mean heat and momentum fluxes across the air-sea interface, surface advective field, etc...

  8. Observing the Agulhas Current with sea surface temperature and altimetry data: challenges and perspectives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available -Red Sea Surface Temperature datasets still suffer from inadequate cloud masking algorithms, particularly in regions of strong temperature gradient. Despite both Sea Surface Height and Sea Surface Temperature observations being severely compromised...

  9. Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Andreas, E. L., and E. C. Monahan, 1999: The role of whitecap bubbles in air- sea heat and moisture exchange. J. Phys. Oceanogr., in press. ...1 Sea Spray Effects on Surface Heat and Moisture Fluxes Edgar L Andreas U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory 72 Lyme Road...www.crrel.usace.army.mil LONG-TERM GOAL The goal is to investigate, theoretically and through analyzing existing data, the role that sea spray plays in

  10. Copper in the sediment and sea surface microlayer near a fallowed, open-net fish farm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Ronald H; Smith, Ruth E; Fisher, Clyde V; Fisher, E Brian

    2012-09-01

    Sediment and sea surface microlayer samples near an open-net salmon farm in Nova Scotia, were analysed for copper. Copper is a constituent of the feed and is an active ingredient of anti-foulants. The salmon farm was placed in fallow after 15 years of production. Sampling was pursued over 27 months. Elevated copper concentrations in the sediments indicated the farm site as a source. Bubble flotation due to gas-emitting sediments from eutrophication is a likely process for accumulating copper in the sea surface microlayer at enriched concentrations. Elevated and enriched concentrations in the sea surface microlayer over distance from the farm site led, as a result of wind-drift, to an enlarged farm footprint. The levels of copper in both sediments and sea surface microlayer exceeded guidelines for protection of marine life. Over the 27 months period, copper levels persisted in the sediments and decreased gradually in the sea surface microlayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Surface diurnal warming in the East China Sea derived from satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Duan, Zhigang; Zhai, Fangguo; He, Qiqi

    2017-09-01

    Process of sea surface diurnal warming has drawn a lot of attention in recent years, but that occurs in shelf seas was rarely addressed. In the present work, surface diurnal warming strength in the East China Sea was calculated by the sea surface temperature (SST) data derived from the MODIS sensors carried by the satellites Aqua and Terra. Due to transit time difference, both the number of valid data and the surface diurnal warming strength computed by the MODIS-Aqua data are relatively larger than Terra. Therefore, the 10-year MODIS-Aqua data from 2005 to 2014 were used to analyze the monthly variability of the surface diurnal warming. Generally, the surface diurnal warming in the East China sea is stronger in summer and autumn but weaker in winter and spring, while it shows different peaks in different regions. Large events with ΔT≥5 K have also been discussed. They were found mainly in coastal area, especially near the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary. And there exists a high-incidence period from April to July. Furthermore, the relationship between surface diurnal warming and wind speed was discussed. Larger diurnal warming mainly lies in areas with low wind speed. And its possibility decreases with the increase of wind speed. Events with ΔT≥2.5 K rarely occur when wind speed is over 12 m/s. Study on surface diurnal warming in the East China Sea may help to understand the daily scale air-sea interaction in the shelf seas. A potential application might be in the marine weather forecasts by numerical models. Its impact on the coastal eco-system and the activities of marine organisms can also be pursued.

  12. Sea Surface Sound: discussion session on future research and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, M. J.; Potter, J. R.

    On one evening during the week of the workshop, a brain-storming session was held with a view to identifying important areas of research into sea surface sound that should be addressed in the future. Potential applications of sea surface sound were included in the discussion. Acting as chairman, Michael Buckingham (MB) introduced the session, which was attended by most of the participants at the workshop. The intention was to encourage the participants to explore, in an informal setting, the future of sea surface sound. A summary of comments and conclusions, compiled from MB's notes of the discussion, is presented below…

  13. An overview on SAR measurements of sea surface wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Studies show that synthetic aperture radar (SAR) has the capability of providing high-resolution (sub-kilometer) sea surface wind fields. This is very useful for applications where knowledge of the sea surface wind at fine scales is crucial. This paper aims to review the latest work on sea surface wind field retrieval using SAR images. As shown, many different approaches have been developed for retrieving wind speed and wind direction. However, much more work will be required to fully exploit the SAR data for improving the retrieval accuracy of high-resolution winds and for producing wind products in an operational sense.

  14. Fouling-resistant surfaces of tropical sea stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Jana; Walker-Smith, Genefor; Warén, Anders; De Nys, Rocky

    2007-01-01

    Qualitative evidence suggests sea stars are free of fouling organisms; however the presence of fouling-resistant surfaces of sea stars has not previously been documented. Field surveys were conducted in northern Queensland, Australia, during the wet and dry seasons and several tropical sea star species were examined for surface-associated micro- and macro-organisms. Mean bacterial abundances on seven sea star species were approximately 10(4) to 10(5) cells cm(-2) during both seasons. There were no consistent trends in bacterial abundances with season, species and aboral positions on sea star arms. No common generalist fouling organisms, such as algae, barnacles, serpulid polychaetes, bryozoans and ascidians, were found on any specimens of 12 sea star species. However, low numbers of parasitic and commensal macro-organisms were found on six sea star species. The gastropods Parvioris fulvescens, Asterolamia hians, Thyca (Granulithyca) nardoafrianti and Thyca crystallina were found exclusively on the sea stars Archaster typicus, Astropecten indicus, Nardoa pauciforis and Linckia laevigata, respectively. The shrimp Periclimenes soror was only found on Acanthaster planci, and the polychaete Ophiodromus sp. on A. typicus. The copepods Stellicola illgi and Paramolgus sp. were only found on L. laevigata and Echinaster luzonicus, respectively. As no common generalist fouling organisms were discovered, sea stars offer an excellent model to investigate the mechanisms driving fouling-resistant surfaces and the selective settlement of specialist invertebrates.

  15. Decadal trends in Red Sea maximum surface temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica

    2017-08-09

    Ocean warming is a major consequence of climate change, with the surface of the ocean having warmed by 0.11 °C decade-1 over the last 50 years and is estimated to continue to warm by an additional 0.6 - 2.0 °C before the end of the century1. However, there is considerable variability in the rates experienced by different ocean regions, so understanding regional trends is important to inform on possible stresses for marine organisms, particularly in warm seas where organisms may be already operating in the high end of their thermal tolerance. Although the Red Sea is one of the warmest ecosystems on earth, its historical warming trends and thermal evolution remain largely understudied. We characterized the Red Sea\\'s thermal regimes at the basin scale, with a focus on the spatial distribution and changes over time of sea surface temperature maxima, using remotely sensed sea surface temperature data from 1982 - 2015. The overall rate of warming for the Red Sea is 0.17 ± 0.07 °C decade-1, while the northern Red Sea is warming between 0.40 and 0.45 °C decade-1, all exceeding the global rate. Our findings show that the Red Sea is fast warming, which may in the future challenge its organisms and communities.

  16. Hourly to Decadal variability of sea surface carbon parameters in the north western Mediteranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Jacqueline; Merlivat, Liliane; Antoine, David; Beaumont, Laurence; Golbol, Melek; Velluci, Vincenzo

    2017-04-01

    Sea surface CO2 fugacity, fCO2, is recorded hourly in the north western Mediterranean Sea since 2013 by two CARIOCA (Carbon Interface Ocean Atmosphere) sensors installed on the BOUSSOLE (Buoy for the acquisition of long term optical time series, http://www.obs-vlfr.fr/Boussole/html/project/introduction.php) mooring at 3m and 10m depth. fCO2 exhibits a large seasonal cycle, about 150 microatm peak to peak, very consistent with earlier CARIOCA measurements taken in 1995-1999 at the DYFAMED site (located 6km apart from the BOUSSOLE mooring) (Hood and Merlivat, JMR, 2001; Copin-Montegut et al., Mar. Chem., 2004): this seasonal cycle is driven primarily by intense mixing in Winter, biological uptake during Spring and warming during Summer. Interannual variability of these processes leads to interannual variability of monthly mean fCO2 that can reach more than 20 microatm. The short term variability (1 hour to 1 week) is large, especially during Summer 2014 (more than 40 microatm) due to a very strong vertical stratification and to the influence of internal waves. The hourly CARIOCA measurements allow to correctly filter out the high frequency variability while the three year long time series allow to smooth out interannual variability. Hence, for the first time, we get a precise estimate of the change of fCO2 in surface waters within 20 years. Over the 1995-2015 interval, we estimate an increase of fCO2 computed at a constant temperature of 13˚ C equal to 1.8 microatm per year. Given the alkalinity/salinity relationship in this region, we estimate mean annual rates of change of -0.0023+/-0.0001 pH unit and of +1.47+/-0.03 μmol kg-1 for pH and DIC respectively. These results give a quantitative estimate of the penetration of anthropogenic carbon in the surface waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, about 80% via air-sea exchange and 20% via transport of carbon from the Atlantic across the Strait of Gibraltar as suggested by Palmieri et al (BG, 2015). We estimate

  17. Southern Caribbean Sea temperature and salinity variability since the mid-Holocene from monthly resolved coral records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Thomas; Giry, Cyril; Kölling, Martin; Scholz, Denis; Wei, Wei; Lohmann, Gerrit; Scheffers, Sander

    2013-04-01

    In the tropical Atlantic, proxy reconstructions of Holocene sea surface temperature and salinity that resolve seasonality and interannual to decadal variability are sparse. However, ocean-atmosphere interactions on these timescales play a critical role for climate extremes such as droughts, floods and hurricanes. Consequently, a better understanding of the natural range of sea surface variability on these timescales is important for projections of future tropical Atlantic climate change. Here we present monthly resolved reconstructions of sea surface temperature (SST) and δ18Oseawater (used as proxy for sea surface salinity, SSS) in the southern Caribbean Sea for snapshots throughout the mid- to late Holocene, derived from Sr/Ca and δ18O analyses of fossil shallow-water corals (Diploria strigosa) from Bonaire (Netherlands Antilles). The corals were dated by the 230Th/U-method and provide a total of ~300 years of record, with individual time windows reaching up to 68 years in length. Our coral records indicate that mid- to late Holocene SST and SSS were characterized by persistent quasi-biennial and prominent interannual to multidecadal variability. However, the amplitude of variability on individual timescales has varied over the last 6200 years. We find that on interannual to multidecadal timescales, warmer conditions were accompanied by more saline conditions at the sea surface, and vice versa. Potential forcing mechanisms of this observed pattern are discussed, including the wind-induced advection of surface waters from the South and the variations in the strength of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. Compared to the late Holocene, SST variability on inter- to multidecadal timescales was more pronounced during the mid- Holocene, and accompanied by enhanced SSS variability. Moreover, an increased amplitude of the SSS annual cycle is reconstructed for the mid- Holocene, very likely resulting from increased summer precipitation at that time, which

  18. Future trends of the Sea Surface Temperature for the Caribbean and the Western Mediterranean Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Garcies

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Global Climate Models foresee a general warming of the atmosphere, with varying intensity depending on the characteristics of each model and the hypotheses made on the release of gases of antropic origin. The warming is not expected to be homogeneous over the planet. In this work we focus on the evolution of the sea surface temperature of the Caribbean and the Mediterranean seas, and its linked with the likely prolongation of the hurricane season and the increase of strength of the hurricanes in the Caribbean, as well as with the more apt conditions for severe weather in the Mediterranean sea. In both areas more frequent occurence and intensity of severe weather events are expected due to the predicted increment of the sea surface temperature, 1.5ºC for the Caribbean sea and 2.5ºC for the Mediterranean sea.

  19. Sea surface temperature mapping using a thermal infrared scanner

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Pandya, R.M.; Mathur, K.M.; Charyulu, R.J.K.; Rao, L.V.G.

    1 metre water column below the sea surface. A thermal infrared scanner developed by the Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad was operated on board R.V. Gaveshani in April/May 1984 for mapping SST over the eastern Arabian Sea. SST values...

  20. Assimilation of Sea Surface Temperature in a doubly, two-way nested primitive equation model of the Ligurian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, A.; Alvera-Azcarate, A.; Rixen, M.; Beckers, J.-M.; Testut, C.-E.; Brankart, J.-M.; Brasseur, P.

    2003-04-01

    The GHER 3D primitive equation model is implemented with three different resolutions: a low resolution model (1/4^o) covering the whole Mediterranean Sea, an intermediate resolution model (1/20^o) of the Liguro-Provençal basin and a high resolution model (1/60^o) simulating the fine mesoscale structures in the Ligurian Sea. Boundary conditions and the averaged fields (feedback) are exchanged between two successive nesting levels. The model of the Ligurian Sea is also coupled with the assimilation package SESAM. It allows to assimilate satellite data and in situ observations using the local adaptative SEEK (Singular Evolutive Extended Kalman) filter. Instead of evolving the error space by the numerically expensive Lyapunov equation, a simplified algebraic equation depending on the misfit between observation and model forecast is used. Starting from the 1st January 1998 the low and intermediate resolution models are spun up for 18 months. The initial conditions for the Ligurian Sea are interpolated from the intermediate resolution model. The three models are then integrated until August 1999. During this period AVHRR Sea Surface Temperature of the Ligurian Sea is assimilated. The results are validated by using CTD and XBT profiles of the SIRENA cruise from the SACLANT Center. The overall objective of this study is pre-operational. It should help to identify limitations and weaknesses of forecasting methods and to suggest improvements of existing operational models.

  1. OW AVISO Sea-Surface Height & Niiler Climatology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface height measurements collected by means of the TOPEX/Poseidon/ERS, JASON-1/Envisat, and Jason-2/Envisat satellite...

  2. OW AVISO Sea-Surface Height & Levitus Climatology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface height measurements collected by means of the TOPEX/Poseidon/ERS, JASON-1/Envisat, and Jason-2/Envisat satellite...

  3. Global 1-km Sea Surface Temperature (G1SST)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — JPL OurOcean Portal: A daily, global Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data set is produced at 1-km (also known as ultra-high resolution) by the JPL ROMS (Regional Ocean...

  4. Surface layer temperature inversion in the Arabian Sea during winter

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Ghosh, A.K.

    Surface layer temperature inversion in the south eastern Arabian Sea, during winter has been studied using Bathythermograph data collected from 1132 stations. It is found that the inversion in this area is a stable seasonal feature...

  5. Seasonal Sea Surface Temperature Averages, 1985-2001 - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of four images showing seasonal sea surface temperature (SST) averages for the entire earth. Data for the years 1985-2001 are averaged to...

  6. OW NOAA Pathfinder/GAC Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer - Global Area Coverage...

  7. OW NOAA AVHRR-GAC Sea-Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The dataset contains satellite-derived sea-surface temperature measurements collected by means of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer - Global Area Coverage...

  8. NOAA High-Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (SST) Analysis Products

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This archive covers two high resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis products developed using an optimum interpolation (OI) technique. The analyses have a...

  9. Tropical sea surface temperatures and the earth's orbital eccentricity cycles

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gupta, S.M.; Fernandes, A.A.; Mohan, R.

    The tropical oceanic warm pools are climatologically important regions because their sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are positively related to atmospheric greenhouse effect and the cumulonimbus-cirrus cloud anvil. Such a warm pool is also present...

  10. Zooplankton incidence in abnormally high sea surface temperature in the Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Goswami, S.C.

    Zooplankton in an abnormally high sea surface temperature (33.1 to 33.8 degrees C) and alternate bands of slick formation were studied in the Eastern Arabian Sea during 26 and 29 April 1981. The phenomenon which may be due to intense diurnal heating...

  11. Effects of the surface waves on air-sea interactions of the sea spray

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francius, M.J.; Eijk, A.M.J. van

    2006-01-01

    Aerosols are important to a large number of processes in the marine boundary layer. On a micro-meteorological scale, they influence the heat and moisture budgets near the sea surface. Since the ocean acts both as a source and a sink for aerosols, the sea spray droplets may transfer water vapour and

  12. Sea surface height variability in the North East Atlantic from satellite altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterlini, Paul; de Vries, Hylke; Katsman, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Data from 21 years of satellite altimeter measurements are used to identify and understand the major contributing components of sea surface height variability (SSV) on monthly time-scales in the North East Atlantic. A number of SSV drivers is considered, which are categorised into two groups; local (wind and sea surface temperature) and remote (sea level pressure and the North Atlantic oscillation index). A multiple linear regression model is constructed to model the SSV for a specific target area in the North Sea basin. Cross-correlations between candidate regressors potentially lead to ambiguity in the interpretation of the results. We therefore use an objective hierarchical selection method based on variance inflation factors to select the optimal number of regressors for the target area and accept these into the regression model if they can be associated to SSV through a direct underlying physical forcing mechanism. Results show that a region of high SSV exists off the west coast of Denmark and that it can be represented well with a regression model that uses local wind, sea surface temperature and sea level pressure as primary regressors. The regression model developed here helps to understand sea level change in the North East Atlantic. The methodology is generalised and easily applied to other regions.

  13. Satellite altimetry in sea ice regions - detecting open water for estimating sea surface heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Felix L.; Dettmering, Denise; Bosch, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    The Greenland Sea and the Farm Strait are transporting sea ice from the central Arctic ocean southwards. They are covered by a dynamic changing sea ice layer with significant influences on the Earth climate system. Between the sea ice there exist various sized open water areas known as leads, straight lined open water areas, and polynyas exhibiting a circular shape. Identifying these leads by satellite altimetry enables the extraction of sea surface height information. Analyzing the radar echoes, also called waveforms, provides information on the surface backscatter characteristics. For example waveforms reflected by calm water have a very narrow and single-peaked shape. Waveforms reflected by sea ice show more variability due to diffuse scattering. Here we analyze altimeter waveforms from different conventional pulse-limited satellite altimeters to separate open water and sea ice waveforms. An unsupervised classification approach employing partitional clustering algorithms such as K-medoids and memory-based classification methods such as K-nearest neighbor is used. The classification is based on six parameters derived from the waveform's shape, for example the maximum power or the peak's width. The open-water detection is quantitatively compared to SAR images processed while accounting for sea ice motion. The classification results are used to derive information about the temporal evolution of sea ice extent and sea surface heights. They allow to provide evidence on climate change relevant influences as for example Arctic sea level rise due to enhanced melting rates of Greenland's glaciers and an increasing fresh water influx into the Arctic ocean. Additionally, the sea ice cover extent analyzed over a long-time period provides an important indicator for a globally changing climate system.

  14. Estimation of Sea Surface Wave Spectra Using Acoustic Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    Holister Dis speciael Dean of Graduate Studiesj ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller B.S. Electrical...James Henry Miller 1987 The author hereby prants to MIT permission to reproduce and distribute copies of this thesis in whole or in part. Signature of...ESTIMATION OF SEA SURFACE WAVE SPECTRA USING ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY by James Henry Miller Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the

  15. Deep Coherent Vortices and Their Sea Surface Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ienna, Federico; Bashmachnikov, Igor; Dias, Joaquim; Peliz, Alvaro

    2017-04-01

    Mediterranean Water eddies, known as Meddies, are an important dynamic process occurring at depths of 1000-meters in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean. Meddies occur as a direct result of the Mediterranean Outflow exiting through the Gibraltar Strait, and represent a prevalent mechanism that can be found extensively throughout the ocean. Moreover, Meddy cores are known to produce measurable expressions at the sea surface in the form of rotating coherent vortices, not only affecting the sea surface from beneath, but also allowing for the possibility to remotely study these deep phenomena through data gathered at the sea surface. While many past studies have focused on the properties of Meddy cores, only a handful of studies focus on the physical characteristics and behavior of the surface expressions produced. Are Meddy surface expressions different from other like vortices that dominate the physical ocean surface? What are the relationships between deep and surface mechanisms, and do any feedbacks exist? To shed light on these questions, we investigate the relationship between Meddies and their sea-surface expressions through observations using in-situ float and drifter profiles and satellite altimetry. A total of 782 Meddy cores were examined in the Northeast Atlantic using temperature and salinity data obtained by CTD and Argo during the Mecanismos de transporte e de dispersão da Água Mediterrânica no Atlântico Nordeste (MEDTRANS) project, and their corresponding sea-level expressions were geo-temporally matched in satellite altimetry data. We report several statistical properties of the sea-surface expressions of Meddies, including their mean diameter and vertical magnitude, and compare the properties of their surface features to the underlying Meddy cores. We investigate how the deep core affects the surface, and whether surface expressions may in return yield information about the underlying cores. Additionally, we examine the variability of the surface

  16. Investigation of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies over Cyprus area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Andreas; Akçit, Nuhcan

    2016-08-01

    The temperature of the sea surface has been identified as an important parameter of the natural environment, governing processes that occur in the upper ocean. This paper focuses on the analysis of the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) anomalies at the greater area of Cyprus. For that, SST data derived from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument on board both Aqua and Terra sun synchronous satellites were used. A four year period was chosen as a first approach to address and describe this phenomenon. Geographical Information Systems (GIS) has been used as an integrated platform of analysis and presentation in addition of the support of MATLAB®. The methodology consists of five steps: (i) Collection of MODIS SST imagery, (ii) Development of the digital geo-database; (iii) Model and run the methodology in GIS as a script; (iv) Calculation of SST anomalies; and (v) Visualization of the results. The SST anomaly values have presented a symmetric distribution over the study area with an increase trend through the years of analysis. The calculated monthly and annual average SST anomalies (ASST) make more obvious this trend, with negative and positive SST changes to be distributed over the study area. In terms of seasons, the same increase trend presented during spring, summer, autumn and winter with 2013 to be the year with maximum ASST observed values. Innovative aspects comprise of straightforward integration and modeling of available tools, providing a versatile platform of analysis and semi-automation of the operation. In addition, the fine resolution maps that extracted from the analysis with a wide spatial coverage, allows the detail representation of SST and ASST respectively in the region.

  17. Deriving a sea surface climatology of CO2 fugacity in support of air–sea gas flux studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Goddijn-Murphy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Climatologies, or long-term averages, of essential climate variables are useful for evaluating models and providing a baseline for studying anomalies. The Surface Ocean Carbon Dioxide (CO2 Atlas (SOCAT has made millions of global underway sea surface measurements of CO2 publicly available, all in a uniform format and presented as fugacity, fCO2. fCO2 is highly sensitive to temperature and the measurements are only valid for the instantaneous sea surface temperature (SST that is measured concurrent with the in-water CO2 measurement. To create a climatology of fCO2 data suitable for calculating air–sea CO2 fluxes it is therefore desirable to calculate fCO2 valid for climate quality SST. This paper presents a method for creating such a climatology. We recomputed SOCAT's fCO2 values for their respective measurement month and year using climate quality SST data from satellite Earth observation and then extrapolated the resulting fCO2 values to reference year 2010. The data were then spatially interpolated onto a 1° × 1° grid of the global oceans to produce 12 monthly fCO2 distributions for 2010. The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2 is also provided for those who prefer to use pCO2. The CO2 concentration difference between ocean and atmosphere is the thermodynamic driving force of the air–sea CO2 flux, and hence the presented fCO2 distributions can be used in air–sea gas flux calculations together with climatologies of other climate variables.

  18. Impact of sea surface temperature on satellite retrieval of sea surface salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xuchen; Zhu, Qiankun; He, Xianqiang; Chen, Peng; Wang, Difeng; Hao, Zengzhou; Huang, Haiqing

    2016-10-01

    Currently, global sea surface salinity (SSS) can be retrieved by the satellite microwave radiometer onboard the satellite, such as the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) and the Aqurius. SMOS is an Earth Explorer Opportunity Mission from the European Space Agency(ESA). It was launched at a sun-synchronous orbit in 2009 and one of the payloads is called MIRAS(Microwave Imaging Radiometer using Aperture Synthesis), which is the first interferometric microwave radiometer designed for observing SSS at L-band(1.41 GHz).The foundation of the salinity retrieval by microwave radiometer is that the sea surface radiance at L-band has the most suitable sensitivity with the variation of the salinity. It is well known that the sensitivity of brightness temperatures(TB) to SSS depends on the sea surface temperature (SST), but the quantitative impact of the SST on the satellite retrieval of the SSS is still poorly known. In this study, we investigate the impact of the SST on the accuracy of salinity retrieval from the SMOS. First of all, The dielectric constant model proposed by Klein and Swift has been used to estimate the vertically and horizontally polarized brightness temperatures(TV and TH) of a smooth sea water surface at L-band and derive the derivatives of TV and TH as a function of SSS to show the relative sensitivity at 45° incident angle. Then, we use the GAM(generalized additive model) method to evaluate the association between the satellite-measured brightness temperature and in-situ SSS at different SST. Moreover, the satellite-derived SSS from the SMOS is validated using the ARGO data to assess the RMSE(root mean squared error). We compare the SMOS SSS and ARGO SSS over two regions of Pacific ocean far from land and ice under different SST. The RMSE of retrieved SSS at different SST have been estimated. Our results showed that SST is one of the most significant factors affecting the accuracy of SSS retrieval. The satellite-measured brightness temperature has a

  19. A microwave emissivity model of sea surface under wave breaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei En-Bo; Ge Yong

    2005-01-01

    With the effective medium approximation theory of composites, a remedial model is proposed for estimating the microwave emissivity of sea surface under wave breaking driven by strong wind on the basis of an empirical model given by Pandey and Kakar. In our model, the effects of the shapes of seawater droplets and the thickness of whitecap layer (i.e. a composite layer of air and sea water droplets) over the sea surface on the microwave emissivity are investigated by calculating the effective dielectric constant of whitecaps layer. The wind speed is included in our model, and the responses of water droplets shapes, such as sphere and ellipsoid, to the emissivity are also discussed at different microwave frequencies. The model is in good agreement with the experimental data of microwave emissivity of sea surface at microwave frequencies of 6.6, 10.7 and 37GHz.

  20. Correlation between sea surface temperature and wind speed in Greenland Sea and their relationships with NAO variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo QU

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO is one of the major causes of many recent changes in the Arctic Ocean. Generally, it is related to wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST, and sea ice cover. In this study, we analyzed the distributions of and correlations between SST, wind speed, NAO, and sea ice cover from 2003 to 2009 in the Greenland Sea at 10°W to 10°E, 65°N to 80°N. SST reached its peak in July, while wind speed reached its minimum in July. Seasonal variability of SST and wind speed was different for different regions. SST and wind speed mainly had negative correlations. Detailed correlation research was focused on the 75°N to 80°N band. Regression analysis shows that in this band, the variation of SST lagged three months behind that of wind speed. Ice cover and NAO had a positive correlation, and the correlation coefficient between ice cover and NAO in the year 2007 was 0.61. SST and NAO also had a positive correlation, and SST influenced NAO one month in advance. The correlation coefficients between SST and NAO reached 0.944 for the year 2005, 0.7 for the year 2008, and 0.74 for the year 2009 after shifting SST one month later. NAO also had a positive correlation with wind speed, and it also influenced wind speed one month in advance. The correlation coefficients between NAO and wind speed reached 0.783, 0.813, and 0.818 for the years 2004, 2005, and 2008, respectively, after shifting wind speed one month earlier.

  1. Satellite-derived sea surface height and sea surface wind data fusion for spilled oil tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2003-12-01

    An attempt is made to estimate the trajectory of the spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka occurred on January 2, 1997 in the Japan Sea by fusing two microwave sensor data, namely ERS-2 altimeter and ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data. In this study 'fusion' is defined as the method of more reliable prediction for the trajectory of spilled oil than before. Geostrophic current vectors are derived from ERS-2 altimeter and wind-induced drift vectors are derived from ADEOS/NSCAT scatterometer data These two different satellite-derived vectors are 'fused' together in the surface current model to estimate and evaluate the trajectory of spilled oil from the sunken tanker Nakhodka. The distribution of component of spill vector is mostly accounted for by the distribution of geostrophic velocity component during the study period with some discrepancies during March, 1997.

  2. The impact of land and sea surface variations on the Delaware sea breeze at local scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Christopher P.

    The summertime climate of coastal Delaware is greatly influenced by the intensity, frequency, and location of the local sea breeze circulation. Sea breeze induced changes in temperature, humidity, wind speed, and precipitation influence many aspects of Delaware's economy by affecting tourism, farming, air pollution density, energy usage, and the strength, and persistence of Delaware's wind resource. The sea breeze front can develop offshore or along the coastline and often creates a near surface thermal gradient in excess of 5°C. The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the dynamics of the Delaware sea breeze with a focus on the immediate coastline using observed and modeled components, both at high resolutions (~200m). The Weather Research and Forecasting model (version 3.5) was employed over southern Delaware with 5 domains (4 levels of nesting), with resolutions ranging from 18km to 222m, for June 2013 to investigate the sensitivity of the sea breeze to land and sea surface variations. The land surface was modified in the model to improve the resolution, which led to the addition of land surface along the coastline and accounted for recent urban development. Nine-day composites of satellite sea surface temperatures were ingested into the model and an in-house SST forcing dataset was developed to account for spatial SST variation within the inland bays. Simulations, which include the modified land surface, introduce a distinct secondary atmospheric circulation across the coastline of Rehoboth Bay when synoptic offshore wind flow is weak. Model runs using high spatial- and temporal-resolution satellite sea surface temperatures over the ocean indicate that the sea breeze landfall time is sensitive to the SST when the circulation develops offshore. During the summer of 2013 a field campaign was conducted in the coastal locations of Rehoboth Beach, DE and Cape Henlopen, DE. At each location, a series of eleven small, autonomous thermo-sensors (i

  3. Dinoflagellate cyst production in Hudson Bay, the world's largest inland sea, based on monthly sediment trap data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Maija; Pospelova, Vera; Forest, Alexandre; Stern, Gary

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplankters, microscopic primary producers of oceans are capable of responding rapidly to environmental fluctuations due to their high cell replication rates. Fast phytoplankton growth maybe balanced out by equally fast consumption by herbivorous grazers. In high-latitude marine systems, seasonal fluctuations in plankton biomass are essentially linked to light regime controlled by the waxing and waning sea-ice cover. In addition, nutrient limitation in surface waters, seasonal temperature fluctuations and changes in freshwater inputs may play important roles. In cold-water seas, many planktonic organisms cope with seasonal harshness by the production of benthic dormant stages. Dinoflagellates are a diverse group of single-celled plankton, constituting major marine primary producers, as well as herbivorous grazers of the microbial loop. Many dinoflagellate species produce highly resistant, organic-walled resting cysts that are archived in sediments and have been increasingly used to reconstruct past environmental conditions, e.g., sea-surface temperature and salinity, productivity, sea-ice cover and eutrophication. Marine sediment core sequences are characterized by slow accumulation rates and high mixing rates: the top centimeter of surface sediment from an arctic shelf may correspond to several years or decades of deposition. Consequently, sedimentary archives do not give direct information on long-term changes in seasonal bloom patterns or cues of annually recurring life-cycle events. We used two particle-intercepting sediment traps moored in eastern and western Hudson Bay, respectively, to study monthly fluctuations in dinoflagellate cyst production from October 2005 to September 2006. The traps were deployed close to the seafloor and recovered during the ArcticNet annual expeditions onboard the CCGS Amundsen in 2005 and the CCGS Pierre Radisson in 2006. We document the seasonal succession of dinoflagellate cyst taxa, together with cyst species composition

  4. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  5. Ocean Surface Current Vectors from MODIS Terra/Aqua Sea Surface Temperature Image Pairs Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Satellites that record imagery of the same sea surface area, at times separated by a few hours, can be used to estimate ocean surface velocity fields based on the...

  6. Sea surface height and transport stream function of the South China Sea from a variable-grid global ocean circulation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏泽勋; 方国洪; 崔秉昊; 方越; 何宜军

    2003-01-01

    A fine-grid model (1/6°) covering the South China Sea (SCS), East China Sea and Japan/East Sea, which is embedded into a coarse-grid (3°) global model, was established to study the SCS circulation. In the present paper, we report the model-produced monthly and annual mean transport stream functions and sea surface heights(SSH) and their anomalies of the SCS. Comparison to the TOPEX/Poseidon data shows that the model-produced monthly sea surface height anomalies (SSHA) are in good agreement with altimeter measurements. Based on the results, the circulation of the SCS, especially the upper layer circulation, is discussed. In the surface layer, the western Philippine Sea water intrudes into the SCS through the Luzon Strait in autumn, winter and spring, but not in summer. However, as far as the whole water column is concerned, the water intrudes into the SCS through the Luzon Strait all the year round. This indicates that in summer the water still intrudes into the SCS in the subsurface and intermediate layers. The area near the northern continental slope of the SCS is dominated by a cyclonic circulation all the year round. The SCS Southern Anticyclonic Gyre, SE Vietnam Off-Shore Current in summertime and SCS Southern Cyclonic Gyre in wintertime are reproduced reasonably. The difference between the monthly averaged SSH and SSHA is significant, indicating the importance of the mean SSH in the SCS circulation.

  7. Fine-resolution simulation of surface current and sea ice in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiying; ZHANG Xuehong; YU Rucong; LIU Hailong; LI Wei

    2007-01-01

    A fine-resolution model is developed for ocean circulation simulation in the National Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (LASG),Chinese Academy of Sciences, and is applied to simulate surface current and sea ice variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. A dynamic sea ice model in elastic-viscous-plastic rheology and a thermodynamic sea ice model are employed. A 200-year simulation is performed and a dimatological average of a 10-year period (141 st-150 th) is presented with focus on sea ice concentration and surface current variations in the Arctic Mediterranean Seas. The model is able to simulate well the East Greenland Current, Beaufort Gyre and the Transpolar Drift, but the simulated West Spitsbergen Current is small and weak. In the March climatology, the sea ice coverage can be simulated well except for a bit more ice in east of Spitsbergen Island. The result is also good for the September scenario except for less ice concentration east of Greenland and greater ice concentration near the ice margin. The extra ice east of Spitsbergen Island is caused by sea ice current convergence forced by atmospheric wind stress.

  8. Zonal surface wind jets across the Red Sea due to mountain gap forcing along both sides of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Houshuo

    2009-01-01

    [1] Mesoscale atmospheric modeling over the Red Sea, validated by in-situ meteorological buoy data, identifies two types of coastal mountain gap wind jets that frequently blow across the longitudinal axis of the Red Sea: (1) an eastward-blowing summer daily wind jet originating from the Tokar Gap on the Sudanese Red Sea coast, and (2) wintertime westward-blowing wind-jet bands along the northwestern Saudi Arabian coast, which occur every 10-20 days and can last for several days when occurring. Both wind jets can attain wind speeds over 15 m s-1 and contribute significantly to monthly mean surface wind stress, especially in the cross-axis components, which could be of importance to ocean eddy formation in the Red Sea. The wintertime wind jets can cause significant evaporation and ocean heat loss along the northeastern Red Sea coast and may potentially drive deep convection in that region. An initial characterization of these wind jets is presented. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  9. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  10. Controls of Caribbean surface hydrology during the mid- to late Holocene: insights from monthly resolved coral records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Giry

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we reconstruct seasonality and interannual to multidecadal variability of sea surface hydrology of the southern Caribbean Sea by applying paired coral Sr/Ca and δ18O measurements on fossil annually-banded Diploria strigosa corals from Bonaire. This allows for better understanding short-term (i.e., seasonal to multidecadal variability of the Caribbean hydrological cycle during the mid- to late Holocene. The monthly-resolved coral Δ δ18O records are used as a proxy for the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater (δ18Osw of the southern Caribbean Sea. Consistent with modern day conditions, annual δ18Osw cycles reconstructed from three modern corals reveal that freshwater budget at the study site is influenced by both the evaporation/precipitation ratio and the seasonal advection of tropical freshwater brought by wind-driven surface currents. In contrast, the annual δ18Osw cycle reconstructed from a mid-Holocene coral indicates sharp peaks towards more negative values in summer suggesting intense summer precipitation at 6 ka before present (BP. In line with this our model simulations indicate that increased seasonality of the hydrological cycle at 6 ka BP results from enhanced precipitation in summertime. On interannual to multidecadal timescales, the systematic positive correlation observed between reconstructed sea surface temperature and salinity suggests that freshwater discharged from the Orinoco and Amazon rivers and transported into the Caribbean by wind-driven surface currents is a critical component influencing sea surface hydrology on these timescales.

  11. Preliminary validation of SMOS sea surface salinity measurements in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yongzheng; Dong, Qing; He, Mingxia

    2015-01-01

    The SMOS (soil moisture and ocean salinity) mission undertaken by the European Space Agency (ESA) has provided sea surface salinity (SSS) measurements at global scale since 2009. Validation of SSS values retrieved from SMOS data has been done globally and regionally. However, the accuracy of SSS measurements by SMOS in the China seas has not been examined in detail. In this study, we compared retrieved SSS values from SMOS data with in situ measurements from a South China Sea (SCS) expedition during autumn 2011. The comparison shows that the retrieved SSS values using ascending pass data have much better agreement with in situ measurements than the result derived from descending pass data. Accuracy in terms of bias and root mean square error (RMS) of the SSS retrieved using three different sea surface roughness models is very consistent, regardless of ascending or descending orbits. When ascending and descending measurements are combined for comparison, the retrieved SSS using a semi-empirical model shows the best agreement with in situ measurements, with bias -0.33 practical salinity units and RMS 0.74. We also investigated the impact of environmental conditions of sea surface wind and sea surface temperature on accuracy of the retrieved SSS. The SCS is a semi-closed basin where radio frequencies transmitted from the mainland strongly interfere with SMOS measurements. Therefore, accuracy of retrieved SSS shows a relationship with distance between the validation sites and land.

  12. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flores, Hauke; van Franeker, Jan-Andries; Cisewski, Boris; Leach, Harry; Van de Putte, Anton P.; Meesters, Erik (H. W. G.); Bathmann, Ulrich; Wolff, Wirn J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0-2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  13. Macrofauna under sea ice and in the open surface layer of the Lazarev Sea, Southern Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florentino De Souza Silva, A.P.; Franeker, van J.A.; Cisewski, B.; Leach, H.; Putte, van de A.P.; Meesters, H.W.G.; Bathmann, U.; Wolff, W.J.

    2011-01-01

    A new fishing gear was used to sample the macrozooplankton and micronekton community in the surface layer (0–2 m) under ice and in open water, the Surface and Under Ice Trawl (SUIT). In total, 57 quantitative hauls were conducted in the Lazarev Sea (Southern Ocean) during 3 different seasons (autumn

  14. Long-term Variability of Sea Surface Temperature in the East China Sea: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hak Lee

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The long-term variability of sea surface temperature in the East China Sea was reviewed based mainly on published literatures. Though the quantitative results are not the same, it is generally shown that sea surface temperature is increasing especially in recent years with the rate of increase about 0.03oC/year. Other meaningful results presented in the literatures is that the difference of water properties between layers upper and lower than the thermocline in summer shows an increasing trend both in temperature and salinity, suggesting that the stratification has been intensified. As a mechanism by which to evaluate the wintertime warming trend in the region, the weakening of wind strength, which is related to the variation of sea level pressure and atmospheric circulation in the western North Pacific and northern Asian continent, is suggested in the most of related studies.

  15. Monthly CO2 at A4HDYD station in a productive shallow marginal sea (Yellow Sea) with a seasonal thermocline: Controlling processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuemei; Zang, Kunpeng; Zhao, Huade; Zheng, Nan; Huo, Cheng; Wang, Juying

    2016-07-01

    Based upon 21 field surveys conducted from March 2011 to November 2013, monthly variation of carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) and other carbon system parameters were investigated for the first time (to our knowledge) at A4HDYD station (38°40‧N, 122°10‧E) located in the North Yellow Sea, a region with a seasonal thermocline. Surface pCO2 was undersaturated from March to May and nearly in equilibrium with the atmosphere from June to August. During September and November, pCO2 declined to a lower level than that from June to August, but reached the highest level in December. In contrast, pCO2 declined to atmospheric CO2 levels in February. Overall, the study area was a net CO2 sink at a rate of 0.85 ± 0.59 mol C m- 2 yr- 1. The underlying processes governing the variation of pCO2 were also examined. In general, temperature had an important influence on the monthly variation of pCO2, but its effect was counterbalanced by biological production in spring and vertical mixing in early winter. Our study indicated that dynamic mechanism studies based on high temporal resolution observations are urgently needed to understand the complexity of the carbon cycle and detect biogeochemical changes or ecosystem responses to climate change on continental margins.

  16. SEA SURFACE ALTIMETRY BASED ON AIRBORNE GNSS SIGNAL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the focus is on ocean surface altimetry using the signals transmitted from GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System satellites. A low-altitude airborne experiment was recently conducted off the coast of Sydney. Both a LiDAR experiment and a GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R experiment were carried out in the same aircraft, at the same time, in the presence of strong wind and rather high wave height. The sea surface characteristics, including the surface height, were derived from processing the LiDAR data. A two-loop iterative method is proposed to calculate sea surface height using the relative delay between the direct and the reflected GNSS signals. The preliminary results indicate that the results obtained from the GNSS-based surface altimetry deviate from the LiDAR-based results significantly. Identification of the error sources and mitigation of the errors are needed to achieve better surface height estimation performance using GNSS signals.

  17. Holocene hydrological and sea surface temperature changes in the northern coast of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mong-Sin; Zong, Yongqiang; Mok, Ka-Man; Cheung, Ka-Ming; Xiong, Haixian; Huang, Guangqing

    2017-03-01

    In order to reconstruct the Holocene environmental history of a coastal site in the northern South China Sea, this study analysed the organic carbon isotope ratios (δ13Corg) and alkenone unsaturation ratios (UK‧37) from a 36.5 m-long sediment core drilled at seabed in the mouth region of the Pearl River estuary and generated a coupled hydrological and temperature record. This record reveals changes of monsoon-induced sediment discharge and sea surface temperature of the Holocene in four stages. In Stage I, the site was under fluvial conditions prior to postglacial marine transgression. Stage II saw an increase of sea surface temperature from c. 23.0 °C to 27.0 °C, associated with a strengthened summer monsoon from c. 10,350 to 8900 cal. years BP. This was also a period of rapid sea-level rise and marine transgression, during which the sea inundated the palaeo-incised channel, i.e. the lower part of the T-shape accommodation space created by the rising sea. In these 1500 years, fluvial discharge was strong and concentrated within the channel, and the high sedimentation rate (11.8 mm/year) was very close to the rate of sea-level rise. In the subsequent 2000 years (Stage III) sea level continued to rise and the sea flooded the broad seabed above the palaeo-incised channel, resulted in fluvial discharge spreading thinly across the wide accommodation space and a much reduced sedimentation rate (1.8 mm/year). Sea surface temperature in this stage reached 27.3 °C initially, but dropped sharply to 26.1 °C towards c. 8200 cal. years BP. The final stage covers the last 7000 years, and the site was under a stable sea level. Sedimentation in this stage varied a little, but averaged at 1.8 mm/year. Whilst fluvial discharge and sea surface temperature didn't change much, two short periods of hydrological and temperature change were observed, which are related to the climatic cooling events of c. 4200 cal. years ago and the Little Ice Age.

  18. Recent sea surface temperature trends and future scenarios for the Mediterranean Sea:

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We analyse recent Mediterranean Sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and their response to global change using 1/4-degree gridded advanced very-high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR) daily SST data, 1982-2012. These data indicate significant annual warming (from 0.24°C decade-1 west of the Strait of Gibraltar to 0.51°C decade-1 over the Black Sea) and significant spatial variation in annual average SST (from 15ºC over the Black Sea to 21°C over the Levantine sub-basin). Ensemble mean scenarios indicat...

  19. STUDY OF NON-BOUSSINESQ EFFCET ON SEA SURFACE HEIGHT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xian-yao; WANG Xuan; WANG Xiu-hong; QIAO Fang-li

    2004-01-01

    A set of equations was derived for a non-Boussinesq ocean model in this paper.A new time-splitting scheme was introduced which incorporates the 4th-order Runge-Kutta explicit scheme of low-frequency mode and an implicit scheme of high-frequency mode.With this model,potential temperature,salinity fields and sea surface height were calculated simultaneously such that the numerical error of extrapolation of density field from the current time level to the next one could be reduced while using the equation of mass conservation to determine sea surface height.The non-Boussinesq effect on the density field and sea surface height was estimated by numerical experiments in the final part of this paper.

  20. Optimisation of sea surface current retrieval using a maximum cross correlation technique on modelled sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, Céline; Eriksson, Leif; Carvajal, Gisela

    2017-04-01

    Using sea surface temperature from satellite images to retrieve sea surface currents is not a new idea, but so far its operational near-real time implementation has not been possible. Validation studies are too region-specific or uncertain, due to the errors induced by the images themselves. Moreover, the sensitivity of the most common retrieval method, the maximum cross correlation, to the three parameters that have to be set is unknown. Using model outputs instead of satellite images, biases induced by this method are assessed here, for four different seas of Western Europe, and the best of nine settings and eight temporal resolutions are determined. For all regions, tracking a small 5 km pattern from the first image over a large 30 km region around its original location on a second image, separated from the first image by 6 to 9 hours returned the most accurate results. Moreover, for all regions, the problem is not inaccurate results but missing results, where the velocity is too low to be picked by the retrieval. The results are consistent both with limitations caused by ocean surface current dynamics and with the available satellite technology, indicating that automated sea surface current retrieval from sea surface temperature images is feasible now, for search and rescue operations, pollution confinement or even for more energy efficient and comfortable ship navigation.

  1. Determination of sea surface temperatures from microwave and IR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Grover, J.

    1982-01-01

    Microwave measurements from the Nimbus 7 SMMR were used to derive the atmospheric precipitable water, which was then used to obtain the atmospheric correction for use with AVHRR thermal IR measurements to obtain sea surface temperature (SST). The resulting SST's were compared with the NOAA operational sea surface temperature measurements, and the two sets of measurements were found to be in reasonable agreement. The average residuals between the two sets of measurements was 0.15 K with the NOAA operational SST's being slightly greater.

  2. Biological control of surface temperature in the Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Gouveia, Albert D.; Shetye, Satish R.; Ravindran, P.; Platt, Trevor

    1991-01-01

    In the Arabian Sea, the southwest monsoon promotes seasonal upwelling of deep water, which supplies nutrients to the surface layer and leads to a marked increase in phytoplankton growth. Remotely sensed data on ocean color are used here to show that the resulting distribution of phytoplankton exerts a controlling influence on the seasonal evolution of sea surface temperature. This results in a corresponding modification of ocean-atmosphere heat exchange on regional and seasonal scales. It is shown that this biological mechanism may provide an important regulating influence on ocean-atmosphere interactions.

  3. A preliminary assessment of the sea surface wind speed production of HY-2 scanning microwave radiometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiaoqi; ZHU Jianhua; LIN Mingsen; ZHAO Yili; WANG He; CHEN Chuntao; PENG Hailong; ZHANG Youguang

    2014-01-01

    A scanning microwave radiometer (RM) was launched on August 16, 2011, on board HY-2 satellite. The six-month long global sea surface wind speeds observed by the HY-2 scanning microwave radiometer are preliminarily validated using in-situ measurements and WindSat observations, respectively, from January to June 2012. The wind speed root-mean-square (RMS) difference of the comparisons with in-situ data is 1.89 m/s for the measurements of NDBC and 1.72 m/s for the recent four-month data measured by PY30-1 oil platform, respectively. On a global scale, the wind speeds of HY-2 RM are compared with the sea surface wind speeds derived from WindSat, the RMS difference of 1.85 m/s for HY-2 RM collocated observations data set is calculated in the same period as above. With analyzing the global map of a mean difference between HY-2 RM and WindSat, it appears that the bias of the sea surface wind speed is obviously higher in the inshore regions. In the open sea, there is a relatively higher positive bias in the mid-latitude regions due to the overestimation of wind speed observations, while the wind speeds are underestimated in the Southern Ocean by HY-2 RM relative to WindSat observations.

  4. Assessment of Sea Surface Temperatures in the Caribbean Sea Associated with Hurricane Tracks Using GOES-East Infrared Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, J. C.; Walker, N. D.; Haag, A.; Pino, J. V.

    2016-02-01

    A minimum sea surface temperature (SST) of 26° C is considered a requirement for hurricane generation and maintenance. Although the Caribbean Sea lies within the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool, notable north-south gradients in SST during summer often exist due to wind-induced cool water upwelling along the northern coast of South America. Our hypothesis is that the spatial extent and magnitude of cooling due to this upwelling process has an impact on the location of individual hurricane tracks. We propose that hurricanes will track further north when upwelling is strong and regionally extensive. We will investigate spatial SST variability within and across hurricane seasons in relationship to hurricane tracks. We will also investigate SST along the hurricane tracks. SSTs will be quantified using GOES-East weekly and monthly composites at a spatial resolution of 4x4 km and using the 4 micron channel, which is least affected by atmospheric water vapor attenuation.A minimum sea surface temperature (SST) of 26° C is considered a requirement for hurricane generation and maintenance. Although the Caribbean Sea lies within the Western Hemisphere Warm Pool, notable north-south gradients in SST during summer often exist due to wind-induced cool water upwelling along the northern coast of South America. Our hypothesis is that the spatial extent and magnitude of cooling due to this upwelling process has an impact on the location of individual hurricane tracks. We propose that hurricanes will track further north when upwelling is strong and regionally extensive. We will investigate spatial SST variability within and across hurricane seasons in relationship to hurricane tracks. We will also investigate SST along the hurricane tracks. SSTs will be quantified using GOES-East weekly and monthly composites at a spatial resolution of 4x4 km and using the 4 micron channel, which is least affected by atmospheric water vapor attenuation.

  5. A new algorithm for microwave radiometer remote sensing of sea surface salinity and temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; Xiaobin; LIU; Yuguang; WANG; Zhenzhan

    2006-01-01

    The microwave radiation of the sea surface, which is denoted by the sea surface brightness temperature, is not only related with sea surface salinity (SSS) and temperature (SST), but also influenced by sea surface wind. The errors of wind detected by satellite sensor have significant influences on the accuracy of SSS and SST retrieval. The effects of sea surface wind on sea surface brightness temperature, i.e. △Th,v, and the relations among △Th,v, wind speed, sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity and incidence angle of observation are investigated. Based on the investigations, a new algorithm depending on the design of a single radiometer with double polarizations and multi-incidence angles is proposed. The algorithm excludes the influence of sea surface wind on SSS and SST retrieval, and provides a new method for remote sensing of SSS and SST.

  6. NOAA/NMC/CAC Arctic and Antarctic Monthly Sea Ice Extent, 1973-1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sea ice extent from January 1973 through August 1990 was digitized from weekly operational sea ice charts produced by the Navy/NOAA Joint Ice Center. Charts were...

  7. Assessment of Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Ice Initial Conditions on Coupled Model Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrieri, J. M.; Solomon, A.; Persson, O. P. G.; Capotondi, A.; LaFontaine, F.; Jedlovec, G.

    2016-12-01

    We present weather-scale (0-10 day) sea ice forecast validation and skill results from an experimental coupled ice-ocean-atmosphere model during the fall freeze-up periods for 2015 and 2016. The model is a mesoscale, coupled atmosphere-ice-ocean mixed-layer model, termed RASM-ESRL, that was developed from the larger-scale Regional Arctic System Model (RASM) architecture. The atmospheric component of RASM-ESRL consists of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the sea-ice component is the Los Alamos CICE model, and the ocean model is POP. Experimental 5-day forecasts were run daily with RASM-ESRL from July through mid-November in 2015 and 2016. Our project focuses on how the modeled sea ice evolution compares to observed physical processes including atmospheric forcing of sea ice movement, melt, and freeze-up through energy fluxes. Model hindcast output is validated against buoy observations, satellite measurements, and concurrent in situ flux observations made from the R/V Sikuliaq in the fall of 2015. Model skill in predicting atmospheric state variables, wind and boundary layer structures, synoptic features, cloud microphysical and ocean properties will be discussed. We will show results of using different initializations of ocean sea surface temperature and sea ice extent and the impacts on sea ice edge prediction.

  8. Global monitoring of Sea Surface Salinity with Aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerloef, G. S. E.; LeVine, D. M.; Chao, Yi; Colomb, R.; Nollmann, I.

    2005-01-01

    Aquarius is a microwave remote sensing system designed to obtain global maps of the surface salinity field of the oceans from space. It will be flown on the Aquarius/SAC-D mission, a partnership between the USA (NASA) and Argentina (CONAE) with launch scheduled for late in 2008. The objective of Aquarius is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This will provide data to address scientific questions associated with ocean circulation and its impact on climate. For example, salinity is needed to understand the large scale thermohaline circulation, driven by buoyancy, which moves large masses of water and heat around the globe. Of the two variables that determine buoyancy (salinity and temperature), temperature is already being monitored. Salinity is the missing variable needed to understand this circulation. Salinity also has an important role in energy exchange between the ocean and atmosphere, for example in the development of fresh water lenses (buoyant water that forms stable layers and insulates water below from the atmosphere) which alter the air-sea coupling. Aquarius is a combination radiometer and scatterometer (radar) operating at L-band (1.413 GHz for the radiometer and 1.26 GHz for the scatterometer). The primary instrument,for measuring salinity is the radiometer which is able to detect salinity because of the modulation salinity produces on the thermal emission from sea water. This change is detectable at the long wavelength end of the microwave spectrum. The scatterometer will provide a correction for surface roughness (waves) which is one of the greatest unknowns in the retrieval. The sensor will be in a sun-synchronous orbit at about 650 km with equatorial crossings of 6am/6pm. The antenna for these two instruments is a 3 meter offset fed reflector with three feeds arranged in pushbroom fashion looking away from the sun toward the shadow side of the orbit to

  9. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea ice variability on monthly-to-annual time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, F.; Hazeleger, W.

    2015-01-01

    The large decrease in Arctic sea ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea ice predictions on seasonal-to-decadal time scales. Hence, it is important to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. This study

  10. Arctic energy budget in relation to sea ice variability on monthly-to-annual time scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krikken, F.; Hazeleger, W.

    2015-01-01

    The large decrease in Arctic sea ice in recent years has triggered a strong interest in Arctic sea ice predictions on seasonal-to-decadal time scales. Hence, it is important to understand physical processes that provide enhanced predictability beyond persistence of sea ice anomalies. This study anal

  11. Effects of the 2003 European heatwave on the Central Mediterranean Sea surface layer: a numerical simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olita

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of anomalous weather conditions on the sea surface layer over the Central Mediterranean were studied with an eddy resolving regional ocean model by performing a 5-year long simulation from 2000 to 2004. The focus was on surface heat fluxes, temperature and dynamics. The analysis of the time series of the selected variables permitted us to identify and quantify the anomalies of the analysed parameters. In order to separate the part of variability not related to the annual cycle and to locate the anomalies in the time-frequency domain, we performed a wavelet analysis of anomalies time series. We found the strongest anomalous event was the overheating affecting the sea surface in the summer of 2003. This anomaly was strictly related to a strong increase of air temperature, a decrease of both wind stress and upward heat fluxes in all their components. The simulated monthly averages of the sea surface temperature were in a good agreement with the remotely-sensed data, although the ocean regional model tended to underestimate the extreme events. We also found, on the basis of the long-wave period of the observed anomaly, this event was not limited to the few summer months, but it was probably part of a longer signal, which also includes negative perturbations of the involved variables. The atmospheric parameters responsible for the overheating of the sea surface also influenced the regional surface and sub-surface dynamics, especially in the Atlantic Ionian Stream and the African Modified Atlantic Water current, in which flows seem to be deeply modified in that period.

  12. SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE and Other Data from UNKNOWN PLATFORMS From World-Wide Distribution from 18700101 to 19781231 (NODC Accession 8800040)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Each file contains data on Sea Surface Temperature Anomaly analyses on a 1-degree square for each calender month of the period January 1870 through December 1894 (25...

  13. Seasonal variation of sea surface temperature in the Bay of Bengal during 1992 as derived from NOAA-AVHRR SST data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Rao, L.V.G.; Reddy, G.V.

    Monthly maps of sea surface temperature (SST) derived for NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration)-AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data during 1992 for the Bay of Bengal are analysed and compared with the available...

  14. Polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional Gaussian sea surfaces with surface reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongkun; Pinel, Nicolas; Bourlier, Christophe

    2011-08-10

    Surface reflection is an important phenomenon that must be taken into account when studying sea surface infrared emissivity, especially at large observation angles. This paper models analytically the polarized infrared emissivity of one-dimensional sea surfaces with shadowing effect and one surface reflection, by assuming a Gaussian surface slope distribution. A Monte Carlo ray-tracing method is employed as a reference. It is shown that the present model agrees well with the reference method. The emissivity calculated by the present model is then compared with measurements. The comparisons show that agreements are greatly improved by taking one surface reflection into account. The Monte Carlo ray-tracing results of sea surface infrared emissivity with two and three reflections are also determined. Their contributions are shown to be negligible.

  15. Processes of India's offshore summer intraseasonal sea surface temperature variability

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kurian, N.; Lengaigne, M.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Vialard, J.; Pous, S.; Peter, A-C.; Durand; Naik, Shweta

    ., vol.63; 2013; 329-346 Processes of India’s offshore summer intraseasonal sea surface temperature variability K. Nisha1, M. Lengaigne1,2, V.V. Gopalakrishna,1 J. Vialard2, S. Pous2, A.-C. Peter2, F. Durand3, S.Naik1 1. NIO, CSIR, Goa, India 2...

  16. On the dependence of sea surface roughness on wind waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, H.K.; Højstrup, J.; Vested, H.J.;

    1998-01-01

    The influence of wind waves on the momentum transfer (wind stress) between the atmosphere and sea surface was studied using new measured data from the RASEX experiment and other datasets compiled by Donelan et al. Results of the data analysis indicate that errors in wind friction velocity u...

  17. Mapping sea-surface roughness using microwave radiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E.

    1971-01-01

    Microwave radiometry data (1.55 cm) taken by aircraft over the Salton Sea have been corrected for viewing angle and atmospheric effects, rectified, and mapped. No fetch-limited conditions are observed along the upwind shore despite a 15 m/sec wind, which indicates that the radiometer is sensitive to the short wavelength surface roughness but not to the longer wavelengths. The brightness temperature field can be represented as a nearly linear function of the surface wind speed.

  18. WIND STRESS AND SURFACE ROUGHNESS AT AIR-SEA INTERFACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Based on the compiled data of thirty independent observations, the report presents the wind - stress coefficient, the surface roughness and the...boundary layer flow regime at the air-sea interface under various wind conditions. Both the wind - stress coefficient and the surface roughness are found to...data and Charnock’s proportionality constant is determined. Finally, two approximate formulae for the wind - stress coefficient, one for light wind and the other for strong wind are suggested.

  19. The Impact of Dielectric Constant Model and Surface Reference on Differences Between SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; LeVine, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  20. The DTU15 MSS (Mean Sea Surface) and DTU15LAT (Lowest Astronomical Tide) reference surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars; Piccioni, Gaia;

    in the Arctic Ocean for DTU10MSS and DTU13MSS.A new reference surface for off-shore vertical referencing is introduced. This is called the DTU15LAT.The surface is derived from the DTU15MSS and the DTU10 Global ocean tide to give a 19 year Lowest Astronomical Tide referenced to either the Mean sea surface...

  1. Nitrogen surface water retention in the Baltic Sea drainage basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stålnacke

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we estimate the surface water retention of nitrogen (N in all the 117 drainage basins to the Baltic Sea with the use of a statistical model (MESAW for source apportionment of riverine loads of pollutants. Our results show that the MESAW model was able to estimate the N load at the river mouth of 88 Baltic Sea rivers, for which we had observed data, with a sufficient degree of precision and accuracy. The estimated retention parameters were also statistically significant. Our results show that around 380 000 t of N are annually retained in surface waters draining to the Baltic Sea. The total annual riverine load from the 117 basins to the Baltic Sea was estimated to 570 000 t of N, giving a total surface water N retention of around 40%. In terms of absolute retention values, three major river basins account for 50% of the total retention in the 117 basins; i.e. around 104 000 t of N is retained in Neva, 55 000 t in Vistula and 32 000 t in Oder. The largest retention was found in river basins with a high percentage of lakes as indicated by a strong relationship between N retention (% and share of lake area in the river drainage areas. For example in Göta älv, we estimated a total N retention of 72%, whereof 67% of the retention occurred in the lakes of that drainage area (Lake Vänern primarily. The obtained results will hopefully enable the Helsinki Commission (HELCOM to refine the nutrient load targets in the Baltic Sea Action Plan (BSAP, as well as to better identify cost-efficient measures to reduce nutrient loadings to the Baltic Sea.

  2. Seasonal variations of air-sea heat fluxes and sea surface temperature in the northwestern Pacific marginal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Na; WU Dexing; LIN Xiaopei; MENG Qingjia

    2014-01-01

    Using a net surface heat flux (Qnet) product obtained from the objectively analyzed air-sea fluxes (OAFlux) project and the international satellite cloud climatology project (ISCCP), and temperature from the simple ocean data assimilation (SODA), the seasonal variations of the air-sea heat fluxes in the northwestern Pa-cific marginal seas (NPMS) and their roles in sea surface temperature (SST) seasonality are studied. The seasonal variations of Qnet, which is generally determined by the seasonal cycle of latent heat flux (LH), are in response to the advection-induced changes of SST over the Kuroshio and its extension. Two dynamic regimes are identified in the NPMS:one is the area along the Kuroshio and its extension, and the other is the area outside the Kuroshio. The oceanic thermal advection dominates the variations of SST and hence the sea-air humidity plays a primary role and explains the maximum heat losing along the Kuroshio. The heat transported by the Kuroshio leads to a longer period of heat losing over the Kuroshio and its Extension. Positive anomaly of heat content corresponds with the maximum heat loss along the Kuroshio. The oceanic advection controls the variations of heat content and hence the surface heat flux. This study will help us understand the mechanism controlling variations of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system in the NPMS. In the Kuroshio region, the ocean current controls the ocean temperature along the main stream of the Ku-roshio, and at the same time, forces the air-sea fluxes.

  3. On model differences and skill in predicting sea surface temperature in the Nordic and Barents Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langehaug, H. R.; Matei, D.; Eldevik, T.; Lohmann, K.; Gao, Y.

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic Seas and the Barents Sea is the Atlantic Ocean's gateway to the Arctic Ocean, and the Gulf Stream's northern extension brings large amounts of heat into this region and modulates climate in northwestern Europe. We have investigated the predictive skill of initialized hindcast simulations performed with three state-of-the-art climate prediction models within the CMIP5-framework, focusing on sea surface temperature (SST) in the Nordic Seas and Barents Sea, but also on sea ice extent, and the subpolar North Atlantic upstream. The hindcasts are compared with observation-based SST for the period 1961-2010. All models have significant predictive skill in specific regions at certain lead times. However, among the three models there is little consistency concerning which regions that display predictive skill and at what lead times. For instance, in the eastern Nordic Seas, only one model has significant skill in predicting observed SST variability at longer lead times (7-10 years). This region is of particular promise in terms of predictability, as observed thermohaline anomalies progress from the subpolar North Atlantic to the Fram Strait within the time frame of a couple of years. In the same model, predictive skill appears to move northward along a similar route as forecast time progresses. We attribute this to the northward advection of SST anomalies, contributing to skill at longer lead times in the eastern Nordic Seas. The skill at these lead times in particular beats that of persistence forecast, again indicating the potential role of ocean circulation as a source for skill. Furthermore, we discuss possible explanations for the difference in skill among models, such as different model resolutions, initialization techniques, and model climatologies and variance.

  4. On model differences and skill in predicting sea surface temperature in the Nordic and Barents Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langehaug, H. R.; Matei, D.; Eldevik, T.; Lohmann, K.; Gao, Y.

    2017-02-01

    The Nordic Seas and the Barents Sea is the Atlantic Ocean's gateway to the Arctic Ocean, and the Gulf Stream's northern extension brings large amounts of heat into this region and modulates climate in northwestern Europe. We have investigated the predictive skill of initialized hindcast simulations performed with three state-of-the-art climate prediction models within the CMIP5-framework, focusing on sea surface temperature (SST) in the Nordic Seas and Barents Sea, but also on sea ice extent, and the subpolar North Atlantic upstream. The hindcasts are compared with observation-based SST for the period 1961-2010. All models have significant predictive skill in specific regions at certain lead times. However, among the three models there is little consistency concerning which regions that display predictive skill and at what lead times. For instance, in the eastern Nordic Seas, only one model has significant skill in predicting observed SST variability at longer lead times (7-10 years). This region is of particular promise in terms of predictability, as observed thermohaline anomalies progress from the subpolar North Atlantic to the Fram Strait within the time frame of a couple of years. In the same model, predictive skill appears to move northward along a similar route as forecast time progresses. We attribute this to the northward advection of SST anomalies, contributing to skill at longer lead times in the eastern Nordic Seas. The skill at these lead times in particular beats that of persistence forecast, again indicating the potential role of ocean circulation as a source for skill. Furthermore, we discuss possible explanations for the difference in skill among models, such as different model resolutions, initialization techniques, and model climatologies and variance.

  5. Comparison of satellite and airborne sensor data on sea surface temperature and suspended solid distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Saito, K.; Hayakawa, S.; Narigasawa, K.

    1992-07-01

    Sea surface temperature and suspended solid were observed simultaneously by LANDSAT TM, NOAA AVHRR and airborne MSS. The authors compared the following items through the data, i.e., 1) Sea surface temperature, 2) Suspended solid in the sea water, 3) Monitoring ability on ocean environment. It was found that distribution patterns of sea surface temperature and suspended solid in the Ariake Sea obtained from LANDSAT TM are similar with those from airborne MSS in a scale of 1:300,000. Sea surface temperature estimated from NOAA AVHRR data indicates a fact of an ocean environment of the Ariake Sea and the around sea area. It is concluded that the TM data can be used for the monitoring of sea environment. The NOAA AVHRR data is useful for the estimation of sea surface temperature with the airborne MSS data.

  6. The global mean sea surface model WHU2013

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taoyong Jin; Jiancheng Li; Weiping Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The mean sea surface (MSS) model is an important reference for the study of charting datum and sea level change.A global MSS model named WHU2013,with 2′ × 2′ spatial resolution between 80°S and 84°N,is established in this paper by combining nearly 20 years of multi-satellite altimetric data that include Topex/Poseidon (T/P),Jason-1,Jason-2,ERS-2,ENVISAT and GFO Exact Repeat Mission (ERM) data,ERS-1/168,Jason-1/C geodetic mission data and Cryosat-2 low resolution mode (LRM) data.All the ERM data are adjusted by the collinear method to achieve the mean along-track sea surface height (SSH),and the combined dataset of T/P,Jason-1 and Jason-2 from 1993 to 2012 after collinear adjustment is used as the reference data.The sea level variations in the non-ERM data (geodetic mission data and LRM data) are mainly investigated,and a combined method is proposed to correct the sea level variations between 66°S and 66°N by along-track sea level variation time series and beyond 66°S or 66°N by seasonal sea level variations.In the crossover adjustment between multi-altimetric data,a stepwise method is used to solve the problem of inconsistency in the reference data between the high and low latitude regions.The proposed model is compared with the CNES-CLS2011 and DTU13 MSS models,and the standard derivation.(STD) of the differences between the models is about 5 cm between 80°S and 84°N,less than 3 cm between 66°S and 66°N,and less than 4 cm in the China Sea and its adjacent sea.Furthermore,the three models exhibit a good agreement in the SSH differences and the along-track gradient of SSH following comparisons with satellite altimetry data.

  7. A Computer Model for Bistatic Sea Surface Microwave Reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-14

    height of the rough surface in the z-direction. The rough sea surface is then modeled as a two-dimensional Gaussian random surface according to Beckmann ...Bistatic RCS In Beckmann and Spizzichino, [1] an equation was derived for the bistatic RCS based on an evaluation of the statistical properties of the...x y G x y S x y x y     (10) In Eq. (10),  ( , )G x y accounts for the wave-slope statistics (the classical Beckmann and Spizzichino

  8. Low frequency variability of the Indian Ocean from TOPEX/POSEIDON sea surface height anomalies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Somayajulu, Y.K.; Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, Y.V.B.

    The sea surface height (SSH) anomalies derived from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimeter have been utilized to study the variability of surface circulation in the Indian Ocean during 1993-1999. The Western Bay, southeastern Arabian Sea, regions off Somalia...

  9. Sea Surface Height, Absolute, Aviso, 0.25 degrees, Global, Science Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviso Absolute Sea Surface Height is the Sea Surface Height Deviation plus the long term mean dynamic height. This is Science Quality data.

  10. GHRSST Level 4 GAMSSA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Australian Bureau...

  11. GHRSST Level 4 RAMSSA Australian Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Australian Bureau...

  12. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  13. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA Eastern Central Pacific Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  14. GHRSST Level 4 G1SST Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the JPL OurOcean...

  15. GHRSST Level 4 DMI_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the Danish...

  16. GHRSST Level 4 OSTIA Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the UK Met Office...

  17. Electromagnetic fields induced by surface ring waves in the deep sea

    OpenAIRE

    Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with electromagnetic effects associated with a radially symmetric system of progressive surface waves in the deep sea, induced by underwater oscillating sources or by dispersive decay of the initial localized perturbations of the sea surface.

  18. GHRSST Level 4 MW_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.25 degree grid at Remote Sensing...

  19. GHRSST Level 4 MUR North America Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced as a retrospective dataset at the JPL Physical...

  20. GHRSST Level 4 OSPO Global Nighttime Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Office of...

  1. GHRSST Level 4 OSPO Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Office of...

  2. GHRSST Level 4 AVHRR_AMSR_OI Global Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.25 degree grid at the NOAA...

  3. GHRSST Level 4 K10_SST Global 1 meter Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Naval...

  4. Interannual variations of surface winds over China marginal seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Che; YAN Xiaomei

    2012-01-01

    In a study of surface monsoon winds over the China marginal seas,Sun et al.(2012) use singular value decomposition method to identify regional dominant modes and analyze their interdecadal variability.This paper continues to evaluate the interannual variability of each dominant mode and its relation to various atmospheric,oceanic and land factors.The findings include:1) The intensity of the winter monsoon over the East China Sea is highly correlated with the Siberian High intensity and anti-correlated with the latitudinal position of the Aleutian Low as well as the rainfall in eastem China,Korean Peninsula and Japan; 2) The western Pacific subtropical high is significantly correlated with the summer monsoon intensity over the East China Sea and anti-correlated with the summer monsoon over the South China Sea; 3) The winter monsoon in a broad zonal belt through the Luzon Strait is dominated by the ENSO signal,strengthening in the La Ni(n)a phase and weakening in the El Ni(n)o phase.This inverse relation exhibits interdecadal shift with a period of weak correlation in the 1980s; 4) Analysis of tidal records validates the interdecadal weakening of the East Asian summer monsoon and reveals an atmospheric bridge that conveys the ENSO signal into the South China Sea via the winter monsoon.

  5. REE geochemistry of surface sediments in the Chukchi Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志华; 高爱国; 刘焱光; 孙海清; 石学法; 杨作升

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of rare earth elements (REEs) in 26 surface sediment samples obtained from the Chukchi Sea were conducted using ICP-MS. In general, REEs are relatively rich in fine-grained sediments and deplete in coarse-grained sediments in the Chukchi Sea although REEs have large concentration spans in different types of sediments. Except that a few samples have weak enrichments of light or heavy REEs,most samples exhibit flat shale-normalized REE pattern, indicating that surface sediments in the Chukchi Sea are composed dominantly of terrigenous components experiencing weak chemical weathering. In terms of REE concentrations and other characteristic parameters, we inferred that sediments on the eastern and western sides of the Chukchi Sea are derived from landmasses of Alaska and Siberia, respectively; the midsouth sediments are possibly related to northward dispersion of the Yukon River materials. The Herald Shoal in the center of the study area is covered with relict sediment, which has large ratios of light-to-heavy REEs (∑Ce/∑Y ratio) and lacks evident negative Ce anomaly; cerium enrichment is possibly related to manganese transfer under oxidizing conditions in early diagenesis.

  6. Effects of winds, tides and storm surges on ocean surface waves in the Sea of Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Wei; TIAN Jiwei; LI Peiliang; HOU Yijun

    2007-01-01

    Ocean surface waves are strongly forced by high wind conditions associated with winter storms in the Sea of Japan. They are also modulated by tides and storm surges. The effects of the variability in surface wind forcing, tides and storm surges on the waves are investigated using a wave model, a high-resolution atmospheric mesoscale model and a hydrodynamic ocean circulation model. Five month-long wave model simulations are inducted to examine the sensitivity of ocean waves to various wind forcing fields, tides and storm surges during January 1997. Compared with observed mean wave parameters, results indicate that the high frequency variability in the surface wind filed has very great effect on wave simulation. Tides and storm surges have a significant impact on the waves in nearshores of the Tsushima-kaihyō, but not for other regions in the Sea of Japan. High spatial and temporal resolution and good quality surface wind products will be crucial for the prediction of surface waves in the JES and other marginal seas, especially near the coastal regions.

  7. Recent sea surface temperature trends and future scenarios for the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shaltout

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyse recent Mediterranean Sea surface temperatures (SSTs and their response to global change using 1/4-degree gridded advanced very-high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR daily SST data, 1982–2012. These data indicate significant annual warming (from 0.24 °C decade−1 west of the Strait of Gibraltar to 0.51 °C decade−1 over the Black Sea and significant spatial variation in annual average SST (from 15 °C over the Black Sea to 21 °C over the Levantine sub-basin. Ensemble mean scenarios indicate that the study area SST may experience significant warming, peaking at 2.6 °C century−1 in the Representative Concentration Pathways 85 (RCP85 scenario.

  8. Recent sea surface temperature trends and future scenarios for the Mediterranean Sea:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Shaltout

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyse recent Mediterranean Sea surface temperatures (SSTs and their response to global change using 1/4-degree gridded advanced very-high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR daily SST data, 1982-2012. These data indicate significant annual warming (from 0.24°C decade-1 west of the Strait of Gibraltar to 0.51°C decade-1 over the Black Sea and significant spatial variation in annual average SST (from 15ºC over the Black Sea to 21°C over the Levantine sub-basin. Ensemble mean scenarios indicate that the study area SST may experience significant warming, peaking at 2.6°C century-1 in the Representative Concentration Pathways 85 (RCP85 scenario.

  9. Sea surface temperature anomalies, planetary waves, and air-sea feedback in the middle latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankignoul, C.

    1985-01-01

    Current analytical models for large-scale air-sea interactions in the middle latitudes are reviewed in terms of known sea-surface temperature (SST) anomalies. The scales and strength of different atmospheric forcing mechanisms are discussed, along with the damping and feedback processes controlling the evolution of the SST. Difficulties with effective SST modeling are described in terms of the techniques and results of case studies, numerical simulations of mixed-layer variability and statistical modeling. The relationship between SST and diabatic heating anomalies is considered and a linear model is developed for the response of the stationary atmosphere to the air-sea feedback. The results obtained with linear wave models are compared with the linear model results. Finally, sample data are presented from experiments with general circulation models into which specific SST anomaly data for the middle latitudes were introduced.

  10. The melting sea ice of Arctic polar cap in the summer solstice month and the role of ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Yi, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice is becoming smaller and thinner than climatological standard normal and more fragmented in the early summer. We investigated the widely changing Arctic sea ice using the daily sea ice concentration data. Sea ice data is generated from brightness temperature data derived from the sensors: Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP)-F13 Special Sensor Microwave/Imagers (SSM/Is), the DMSP-F17 Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) instrument on the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua satellite. We tried to figure out appearance of arctic sea ice melting region of polar cap from the data of passive microwave sensors. It is hard to explain polar sea ice melting only by atmosphere effects like surface air temperature or wind. Thus, our hypothesis explaining this phenomenon is that the heat from deep undersea in Arctic Ocean ridges and the hydrothermal vents might be contributing to the melting of Arctic sea ice.

  11. Northern South China Sea Surface Circulation and its Variability Derived by Combining Satellite Altimetry and Surface Drifter Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Peter Benny

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study analyses the mean and seasonal mesoscale surface circulation of the Northern South China Sea (NSCS and determines the influence of El Niño/SouthernNiño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO. High resolution Eulerian velocity field is derived by combining the available satellite tracked surface drifter data with satellite altimetry during 1993 - 2012. The wind driven current is computed employing the weekly ocean surface mean wind fields derived from the scatterometers on board ERS 1/2, QuikSCAT and ASCAT. The derived mean velocity field exhibits strong boundary currents and broad zonal flow across NSCS. The anomalous field is quite strong in the southern part and the Seasonal circulation clearly depicts the monsoonal forcing. Eddy Kinetic Energy (EKE distribution and its spatial and temporal structures are determined employing Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF analysis. The ENSO influence on NSCS surface circulation has been analyzed using monthly absolute geostrophic velocity fields during 1996 - 1999.

  12. Comparison of SMOS and Aquarius Sea Surface Salinity and Analysis of Possible Causes for the Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, E. P.; Boutin, J.; Yin, X.; Le Vine, D. M.; Waldteufel, P.; Vergely, J. -L.

    2014-01-01

    Two ongoing space missions share the scientific objective of mapping the global Sea Surface Salinity (SSS), yet their observations show significant discrepancies. ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Aquarius use L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometers to measure emission from the sea surface and retrieve SSS. Significant differences in SSS retrieved by both sensors are observed, with SMOS SSS being generally lower than Aquarius SSS, except for very cold waters where SMOS SSS is the highest overall. Figure 1 is an example of the difference between the SSS retrieved by SMOS and Aquarius averaged over one month and 1 degree in longitude and latitude. Differences are mostly between -1 psu and +1 psu (psu, practical salinity unit), with a significant regional and latitudinal dependence. We investigate the impact of the vicarious calibration and some components of the retrieval algorithm used by both mission on these differences.

  13. Sea surface salinity and temperature seasonal changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Radenac, Marie-Helene; Cravatte, Sophie; Gourdeau, Lionel; Alory, Gael

    2014-05-01

    Small SST and SSS (an indicator of iron-rich Papua New Guinea river outflows) changes in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas may be transported to the equatorial Pacific and have strong climatic and biological impacts. We analyze mean and seasonal change of SST and SSS in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas, using 1977-2009 in situ data collected from Voluntary Observing Ships. Co-variability of these two variables with surface wind, altimeter-derived current anomalies, precipitation, and Sepik river discharge is examined. SST and SSS show large annual oscillations in the Solomon Sea, with the coldest and saltiest waters occurring in July/August mainly due to horizontal advection. In contrast, they show large semi-annual oscillations in the Bismarck Sea. There, the coldest and saltiest waters happen in January/February, when the northwest monsoon winds drive coastal upwelling, and in July/August, when the New Guinea Coastal Current advects cold and high-salinity waters from the Solomon Sea through Vitiaz Strait. The low SSS values observed in April/May, stuck between the two SSS maxima, are further enhanced by the Sepik river discharge annual maximum. A high-resolution model strengthens the conclusions we derive from observations. The impacts of ENSO on SST and SSS are also discussed.

  14. Calibration plan for the sea and land surface temperature radiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L.; Nightingale, Tim J.; Mortimer, Hugh; Middleton, Kevin; Edeson, Ruben; Cox, Caroline V.; Mutlow, Chris T.; Maddison, Brian J.

    2013-10-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) to be flown on ESA's Sentinel-3 mission is a multichannel scanning radiometer that will continue the 21-year datasets of the Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) series. As its name implies, measurements from SLSTR will be used to retrieve global sea surface temperatures to an uncertainty of SLSTR instrument, infrared calibration sources and alignment equipment. The calibration rig has been commissioned and results of these tests will be presented. Finally the authors will present the planning for the on-orbit monitoring and calibration activities to ensure that calibration is maintained. These activities include vicarious calibration techniques that have been developed through previous missions, and the deployment of ship-borne radiometers.

  15. Full polarization scattering characteristics of sea fractal surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Tao; He Yijun; Nan Chengfeng

    2006-01-01

    In the conventional single polarization SAR system, only the scattering information of HH polarization or VV polarization can be obtained. Only co-polarizaion scattering cases are considered and cross-polarizaiton (HV and VH polarization) scattering cases are neglected. Therefore, much important information must be lost. Research on full polarization SAR system is an important approach to extract more useful information from SAR imaging. In this paper, the authors derived the full polarization scattering coefficients of 2-D sea fractal surface and simulated the radar cross section (RCS) of different polarizations. They also gave the exact theoretical explanations of the fully polarization scattering characteristics of sea fractal surface, and confirmed that the depolarization can be neglected. The result is the basis of the full SAR system design and SAR imaging.

  16. Detecting climate rationality and homogeneities of sea surface temperature data in Longkou marine station using surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Li, Huan; Wang, Qingyuan; Wang, Guosong; Fan, Wenjing

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a systematic evaluation of the climate rationality and homogeneity of monthly sea surface temperature (SST) in Longkou marine station from 1960 to 2011. The reference series are developed using adjacent surface air temperature (SAT) on a monthly timescale. The results suggest SAT as a viable option for use in evaluating climate rationality and homogeneity in the SST data on the coastal China Seas. According to the large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns and SAT of the adjacent meteorological stations, we confirm that there is no climate shift in 1972/1973 and then the climate shift in 1972/1973 is corrected. Besides, the SST time series has serious problems of inhomogeneity. Three documented break points have been checked using penalized maximum T (PMT) test and metadata. The changes in observation instruments and observation system are the main causes of the break points. For the monthly SST time series, the negative adjustments may be greatly due to the SST decreasing after automation. It is found that the increasing trend of annual mean SST after adjustment is higher than before, about 0.24 °C/10 yr.

  17. The effects of additional black carbon on Arctic sea ice surface albedo: variation with sea ice type and snow cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Marks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon in sea ice will decrease sea ice surface albedo through increased absorption of incident solar radiation, exacerbating sea ice melting. Previous literature has reported different albedo responses to additions of black carbon in sea ice and has not considered how a snow cover may mitigate the effect of black carbon in sea ice. Sea ice is predominately snow covered. Visible light absorption and light scattering coefficients are calculated for a typical first year and multi-year sea ice and "dry" and "wet" snow types that suggest black carbon is the dominating absorbing impurity. The albedo response of first year and multi-year sea ice to increasing black carbon, from 1–1024 ng g−1, in a top 5 cm layer of a 155 cm thick sea ice was calculated using the radiative transfer model: TUV-snow. Sea ice albedo is surprisingly unresponsive to black carbon additions up to 100 ng g−1 with a decrease in albedo to 98.7% of the original albedo value due to an addition of 8 ng g−1 of black carbon in first year sea ice compared to an albedo decrease to 99.6% for the same black carbon mass ratio increase in multi-year sea ice. The first year sea ice proved more responsive to black carbon additions than the multi-year ice. Comparison with previous modelling of black carbon in sea ice suggests a more scattering sea ice environment will be less responsive to black carbon additions. Snow layers on sea ice may mitigate the effects of black carbon in sea ice. "Wet" and "dry" snow layers of 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm were added onto the sea ice surface and the snow surface albedo calculated with the same increase in black carbon in the underlying sea ice. Just a 0.5 cm layer of snow greatly diminishes the effect of black carbon on surface albedo, and a 2–5 cm layer (less than half the e-folding depth of snow is enough to "mask" any change in surface albedo owing to additional black carbon in sea ice, but not thick enough to ignore the underlying sea ice.

  18. SMOS: The Challenging Sea Surface Salinity Measurement From Space

    OpenAIRE

    Font, Jordi; Camps, Adriano; Borges, A; Martin-Neira, Manuel; Boutin, Jacqueline; Reul, Nicolas; Kerr, Yann; Hahne, A.; Mecklenburg, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity, European Space Agency, is the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring sea surface salinity from space. It uses an L-band microwave interferometric radiometer with aperture synthesis (MIRAS) that generates brightness temperature images, from which both geophysical variables are computed. The retrieval of salinity requires very demanding performances of the instrument in terms of calibration and stability. This paper highlights the importa...

  19. Determination of apparent sampling thickness of sea surface microlayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Ding, Hai-Bing; Wu, Zhi-Jian; Zhang, Zheng-Bin; Liu, Lian-Sheng

    1998-06-01

    In situ and laboratory studies of sea—surface microlayer sampling methods using glass plate, rotating drum, screen and funnel samplers were conducted. For glass plate and rotating drum samplers, surface microlayer samples of different thickness were collected by controlling their withdrawal rate and rotating rate. The relationships between pH, surface tension, the concentration of dissolved trace metals Cu and Pb, phosphate, particulate matters and sampling thickness were carefully investigated. It was shown that physicochemical and biological properties change obviously at the sampling thickness of about 50 μm, which is consistent with the mean thickness of the boundary film in the models of gas exchange across the sea surface. It is proposed that the apparent sampling thickness of the surface microlayer should be less than 40 μm. The factors affecting the sampling thickness are discussed, and the feasibility and applicable conditions for different sampling methods are evaluated.

  20. Monthly mean sea level variations at Cochin, southwest coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DineshKumar, P.K.

    storm surges on coastal zones (Gornitz et al. 19S2). Such a rise would also cause substantial beach erosion and the intrusion of sea water into low-lying areas. Flooding due to sea level rise would also threaten the habitat of a large proportion... for the study of changes in sea level and it's effects. The statistics of the extreme high waters obtained over a long period of time are the primary criteria in the design of structures and marine engineering along the coast and in the generation of flood...

  1. An Analysis of the Steric Sea Level Change by Introducing Sea Surface Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ruili; LI Lei; LI Peiliang

    2013-01-01

    In this paper,we use the optimum interpolation sea surface temperature (OISST) provided by the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) to replace the temperature in the top three layers in the ISHII data,and make use of the modified ISHII temperature data to calculate the thermosteric sea level (called modified steric sea level (SSL) hereafter).We subtract the modified SSL and the steric sea level (called ordinary SSL hereafter) derived from the ISHII temperature and salinity from the steric sea level (SSL) provided by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE),respectively,and find that the rms error of the difference of the former is obviously smaller than that of the latter.Therefore we reach the conclusion that under the assumption that the GRACE SSL is accurate,the modified SSL can reflect the true steric sea level more accurately.Making use of the modified SSL,we can find that the modified SSL in sea areas of different spatial scales shows an obvious rising trend in the upper 0-700 m layer for the period 1982-2006.The global mean SSL rises with a rate of 0.6 mm year-1.The modified SSLs in sea areas of different spatial scales all show obvious oscillations with period of one year.There are oscillations with periods of 4-8 years in global oceans and with periods of 2-7 years in the Pacific.The Empirical Orthogonal Function method is applied to the sea areas of different spatial scales and we find that the first modes all have obvious 1-year period oscillations,the first mode of the global ocean has 4-8 year period oscillations,and that of the Pacific has 2-6 year period oscillations.The spatial distribution of the linear rising trend of the global modified SSL in the upper 0-700 m layer is inhomogeneous with intense regional characteristics.The modified SSL linear trend indicates a zonal dipole in the tropical Pacific,rising in the west and descending in the east.In the North Atlantic,the modified SSL indicates a meridional dipole,rising in

  2. An empirically derived inorganic sea spray source function incorporating sea surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Salter

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an inorganic sea spray source function that is based upon state-of-the-art measurements of sea spray aerosol production using a temperature-controlled plunging jet sea spray aerosol chamber. The size-resolved particle production was measured between 0.01 and 10 μm dry diameter. Particle production decreased non-linearly with increasing seawater temperature (between −1 and 30 °C similar to previous findings. In addition, we observed that the particle effective radius as well as the particle-surface, -volume and -mass, increased with increasing seawater temperature due to increased production of super-micron particles. By combining these measurements with the volume of air entrained by the plunging jet we have determined the size-resolved particle flux as a function of air entrainment. Through the use of existing parameterisations of air entrainment as a function of wind speed we were subsequently able to scale our laboratory measurements of particle production to wind speed. By scaling in this way we avoid the difficulties associated with defining the "white-area" of the laboratory whitecap – a contentious issue when relating laboratory measurements of particle production to oceanic whitecaps using the more frequently applied whitecap method. The here-derived inorganic sea spray sea spray source function was implemented in a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (FLEXPART. An estimated annual global flux of inorganic sea spray aerosol of 5.9 ± 0.2 Pg yr−1 was derived that is close to the median of estimates from the same model using a wide range of existing sea spray source functions. When using the source function derived here, the model also showed good skill in predicting measurements of Na+ concentration at a number of field sites further underlining the validity of our source function. In a final step, the sensitivity of a large-scale model (NorESM to our new source function was tested. Compared to the previously

  3. A sea surface salinity dipole mode in the tropical Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Du, Yan; Qu, Tangdong

    2016-10-01

    Based on the 10 years sea surface salinity (SSS) data from Argo, we identified a salinity dipole mode in the tropical Indian Ocean, termed S-IOD: a pattern of interannual SSS variability with anomalously low-salinity in the central equatorial and high-salinity in the southeastern tropical Indian Ocean. The S-IOD matures in November-December, lagging the Indian Ocean dipole (IOD) mode derived from sea surface temperature (SST) by 2 months. For the period of observations, the S-IOD persists longer than the IOD, until the following September-October. Oscillations of the two S-IOD poles are governed by different processes. Ocean advection associated with equatorial current variability dominates the SSS anomalies of the northern pole, while surface freshwater flux variability plays a key role in the SSS anomalies of the southern pole, where anomalous precipitation is sustained by preformed sea surface temperature anomalies. The S-IOD concurs with the strong IOD, reflecting an ocean-atmosphere coupling through the SST-precipitation-SSS feedback.

  4. Elastic Properties of Natural Sea Surface Films Incorporated with Solid Dust Particles: Model Baltic Sea Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Z. Mazurek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Floating dust-originated solid particles at air-water interfaces will interact with one another and disturb the smoothness of such a composite surface affecting its dilational elasticity. To quantify the effect, surface pressure (Π versus film area (A isotherm, and stress-relaxation (Π-time measurements were performed for monoparticulate layers of the model hydrophobic material (of μm-diameter and differentiated hydrophobicity corresponding to the water contact angles (CA ranging from 60 to 140° deposited at surfaces of surfactant-containing original seawater and were studied with a Langmuir trough system. The composite surface dilational modulus predicted from the theoretical approach, in which natural dust load signatures (particle number flux, daily deposition rate, and diameter spectra originated from in situ field studies performed along Baltic Sea near-shore line stations, agreed well with the direct experimentally derived data. The presence of seawater surfactants affected wettability of the solid material which was evaluated with different CA techniques applicable to powdered samples. Surface energetics of the particle-subphase interactions was expressed in terms of the particle removal energy, contact cross-sectional areas, collapse energies, and so forth. The hydrophobic particles incorporation at a sea surface film structure increased the elasticity modulus by a factor K (1.29–1.58. The particle-covered seawater revealed a viscoelastic behavior with the characteristic relaxation times ranging from 2.6 to 68.5 sec.

  5. Scaling observations of surface waves in the Beaufort Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madison Smith

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The rapidly changing Arctic sea ice cover affects surface wave growth across all scales. Here, in situ measurements of waves, observed from freely-drifting buoys during the 2014 open water season, are interpreted using open water distances determined from satellite ice products and wind forcing time series measured in situ with the buoys. A significant portion of the wave observations were found to be limited by open water distance (fetch when the wind duration was sufficient for the conditions to be considered stationary. The scaling of wave energy and frequency with open water distance demonstrated the indirect effects of ice cover on regional wave evolution. Waves in partial ice cover could be similarly categorized as distance-limited by applying the same open water scaling to determine an ‘effective fetch’. The process of local wave generation in ice appeared to be a strong function of the ice concentration, wherein the ice cover severely reduces the effective fetch. The wave field in the Beaufort Sea is thus a function of the sea ice both locally, where wave growth primarily occurs in the open water between floes, and regionally, where the ice edge may provide a more classic fetch limitation. Observations of waves in recent years may be indicative of an emerging trend in the Arctic Ocean, where we will observe increasing wave energy with decreasing sea ice extent.

  6. SMOS sea surface salinity maps of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Olmedo, Estrella; Turiel, Antonio; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Martinez, Justino; Portabella, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    Salinity and temperature gradients drive the thermohaline circulation of the oceans, and play a key role in the ocean-atmosphere coupling. The strong and direct interactions between the ocean and the cryosphere (primarily through sea ice and ice shelves) is also a key ingredient of the thermohaline circulation. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, launched in 2009, has the objective measuring soil moisture over the continents and sea surface salinity over the oceans. Although the mission was originally conceived for hydrological and oceanographic studies [1], SMOS is also making inroads in the cryospheric monitoring. SMOS carries an innovative L-band (1.4 GHz, or 21-cm wavelength), passive interferometric radiometer (the so-called MIRAS) that measures the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the Earth's surface, at about 50 km spatial resolution wide swath (1200-km), and with a 3-day revisit time at the equator, but a more frequent one at the poles. Although the SMOS radiometer operating frequency offers almost the maximum sensitivity of the brightness temperature (TB) to sea surface salinity (SSS) variations, this is rather low, , i.e.,: 90% of ocean SSS values span a range of brightness temperatures of only 5K at L-band. This sensitivity is particularly low in cold waters. This implies that the SSS retrieval requires high radiometric performance. Since the SMOS launch, SSS Level 3 maps have been distributed by several expert laboratories including the Barcelona Expert Centre (BEC). However, since the TB sensitivity to SSS decreases with decreasing sea surface temperature (SST), large retrieval errors had been reported when retrieving salinity values at latitudes above 50⁰N. Two new processing algorithms, recently developed at BEC, have led to a considerable improvement of the SMOS data, allowing for the first time to derive SSS maps in cold waters. The first one is to empirically characterize and correct the systematic biases with six

  7. Monthly Diversions from the Surface-Water Network of the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly diversions from the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an...

  8. Monthly inflows to the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital dataset contains the monthly inflows to the surface-water network for the Central Valley Hydrologic Model (CVHM). The Central Valley encompasses an...

  9. Surface observation of thin hydroxyapatite-coated implants at 80 months after insertion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Miake, Yasuo; Yajima, Yasutomo; Yamamoto, Kohji; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    We observed surfaces and cross sections of thin hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated implants produced by the thermal decomposition method in a patient attending our clinic who underwent implant removal at 80 months due to fracture of the implants...

  10. Ciguatera fish poisoning and sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean Sea and the West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, Patricia A; Feldman, Rebecca L; Nau, Amy W; Kibler, Steven R; Wayne Litaker, R

    2010-10-01

    Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is a circumtropical disease caused by ingestion of a variety of reef fish that bioaccumulate algal toxins. Distribution and abundance of the organisms that produce these toxins, chiefly dinoflagellates of the genus Gambierdiscus, are reported to correlate positively with water temperature. Consequently, there is growing concern that increasing temperatures associated with climate change could increase the incidence of CFP. This concern prompted experiments on the growth rates of six Gambierdiscus species at temperatures between 18 degrees C and 33 degrees C and the examination of sea surface temperatures in the Caribbean and West Indies for areas that could sustain rapid Gambierdiscus growth rates year-round. The thermal optimum for five of six Gambierdiscus species tested was >/=29 degrees C. Long-term SST data from the southern Gulf of Mexico indicate the number of days with sea surface temperatures >/=29 degrees C has nearly doubled (44 to 86) in the last three decades. To determine how the sea surface temperatures and Gambierdiscus growth data correlate with CFP incidences in the Caribbean, a literature review and a uniform, region-wide survey (1996-2006) of CFP cases were conducted. The highest CFP incidence rates were in the eastern Caribbean where water temperatures are warmest and least variable.

  11. Adjusting altimetric sea surface height observations in coastal regions. Case study in the Greek Seas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mintourakis Ioannis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When processing satellite altimetry data for Mean Sea Surface (MSS modelling in coastal environments many problems arise. The degradation of the accuracy of the Sea Surface Height (SSH observations close to the coastline and the usually irregular pattern and variability of the sea surface topography are the two dominant factors which have to be addressed. In the present paper, we study the statistical behavior of the SSH observations in relation to the range from the coastline for many satellite altimetry missions and we make an effort to minimize the effects of the ocean variability. Based on the above concepts we present a process strategy for the homogenization of multi satellite altimetry data that takes advantage ofweighted SSH observations and applies high degree polynomials for the adjustment and their uniffcation at a common epoch. At each step we present the contribution of each concept to MSS modelling and then we develop a MSS, a marine geoid model and a grid of gravity Free Air Anomalies (FAA for the area under study. Finally, we evaluate the accuracy of the resulting models by comparisons to state of the art global models and other available data such as GPS/leveling points, marine GPS SSH’s and marine gravity FAA’s, in order to investigate any progress achieved by the presented strategy

  12. Microwave emission measurements of sea surface roughness, soil moisture, and sea ice structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloersen, P.; Wilheit, T. T.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of the microwave radiometers to be carried aboard the Nimbus 5 and 6 satellites and proposed for one of the earth observatory satellites, remote measurements of microwave radiation at wavelengths ranging from 0.8 to 21 cm have been made of a variety of the earth's surfaces from the NASA CV-990 A/C. Brightness temperatures of sea water surfaces of varying roughness, of terrain with varying soil moisture, and of sea ice of varying structure were observed. In each case, around truth information was available for correlation with the microwave brightness temperature. The utility of passive microwave radiometry in determining ocean surface wind speeds, at least for values higher than 7 meters/second has been demonstrated. In addition, it was shown that radiometric signatures can be used to determine soil moisture in unvegetated terrain to within five percentage points by weight. Finally, it was demonstrated that first year thick, multi-year, and first year thin sea ice can be distinguished by observing their differing microwave emissivities at various wavelengths.

  13. Model study on the dependence of primary marine aerosol emission on the sea surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Barthel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosol composed of sea salt and organic material is an important contributor to the global aerosol load. By comparing measurements from two EMEP (co-operative programme for monitoring and evaluation of the long-range transmissions of air-pollutants in Europe intensive campaigns in June 2006 and January 2007 with results from an atmospheric transport model this work shows that accounting for the influence of the sea surface temperature on the emission of primary marine aerosol improves the model results towards the measurements in both months. Different sea surface temperature dependencies were evaluated. Using correction functions based on Sofiev et al. (2011 and Jaeglé et al. (2011 improves the model results for coarse mode particles. In contrast, for the fine mode aerosols no best correction function could be found. The model captures the low sodium concentrations at the marine station Virolahti II (Finland, which is influenced by air masses from the low salinity Baltic Sea, as well as the higher concentrations at Cabauw (Netherlands and Auchencorth Moss (Scotland. These results indicate a shift towards smaller sizes with lower salinity for the emission of dry sea salt aerosols. Organic material was simulated as part of primary marine aerosol assuming an internal mixture with sea salt. A comparison of the model results for primary organic carbon with measurements by a Berner-impactor at Sao Vincente (Cape Verde indicated that the model underpredicted the observed organic carbon concentration. This leads to the conclusion that the formation of secondary organic material needs to be included in the model to improve the agreement with the measurements.

  14. Clouds, radiation, and the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature in the tropical Western Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, P.J.; Clayson, C.A.; Curry, J.A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    In the tropical Western Pacific (TWP) Ocean, the clouds and the cloud-radiation feedback can only be understood in the context of air/sea interactions and the ocean mixed layer. Considerable interest has been shown in attempting to explain why sea surface temperature (SST) rarely rises above 30{degrees}C, and gradients of the SST. For the most part, observational studies that address this issue have been conducted using monthly cloud and SST data, and the focus has been on intraseasonal and interannual time scales. For the unstable tropical atmosphere, using monthly averaged data misses a key feedback between clouds and SST that occurs on the cloud-SST coupling time scale, which was estimated to be 3-6 days for the unstable tropical atmosphere. This time scale is the time needed for a change in cloud properties, due to the change of ocean surface evaporation caused by SST variation, to feed back to the SST variation, to feed back to the SST through its effect on the surface heat flux. This paper addresses the relationship between clouds, surface radiation flux and SST of the TWP ocean over the diurnal cycle.

  15. ENSO signature in the SMOS sea surface salinity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballabrera, J.; Umbert, M.; Hoareau, N.; Turiel, A.; Font, J.

    2012-12-01

    Until recently, the role of salinity observations in the operational simulation and prediction of ENSO was neglected because of the historical lack of observations and because leading intermediate coupled models had significant predictive skill without directly accounting for salinity effects. In Ballabrera-Poy et al., (2002), the potential role of sea surface salinity (SSS) observations on the statistical predictions of ENSO was investigated. It was shown that, although SSS observations would play little role in statistical nowcasts of ENSO, they would provide a significant role in the 6-12 month predictions. The European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) Earth Explorer opportunity mission was launched on November 2, 2009, becoming the first satellite mission addressing the challenge of measuring SSS from space with the help of MIRAS (Microwave Imaging Radiometer with Aperture Synthesis), a novel two-dimensional interferometer operating at L-band (1.4 GHz). Although the L-band frequency is the optimal for ocean salinity measurements, the retrieval of SSS information requires special care because of the low sensitivity of the brightness temperature to SSS: from 0.2-0.8 K per salinity unit. Maps of 10-day averages of SSS in 1x1 degree boxes are distributed by the SMOS Barcelona Expert Centre on Radiometric Calibration and Ocean Salinity (SMOS-BEC, http://www.smos-bec.icm.csic.es). These maps are derived from the SMOS reprocessing campaign released to the SMOS user community in March 2011, and span the period from January 2010 through December 2011. The current accuracy of these SSS maps ranges from 0.2-0.4, depending on the ocean region being considered (Umbert et al., 2012). During the period of the reprocessing campaign, the equatorial Pacific has been in a quasi-continuous La Niña state. During the cold phases of ENSO, positive anomalies of SSS are expected with a largest anomalous values in the western warm-fresh pool. The anomalies

  16. Nearshore, seasonally persistent fronts in sea surface temperature on Red Sea tropical reefs

    KAUST Repository

    Blythe, J. N.

    2011-07-08

    Temperature variability was studied on tropical reefs off the coast of Saudi Arabia in the Red Sea using remote sensing from Aqua and Terra satellites. Cross-shore gradients in sea surface temperature (SST) were observed, including cold fronts (colder inshore) during winter and warm fronts (warmer inshore) during summer. Fronts persisted over synoptic and seasonal time-scales and had a periodic annual cycle over a 10-year time-series. Measurements of cross-shore SST variability were conducted at the scale of tens of kilometres, which encompassed temperature over shallow tropical reef complexes and the continental slope. Two tropical reefs that had similar reef geomorphology and offshore continental slope topography had identical cold fronts, although they were separated by 100 km along the Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia. Satellite SST gradients across contours of topography of tropical reefs can be used as an index to flag areas potentially exposed to temperature stress. © 2011 International Council for the Exploration of the Sea.

  17. Spatial heterogeneity of ocean surface boundary conditions under sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthélemy, Antoine; Fichefet, Thierry; Goosse, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    The high heterogeneity of sea ice properties implies that its effects on the ocean are spatially variable at horizontal scales as small as a few meters. Previous studies have shown that taking this variability into account in models could be required to simulate adequately mixed layer processes and the upper ocean temperature and salinity structures. Although many advanced sea ice models include a subgrid-scale ice thickness distribution, potentially providing heterogeneous surface boundary conditions, the information is lost in the coupling with a unique ocean grid cell underneath. The present paper provides a thorough examination of boundary conditions at the ocean surface in the NEMO-LIM model, which can be used as a guideline for studies implementing subgrid-scale ocean vertical mixing schemes. Freshwater, salt, solar heat and non-solar heat fluxes are examined, as well as the norm of the surface stress. All of the thermohaline fluxes vary considerably between the open water and ice fractions of grid cells. To a lesser extent, this is also the case for the surface stress. Moreover, the salt fluxes in both hemispheres and the solar heat fluxes in the Arctic show a dependence on the ice thickness category, with more intense fluxes for thinner ice, which promotes further subgrid-scale heterogeneity. Our analysis also points out biases in the simulated open water fraction and in the ice thickness distribution, which should be investigated in more details in order to ensure that the latter is used to the best advantage.

  18. Sea level changes from monthly solutions of ice sheet mass balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barletta, Valentina Roberta; Sørensen, Louise Sandberg; Forsberg, René

    We present mass change time series at basin scale for both Greenland and Antarctica, de-rived from GRACE data, and use these data to find the associated global sea level changes. We use two independent methods for GRACE ice mass loss estimation, including use of different GIA models and estimation...... also compare our GRACE derived regional estimates with independent mass change results based on altimetry data from NASA’s Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite. From the estimated Greenland and Antarctica mass changes we compute the gravitationally self-consistent sea-level changes and its associated...... uncertainties, and show results of the impact of Earth model uncertainties in the global sea level change and its regional “fingerprints”....

  19. Impact of Sea Surface Temperature Front on Stratus-Sea Fog over the Yellow and East China Seas-A Case Study with Implications for Climatology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Man; ZHANG Suping

    2013-01-01

    A stratus-sea fog event that occurred over the Yellow and East China Seas on 3 June 2011 is investigated using observations and a numerical model,with a focus on the effects of background circulation and Sea Surface Temperature Front (SSTF) on the transition of stratus into sea fog.Southerly winds of a synoptic high-pressure circulation transport water vapor to the Yellow Sea,creating conditions favorable for sea fog/stratus formation.The subsidence from the high-pressure contributes to the temperature inversion at the top of the stratus.The SSTF forces a secondary circulation within the ABL (Atmospheric Boundary Layer),the sinking branch of which on the cold flank of SSTF helps lower the stratus layer further to reach the sea surface.The cooling effect over the cold sea surface counteracts the adiabatic warming induced by subsidence.The secondary circulation becomes weak and the fog patches are shrunk heavily with the smoothed SSTF.A conceptual model is proposed for the transition of stratus into sea fog over the Yellow and East China Seas.Finally,the analyses suggest that sea fog frequency will probably decrease due to the weakened SSTF and the reduced subsidence of secondary circulation under global warming.

  20. Relationship between the tropical cyclone genesis over the Northwest Pacific and the sea surface temperature anomalies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Using the tropical cyclone (TC) data derived from the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) and the sea surface temperature data derived from the Joint Environmental Data Analysis Center (JEDAC) at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography from January 1955 to December 2000, we analyzed the relationship between the TC genesis over the Northwest Pacific (NWP) and the sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) over the Pacific basin. A long-term trend indicated that the highest frequency of monthly TC genesis appeared earlier and the annual genesis sum increased gradually during the last half century with some oscillations. No significant synchronous correlation was found between the NWP TC events and the SSTA over the Pacific basin, while the annual sum of TC genesis was closely related with the SSTA averaged from the first three months (January, February and March) of the year in the equatorial western and eastern Pacific and over mid-high latitudes of the North Pacific. The results implied that there are an interannual El Ni(n)o SSTA mode in the equatorial western and eastern Pacific and an interdecadal SSTA mode in the northern Pacific, which affected the TC genesis. A regression analysis between the first three-month SSTA and the annual TC sum based on two time scales was conducted. The correlation coefficient between simulated and observed TC sums reached a high value of 0.77.

  1. Validation of sea surface temperature, wind speed and integrated water vapour from MSMR measurements. Project report

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Muraleedharan, P.M.

    and autonomous weather station) were utilized for measuring sea truth parameters such as sea surface temperature (SST), Sea Surface Wind Speed (WS) and Columnar Water Vapor (WV). Total match-ups for SST and WS measured from various platforms exceeded 1400 (2 hrs...

  2. Remote sensing of pigment concentration and sea surface temperature on the continental shelf of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Danling

    The combination of a population of more than 1.2 billion people and the recent rapid industrialization and large-scale infrastructure projects have placed a very heavy burden on the coastal environment in China. Algal blooms and red tides pose a serious threat to public health, fisheries and aquaculture industry. Consequently, a thorough assessment of their impacts on the coastal zone is urgently needed. This research is the first application of the historical satellite remote sensing archive to investigate temporal and spatial patterns of pigment concentrations (PC) and sea surface temperatures (SST) on the entire continental shelf of China. Firstly, I examined the temporal (annual/monthly) and spatial patterns of PC and SST on the continental shelf of China. The image availability for the study area was examined. A total of 2139 scenes were obtained from the study area during the years of the Nimbus-7 satellite mission (from 1978 to 1986), from which 76 monthly and 8 annual composite CZCS images were generated. AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) data from NOAA (National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration) satellites were also examined. A distinctive high PC belt of about 50 km wide existed along the coastline of China, and a large plume of high PC was observed which extended nearly 500 km to the east from the Yangtze River. PC were high in the Yellow Sea (about 1--2 mg m-3 it decreased seawards and southeastwards with a minimum value in the Philippine Sea (about 0.2 mg m-3 ). Annual PC increased from 1979 and reached a peak in 1981; it dropped in 1982 with a strong El Nino. In the northern area (Yellow Sea), there were two peaks of PC in each year (spring and fall). In the southern area (northern South China Sea), PC was relatively low and constant over each year. A basin-wide gyre appeared in the center of the Yellow Sea in April 1986. Secondly, I focused on the Luzon Strait, a channel between the Philippine Sea and the South China Sea. High

  3. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  4. Kernel empirical orthogonal function analysis of 1992-2008 global sea surface height anomaly data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a kernel version of empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis and its application to detect patterns of interest in global monthly mean sea surface height (SSH) anomalies from satellite altimetry acquired during the last 17 years. EOF analysis like principal component...... to large scale ocean currents and particularly to the pulsing of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation. Large scale ocean events associated with the El Niño/Southern Oscillation related signals are conveniently concentrated in the first SSH EOF modes. A major difference between the classical linear EOF...

  5. Climate Variability in Coastal Ecosystems - Use of MODIS Land Surface and Sea Surface Temperature Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintalapati, S.; Lakshmi, V.

    2007-12-01

    The intertidal zone, with its complex blend of marine and terrestrial environments, is one of the intensively studied ecosystems, in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution. As climatic conditions change, the geographic limits of the intertidal species will likely move towards more tolerable coastal conditions. Traditionally, understanding climate change effects through species physiologic response have involved use of in situ measurements and thermal engineering models. But these approaches are constrained by their data intensive requirements and may not be suitable for predicting change patterns relevant to large scale species distributions. Satellite remote sensing provides an alternate approach, given the regular global coverage at moderate spatial resolutions. The present study uses six years of land surface temperature (LST) and sea surface temperature (SST) data from MODIS/Terra instrument along various coastlines around the globe - East and West Coast US, Southern Africa, Northern Japan and New Zealand. Apart from the dominant annual cycle in LST and SST, the other seasonal cycles vary from dominant semi-annual cycles in lower latitudes to 1.5 and 2 year cycles at higher latitudes. The monthly anomalies show strong spatial structure at lower latitudes when compared to higher latitudes, with the exception of US east coast, where the spatial structure extended almost along the whole coastline, indicating strong regulation from the Gulf Stream. The patterns along different coast lines are consistent with the atmospheric and ocean circulation patterns existing at those regions. These results suggest that the climatology at the coastal regions can be adequately represented using satellite-based temperature data, thus enabling further research in understanding the effects of climate change on species abundance and distribution at larger scales.

  6. Multilevel vector autoregressive prediction of sea surface temperature in the North Tropical Atlantic Ocean and the Caribbean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Eun; Chapman, David; Henderson, Naomi; Chen, Chen; Cane, Mark A.

    2016-07-01

    We use a multilevel vector autoregressive model (VAR-L), to forecast sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) in the Atlantic hurricane Main Development Region (MDR). VAR-L is a linear regression model using global SSTA data from L prior months as predictors. In hindcasts for the recent 30 years, the multilevel VAR-L outperforms a state-of-the-art dynamic forecast model, as well as the commonly used linear inverse model (LIM). The multilevel VAR-L model shows skill in 6-12 month forecasts, with its greatest skill in the months of the active hurricane season. The optimized model for the best long-range skill score in the MDR, chosen by a cross-validation procedure, has 12 time levels and 12 empirical orthogonal function modes. We investigate the optimal initial conditions for MDR SSTA prediction using a generalized singular vector decomposition of the propagation matrix. We find that the added temporal degrees of freedom for the predictands in VAR12 as compared with a LIM model, which allow the model to capture both the local wind-evaporation-SST feedback in the Tropical Atlantic and the impact on the Atlantic of an improved medium-range ENSO forecast, elevate the long-range forecast skill in the MDR.

  7. The first months at sea: marine migration and habitat use of sea trout Salmo trutta post-smolts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaten, A C; Davidsen, J G; Thorstad, E B; Whoriskey, F; Rønning, L; Sjursen, A D; Rikardsen, A H; Arnekleiv, J V

    2016-09-01

    The early migration and habitat use of brown trout Salmo trutta post-smolts tagged with acoustic transmitters (n = 50) were investigated in a fjord system in central Norway from 30 April to 26 November 2014. The main aims were to investigate return rate, marine residence time and spatial use of the fjord system. Median seaward migration and return to fresh water dates were 22 May and 4 July, respectively. Of the 40 seaward migrating smolts, 26 returned to fresh water, giving a minimum return rate to fresh water of 65%. Entrance to the fjord from the river occurred mainly at night (80% of the S. trutta), however, no such diurnal pattern was observed during the return migration. Mean marine residence time was 38 days, but with large individual variation (22-99 days). The innermost parts of the study area were more utilized than the outer part of the fjord system during the sea residency, and with more use of the near shore habitat than the open, pelagic areas. Many post-smolts also utilized the outer part of the fjord system, however, and 94% of the post-smolts were recorded at least 14 km from the home river mouth. Marine survival and distribution in the fjord were size dependent with the largest individuals utilizing outer fjord areas and having higher return rates to fresh water. As far as is known, this is the first published study on temporal and spatial behaviour in the marine environment of first-time S. trutta migrants during the full course of their first trip to sea.

  8. Sea Surface Height Variability and Eddy Statistical Properties in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Zhan, Peng

    2013-05-01

    Satellite sea surface height (SSH) data over 1992-2012 are analyzed to study the spatial and temporal variability of sea level in the Red Sea. Empirical orthogonal functions (EOF) analysis suggests the remarkable seasonality of SSH in the Red Sea, and a significant correlation is found between SSH variation and seasonal wind cycle. A winding-angle based eddy identification algorithm is employed to derive the mesoscale eddy information from SSH data. Totally more than 5500 eddies are detected, belonging to 2583 eddy tracks. Statistics suggest that eddies generate over the entire Red Sea, with two regions in the central basin of high eddy frequency. 76% of the detected eddies have a radius ranging from 40km to 100km, of which both intensity and absolute vorticity decrease with eddy radius. The average eddy lifespan is about 5 weeks, and eddies with longer lifespan tend to have larger radius but less intensity. Different deformation rate exists between anticyclonic eddies (AEs) and cyclonic eddies (CEs), those eddies with higher intensity appear to be less deformed and more circular. Inspection of the 84 long-lived eddies suggests the AEs tend to move a little more northward than CEs. AE generation during summer is obviously lower than that during other seasons, while CE generation is higher during spring and summer. Other features of AEs and CEs are similar with both vorticity and intensity reaching the summer peaks in August and winter peaks in January. Inter-annual variability reveals that the eddies in the Red Sea are isolated from the global event. The eddy property tendencies are different from the south and north basin, both of which exhibit a two-year cycle. Showing a correlation coefficient of -0.91, Brunt–Väisälä frequency is negatively correlated with eddy kinetic energy (EKE), which results from AE activities in the high eddy frequency region. Climatological vertical velocity shear variation is identical with EKE except in the autumn, suggesting the

  9. Holocene coastal sea surface temperature changes in the northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, K.; Kong, D.; Wei, G.; Liu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Holocene sea surface temperature (SST) changes in the northern South China Sea (SCS) coastal region are affected by complex factors. Previous studies have identified a long-term cooling trend, attributed to coastal mixing and intensified East Asian Winter Monsoon (EAWM), yet spatial patterns of coastal cooling along the southern China are still not well established. Here we reconstructed a Holocene Sea Surface Temperature (SST) record, derived from long-chain alkenone unsaturation index - UK'37, in the northern SCS. Our result reveals that a gentle cooling trend dominates the mid-late Holocene. The gradual warming trend occurring during the early Holocene might have resulted from the rising sea level or the rebound of "8.2 ka cold event". Besides, the C37-content also shows an extremely-low level before 8 ka. Later, both alkenone-derived SST and C37-content reach their highest levels during approximately 7-4.5 ka, corresponding to the Holocene Climate Optimum (HCO). Consistent with previous studies, the long-term cooling trend identified in coastal regions, but not offshore ones, presumably indicates intensified EAWM toward present. Further, during the late Holocene, coastal SST changes in the northern SCS show heterogeneous responses to global climatic conditions. In the Mirs Bay, SST was warmer during the Little Ice Age (LIA) than the Medieval Warm Period (WMP) and the current warm period, interpreted as reflecting intensified coastal mixing, due to strengthened East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) during warmer periods. However, SST records at other coastal sites, as well as offshore regions, show fluctuations consistent with global/northern hemisphere temperature changes, suggesting that these regions are less influenced by the EASM-induced coastal mixing, probably with the aid of Pearl River freshwater input.

  10. Consistency of Aquarius sea surface salinity with Argo products on various spatial and temporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tong

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the accuracies of satellite-derived sea surface salinity measurements in depicting temporal changes and their dependence on spatiotemporal scales is important to applications, capability assessment, and future satellite mission design. This study quantifies the consistency between Aquarius Version 4 monthly gridded sea surface salinity (SSS) with two Argo-based monthly gridded near-surface salinity products for describing temporal changes on 1° × 1°, 3° × 3°, and 10° × 10° scales. Globally averaged standard deviation values for Aquarius-Argo salinity differences on these three spatial scales are 0.16, 0.14, and 0.09 practical salinity unit (psu), compared to those between the two Argo products of 0.10, 0.09, and 0.04 psu. The consistency between Aquarius and Argo is similar to that between the two Argo products in the tropics for seasonal signals, and in the tropics and midlatitudes for nonseasonal signals. Therefore, the uncertainties of Argo products for various scales need to be considered in evaluating satellite SSS. Innovative satellite technologies are needed to improve high-latitude satellite SSS measurements.

  11. An evaluation of surface micro- and mesoplastic pollution in pelagic ecosystems of the Western Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Florian; Saini, Camille; Potter, Gaël; Galgani, François; de Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Hagmann, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the distribution, abundance and characteristics of surface micro- and mesoplastic debris in the Western Mediterranean Sea. 41 samples were collected in 2011 (summer) and 2012 (summer). Results, firstly, revealed that micro- (Sea.

  12. Surface radiation at sea validation of satellite-derived data with shipboard measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Dieter Behr

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Quality-controlled and validated radiation products are the basis for their ability to serve the climate and solar energy community. Satellite-derived radiation fluxes are well preferred for this task as they cover the whole research area in time and space. In order to monitor the accuracy of these data, validation with well maintained and calibrated ground based measurements is necessary. Over sea, however, long-term accurate reference data sets from calibrated instruments recording radiation are scarce. Therefore data from research vessels operating at sea are used to perform a reasonable validation. A prerequisite is that the instruments on board are maintained as well as land borne stations. This paper focuses on the comparison of radiation data recorded on board of the German Research Vessel "Meteor" during her 13 months cruise across the Mediterranean and the Black Sea with CM-SAF products using NOAA- and MSG-data (August 2006-August 2007: surface incoming short-wave radiation (SIS and surface downward long-wave radiation (SDL. Measuring radiation fluxes at sea causes inevitable errors, e.g.shadowing of fields of view of the radiometers by parts of the ship. These ship-inherent difficulties are discussed at first. A comparison of pairs of ship-recorded and satellite-derived mean fluxes for the complete measuring period delivers a good agreement: the mean bias deviation (MBD for SIS daily means is −7.6 W/m2 with a median bias of −4 W/m2 and consistently the MBD for monthly means is −7.3 W/m2, for SDL daily means the MBD is 8.1 and 6 W/m2 median bias respectively. The MBD for monthly means is 8.2 W/m2. The variances of the daily means (ship and satellite have the same annual courses for both fluxes. No significant dependence of the bias on the total cloud cover recorded according to WMO (1969 has been found. The results of the comparison between ship-based observations and satellite retrieved surface radiation reveal the good accuracy

  13. DNSC08 mean sea surface and mean dynamic topography models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    2009-01-01

    -2004. It is the first global MSS without a polar gap including all of the Arctic Ocean by including laser altimetry from the ICESat mission. The mean dynamic topography (MDT) is the quantity that bridges the geoid and the mean sea surface constraining large-scale ocean circulation. Here we present a new high......-resolution 1 min global MDT called DNSC08 MDT derived from the slightly smoothed difference between the DNSC08 MSS and the EGM2008 geoid. The derivation and quality control of the new DNSC08 MSS and DNSC08 MDT is presented in this paper along with suggestions for time period standardization of the MSS and MDT...

  14. Labrador Sea surface temperature control on the summer weather in the Eastern Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnatiuk, Natalia; Vihma, Timo; Bobylev, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have addressed the linkages between the Arctic Amplification and mid-latitude weather patterns. Most of them have focused on the effects of changes in sea ice, terrestrial snow or open ocean SST on the air temperature in selected mid-latitude areas. However, when analysing such potential linkages, one should be aware that from the point of view of the atmosphere it is almost the same whether the thermal forcing originates from the sea ice melt, snowmelt, or changes in SST. Most important is to quantify how the atmosphere responds to anomalies in the surface temperature and then affects weather patterns in remote areas. For this purpose, we studied the hemispheric-scale relationships between anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere Earth surface temperature (Ts) and 2-m air temperature (T2m) in mid-latitudes (Central and Eastern Europe). Using regression analyses based on the ERA-Interim reanalysis data, we assessed the said temperature relationships with focus on the lagged monthly and inter-seasonal linkages. Technically we divided the Northern Hemisphere in equal areas with a size of 15x10 degrees and calculated correlation coefficients for the monthly mean temperatures between all defined regions from one side and the Central/East European study regions from another side over the period 1979-2014. Using this approach, we found that the strongest links in the considered kind of relationships take place between spring sea surface temperature in the Labrador Sea and summer air (T2m) temperature in the Eastern Europe. In order to confirm the correlation results obtained, to identify thermal forcing factors and to assess their relative importance, we analysed the multiyear averages and anomalies of various meteorological parameters for 10 coldest and 10 warmest springs and summers in the period 1979-2014: surface pressure, total precipitation, sea-ice and total cloud cover, wind components, surface solar radiation downwards, surface heat fluxes and air

  15. Chemistry of the sea-surface microlayer. 3. Studies on the nutrient chemistry of the northern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singbal, S.Y.S.; Narvekar, P.V.; Nagarajan, R.

    with Chlorophyll values at 1 m depth. Relatively high enrichment factors, sea-surface microlayer (SML), in coastal waters could be attributed to the influence of freshwater carrying considerable quantities of nutrients into the sea either from land runoff or from...

  16. Attributing extreme precipitation in the Black Sea region to sea surface warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Edmund; Semenov, Vladimir; Maraun, Douglas; Park, Wonsun; Chernokulsky, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Higher sea surface temperatures (SSTs) warm and moisten the overlying atmosphere, increasing the low-level atmospheric instability, the moisture available to precipitating systems and, hence, the potential for intense convective systems. Both the Mediterranean and Black Sea regions have seen a steady increase in summertime SSTs since the early 1980s, by over 2 K in places. This raises the question of how this SST increase has affected convective precipitation extremes in the region, and through which mechanisms any effects are manifested. In particular, the Black Sea town of Krymsk suffered an unprecedented precipitation extreme in July 2012, which may have been influenced by Black Sea warming, causing over 170 deaths. To address this question, we adopt two distinct modelling approaches to event attribution and compare their relative merits. In the first, we use the traditional probabilistic event attribution approach involving global climate model ensembles representative of the present and a counterfactual past climate where regional SSTs have not increased. In the second, we use the conditional event attribution approach, taking the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme as a showcase example. Under the second approach, we carry out ensemble sensitivity experiments of the Krymsk event at convection-permitting resolution with the WRF regional model, and test the sensitivity of the event to a range of SST forcings. Both experiments show the crucial role of recent Black Sea warming in amplifying the 2012 Krymsk precipitation extreme. In the conditional event attribution approach, though, the explicit simulation of convective processes provides detailed insight into the physical mechanisms behind the extremeness of the event, revealing the dominant role of dynamical (i.e. static stability and vertical motions) over thermodynamical (i.e. increased atmospheric moisture) changes. Additionally, the wide range of SST states tested in the regional setup, which would be

  17. Mean sea surface and gravity investigations using TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.

    1991-01-01

    From a broad point of view, we will be concerned with studying global ocean circulation patterns on the basis of ocean surface determinations with geoid undulation information. In addition, we will study local variations of the gravity field implied by the altimeter data. These general goals are reflected in the title of our investigation. To meet our general goal, we have defined a number of specific objectives: (1) sea surface topography representation; (2) mean sea surface determination; (3) development of local geoid models; (4) mean sea surface comparisons; (5) sea surface topographic files; and (6) gravity anomaly determination.

  18. A model of the tropical Pacific sea surface temperature climatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Richard; Zebiak, Stephen E.; Cane, Mark A.

    1988-01-01

    A model for the climatological mean sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical Pacific Ocean is developed. The upper ocean response is computed using a time dependent, linear, reduced gravity model, with the addition of a constant depth frictional surface layer. The full three-dimensional temperature equation and a surface heat flux parameterization that requires specification of only wind speed and total cloud cover are used to evaluate the SST. Specification of atmospheric parameters, such as air temperature and humidity, over which the ocean has direct influence, is avoided. The model simulates the major features of the observed tropical Pacific SST. The seasonal evolution of these features is generally captured by the model. Analysis of the results demonstrates the control the ocean has over the surface heat flux from ocean to atmosphere and the crucial role that dynamics play in determining the mean SST in the equatorial Pacific. The sensitivity of the model to perturbations in the surface heat flux, cloud cover specification, diffusivity, and mixed layer depth is discussed.

  19. Sea Surface Infrared Radiance Simulator. Part 1: Roughness and Temperature Models of the Sea Surface Radiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    simulateur infrarouge de la radiance de la surface de l’eau. Des documents ultérieurs suivront pour décrire le modèle de discrétisation de l’espace...géométrique, le modèle infrarouge de sillages des navires ainsi que la performance du simulateur. vi DRDC Atlantic TM 2010-280 Table of contents

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature -WHOI, Version 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Ocean Surface Bundle (OSB) Climate Data Record (CDR) consist of three parts: sea surface temperature, near-surface atmospheric properties, and heat fluxes....

  1. Chlorophyll modulation of sea surface temperature in the Arabian Sea in a mixed-layer isopycnal general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    Remotely sensed chlorophyll pigment concentrations from the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) are used to estimate biological heating rate and investigate the biological modulation of the sea surface temperature (SST) in a bulk mixed layer model...

  2. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles 60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on upwind (windward) face of the tilting wave. Retrieval of Bragg roughness properties shows that omni-directional saturation spectra at ~1000 rad/m are 2-3 times higher (0.01 at 10 m/s wind speed) than the spectra obtained from optical measurements of regular sea surface without wave breaking. This suggests that observed difference can arise

  3. Seasonality and anomalies of sea surface temperature off the coast of Nayarit, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Hernández, Emilio; Carrillo, Laura E.; Filonov, Anatoliy; Brito-Castillo, Luis; Cabrera-Ramos, Carlos E.

    2010-02-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) harmonic and empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses covering 18 years were performed for the area located from 114° to 105° W and from 18° to 25° N. The results indicate that the influence of the annual signal predominates over the semi-annual signal, and the closer to the coast, the stronger the annual harmonic. Several interannual anomalies arose that are connected with the main global indexes, especially the Oceanic Niño Index. Pearson correlations between the first temporal mode of the SST and regional rainfalls in Nayarit indicate that maximum correlations ( r > 0.7) are observed when there is a +1-month lag between the series. However, this result indicates that SST is delayed with 1 month after rainfall occurrence, which shows that the dominant influence in this relationship is not the SST forcing.

  4. Dynamical seasonal prediction of summer sea surface temperatures in the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillman, C. M.; Alves, O.

    2009-03-01

    Coral bleaching is a serious problem threatening the world coral reef systems, triggered by high sea surface temperatures (SST) which are becoming more prevalent as a result of global warming. Seasonal forecasts from coupled ocean-atmosphere models can be used to predict anomalous SST months in advance. In this study, we assess the ability of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology seasonal forecast model (POAMA) to forecast SST anomalies in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with particular focus on the major 1998 and 2002 bleaching events. Advance warning of potential bleaching events allows for the implementation of management strategies to minimise reef damage. This study represents the first attempt to apply a dynamical seasonal model to the problem of coral bleaching and predict SST over a reef system for up to 6 months lead-time, a potentially invaluable tool for reef managers.

  5. Aquarius and Remote Sensing of Sea Surface Salinity from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeVine, David M.; Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Torrusio, S.

    2012-01-01

    Aquarius is an L-band radiometer and scatterometer instrument combination designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The instrument is designed to provide global salinity maps on a monthly basis with a spatial resolution of 150 km and an accuracy of 0.2 psu. The science objective is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean. This data will promote understanding of ocean circulation and its role in the global water cycle and climate.

  6. Assessing the potential for dimethylsulfide enrichment at the sea surface and its influence on air-sea flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Carolyn F.; Harvey, Mike J.; Smith, Murray J.; Bell, Thomas G.; Saltzman, Eric S.; Marriner, Andrew S.; McGregor, John A.; Law, Cliff S.

    2016-09-01

    The flux of dimethylsulfide (DMS) to the atmosphere is generally inferred using water sampled at or below 2 m depth, thereby excluding any concentration anomalies at the air-sea interface. Two independent techniques were used to assess the potential for near-surface DMS enrichment to influence DMS emissions and also identify the factors influencing enrichment. DMS measurements in productive frontal waters over the Chatham Rise, east of New Zealand, did not identify any significant gradients between 0.01 and 6 m in sub-surface seawater, whereas DMS enrichment in the sea-surface microlayer was variable, with a mean enrichment factor (EF; the concentration ratio between DMS in the sea-surface microlayer and in sub-surface water) of 1.7. Physical and biological factors influenced sea-surface microlayer DMS concentration, with high enrichment (EF > 1.3) only recorded in a dinoflagellate-dominated bloom, and associated with low to medium wind speeds and near-surface temperature gradients. On occasion, high DMS enrichment preceded periods when the air-sea DMS flux, measured by eddy covariance, exceeded the flux calculated using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Coupled-Ocean Atmospheric Response Experiment (COARE) parameterized gas transfer velocities and measured sub-surface seawater DMS concentrations. The results of these two independent approaches suggest that air-sea emissions may be influenced by near-surface DMS production under certain conditions, and highlight the need for further study to constrain the magnitude and mechanisms of DMS production in the sea-surface microlayer.

  7. Summer and Fall Sea Ice Processes in the Amundsen Sea: Bottom melting, surface flooding and snow ice formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackley, S. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Weissling, B.; Elder, B. C.

    2011-12-01

    Two ice mass balance buoys were deployed on the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica, ice pack near January 1, 2011. Below freezing air and snow temperatures and sea ice and seawater temperatures at the freezing point at this time indicated that summer melt had not yet commenced. Over the next two months, however, while snow depths changed by less than 0.1m, ice thickness decreased, from bottom melting, by 0.9-1.0m. As snow temperature records did not show temperatures ever reaching the melting point, no surface melt was recorded during the summer period and the small snow depth changes were presumed to occur by consolidation or wind scouring. Water temperatures above the freezing point caused the observed bottom melting from mid January to late February. During the ice loss periods, progressive flooding by sea water at the base of the snow pack was recorded by temperature sensors, showing an increase in the depth of flooded snow pack of 0.4m by the end of the summer period in late February. We hypothesize that progressive flooding of the surface snow pack gives a mechanism for nutrient replenishment in these upper layers, and continuous high algal growth can therefore occur in the flooded snow layer during summer. An underice radiometer recorded light transmission through the ice and snow at selective wavelengths sensitive to chlorophyll. These radiometric results will be presented to examine this algal growth hypothesis. This flooded layer then refroze from the top down into snow ice as air temperatures dropped during March and April, showing that the layer had refrozen as snow ice on the top surface of the ice. Refreezing of the flooded layer gives an ice growth mechanism at the end of summer of 0.2 m to 0.4m of new ice growth over the majority of the ice pack. The snow ice growth in areas covered with pack ice gives salt fluxes commensurate with new ice growth in the autumn expansion of the ice edge over open water. These high salt fluxes therefore represent a marked

  8. Sea-surface bioproductivity changes in the Northwest Pacific over the last 25 kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsepyan, E. A.; Ivanova, E. V.; Murdmaa, L. O.; Alekhina, G. N.

    2014-07-01

    The sea-surface bioproductivity changes over the last 25 kyr were inferred from published data on 30 sediment cores from the open Northwest Pacific (NWP), Sea of Okhotsk, Bering Sea and Sea of Japan accounting for the glacioeustatic sea-level changes. A novel method was developed to compare the variations of several independent productivity proxies relative to the present-day values. During the Last Glacial Maximum, the bioproductivity in the Sea of Okhotsk and the western Bering Sea (BS) was lower than at present, whereas the southern and southeastern Bering Sea and the open NWP are characterized by enhanced bioproductivity. During the early deglacial stage, an increase in bioproductivity was estimated only for the southeastern Bering Sea. High and fairly high bioproductivity was estimated for Heinrich 1 in the open NWP, above the Umnak Plateau and on the Shirshov and Bowers Ridges in the Bering Sea. The high productivity in the Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk and NWP during the Bølling/Allerød was caused by the global warming and enhanced nutrient supply by meltwater from the continent. During the Early Holocene, high productivity was estimated for almost the entire NWP. The Late Holocene sea-surface bioproductivity was generally lower than that of the Early Holocene. Proposed factors that have controlled the sea-surface bioproductivity during the last 25 kyr include: the location of the sea ice margin, the river runoff, gradual flooding of the Bering Sea and the Sea of Okhotsk shelf areas, the water mass exchange between the marginal seas and the open NWP, the eolian supply and the deep vertical mixing of the water column.

  9. Generation of hourly solar radiation for inclined surfaces using monthly mean sunshine duration in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mefti, A.; Bouroubi, M.Y. [Centre of Development of Renewable Energy, Lab. of Energy Resources, Algiers (Algeria); Adane, A. [Univ. of Science and Technology of Algiers (U.S.T.H.B.), Lab. of Image Processing and Radiation, Algiers (Algeria)

    2003-11-01

    Hourly global solar radiation flux incident on an inclined surface is evaluated in any site of Algeria using monthly mean daily sunshine duration measurements. The methodology used consists of successive transformations of solar data, respectively, based on the exponential probability distribution of daily sunshine duration, Angstrom equation, beta probability distribution of hourly global solar radiation flux, polynomial correlations of hourly direct and diffuse radiation with global solar radiation and the Klucher model. Monthly mean values of daily sunshine duration data recorded in 54 meteorological stations of Algeria and hourly solar radiation data collected in Algiers, Bechar and Tamanrasset are available for this study. Knowing the monthly mean daily sunshine duration measurements, the hourly global solar radiation data are then obtained on a tilted surface for the locations of Algiers, Tamanrasset and Bechar. The monthly mean hourly global solar radiation data estimated for Algiers are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental ones. Associated with the principal component analysis, the above method has been extended to all the other meteorological stations, and monthly mean values of hourly global solar radiation flux incident on an inclined surface have been simulated for every site of Algeria. This yields an important database useful for solar energy applications. (Author)

  10. Arctic sea surface height variability and change from satellite radar altimetry and GRACE, 2003-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Thomas W. K.; Bacon, Sheldon; Ridout, Andy L.; Thomas, Sam F.; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Wingham, Duncan J.

    2016-06-01

    Arctic sea surface height (SSH) is poorly observed by radar altimeters due to the poor coverage of the polar oceans provided by conventional altimeter missions and because large areas are perpetually covered by sea ice, requiring specialized data processing. We utilize SSH estimates from both the ice-covered and ice-free ocean to present monthly estimates of Arctic Dynamic Ocean Topography (DOT) from radar altimetry south of 81.5°N and combine this with GRACE ocean mass to estimate steric height. Our SSH and steric height estimates show good agreement with tide gauge records and geopotential height derived from Ice-Tethered Profilers. The large seasonal cycle of Arctic SSH (amplitude ˜5 cm) is dominated by seasonal steric height variation associated with seasonal freshwater fluxes, and peaks in October-November. Overall, the annual mean steric height increased by 2.2 ± 1.4 cm between 2003 and 2012 before falling to circa 2003 levels between 2012 and 2014 due to large reductions on the Siberian shelf seas. The total secular change in SSH between 2003 and 2014 is then dominated by a 2.1 ± 0.7 cm increase in ocean mass. We estimate that by 2010, the Beaufort Gyre had accumulated 4600 km3 of freshwater relative to the 2003-2006 mean. Doming of Arctic DOT in the Beaufort Sea is revealed by Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis to be concurrent with regional reductions in the Siberian Arctic. We estimate that the Siberian shelf seas lost ˜180 km3 of freshwater between 2003 and 2014, associated with an increase in annual mean salinity of 0.15 psu yr-1. Finally, ocean storage flux estimates from altimetry agree well with high-resolution model results, demonstrating the potential for altimetry to elucidate the Arctic hydrological cycle.

  11. Statistical modelling of monthly mean sea level at coastal tide gauge stations along the Indian subcontinent

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Srinivas, K.; Das, V.K.; DineshKumar, P.K.

    on the west coast have shown minimum RMSEs for the corresponding coasts for all the three models, while Bhavnagar on west coast has shown very high RMSE values. The EWMA technique (which yields forecast with a lead time of only one month) gave the lowest root...

  12. Reevaluation of mid-Pliocene North Atlantic sea surface temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Marci M.; Dowsett, Harry J.; Dwyer, Gary S.; Lawrence, Kira T.

    2008-01-01

    Multiproxy temperature estimation requires careful attention to biological, chemical, physical, temporal, and calibration differences of each proxy and paleothermometry method. We evaluated mid-Pliocene sea surface temperature (SST) estimates from multiple proxies at Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes 552A, 609B, 607, and 606, transecting the North Atlantic Drift. SST estimates derived from faunal assemblages, foraminifer Mg/Ca, and alkenone unsaturation indices showed strong agreement at Holes 552A, 607, and 606 once differences in calibration, depth, and seasonality were addressed. Abundant extinct species and/or an unrecognized productivity signal in the faunal assemblage at Hole 609B resulted in exaggerated faunal-based SST estimates but did not affect alkenone-derived or Mg/Ca–derived estimates. Multiproxy mid-Pliocene North Atlantic SST estimates corroborate previous studies documenting high-latitude mid-Pliocene warmth and refine previous faunal-based estimates affected by environmental factors other than temperature. Multiproxy investigations will aid SST estimation in high-latitude areas sensitive to climate change and currently underrepresented in SST reconstructions.

  13. Physicochemical Studies of the Sea-Surface Microlayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhengbin; Liu Chunying; Liu Lianshen

    2006-01-01

    In physicochemical studies on the sea-surface microlayer(SML)in seawater,the main researches conducted were as follows:(1)It was found that there is an objective layer of sudden change in physical and chemical properties between the SML and the subsurface layer in seawater.(2)The SML thickness was determined and should be about 50±10 μm.(3)The Gibbs model of the SML was extended,and the multilayer model of the SML was advanced.(4)The original-location method,which corresponds with the traditional removal-location method,was founded and used to determine the SML thickness.The results obtained from the two methods were almost identical.(5)An abnormal phenomenon was found when the Gibbs solution adsorption was applied to the seawater system,the reason for which was discussed preliminarily.

  14. Satellite techniques for determining the geopotential of sea surface elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisacane, V. L.

    1986-01-01

    Spaceborne altimetry with measurement accuracies of a few centimeters which has the potential to determine sea surface elevations necessary to compute accurate three-dimensional geostrophic currents from traditional hydrographic observation is discussed. The limitation in this approach is the uncertainties in knowledge of the global and ocean geopotentials which produce satellite and height uncertainties about an order of magnitude larger than the goal of about 10 cm. The quantitative effects of geopotential uncertainties on processing altimetry data are described. Potential near term improvements, not requiring additional spacecraft, are discussed. Even though there is substantial improvements at the longer wavelengths, the oceanographic goal will be achieved. The geopotential research mission (GRM) is described which should produce geopotential models that are capable of defining the ocean geoid to 10 cm and near-earth satellite position. The state of the art and the potential of spaceborne gravimetry is described as an alternative approach to improve our knowledge of the geopotential.

  15. Change point detection of the Persian Gulf sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirvani, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the Student's t parametric and Mann-Whitney nonparametric change point models (CPMs) were applied to detect change point in the annual Persian Gulf sea surface temperature anomalies (PGSSTA) time series for the period 1951-2013. The PGSSTA time series, which were serially correlated, were transformed to produce an uncorrelated pre-whitened time series. The pre-whitened PGSSTA time series were utilized as the input file of change point models. Both the applied parametric and nonparametric CPMs estimated the change point in the PGSSTA in 1992. The PGSSTA follow the normal distribution up to 1992 and thereafter, but with a different mean value after year 1992. The estimated slope of linear trend in PGSSTA time series for the period 1951-1992 was negative; however, that was positive after the detected change point. Unlike the PGSSTA, the applied CPMs suggested no change point in the Niño3.4SSTA time series.

  16. Electromagnetic Scattering from Rough Sea Surface with PM Spectrum Covered by an Organic Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Rui; GUO Li-Xin; WANG An-Qi; WU Zhen-Sen

    2011-01-01

    The rough sea surface covered by an organic film will cause attenuation of capillarity waves, which implies that the organic films play an important role in rough sea surface processes. We focus on a one-dimensional(1D)rough sea surface with the Pierson-Moskowitz(PM)spectrum distributed to the homogeneous insoluble organic slicks. First, the impact of the organic film on the PM surface spectrum is presented, as well as that of the correlation length, the rms height and slope of the rough sea surface. The damping effect of the organic film changes the physical parameters of the rough sea surface. For example, the organic film will reduce the rms height and slopee of the rough sea surface, which results in the attenuation of the high-frequency components of the PM spectrum leading to modification of the surface PM spectrum. Then, the influence of the organic film on the electromagnetic(EM) scattering coefficients from PM rough sea surface covered by the organic film is investigated and discussed in detail, compared with the clean PM rough sea surface through the method of moments.

  17. Sea Surface Salinity signature of tropical Atlantic interannual modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awo, Mesmin; Alory, Gael; Da-Allada, Casimir; Jouanno, Julien; Delcroix, Thierry; Baloitcha, Ezinvi

    2017-04-01

    Interannual climate variability in the tropical Atlantic is dominated by two internal modes: an equatorial and a meridional mode. The equatorial mode is partly responsible for sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies observed in boreal summer in the Gulf of Guinea. The meridional mode peaks in boreal spring as an inter-hemispheric SST fluctuation. Previous studies show that these modes affect the migration of the inter tropical convergence zone which drives regional precipitation. In this study, we extracted the Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) signature of these modes from in situ data. The results indicate strong SSS anomalies in the equatorial, north west and south east tropical Atlantic related to the equatorial mode. Moreover, the results also indicate the existence of a meridional SSS dipole in the equatorial region, strong SSS anomalies in north and south tropical Atlantic and in runoff regions, related to the meridional mode. Using a mixed-layer salt budget in a realistic model, we investigated the oceanic and/or atmospheric processes responsible for this signature: For the equatorial mode, both fresh water flux and horizontal advection explain the observed signature in the north equatorial region, but in the south equatorial region, the signature is explained by the combined contribution of total (horizontal and vertical) advection and vertical diffusion. For the meridional mode, changes in fresh water flux explain the observed equatorial dipole while the signature in runoff regions is explained by the total advection. In the north west and south east tropical Atlantic, only horizontal advection is important for explaining the signature of these two modes.

  18. Surface wave effects on water temperature in the Baltic Sea: simulations with the coupled NEMO-WAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alari, Victor; Staneva, Joanna; Breivik, Øyvind; Bidlot, Jean-Raymond; Mogensen, Kristian; Janssen, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Coupled circulation (NEMO) and wave model (WAM) system was used to study the effects of surface ocean waves on water temperature distribution and heat exchange at regional scale (the Baltic Sea). Four scenarios—including Stokes-Coriolis force, sea-state dependent energy flux (additional turbulent kinetic energy due to breaking waves), sea-state dependent momentum flux and the combination these forcings—were simulated to test the impact of different terms on simulated temperature distribution. The scenario simulations were compared to a control simulation, which included a constant wave-breaking coefficient, but otherwise was without any wave effects. The results indicate a pronounced effect of waves on surface temperature, on the distribution of vertical temperature and on upwelling's. Overall, when all three wave effects were accounted for, did the estimates of temperature improve compared to control simulation. During the summer, the wave-induced water temperature changes were up to 1 °C. In northern parts of the Baltic Sea, a warming of the surface layer occurs in the wave included simulations in summer months. This in turn reduces the cold bias between simulated and measured data, e.g. the control simulation was too cold compared to measurements. The warming is related to sea-state dependent energy flux. This implies that a spatio-temporally varying wave-breaking coefficient is necessary, because it depends on actual sea state. Wave-induced cooling is mostly observed in near-coastal areas and is the result of intensified upwelling in the scenario, when Stokes-Coriolis forcing is accounted for. Accounting for sea-state dependent momentum flux results in modified heat exchange at the water-air boundary which consequently leads to warming of surface water compared to control simulation.

  19. Comparison of different Geostatistical Approaches to map Sea Surface Temperature (SST) of Southern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Azizi; Mohd Muslim, Aidy; Lokman Husain, Mohd; Fadzil Akhir, Mohd

    2013-04-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) variation provides vital information for weather and ocean forecasting especially when studying climate change. Conventional methods of collecting ocean parameters such as SST, remains expensive and labor intensive due to the large area coverage and complex analytical procedure required. Therefore, some studies need to be conducted on the spatial and temporal distribution of ocean parameters. This study looks at Geo-statisctical methods in interpolating SST values and its impact on accuracy. Two spatial Geo-statistical techniques, mainly kriging and inverse distance functions (IDW) were applied to create variability distribution maps of SST for the Southern South China Sea (SCS). Data from 72 sampling station was collected in July 2012 covering an area of 270 km x 100 km and 263 km away from shore. This data provide the basis for the interpolation and accuracy analysis. After normalization, variograms were computed to fit the data sets producing models with the least RSS value. The accuracy were later evaluated based on on root mean squared error (RMSE) and root mean kriging variance (RMKV). Results show that Kriging with exponential model produced most accuracy estimates, reducing error in 17.3% compared with inverse distance functions.

  20. The mean sea surface height and geoid along the Geosat subtrack from Bermuda to Cape Cod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Joyce, Terrence M.; Schubert, David M.; Caruso, Michael J.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of near-surface velocity and concurrent sea level along an ascending Geosat subtrack were used to estimate the mean sea surface height and the Earth's gravitational geoid. Velocity measurements were made on three traverses of a Geosat subtrack within 10 days, using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). A small bias in the ADCP velocity was removed by considering a mass balance for two pairs of triangles for which expendable bathythermograph measurements were also made. Because of the large curvature of the Gulf Stream, the gradient wind balance was used to estimate the cross-track component of geostrophic velocity from the ADCP vectors; this component was then integrated to obtain the sea surface height profile. The mean sea surface height was estimated as the difference between the instantaneous sea surface height from ADCP and the Geosat residual sea level, with mesoscale errors reduced by low-pass filtering. The error estimates were divided into a bias, tilt, and mesoscale residual; the bias was ignored because profiles were only determined within a constant of integration. The calculated mean sea surface height estimate agreed with an independent estimate of the mean sea surface height from Geosat, obtained by modeling the Gulf Stream as a Gaussian jet, within the expected errors in the estimates: the tilt error was 0.10 m, and the mesoscale error was 0.044 m. To minimize mesoscale errors in the estimate, the alongtrack geoid estimate was computed as the difference between the mean sea level from the Geosat Exact Repeat Mission and an estimate of the mean sea surface height, rather than as the difference between instantaneous profiles of sea level and sea surface height. In the critical region near the Gulf Stream the estimated error reduction using this method was about 0.07 m. Differences between the geoid estimate and a gravimetric geoid were not within the expected errors: the rms mesoscale difference was 0.24 m rms.

  1. Eddy-Induced Ekman Pumping from Sea-Surface Temperature and Surface Current Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaube, P.; Chelton, D. B.; O'Neill, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    Numerous past studies have discussed the biological importance of upwelling of nutrients into the interiors of nonlinear eddies. Such upwelling can occur during the transient stages of formation of cyclones from shoaling of the thermocline. In their mature stages, upwelling can occur from Ekman pumping driven by eddy-induced wind stress curl. Previous investigations of ocean-atmosphere interaction in regions of persistent sea-surface temperature (SST) frontal features have shown that the wind field is locally stronger over warm water and weaker over cold water. Spatial variability of the SST field thus results in a wind stress curl and an associated Ekman pumping in regions of crosswind temperature gradients. It can therefore be anticipated that any SST anomalies associated with eddies can generate Ekman pumping in the eddy interiors. Another mechanism for eddy-induced Ekman pumping is the curl of the stress on the sea surface that arises from the difference between the surface wind velocity and the surface ocean velocity. While SST-induced Ekman upwelling can occur over eddies of either polarity surface current effects on Ekman upwelling occur only over anticyclonic eddies The objective of this study is to determine the spatial structures and relative magnitudes of the two mechanisms for eddy-induced Ekman pumping within the interiors of mesoscale eddies. This is achieved by collocating satellite-based measurements of SST, surface winds and wind stress curl to the interiors of eddies identified and tracked with an automated procedure applied to the sea-surface height (SSH) fields in the Reference Series constructed by AVISO from the combined measurements by two simultaneously operating altimeters. It is shown that, on average, the wind stress curl from eddy-induced surface currents is largest at the eddy center, resulting in Ekman pumping velocities of order 10 cm day-1. While this surface current-induced Ekman pumping depends only weakly on the wind direction

  2. A case study of sea breeze blocking regulated by sea surface temperature along the English south coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Sweeney

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of sea breeze structure to sea surface temperature (SST and coastal orography is investigated in convection-permitting Met Office Unified Model simulations of a case study along the south coast of England. Changes in SST of 1 K are shown to significantly modify the structure of the sea breeze. On the day of the case study the sea breeze was partially blocked by coastal orography, particularly within Lyme Bay. The extent to which the flow is blocked depends strongly on the static stability of the marine boundary layer. In experiments with colder SST, the marine boundary layer is more stable, and the degree of blocking is more pronounced. The implications of prescribing fixed SST from climatology in numerical weather prediction model forecasts of the sea breeze are discussed.

  3. Biofilm-like properties of the sea surface and predicted effects on air-sea CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurl, Oliver; Stolle, Christian; Van Thuoc, Chu; The Thu, Pham; Mari, Xavier

    2016-05-01

    Because the sea surface controls various interactions between the ocean and the atmosphere, it has a profound function for marine biogeochemistry and climate regulation. The sea surface is the gateway for the exchange of climate-relevant gases, heat and particles. Thus, in order to determine how the ocean and the atmosphere interact and respond to environmental changes on a global scale, the characterization and understanding of the sea surface are essential. The uppermost part of the water column is defined as the sea-surface microlayer and experiences strong spatial and temporal dynamics, mainly due to meteorological forcing. Wave-damped areas at the sea surface are caused by the accumulation of surface-active organic material and are defined as slicks. Natural slicks are observed frequently but their biogeochemical properties are poorly understood. In the present study, we found up to 40 times more transparent exopolymer particles (TEP), the foundation of any biofilm, in slicks compared to the underlying bulk water at multiple stations in the North Pacific, South China Sea, and Baltic Sea. We found a significant lower enrichment of TEP (up to 6) in non-slick sea surfaces compared to its underlying bulk water. Moreover, slicks were characterized by a large microbial biomass, another shared feature with conventional biofilms on solid surfaces. Compared to non-slick samples (avg. pairwise similarity of 70%), the community composition of bacteria in slicks was increasingly (avg. pairwise similarity of 45%) different from bulk water communities, indicating that the TEP-matrix creates specific environments for its inhabitants. We, therefore, conclude that slicks can feature biofilm-like properties with the excessive accumulation of particles and microbes. We also assessed the potential distribution and frequency of slick-formation in coastal and oceanic regions, and their effect on air-sea CO2 exchange based on literature data. We estimate that slicks can reduce CO2

  4. Analysis of historical MERIS and MODIS data to evaluate the impact of dredging to monthly mean surface TSM concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raag, L.; Uiboupin, R.; Sipelgas, L.

    2013-10-01

    We studied the changes of total suspended matter (TSM) distribution in Estonian coastal sea with special focus onPaldiskiharbor at the Pakri Bay (SW Gulf Of Finland). The purpose of current study was to examine the suitability of remote sensing data for detection of turbidity differences caused by dredged sediments on monthly mean surface TSM concentration, retrieved from satellite images. The MERIS (FSG) products with 300m resolution and MODIS band 1 data with 250m resolution from years 2006-2010 were used in theanalysis. MERIS images were processed using the Case-2 water processors available in BEAM software. Validation of the two processors (C2R and FUB) with in situ measurements of TSM gave reliable correlation between satellite data and in situ TSM measurements: r2 was 0.43 for FUB processor and 0.47 for C2R processor. An empirical algorithm was established for conversion of MODIS band 1 reflectance (620-670 nm) data to TSM concentration. We found reliable (r2=0.43) relationship between MODIS reflectance at band 1and TSM concentration measured fromwater samples. The monthly average TSM maps in the harbor region were calculated from MERIS and MODIS data using validated conversion algorithms in order to describe TSM variability and to analyzeenvironmental impact of dredging.

  5. Teleconnected influence of North Atlantic sea surface temperature on the El Nino onset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Environmental Dynamics, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Guangzhou (China); City University of Hong Kong, Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre, School of Energy and Environment, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Chunzai [NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL (United States); Zhou, Wen [City University of Hong Kong, Guy Carpenter Asia-Pacific Climate Impact Centre, School of Energy and Environment, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Dongxiao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Tropical Marine Environmental Dynamics, South China Sea Institute of Oceanology, Guangzhou (China); Song, Jie [Chinese Academy of Sciences, LASG, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Beijing (China)

    2011-08-15

    Influence of North Atlantic sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies on tropical Pacific SST anomalies is examined. Both summer and winter North Atlantic SST anomalies are negatively related to central-eastern tropical Pacific SST anomalies in the subsequent months varying from 5 to 13 months. In particular, when the North Atlantic is colder than normal in the summer, an El Nino event is likely to be initiated in the subsequent spring in the tropical Pacific. Associated with summer cold North Atlantic SST anomalies is an anomalous cyclonic circulation at low-level over the North Atlantic from subsequent October to April. Corresponded to this local response, an SST-induced heating over the North Atlantic produces a teleconnected pattern, similar to the East Atlantic/West Russia teleconnection. The pattern features two anticyclonic circulations near England and Lake Baikal, and two cyclonic circulations over the North Atlantic and near the Caspian Sea. The anticyclonic circulation near Lake Baikal enhances the continent northerlies, and strengthens the East-Asian winter monsoon. These are also associated with an off-equatorial cyclonic circulation in the western Pacific during the subsequent winter and spring, which produces equatorial westerly wind anomalies in the western Pacific. The equatorial westerly wind anomalies in the winter and spring can help initiate a Pacific El Nino event following a cold North Atlantic in the summer. (orig.)

  6. Comparison of MTI and Ground Truth Sea Surface Temperatures at Nauru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurzeja, R.

    2002-09-05

    This report evaluates MTI-derived surface water temperature near the tropical Pacific island of Nauru. The MTI sea-surface temperatures were determined by the Los Alamos National Laboratory based on the robust retrieval.

  7. Anomalous Arctic surface wind patterns and their impacts on September sea ice minima and trend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingyi Wu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We used monthly mean surface wind data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Centers for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR reanalysis dataset during the period 1979–2010 to describe the first two patterns of Arctic surface wind variability by means of the complex vector empirical orthogonal function (CVEOF analysis. The first two patterns respectively account for 31 and 16% of its total anomalous kinetic energy. The leading pattern consists of the two subpatterns: the northern Laptev Sea (NLS pattern and the Arctic dipole (AD pattern. The second pattern contains the northern Kara Sea (NKS pattern and the central Arctic (CA pattern. Over the past two decades, the combined dynamical forcing of the first two patterns has contributed to Arctic September sea ice extent (SIE minima and its declining trend. September SIE minima are mainly associated with the negative phase of the AD pattern and the positive phase of the CA pattern during the summer (July to September season, and both phases coherently show an anomalous anticyclone over the Arctic Ocean. Wind patterns affect September SIE through their frequency and intensity. The negative trend in September SIE over the past two decades is associated with increased frequency and enhanced intensity of the CA pattern during the melting season from April to September. Thus, it cannot be simply attributed to the AD anomaly characterised by the second empirical orthogonal function mode of sea level pressure north of 70°N. The CA pattern exhibited interdecadal variability in the late 1990s, and an anomalous cyclone prevailed before 1997 and was then replaced by an anomalous anticyclone over the Arctic Ocean that is consistent with the rapid decline trend in September SIE. This paper provides an alternative way to identify the dominant patterns of climate variability and investigate their associated Arctic sea ice variability from a dynamical perspective. Indeed, this study

  8. Horizontal advection, diffusion and plankton spectra at the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracco, A.; Clayton, S.; Pasquero, C.

    2009-04-01

    Plankton patchiness is ubiquitous in the oceans, and various physical and biological processes have been proposed as its generating mechanisms. However, a coherent statement on the problem is missing, due to both a small number of suitable observations and to an incomplete understanding of the properties of reactive tracers in turbulent media. Abraham (1998) suggested that horizontal advection may be the dominant process behind the observed distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton, acting to mix tracers with longer reaction times (Rt) down to smaller scales. Conversely, Mahadevan and Campbell (2002) attributed the relative distributions of sea surface temperature and phytoplankton to small scale upwelling, where tracers with longer Rt are able to homogenize more than those with shorter reaction times. Neither of the above mechanisms can explain simultaneously the (relative) spectral slopes of temperature, phytoplankton and zooplankton. Here, with a simple advection model and a large suite of numerical experiments, we concentrate on some of the physical processes influencing the relative distributions of tracers at the ocean surface, and we investigate: 1) the impact of the spatial scale of tracer supply; 2) the role played by coherent eddies on the distribution of tracers with different Rt; 3) the role of diffusion (so far neglected). We show that diffusion determines the distribution of temperature, regardless of the nature of the forcing. We also find that coherent structures together with differential diffusion of tracers with different Rt impact the tracer distributions. This may help in understanding the highly variable nature of observed plankton spectra.

  9. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    as the entire atmosphere above. Under conditions of light winds and strong solar insolation, warming of the upper oceanic layer may occur. In this PhD study, remote sensing from satellites is used to obtain information for the near-surface ocean wind and the sea surface temperature over the North Sea...

  10. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscattering at 940 Hz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Ainslie, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Reliable predictions of sea-surface backscattering strength are required for sonar performance modeling. These are, however, difficult to obtain as measurements of sea-surface backscattering are not available at small grazing angles relevant to low-frequency active sonar (1-3 kHz). Accurate theoreti

  11. Remotely sensed seasonality in the spatial distribution of sea-surface suspended particulate matter in the southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleveld, Marieke A.; Pasterkamp, Reinold; van der Woerd, Hendrik J.; Pietrzak, Julie D.

    2008-10-01

    An algorithm is presented for estimating near-surface SPM concentrations in the turbid Case 2 waters of the southern North Sea. The single band algorithm, named POWERS, was derived by parameterising Gordon's approximation of the radiative transfer model with measurements of Belgian and Dutch inherent optical properties. The algorithm was used to calculate near-surface SPM concentration from 491 SeaWiFS datasets for 2001. It was shown to be a robust algorithm for estimating SPM in the southern North Sea. Regression of annual geometric mean SPM concentration derived from remote sensing (SPM rs), against in situ (SPM is) data from 19 Dutch monitoring stations was highly significant with an r2 of 0.87. Further comparison and statistical testing against independent datasets for 2000 confirmed the consistency of this relationship. Moreover, time series of SPM rs concentrations derived from the POWERS algorithm, were shown to follow the same temporal trends as individual SPM is data recorded during 2001. Composites of annual, winter and summer SPM rs for 2001 highlight the three dominant water masses in the southern North Sea, as well as their winter-fall and spring-summer variability. The results indicate that wind induced wave action and mixing cause high surface SPM signals in winter in regions where the water column becomes well mixed, whereas in summer stratification leads to a lower SPM surface signal. The presented algorithm gives accurate near-surface SPM concentrations and could easily be adapted for other water masses and seas.

  12. The mechanism for the impact of sea surface temperature anomaly on the ridgeline surface of Western Pacific

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the atmospheric circulation data provided by ECMWF and the sea surface temperature data by NOAA, we studied the mechanism for the impact of sea surface temperature anomaly on the ridgeline surface of western Pacific using an improved high truncated spectral model. Our results show that the wave-wave interaction and the wave-mean flow interactions are weaker in the inner dynamic process of atmospheric circulation, when atmospheric circulation is forced by the sea surface temperature of El Ni-o pattern. With the external thermal forcing changed from winter to summer pattern, the range of ridgeline surface of western Pacific moving northward is smaller, which causes the ridgeline surface of western Pacific on south of normal. On the contrary, the wave-wave interaction and the wave-mean flow interaction are stronger, when atmospheric circulation is forced by the sea surface temperature of La Ni-a pattern. With the external thermal forcing turning from winter to summer pattern, the ridgeline surface of western Pacific shifts northward about 19 latitude degrees, which conduces the ridgeline surface of western Pacific on north of normal. After moving to certain latitude, the ridgeline surface of western Pacific oscillates with the most obvious 30-60 d period and the 4°-7° amplitude. It is one of the important reasons for the interannual variation of ridgeline surface of Western Pacific that the at- mospheric inner dynamical process forced out by different sea surface temperature anomaly pattern is different.

  13. Analysis of the Scattering Characteristics of Sea Surface with the Influence from Internal Wave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Yi-wen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The internal wave travels beneath the sea surface and modulate the roughness of the sea surface through the wave-current interaction. This makes some dark and bright bands can be observed in the Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR images. In this paper, we first establish the profile of the internal wave based on the KdV equations; then, the action balance equation and the wave-current interaction source function are used to modify the sea spectrum; finally, the two-scale theory based facet model is combined with the modified sea spectrum to calculate the scattering characteristics of the sea. We have simulated the scattering coefficient distribution of the sea with an internal wave traveling through. The influence on the scattering coefficients and the Doppler spectra under different internal wave parameters and sea state parameters are analyzed.

  14. Snow melt on sea ice surfaces as determined from passive microwave satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark R.

    1987-01-01

    SMMR data for the year 1979, 1980 and 1984 have been analyzed to determine the variability in the onset of melt for the Arctic seasonal sea ice zone. The results show melt commencing in either the Kara/Barents Seas or Chukchi Sea and progressing zonally towards the central Asian coast (Laptev Sea). Individual regions had interannual variations in melt onset in the 10-20 day range. To determine whether daily changes occur in the sea ice surface melt, the SMMR 18 and 37 GHz brightness temperature data are analyzed at day/night/twilight periods. Brightness temperatures illustrate diurnal variations in most regions during melt. In the East Siberian Sea, however, daily variations are observed in 1979, throughout the analysis period, well before any melt would usually have commenced. Understanding microwave responses to changing surface conditions during melt will perhaps give additional information about energy budgets during the winter to summer transition of sea ice.

  15. The clear-sky greenhouse effect sensitivity to a sea surface temperature change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvel, J. PH.; Breon, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The clear-sky greenhouse effect response to a sea surface temperature (SST or Ts) change is studied using outgoing clear-sky longwave radiation measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Considering geographical distributions for July 1987, the relation between the SST, the greenhouse effect (defined as the outgoing infrared flux trapped by atmospheric gases), and the precipitable water vapor content (W), estimated by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager, is analyzed first. A fairly linear relation between W and the normalized greenhouse effect g, is found. On the contrary, the SST dependence of both W and g exhibits nonlinearities with, especially, a large increase for SST above 25 C. This enhanced sensitivity of g and W can be interpreted in part by a corresponding large increase of atmospheric water vapor content related to the transition from subtropical dry regions to equatorial moist regions. Using two years of data (1985 and 1986), the normalized greenhouse effect sensitivity to the sea surface temperature is computed from the interannual variation of monthly mean values.

  16. Sensitivity of Horn of Africa Rainfall to Regional Sea Surface Temperature Forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewdu T. Segele

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP version 4.4 Regional Climate Model (RegCM4 is used to investigate the rainfall response to cooler/warmer sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA forcing in the Indian and Atlantic Oceans. The effect of SSTA forcing in a specific ocean basin is identified by ensemble, averaging 10 individual simulations in which a constant or linearly zonally varying SSTA is prescribed in individual basins while specifying the 1971–2000 monthly varying climatological sea surface temperature (SST across the remaining model domain. The nonlinear rainfall response to SSTA amplitude also is investigated by separately specifying +1K, +2K, and +4K SSTA forcing in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The simulation results show that warm SSTs over the entire Indian Ocean produce drier conditions across the larger Blue Nile catchment, whereas warming ≥ +2K generates large positive rainfall anomalies exceeding 10 mm·day−1 over drought prone regions of Northeastern Ethiopia. However, the June–September rainy season tends to be wetter (drier when the SST warming (cooling is limited to either the Northern or Southern Indian Ocean. Wet rainy seasons generally are characterized by deepening of the monsoon trough, east of 40°E, intensification of the Mascarene high, strengthening of the Somali low level jet and the tropical easterly jet, enhanced zonal and meridional vertically integrated moisture fluxes, and steeply vertically decreasing moist static energy. The opposite conditions hold for dry monsoon seasons.

  17. Forecasting decadal changes in sea surface temperatures and coral bleaching within a Caribbean coral reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angang; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2014-09-01

    Elevated sea surface temperature (SST) caused by global warming is one of the major threats to coral reefs. While increased SST has been shown to negatively affect the health of coral reefs by increasing rates of coral bleaching, how changes to atmospheric heating impact SST distributions, modified by local flow environments, has been less understood. This study aimed to simulate future water flow patterns and water surface heating in response to increased air temperature within a coral reef system in Bocas del Toro, Panama, located within the Caribbean Sea. Water flow and SST were modeled using the Delft3D-FLOWcomputer simulation package. Locally measured physical parameters, including bathymetry, astronomic tidal forcing, and coral habitat distribution were input into the model and water flow, and SST was simulated over a four-month period under present day, as well as projected warming scenarios in 2020s, 2050s, and 2080s. Changes in SST, and hence the thermal stress to corals, were quantified by degree heating weeks. Results showed that present-day reported bleaching sites were consistent with localized regions of continuous high SST. Regions with highest SST were located within shallow coastal sites adjacent to the mainland or within the interior of the bay, and characterized by low currents with high water retention times. Under projected increases in SSTs, shallow reef areas in low flow regions were found to be hot spots for future bleaching.

  18. Monthly variation in the fat content of anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) in the Yellow Sea: implications for acoustic abundance estimation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bo; ZHAO Xianyong; DAI Fangqun

    2011-01-01

    Anchovy is a key species in the Yellow Sea ecosystem. An accurate estimate of anchovy abundance is vital for the management of the anchovy stock and measurement of the ecosystem response to changes in anchovy abundance. However, the acoustic fish abundance estimate may be biased by 30%-40% if the fat-content induced target strength variation is not taken into account. We measured the monthly variation in the fat content of anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) in the Yellow Sea, and evaluated the potential effect of variation in fat content on the acoustic assessment of anchovy abundance. The fat content of anchovy varied seasonally, with two maxima and two minima in a year. The highest fat content (14.75%) was measured in the pre-spawning period in May, and the lowest fat content (2.48%) was measured during the post-spawning period in October. Fat content appeared to correlate with water content,but not body size. Assuming that the target strength is decreased by 0.2dB for every 1% increase in fat content, the seasonal difference in the target strength of anchovy may be as high as 2.45 dB. Given this,the acoustic abundance estimate may be biased by between 43% and 76%. Our results highlight the need for more information on the changes in fat content of fishes whose abundance is estimated by acoustic surveys.

  19. Sound scattering by bubble clouds near the sea surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunaurd; Huang

    2000-01-01

    The classical exact formulation required to evaluate the form function (or the scattering cross-section, SCS) of a single, ideal, air bubble in a boundless liquid is briefly recalled. It is then immediately generalized to the case of a round cloud of many possibly interacting such bubbles of known volume concentration, contained within the same boundless medium. This is further generalized to the case when the bubble cloud is near a free surface. The presence of the nearby pressure release surface, assumed flat, substantially alters the cloud's scattering cross-section relative to its value in the absence of boundaries. We then use an earlier technique of ours [i.e., see I.E.E.E. J. Ocean. Eng. 20, 285-293 (1995)] based on the method of images that uses the addition theorem for the spherical wave functions, to relate all the scattered sound fields to a common origin and thus obtain the (modified) SCS of the cloud now near the boundary. This formulation accounts for all orders of multiple scattering and yields an infinite set of coupled algebraic equations for the coupling coefficients. This set is then solved for the coupling coefficients in terms of infinite sums of products of pairs of Wigner 3-j symbols, which are then used to construct and evaluate the form function. We display numerical results in four cases that correspond to geographical sites in which the bubble concentrations within the cloud have been measured along a couple of oblique upward directions, or have been assumed to have increasing (and in a few instances, purposely unrealistically high) values. In all cases considered here the bubble clouds are only a few meters beneath the sea surface and consist of ideal bubbles. The results are also compared to those found in the absence of a boundary in all the cases considered.

  20. Mean sea surface and geoid gradient comparisons with TOPEX altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Yi, Yuchan; Wang, Yan Ming

    1994-01-01

    Cycles 4 to 54 of TOPEX data have been analyzed through comparisons with the mean sea surface given on the disturbed geophysical data record (GDR). Two inverted barometer correction procedures were considered for the data reduction. One used a constant atmospheric pressure for all data while the one adopted for use, for most computations, introduced a cycle average pressure. The maximum difference between the two estimates was 3.0 cm with a clear annual signal. With the modified correction the TOPEX sea surface was compared to The Ohio State University (OSU) mean sea surface, given on the GDR, to estimate three translations ( delta x = -2.3 cm; delta y = 25.0 cm; delta z = -0.3 cm) and a bias (43.3 cm) between the two surfaces. The only significant translation is delta y which indicates the reference frame of the TOPEX system differs from that used in the OSU mean sea surface system. The bias between the TOPEX mean sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface was used to estimate an equatorial radius of 6,378,136.55 m based on an 18-cm biased estimate of the TOPEX altimeter. Examination of the average difference, by cycle, between the TOPEX sea surface and the OSU mean sea surface suggested a bias change of 3.1 +/- 2.2 mm/yr with a positive sign indicating the average ocean surface is rising or the altimeter measured distance is decreasing. Models were implemented that solved directly for a bias, bias rate annual/semiannual, and tide correction terms. The computations indicated that a simultaneous solution for this bias, bias rate, and annual/semiannual terms gave the most accurate results. Nonsimultaneous solutions led to slightly different bias rate values. The root mean square difference between the TOPEX sea surface and OSU sea surface, after translation and bias correction, was +/- 17 cm for a typical cycle. Some locations were indentified where the difference could reach 2.3 cm and were repeated over several cycles indicating errors in the mean sea surface. Most

  1. Sea level and turbidity controls on mangrove soil surface elevation change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Catherine E.; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Bennion, Vicki; Hayes, Matthew; Reef, Ruth; Santini, Nadia; Cahoon, Donald R.

    2015-02-01

    Increases in sea level are a threat to seaward fringing mangrove forests if levels of inundation exceed the physiological tolerance of the trees; however, tidal wetlands can keep pace with sea level rise if soil surface elevations can increase at the same pace as sea level rise. Sediment accretion on the soil surface and belowground production of roots are proposed to increase with increasing sea level, enabling intertidal habitats to maintain their position relative to mean sea level, but there are few tests of these predictions in mangrove forests. Here we used variation in sea level and the availability of sediments caused by seasonal and inter-annual variation in the intensity of La Nina-El Nino to assess the effects of increasing sea level on surface elevation gains and contributing processes (accretion on the surface, subsidence and root growth) in mangrove forests. We found that soil surface elevation increased with mean sea level (which varied over 250 mm during the study) and with turbidity at sites where fine sediment in the water column is abundant. In contrast, where sediments were sandy, rates of surface elevation gain were high, but not significantly related to variation in turbidity, and were likely to be influenced by other factors that deliver sand to the mangrove forest. Root growth was not linked to soil surface elevation gains, although it was associated with reduced shallow subsidence, and therefore may contribute to the capacity of mangroves to keep pace with sea level rise. Our results indicate both surface (sedimentation) and subsurface (root growth) processes can influence mangrove capacity to keep pace with sea level rise within the same geographic location, and that current models of tidal marsh responses to sea level rise capture the major feature of the response of mangroves where fine, but not coarse, sediments are abundant.

  2. Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Retrieval Algorithm Using Combined Passive-Active L-Band Microwave Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquarius is a combined passive/active L-band microwave instrument developed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. The data will support studies of the coupling between ocean circulation, the global water cycle, and climate. The primary science objective of this mission is to monitor the seasonal and interannual variation of the large scale features of the surface salinity field in the open ocean with a spatial resolution of 150 kilometers and a retrieval accuracy of 0.2 practical salinity units globally on a monthly basis. The measurement principle is based on the response of the L-band (1.413 gigahertz) sea surface brightness temperatures (T (sub B)) to sea surface salinity. To achieve the required 0.2 practical salinity units accuracy, the impact of sea surface roughness (e.g. wind-generated ripples and waves) along with several factors on the observed brightness temperature has to be corrected to better than a few tenths of a degree Kelvin. To the end, Aquarius includes a scatterometer to help correct for this surface roughness effect.

  3. Radioactive 129I in surface water of the Celtic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Peng; Hou, Xiaolin; Aldahan, Ala

    2014-01-01

    Relatively large amounts of radioactive iodine 129I (T 1/2 = 15.7 Ma) have been documented in seawater such as the English Channel, the Irish Sea and the North Sea. Data on the concentration of the iodine isotopes in waters of the Celtic Sea are missing. Aiming to provide first 129I data in the C......Relatively large amounts of radioactive iodine 129I (T 1/2 = 15.7 Ma) have been documented in seawater such as the English Channel, the Irish Sea and the North Sea. Data on the concentration of the iodine isotopes in waters of the Celtic Sea are missing. Aiming to provide first 129I data...

  4. Speciation of mercury in surface and deep-sea waters in the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Milena; Kotnik, Jože; Logar, Martina; Fajon, Vesna; Zvonarić, Tomislav; Pirrone, Nicola

    A summary of data recently obtained for mercury analysis and speciation (reactive Hg, total Hg and monomethylmercury (MMHg)) in filtered and non-filtered seawater samples, dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) and dimethylmercury (DMHg) in open and coastal waters of the Mediterranean Sea is presented. The majority of the results were obtained during an oceanographic cruise aboard the research vessel Urania from 14 July to 9 August, 2000, as part of the MED-OCEANOR Project funded by the National Research Council of Italy. The results are compared with those obtained in contaminated coastal environments of the Adriatic (The Gulf of Trieste and Kaštela Bay) and non-contaminated coastal waters of the eastern Adriatic coast obtained in 1998. Total mercury concentrations in surface ocean waters are relatively low with an average of 0.81 pM (0.49-1.91 pM). Reactive Hg represents a substantial part with an average of 57% of total Hg (15-97%). Most mercury in open ocean waters was present in the dissolved form (32-95%, av. 70%), which is mainly due to the low abundance of particulate matter, a phenomenon well known for the Mediterranean open ocean waters. On average the percentage of Hg as MMHg was about 20%, of which about 66% was present in the dissolved form. The percentage of DGM in the surface ocean waters represents about 9% of total Hg (2.5-24.5%) and may originate from photochemical, biologically mediated mechanisms or diffusion from deeper layer either due to biological and/or to tectonic activity which is typical of the Mediterranean region. The presence of DMHg was confirmed only in waters below 20 m (up to 12 fM), while in surface waters DMHg was below the limit of detection (<0.1 fM). Surface concentrations of Hg in the eastern and western parts are comparable, except for DGM which shows significantly higher concentrations in the eastern part (mean value: 0.22 pM) as compared to the western Mediterranean (mean value: 0.09 pM). The distribution of Hg species with

  5. SeaWIFS Postlaunch Technical Report Series. Volume 13; The SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurement (SeaPRISM) Field Commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Zibordi, Giuseppe; Berthon, Jean-Francois; Bailey, Sean W.; Pietras, Christophe M.; Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the scientific activities that took place at the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT) in the northern Adriatic Sea off the coast of Italy from 2-6 August 1999. The ultimate objective of the field campaign was to evaluate the capabilities of a new instrument called the SeaWiFS Photometer Revision for Incident Surface Measurements (SeaPRISM). SeaPRISM is based on a CE-318 sun photometer made by CIMEL Electronique (Paris, France). The CE-318 is an automated, robotic system which measures the direct sun irradiance plus the sky radiance in the sun plane and in the almucantar plane. The data are transmitted over a satellite link, and this remote operation capability has made the device very useful for atmospheric measurements. The revision to the CE-318 that makes the instrument potentially useful for SeaWiFS calibration and validation activities is to include a capability for measuring the radiance leaving the sea surface in wavelengths suitable for the determination of chlorophyll a concentration. The initial evaluation of this new capability involved above- and in-water measurement protocols. An intercomparison of the water-leaving radiances derived from SeaPRISM and an in-water system showed the overall spectral agreement was approximately 8.6%, but the blue-green channels intercompared at the 5% level. A blue-green band ratio comparison was at the 4% level.

  6. Predicting Fire Season Severity in South America Using Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.; Jin, Yufang; DeFries, Ruth S.; Collatz, George J.; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Giglio, Louis; Jin, Yufang; Marlier, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Fires in South America cause forest degradation and contribute to carbon emissions associated with land use change. Here we investigated the relationship between year-to-year changes in satellite-derived estimates of fire activity in South America and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies. We found that the Oceanic Ni o Index (ONI) was correlated with interannual fire activity in the eastern Amazon whereas the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) index was more closely linked with fires in the southern and southwestern Amazon. Combining these two climate indices, we developed an empirical model that predicted regional annual fire season severity (FSS) with 3-5 month lead times. Our approach provides the foundation for an early warning system for forecasting the vulnerability of Amazon forests to fires, thus enabling more effective management with benefits for mitigation of greenhouse gas and air pollutant emissions.

  7. Forecasting Fire Season Severity in South America Using Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Collatz, G. James; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Giglio, Louis; Jin, Yufang; Marlier, Miriam E.

    2011-01-01

    Fires in South America cause forest degradation and contribute to carbon emissions associated with land use change. We investigated the relationship between year-to-year changes in fire activity in South America and sea surface temperatures. We found that the Oceanic Ni o Index was correlated with interannual fire activity in the eastern Amazon, whereas the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation index was more closely linked with fires in the southern and southwestern Amazon. Combining these two climate indices, we developed an empirical model to forecast regional fire season severity with lead times of 3 to 5 months. Our approach may contribute to the development of an early warning system for anticipating the vulnerability of Amazon forests to fires, thus enabling more effective management with benefits for climate and air quality.

  8. Forecasting Fire Season Severity in South America Using Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.; DeFries, Ruth S.; Collatz, G. James; Kasibhatla, Prasad S.; Giglio, Louis; Jin, Yufang; Marlier, Miriam E.

    2011-01-01

    Fires in South America cause forest degradation and contribute to carbon emissions associated with land use change. We investigated the relationship between year-to-year changes in fire activity in South America and sea surface temperatures. We found that the Oceanic Ni o Index was correlated with interannual fire activity in the eastern Amazon, whereas the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation index was more closely linked with fires in the southern and southwestern Amazon. Combining these two climate indices, we developed an empirical model to forecast regional fire season severity with lead times of 3 to 5 months. Our approach may contribute to the development of an early warning system for anticipating the vulnerability of Amazon forests to fires, thus enabling more effective management with benefits for climate and air quality.

  9. Influence of Rough Flow over Sea Surface on Dry Atmospheric Deposition Velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A Meteorological model and a dry deposition module were used to estimate the effects of sea surface rough flow (SSRF over the sea surface on dry deposition velocities. The dry deposition turbulence resistance, Ra, and sub-layer resistance, Rb, decreased more than 10% and 5% due to SSRF, respectively. For example, for HNO3, the mean dry deposition velocities (Vd were 0.51 cm s-1 in January, 0.58 in April, 0.65 cm s-1 in July and 0.79 cm s-1 in October with only smooth flow over the sea surface. However, the SSRF increased the Vd of HNO3 by 5 - 20% in the east China seas. These results show that SSRF is an important factor in estimating surface roughness to further improve calculation of the dry deposition velocities over the ocean. Improvements in parameterization of sea roughness length will be a worthwhile effort in related future studies.

  10. Spatial Statistical Estimation for Massive Sea Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Y.; Vazquez, J.; Nguyen, H.; Braverman, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    We combine several large remotely sensed sea surface temperature (SST) datasets to create a single high-resolution SST dataset that has no missing data and provides an uncertainty associated with each value. This high resolution dataset will optimize estimates of SST in critical parts of the world's oceans, such as coastal upwelling regions. We use Spatial Statistical Data Fusion (SSDF), a statistical methodology for predicting global spatial fields by exploiting spatial correlations in the data. The main advantages of SSDF over spatial smoothing methodologies include the provision of probabilistic uncertainties, the ability to incorporate multiple datasets with varying footprints, measurement errors and biases, and estimation at any desired resolution. In order to accommodate massive input and output datasets, we introduce two modifications of the existing SSDF algorithm. First, we compute statistical model parameters based on coarse resolution aggregated data. Second, we use an adaptive spatial grid that allows us to perform estimation in a specified region of interest, but incorporate spatial dependence between locations in that region and all locations globally. Finally, we demonstrate with a case study involving estimations on the full globe at coarse resolution grid (30 km) and a high resolution (1 km) inset for the Gulf Stream region.

  11. Quality control methods for KOOS operational sea surface temperature products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chansu; KIM Sunhwa

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface temperature SST obtained from the initial version of the Korea Operational Oceanographic System (KOOS) SST satellite have low accuracy during summer and daytime. This is attributed to the diurnal warming effect. Error estimation of SST data must be carried out to use the real-time forecasting numerical model of the KOOS. This study suggests two quality control methods for the KOOS SST system. To minimize the diurnal warming effect, SSTs of areas where wind speed is higher than 5 m/s were used. Depending on the wind threshold value, KOOS SST data for August 2014 were reduced by 0.15°C. Errors in SST data are considered to be a combination of random, sampling, and bias errors. To estimate bias error, the standard deviation of bias between KOOS SSTs and climatology SSTs were used. KOOS SST data yielded an analysis error standard deviation value similar to OSTIA and NOAA NCDC (OISST) data. The KOOS SST shows lower random and sampling errors with increasing number of observations using six satellite datasets. In further studies, the proposed quality control methods for the KOOS SST system will be applied through more long-term case studies and comparisons with other SST systems.

  12. Bias correction methods for decadal sea-surface temperature forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balachandrudu Narapusetty

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two traditional bias correction techniques: (1 systematic mean correction (SMC and (2 systematic least-squares correction (SLC are extended and applied on sea-surface temperature (SST decadal forecasts in the North Pacific produced by Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2 to reduce large systematic biases. The bias-corrected forecast anomalies exhibit reduced root-mean-square errors and also significantly improve the anomaly correlations with observations. The spatial pattern of the SST anomalies associated with the Pacific area average (PAA index (spatial average of SST anomalies over 20°–60°N and 120°E–100°W is improved after employing the bias correction methods, particularly SMC. Reliability diagrams show that the bias-corrected forecasts better reproduce the cold and warm events well beyond the 5-yr lead-times over the 10 forecasted years. The comparison between both correction methods indicates that: (1 prediction skill of SST anomalies associated with the PAA index is improved by SMC with respect to SLC and (2 SMC-derived forecasts have a slightly higher reliability than those corrected by SLC.

  13. Trials at Sea: Successful Implementation of a Unique Two-Month Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, L. W.; Orcutt, B. N.; Fisher, A. T.; Tsuji, T.; Petronotis, K. E.; Iodp Expedition 327 Participants

    2010-12-01

    During the summer of 2010, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 327 conducted coring and observatory installations on the Juan de Fuca Plate to characterize the hydrogeology of ridge-flank ocean crust. Due to the nature of the expedition, a smaller science party than usual was needed. IODP took this opportunity to expand education, outreach, and communication (EOC) activities with a previously untested model. Up to now, the IODP U.S. Implementing Organization had sailed either individual teachers on regular (2-month long) expeditions or groups of teachers and informal educators during short (2-week long) transits (School of Rock workshops). After two shipboard (Expeditions 312 and 321T) and two shore-based (Gulf Coast Repository) programs, we have recognized that sailing a group of educators is a beneficial model for IODP and the participants. What has been unavoidable is that these workshops took place outside typical expedition activities. Expedition 327 provided a unique opportunity to sail a diverse group of outreach officers on a regular expedition with a full range of scientific activities. The group included individuals with a wide variety of skills and backgrounds. US participants included a late-career high school physics teacher, a visualization graduate student, an undergraduate engineering student from an historically black university, and an artist. French participants included two middle and high school earth and life science teachers. This diversity made the group more dynamic but it also posed a challenge. Numerous scientific and technical staff also participated in EOC activity design and leadership, including development of dedicated web sites and blogs. After a seminar on constructivist and inquiry-based methods, we spent the first few weeks investigating earth science concepts so EOC participants could gain a basic understanding of the regional geology and the scientific objectives of the expedition. Close to the beginning of the

  14. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Terra MODIS-AMSRE Day North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  15. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Aqua MODIS-AMSRE Night North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  16. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Terra MODIS-AMSRE Night North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  17. GHRSST Level 4 RTO Aqua MODIS-AMSRE Day North America Regional Blended Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the JPL Physical...

  18. GHRSST Level 4 CMC0.2deg Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature (SST) analysis produced daily on an operational basis at the Canadian...

  19. GHRSST Level 4 REMO_OI_SST_5km Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature (SST) analysis produced daily on an operational basis by the...

  20. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) from AVHRR Pathfinder, Version 5.2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.2 Sea Surface Temperature data set (PFV52) is a collection of global, twice-daily 4km sea surface temperature data produced in a...

  1. GHRSST Level 4 ODYSSEA North-Western Europe Regional Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (GDS version 1)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on an operational basis at Ifremer/CERSAT...

  2. GHRSST Level 4 MW_IR_OI Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature analysis (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) global Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced daily on a 0.81 degree grid at Remote Sensing...

  3. GHRSST Level 4 MUR Global Foundation Sea Surface Temperature Analysis (v4.1) (GDS versions 1 and 2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) Level 4 sea surface temperature analysis produced as a retrospective dataset (four day latency) and...

  4. Holocene Sea Surface and Subsurface Water Mass Variability Reconstructed from Temperature and Sea-ice Proxies in Fram Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kirstin; Spielhagen, Robert F.; Müller, Juliane; Husum, Katrine; Kandiano, Evgenia S.; Polyak, Leonid

    2016-04-01

    In two high-resolution sediment cores from the West Spitsbergen continental margin we investigated planktic foraminiferal, biomarker and dinocyst proxy data in order to reconstruct surface and subsurface water mass variability during the Holocene. The two study sites are today influenced by northward flowing warm and saline Atlantic Water. Both foraminiferal and dinocyst (de Vernal et al., 2013) temperature reconstructions indicate a less-stratified, ice-free, nutrient-rich summer surface ocean with strong Atlantic Water advection between 10.6 and 8.5 cal ka BP, likely related to maximum July insolation during the early Holocene. Sea surface to subsurface water temperatures of up to 6°C prevailed until ca 5 cal ka BP. A weakened contribution of Atlantic Water is found when subsurface temperatures strongly decreased with minimum values between ca 4 and 3 cal ka BP. High planktic foraminifer shell fragmentation and increased oxygen isotope values of the subpolar planktic foraminifer species Turborotalita quinqueloba as well as increasing concentrations of the sea ice biomarker IP25 further indicate cool conditions. Indices associated with IP25 as well as dinocyst data suggest a sustained cooling and consequently sea-ice increase during the late Holocene. However, planktic foraminiferal data indicate a slight return of stronger subsurface influx of Atlantic Water since ca 3 cal ka BP. The observed decoupling of cooling surface and warming subsurface waters during the later Holocene might be attributed to a strong pycnocline layer separating cold sea-ice fed surface waters from enhanced subsurface Atlantic Water advection. Reference: de Vernal, A., Hillaire-Marcel, C., Rochon, A., Fréchette, B., Henry, M., Solignac, S., Bonnet, S., 2013. Dinocyst-based reconstructions of sea ice cover concentration during the Holocene in the Arctic Ocean, the northern North Atlantic Ocean and its adjacent seas. Quaternary Science Reviews 79, 111-121.

  5. Arctic Sea Salt Aerosol from Blowing Snow and Sea Ice Surfaces - a Missing Natural Source in Winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; Norris, S. J.; Brooks, I. M.; Nishimura, K.; Jones, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric particles in the polar regions consist mostly of sea salt aerosol (SSA). SSA plays an important role in regional climate change through influencing the surface energy balance either directly or indirectly via cloud formation. SSA irradiated by sunlight also releases very reactive halogen radicals, which control concentrations of ozone, a pollutant and greenhouse gas. However, models under-predict SSA concentrations in the Arctic during winter pointing to a missing source. It has been recently suggested that salty blowing snow above sea ice, which is evaporating, to be that source as it may produce more SSA than equivalent areas of open ocean. Participation in the 'Norwegian Young Sea Ice Cruise (N-ICE 2015)' on board the research vessel `Lance' allowed to test this hypothesis in the Arctic sea ice zone during winter. Measurements were carried out from the ship frozen into the pack ice North of 80º N during February to March 2015. Observations at ground level (0.1-2 m) and from the ship's crows nest (30 m) included number concentrations and size spectra of SSA (diameter range 0.3-10 μm) as well as snow particles (diameter range 50-500 μm). During and after blowing snow events significant SSA production was observed. In the aerosol and snow phase sulfate is fractionated with respect to sea water, which confirms sea ice surfaces and salty snow, and not the open ocean, to be the dominant source of airborne SSA. Aerosol shows depletion in bromide with respect to sea water, especially after sunrise, indicating photochemically driven release of bromine. We discuss the SSA source strength from blowing snow in light of environmental conditions (wind speed, atmospheric turbulence, temperature and snow salinity) and recommend improved model parameterisations to estimate regional aerosol production. N-ICE 2015 results are then compared to a similar study carried out previously in the Weddell Sea during the Antarctic winter.

  6. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  7. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II:Electromagnetic backscattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢涛; William Perrie; 赵尚卓; 方贺; 于文金; 何宜军

    2016-01-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface.

  8. Statistical analysis of global surface air temperature and sea level using cointegration methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmith, Torben; Johansen, Søren; Thejll, Peter

    Global sea levels are rising which is widely understood as a consequence of thermal expansion and melting of glaciers and land-based ice caps. Due to physically-based models being unable to simulate observed sea level trends, semi-empirical models have been applied as an alternative for projecting...... of future sea levels. There is in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis to observed global sea level and surface air temperature, capable of handling such peculiarities. We find a relationship between sea...... level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. We further find that the warming episode in the 1940s is exceptional in the sense that sea level and warming deviates from the expected...

  9. The seasonal variations in the significant wave height and sea surface wind speed of the China’s seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chongwei; PAN Jing; TAN Yanke; GAO Zhansheng; RUI Zhenfeng; CHEN Chaohui

    2015-01-01

    Long-term variations in a sea surface wind speed (WS) and a significant wave height (SWH) are associated with the global climate change, the prevention and mitigation of natural disasters, and an ocean resource exploitation, and other activities. The seasonal characteristics of the long-term trends in China’s seas WS and SWH are determined based on 24 a (1988–2011) cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) wind data and 24 a hindcast wave data obtained with the WAVEWATCH-III (WW3) wave model forced by CCMP wind data. The results show the following. (1) For the past 24 a, the China’s WS and SWH exhibit a significant increasing trend as a whole, of 3.38 cm/(s·a) in the WS, 1.3 cm/a in the SWH. (2) As a whole, the increasing trend of the China’s seas WS and SWH is strongest in March-April-May (MAM) and December-January-February (DJF), followed by June-July-August (JJA), and smallest in September-October-November (SON). (3) The areal extent of significant increases in the WS was largest in MAM, while the area decreased in JJA and DJF;the smallest area was apparent in SON. In contrast to the WS, almost all of China’s seas exhibited a significant increase in SWH in MAM and DJF;the range was slightly smaller in JJA and SON. The WS and SWH in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea, East China Sea, the Tsushima Strait, the Taiwan Strait, the northern South China Sea, the Beibu Gulf, and the Gulf of Thailand exhibited a significant increase in all seasons. (4) The variations in China’s seas SWH and WS depended on the season. The areas with a strong increase usually appeared in DJF.

  10. Correlations of surface ocean pCO2 to satellite chlorophyll on monthly to interannual timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Amanda R.; McKinley, Galen A.

    2017-03-01

    On the mean, ocean carbon uptake is linked to biological productivity, but how biological variability impacts carbon uptake is poorly quantified. Our ability to diagnose past change, understand present variability, and predict the future state of the global carbon cycle requires improving mechanistic understanding in this area. Here we make use of colocated pCO2 and temperature data, a merged surface ocean color product, and physical fields from an ocean state estimate to assess relationships between surface ocean biology and the carbon cycle on seasonal, monthly anomaly, and interannual timescales over the period 1998-2014. Using a correlation analysis on spatial scales from local to basin-scale biomes, we identify the timescales on which ocean productivity could be directly modifying ocean carbon uptake. On seasonal timescales outside of the equatorial Pacific, biome-scale correlations are negative between chlorophyll and pCO2. Though this relationship is pervasive, the underlying mechanisms vary across timescales and biomes. Consistent with previous findings, biological activity is a significant driver of pCO2 seasonality only in the subpolar biomes. For monthly anomalies acting on top of the mean seasonality, productivity and pCO2 changes are significantly correlated in the subpolar North Pacific and Southern Ocean. Only in the Southern Ocean are correlations consistent with a dominant role for biology in the surface ocean carbon cycle on all timescales.

  11. Polarimetric Doppler spectrum of backscattered echoes from nonlinear sea surface damped by natural slicks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pengju; Guo, Lixin

    2016-11-01

    Based on the Lombardini et al. model that can predict the hydrodynamic damping of rough sea surfaces in the presence of monomolecular slicks and the "choppy wave" model (CWM) that can describe the nonlinear interactions between ocean waves, the modeling of time-varying nonlinear sea surfaces damped by natural or organic sea slicks is presented in this paper. The polarimetric scattering model of second-order small-slope approximation (SSA-II) with tapered wave incidence is utilized for evaluating co- and cross-polarized backscattered echoes from clean and contaminated CWM nonlinear sea surfaces. The influence of natural sea slicks on Doppler shift and spectral bandwidth of radar sea echoes is investigated in detail by comparing the polarimetric Doppler spectra of contaminated sea surfaces with those of clean sea surfaces. A narrowing of Doppler spectra in the presence of oil slicks is observed for both co- and cross-polarization, which is qualitatively consistent with wave-tank measurements. Simulation results also show that the Doppler shifts in slicks can increase or decrease, depending on incidence angles and polarizations.

  12. Quantifying sea surface temperature ranges of the Arabian Sea for the past 20 000 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Ganssen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxygen isotopic composition of planktonic foraminifera tests is one of the widest used geochemical tools to reconstruct past changes of physical parameters of the upper ocean. It is common practice to analyze multiple individuals from a mono-specific population and assume that the outcome reflects a mean value of the environmental conditions during calcification of the analyzed individuals. Here we present the oxygen isotope composition of individual specimens of the surface-dwelling species Globigerinoides ruber and Globigerina bulloides from sediment cores in the Western Arabian Sea off Somalia, inferred as indicators of past seasonal ranges in temperature. Combining the δ18O measurements of individual specimens to obtain temperature ranges with Mg/Ca based mean calcification temperatures allows us to reconstruct temperature extrema. Our results indicate that over the past 20 kyr the seasonal temperature range has fluctuated from its present value of 16 °C to mean values of 13 °C and 11 °C for the Holocene and LGM, respectively. The data for the LGM suggest that the maximum temperature was lower, whilst minimum temperature remained approximately constant. The rather minor variability in lowest summer temperatures during the LGM suggests roughly constant summer monsoon intensity, while upwelling-induced productivity was lowered.

  13. Terrestrial basking sea turtles are responding to spatio-temporal sea surface temperature patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtan, Kyle S; Halley, John M; Marks, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Naturalists as early as Darwin observed terrestrial basking in green turtles (Chelonia mydas), but the distribution and environmental influences of this behaviour are poorly understood. Here, we examined 6 years of daily basking surveys in Hawaii and compared them with the phenology of local sea surface temperatures (SST). Data and models indicated basking peaks when SST is coolest, and we found this timeline consistent with bone stress markings. Next, we assessed the decadal SST profiles for the 11 global green turtle populations. Basking generally occurs when winter SST falls below 23°C. From 1990 to 2014, the SST for these populations warmed an average 0.04°C yr(-1) (range 0.01-0.09°C yr(-1)); roughly three times the observed global average over this period. Owing to projected future warming at basking sites, we estimated terrestrial basking in green turtles may cease globally by 2100. To predict and manage for future climate change, we encourage a more detailed understanding for how climate influences organismal biology.

  14. Estimating spatially distributed monthly evapotranspiration rates by linear transformations of MODIS daytime land surface temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szilagyi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Under simplifying conditions catchment-scale vapor pressure at the drying land surface can be calculated as a function of its watershed-representative temperature (<Ts> by the wet-surface equation (WSE, similar to the wet-bulb equation in meteorology for calculating the dry-bulb thermometer vapor pressure of the Complementary Relationship of evaporation. The corresponding watershed ET rate, , is obtained from the Bowen ratio with the help of air temperature, humidity and percent possible sunshine data. The resulting (<Ts>, pair together with the wet-environment surface temperature (<Tws> and ET rate (ETw, obtained by the Priestley-Taylor equation, define a linear transformation on a monthly basis by which spatially distributed ET rates can be estimated as a sole function of MODIS daytime land surface temperature, Ts, values within the watershed. The linear transformation preserves the mean which is highly desirable. <Tws>, in the lack of significant open water surfaces within the study watershed (Elkhorn, Nebraska, was obtained as the mean of the smallest MODIS Ts values each month. The resulting period-averaged (2000–2007 catchment-scale ET rate of 624 mm/yr is very close to the water-balance derived ET rate of about 617 mm/yr. The latter is a somewhat uncertain value due to the effects of (a observed groundwater depletion of about 1m over the study period caused by extensive irrigation, and; (b the uncertain rate of net regional groundwater supply toward the watershed. The spatially distributed ET rates correspond well with soil/aquifer properties and the resulting land use type (i.e. rangeland versus center-pivot irrigated crops.

  15. Long-term sea surface temperature baselines - time series, spatial covariation and implications for biological processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacKenzie, Brian; Schiedek, D.

    2007-01-01

    questions at large spatial scales, such as the response of species distributions and phenologies to climate change. In this study we investigate the spatial synchrony of long-term sea surface temperatures in the North Sea-Baltic Sea region as measured daily at four coastal sites (Marsdiep, Netherlands...... assessments of how species and ecosystems have responded to past temperature changes and how they may react to future temperature changes. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  16. Surface and basal sea ice melt from autonomous buoy arrays during the 2014 sea ice retreat in the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksym, T. L.; Wilkinson, J.; Hwang, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    As the Arctic continues its transition to a seasonal ice cover, the nature and role of the processes driving sea ice retreat are expected to change. Key questions revolve around how the coupling between dynamics and thermodynamic processes and potential changes in the role of melt ponds contribute to an accelerated seasonal ice retreat. To address these issues, 44 autonomous platforms were deployed in four arrays in the Beaufort Sea in March, 2014, with an additional array deployed in August in the Chukchi Sea to monitor the evolution of ice conditions during the seasonal sea ice retreat. Each "5-dice" array included four or five co-sited ice mass balance buoys (IMB) and wave buoys with digital cameras, and one automatic weather station (AWS) at the array center. The sensors on these buoys, combined with satellite imagery monitoring the large-scale evolution of the ice cover, provide a near-complete history of the processes involved in the seasonal melt of sea ice. We present a preliminary analysis of the contributions of several key processes to the seasonal ice decay. The evolution of surface ponding was observed at several sites with differing ice types and surface morphologies. The records of surface melt and ice thickness demonstrate a key role of ice type in driving the evolution of the ice cover. Analysis of the surface forcing and estimates of solar energy partitioning between the surface and upper ocean is compared to the surface and basal mass balance from the IMBs. The role of ice divergence and deformation in driving sea ice decay - in particular its role in accelerating thermodynamic melt processes - is discussed.

  17. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vose, R.S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schmoyer, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. [National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States); Eischeid, J.K. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the ``best`` data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  18. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vose, R.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Schmoyer, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. (National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States)); Eischeid, J.K. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the best'' data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  19. Decadal variability in core surface flows deduced from geomagnetic observatory monthly means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whaler, K. A.; Olsen, Nils; Finlay, Chris

    2016-01-01

    itself changes slowly, its time derivative can be locally (temporally and spatially) large, in particular when and where core surface secular acceleration peaks. Spherical harmonic expansion coefficients of the flows are not well resolved, and many of them are strongly correlated. Averaging functions......Monthly means of the magnetic field measurements at ground observatories are a key data source for studying temporal changes of the core magnetic field. However, when they are calculated in the usual way, contributions of external (magnetospheric and ionospheric) origin may remain, which make them...

  20. SIMULATION OF THE Ku-BAND RADAR ALTIMETER SEA ICE EFFECTIVE SCATTERING SURFACE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonboe, Rasmus; Andersen, Søren; Pedersen, Leif Toudal

    2006-01-01

    A radiative transfer model is used to simulate the sea ice radar altimeter effective scattering surface variability as a function of snow depth and density. Under dry snow conditions without layering these are the primary snow parameters affecting the scattering surface variability. The model...... is initialised with in situ data collected during the May 2004 GreenIce ice camp in the Lincoln Sea (73ºW; 85ºN). Our results show that the snow cover is important for the effective scattering surface depth in sea ice and thus for the range measurement, ice freeboard and ice thickness estimation....

  1. Removing the impact of wind direction on remote sensing of sea surface salinity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Xiaobin; LIU Yuguang; ZHANG Hande

    2006-01-01

    Using the small-slope approximation model of microwave emission of rough sea surface, the impacts of sea surface wind on brightness temperature variations generated by the surface roughness, i.e. △Th,v, are investigated. Here △T denotes the brightness temperature variation, and "h" and "v" denote the horizontal and vertical polarizations respectively. △Th,v has a linear relation with wind speed, sea surface temperature (SST) and sea surface salinity (SSS) respectively. Further more, the impact of wind direction on SSS retrieval, under small incidence angles, can be removed by calculating (△Th+△Tv). These characteristics provide simple new ways to develop an SSS retrieval algorithm without wind direction factor.

  2. Sea-surface salinity variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea across the mid-Pleistocene transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sepulcre

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at documenting climate changes in tropical area in response to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT by reconstructing past hydrologic variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea and its influence on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC during the last 940 kyr. Using core MD03-2628, we estimated past changes in sea surface salinity (SSS using Δδ18O, the difference between the modern and the past δ18O of seawater (obtained by combining alkenone thermometer data with the δ18O of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white and corrected for ice-sheet volume effects. Today, the lowest SSS values in the studied area are associated with the northernmost location of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. The Δδ18O record exhibits glacial/interglacial cyclicity with higher values during all glacial periods spanning the last 940 kyr, indicating increased SSS. At a longer timescale, the Δδ18O exhibits a shift toward lower values for interglacial periods during the last 450 kyr, when compared to interglacial stages older than 650 kyr. A rise in SSS during glacial stages may be related to the southernmost location of the ITCZ, which is induced by a steeper interhemispheric temperature gradient and associated with reduced northward cross equatorial oceanic transport. Therefore, the results suggest a permanent link between the tropical salinity budget and the AMOC during the last 940 kyr. Following the MPT, lower salinities during the last five interglacial stages indicate a northernmost ITCZ location, forced by changes in the interhemispheric temperature gradient that is associated with the poleward position of Southern Oceanic Fronts that amplified the transport of heat and moisture to the North Atlantic. These processes may have contributed to amplification of the climate cycles that

  3. Sea-surface salinity variations in the northern Caribbean Sea across the Mid-Pleistocene Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sepulcre

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available By reconstructing past hydrologic variations in the Northern Caribbean Sea and their influence on the stability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC during the last 940 ka, we seek to document climate changes in this tropical area in response to the Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT. Using core MD03-2628, we estimated past changes in sea surface salinity (SSS using Δδ18O, the difference between the modern, and the past δ18O of seawater (obtained by combining alkenone thermometer data with the δ18O of the planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides rube (white and corrected for ice-sheet volume effects. Today, the lowest SSS values in the area studied are associated with the northernmost location of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ. The Δδ18O record obtained from core MD03-2628 exhibits glacial/interglacial cyclicity with higher values during all glacial periods spanning the last 940 ka, indicating increased SSS. A long-term trend was also observed in the Δδ18O values that exhibited a shift toward lower values for interglacial periods during the last 450 ka, as compared to interglacial stages older than 650 ka. A rise in SSS during glacial stages may be related to the southernmost location of the ITCZ, which is induced by a steeper cross-equator temperature gradient and associated with reduced northward cross-equatorial oceanic transport. Therefore, the results suggest a permanent link between the tropical salinity budget and the AMOC during the last 940 ka. Following the MPT, lower salinities during the last five interglacial stages indicated a northernmost ITCZ location that was forced by changes in the cross-equator temperature gradient and that was associated with the poleward position of Southern Oceanic Fronts that amplify the transport of heat and moisture to the North Atlantic. These processes may have contributed to the amplification of the

  4. Monitoring sea level and sea surface temperature trends from ERS satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per; Beckley, B.

    2002-01-01

    over this period. In the Indian Ocean and particularly the Pacific Ocean the trends in both sea level and temperature are still dominated by the large changes associated with the El Nino Southern Oscillation. In terms of contribution to the total global sea level change, the contribution of the central...

  5. Manifestation of two meddies in altimetry and sea-surface temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Bashmachnikov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two meddies were identified in the Iberian Basin using shipboard ADCP (Meddy 1 and Argo float (Meddy 2 in contrasting background conditions. Meddy 1 was observed while interacting with the Azores Current (AzC, while Meddy 2 was observed in a much calmer dynamical background, north from the AzC jet. In both cases the meddies formed a clear anticyclonic surface signal, detectable in altimetry as well as in sea-surface temperature (SST. Analysis of the in situ observations of the dynamic signal over Meddy 1 showed that the signal, generated by the moving meddy, dominated the AzC dynamics at least up to the base of the seasonal thermocline even at the late stages of its interaction with the jet. The centre of rotation of the surface signal was shifted south-westward from the axis of the meddy by about 18 km, and its dynamic radius was 2 times bigger than that of the meddy. In the centre of the anticyclonic surface signals of both meddies, SST was colder than that of the surrounding water, in contrast to warm SST anomalies in the cores of surface anticyclones generated by meandering surface currents. The latter difference gives ground for identification of meddies (as well as other sub-surface anticyclones in comparatively dynamically calm regions using coupled altimetry–SST remote sensing data. An identification of Meddy 1 prior to the shipboard ADCP measurements was the first successful experience. At the same time, SST anomalies over the meddies were rather weak, often unstable and statistically significant only over periods of months.

  6. Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer detection assembly design and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Peter; Mastrandrea, Carmine; Stagi, Moreno; Calamai, Luciano; Nieke, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometers (SLSTRs) are high-accuracy radiometers selected for the Copernicus mission Sentinel-3 space component to provide sea surface temperature (SST) data continuity with respect to previous (Advanced) Along Track Scanning Radiometers [(A)ATSRs] for climatology. Many satellites are foreseen over a 20-year period, each with a 7.5-year lifetime. Sentinel-3A will be launched in 2015 and Sentinel-3B at least six months later, implying that two identical satellites will be maintained in the same orbit with a 180-deg phase delay. Each SLSTR has an improved design with respect to AATSR affording wider near-nadir and oblique view swaths (1400 and 740 km) for SST/land surface temperature global coverage at a 1-km spatial resolution (at SSP) with a daily revisit time (with two satellites), appropriate for both climate and meteorology. Cloud screening and other products are obtained with 0.5 km spatial resolution [at sub-satellite point (SSP)] in visible and short wave infrared (SWIR) bands, while two additional channels are included to monitor high temperature events such as forest fires. The two swaths are obtained with two conical scans and telescopes combined optically at a common focus, representing the input of a cooled focal plane assembly, where nine channels are separated with dichroic and are focalized on detectors with appropriate optical relays. IR and SWIR optics/detectors are cooled to 85 K by an active mechanical cryo-cooler with vibration compensation, while the VIS ones are maintained at a stable temperature. The opto-mechanical design and the expected electro-optical performance of the focal plane assembly are described and the model predictions at system level are compared with experimental data acquired in the vacuum chamber in flight representative thermal conditions or in the laboratory.

  7. Prediction of daily sea surface temperature using efficient neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kalpesh; Deo, Makaranad Chintamani

    2017-04-01

    Short-term prediction of sea surface temperature (SST) is commonly achieved through numerical models. Numerical approaches are more suitable for use over a large spatial domain than in a specific site because of the difficulties involved in resolving various physical sub-processes at local levels. Therefore, for a given location, a data-driven approach such as neural networks may provide a better alternative. The application of neural networks, however, needs a large experimentation in their architecture, training methods, and formation of appropriate input-output pairs. A network trained in this manner can provide more attractive results if the advances in network architecture are additionally considered. With this in mind, we propose the use of wavelet neural networks (WNNs) for prediction of daily SST values. The prediction of daily SST values was carried out using WNN over 5 days into the future at six different locations in the Indian Ocean. First, the accuracy of site-specific SST values predicted by a numerical model, ROMS, was assessed against the in situ records. The result pointed out the necessity for alternative approaches. First, traditional networks were tried and after noticing their poor performance, WNN was used. This approach produced attractive forecasts when judged through various error statistics. When all locations were viewed together, the mean absolute error was within 0.18 to 0.32 °C for a 5-day-ahead forecast. The WNN approach was thus found to add value to the numerical method of SST prediction when location-specific information is desired.

  8. Prediction of daily sea surface temperature using efficient neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Kalpesh; Deo, Makaranad Chintamani

    2017-02-01

    Short-term prediction of sea surface temperature (SST) is commonly achieved through numerical models. Numerical approaches are more suitable for use over a large spatial domain than in a specific site because of the difficulties involved in resolving various physical sub-processes at local levels. Therefore, for a given location, a data-driven approach such as neural networks may provide a better alternative. The application of neural networks, however, needs a large experimentation in their architecture, training methods, and formation of appropriate input-output pairs. A network trained in this manner can provide more attractive results if the advances in network architecture are additionally considered. With this in mind, we propose the use of wavelet neural networks (WNNs) for prediction of daily SST values. The prediction of daily SST values was carried out using WNN over 5 days into the future at six different locations in the Indian Ocean. First, the accuracy of site-specific SST values predicted by a numerical model, ROMS, was assessed against the in situ records. The result pointed out the necessity for alternative approaches. First, traditional networks were tried and after noticing their poor performance, WNN was used. This approach produced attractive forecasts when judged through various error statistics. When all locations were viewed together, the mean absolute error was within 0.18 to 0.32 °C for a 5-day-ahead forecast. The WNN approach was thus found to add value to the numerical method of SST prediction when location-specific information is desired.

  9. Indian Ocean sea surface salinity variations in a coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; Nanjundiah, Ravi S. [Indian Institute of Science, Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Bangalore (India)

    2009-08-15

    The variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Indian Ocean is studied using a 100-year control simulation of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM 2.0). The monsoon-driven seasonal SSS pattern in the Indian Ocean, marked by low salinity in the east and high salinity in the west, is captured by the model. The model overestimates runoff into the Bay of Bengal due to higher rainfall over the Himalayan-Tibetan regions which drain into the Bay of Bengal through Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers. The outflow of low-salinity water from the Bay of Bengal is too strong in the model. Consequently, the model Indian Ocean SSS is about 1 less than that seen in the climatology. The seasonal Indian Ocean salt balance obtained from the model is consistent with the analysis from climatological data sets. During summer, the large freshwater input into the Bay of Bengal and its redistribution decide the spatial pattern of salinity tendency. During winter, horizontal advection is the dominant contributor to the tendency term. The interannual variability of the SSS in the Indian Ocean is about five times larger than that in coupled model simulations of the North Atlantic Ocean. Regions of large interannual standard deviations are located near river mouths in the Bay of Bengal and in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Both freshwater input into the ocean and advection of this anomalous flux are responsible for the generation of these anomalies. The model simulates 20 significant Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events and during IOD years large salinity anomalies appear in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The anomalies exist as two zonal bands: negative salinity anomalies to the north of the equator and positive to the south. The SSS anomalies for the years in which IOD is not present and for ENSO years are much weaker than during IOD years. Significant interannual SSS anomalies appear in the Indian Ocean only during IOD years. (orig.)

  10. Indian Ocean sea surface salinity variations in a coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayachandran, P. N.; Nanjundiah, Ravi S.

    2009-08-01

    The variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Indian Ocean is studied using a 100-year control simulation of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM 2.0). The monsoon-driven seasonal SSS pattern in the Indian Ocean, marked by low salinity in the east and high salinity in the west, is captured by the model. The model overestimates runoff into the Bay of Bengal due to higher rainfall over the Himalayan-Tibetan regions which drain into the Bay of Bengal through Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers. The outflow of low-salinity water from the Bay of Bengal is too strong in the model. Consequently, the model Indian Ocean SSS is about 1 less than that seen in the climatology. The seasonal Indian Ocean salt balance obtained from the model is consistent with the analysis from climatological data sets. During summer, the large freshwater input into the Bay of Bengal and its redistribution decide the spatial pattern of salinity tendency. During winter, horizontal advection is the dominant contributor to the tendency term. The interannual variability of the SSS in the Indian Ocean is about five times larger than that in coupled model simulations of the North Atlantic Ocean. Regions of large interannual standard deviations are located near river mouths in the Bay of Bengal and in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Both freshwater input into the ocean and advection of this anomalous flux are responsible for the generation of these anomalies. The model simulates 20 significant Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events and during IOD years large salinity anomalies appear in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The anomalies exist as two zonal bands: negative salinity anomalies to the north of the equator and positive to the south. The SSS anomalies for the years in which IOD is not present and for ENSO years are much weaker than during IOD years. Significant interannual SSS anomalies appear in the Indian Ocean only during IOD years.

  11. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-11-10

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  12. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  13. Detection of Small Sea-Surface Targets with a Search Lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Putten, F.J.M.; Cohen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Naval operations in the littoral have to deal with the threat of small sea-surface targets. These targets have a low radar cross-section and low velocity, which makes them hard to detect by radar in the presence of sea clutter. Typical threats include periscopes, jet skies, FIAC’s, and speedboats. S

  14. Detection of Small Sea-Surface Targets with a Search Lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Putten, F.J.M.; Cohen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Naval operations in the littoral have to deal with the threat of small sea-surface targets. These targets have a low radar cross-section and low velocity, which makes them hard to detect by radar in the presence of sea clutter. Typical threats include periscopes, jet skies, FIAC’s, and speedboats.

  15. The significance of multiple scattering in bubble measurements near the sea surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Leif Bjørnø; Bjørnø, Irina K.

    1996-01-01

    The acoustic interactions between gas bubbles in bubble plumes formed near the sea surface may significantly change the propagation and attenuation conditions for acoustical signals in the sea. The scattering properties of the bubble plumes have been studied extensively since Foldy's formulation...

  16. Range and geophysical corrections in coastal regions: and implications for mean sea surface determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Scharroo, Remko

    2011-01-01

    The determination of sea surface height from the altimeter range measurement involves a number of corrections: those expressing the behavior of the radar pulse through the atmosphere, and those correcting for sea state and other geophysical signals. A number of these corrections need special...

  17. Black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments of China's marginal seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yanju; Wang, Xuchen; Dai, Minhan; Feng, Huan; Li, Anchun; Song, Qian

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates the distribution of black carbon (BC) and its correlation with total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ΣPAH) in the surface sediments of China’s marginal seas. BC content ranges from cycling in China’s marginal seas.

  18. Offshore Wind Energy: Wind and Sea Surface Temperature from Satellite Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    and the Baltic Sea. The aim is to evaluate their potential use and demonstrate their applicability within the context of offshore wind energy; for the quantication of the wind resources and for the identication of diurnal warming of the sea surface temperature. Space-borne observations of wind are obtained from...

  19. Micro contaminants in surface sediments and macrobenthic invertebrates of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaarts, J.M.; Fischer, C.V.

    1989-01-01

    Trace metal concentrations (copper, zinc, cadmium and lead) were measured in the silt fraction (grainsize < 63 µm) of surface sediment of the North Sea. The concentrations varied in different areas of the Dutch continental shelf of the North Sea. The trace metal concentrations were highly related wi

  20. Detection of Small Sea-Surface Targets with a Search Lidar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, J.C. van den; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Putten, F.J.M.; Cohen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Naval operations in the littoral have to deal with the threat of small sea-surface targets. These targets have a low radar cross-section and low velocity, which makes them hard to detect by radar in the presence of sea clutter. Typical threats include periscopes, jet skies, FIAC’s, and speedboats. S

  1. Predictability of rainfall and teleconnections patterns influencing on Southwest Europe from sea surfaces temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, M. N.; Iglesias, I.; Taboada, J. J.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.; Ramos, A. M.

    2009-04-01

    This work assesses the possibility of doing a forecast of rainfall and the main teleconnections patterns that influences climate in Southwest Europe by using sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA). The area under study is located in the NW Iberian Peninsula. This region has a great oceanic influence on its climate and has an important dependency of the water resources. In this way if the different SST patterns are known, the different rainfall situations can be predicted. On the other hand, the teleconnection patterns, which have strong weight on rainfall, are influenced by the SSTA of different areas. In the light of this, the aim of this study is to explore the relationship between global SSTAs, rainfall and the main teleconnection patterns influencing on Europe. The SST data with a 2.0 degree resolution was provided by the NOAA/OAR/ESRL PSD, Boulder, Colorado, USA. A monthly averaged data from 1 January 1951 through December 2006 was considered. The monthly precipitation data from 1951-2006 were obtained from the database CLIMA of the University of Santiago de Compostela with data from the Meteorological State Agency (AEMET) and the Regional Government of Galicia. The teleconnection indices were taken of the Climate Prediction Center of the NOAA between 1950 and 2006. A monthly and seasonal study was analysed considering up to three months of delay in the first case and up to four seasons of delay in the second case. The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient r was considered to quantify linear associations between SSTA and precipitation and/or SSTA and teleconnection indices. A test for field-significance was applied considering the properties of finiteness and interdependence of the spatial grid to avoid spurious correlations. Analysing the results obtained with the global SSTA and the teleconnection indices, a great number of ocean regions with high correlations can be found. The spatial patterns show very high correlations with Indian Ocean waters

  2. A Coral-based Reconstruction of Sea Surface Salinity at Sabine Bank, Vanuatu from 2007 to 1843 CE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, M. K.; Quinn, T. M.; Taylor, F. W.; Dunn, E. M.; Cabioch, G.; Ballu, V.; Maes, C.; Austin, J. A.; Saustrup, S.; Pelletier, B.

    2011-12-01

    We present a reconstruction of sea surface salinity (SSS) derived from a coral δ18O time series extending from 2007-1843 CE at Sabine Bank, Vanuatu (SBV, 166.04° E, 15.94°S). This reconstruction is significant because instrumental records of SSS are rare in time and space, yet the SSS response to the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forcing is large in many regions of the tropical oceans. There is a strong positive relationship between sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA) in the central Pacific (Niño 3.4 region; canonical ENSO signal) and six month lagged sea surface salinity anomalies (SSSA, data from Delcroix et al., 2011) at SBV, which establishes a dynamical link between surface ocean variability at SBV and ENSO variability. We calculate a coral δ18O anomaly time series and note that there is a strong correlation between it and instrumental SSS variations over the period 1970-2007 (r = 0.70, p 0.5 psu) pre-1970 corresponding to strong ENSO warm phase events recorded in the SST instrumental record and historical ENSO record (i.e. 1941-42, 1918-19, 1877-78), and an overall freshening trend, demonstrating the ability of our reconstructed dataset to capture interannual variability as well as long-term trends in SSS at Vanuatu.

  3. Spatial validation of large scale land surface models against monthly land surface temperature patterns using innovative performance metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Julian; Siemann, Amanda; Stisen, Simon; Sheffield, Justin

    2016-04-01

    Land surface models (LSMs) are a key tool to enhance process understanding and to provide predictions of the terrestrial hydrosphere and its atmospheric coupling. Distributed LSMs predict hydrological states and fluxes, such as land surface temperature (LST) or actual evapotranspiration (aET), at each grid cell. LST observations are widely available through satellite remote sensing platforms that enable comprehensive spatial validations of LSMs. In spite of the availability of LST data, most validation studies rely on simple cell to cell comparisons and thus do not regard true spatial pattern information. This study features two innovative spatial performance metrics, namely EOF- and connectivity-analysis, to validate predicted LST patterns by three LSMs (Mosaic, Noah, VIC) over the contiguous USA. The LST validation dataset is derived from global High-Resolution-Infrared-Radiometric-Sounder (HIRS) retrievals for a 30 year period. The metrics are bias insensitive, which is an important feature in order to truly validate spatial patterns. The EOF analysis evaluates the spatial variability and pattern seasonality, and attests better performance to VIC in the warm months and to Mosaic and Noah in the cold months. Further, more than 75% of the LST variability can be captured by a single pattern that is strongly driven by air temperature. The connectivity analysis assesses the homogeneity and smoothness of patterns. The LSMs are most reliable at predicting cold LST patterns in the warm months and vice versa. Lastly, the coupling between aET and LST is investigated at flux tower sites and compared against LSMs to explain the identified LST shortcomings.

  4. From the chlorophyll a in the surface layer to its vertical profile: a Greenland Sea relationship for satellite applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cherkasheva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Current estimates of global marine primary production range over a factor of two. Improving these estimates requires an accurate knowledge of the chlorophyll vertical profiles, since they are the basis for most primary production models. At high latitudes, the uncertainty in primary production estimates is larger than globally, because here phytoplankton absorption shows specific characteristics due to the low-light adaptation, and in situ data and ocean colour observations are scarce. To date, studies describing the typical chlorophyll profile based on the chlorophyll in the surface layer have not included the Arctic region, or, if it was included, the dependence of the profile shape on surface concentration was neglected. The goal of our study was to derive and describe the typical Greenland Sea chlorophyll profiles, categorized according to the chlorophyll concentration in the surface layer and further monthly resolved profiles. The Greenland Sea was chosen because it is known to be one of the most productive regions of the Arctic and is among the regions in the Arctic where most chlorophyll field data are available. Our database contained 1199 chlorophyll profiles from R/Vs Polarstern and Maria S. Merian cruises combined with data from the ARCSS-PP database (Arctic primary production in situ database for the years 1957–2010. The profiles were categorized according to their mean concentration in the surface layer, and then monthly median profiles within each category were calculated. The category with the surface layer chlorophyll (CHL exceeding 0.7 mg C m−3 showed values gradually decreasing from April to August. A similar seasonal pattern was observed when monthly profiles were averaged over all the surface CHL concentrations. The maxima of all chlorophyll profiles moved from the greater depths to the surface from spring to late summer respectively. The profiles with the smallest surface values always showed a subsurface chlorophyll

  5. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data and seasonal pattern analysis for the Arctic Ocean ecoregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Meredith C.; Reusser, Deborah A.; Lee, Henry

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. In particular, the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish, is in question. This poses an intriguing problem for future research of Arctic environments - one that will require examination of long-term SST records. This publication describes and provides access to an easy-to-use Arctic SST dataset for ecologists, biogeographers, oceanographers, and other scientists conducting research on habitats and/or processes in the Arctic Ocean. The data cover the Arctic ecoregions as defined by the "Marine Ecoregions of the World" (MEOW) biogeographic schema developed by The Nature Conservancy as well as the region to the north from approximately 46°N to about 88°N (constrained by the season and data coverage). The data span a 29-year period from September 1981 to December 2009. These SST data were derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument measurements that had been compiled into monthly means at 4-kilometer grid cell spatial resolution. The processed data files are available in ArcGIS geospatial datasets (raster and point shapefiles) and also are provided in text (.csv) format. All data except the raster files include attributes identifying latitude/longitude coordinates, and realm, province, and ecoregion as defined by the MEOW classification schema. A seasonal analysis of these Arctic ecoregions reveals a wide range of SSTs experienced throughout the Arctic, both over the course of an annual cycle and within each month of that cycle. Sea ice distribution plays a major role in SST regulation in all Arctic ecoregions.

  6. Surface microtopographies of tropical sea stars: lack of an efficient physical defence mechanism against fouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Jana; De Nys, Rocky

    2007-01-01

    The role of surface topography as a defence against fouling in tropical sea stars was investigated. The sea stars Linckia laevigata, Fromia indica, Cryptasterina pentagona and Archaster typicus are not fouled and have paxillae (modified ossicles with a median vertical pillar) on their aboral surfaces, which varied in diameter, height and distance depending on species and position on the aboral surface, providing unique and complex surface microtopographies for each species. The surfaces of the sea stars L. laevigata, F. indica and A. typicus were moderately wettable, with their mean seawater contact angles, calculated from captive bubble measurements, being 60.1 degrees, 70.3 degrees and 57.3 degrees, respectively. The seawater contact angle of C. pentagona could not be measured. To evaluate the effectiveness of the surface microtopographies in deterring the settlement of fouling organisms, field experiments with resin replicas of the four sea star species were conducted at three sites around Townsville, Australia, for 8 weeks during the dry and wet seasons. The fouling community and total fouling cover did not differ significantly between replicas of L. laevigata, F. indica, C. pentagona, A. typicus and control surfaces at any site during the dry season. Significant differences between fouling communities on the replicas of the sea stars and control surfaces were detected at two sites during the wet season. However, these differences were transitory, and the total fouling cover did not differ significantly between replicas of sea stars and control surfaces at two of the three sites. In contrast to recent literature on the effects of biofouling control by natural surfaces in the marine environment, the surface microtopographies of tropical sea stars alone were not effective in deterring the settlement and growth of fouling organisms.

  7. Retrieval of sea surface humidity and back radiation from satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathe, P.V.; Muraleedharan, P.M.

    originally proposed by Schlussel in 1995. Results for surface humidity and back radiation over the Arabian Sea for the year 2000 is presented and have shown them to be in agreement with the atmospheric and oceanographic precesses operating during...

  8. New sea surface salinity product in the tropical Indian Ocean estimated from outgoing longwave radiation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Subrahmanyam, B.; Murty, V.S.N.; O'Brien, J.J.

    The sea surface salinity (SSS) product as derived from space-borne satellite measurements of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR), based on the algorithms developed by (1), is discussed for the tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) during the period 1995...

  9. 14 km Sea Surface Temperature for North America, 1986 - present (NODC Accession 0099042)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This product presents local sea surface temperatures (degrees C). It is a composite gridded-image derived from 8-km resolution SST observations collected by...

  10. Sea surface temperature variability over North Indian Ocean - A study of two contrasting monsoon seasons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Sathyendranath, S.; Viswambharan, N.K.; Rao, L.V.G.

    Using the satellite derived sea surface temperature (SST) data for 1979 (bad monsoon) and 1983 (good monsoon), the SST variability for two contrasting monsoon seasons is studied. The study indicates that large negative anomalies off the Somali...

  11. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, Sea Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  12. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  13. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Quarterly, Sea Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has quarterly Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  14. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, 5-Day, Sea Surface Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has 5-day Sea Surface Temperature (SST) data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  15. TAO/TRITON, RAMA, and PIRATA Buoys, Daily, Sea Surface Salinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has daily Sea Surface Salinity data from the TAO/TRITON (Pacific Ocean, http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/tao/), RAMA (Indian Ocean,...

  16. Moderate-resolution sea surface temperature data for the Arctic Ocean Ecoregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is an important environmental characteristic in determining the suitability and sustainability of habitats for marine organisms. Of particular interest is the fate of the Arctic Ocean, which provides critical habitat to commercially important fish (M...

  17. NOAA Optimum Interpolation 1/4 Degree Daily Sea Surface Temperature (OISST) Analysis, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This high-resolution sea surface temperature (SST) analysis product was developed using an optimum interpolation (OI) technique. The SST analysis has a spatial grid...

  18. Impact of Atlantic sea surface temperatures on the warmest global surface air temperature of 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Riyu

    2005-03-01

    The year 1998 is the warmest year in the record of instrumental measurements. In this study, an atmospheric general circulation model is used to investigate the role of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in this warmth, with a focus on the role of the Atlantic Ocean. The model forced with the observed global SSTs captures the main features of land surface air temperature anomalies in 1998. A sensitivity experiment shows that in comparison with the global SST anomalies, the Atlantic SST anomalies can explain 35% of the global mean surface air temperature (GMAT) anomaly, and 57% of the land surface air temperature anomaly in 1998. The mechanisms through which the Atlantic Ocean influences the GMAT are likely different from season to season. Possible detailed mechanisms involve the impact of SST anomalies on local convection in the tropical Atlantic region, the consequent excitation of a Rossby wave response that propagates into the North Atlantic and the Eurasian continent in winter and spring, and the consequent changes in tropical Walker circulation in summer and autumn that induce changes in convection over the tropical Pacific. This in turn affects climate in Asia and Australia. The important role of the Atlantic Ocean suggests that attention should be paid not only to the tropical Pacific Ocean, but also to the tropical Atlantic Ocean in understanding the GMAT variability and its predictability.

  19. Sea surface height anomaly and geostrophic circulation variations in the South China Sea from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘克修; 马继瑞; 许建平; 韩桂军; 范振华

    2002-01-01

    --The sea surface height anomaly (SSHA) and geostrophic circulation in the South ChinaSea (SCS) are studied using TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P) altimetry data. The SSHA, which is obtained after tidal correction based on the tidal results from T/P data, is predominated by seasonal alternating monsoons. The results reveal that the SSHA in the central part of the SCS is positive in spring and summer, but negative in autumn and winter. It is also found that the SSHA in the SCS can be approached with the sum of tidal constituents SA and SSA. The geostrophic circulations in the SCS are calculated according to sea surface dynamic topography, which is the sum of SSHA and mean sea surface height. It is suggested that the circulation in the upper layer of the SCS is generally cyclonic and notably western intensified during autumn and winter, while the western intensification is weak during spring and summer. It is also indicated that the Kuroshio intrudes into the northeastern SCS throuth the Luzon Strait in winter. But there is no indication of Kuroshio intruding into the SCS in summer.

  20. Physically-based Ice Thickness and Surface Roughness Retrievals over Rough Deformed Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Gaiser, Peter; Allard, Richard; Posey, Pamela; Hebert, David; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Polashenski, Christopher; Claffey, Keran

    2016-04-01

    The observations of sea ice thickness and ice surface roughness are critical for our understanding of the state of the changing Arctic. Currently, the Radar and/or LiDAR data of sea ice freeboard are used to infer sea ice thickness via isostasy. The underlying assumption is that the LiDAR signal returns at the air/snow interface and radar signal at the snow/ice interface. The elevations of these interfaces are determined based on LiDAR/Radar return waveforms. However, the commonly used threshold-based surface detection techniques are empirical in nature and work well only over level/smooth sea ice. Rough sea ice surfaces can modify the return waveforms, resulting in significant Electromagnetic (EM) bias in the estimated surface elevations, and thus large errors in the ice thickness retrievals. To understand and quantify such sea ice surface roughness effects, a combined EM rough surface and volume scattering model was developed to simulate radar returns from the rough sea ice 'layer cake' structure. A waveform matching technique was also developed to fit observed waveforms to a physically-based waveform model and subsequently correct the roughness induced EM bias in the estimated freeboard. This new EM Bias Corrected (EMBC) algorithm was able to better retrieve surface elevations and estimate the surface roughness parameter simultaneously. Both the ice thickness and surface roughness retrievals are validated using in-situ data. For the surface roughness retrievals, we applied this EMBC algorithm to co-incident LiDAR/Radar measurements collected during a Cryosat-2 under-flight by the NASA IceBridge missions. Results show that not only does the waveform model fit very well to the measured radar waveform, but also the roughness parameters derived independently from the LiDAR and radar data agree very well for both level and deformed sea ice. For sea ice thickness retrievals, validation based on in-situ data from the coordinated CRREL/NRL field campaign demonstrates

  1. Statistical analysis of global surface temperature and sea level using cointegration methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Torben; Johansen, Søren; Thejll, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Global sea levels are rising which is widely understood as a consequence of thermal expansion and melting of glaciers and land-based ice caps. Due to the lack of representation of ice-sheet dynamics in present-day physically-based climate models being unable to simulate observed sea level trends......, semi-empirical models have been applied as an alternative for projecting of future sea levels. There is in this, however, potential pitfalls due to the trending nature of the time series. We apply a statistical method called cointegration analysis to observed global sea level and land-ocean surface air...... temperature, capable of handling such peculiarities. We find a relationship between sea level and temperature and find that temperature causally depends on the sea level, which can be understood as a consequence of the large heat capacity of the ocean. We further find that the warming episode in the 1940s...

  2. Distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in surface sediments in the Yellow Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xin; Teng, Ankang; Xu, Wenzhe; Liu, Xiaoshou

    2014-06-15

    Heavy metal concentrations in surface sediments at 56 stations during two cruises in the Yellow Sea in summer and winter, 2011 were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The pollution status was assessed via the Geoaccumulation index and Hankanson potential ecological risk index. Higher concentrations of heavy metals (except for Mn) were found in the central Southern Yellow Sea and the western Northern Yellow Sea. The higher contents of Mn were much closer to Shandong Peninsula. Correlation analyses indicated that Pb, Cu, Fe, Ni, Zn and Co probably had the same origin and were controlled by grain size and total organic carbon. Pollution assessment showed that most areas of the Yellow Sea were not or lowly contaminated with the exception of the northwest and south parts of the Southern Yellow Sea showing Cd-contamination. The pollution status of the Yellow Sea in summer was worse than that in winter.

  3. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE: Near-Global Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies as Predictors of Australian Seasonal Rainfall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosdowsky, Wasyl; Chambers, Lynda E.

    2001-04-01

    An operational system for the prediction of Australian seasonal rainfall variations using sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) patterns over the Indian and Pacific Oceans is described. The SSTA patterns are represented by rotated principal components, with individual monthly values at 1- and 3-month lead times used as predictors;for example, November and January SSTAs are used to forecast March-May seasonal rainfall. The historical seasonal rainfall is also represented by rotated principal components of a gridded 1° rainfall dataset, with the principal component loadings used as weights to project the forecasts back to the original 1° grid points.Forecasts of seasonal rainfall in two (above/below median) or three categories (terciles) are produced using linear discriminant analysis. Hindcast skill, measured by the linear error in probability space (LEPS) skill score has been assessed using cross validation. Experiments were also performed using a double or nested cross-validation procedure to select the best model or combination of predictors. The model chosen for operational seasonal forecasts uses the first two rotated SSTA components lagged by 1 and 3 months as predictors for every season and location, to maintain continuity of forecast probabilities between the overlapping 3-month seasons.Current values of the principal component amplitudes are calculated by projecting either the Bureau of Meteorology's or the National Centers for Environmental Prediction's SST analysis onto the set of SST principal components. The hindcasts and experimental real-time forecasts over the 5-yr period from January-March 1994 to December-February 1998/99 indicate improved skill over parts of southern Australia during the autumn period using the SST-based schemes when compared with forecasts using the Southern Oscillation index alone.

  4. Impact of surface roughness on L-band emissivity of the sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miernecki, M.; Kaleschke, L.; Hendricks, S.; Søbjærg, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2014 a joint experiment IRO2/SMOSice was carried out in the Barents Sea. R/V Lance equipped with meteorological instruments, electromagnetic sea ice thickness probe and engine monitoring instruments, was performing a series of tests in different ice conditions in order to validate the ice route optimization (IRO) system, advising on his route through pack ice. In parallel cal/val activities for sea ice thickness product obtained from SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission) L-band radiometer were carried out. Apart from helicopter towing the EMbird thickness probe, Polar 5 aircraft was serving the area during the experiment with L-band radiometer EMIRAD2 and Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) as primary instruments. Sea ice Thickness algorithm using SMOS brightness temperature developed at University of Hamburg, provides daily maps of thin sea ice (up to 0.5-1 m) in polar regions with resolution of 35-50 km. So far the retrieval method was not taking into account surface roughness, assuming that sea ice is a specular surface. Roughness is a stochastic process that can be characterized by standard deviation of surface height σ and by shape of the autocorrelation function R to estimate it's vertical and horizontal scales respectively. Interactions of electromagnetic radiation with the surface of the medium are dependent on R and σ and they scales with respect to the incident wavelength. During SMOSice the radiometer was observing sea ice surface at two incidence angles 0 and 40 degrees and simultaneously the surface elevation was scanned with ALS with ground resolution of ~ 0.25 m. This configuration allowed us to calculate σ and R from power spectral densities of surface elevation profiles and quantify the effect of surface roughness on the emissivity of the sea ice. First results indicate that Gaussian autocorrelation function is suitable for deformed ice, for other ice types exponential function is the best fit.

  5. Observing seasonal variations of sea surface wind speed and significant wave height using TOPEX altimetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    One year of ocean topography experiment (TOPEX) altimeter data are used to study the seasonal variations of global sea surface wind speed and significant wave height. The major wind and wave zones of the world oceans are precisely identified, their seasonal variability and characteristics are quantitatively analyzed, and the diversity of global wind speed seasonality and the variability of significant wave height in response to sea surface wind speed are also revealed.

  6. Observed and modeled surface eddy heat fluxes in the eastern Nordic Seas

    OpenAIRE

    Isachsen, P.E. .; Koszalka, Inga Monika; LaCasce, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale budget calculations and numerical model process studies suggest that lateral eddy heat fluxes have an important cooling effect on the Norwegian Atlantic Current (NwAC) as it flows through the Nordic Seas. But observational estimates of such fluxes have been lacking. Here, wintertime surface eddy heat fluxes in the eastern Nordic Seas are estimated from surface drifter data, satellite data and an eddy-permitting numerical model. Maps of the eddy heat flux divergence suggest advecti...

  7. Evaluation of model simulated and MODIS-Aqua retrieved sea surface chlorophyll in the eastern Arabian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kunal; Gupta, Anubhav; Lotliker, Aneesh A.; Tilstone, Gavin

    2016-11-01

    In this study we assess the accuracy of sea surface Chlorophyll-a (Chla) retrieved from satellite (MODIS-Aqua), using standard OC3M algorithm, and from a Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS) biophysical model against in situ data, measured in surface waters of the eastern Arabian Sea, from April 2009 to December 2012. MODIS-Aqua OC3M Chla concentrations showed a high correlation with the in situ data with slope close to unity and low root mean square error. In comparison, the ROMS model underestimated Chla, though the correlation was significant indicating that the model is capable of reproducing the trend in in situ Chla. Time Series trends in Chla were examined against wind driven Upwelling Indices (UIW) from April 2009 to December 2012 in north-eastern (Gujarat) and south-eastern (Kochi) coastal waters of the Arabian Sea. The annual peak in Chla along the Kochi coast during the summer monsoon was adequately captured by the model. It is well known that the peak in surface Chla along the Kochi and Gujarat coasts during the summer monsoon is the result of coastal upwelling, which the ROMS model was able to reproduce accurately. The maximum surface Chla along the Gujarat coast during the winter monsoon is due to convective mixing, which was also significantly captured by ROMS biophysical model. There was a lag of approximately one week between the maximum surface Chla and the peak in the Upwelling Index.

  8. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  9. Applications and Prospect of Micro-motion Theory in the Detection of Sea Surface Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiao-long

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro-Doppler is one of the target physical characteristics. The radar signature of target with micro-motion can make fine characterization of the shape, structure and moving state of target, which reflects the nonstationary property of radar signal. Hence, it has great superiority in the analysis of sea clutter and target detection in case of high sea state based on micro-Doppler theory. In this paper, modeling of scattering clutter from time-varying sea surface and analysis methods of sea clutter Doppler are firstly reviewed based on the principle and characteristic of micro-Doppler, which shows the necessity of micro-Doppler. Then, applications and technological approaches of micro-Doppler in the sea surface target detection are introduced from the aspects of the micro-motion target modeling and detection methods of micro-motion signature. In the end, future research interests are pointed out according to the problems of present study.

  10. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  11. Productivity and sea surface temperature are correlated with the pelagic larval duration of damselfishes in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robitzch, Vanessa S N; Lozano-Cortés, Diego; Kandler, Nora M; Salas, Eva; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-04-30

    We examined the variation of pelagic larval durations (PLDs) among three damselfishes, Dascyllus aruanus, D. marginatus, and D. trimaculatus, which live under the influence of an environmental gradient in the Red Sea. PLDs were significantly correlated with latitude, sea surface temperature (SST), and primary production (CHLA; chlorophyll a concentrations). We find a consistent decrease in PLDs with increasing SST and primary production (CHLA) towards the southern Red Sea among all species. This trend is likely related to higher food availability and increased metabolic rates in that region. We suggest that food availability is a potentially stronger driver of variation in PLD than temperature, especially in highly oligotrophic regions. Additionally, variations in PLDs were particularly high among specimens of D. marginatus, suggesting a stronger response to local environmental differences for endemic species. We also report the first average PLD for this species over a broad geographic range (19.82 ± 2.92 days).

  12. Productivity and sea surface temperature are correlated with the pelagic larval duration of damselfishes in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Robitzch, Vanessa S.N.

    2015-12-01

    We examined the variation of pelagic larval durations (PLDs) among three damselfishes, Dascyllus aruanus, D. marginatus, and D. trimaculatus, which live under the influence of an environmental gradient in the Red Sea. PLDs were significantly correlated with latitude, sea surface temperature (SST), and primary production (CHLA; chlorophyll a concentrations). We find a consistent decrease in PLDs with increasing SST and primary production (CHLA) towards the southern Red Sea among all species. This trend is likely related to higher food availability and increased metabolic rates in that region. We suggest that food availability is a potentially stronger driver of variation in PLD than temperature, especially in highly oligotrophic regions. Additionally, variations in PLDs were particularly high among specimens of D. marginatus, suggesting a stronger response to local environmental differences for endemic species. We also report the first average PLD for this species over a broad geographic range (19.82 ± 2.92 days).

  13. Distribution of Organic Matter, Iron, Mangenese in Surface Sediments in the Nansha Islands Sea Area, South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Weihua; Wu Yunhua; Chen Shaoyong; Yin Kedong

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of organic matter, iron and manganese in the deep sea surface sediments in the Nansha Islands sea area, South China Sea are measured. Horizontal and vertical distributions of iron and manganese are discussed. The vertical distribution of iron and manganese in the sediments results from reduction, diffusion, and redeposition of manganese (or iron) oxide and hydroxide in the sediment. There are the maxima of iron and manganese in solid phase in the top of the sediment, which is caused by the penetration of O2 and the upward flux of Mn2+ ( or Fe2+ ). Manganese bacteria play a very important role in the cycle of solid-phase iron and manganese in the ocean environment. Manganese bacteria oxidize Mn2+ ( or Fe2+ ) in dissolved state to Mn4+ ( or Fe3+ ) in oxidized state under the aerobic condition, whereas they reduce iron and manganese in anaerobic conditions.

  14. The Fast Simulation of Scattering Characteristics from a Simplified Time Varying Sea Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwen Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at applying a simplified sea surface model into the physical optics (PO method to accelerate the scattering calculation from 1D time varying sea surface. To reduce the number of the segments and make further improvement on the efficiency of PO method, a simplified sea surface is proposed. In this simplified sea surface, the geometry of long waves is locally approximated by tilted facets that are much longer than the electromagnetic wavelength. The capillary waves are considered to be sinusoidal line superimposing on the long waves. The wavenumber of the sinusoidal waves is supposed to satisfy the resonant condition of Bragg waves which is dominant in all the scattered short wave components. Since the capillary wave is periodical within one facet, an analytical integration of the PO term can be performed. The backscattering coefficient obtained from a simplified sea surface model agrees well with that obtained from a realistic sea surface. The Doppler shifts and width also agree well with the realistic model since the capillary waves are taken into consideration. The good agreements indicate that the simplified model is reasonable and valid in predicting both the scattering coefficients and the Doppler spectra.

  15. Empirical models of monthly and annual surface albedo in managed boreal forests of Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Ryan M.; Astrup, Rasmus; Strømman, Anders H.

    2013-04-01

    As forest management activities play an increasingly important role in climate change mitigation strategies of Nordic regions such as Norway, Sweden, and Finland -- the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the types and magnitude of biogeophysical climate effects and their various tradeoffs with the global carbon cycle becomes essential to avoid implementation of sub-optimal policy. Forest harvest in these regions reduces the albedo "masking effect" and impacts Earth's radiation budget in opposing ways to that of concomitant carbon cycle perturbations; thus, policies based solely on biogeochemical considerations in these regions risk being counterproductive. There is therefore a need to better understand how human disturbances (i.e., forest management activities) affect important biophysical factors like surface albedo. An 11-year remotely sensed surface albedo dataset coupled with stand-level forest management data for a variety of stands in Norway's most productive logging region are used to develop regression models describing temporal changes in monthly and annual forest albedo following clear-cut harvest disturbance events. Datasets are grouped by dominant tree species and site indices (productivity), and two alternate multiple regression models are developed and tested following a potential plus modifier approach. This resulted in an annual albedo model with statistically significant parameters that explains a large proportion of the observed variation, requiring as few as two predictor variables: i) average stand age - a canopy modifier predictor of albedo, and ii) stand elevation - a local climate predictor of a forest's potential albedo. The same model structure is used to derive monthly albedo models, with models for winter months generally found superior to summer models, and conifer models generally outperforming deciduous. We demonstrate how these statistical models can be applied to routine forest inventory data to predict the albedo

  16. Sea surface temperature 1871-2099 in 14 cells around the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Charles

    2004-07-01

    Monthly sea surface temperature is provided for 14 locations around the UK for a 230 year period. These series are derived from the HadISST1 data set for historical time (1871-1999) and from the HadCM3 climate model for predicted SST (1950-2099). Two adjustments of the forecast data sets are needed to produce confluent SST series: the 50 year overlap is used for a gross adjustment, and a statistical scaling on the forecast data ensures that annual variations in forecast data match those of historical data. These monthly SST series are available on request. The overall rise in SST over time is clear for all sites, commencing in the last quarter of the 20th century. Apart from expected trends of overall warmer mean SST with more southerly latitudes and overall cooler mean SST towards the East, more interesting statistically significant general trends include a greater decadal rate of rise from warmer starting conditions. Annual temperature variation is not affected by absolute temperature, but is markedly greater towards the East. There is no correlation of annual range of SST with latitude, or with present SST values.

  17. Relation between sea surface temperature anomaly in the Atlantic and summer precipitation over the Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白人海

    2001-01-01

    Based on global monthly average data set of sea surface temperature (SST) during 1950 -1992 and global monthly average 500 hPa height during 1950 - 1997 offered by NCAR/NCEP, the feature of SST anomaly in the Atlantic and its relation with summer precipitation over the Northeast China are analyzed. The results show that, the second eigenvector of the SST′s empirical orthogonal expanssion in winter season over the North Atlantic suggests that distribution of SST anomaly has unusual meridional difference; The location of its center is basically identical to center of significant correlation region between summer precipitation over the Northeast China and winter SST in the Atlantic. When winter SST in the North Atlantic is hot in south and cold in north, the blocking situation is stronger in the middle- high latitude. Correspondingly, the blocking high pressure in the northern North Pacific is also getting stronger,the westerlies circulation index in East Asia in next summer would be lower, asa result, more precipitation in the summer would be experienced over Northeast China and vice versa.

  18. Seasonal and decadal forecasts of Atlantic Sea surface temperatures using a linear inverse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddart, Benjamin; Subramanian, Aneesh; Zanna, Laure; Palmer, Tim

    2017-09-01

    Predictability of Atlantic Ocean sea surface temperatures (SST) on seasonal and decadal timescales is investigated using a suite of statistical linear inverse models (LIM). Observed monthly SST anomalies in the Atlantic sector (between 22°S and 66°N) are used to construct the LIMs for seasonal and decadal prediction. The forecast skills of the LIMs are then compared to that from two current operational forecast systems. Results indicate that the LIM has good forecast skill for time periods of 3-4 months on the seasonal timescale with enhanced predictability in the spring season. On decadal timescales, the impact of inter-annual and intra-annual variability on the predictability is also investigated. The results show that the suite of LIMs have forecast skill for about 3-4 years over most of the domain when we use only the decadal variability for the construction of the LIM. Including higher frequency variability helps improve the forecast skill and maintains the correlation of LIM predictions with the observed SST anomalies for longer periods. These results indicate the importance of temporal scale interactions in improving predictability on decadal timescales. Hence, LIMs can not only be used as benchmarks for estimates of statistical skill but also to isolate contributions to the forecast skills from different timescales, spatial scales or even model components.

  19. Sea Surface Temperature Influence on Terrestrial Gross Primary Production along the Southern California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Janet J.; Vargas, Rodrigo; Rivas, David; Gaxiola-Castro, Gilberto; Hernandez-Ayon, J. Martin; Lara-Lara, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Some land and ocean processes are related through connections (and synoptic-scale teleconnections) to the atmosphere. Synoptic-scale atmospheric (El Niño/Southern Oscillation [ENSO], Pacific Decadal Oscillation [PDO], and North Atlantic Oscillation [NAO]) decadal cycles are known to influence the global terrestrial carbon cycle. Potentially, smaller scale land-ocean connections influenced by coastal upwelling (changes in sea surface temperature) may be important for local-to-regional water-limited ecosystems where plants may benefit from air moisture transported from the ocean to terrestrial ecosystems. Here we use satellite-derived observations to test potential connections between changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in regions with strong coastal upwelling and terrestrial gross primary production (GPP) across the Baja California Peninsula. This region is characterized by an arid/semiarid climate along the southern California Current. We found that SST was correlated with the fraction of photosynthetic active radiation (fPAR; as a proxy for GPP) with lags ranging from 0 to 5 months. In contrast ENSO was not as strongly related with fPAR as SST in these coastal ecosystems. Our results show the importance of local-scale changes in SST during upwelling events, to explain the variability in GPP in coastal, water-limited ecosystems. The response of GPP to SST was spatially-dependent: colder SST in the northern areas increased GPP (likely by influencing fog formation), while warmer SST at the southern areas was associated to higher GPP (as SST is in phase with precipitation patterns). Interannual trends in fPAR are also spatially variable along the Baja California Peninsula with increasing secular trends in subtropical regions, decreasing trends in the most arid region, and no trend in the semi-arid regions. These findings suggest that studies and ecosystem process based models should consider the lateral influence of local-scale ocean processes that could

  20. Assessment of the Jason-2 Extension to the TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-l Sea-Surface Height Time Series for Global Mean Sea Level Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, B. D.; Zelensky, N. P.; Holmes, S. A.; Lemoine, F. G.; Ray, R. D.; Mitchum, G. T.; Dedai, S. D.; Brown, S. T.

    2010-01-01

    The Jason-2 (OSTM) follow-on mission to Jason-I provides for the continuation of global and regional mean sea level estimates along the ground-track of the initial phase of the TOPEX/Poseidon mission. During the first several months, Jason-I and Jason-2 flew in formation separated by only 55 seconds, enabling the isolation of intermission instrument biases through direct collinear differencing of near simultaneous observations. The Jason-2 Ku-band range bias with respect to Jason-I is estimated to be -84 +/- 9 mm, based on the orbit altitudes provided on the Geophysical Data Records. Modest improved agreement is achieved with the GSFC replacement orbits, which further enables the isolation of subtle 1 cm) instrument-dependent range correction biases. Inter-mission bias estimates are confirmed with an independent assessment from comparisons to a 64-station tide-gauge network, also providing an estimate of the stability of the 17-year time series to be less than 0.1 mm/yr +/- 0.4 mm/yr. The global mean sea level derived from the multi-mission altimeter sea-surface height record from January 1993 through September 2009 is 3.3 +/- 0.4 mm/yr. Recent trends over the period from 2004 through 2008 are smaller and estimated to be 2.0 +/- 0.4 mm/yr.

  1. Mean sea level and surface circulation variability of the Mediterranean Sea from 2 years of TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larnicol, Gilles; Le Traon, Pierre-Yves; Ayoub, Nadia; de Mey, Pierre

    1995-12-01

    We describe the circulation and mean sea level variations of the Mediterranean Sea from 2 years of TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetric data. It is first shown that the response of the Mediterranean Sea to atmospheric pressure forcing is close to an inverse barometer (except at high frequencies) which means that the adjustment is accompanied by a flow through the Straits of Sicily and Gibraltar. We then use TOPEX/POSEIDON to study the mean sea level variations, representing steric effects and integrated large-scale changes of the mass of the Mediterranean Sea. We observe an annual cycle with a fast drop during winter. Steric effects account for about half of the observed variations. The remaining signal is believed to be driven by evaporation minus precipitation (E - P) forcing and internal hydraulic control in the Straits of Gibraltar. Using suboptimal space-time objective analysis, the classic components of the Mediterranean surface circulation are recovered, despite low signal-to-noise ratio (the rms of sea level variability is less than 10 cm). The variable Mediterranean circulation is seen as a complex combination of mesoscale and large-scale variations. The surface circulation is more complex in the eastern basin than in the western basin. In the east it is composed of subbasin-scale gyres, such as the so-called Mersa-Matruh and Shikmona gyres, which do not have an obvious recurrence period. We also observe an intensification of the large-scale cyclonic winter circulation in the western and in the Ionian basins. Several mesoscale structures, such as the Alboran gyres and the Ierepetra gyre, show a clear seasonal cycle, with a maximum in summer. The good qualitative and quantitative agreement of the results with previous data from the Mediterranean illustrates the improved accurary of TOPEX/POSEIDON over its predecessors.

  2. Video system for monitoring sea-surface characteristics in coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Oleg G.; Pavlov, Andrey N.

    2012-11-01

    A method of investigation sea surface roughness by analysis polarization images is suggested. Equipment and software were developed and tested at the Pacific Oceanological Institute (POI) It is shown a possibility to study surface manifestations of hydrodynamic processes in coastal zone, such as the dynamics of vortex structures, internal waves, spatio-temporal properties of surface waves by using the panoramic video system for a sea surface control and by the imaging polarimeter. Analysis of a time sequence of transformed to the plane panoramic images obtained using the system allows to estimate a velocity field of vortex structure, phase velocity of surface manifestations of internal waves, intensity and dynamics of surface films of oil pollution. It is shown an ability of sea surface reconstruction by analyzing time sequence of the imaging polarimeter pictures. The results are compared with the height difference of the floats located on the vertical guides that are in the imaging polarimeter field of view. The float heights obtained from its image coordinates. Field experiments were conducted at the POI marine station in the Japan Sea. Moreover, the developed methods and equipment may be used as a source of unique in situ information on the sea surface roughness during satellite optical and radar sensing.

  3. Large contribution of sea surface warming to recent increase in Atlantic hurricane activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Mark A; Lea, Adam S

    2008-01-31

    Atlantic hurricane activity has increased significantly since 1995 (refs 1-4), but the underlying causes of this increase remain uncertain. It is widely thought that rising Atlantic sea surface temperatures have had a role in this, but the magnitude of this contribution is not known. Here we quantify this contribution for storms that formed in the tropical North Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico; these regions together account for most of the hurricanes that make landfall in the United States. We show that a statistical model based on two environmental variables--local sea surface temperature and an atmospheric wind field--can replicate a large proportion of the variance in tropical Atlantic hurricane frequency and activity between 1965 and 2005. We then remove the influence of the atmospheric wind field to assess the contribution of sea surface temperature. Our results indicate that the sensitivity of tropical Atlantic hurricane activity to August-September sea surface temperature over the period we consider is such that a 0.5 degrees C increase in sea surface temperature is associated with a approximately 40% increase in hurricane frequency and activity. The results also indicate that local sea surface warming was responsible for approximately 40% of the increase in hurricane activity relative to the 1950-2000 average between 1996 and 2005. Our analysis does not identify whether warming induced by greenhouse gases contributed to the increase in hurricane activity, but the ability of climate models to reproduce the observed relationship between hurricanes and sea surface temperature will serve as a useful means of assessing whether they are likely to provide reliable projections of future changes in Atlantic hurricane activity.

  4. Sea surface temperature variability in the Norwegian Sea during the late Pliocene linked to subpolar gyre strength and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachem, Paul E.; Risebrobakken, Bjørg; McClymont, Erin L.

    2016-07-01

    The mid-Piacenzian warm period (3.264-3.025 Ma) of the Pliocene epoch has been proposed as a possible reference for future warm climate states. However, there is significant disagreement over the magnitude of high latitude warming between data and models for this period of time, raising questions about the driving mechanisms and responsible feedbacks. We have developed a new set of orbital-resolution alkenone-based sea surface temperature (SST) and ice rafted debris (IRD) records from the Norwegian Sea spanning 3.264-3.14 Ma. The SSTs in the Norwegian Sea were 2-3 °C warmer than the Holocene average, likely caused by the radiative effect of higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations. There is notable obliquity-driven SST variability with a range of 4 °C, shown by evolutive spectra. The correlation of SST variability with the presence of IRD suggests a common climate forcing acting across the Nordic Seas region. Changes of the SST gradient between the Norwegian Sea and North Atlantic sites suggest that the subpolar gyre was at least as strong as during the Holocene, and that the northward heat transport by the North Atlantic Current was comparable.

  5. Processes controlling surface, bottom and lateral melt of Arctic sea ice in a state of the art sea ice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamados, Michel; Feltham, Daniel; Petty, Alek; Schroeder, David; Flocco, Daniela

    2015-10-13

    We present a modelling study of processes controlling the summer melt of the Arctic sea ice cover. We perform a sensitivity study and focus our interest on the thermodynamics at the ice-atmosphere and ice-ocean interfaces. We use the Los Alamos community sea ice model CICE, and additionally implement and test three new parametrization schemes: (i) a prognostic mixed layer; (ii) a three equation boundary condition for the salt and heat flux at the ice-ocean interface; and (iii) a new lateral melt parametrization. Recent additions to the CICE model are also tested, including explicit melt ponds, a form drag parametrization and a halodynamic brine drainage scheme. The various sea ice parametrizations tested in this sensitivity study introduce a wide spread in the simulated sea ice characteristics. For each simulation, the total melt is decomposed into its surface, bottom and lateral melt components to assess the processes driving melt and how this varies regionally and temporally. Because this study quantifies the relative importance of several processes in driving the summer melt of sea ice, this work can serve as a guide for future research priorities. © 2015 The Author(s).

  6. Climatic variability of river outflow in the Pantanal region and the influence of sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos Batista; Silva, Maria Elisa Siqueira; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigates possible linear relationships between climate, hydrology, and oceanic surface variability in the Pantanal region (in South America's central area), over interannual and interdecadal time ranges. In order to verify the mentioned relations, lagged correlation analysis and linear adjustment between river discharge at the Pantanal region and sea surface temperature were used. Composite analysis for atmospheric fields, air humidity flux divergence, and atmospheric circulation at low and high levels, for the period between 1970 and 2003, was analyzed. Results suggest that the river discharge in the Pantanal region is linearly associated with interdecadal and interannual oscillations in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, making them good predictors to continental hydrological variables. Considering oceanic areas, 51 % of the annual discharge in the Pantanal region can be linearly explained by mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Subtropical North Pacific, Tropical North Pacific, Extratropical South Pacific, and Extratropical North Atlantic over the period. Considering a forecast approach in seasonal scale, 66 % of the monthly discharge variance in Pantanal, 3 months ahead of SST, is explained by the oceanic variables, providing accuracy around 65 %. Annual discharge values in the Pantanal region are strongly related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) variability (with 52 % of linear correlation), making it possible to consider an interdecadal variability and a consequent subdivision of the whole period in three parts: 1st (1970-1977), 2nd (1978-1996), and 3rd (1997-2003) subperiods. The three subperiods coincide with distinct PDO phases: negative, positive, and negative, respectively. Convergence of humidity flux at low levels and the circulation pattern at high levels help to explain the drier and wetter subperiods. During the wetter 2nd subperiod, the air humidity convergence at low levels is much more evident than during the other two

  7. Climatic variability of river outflow in the Pantanal region and the influence of sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Carlos Batista; Silva, Maria Elisa Siqueira; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2017-07-01

    This paper investigates possible linear relationships between climate, hydrology, and oceanic surface variability in the Pantanal region (in South America's central area), over interannual and interdecadal time ranges. In order to verify the mentioned relations, lagged correlation analysis and linear adjustment between river discharge at the Pantanal region and sea surface temperature were used. Composite analysis for atmospheric fields, air humidity flux divergence, and atmospheric circulation at low and high levels, for the period between 1970 and 2003, was analyzed. Results suggest that the river discharge in the Pantanal region is linearly associated with interdecadal and interannual oscillations in the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, making them good predictors to continental hydrological variables. Considering oceanic areas, 51 % of the annual discharge in the Pantanal region can be linearly explained by mean sea surface temperature (SST) in the Subtropical North Pacific, Tropical North Pacific, Extratropical South Pacific, and Extratropical North Atlantic over the period. Considering a forecast approach in seasonal scale, 66 % of the monthly discharge variance in Pantanal, 3 months ahead of SST, is explained by the oceanic variables, providing accuracy around 65 %. Annual discharge values in the Pantanal region are strongly related to the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) variability (with 52 % of linear correlation), making it possible to consider an interdecadal variability and a consequent subdivision of the whole period in three parts: 1st (1970-1977), 2nd (1978-1996), and 3rd (1997-2003) subperiods. The three subperiods coincide with distinct PDO phases: negative, positive, and negative, respectively. Convergence of humidity flux at low levels and the circulation pattern at high levels help to explain the drier and wetter subperiods. During the wetter 2nd subperiod, the air humidity convergence at low levels is much more evident than during the other two

  8. Last Glacial Maximum sea surface temperature and sea-ice extent in the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Verena; Esper, Oliver; Gersonde, Rainer; Lamy, Frank; Tiedemann, Ralf

    2016-08-01

    Sea surface temperatures and sea-ice extent are most critical variables to evaluate the Southern Ocean paleoceanographic evolution in relation to the development of the global carbon cycle, atmospheric CO2 and ocean-atmosphere circulation. Here we present diatom transfer function-based summer sea surface temperature (SSST) and winter sea-ice (WSI) estimates from the Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean to bridge a gap in information that has to date hampered a well-established reconstruction of the last glacial Southern Ocean at circum-Antarctic scale. We studied the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at the EPILOG time slice (19,000-23,000 calendar years before present) in 17 cores and consolidated our LGM picture of the Pacific sector taking into account published data from its warmer regions. Our data display a distinct east-west differentiation with a rather stable WSI edge north of the Pacific-Antarctic Ridge in the Ross Sea sector and a more variable WSI extent over the Amundsen Abyssal Plain. The zone of maximum cooling (>4 K) during the LGM is in the present Subantarctic Zone and bounded to its south by the 4 °C isotherm. The isotherm is in the SSST range prevailing at the modern Antarctic Polar Front, representing a circum-Antarctic feature, and marks the northern edge of the glacial Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). The northward deflection of colder than modern surface waters along the South American continent led to a significant cooling of the glacial Humboldt Current surface waters (4-8 K), which affected the temperature regimes as far north as tropical latitudes. The glacial reduction of ACC temperatures may also have resulted in significant cooling in the Atlantic and Indian Southern Ocean, thus enhancing thermal differentiation of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic continental cooling. The comparison with numerical temperature and sea-ice simulations yields discrepancies, especially concerning the estimates of the sea-ice fields, but some simulations

  9. Effects of the 2003 European heatwave on the Central Mediterranean Sea: surface fluxes and the dynamical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sorgente

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the 2003 European heatwave on the sea surface layer of the Central Mediterranean were studied using a regional 3-D ocean model. The model was used to simulate the period 2000 to 2004 and its performance was validated using remotely-sensed and in situ data. Analysis of the results focused on changes in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST and on changes to the surface and sub-surface current field. This permitted us to identify and quantify the anomalies of atmospheric and sea surface parameters that accompanied the heatwave. The dominant annual cycle in each variable was first removed and a wavelet analysis then used to locate anomalies in the time-frequency domain.

    We found that the excess heating affecting the sea surface in the summer of 2003 was related to a significant increase in air temperature, a decrease in wind stress and reduction of all components of the upward heat flux. The monthly averages of the model SST were found to be in good agreement with remotely-sensed data during the period studied, although the ocean model tended to underestimate extreme events. The spatial distribution of SST anomalies as well as their time-frequency location was similar for both the remotely-sensed and model temperatures. We also found, on the basis of the period of the observed anomaly, that the event was not limited to the few summer months of 2003 but was part of a longer phenomenon. Both the model results and experimental data suggest the anomalous heating mainly affected the top 15 m of ocean and was associated with strong surface stratification and low mixing.

    The skill of the model to reproduce the sub-surface hydrographic features during the heatwave was checked by comparison with temperature and salinity measurements. This showed that the model was generally in good agreement with observations. The model and observations showed that the anomalous warming also modified the currents in the region, most noticeably

  10. Multiresolution infrared optical properties for Gaussian sea surfaces: theoretical validation in the one-dimensional case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauqueux, Sandrine; Caillault, Karine; Simoneau, Pierre; Labarre, Luc

    2009-10-01

    The validation of the multiresolution model of sea surface infrared optical properties developed at ONERA is investigated in the one-dimensional case by comparison with a reference model, using a submillimeter discretization of the surface. Having expressed the optical properties, we detail the characteristics of each model. A set of numerical tests is made for various wind speeds, resolutions, and realizations of the sea surface. The tests show a good agreement between the results except for grazing angles, where the impact of multiple reflections and the effects of adjacent rough surfaces on shadow have to be investigated.

  11. Holocene sea subsurface and surface water masses in the Fram Strait - Comparisons of temperature and sea-ice reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Kirstin; Müller, Juliane; Husum, Katrine; Spielhagen, Robert F.; Kandiano, Evgenia S.; Polyak, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Two high-resolution sediment cores from eastern Fram Strait have been investigated for sea subsurface and surface temperature variability during the Holocene (the past ca 12,000 years). The transfer function developed by Husum and Hald (2012) has been applied to sediment cores in order to reconstruct fluctuations of sea subsurface temperatures throughout the period. Additional biomarker and foraminiferal proxy data are used to elucidate variability between surface and subsurface water mass conditions, and to conclude on the Holocene climate and oceanographic variability on the West Spitsbergen continental margin. Results consistently reveal warm sea surface to subsurface temperatures of up to 6 °C until ca 5 cal ka BP, with maximum seawater temperatures around 10 cal ka BP, likely related to maximum July insolation occurring at that time. Maximum Atlantic Water (AW) advection occurred at surface and subsurface between 10.6 and 8.5 cal ka BP based on both foraminiferal and dinocyst temperature reconstructions. Probably, a less-stratified, ice-free, nutrient-rich surface ocean with strong AW advection prevailed in the eastern Fram Strait between 10 and 9 cal ka BP. Weakened AW contribution is found after ca 5 cal ka BP when subsurface temperatures strongly decrease with minimum values between ca 4 and 3 cal ka BP. Cold late Holocene conditions are furthermore supported by high planktic foraminifer shell fragmentation and high δ18O values of the subpolar planktic foraminifer species Turborotalita quinqueloba. While IP25-associated indices as well as dinocyst data suggest a sustained cooling due to a decrease in early summer insolation and consequently sea-ice increase since about 7 cal ka BP in surface waters, planktic foraminiferal data including stable isotopes indicate a slight return of stronger subsurface AW influx since ca 3 cal ka BP. The observed decoupling of surface and subsurface waters during the later Holocene is most likely attributed to a strong

  12. Effects of sea surface winds on marine aerosols characteristics and impacts on longwave radiative forcing over the Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar S. Nair

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Collocated measurements of spectral aerosol optical depths (AODs, total and BC mass concentrations, and number size distributions of near surface aerosols, along with sea surface winds, made onboard a scientific cruise over southeastern Arabian Sea, are used to delineate the effects of changes in the wind speed on aerosol properties and its implication on the shortwave and longwave radiative forcing. The results indicated that an increase in the sea-surface wind speed from calm to moderate (<1 to 8 m s−1 values results in a selective increase of the particle concentrations in the size range 0.5 to 5 μm, leading to significant changes in the size distribution, increase in the mass concentration, decrease in the BC mass fraction, a remarkable increase in AODs in the near infrared and a flattening of the AOD spectrum. The consequent increase in the longwave direct radiative forcing almost entirely offsets the corresponding increase in the short wave direct radiative forcing (or even overcompensates at the top of the atmosphere; while the surface forcing is offset by about 50%.

  13. Sound Scattering From Rough Bubbly Ocean Surface Based on Modified Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator and Consideration of Various Incident Angles and Sub-surface Bubbles’ Radii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alireza Bolghasi; Parviz Ghadimi; Mohammad A. Feizi Chekab

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz–Kirchhoff–Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall–Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall–Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  14. Sound scattering from rough bubbly ocean surface based on modified sea surface acoustic simulator and consideration of various incident angles and sub-surface bubbles' radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolghasi, Alireza; Ghadimi, Parviz; Chekab, Mohammad A. Feizi

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to improve the capabilities and precision of a recently introduced Sea Surface Acoustic Simulator (SSAS) developed based on optimization of the Helmholtz-Kirchhoff-Fresnel (HKF) method. The improved acoustic simulator, hereby known as the Modified SSAS (MSSAS), is capable of determining sound scattering from the sea surface and includes an extended Hall-Novarini model and optimized HKF method. The extended Hall-Novarini model is used for considering the effects of sub-surface bubbles over a wider range of radii of sub-surface bubbles compared to the previous SSAS version. Furthermore, MSSAS has the capability of making a three-dimensional simulation of scattered sound from the rough bubbly sea surface with less error than that of the Critical Sea Tests (CST) experiments. Also, it presents scattered pressure levels from the rough bubbly sea surface based on various incident angles of sound. Wind speed, frequency, incident angle, and pressure level of the sound source are considered as input data, and scattered pressure levels and scattering coefficients are provided. Finally, different parametric studies were conducted on wind speeds, frequencies, and incident angles to indicate that MSSAS is quite capable of simulating sound scattering from the rough bubbly sea surface, according to the scattering mechanisms determined by Ogden and Erskine. Therefore, it is concluded that MSSAS is valid for both scattering mechanisms and the transition region between them that are defined by Ogden and Erskine.

  15. Undersea acoustic telemetry across the North Anatolian Fault, Marmara Sea: results from the first 6 months of monitoring of the fault displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, J. Y.; Deschamps, A.; Piete, H.; Sakic, P.; Ballu, V.; Apprioual, R.; Kopp, H.; Lange, D.; Ruffine, L.; Géli, L.

    2015-12-01

    Located in the Marmara Sea, the Istanbul-Silivri segment of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is known to be a seismic gap since 1766, although, in the last century, the NAF has caused major devastating earthquakes over most of its extent. This fault segment, void of seismicity, may be either creeping aseismically or blocked and accumulating enough strain to produce an earthquake of magnitude 7 or greater. This section of the NAF may thus represent a major seismic and tsunamigenic hazard for the Istanbul megalopolis, located only 40 km away. The objective of the MARSITE project, funded by the European Union and coordinated by the Observatory of the University of Kandilli (KOERI), is to determine the blocking state of the Istanbul-Silivri fault segment. In this context, an array of 10 acoustic transponders has been deployed on either sides of the fault, in the eastern part of the Kumburgaz Basin, to measure the displacements of the fault over a period of 3 to 5 years. The telemetric beacons (4 from the University of Brest and 6 from the GEOMAR Institute in Kiel) form two arrays fitted in one another. The principle of the experiment is to repeatedly measure the distance (ie two-way-travel time of acoustic pings) between pairs of beacons and thus to monitor the deformation of an array of 9 baselines, 500m to 3000m long, of which 5 cross obliquely the assumed fault trace. The French and German arrays are independent but ensure a redundancy of rangings along common baselines. Each acoustic transponder also monitors the temperature, pressure, sound-velocity and attitude (tiltmeters), every one or two hours. Data are stored in each beacon and can be downloaded from the surface using an acoustic modem. We present here the first 6 months of recording by the French array, from November 1st, 2014 to April 25, 2015. All acoustic transponders worked nominally for 6 months and appear to have remained stable on the seafloor. Recorded sea-bottom temperatures provide evidence for

  16. Global Sea Surface Temperature and Sea Level Rise Estimation with Optimal Historical Time Lag Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa M. Aral

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of global temperatures and sea level rise (SLR is important for sustainable development planning of coastal regions of the world and the health and safety of communities living in these regions. In this study, climate change effects on sea level rise is investigated using a dynamic system model (DSM with time lag on historical input data. A time-invariant (TI-DSM and time-variant dynamic system model (TV-DSM with time lag is developed to predict global temperatures and SLR in the 21st century. The proposed model is an extension of the DSM developed by the authors. The proposed model includes the effect of temperature and sea level states of several previous years on the current temperature and sea level over stationary and also moving scale time periods. The optimal time lag period used in the model is determined by minimizing a synthetic performance index comprised of the root mean square error and coefficient of determination which is a measure for the reliability of the predictions. Historical records of global temperature and sea level from 1880 to 2001 are used to calibrate the model. The optimal time lag is determined to be eight years, based on the performance measures. The calibrated model was then used to predict the global temperature and sea levels in the 21st century using a fixed time lag period and moving scale time lag periods. To evaluate the adverse effect of greenhouse gas emissions on SLR, the proposed model was also uncoupled to project the SLR based on global temperatures that are obtained from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC emission scenarios. The projected SLR estimates for the 21st century are presented comparatively with the predictions made in previous studies.

  17. Fluxes of carbon and nutrients to the Iceland Sea surface layer and inferred primary productivity and stoichiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Jeansson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluxes of carbon and nutrients to the upper 100 m of the Iceland Sea are evaluated. The study utilises hydro-chemical data from the Iceland Sea time-series station (68.00° N, 12.67° W, for the years between 1993 and 2006. By comparing data of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and nutrients in the surface layer (upper 100 m, and a sub-surface layer (100–200 m, we calculate monthly deficits in the surface, and use these to deduce the surface layer fluxes that affect the deficits: vertical mixing, horizontal advection, air–sea exchange, and biological activity. The deficits show a clear seasonality with a minimum in winter, when the mixed layer is at the deepest, and a maximum in early autumn, when biological uptake has removed much of the nutrients. The annual vertical fluxes of DIC and nitrate amounts to 1.7 ± 0.3 and 0.23 ± 0.07 mol m−2 yr−1, respectively, and the annual air–sea uptake of atmospheric CO2 is 4.4 ± 1.1 mol m−2 yr−1. The biologically driven changes in DIC during the year relates to net community production (NCP, and the net annual NCP corresponds to export production, and is here calculated to 6.1 ± 0.9 mol C m−2 yr−1. The typical, median C : N ratio during the period of net community uptake is 11, and thus clearly higher than Redfield, but is varying during the season.

  18. Forecasting terrestrial water storage changes in the Amazon Basin using Atlantic and Pacific sea surface temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. de Linage

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Floods and droughts frequently affect the Amazon River basin, impacting transportation, river navigation, agriculture, and ecosystem processes within several South American countries. Here we examined how sea surface temperatures (SSTs influence interannual variability of terrestrial water storage anomalies (TWSAs in different regions within the Amazon basin and propose a modeling framework for inter-seasonal flood and drought forecasting. Three simple statistical models forced by a linear combination of lagged spatial averages of central Pacific (Niño 4 index and tropical North Atlantic (TNAI index SSTs were calibrated against a decade-long record of 3°, monthly TWSAs observed by the Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE satellite mission. Niño 4 was the primary external forcing in the northeastern region of the Amazon basin whereas TNAI was dominant in central and western regions. A combined model using the two indices improved the fit significantly (p < 0.05 for at least 64% of the grid cells within the basin, compared to models forced solely with Niño 4 or TNAI. The combined model explained 66% of the observed variance in the northeastern region, 39% in the central and western regions, and 43% for the Amazon basin as a whole with a 3 month lead time between the SST indices and TWSAs. Model performance varied seasonally: it was higher than average during the rainfall wet season in the northeastern Amazon and during the dry season in the central and western regions. The predictive capability of the combined model was degraded with increasing lead times. Degradation was smaller in the northeastern Amazon (where 49% of the variance was explained using an 8 month lead time vs. 69% for a 1 month lead time compared to the central and western Amazon (where 22% of the variance was explained at 8 months vs. 43% at 1 month. These relationships may enable the development of an early warning system for flood and drought risk. This work also

  19. Seasonal and inter-annual variability of sea surface temperature at the east coast fishing area off Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Ridani, S.; Mustapha, M. A.; Lihan, T.; Ku Kassim, K. Y.; Raja Bidin, R. H.

    2015-09-01

    Empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was used to study a time-series of the aqua MODIS data imageries in the exclusive economic zone of east coast off Peninsular Malaysia. Temporal and spatial characteristics were examined to determine the dominant pattern of sea surface temperature (SST) variability from January 2003 to December 2011.The data were analysed from daily Level 1A (1km spatial resolution) to monthly composites Level 3 data using SeaDAS and ERDAS imagine software. Four modes was obtained from the analysis with the highest variance (7.9%) represented by mode 1 which explained the seasonal cycle. Mode 2 (5.11 % of total variance) showed positive and negative peak signal during March and April and in October and November with variability near the Kelantan and Pahang waters that indicated the inter monsoon. Mode 3 (3.8 % of variance) shows variability near the Terengganu, Kelantan and Johor waters to the open sea during July and August and in May and June representing the Southwest monsoon. Mode 4 (3.36 %) showed positive signal during November and December with strong signal near Pahang and Kelantan waters while weak signal was detected near Terengganu and Kelantan's open sea representing the Northeast monsoon. The SST variability was influenced by the monsoonal system which originated by the wind forcing condition that influences circulation in the study area.

  20. Biweekly Sea Surface Temperature over the South China Sea and its association with the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaid, B. H.

    2017-02-01

    The association of the biweekly intraseasonal (BWI) oscillation in the Sea Surface Temperature (SST) over the South China Sea (SCS) and the Western North Pacific Summer Monsoon is authenticated using version 4 the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager data (SST and rain) and heat fluxes from Ocean Atmosphere Flux project data during 1998-2012. The results suggest that the SCS involves ocean-atmosphere coupling on biweekly timescales. The positive biweekly SST anomalies lead the rain anomalies over the SCS by 3 days, with a significant correlation coefficient ( r = 0.6, at 99 % significance levels) between the SST-rain anomalies. It is evident from lead/lag correlation between biweekly SST and zonal wind shear that warm ocean surface induced by wind shear may contribute to a favorable condition of the convective activity over the SCS. The present study suggests that ocean-to-atmospheric processes induced by the BWI oscillation in the SCS SST results in enhanced sea level pressure and surface shortwave radiation flux during the summer monsoon. Besides, it is observed that the SCS BWI oscillation in the changes of SST causes a feedback in the atmosphere by modifying the atmospheric instability. This suggests that the active/break biweekly cycle of the SST over the SCS is related by sea level pressure, surface heat fluxes and atmospheric instability. The potential findings here indicate that the biweekly SST over the SCS play an important role in the eastward and the southward propagation of the biweekly anomalies in the Western North Pacific.

  1. The Sensitivity of African Easterly Waves to Eastern Tropical Atlantic Sea-Surface Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druyan, Leonard M.; Fulakeza, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The results of two regional atmospheric model simulations are compared to assess the influence of the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum on local precipitation, transient easterly waves and the West African summer monsoon. Both model simulations were initialized with reanalysis 2 data (US National Center for Environmental Prediction and Department of Energy) on 15 May 2006 and extended through 6 October 2006, forced by synchronous reanalysis 2 lateral boundary conditions introduced four times daily. One simulation uses 2006 reanalysis 2 sea-surface temperatures, also updated four times daily, while the second simulation considers ocean forcing absent the sea-surface temperature maximum, achieved here by subtracting 3 K at every ocean grid point between 0 and 15 N during the entire simulation. The simulation with 2006 sea-surface temperature forcing produces a realistic distribution of June-September mean precipitation and realistic westward propagating swaths of maximum rainfall, based on validation against Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates. The simulation without the sea-surface temperature maximum produces only 57% of the control June-September total precipitation over the eastern tropical Atlantic and about 83% of the Sahel precipitation. The simulation with warmer ocean temperatures generates generally stronger circulation, which in turn enhances precipitation by increasing moisture convergence. Some local precipitation enhancement is also attributed to lower vertical thermal stability above the warm water. The study shows that the eastern tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature maximum enhances the strength of transient easterly waves and broadens the spatial extent of associated precipitation. However, large-scale circulation and its interaction with the African continent, and not sea-surface temperatures, control the timing and trajectories of the waves.

  2. Sea surface conditions in the southern Nordic Seas during the Holocene based on dinoflagellate cyst assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Nicolas; Baumann, Astrid; Matthiessen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Dinoflagellate cyst (dinocyst) records from the southern Nordic Seas were compiled in order to evaluate the evolution of upper ocean conditions, on a millennial timescale and supported by a highly resolved record from the Vøring Plateau. After the transitional phase from the last deglaciation...

  3. Innovative eco-friendly bio- solvent for combating sea surface and sedimented oil pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorou, Paraskevas

    2017-04-01

    The combating of oil spill at sea surface by chemical dispersants accelerates the evaporation and disperse the oil into the water column, where it is broken down by natural processes and/or is sedimented at the sea bottom, especially at near coastal shallow areas, ports and marinas. The usual methodology for cleaning the sedimented oil from the sea bottom is mainly carried out via excavation and dumping of the polluted sediment into deeper sea areas, where the contamination is transferred from one area to another. The eco-friendly bio-solvent MSL Aqua 250 is an innovative new solution based mainly on natural constituents. The action mechanism and the effectiveness of this eco-friendly solvent is based on the high surface tension process. Organic compounds, including hydrocarbons upon coming in contact with MSL Aqua 250 solvent generate a significant surface tension reaction, which is able to alter the organic compounds to liquid form and then to drastically evaporate it. The use of MSL Aqua 250 solvent, both at sea surface and at the bottom, has the following advantages compared to the dispersants: • Efficient solution without transferring the pollution from sea surface to the water column and to the bottom or disturbing the Aquatic Eco System. • Non-Toxic. • Environmentally friendly with a restoration of marine life in the Eco System. • Cost effective. The MSL Aqua 250 solvent has been tested in cooperation with the Cyprus Department of Fisheries and Marine Research and the Technological University of Cyprus and used during the years 2015 and 2016 in marinas and fishing shelters in Cyprus faced oil pollution, with high concentration in the sea water and at the sea bottom of chemical parameters (BOD5, COD, FOG, TKN, TP, TPH), with excellent results.

  4. Salinity variations of the surface water at the southern coast of the Baltic Sea in years 1950-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girjatowicz, Józef Piotr; Świątek, Małgorzata

    2016-09-01

    This work aims to examine trends in surface water salinity along the southern Baltic Sea coast over the period between 1950 and 2010. Major trends in hydrological and meteorological factors that potentially influenced variations in salinity, and their relationships with salinity are examined as well. The study is based on monthly surface water salinity values from Międzyzdroje, Władysławowo, Hel and Gdynia (1950-2010), monthly atmospheric precipitation totals from Świnoujście, Hel and Gdynia (1951-2010), annual values of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index (1951-2010), monthly number of days with particular atmospheric circulation types over Poland according to Lityński classification (1951-2005), and monthly discharge values for Vistula and Oder rivers (1951-2010). Pearson correlation analysis and linear regression analysis were applied in this study. A decrease in surface water salinity along the southern Baltic Sea coast was observed over the study period, especially pronounced in the eastern part of the coast. Winter salinity trends at Władysławowo, Hel and Gdynia were considerably statistically significant even at α=0.001 level. For the remaining seasons, salinity trends were weaker, but still significant, at least at α=0.05 level. For Międzyzdroje, however, salinity trends are not significant. Even though increasing tendency prevailed over the study period, no statistically significant trends were detected in atmospheric precipitation sums, nor in river discharge. This probably results from a high annual variability in these parameters. An increasing trend in Vistula river discharge was observed in the last decade of the 20th century, i.e. a period of pronounced salinity drop.

  5. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to perturbations in sea surface temperature and sea ice cover: a study with the regional climate model MAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, B.; Fettweis, X.; van de Berg, W. J.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Erpicum, M.

    2014-10-01

    During recent summers (2007-2012), several surface melt records were broken over the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS). The extreme summer melt resulted in part from a persistent negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), favoring warmer atmospheric conditions than normal over the GrIS. Simultaneously, large anomalies in sea ice cover (SIC) and sea surface temperature (SST) were observed in the North Atlantic, suggesting a possible connection. To assess the direct impact of 2007-2012 SIC and SST anomalies on GrIS surface mass balance (SMB), a set of sensitivity experiments was carried out with the regional climate model MAR forced by ERA-Interim. These simulations suggest that perturbations in SST and SIC in the seas surrounding Greenland do not considerably impact GrIS SMB, as a result of the katabatic wind blocking effect. These offshore-directed winds prevent oceanic near-surface air, influenced by SIC and SST anomalies, from penetrating far inland. Therefore, the ice sheet SMB response is restricted to coastal regions, where katabatic winds cease. A topic for further investigation is how anomalies in SIC and SST might have indirectly affected the surface melt by changing the general circulation in the North Atlantic region, hence favoring more frequent warm air advection towards the GrIS.

  6. Reconstructing Variations of Global Sea-Surface Temperature during the Last Interglaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. S.; Clark, P. U.; He, F.; Parnell, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The last interglaciation (LIG; ~130-116 ka) was the most recent period in Earth history with higher-than-present global sea level (≥6 m) under similar-to-preindustrial concentrations of atmospheric CO2, suggesting additional feedbacks related to albedo, insolation, and ocean circulation in generating the apparent climatic differences between the LIG and present Holocene. However, our understanding of how much warmer the LIG sea surface was relative to the present interglaciation remains uncertain, with current estimates suggesting from 0°C to 2°C warmer than late-20thcentury average global temperatures. Moreover, the timing, spatial expression, and amplitude of regional and global sea surface temperature variability related to other climate forcing during the LIG are poorly constrained, largely due to uncertainties in age control and proxy temperature reconstructions. An accurate characterization of global and regional temperature change during the LIG can serve as a benchmark for paleoclimate modeling intercomparison projects and help improve understanding of sea-level sensitivity to temperature change. We will present a global compilation (~100 published records) of sea surface temperature (SST) and other climate reconstructions spanning the LIG. Using a Monte Carlo-enabled cross-correlation maximization algorithm to climatostratigraphically align proxy records and then account for both the resulting chronologic and proxy calibration uncertainties with Bayesian statistical inference, our results quantify the spatial timing, amplitude, and uncertainty in estimates of global and regional sea surface temperature change during the LIG and its relation to potential forcings.

  7. Emissivity of rough sea surface for 8-13 num: modeling and verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X; Smith, W L

    1997-04-20

    The emissivity model for rough sea surface [Remote Sensing Environ. 24, 313-329 (1988)] is inspected in light of the measured surface emissivity. In the presence of moderate wind (5 m/s or less), the emissivity model is found to be adequate for small to moderate view angles. For large view angles, the discrepancy between the computed and the measured emissivity is large, but one can reduce this considerably by incorporating the reflected sea surface emission into the emissivity model. In addition, examination of the spectral variation of the observed and computed emissivity suggests the need for refined measurements of the complex refractive index. An improved model is constructed to calculate the rough sea surface emissivity that can be used to provide accurate estimates of sea surface skin temperatures from remotely sensed radiometric measurements. An important feature of the improved model is that the computed sea surface emissivity is only weakly dependent on wind speed for most view angles used in practice.

  8. Study on Precipitation Anomalies of North of China in April and Its relationship to Sea Surface Temperature Evolvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Y.; Li, Z.; Guan, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Using monthly precipitation data in North of China for 1960-2007, American NCEP/NCAR monthly reanalysis data and NOAA SST (sea surface temperature) data, and SST indices data in Climate System Monitoring Bulletin collected by National Climate Center, this paper studied the general circulation, large-scale weather system anomalous characteristics and SSTA evolvement with more rainfall of North of China in April. The results showed that precipitation differences between months in spring in North of China were quite obvious, and the correlation coefficients between precipitation of North of China in April and that in March and in May were not significant respectively. The linear trend of precipitation in April was out of phase with that in spring. It was meaningful to study precipitation in April solely. The space pattern of first leading mode of EOF analysis for precipitation of North of China in April indicated that rainfall changed synchronously. In years of more rainfall in April showed negative phase of EU pattern in 500hPa geopotential height field of high latitude in the Northern Hemisphere, and North of China located at where cold and warm air masses met, which availed reinforcement of south wind and ascending motion. In middle and high latitudes was latitudinal circulation, and North of China was controlled by warm ridge and latitudinal large-scale front zone; In years of less rainfall, meridional circulation prevailed and large-scale front zone located northward and presented meridional pattern, and North of China was affected by cold air mass. At the same time, water vapor was transported strongly from Pacific, South China Sea and southwest of China, and reached Northeast of China. In years of less rainfall, the water vapor transportation was quite weak. The rainfall was related closely to sea surface temperature anomalies, especially to the Indian Ocean, the middle and east of Pacific, middle and south of Pacific and northwest of Pacific where there were

  9. Modelling surface radioactive spill dispersion in the Alboran Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perianez, R. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada I, E.U. Ingenieria Tecnica Agricola, Universidad de Sevilla. Ctra. Utrera km 1, 41013 Sevilla (Spain)]. E-mail: rperianez@us.es

    2006-07-01

    The Strait of Gibraltar and the Alboran Sea are the only connection between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Intense shipping activities occur in the area, including transport of waste radionuclides and transit of nuclear submarines. Thus, it is relevant to have a dispersion model that can be used in an emergency situation after an accident, to help the decision-making process. Such dispersion model requires an appropriate description of the physical oceanography of the region of interest, with simulations of tides and residual (average) circulation. In this work, a particle-tracking dispersion model that can be used to simulate the dispersion of radionuclides in the system Strait of Gibraltar-Alboran Sea is described. Tides are simulated using a barotropic model and for the average circulation a reduced-gravity model is applied. This model is able to reproduce the main features of the Alboran circulation (the well known Western Alboran Gyre, WAG, and the coastal circulation mode). The dispersion model is run off-line, using previously computed tidal and residual currents. The contamination patch is simulated by a number of particles whose individual paths are computed; diffusion and decay being modelled using a Monte Carlo method. Radionuclide concentrations may be obtained from the density of particles per water volume unit. Results from the hydrodynamic models have been compared with observations in the area. Several examples of dispersion computations under different wind and circulation conditions are presented.

  10. Impacts of Freshwater on the Seasonal Variations of Surface Salinity and Circulation in the Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Author’s personal copy Impacts of freshwater on the seasonal variations of surface salinity and circulation in the Caspian Sea A. Birol Kara a, Alan ...circulation. Izv. Atmos. Ocean. Phys. 44, 236–249. Large, W.G., Danabasoglu, G., Doney, S.C., McWilliams , J.C., 1997. Sensitivity to surface forcing and

  11. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscatter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, R. van; Ainslie, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of sea-surface back-scattering strength are needed for sonar performance modelling. Such predictions are hampered by two problems. First, measurements of surface back-scattering are not available at small grazing angles. These are of special interest to low-frequency active sonar since t

  12. Pliocene pre-glacial North Atlantic: A coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation climate response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishman, S.E.; Dowsett, H.J. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States). National Center)

    1992-01-01

    A latitudinal transect of North Atlantic Deep Sea Drilling Project Holes from the equatorial region to 56 N in the 2,300- to 3,000-meter depth range was designed for a high-resolution study of coupled sea surface and deep ocean response to climate change. Precise age control was provided using magnetostratigraphic and biostratigraphic data from the cores to identify the 4.0 to 2.2 Ma interval, a period of warm-to-cool climatic transitions in the North Atlantic. The objective is to evaluate incremental (10 kyr) changes in sea surface temperatures (SST) and deep North Atlantic circulation patterns between 4.0 and 2.2 Ma to develop a coupled sea surface-deep ocean circulation response model. Sea surface temperature (SST) estimates are based on planktic foraminifer-based factor-analytic transfer functions. Oxygen isotopic data from paired samples provide tests of the estimated temperature gradients between localities. Benthic foraminifer assemblage data and [partial derivative]O-18 and [partial derivative]C-13 Isotopic data are used to quantitatively determine changes in deep North Atlantic circulation. These data are used to determine changes in source area (North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) or Antarctic Bottom Water) and (or) in the components of NADW that were present (Upper or Lower NADW). These paired paleoceanographic sea surface and deep circulation interpretations over a 1.8 my interval form the basis for a coupled sea surface-deep circulation response model for the Pliocene North Atlantic Ocean.

  13. Interannual variability of surface and bottom sediment transport on the Laptev Sea shelf during summer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wegner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Sediment transport dynamics were studied during ice-free conditions under different atmospheric circulation regimes on the Laptev Sea shelf (Siberian Arctic. To study the interannual variability of suspended particulate matter (SPM dynamics and their coupling with the variability in surface river water distribution on the Laptev Sea detailed oceanographic, optical (turbidity and Ocean Color satellite data, and hydrochemical (nutrients, SPM, stable oxygen isotopes process studies were carried out continuously during the summers of 2007 and 2008. Thus, for the first time SPM and nutrient variations on the Laptev Sea shelf under different atmospheric forcing and the implications for the turbidity and transparency of the water column can be presented.

    The data indicate a clear link between different surface distributions of riverine waters and the SPM transport dynamics within the entire water column. The summer of 2007 was dominated by shoreward winds and an eastward transport of riverine surface waters. The surface SPM concentration on the south-eastern inner shelf was elevated, which led to decreased transmissivity and increased light absorption. Surface SPM concentrations in the Central and Northern Laptev Sea were comparatively low. However, the SPM transport and concentration within the bottom nepheloid layer increased considerably on the entire eastern shelf. The summer of 2008 was dominated by offshore-winds and northwards transport of the river plume. The surface SPM transport was enhanced and extended onto the mid-shelf whereas the bottom SPM transport and concentration was diminished. This study suggests that the SPM concentration and transport in both, the surface and bottom nepheloid layers, are associated with the distribution of riverine surface waters which are linked to the atmospheric circulation patterns over the Laptev Sea and the adjacent Arctic Ocean during open water season. A continuing trend toward shoreward winds

  14. Glacial-to-Holocene evolution of sea surface temperature and surface circulation in the subarctic northwest Pacific and the Western Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Vera D.; Max, Lars; Hefter, Jens; Tiedemann, Ralf; Mollenhauer, Gesine

    2016-07-01

    It has been proposed that North Pacific sea surface temperature (SST) evolution was intimately linked to North Atlantic climate oscillations during the last glacial-interglacial transition. However, during the early deglaciation and the Last Glacial Maximum, the SST development in the subarctic northwest Pacific and the Bering Sea is poorly constrained as most existing deglacial SST records are based on alkenone paleothermometry, which is limited prior to 15 ka B.P. in the subarctic North Pacific realm. By applying the TEXL86 temperature proxy we obtain glacial-Holocene-SST records for the marginal northwest Pacific and the Western Bering Sea. Our TEXL86-based records and existing alkenone data suggest that during the past 15.5 ka, SSTs in the northwest Pacific and the Western Bering Sea closely followed millennial-scale climate fluctuations known from Greenland ice cores, indicating rapid atmospheric teleconnections with abrupt climate changes in the North Atlantic. Our SST reconstructions indicate that in the Western Bering Sea SSTs drop significantly during Heinrich Stadial 1 (HS1), similar to the known North Atlantic climate history. In contrast, progressively rising SST in the northwest Pacific is different to the North Atlantic climate development during HS1. Similarities between the northwest Pacific SST and climate records from the Gulf of Alaska point to a stronger influence of Alaskan Stream waters connecting the eastern and western basin of the North Pacific during this time. During the Holocene, dissimilar climate trends point to reduced influence of the Alaskan Stream in the northwest Pacific.

  15. Sea-surface temperature reconstruction from trace elements variations of tropical coralline red algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrenougue, Nicolas; De Deckker, Patrick; Eggins, Stephen; Payri, Claude

    2014-06-01

    We used laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) to obtain high-resolution variations of the Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca composition of free-living forms (i.e. rhodoliths) of the coralline red algal species Sporolithon durum in order to test their potential to archive seawater temperature information. A monitoring experiment was conducted based on alizarin red S (ARS) staining of rhodoliths specimens collected in various locations across a ˜1 km2 rhodolith bed in the vicinity of Nouméa, New Caledonia, where in situ temperature (IST) variations were recorded for 22 months between November 2009 and August 2011. A >45-year comparison of Mg and trace elements with sea-surface temperature (SST) was established from the analysis of 5 different branches belonging to three of the largest (7.4-8.5 cm in diameter) rhodolith specimens observed at the site. Consistent mean Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca concentrations and seasonal patterns are found for the rhodoliths' last living years (2009-2011) across 43 branches and for the full 1963-2008 period across the 5 branches. Average elemental concentrations (Mg/Ca: 0.31 ± 0.04 mol/mol; Sr/Ca: 3.5 ± 0.4 mmol/mol and Li/Ca: 0.08 ± 0.02 mmol/mol) fall within range of those found in the literature. Individual element variations show good reproducibility between records and Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca co-vary systematically. Combined records of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Li/Ca are highly correlated with the IST monthly pattern for the 2009-2011 period (0.82 < r < 0.91; p < 0.001) and with local variations of monthly SST for the 1963-2008 period (0.65 < r < 0.85; p < 0.001), with Mg/Ca systematically being the best fit to monthly seawater temperature variations. Inter-annual Mg/Ca anomalies show significant correlation with the Oceanic Nino Index (ONI), indicating that S. durum rhodoliths also have the capacity to record the regional climate pattern in the tropical Pacific. Finally, consistent variations between the combined Mg

  16. Retrieval of sea surface winds under hurricane conditions from GNSS-R observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Cheng; YANG Xiaofeng; MA Wentao; YU Yang; DONG Di; LI Ziwei; XU Cong

    2016-01-01

    Reflected signals from global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) have been widely acknowledged as an important remote sensing tool for retrieving sea surface wind speeds. The power of GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) signals can be mapped in delay chips and Doppler frequency space to generate delay Doppler power maps (DDMs), whose characteristics are related to sea surface roughness and can be used to retrieve wind speeds. However, the bistatic radar cross section (BRCS), which is strongly related to the sea surface roughness, is extensively used in radar. Therefore, a bistatic radar cross section (BRCS) map with a modified BRCS equation in a GNSS-R application is introduced. On the BRCS map, three observables are proposed to represent the sea surface roughness to establish a relationship with the sea surface wind speed. Airborne Hurricane Dennis (2005) GNSS-R data are then used. More than 16 000 BRCS maps are generated to establish GMFs of the three observables. Finally, the proposed model and classic one-dimensional delay waveform (DW) matching methods are compared, and the proposed model demonstrates a better performance for the high wind speed retrievals.

  17. Impact of Typhoon-induced sea surface cooling on the track of next Typhoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Y.; Horiguchi, M.; Kodera, K.; Tachibana, Y.; Yamazaki, K.

    2015-12-01

    Typhoons (TCs) MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI (2014), which caused Japan catastrophic disaster, landed the western part of Japan. The TCs came to Japan one after another during late July to early August 2014. The tracks of these TCs were similar, i.e., the TCs followed the western edge of the subtropical northwestern Pacific high (SNPH). However, the tracks gradually reached to Japan, which were associated with weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. It was found that the changes in westward expansion of the SNPH were associated with TC-induced sea surface cooling of previous Typhoon. It has previously been reported that TC-induced sea surface cooling is mainly caused by Ekman upwelling and vertical turbulent mixing. The TCs MATMO, HALONG, and NAKRI passed around the Philippines, and induced sea surface cooling of this area. The sea surface temperatures of this area are important for Pacific-Japan pattern, which was associated with the westward expansion of the SNPH. Consequently, previous Typhoon induced sea surface cooling around the Philippines, which weakening the westward expansion of the SNPH. Then, the tracks of next Typhoon were changed, and gradually reached to Japan.

  18. NODC Standard Product: International ocean atlas Volume 12 - Climatic atlas of the North Pacific Seas 2009 (NODC Accession 0098576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas contains monthly climatic charts of temperature, salinity, and oxygen at the sea surface and at standard depth levels for the Bering Sea, Sea of Okhotsk,...

  19. Surfactant-Associated Bacteria in the Sea Surface Microlayer and their Effect on Remote Sensing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, N.; Vella, K.; Tartar, A.; Matt, S.; Shivji, M.; Perrie, W. A.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic aperture radar remote sensing captures various fine-scale features on the ocean surface such as coastal discharges, oil pollution, vessel traffic, algal blooms and sea slicks. Although numerous factors potentially affect the synthetic aperture radar imaging process, the influence of biogenic and anthropogenic surfactants has been suggested as one of the primary parameters, especially under relatively low wind conditions. Surfactants have a tendency to dampen the short gravity-capillary ocean waves causing the sea surface to smoothen, thus allowing the radar to detect areas of surfactants. Surfactants are found in sea slicks, which are the accumulation of organic material shaped as elongated bands on the ocean's surface. Sea slicks are often observable with the naked eye due to their glassy appearance and can also be seen on synthetic aperture radar images as dark scars. While the sources of surfactants can vary, some are known to be of marine bacteria origin. Countless numbers of marine bacteria are present in the oceanic environment, and their biogeochemical contributions cannot be overlooked. Not only does marine-bacteria produce surfactants, but they also play an important role in the transformation of surfactants. In this study, we profiled the surfactant-associated bacteria composition within the biogenic thin layer of the ocean surface more commonly referred as the sea surface microlayer. Bacterial samples were collected from the sea surface microlayer for comparative analysis from both within and outside of sea slick areas as well as the underlying subsurface water. The bacterial microlayer sampling coincided with synthetic aperture radar satellite, RADARSAT-2, overpasses to demonstrate the simultaneous in-situ measurements during a satellite image capture. The sea surface microlayer sampling method was designed to enable aseptic bacterial sampling. A 47 mm polycarbonate membrane was utilized at each sampling site to obtain a snapshot of the

  20. Variations in sea surface roughness induced by the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman tsunami

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Godin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of tsunamis away from shore are critically important for improving early warning systems and understanding of tsunami generation and propagation. Tsunamis are difficult to detect and measure in the open ocean because the wave amplitude there is much smaller than it is close to shore. Currently, tsunami observations in deep water rely on measurements of variations in the sea surface height or bottom pressure. Here we demonstrate that there exists a different observable, specifically, ocean surface roughness, which can be used to reveal tsunamis away from shore. The first detailed measurements of the tsunami effect on sea surface height and radar backscattering strength in the open ocean were obtained from satellite altimeters during passage of the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman tsunami. Through statistical analyses of satellite altimeter observations, we show that the Sumatra-Andaman tsunami effected distinct, detectable changes in sea surface roughness. The magnitude and spatial structure of the observed variations in radar backscattering strength are consistent with hydrodynamic models predicting variations in the near-surface wind across the tsunami wave front. Tsunami-induced changes in sea surface roughness can be potentially used for early tsunami detection by orbiting microwave radars and radiometers, which have broad surface coverage across the satellite ground track.

  1. A GIS Approach to Wind,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkhalili, Seyedhamzeh

    2016-07-01

    Chlorophyll is an extremely important bio-molecule, critical in photosynthesis, which allows plants to absorb energy from light. At the base of the ocean food web are single-celled algae and other plant-like organisms known as Phytoplankton. Like plants on land, Phytoplankton use chlorophyll and other light-harvesting pigments to carry out photosynthesis. Where Phytoplankton grow depends on available sunlight, temperature, and nutrient levels. In this research a GIS Approach using ARCGIS software and QuikSCAT satellite data was applied to visualize WIND,SST(Sea Surface Temperature) and CHL(Chlorophyll) variations in the Caspian Sea.Results indicate that increase in chlorophyll concentration in coastal areas is primarily driven by terrestrial nutrients and does not imply that warmer SST will lead to an increase in chlorophyll concentration and consequently Phytoplankton abundance.

  2. A Primary Study of Interaction Between Monsoon and Sea Surface Temperature in the Neighborhood Sea Area in South Aisa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lihong; ZHENG Zuguang; XIA Youlong; WU Hong

    2005-01-01

    Using a coupled ocean-atmosphere model simplified, and the low spectrum method and the equilibria theory, we discussed the interaction of South Asian winter and summer monsoons with sea surface temperature(SST) seasonal variation in the neighbor sea area. The results indicate that, when the winter monsoon is strong, the winter SST is low, and the SST will also be low next summer;and vice versa. When the summer monsoon is strong, the summer SST is high;and vice versa. It is inconspicuous for SST in winter that summer monsoon is strong or weak. Ocean-atmosphere interaction reinforces winter and summer monsoons,while meridional SST gradient reinforces winter monsoon and weakens summer monsoon.

  3. Microwat : a new Earth Explorer mission proposal to measure the Sea surface Temperature and the Sea Ice Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Catherine; Aires, Filipe; Heygster, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Ocean surface characterization from satellites is required to understand, monitor and predict the general circulation of the ocean and atmosphere. With more than 70% global cloud coverage at any time, visible and infrared satellite observations only provide limited information. The polar regions are particularly vulnerable to the climate changes and are home to complex mesoscale mechanisms that are still poorly understood. They are also under very persis- tent cloudiness. Passive microwave observations can provide surface information such as Sea Surface Temperature (SST) and Sea Ice Concentration (SIC) regardless of the cloud cover, but up to now they were limited in spatial resolution. Here, we propose a passive microwave conically scanning imager, MICROWAT, in a polar orbit, for the retrieval of the SST and SIC, with a spatial resolution of 15km. It observes at 6 and 10GHz, with low-noise dual polarization receivers, and a foldable mesh antenna of 5m-diameter. Furthermore, MICROWAT will fly in tandem with MetOp-SG B to benefit from the synergy with scatterometers (SCA) and microwave imagers (MWI). MICROWAT will provide global SST estimates, twice daily, regardless of cloud cover, with an accuracy of 0.3K and a spatial resolution of 15km. The SIC will be derived with an accuracy of 3%. With its unprecedented "all weather" accurate SST and SIC at 15km, MICROWAT will provide the atmospheric and oceanic forecasting sys- tems with products compatible with their increasing spatial resolution and complexity, with impact for societal applications. It will also answer fundamental science questions related to the ocean, the atmosphere and their interactions. * Prigent, Aires, Bernardo, Orlhac, Goutoule, Roquet, & Donlon, Analysis of the potential and limitations of microwave radiometry for the retrieval of sea surface temperature: Definition

  4. A new method to retrieve salinity profiles from sea surface salinity observed by SMOS satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tingting; CHEN Zhongbiao; HE Yijun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to retrieve salinity profiles from the sea surface salinity (SSS) observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The main vertical patterns of the salinity profiles are firstly extracted from the salinity profiles measured by Argo using the empirical orthogonal function. To determine the time coefficients for each vertical pattern, two statistical models are developed. In the linear model, a transfer function is proposed to relate the SSS observed by SMOS (SMOS_SSS) with that measured by Argo, and then a linear relationship between the SMOS_SSS and the time coefficient is established. In the nonlinear model, the neural network is utilized to estimate the time coefficients from SMOS_SSS, months and positions of the salinity profiles. The two models are validated by comparing the salinity profiles retrieved from SMOS with those measured by Argo and the climatological salinities. The root-mean-square error (RMSE) of the linear and nonlinear model are 0.08–0.16 and 0.08–0.14 for the upper 400 m, which are 0.01–0.07 and 0.01–0.09 smaller than the RMSE of climatology. The error sources of the method are also discussed.

  5. Correlations of global sea surface temperatures with the solar wind speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Limin; Tinsley, Brian; Chu, Huimin; Xiao, Ziniu

    2016-11-01

    A significant correlation between the solar wind speed (SWS) and sea surface temperature (SST) in the region of the North Atlantic Ocean has been found for the Northern Hemisphere winter from 1963 to 2010, based on 3-month seasonal averages. The correlation is dependent on Bz (the interplanetary magnetic field component parallel to the Earth's magnetic dipole) as well as the SWS, and somewhat stronger in the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) west phase than in the east phase. The correlations with the SWS are stronger than those with the F10.7 parameter representing solar UV inputs to the stratosphere. SST responds to changes in tropospheric dynamics via wind stress, and to changes in cloud cover affecting the radiative balance. Suggested mechanisms for the solar influence on SST include changes in atmospheric ionization and cloud microphysics affecting cloud cover, storm invigoration, and tropospheric dynamics. Such changes modify upward wave propagation to the stratosphere, affecting the dynamics of the polar vortex. Also, direct solar inputs, including energetic particles and solar UV, produce stratospheric dynamical changes. Downward propagation of stratospheric dynamical changes eventually further perturbs tropospheric dynamics and SST.

  6. Interannual Variability of Sea Surface Temperature in the Northern Indian Ocean Associated with ENSO and IOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-Ling; DU Yan; ZHANG Yu-Hong; ZHENG Xiao-Tong

    2012-01-01

    The Northern Indian Ocean (NIO) sea surface temperature (SST) warming, associated with the E1 Nifio/Southern Oscillations (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) mode, is investigated using the International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) monthly data for the period 1979-2010. Statistical analy- ses are used to identify respective contribution from ENSO and IOD. The results indicate that the first NIO SST warming in September-November is associated with an IOD event, while the second NIO SST warming in spring-summer following the mature phase of ENSO is associated with an ENSO event. In the year that IOD co-occurred with ENSO, NIO SST warms twice, rising in the ENSO developing year and decay year. Both short- wave radiation and latent heat flux contribute to the NIO SST variation. The change in shortwave radiation is due to the change in cloudiness. A cloud-SST feedback plays an important role in NIO SST warming. The latent heat flux is related to the change in monsoonal wind. In the first NIO warming, the SST anomaly is mainly due to the change in the latent heat flux. In the second NIO warming, both factors are important.

  7. Coupled Modes of Rainfall over China and the Pacific Sea Surface Temperature in Boreal Summertime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chun; MA Hao

    2011-01-01

    In this study,monthly NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data and NOAA ERSST as well as observed precipitation data from 160 stations in China were used to investigate coupled modes affecting the rainfall over China and sea surface temperature (SST) in the Pacific during boreal summertime based on singular value decomposition (SVD) method.The SVD analysis revealed three remarkable coupled modes:rainfall over North China associated with an ENSO-like SST pattern (ENSO NC),rainfall over the Yangtze River valley associated with SST anomalies in the western tropical Pacific (WTP-YRV),and rainfall over the Ycllow River loop valley associated with tropical Pacific meridional mode-like SST pattern (TPMM-YRLV).These coupled SVD modes appear robust and closely correlated with the single field,Furthermore,the covariabilities among of the three coupled modes have different characteristics at the decadal time scale.In addition,the possible atmospheric teleconnections of the coupled rainfall and SST modes were discussed.For the ENSO-NC mode,anomalous low-pressure and high-pressure over the Asian continent induces moisture divergence over North China and reduces summer rainfall there.For the WTP-YRV mode,East Asia-Pacific teleconnection induces moisture convergence over the Yangtze River valley and enhances the summer rainfall there.The TPMM SST and the summer rainfall anomalies over the YRVL are linked by a circumglobal,wave-train-like,atmospheric teleconnection.

  8. Assessment Of Sea Surface Salinity Obtain From SMOS And Aquarius Satellites Over Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calla, O. P. N.; Dadhich, Harendra Kumar; Singhal, Shruti

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, assessment is done of Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) obtained from both SMOS and Aquarius satellites for couple of months over Indian Ocean (IO). The SSS values of the Southern Indian Ocean (SIO) are being investigated as the North Indian Ocean (NIO) is found much corrupted with the Radio Frequency Interference and even due to large variability of SSS in IO; the study area has been divided into different sub regions. The data of both the satellites at same location and of same processing level that is Level-2 have been procured and evaluated. The resolution factor is also being taken care for both onboard sensors. The resolution of SMOS L2 data products [1] is 15 X 15 Km and for Aquarius there are three different resolutions according to the BEAM's. BEAM 1 has a resolution of 76 X 94 Km, BEAM 2 has 84X120Km and BEAM3 has 96X156Km. The data have been averaged of SMOS [2] in the same way so as to match up with Aquarius resolution. By this paper we want to convince the readers that measuring SSS from space is a practical idea. SSS remote sensing now bears no more scientific perils than other remote sensing techniques did in their formative years. Advancing technology with proper resources has significantly reduced the errors.

  9. Sea-surface temperature and salinity mapping from remote microwave radiometric measurements of brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans-Juergen, C. B.; Kendall, B. M.; Fedors, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A technique to measure remotely sea surface temperature and salinity was demonstrated with a dual frequency microwave radiometer system. Accuracies in temperature of 1 C and in salinity of part thousand for salinity greater than 5 parts per thousand were attained after correcting for the influence of extraterrestrial background radiation, atmospheric radiation and attenuation, sea-surface roughness, and antenna beamwidth. The radiometers, operating at 1.43 and 2.65 GHz, comprise a third-generation system using null balancing and feedback noise injection. Flight measurements from an aircraft at an altitude of 1.4 km over the lower Chesapeake Bay and coastal areas of the Atlantic Ocean resulted in contour maps of sea-surface temperature and salinity with a spatial resolution of 0.5 km.

  10. The effect of wind-generated bubbles on sea-surface backscatter

    OpenAIRE

    Vossen, R.; Ainslie, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    Predictions of sea-surface back-scattering strength are needed for sonar performance modelling. Such predictions are hampered by two problems. First, measurements of surface back-scattering are not available at small grazing angles. These are of special interest to low-frequency active sonar since they mainly contribute to long range propagation. Second, existing theoretical models based on a bubble-free interface underestimate the surface back-scattering strength at larger grazing angles. We...

  11. EUMETSAT and OSI-SAF Sea Surface Temperature: Recent results and future developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Anne; Le Borgne, Pierre

    2014-05-01

    The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) delivers operational weather and climate-related satellite data, images and products throughout all day and year. EUMETSAT also has commitments to operational oceanography and atmospheric composition monitoring. Activities over the next twenty years include the continuation of the Mandatory Programmes (MSG, EPS) and future (MTG, EPS-SG), which all include ocean observations of Sea Surface Temperature. The EUMETSAT Ocean and Sea-ice (OSI) Satellite Application Facility (SAF) is lead by Meteo-France with a consortium of institutes from EUMETSAT member states, and provides reliable and timely operational services related to meteorology, oceanography and the marine environment. The OSI-SAF delivers level-2 Sea Surface Temperature products in GHRSST format from a range of EUMETSAT data including Metop AVHRR, IASI; and SEVIRI. EUMETSAT is participating in Copernicus Sentinel-3 in partnership with ESA, where EUMETSAT will operate the satellite and will serve the marine user community. The operational Sea Surface Temperature product delivered by EUMETSAT for Sentinel-3 SLSTR will be in GHRSST L2P format. On-going work towards access to relevant data from third-parties with the preparation of agreements with ISRO, SOA and JAXA, will give EUMETSAT access to an enhanced ocean products catalogue. The presentation will give an overview of activities relating to Sea Surface Temperature at EUMETSAT and the OSI-SAF, and their support to GHRSST, focusing on recent results and future developments.

  12. The impact of sea surface currents in wave power potential modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Kallos, George; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Kalogeri, Christina; Liakatas, Aristotelis; Stylianou, Stavros

    2015-11-01

    The impact of sea surface currents to the estimation and modeling of wave energy potential over an area of increased economic interest, the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, is investigated in this work. High-resolution atmospheric, wave, and circulation models, the latter downscaled from the regional Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS) of the Copernicus marine service (former MyOcean regional MFS system), are utilized towards this goal. The modeled data are analyzed by means of a variety of statistical tools measuring the potential changes not only in the main wave characteristics, but also in the general distribution of the wave energy and the wave parameters that mainly affect it, when using sea surface currents as a forcing to the wave models. The obtained results prove that the impact of the sea surface currents is quite significant in wave energy-related modeling, as well as temporally and spatially dependent. These facts are revealing the necessity of the utilization of the sea surface currents characteristics in renewable energy studies in conjunction with their meteo-ocean forecasting counterparts.

  13. Phytoplankton assemblages and lipid biomarkers indicate sea-surface warming and sea-ice decline in the Ross Sea during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Julian D.; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Peterse, Francien; Barcena, Maria A.; Albertazzi, Sonia; Asioli, Alessandra; Giglio, Federico; Langone, Leonardo; Tateo, Fabio; Trincardi, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    The Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e (~ 125 - 119 kyrs BP), the last interglacial period before the present, is believed to have been globally warmer (~ 2°C) than today. Studying this time interval might therefore provide insights into near future climate state given the ongoing climate change and global temperature increase. Of particular interest are the expected changes in polar ice cover. One important aspect of the cryosphere is sea-ice, which influences albedo, deep and surface water currents, and phytoplankton production, and thus affects the global climate system. To investigate whether changes in sea-ice cover occurred in the Southern Ocean close to Antarctica during Marine Isotope sub-Stage 5e dinoflagellate and diatom assemblages have been analyzed in core AS05-10, drilled in the continental slope off the Drygalski basin (Ross Sea) at a water depth of 2377 m. The core was drilled within the frame of the PNRA 2009/A2.01 project, an Italian project with a multidisciplinary approach, and covers the interval from Present to Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 7. The core stratigraphy is based on diatom bioevents and on the climate cyclicity provided by the variations of the diatom assemblages. For this study we focused on the interval from MIS7 to MIS5. A strong reduction of sea-ice-loving diatom taxa with respect to open water-loving diatom taxa is observed during MIS5. In general the production of phytoplankton increases at the base of MIS5 and then slowly decreases. Dinoflagellate cysts, particularly heterotrophic species, are abundant during MIS5e only. The sea surface temperature reconstruction based on the TEX86L, a proxy based on lipid biomarkers produced by Thaumarcheota, shows a 4°C temperature increase from MIS6 to MIS5e. A slightly smaller temperature increase is observed at the onset of MIS7, but this stage is barren of heterotrophic dinoflagellates. All proxies together seem to indicate that the retreat of the summer sea-ice in the Ross Sea during MIS5e was

  14. Sea surface height determination in the arctic ocean from Cryosat2 SAR data, the impact of using different empirical retrackers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Maulik; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Stenseng, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Cryosat2 Level 1B SAR data can be processed using different empirical retrackers to determine the sea surface height and its variations in the Arctic Ocean. Two improved retrackers based on the combination of OCOG (Offset Centre of Gravity), Threshold methods and Leading Edge Retrieval is used...... to estimate the sea surface height in the Arctic Region. This sea surface height determination is to be compared with the Level2 sea surface height components available in the Cryosat2 data. Further a comparison is done with the marine gravity field for retracker performance evaluation....

  15. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South...in mathematical methods for detecting key Lagrangian transport structures in velocity field data sets for spatially complex, time- dependent, ocean...surface flows. Such transport structures are typically not inherently obvious in snapshots of the Eulerian velocity field and require analysis

  16. Temporal and spatial characteristics of sea surface height variability in the North Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cromwell

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spatial and temporal variability of sea surface height (SSH in the North Atlantic basin using satellite altimeter data from October 1992–January 2004. Our primary aim is to provide a detailed description of such variability, including that associated with propagating signals. We also investigate possible correlations between SSH variability and atmospheric pressure changes as represented by climate indices. We first investigate interannual SSH variations by deriving the complex empirical orthogonal functions (CEOFs of altimeter data lowpass-filtered at 18 months. We determine the spatial structure of the leading four modes (both in amplitude and phase and also the associated principal component (PC time series. Using wavelet analysis we derive the time-varying spectral density of the PCs, revealing when particular modes were strongest between 1992–2004. The spatial pattern of the leading CEOF, comprising 30% of the total variability, displays a 5-year periodicity in phase; signal propagation is particularly marked in the Labrador Sea. The second mode, with a dominant 3-year signal, has strong variability in the eastern basin. Secondly, we focus on the Azores subtropical frontal zone. The leading mode (35% is strong in the south and east of this region with strong variations at 3- and 5-year periods. The second mode (21% has a near-zonal band of low variance between  22°–27° N, sandwiched between two regions of high variance. Thirdly, we lowpass filter the altimeter data at a cutoff of 30 days, instead of 18 months, in order to retain signals associated with propagating baroclinic Rossby waves and/or eddies. The leading mode is the annual steric signal, around 46% of the SSH variability. The third and fourth CEOFs,  11% of the remaining variability, are associated with westward propagation which is particularly dominant in a "waveband" between 32°–36° N. For all three cases considered above, no significant cross

  17. Comparative Analysis of Sea Surface Temperature Pattern in the Eastern and Western Gulfs of Arabian Sea and the Red Sea in Recent Past Using Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Nandkeolyar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With unprecedented rate of development in the countries surrounding the gulfs of the Arabian Sea, there has been a rapid warming of these gulfs. In this regard, using Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR data from 1985 to 2009, a climatological study of Sea Surface Temperature (SST and its inter annual variability in the Persian Gulf (PG, Gulf of Oman (GO, Gulf of Aden (GA, Gulf of Kutch (KTCH, Gulf of Khambhat (KMBT, and Red Sea (RS was carried out using the normalized SST anomaly index. KTCH, KMBT, and GA pursued the typical Arabian Sea basin bimodal SST pattern, whereas PG, GO, and RS followed unimodal SST curve. In the western gulfs and RS, from 1985 to 1991-1992, cooling was observed followed by rapid warming phase from 1993 onwards, whereas in the eastern gulfs, the phase of sharp rise of SST was observed from 1995 onwards. Strong influence of the El Niño and La Niña and the Indian Ocean Dipole on interannual variability of SST of gulfs was observed. Annual and seasonal increase of SST was lower in the eastern gulfs than the western gulfs. RS showed the highest annual increase of normalized SST anomaly (+0.64/decade followed by PG (+0.4/decade.

  18. Analyzing the Effects of Climate Change on Sea Surface Temperature in Monitoring Coral Reef Health in the Florida Keys Using Sea Surface Temperature Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jason; Burbank, Renane; Billiot, Amanda; Schultz, Logan

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses use of 4 kilometer satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) data to monitor and assess coral reef areas of the Florida Keys. There are growing concerns about the impacts of climate change on coral reef systems throughout the world. Satellite remote sensing technology is being used for monitoring coral reef areas with the goal of understanding the climatic and oceanic changes that can lead to coral bleaching events. Elevated SST is a well-documented cause of coral bleaching events. Some coral monitoring studies have used 50 km data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) to study the relationships of sea surface temperature anomalies to bleaching events. In partnership with NOAA's Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the University of South Florida's Institute for Marine Remote Sensing, this project utilized higher resolution SST data from the Terra's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and AVHRR. SST data for 2000-2010 was employed to compute sea surface temperature anomalies within the study area. The 4 km SST anomaly products enabled visualization of SST levels for known coral bleaching events from 2000-2010.

  19. Forward scattering from the sea surface and the van Cittert-Zernike theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Peter H

    2004-02-01

    The van Cittert-Zernike theorem is used to generate models for the spatial coherence of a sound field that has been forward scattered from the sea surface. The theorem relates the spatial coherence of an observed wave field to the distant source intensity distribution associated with this field. In this case, the sea surface upon ensonification is taken to be the source, and the sea-surface bistatic cross section corrected for transmission loss is taken as a surrogate for the source intensity distribution. Improvements in methodology for generating an estimate of the 2D autocorrelation function for sea surface waveheight variation, necessary to compute the bistatic cross section, are documented in the Appendix. Upon invoking certain approximations, simple expressions for the characteristic length scales of vertical, horizontal, and horizontal-longitudinal coherence, are derived from the theorem. The three coherence length scales identify a coherence volume for the spatial coherence of a sound field arriving via the surface bounce channel. Models for spatial coherence derived from the van Cittert-Zernike theorem without these approximations compare reasonably well with measurements of complex vertical coherence made at 8 kHz and 20 kHz in the East China Sea as part of the 2001 ASIAEX field program. In terms of the ASIAEX field geometries and sea-surface conditions, at frequency of 20 kHz the coherence volume is a vertical layer 0.5 m thick by 3 m in each of the two horizontal dimensions; at 8 kHz these dimensions increase by a factor of 2.5, representing the ratio of the two frequencies.

  20. How much global burned area can be forecast on seasonal time scales using sea surface temperatures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Morton, Douglas C.; Andela, Niels; Giglio, Louis; Randerson, James T.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale sea surface temperature (SST) patterns influence the interannual variability of burned area in many regions by means of climate controls on fuel continuity, amount, and moisture content. Some of the variability in burned area is predictable on seasonal timescales because fuel characteristics respond to the cumulative effects of climate prior to the onset of the fire season. Here we systematically evaluated the degree to which annual burned area from the Global Fire Emissions Database version 4 with small fires (GFED4s) can be predicted using SSTs from 14 different ocean regions. We found that about 48% of global burned area can be forecast with a correlation coefficient that is significant at a p climate index (OCI) 3 or more months prior to the month of peak burning. Continental regions where burned area had a higher degree of predictability included equatorial Asia, where 92% of the burned area exceeded the correlation threshold, and Central America, where 86% of the burned area exceeded this threshold. Pacific Ocean indices describing the El Niño-Southern Oscillation were more important than indices from other ocean basins, accounting for about 1/3 of the total predictable global burned area. A model that combined two indices from different oceans considerably improved model performance, suggesting that fires in many regions respond to forcing from more than one ocean basin. Using OCI—burned area relationships and a clustering algorithm, we identified 12 hotspot regions in which fires had a consistent response to SST patterns. Annual burned area in these regions can be predicted with moderate confidence levels, suggesting operational forecasts may be possible with the aim of improving ecosystem management.

  1. CALYPSO: a new HF RADAR network to monitor sea surface currents in the Malta-Sicily channel (Mediterranean sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosoli, S.; Ciraolo, G.; Drago, A.; Capodici, F.; Maltese, A.; Gauci, A.; Galea, A.; Azzopardi, J.; Buscaino, G.; Raffa, F.; Mazzola, S.; Sinatra, R.

    2016-12-01

    Located in one of the main shipping lanes in the Mediterranean Sea, and in a strategic region for oil extraction platforms, the Malta-Sicily channel is exposed to significant oil spill risks. Shipping and extraction activities constitute a major threat for marine areas of relevant ecological value in the area, and impacts of oil spills on the local ecosystems and the economic activities, including tourism and fisheries, can be dramatic. Damages would be even more devastating for the Maltese archipelago, where marine resources represent important economic assets. Additionally, North Africa coastal areas are also under threat, due to their proximity to the Malta-Sicily Channel. Prevention and mitigation measures, together with rapid-response and decision-making in case of emergency situations, are fundamental steps that help accomplishing the tasks of minimizing risks and reducing impacts to the various compartments. Thanks to state-of-art technology for the monitoring of sea-surface currents in real-time under all sea-state conditions, the CALYPSO network of High-Frequency Radars represents an essential and invaluable tool for the specific purpose. HF radars technology provide a unique tool to track surface currents in near-real time, and as such the dispersion of pollutants can be monitored and forecasted and their origin backtracked, for instance through data assimilation into ocean circulation models or through short-term data-driven statistical forecasts of ocean currents. The network is constituted of four SeaSonde systems that work in the 13.5MHz frequency band. The network is operative since August 2012 and has been extensively validated using a variety of independent platforms and devices, including current meter data and drifting buoys. The latter provided clear evidences of the reliability of the collected data as for tracking the drifting objects. Additionally, data have provided a new insight into the oceanographic characteristics of the region

  2. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K.; Jakuba, Michael V.; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L.; McFarland, Christopher J.; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R.

    2015-09-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000 m2), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  3. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, C.; Arndt, S.; Nicolaus, M.; Perovich, D. K.; Jakuba, M.; Suman, S.; Elliott, S.; Whitcomb, L. L.; McFarland, C.; Gerdes, R.; Boetius, A.

    2015-12-01

    The changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover observed over the last decades severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role in the amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to undertake challenging research at the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance onboard the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely-piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three-dimensional under-ice topography and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties during summer on the spatial variability of light transmittance. Results show that surface properties dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (<1000m²), while sea ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we suggest an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  4. The surface circulation in the eastern basin of the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, N.; Millot, C.; Taupier-Letage, I.

    2003-04-01

    "Cilician Current" and the "Asia Minor Current", which clearly appear to be the continuity of the overall alongslope flow, meander and generate eddies of medium size. Then, this current can either flow into the Aegean, especially in winter, or soutwestwards, up to feeding Ierapetra. North of Crete, most eddies propagate eastwards. In the northern Ionian, the surface flow towards the Adriatic displays a marked seasonal variability, being especially intense in winter. In the Adriatic, it clearly surrounds the dense water formation zone in winter. The analysis of all monthly composites available since 1985 confirms that an alongslope and anticlockwise schema also applies to the late eighties - early nineties at least. In addition, all the features evidenced with in situ data during the various POEM campaigns can be seen with the infrared imagery. It is thus concluded that the POEM-schema results from a misinterpretation of the observed features. Although mainly descriptive, our detailed analysis of infrared images of the whole eastern basin of the Mediterranean Sea allows proposing an alternative realistic schema of the surface circulation there. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Najwa Hamad receives support for her PhD from the High Institute of Marine Research / University of Tishreen / Syria. Assef Abbas, Jean-Luc Fuda and Gilles Rougier are warmly acknowledged for their help. We used satellite infrared images from the German remote sensing centre (DLR/DFD, about 1 km, daily, weekly and monthly composites from March 1993-present: http://eoweb.dlr.de), from the SATMOS (agreement INSU/METEO-FRANCE, about 1 km, individual paths, October 2001-present), and from the PODAAC Pathfinder Archive (about 9km, daily, 8-day and monthly composites from about January 1985-present: http://podaac.jpl.nasa.gov/sst/). We also benefited from a catalogue of images kindly provided by Alex Lascaratos and from XBT data collected during MFSPP (http://www.santateresa.enea.it/www/ec/new/mfs2.htm). REFERENCES Le

  5. Flux measurements in the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer over the Aegean Sea, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostopoulos, V E; Helmis, C G

    2014-10-01

    Micro-meteorological measurements within the surface Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer took place at the shoreline of two islands at northern and south-eastern Aegean Sea of Greece. The primary goal of these experimental campaigns was to study the momentum, heat and humidity fluxes over this part of the north-eastern Mediterranean Sea, characterized by limited spatial and temporal scales which could affect these exchanges at the air-sea interface. The great majority of the obtained records from both sites gave higher values up to factor of two, compared with the estimations from the most widely used parametric formulas that came mostly from measurements over open seas and oceans. Friction velocity values from both campaigns varied within the same range and presented strong correlation with the wind speed at 10 m height while the calculated drag coefficient values at the same height for both sites were found to be constant in relation with the wind speed. Using eddy correlation analysis, the heat flux values were calculated (virtual heat fluxes varied from -60 to 40 W/m(2)) and it was found that they are affected by the limited spatial and temporal scales of the responding air-sea interaction mechanism. Similarly, the humidity fluxes appeared to be strongly influenced by the observed intense spatial heterogeneity of the sea surface temperature.

  6. Freely decaying weak turbulence for sea surface gravity waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, M; Osborne, A R; Serio, M; Resio, D; Pushkarev, A; Zakharov, V E; Brandini, C

    2002-09-30

    We study the long-time evolution of deep-water ocean surface waves in order to better understand the behavior of the nonlinear interaction processes that need to be accurately predicted in numerical models of wind-generated ocean surface waves. Of particular interest are those nonlinear interactions which are predicted by weak turbulence theory to result in a wave energy spectrum of the form of [k](-2.5). We numerically implement the primitive Euler equations for surface waves and demonstrate agreement between weak turbulence theory and the numerical results.

  7. The Last Interglacial Labrador Sea: A Pervasive Millennial Oscillation In Surface Water Conditions Without Labrador Sea Water Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaire-Marcel, C.; de Vernal, A.

    A multi-proxy approach was developed to document secular to millenial changes of potential density in surface, mesopelagic, and bottom waters of the Labrador Sea, thus allowing to reconstruct situations when winter convection with intermediate or deep water formation occurred in the basin. This approach relies on dinocyst-transfer functions providing estimates of sea-surface temperature and salinity that are used to calibrate past-relationships between oxygen 18 contents in calcite and potential density gradients. The oxygen isotope compositions of epipelagic (Globigerina bul- loides), deeper-dwelling (Neogloboquadrina pachyderma, left coiling), and benthic (Uvigerina peregrina and Cibicides wuellerstorfi) foraminifera, then allow to extrap- olate density gradients between the corresponding water layers. This approach has been tested in surface sediments in reference to modern hydrographic conditions at several sites from the NW North Atlantic, then used to reconstruct past conditions from high resolution studies of cores raised from the southern Greenland Rise (off Cape Farewell). Results indicate that the modern-like regime established during the early Holocene and full developed after 7 ka only. It is marked by weak density gradi- ents between the surface and intermediate water masses, allowing winter convection down to a lower pycnocline between intermediate and deep-water masses, thus the formation of intermediate Labrador Sea Water (LSW). Contrasting with the middle to late Holocene situation, since the last interglacial and throughout the last climatic cycle, a single and dense water mass seems to have occupied the water column below a generally low-density surface water layer, thus preventing deep convection. There- fore, the production of LSW seems to be feature specific to the present interglacial interval that could soon cease to exist, due to global warming, as suggested by recent ocean model experiments and by the fact that it never occurred during the

  8. On the persistence and coherence of subpolar sea surface temperature and salinity anomalies associated with the Atlantic multidecadal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong

    2017-08-01

    This study identifies key features associated with the Atlantic multidecadal variability (AMV) in both observations and a fully coupled climate model, e.g., decadal persistence of monthly mean subpolar North Atlantic (NA) sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) anomalies, and high coherence at low frequency among subpolar NA SST/SSS, upper ocean heat/salt content, and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) fingerprint. These key AMV features, which can be used to distinguish the AMV mechanism, cannot be explained by the slab ocean model results or the red noise process but are consistent with the ocean dynamics mechanism. This study also shows that at low frequency, the correlation and regression between net surface heat flux and SST anomalies are key indicators of the relative roles of oceanic versus atmospheric forcing in SST anomalies. The oceanic forcing plays a dominant role in the subpolar NA SST anomalies associated with the AMV.

  9. Succession of the sea-surface microlayer in the Baltic Sea under natural and experimentally induced low-wind conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stolle

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The sea-surface microlayer (SML is located within the boundary between the atmosphere and hydrosphere. The high spatial and temporal variability of the SML's properties, however, have hindered a clear understanding of interactions between biotic and abiotic parameters at or across the air-water interface. Among the factors changing the physical and chemical environment of the SML, wind speed is an important one. In order to examine the temporal effects of minimized wind influence, SML samples were obtained from the southern Baltic Sea and from mesocosm experiments in a marina to study naturally and artificially calmed sea surfaces. Organic matter concentrations as well as abundance, 3H-thymidine incorporation, and the community composition of bacteria in the SML (bacterioneuston compared to the underlying bulk water (ULW were analyzed. In all SML samples, dissolved organic carbon and nitrogen were only slightly enriched and showed low temporal variability, whereas particulate organic carbon and nitrogen were generally greatly enriched and highly variable. This was especially pronounced in a dense surface film (slick that developed during calm weather conditions as well as in the artificially calmed mesocosms. Overall, bacterioneuston abundance and productivity correlated with changing concentrations of particulate organic matter. Moreover, changes in the community composition in the field study were stronger in the particle-attached than in the non-attached bacterioneuston. This implies that decreasing wind enhances the importance of particle-attached assemblages and finally induces a succession of the bacterial community in the SML. Eventually, under very calm meteorological conditions, there is an uncoupling of the bacterioneuston from the ULW.

  10. Sea surface freshwater flux estimates from GECCO, HOAPS and NCEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, V.; Köhl, A.; Stammer, D.; Klepp, C.; Andersson, A.; Bakan, S.

    2010-08-01

    Surface net freshwater flux fields, estimated from the GECCO ocean state estimation effort over the 50 yr period 1951-2001, are compared to purely satellite-based HOAPS freshwater flux estimates and to the NCEP atmospheric re-analysis net surface freshwater flux fields to assess the quality of all flux products and to improve our understanding of the time-mean surface freshwater flux distribution as well as its temporal variability. Surface flux fields are adjusted by the GECCO state estimation procedure together with initial temperature and salinity conditions so that the model simulation becomes consistent with ocean observations. The entirely independent HOAPS net surface freshwater flux fields result from the difference between SSM/I based precipitation estimates and fields of evaporation resulting from a bulk aerodynamic approach using SSM/I data and the Pathfinder SST. All three products agree well on a global scale. However, overall GECCO seems to have moved away from the NCEP/NCAR first guess surface fluxes and is often closer to the HOAPS data set. This holds for the time mean as well as for the seasonal cycle.

  11. Sea surface temperature and sea ice variability in the sub-polar North Atlantic from explosive volcanism of the late thirteenth century

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sicre, M.-A.; Khodri, M.; Mignot, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we use IP25 and alkenone biomarker proxies to document the subdecadal variations of sea ice and sea surface temperature in the subpolar North Atlantic induced by the decadally paced explosive tropical volcanic eruptions of the second half of the thirteenth century. The short-and lo...

  12. Enrichment of Fusobacteria in Sea Surface Oil Slicks from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Tony; Berry, David; Teske, Andreas; Aitken, Michael D

    2016-07-27

    The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill led to rapid microbial community shifts in the Gulf of Mexico, including the formation of unprecedented quantities of marine oil snow (MOS) and of a massive subsurface oil plume. The major taxa that bloomed in sea surface oil slicks during the spill included Cycloclasticus, and to a lesser extent Halomonas, Alteromonas, and Pseudoalteromonas-organisms that grow and degrade oil hydrocarbons aerobically. Here, we show that sea surface oil slicks at DWH contained obligate and facultative anaerobic taxa, including members of the obligate anaerobic phylum Fusobacteria that are commonly found in marine sediment environments. Pyrosequencing analysis revealed that Fusobacteria were strongly selected for when sea surface oil slicks were allowed to develop anaerobically. These organisms have been found in oil-contaminated sediments in the Gulf of Mexico, in deep marine oil reservoirs, and other oil-contaminated sites, suggesting they have putative hydrocarbon-degrading qualities. The occurrence and strong selection for Fusobacteria in a lab-based incubation of a sea surface oil slick sample collected during the spill suggests that these organisms may have become enriched in anaerobic zones of suspended particulates, such as MOS. Whilst the formation and rapid sinking of MOS is recognised as an important mechanism by which a proportion of the Macondo oil had been transported to the sea floor, its role in potentially transporting microorganisms, including oil-degraders, from the upper reaches of the water column to the seafloor should be considered. The presence of Fusobacteria on the sea surface-a highly oxygenated environment-is intriguing, and may be explained by the vertical upsurge of oil that provided a carrier to transport these organisms from anaerobic/micro-aerophilic zones in the oil plume or seabed to the upper reaches of the water column. We also propose that the formation of rapidly-sinking MOS may have re-transported these

  13. Magnetic Susceptibility in Surface Sediments in the Southern South China Sea and Its Implication for Sub-sea Methane Venting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhong; Yan Wen; Tang Xianzan; Liu Jianguo; Chen Muhong; Yang Huaping

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the characteristics of magnetic variability and their possible implication for sub-sea methane venting,magnetic susceptibility (MS) of 145 surface sediment samples from the southern South China Sea (SCS) was investigated.Magnetic particles extracted from 20 representative samples were also examined for their mineral,chemical compositions and micromorphology.Results indicate that MS values range between -7.73×10-8 and 45.06x10-8 m3/kg.The high MS zones occur at some hydrecarbon-bearing basins and along main tectonic zones,and low ones are distributed mainly within the river delta or along continental shelves.Iron concretions and manganese concretions are not main contributors for high MS values in sediments,while authigenic iron sulphide minerals are possibly responsible for the MS enhancement.This phenomenon is suspected to be produced by the reducing environment where the high upward venting methane beneath the seafloor reacts with seawater sulfate,resulting in seep precipitation of highly susceptible intermediate mineral pyrrhotite,greigite and paramagnetic pyrite.It suggests that MS variability is possibly one of the geochemical indicators for mapping sub-sea zones of methane venting in the southern SCS.

  14. Sea surface temperature variability in the North Western Mediterranean Sea (Gulf of Lion) during the Common Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicre, Marie-Alexandrine; Jalali, Bassem; Martrat, Belen; Schmidt, Sabine; Bassetti, Maria-Angela; Kallel, Nejib

    2016-12-01

    This study investigates the multidecadal-scale variability of sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the convection region of the Gulf of Lion (NW Mediterranean Sea) over the full past 2000 yr (Common Era) using alkenone biomarkers. Our data show colder SSTs by 1.7 °C over most of the first millennium (200-800 AD) and by 1.3 °C during the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1400-1850 AD) than the 20th century mean (17.9 °C). Although on average warmer, those of the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) (1000-1200 AD) were lower by 1 °C. We found a mean SST warming of 2 °C/100 yr over the last century in close agreement with the 0.22 and 0.26 °C/decade values calculated for the western Mediterranean Sea from in situ and satellite data, respectively. Our results also reveal strongly fluctuating SSTs characterized by cold extremes followed by abrupt warming during the LIA. We suggest that the coldest decades of the LIA were likely caused by prevailing negative EA states and associated anticyclone blocking over the North Atlantic resulting in cold continental northeasterly winds to blow over Western Europe and the Mediterranean region.

  15. Detailed analytical approach to the Gaussian surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function specular component applied to the sea surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vincent; Dion, Denis; Potvin, Guy

    2005-11-01

    A statistical sea surface specular BRDF (bidirectional reflectance distribution function) model is developed that includes mutual shadowing by waves, wave facet hiding, and projection weighting. The integral form of the model is reduced to an analytical form by making minor and justifiable approximations. The new form of the BRDF thus allows one to compute sea reflected radiance more than 100 times faster than the traditional numerical solutions. The repercussions of the approximations used in the model are discussed. Using the analytical form of the BRDF, an analytical approximation is also obtained for the reflected sun radiance that is always good to within 1% of the numerical solution for sun elevations of more than 10 degrees above the horizon. The model is validated against measured sea radiances found in the literature and is shown to be in very good agreement.

  16. Phosphorus speciation and distribution in surface sediments of the Yellow Sea and East China Sea and potential impacts on ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Guodong; LIU Sumei

    2015-01-01

    For better understanding the phosphorus (P) cycle and its impacts on one of the most important fishing grounds and pressures on the marine ecosystem in the Yellow Sea (YS) and East China Sea (ECS), it is essential to distinguish the contents of different P speciation in sediments and have the knowledge of its distribution and bioavailability. In this study, the modified SEDEX procedure was employed to quantify the different forms of P in sediments. The contents of phosphorus fractions in surface sediments were 0.20–0.89μmol/g for exchangeable-P (Exch-P), 0.37–2.86μmol/g for Fe-bound P (Fe-P), 0.61–3.07μmol/g for authigenic Ca-P (ACa-P), 6.39–13.73μmol/g for detrital-P (DAP) and 0.54–10.06μmol/g for organic P (OP). The distribution of Exch-P, Fe-P and OP seemed to be similar. The concentrations of Exch-P, Fe-P and OP were slightly higher in the Yellow Sea than that in the East China Sea, and low concentrations could be observed in the middle part of the ECS and southwest off Cheju Island. The distribution of ACa-P was different from those of Exch-P, Fe-P and OP. DAP was the major fraction of sedimentary P in the research region. The sum of Exch-P, Fe-P and OP may be thought to be potentially bioavailable P in the research region. The percentage of bioavailable P in TP ranged from 13%to 61%. Bioavailable P burial flux that appeared regional differences was affected by sedimentation rates, porosity and bioavailable P content, and the distribution of bioavailable P burial flux were almost the same as that of TP burial flux.

  17. Assessment of the global monthly mean surface insolation estimated from satellite measurements using global energy balance archive data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Whitlock, Charles H.; Charlock, Thomas P.

    1995-01-01

    Global sets of surface radiation budget (SRB) have been obtained from satellite programs. These satellite-based estimates need validation with ground-truth observations. This study validates the estimates of monthly mean surface insolation contained in two satellite-based SRB datasets with the surface measurements made at worldwide radiation stations from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA). One dataset was developed from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) using the algorithm of Li et al. (ERBE/SRB), and the other from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) using the algorithm of Pinker and Laszlo and that of Staylor (GEWEX/SRB). Since the ERBE/SRB data contain the surface net solar radiation only, the values of surface insolation were derived by making use of the surface albedo data contained GEWEX/SRB product. The resulting surface insolation has a bias error near zero and a root-mean-square error (RMSE) between 8 and 28 W/sq m. The RMSE is mainly associated with poor representation of surface observations within a grid cell. When the number of surface observations are sufficient, the random error is estimated to be about 5 W/sq m with present satellite-based estimates. In addition to demonstrating the strength of the retrieving method, the small random error demonstrates how well the ERBE derives from the monthly mean fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). A larger scatter is found for the comparison of transmissivity than for that of insolation. Month to month comparison of insolation reveals a weak seasonal trend in bias error with an amplitude of about 3 W/sq m. As for the insolation data from the GEWEX/SRB, larger bias errors of 5-10 W/sq m are evident with stronger seasonal trends and almost identical RMSEs.

  18. Oceanic whitecaps: Sea surface features detectable via satellite that are indicators of the magnitude of the air-sea gas transfer coefficient

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E C Monahan

    2002-09-01

    Stage A whitecaps (spilling wave crests) have a microwave emissivity of close to 1. Thus if even a small fraction of the sea surface is covered by these features there will be a detectable enhancement in the apparent microwave brightness temperature of that surface as determined by satellite-borne microwave radiometers. This increase in the apparent microwave brightness temperature can as a consequence be routinely used to estimate the fraction of the sea surface covered by stage A whitecaps. For all but the very lowest wind speeds it has been shown in a series of controlled experiments that the air-sea gas transfer coeffcient for each of a wide range of gases, including carbon dioxide and oxygen, is directly proportional to the fraction of the sea surface covered by these stage A whitecaps.

  19. Examining Lagrangian surface transport during a coastal upwelling in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpeche-Ellmann, Nicole; Mingelaitė, Toma; Soomere, Tarmo

    2017-07-01

    We employ in-situ surface drifters and satellite derived sea surface temperature data to examine the impact that an upwelling event may have on mixing and Lagrangian transport of surrounding surface waters. The test area is located near the southern coast of the Gulf of Finland where easterly winds are known to trigger intense coastal upwellings. The analysis is based on the comparison of motions of three drifters that follow the currents in the uppermost layer with a thickness of 2 m with MODIS-based sea surface temperature data and high-quality open sea wind time series. The presence of an upwelling event superseded the classic Ekman-type drift of the surface layer and considerably slowed down the average speed of surface currents in the region affected by the upwelled cold water jet and its filaments. The drifters tended to stay amidst the surrounding surface waters. The properties of mixing were evaluated using the daily rate of temperature change along several transects. The upwelled cooler water largely kept its identity during almost the entire duration of the upwelling event. Intense mixing started at a later stage of the upwelling and continued after the end of the event when the winds that have driven the entire process began to subside.

  20. Surface energy, CO2 fluxes and sea ice

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gulev, SK

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available , there are serious concerns about the recent decline in the number of VOS observations. Closure of global and regional energy balances still cannot be achieved without adjustments to the flux fields and/or the underlying surface meteorological variables. The impact...

  1. Influence of ice thickness and surface properties on light transmission through Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katlein, Christian; Arndt, Stefanie; Nicolaus, Marcel; Perovich, Donald K; Jakuba, Michael V; Suman, Stefano; Elliott, Stephen; Whitcomb, Louis L; McFarland, Christopher J; Gerdes, Rüdiger; Boetius, Antje; German, Christopher R

    2015-09-01

    The observed changes in physical properties of sea ice such as decreased thickness and increased melt pond cover severely impact the energy budget of Arctic sea ice. Increased light transmission leads to increased deposition of solar energy in the upper ocean and thus plays a crucial role for amount and timing of sea-ice-melt and under-ice primary production. Recent developments in underwater technology provide new opportunities to study light transmission below the largely inaccessible underside of sea ice. We measured spectral under-ice radiance and irradiance using the new Nereid Under-Ice (NUI) underwater robotic vehicle, during a cruise of the R/V Polarstern to 83°N 6°W in the Arctic Ocean in July 2014. NUI is a next generation hybrid remotely operated vehicle (H-ROV) designed for both remotely piloted and autonomous surveys underneath land-fast and moving sea ice. Here we present results from one of the first comprehensive scientific dives of NUI employing its interdisciplinary sensor suite. We combine under-ice optical measurements with three dimensional under-ice topography (multibeam sonar) and aerial images of the surface conditions. We investigate the influence of spatially varying ice-thickness and surface properties on the spatial variability of light transmittance during summer. Our results show that surface properties such as melt ponds dominate the spatial distribution of the under-ice light field on small scales (ice-thickness is the most important predictor for light transmission on larger scales. In addition, we propose the use of an algorithm to obtain histograms of light transmission from distributions of sea ice thickness and surface albedo.

  2. Sea water surface energy balance in the Arctic fjord (Hornsund, SW Spitsbergen) in May-November 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuniak, Krzysztof; Przybylak, Rajmund; Araźny, Andrzej; Pawlak, Włodzimierz; Wyszyński, Przemysław

    2017-05-01

    The full surface energy balance of the sea water of the Arctic fjord was analysed for the period from May to November 2014 in Hornsund (SW Spitsbergen). The sensible and latent turbulent fluxes were measured with the aid of the open-path eddy covariance method. The measurement site was located in the Wilczek Peninsula (Wilczekodden) on the rocks, right at the seafront. At this location, and with the wind system observed there, the source area of turbulent fluxes was spread over the sea water of the Hornsundfjord. The turbulent fluxes were calculated for 1-h intervals with a standard methodology. Stationarity was checked by three independent tests, and two datasets were analysed independently: data approved by all three tests, and data approved by at least one of the tests. The sensible heat flux, Q H , undergoes a clear seasonal regularity, with downward heat transport (negative fluxes) from July to September (with mean ranges from -30 to -15 Wm-2), reaching close to zero in October, then upward in the other months of the analysed period, reaching maximum in November (50 Wm-2). The latent heat flux, Q E , was mostly positive (more than 90 %) and more intensive. The highest mean values of Q E were recorded in July and November (around 135 Wm-2), with the lowest in May, June and August (around 70 Wm-2). Very intensive latent heat fluxes, above 200 Wm-2, in extreme cases exceeding 500 Wm-2, were observed in all months.

  3. Parameterization of atmosphere–surface exchange of CO2 over sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Jensen, Bjarne; Glud, Ronnie;

    2014-01-01

    are discussed. We found the flux to be small during the late winter with fluxes in both directions. Not surprisingly we find that the resistance across the surface controls the fluxes and detailed knowledge of the brine volume and carbon chemistry within the brines as well as knowledge of snow cover and carbon...... chemistry in the ice are essential to estimate the partial pressure of pCO2 and CO2 flux. Further investigations of surface structure and snow cover and driving parameters such as heat flux, radiation, ice temperature and brine processes are required to adequately parameterize the surface resistance.......We suggest the application of a flux parameterization commonly used over terrestrial areas for calculation of CO2 fluxes over sea ice surfaces. The parameterization is based on resistance analogy.We present a concept for parameterization of the CO2 fluxes over sea ice suggesting to use properties...

  4. Surface water mass composition changes captured by cores of Arctic land-fast sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, I. J.; Eicken, H.; Mahoney, A. R.; Van Hale, R.; Gough, A. J.; Fukamachi, Y.; Jones, J.

    2016-04-01

    In the Arctic, land-fast sea ice growth can be influenced by fresher water from rivers and residual summer melt. This paper examines a method to reconstruct changes in water masses using oxygen isotope measurements of sea ice cores. To determine changes in sea water isotope composition over the course of the ice growth period, the output of a sea ice thermodynamic model (driven with reanalysis data, observations of snow depth, and freeze-up dates) is used along with sea ice oxygen isotope measurements and an isotopic fractionation model. Direct measurements of sea ice growth rates are used to validate the output of the sea ice growth model. It is shown that for sea ice formed during the 2011/2012 ice growth season at Barrow, Alaska, large changes in isotopic composition of the ocean waters were captured by the sea ice isotopic composition. Salinity anomalies in the ocean were also tracked by moored instruments. These data indicate episodic advection of meteoric water, having both lower salinity and lower oxygen isotopic composition, during the winter sea ice growth season. Such advection of meteoric water during winter is surprising, as no surface meltwater and no local river discharge should be occurring at this time of year in that area. How accurately changes in water masses as indicated by oxygen isotope composition can be reconstructed using oxygen isotope analysis of sea ice cores is addressed, along with methods/strategies that could be used to further optimize the results. The method described will be useful for winter detection of meteoric water presence in Arctic fast ice regions, which is important for climate studies in a rapidly changing Arctic. Land-fast sea ice effective fractionation coefficients were derived, with a range of +1.82‰ to +2.52‰. Those derived effective fractionation coefficients will be useful for future water mass component proportion calculations. In particular, the equations given can be used to inform choices made when

  5. Impact of surface wind biases on the Antarctic sea ice concentration budget in climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, O.; Goosse, H.; Fichefet, T.; Holland, P. R.; Uotila, P.; Zunz, V.; Kimura, N.

    2016-09-01

    We derive the terms in the Antarctic sea ice concentration budget from the output of three models, and compare them to observations of the same terms. Those models include two climate models from the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and one ocean-sea ice coupled model with prescribed atmospheric forcing. Sea ice drift and wind fields from those models, in average over April-October 1992-2005, all exhibit large differences with the available observational or reanalysis datasets. However, the discrepancies between the two distinct ice drift products or the two wind reanalyses used here are sometimes even greater than those differences. Two major findings stand out from the analysis. Firstly, large biases in sea ice drift speed and direction in exterior sectors of the sea ice covered region tend to be systematic and consistent with those in winds. This suggests that sea ice errors in these areas are most likely wind-driven, so as errors in the simulated ice motion vectors. The systematic nature of these biases is less prominent in interior sectors, nearer the coast, where sea ice is mechanically constrained and its motion in response to the wind forcing more depending on the model rheology. Second, the intimate relationship between winds, sea ice drift and the sea ice concentration budget gives insight on ways to categorize models with regard to errors in their ice dynamics. In exterior regions, models with seemingly too weak winds and slow ice drift consistently yield a lack of ice velocity divergence and hence a wrong wintertime sea ice growth rate. In interior sectors, too slow ice drift, presumably originating from issues in the physical representation of sea ice dynamics as much as from errors in surface winds, leads to wrong timing of the late winter ice retreat. Those results illustrate that the applied methodology provides a valuable tool for prioritizing model improvements based on the ice concentration budget-ice drift biases-wind biases

  6. The Role of the Mean State of Arctic Sea Ice on Near-Surface Temperature Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.C.; Bintanja, R.; Hazeleger, W.; Katsman, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Century-scale global near-surface temperature trends in response to rising greenhouse gas concentrations in climate models vary by almost a factor of 2, with greatest intermodel spread in the Arctic region where sea ice is a key climate component. Three factors contribute to the intermodel spread:

  7. Surface sediment diatoms from the western Pacific marginal seas and their correlation to environmental variables

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yue; JIANG Hui; Svante Bj(o)rck; LI Tiegang; LU Houyuan; RAN Lihua

    2009-01-01

    Diatom data of 192 surface sediment samples from the marginal seas in the western Pacific together with modern summer and winter sea surface temperature and salinity data were analyzed. The results of canonical correspondence analysis show that summer sea-surface salinity (SSS) is highly positively correlated with winter SSS and so is summer sea-surface temperature (SST) with winter SST. The correlations between SSSs and SSTs are less positively correlated, which may be due to interactions of regional current pattern and monsoon climate. The correlations between diatom species, sample sites and environmental variables concur with known diatom ecology and regional oceanographic characters. The results of forward selection of the environmental variables and associated Monte Carlo permutation tests of the statistical significance of each variable suggest that summer SSS and winter SST are the main environmental factors affecting the diatom distribution in the area and therefore preserved diatom data from down core could be used for reconstructions of summer SSS and winter SST in the region.

  8. Annual and interannual variability of scatterometer ocean surface wind over the South China Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, GS; Xu, Q.; Gong, Z.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the annual and interannual variability of ocean surface wind over the South China Sea (SCS), the vector empirical orthogonal function (VEOF) method and the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) method were employed to analyze a set of combined satellite scatterometer wind data during...

  9. Analysis of some methods for obtaining sea surface temperature from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Satellite measurements of sea surface temperature must be corrected for atmospheric moisture, cloud contamination, reflected solar radiation and other sources of error. Procedures for reducing errors are discussed. It appears that routine accuracies of 1 C are possible, given low noise spectral measurements in the infrared.

  10. Sulfur and iron speciation in surface sediments along the northwestern margin of the Black Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.W.M.; Middelburg, J.J.; Herman, P.M.J.; Bottcher, M.E.; Heip, C.H.R.

    2001-01-01

    The speciation of sedimentary sulfur (pyrite, acid volatile sulfides (AVS), S-0 H2S, and sulfate) was analyzed in surface sediments recovered at different water depths from the northwestern margin of the Black Sea. Additionally, dissolved and dithionite-extractable iron were quantified, and the sulf

  11. Optimizing Surface Winds using QuikSCAT Measurements in the Mediterranean Sea During 2000-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-28

    r.com/ locate / jmarsysOptimizing surface winds using QuikSCAT measurements in the Mediterranean Sea during 2000–2006 A. Birol Kara a,⁎, Alan J...flux algorithms. J. Geophys. Res. 113, C04009. doi:10.1029/2007JC004324. Large, W.G., Danabasoglu, G., Doney, S.C., McWilliams , J.C., 1997

  12. Chemistry of the sea surface microlayer. 1. Fabrication and testing of the sampler

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Singbal, S.Y.S.; Narvekar, P.V.

    A screen sampler fabricated to study the sea surface microlayer (SML) has been described. The screen sampler was tested in the Mandovi estuary and adjacent waters. Physico-chemical parameters of the subsurface waters from a depth of 25 cm was also...

  13. Trophic Dynamics of Deep-Sea Megabenthos Are Mediated by Surface Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tecchio, S.; van Oevelen, D.; Soetaert, K.; Navarro, J.; Ramírez-Llodra, E.

    2013-01-01

    Most deep-sea benthic ecosystems are food limited and, in the majority of cases, are driven by the organic matter falling from the surface or advected downslope. Species may adapt to this scarceness by applying a wide variety of responses, such as feeding specialisation, niche width variation, and r

  14. Mid-Holocene sea surface conditions and riverine influence on the inshore Great Barrier Reef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roche, R.C.; Perry, C.T.; Smithers, S.G.; Leng, M.J.; Grove, C.A.; Sloane, H.J.; Unsworth, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of Sr/Ca, d18O, and spectral luminescence ratios (G/B) from a mid-Holocene Porites sp. microatoll recovered from the nearshore Great Barrier Reef (GBR). These records were used as proxies to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST), the d18O of surrounding seawater (d18Osw),

  15. Effectiveness of WRF wind direction for retrieving coastal sea surface wind from synthetic aperture radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takeyama, Yuko; Ohsawa, Teruo; Kozai, Katsutoshi;

    2013-01-01

    Wind direction is required as input to the geophysical model function (GMF) for the retrieval of sea surface wind speed from a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. The present study verifies the effectiveness of using the wind direction obtained from the weather research and forecasting model...

  16. The Role of the Mean State of Arctic Sea Ice on Near-Surface Temperature Trends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.C.; Bintanja, R.; Hazeleger, W.; Katsman, C.A.

    2014-01-01

    Century-scale global near-surface temperature trends in response to rising greenhouse gas concentrations in climate models vary by almost a factor of 2, with greatest intermodel spread in the Arctic region where sea ice is a key climate component. Three factors contribute to the intermodel spread: 1

  17. Sea surface temperature variability at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography Pier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Checkley, David M.; Lindegren, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) has been measured from near the end of the SIO pier daily since 1916. It is one of the world’s longest instrumental time series of SST. It is widely used in studies of climate and marine ecosystems and in fisheries management. We hypothesized that a discontinuity exi...

  18. Multimodel simulations of Arctic Ocean sea surface height variability in the period 1970-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koldunov, Nikolay V.; Serra, Nuno; Koehl, Armin

    2014-01-01

    The performance of several numerical ocean models is assessed with respect to their simulation of sea surface height (SSH) in the Arctic Ocean, and the main patterns of SSH variability and their causes over the past 40 years (1970-2009) are analyzed. In comparison to observations, all tested mode...

  19. Rose Island, American Samoa, 2006 Sea Surface Temperature and Meterological Standard Mooring - CRED CREWS Near Real Time and Historical Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Site - Rose Island, American Samoa, -14.5514, -168.16018 ARGOS ID 27267 Time series data from this mooring provide high resolution sea surface temperature, surface...

  20. Quantitative estimation of Holocene surface salinity variation in the Black Sea using dinoflagellate cyst process length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertens, Kenneth Neil; Bradley, Lee R.; Takano, Yoshihito

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of salinity in the Holocene Black Sea has been an ongoing debate over the past four decades. Here we calibrate summer surface water salinity in the Black Sea, Sea of Azov and Caspian Sea with the process length of the dinoflagellate cyst Lingulodinium machaerophorum. We then apply...... this calibration to make a regional reconstruction of paleosalinity in the Black Sea, calculated by averaging out process length variation observed at four core sites from the Black Sea with high sedimentation rates and dated by multiple mollusk shell ages. Results show a very gradual change of salinity from ∼14...... ± 0.91 psu around 9.9 cal ka BP to a minimum ∼12.3 ± 0.91 psu around 8.5 cal ka BP, reaching current salinities of ∼17.1 ± 0.91 psu around 4.1 cal ka BP. The resolution of our sampling is about 250 years, and it fails to reveal a catastrophic salinization event at ∼9.14 cal ka BP advocated by other...

  1. Lithological and geochemical typification of surface bottom sediments in the Kara Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, V. Yu.; Kuzhmina, T. G.; Levitan, M. A.; Toropchenova, E. S.; Zhylkina, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    The Kara Sea is part of the Western Arctic shelf of Eurasia. The deposition of sediments in this shallow sea is largely determined by solid runoff from two great Siberian rivers (the Yenisei and Ob) and the glacial periods when the sea area repeatedly (during the Quaternary) dried up and was covered by continental glaciers. The rise of the World Ocean due to Holocene warming resulted in a significant expansion of the sea area to the south and complete degradation of the ice sheet. In this article, new data on the geochemical composition of the surface (0- to 2-cm) layer of sea-bottom sediments are considered, which reflects the spatial distribution of marine sediments during the maximum sea level. Cluster analysis of the variance for 24 chemical elements reveals sediment chemotypes, and critical analysis of their relationship with lithotypes is performed. The presented data have been collected on cruises of the R/V Akademik Boris Petrov in 2000, 2001, and 2003 and the R/V Akademik Mstislav Keldysh in 2015.

  2. An Examination of the Hadley Sea-Surface Temperature Time Series for the Nino 3.4 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    The Hadley sea-surface temperature (HadSST) dataset is investigated for the interval 1871-2008. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the degree of success in identifying and characterizing El Nino (EN) southern (ENSO) extreme events, both EN and La Nina (LN) events. Comparisons are made against both the Southern Oscillation Index for the same time interval and with published values of the Oceanic Nino Index for the interval since 1950. Some 60 ENSO extreme events are identified in the HadSST dataset, consisting of 33 EN and 27 LN events. Also, preferential associations are found to exist between the duration of ENSO extreme events and their maximum anomalous excursion temperatures and between the recurrence rate for an EN event and the duration of the last known EN event. Because the present ongoing EN is a strong event, it should persist 11 months or longer, inferring that the next EN event should not be expected until June 2012 or later. Furthermore, the decadal sum of EN-related months is found to have increased somewhat steadily since the decade of 1920-1929, suggesting that the present decade (2010-2019) possibly will see about 3-4 EN events, totaling about 37 +/- 3 EN-related months (i.e., months that meet the definition for the occurrence of an EN event).

  3. AVHRR Pathfinder version 5.3 level 3 collated (L3C) global 4km sea surface temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AVHRR Pathfinder Version 5.3 (PFV53) L3C Sea Surface Temperature data set is a collection of global, twice-daily (Day and Night) 4km sea surface temperature...

  4. Evolution of the 2014-2015 sea surface temperature warming in the central west coast of Baja California, Mexico, recorded by remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carlos J.

    2016-07-01

    Extraordinarily warm sea surface temperatures were present in the California Current System during 2014-2015. In several locations surface waters temperature registered new record high in the recent time series. This study focuses in the evolution of the warming in the southern part of the California Current System (CCS), off the west coast of Baja California, Mexico. Analysis of monthly sea surface temperature (SST), sea level pressure, and wind speed as measured by satellite from January 1988 to December 2015 show that recent warming occurred during two distinct periods. From May 2014 to April 2015, SST warming was related to weak coastal winds not associated to El Niño. During this period occurred the longest sustained record of 15 months of negative wind anomalies in the series. A reduction of wind stress suggests a weakened coastal upwelling, and consequently, cold water not transported into the surface. The second process of warming occurred from September to December 2015, during a strong El Niño condition.

  5. Rising Mediterranean Sea Surface Temperatures Amplify Extreme Summer Precipitation in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volosciuk, Claudia; Maraun, Douglas; Semenov, Vladimir A.; Tilinina, Natalia; Gulev, Sergey K.; Latif, Mojib

    2016-08-01

    The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a number of severe summer floods in Central Europe associated with extreme precipitation (e.g., Elbe 2002, Oder 2010 and Danube 2013). Extratropical storms, known as Vb-cyclones, cause summer extreme precipitation events over Central Europe and can thus lead to such floodings. Vb-cyclones develop over the Mediterranean Sea, which itself strongly warmed during recent decades. Here we investigate the influence of increased Mediterranean Sea surface temperature (SST) on extreme precipitation events in Central Europe. To this end, we carry out atmosphere model simulations forced by average Mediterranean SSTs during 1970-1999 and 2000-2012. Extreme precipitation events occurring on average every 20 summers in the warmer-SST-simulation (2000-2012) amplify along the Vb-cyclone track compared to those in the colder-SST-simulation (1970-1999), on average by 17% in Central Europe. The largest increase is located southeast of maximum precipitation for both simulated heavy events and historical Vb-events. The responsible physical mechanism is increased evaporation from and enhanced atmospheric moisture content over the Mediterranean Sea. The excess in precipitable water is transported from the Mediterranean Sea to Central Europe causing stronger precipitation extremes over that region. Our findings suggest that Mediterranean Sea surface warming amplifies Central European precipitation extremes.

  6. Distribution characteristics of magnetic susceptibility of the surface sediments in the southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic distributions of magnetic susceptibility (MS) are analyzed on the basis of susceptibility of 172 surface sediment samples in the southern Yellow Sea (SYS). The preliminary results are as follows: first, the distributions clearly correspond to different modern sediment assemblages in the continental sea, which indicates different sediment origins. With the 30 μCGS isoline being taken as demarcation line, the study area can then be divided into section H (high MS value area) and section L (low MS value area). Section H is mainly adjacent to land with two main sources of the Changjiang River and the Huanghe River.Section L is mainly an eddy sediment area, where Yellow Sea Cold Water is entrenched all the year round. The distribution pattern of MS could tell apart strong or weak hydrodynamic conditions and has a close relation to the circulation system in this area. At the areas of the SYS Circumfluent and northern East China Sea (NECS) Circumfluent (weak hydrodynamic), the MS has low values, while in the areas of Coastal Current (strong hydrodynamic), the values are high. At the same time, the oxidizing areas tend to take on higher MS, while the reducing areas have lower one. It seems safe to say that the MS in the continental sea reflects more of the sediment origin and sedimentary environment, which is different from that of loess, lake and surface soil as a climate proxy.

  7. Distribution characteristics of magnetic susceptibility of the surface sediments in the southern Yellow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GEShulan; SHIXuefa; HANYibing

    2003-01-01

    The characteristic distributions of magnetic susceptibility (MS) are analyzed on the basis of susceptibility of 172 surface sediment samples in the southern Yellow Sea (SYS). The preliminary results are as follows: first, the distributions clearly correspond to different modern sediment assemblages in the continental sea, which indicates different sediment origins. With the 30 μCGS isoline being taken as demarcation line, the study area can then be divided into section H (high MS value area) and section L (low MS value area). Section H is mainly adjacent to land with two main sources of the Changjiang River and the Huanghe River.Section L is mainly an eddy sediment area, where Yellow Sea Cold Water is entrenched all the year round. The distribution pattern of MS could tell apart strong or weak hydrodynamic conditions and has a close relation to the circulation system in this area. At the areas of the SYS Circumfluent and northern East China Sea (NECS) Circumfluent (weak hydrodynamic), the MS has low values, while in the areas of Coastal Current (strong hydrodynamic), the values are high.At the same time, the oxidizing areas tend to take on higher MS, while the reducing areas have lower one. It seems safe to say that the MS in the continental sea reflects more of the sediment origin and sedimentary environment, which is different from that of loess, lake and surface soil as a climate proxy.

  8. Changes in snow distribution and surface topography following a snowstorm on Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Ernesto; Leonard, Katherine; Maksym, Ted; Lehning, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Snow distribution over sea ice is an important control on sea ice physical and biological processes. We combine measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer and blowing snow on an Antarctic sea ice floe with terrestrial laser scanning to characterize a typical storm and its influence on the spatial patterns of snow distribution at resolutions of 1-10 cm over an area of 100 m × 100 m. The pre-storm surface exhibits multidirectional elongated snow dunes formed behind aerodynamic obstacles. Newly deposited dunes are elongated parallel to the predominant wind direction during the storm. Snow erosion and deposition occur over 62% and 38% of the area, respectively. Snow deposition volume is more than twice that of erosion (351 m3 versus 158 m3), resulting in a modest increase of 2 ± 1 cm in mean snow depth, indicating a small net mass gain despite large mass relocation. Despite significant local snow depth changes due to deposition and erosion, the statistical distributions of elevation and the two-dimensional correlation functions remain similar to those of the pre-storm surface. Pre-storm and post-storm surfaces also exhibit spectral power law relationships with little change in spectral exponents. These observations suggest that for sea ice floes with mature snow cover features under conditions similar to those observed in this study, spatial statistics and scaling properties of snow surface morphology may be relatively invariant. Such an observation, if confirmed for other ice types and conditions, may be a useful tool for model parameterizations of the subgrid variability of sea ice surfaces.

  9. Study on the photosynthetic performances of Enteromorpha prolifera collected from the surface and bottom of the sea of Qingdao sea area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN APeng; WANG Chao; QIAO HongJin; PAN GuangHua; WANG GuangCe; SONG LiYun; WANG ZhiYuan; SUN Song; ZHOU BaiCheng

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the photosynthetic performances of Enteromorpha prolifera thalli collected from the sur-face and bottom of the sea of Qingdao sea area were studied with chlorophyll fluorescence and oxy-graph technology. The samples with the highest photosynthetic activity among their kinds, the floating thalli from the sea surface of the south of the Qingdao Olympic Sailing Center and the sedimentary thaili from the mud surface of the bottom Tuandao bay, were chosen as representatives of surface thalli and bottom thallil respectively. The results showed that the maximal PSll quantum yield of the floating thalli was significantly lower than the normal level although their photosynthetic activities were relatively high; the photosynthetic potential of the thalli form the mud surface was extremely low. Thus, it is indicated that the floating thalli are seriously stressed by their environment and the thalli from the mud surface are already dead or are dying. On the other hand, the results of the laboratory cultivation showed that the sedimentary thalli cannot regain normal photosynthetic activity even under normal illumination condi-tions. Thus, the thalli from the mud surface cannot become reproductive source of the alga even if they can reach sea surface again. Therefore, a preliminary conclusion can be reached that, up to mid-July 2008, the environmental conditions of the Qingdao sea area are not suitable for the growth of the alga E. prolifera and for this reason the biomass of E. prolifera, in the area, could be declining.

  10. The role of sea surface salinity in ENSO related water cycle anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenqing; Yueh, Simon

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates the role of sea surface salinity (SSS) in the water cycle anomaly associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The 2015-16 El Niño, one of the strongest ENSO events observed in centuries, coincident with unprecedented coverage of spacebased remote sensing of SSS over global oceans. We analyze three SSS data sets: from the NASA's missions of SMAP and Aquarius, and the ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS). One typical characteristics of an ENSO event is the zonal displacement of the Western equatorial Pacific Fresh Pool (WPFP). The edge of the pool extends eastward during El Niño, retreats westward during La Niña. For super El Niño, the eastern edge of WPFP extends much more east across the equatorial Pacific. Indeed, SSS from SMAP reveals much stronger eastward migration of WPFP starting in April 2015. The eastern edge of WPFP reached 140°W in March 2016, about 40° more eastward extension than Aquarius observed in previous years. In the following months from March to June 2016, WPFP retreated westward, coincident with the ending of this strong El Niño event [WMO, El Nino/La Nina update, 2016]. SMOS data shows similar feature, confirming that there is no systematic biases between SMAP and Aquarius retrievals. We examine the linkage between the observed SSS variation and ENSO related water cycle anomaly by integrated analysis of SSS data sets in conjunction with other satellite and in situ measurements on rain, wind, evaporation and ocean currents. Based on the governing equation of the mixed layer salt budget, the freshwater exchange between air-sea interfaces is estimated as residual of the mixed-layer salinity (MLS) temporal change and advection (Focean), as an alternative to evaporation minus precipitation (FE-P). We analyzed the spatial and temporal variation of Focean and FE-P to explore the anomalous signature in the oceanic and atmospheric branches of the water cycle associated with 2015/16 ENSO. The maximum

  11. Seasonal variability of diurnal temperature range in Egypt with links to atmospheric circulations and sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kenawy, A.; Lopez Moreno, J. I.; Vicente-Serrano, S.

    2010-09-01

    The diurnal temperature range (DTR) is an important climate-change variable. Seasonal and annual variability of DTR in Egypt was investigated based on a monthly dataset of 40 observatories distributing across the country. The trends were calculated using the Rho spearman rank test at the 95 % level of significance. The trends at the independent individual scale were compared with a regional series created for the whole country following the Thiessen polygon approach. A cross-tabulation analysis was performed between the trends of the DTR and the trends of maximum and minimum temperatures to account for directional causes of variability of the DTR at seasonal and annual scales. The physical processes controlling the DTR variability were also assessed in terms of large atmospheric circulations representing in the indices of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic (EA) pattern, El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) index and the EAWR (East Atlantic/West Russia) Pattern. Also, the variability of the DTR was linked with anomaly of Sea Surface Temperature (SST). A cooling trend was observed in Egypt with strong behavior in winter and summer rather than fall and spring. The upwarding trend of the mean minimum temperature was mainly responsible for variability of the DTR rather than the mean maximum temperature. Also, the EA and the EAWR indices were the main indices accounted for most of variation in the DTR in Egypt, particularly in summer. Key words: trend analysis, temperature variability, Diurnal temperature range, atmospheric circulation, sea surface temperature, Egypt.

  12. Spatial patterns of sea surface temperature influences on East African precipitation as revealed by empirical orthogonal teleconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eAppelhans

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available East Africa is characterized by a rather dry annual precipitation climatology with two distinct rainy seasons. In order to investigate sea surface temperature driven precipitation anomalies for the region we use the algorithm of empirical orthogonal teleconnection analysis as a data mining tool. We investigate the entire East African domain as well as 5 smaller sub-regions mainly located in areas of mountainous terrain. In searching for influential sea surface temperature patterns we do not focus any particular season or oceanic region. Furthermore, we investigate different time lags from zero to twelve months. The strongest influence is identified for the immediate (i.e. non-lagged influences of the Indian Ocean in close vicinity to the East African coast. None of the most important modes are located in the tropical Pacific Ocean, though the region is sometimes coupled with the Indian Ocean basin. Furthermore, we identify a region in the southern Indian Ocean around the Kerguelen Plateau which has not yet been reported in the literature with regard to precipitation modulation in East Africa. Finally, it is observed that not all regions in East Africa are equally influenced by the identified patterns.

  13. Iceberg ploughmark features on bottom surface of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorokhov, Dmitry; Sivkov, Vadim; Dorokhova, Evgenia; Krechik, Viktor

    2016-04-01

    A detail swath bathymetry, side-scan sonar and acoustic profiling combined with sediment sampling during the 64th cruise of RV "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (October 2015) allowed to identify new geomorphological features of the South-Eastern Baltic Sea bottom surface. The extended chaotic ploughmarks (furrows) in most cases filled with thin layer of mud were discovered on surface of the Gdansk-Gotland sill glacial deposits. They are observed on the depth of more than 70 m and have depth and width from 1 to 10 m. Most of them are v- or u-shaped stepped depressions. The side-scan records of similar geomorpholoical features are extensively reported from Northern Hemisphere and Antarctica (Goodwin et al., 1985; Dowdeswell et al., 1993). Ploughmarks are attributed to the action of icebergs scouring into the sediment as they touch bottom. We are suggest that furrows discovered in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea are also the result of iceberg scouring during the Baltic Ice Lake stage (more than 11 600 cal yr BP (Bjorck, 2008)). This assumption confirmed by occurrence of fragmental stones and boulders on the sea bottom surface which are good indicators of iceberg rafting (Lisitzin, 2003). Ice ploughmarks at sea bottom surface were not occurred before in the South-Eastern Baltic Sea. The study was financed by Russian Scientific Fund, grant number 14-37-00047. References Bjorck S. The late Quaternary development of the Baltic Sea Basin. In: The BACC Author Team (eds) Assessment of climate change for the Baltic Sea Basin. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg. 2008. Dowdeswell J. A., Villinger H., Whittington R. J., Marienfeld P. Iceberg scouring in Scoresby Sund and on the East Greenland continental shelf // Marine Geology. V. 111. N. 1-2. 1993. P. 37-53. Goodwin C. R., Finley J. C., Howard L. M. Ice scour bibliography. Environmental Studies Revolving Funds Report No. 010. Ottawa. 1985. 99 pp. Lisitzin A. P. Sea-Ice and Iceberg Sedimentation in the Ocean: Recent and Past. Springer

  14. Dissolved Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd in the South China Sea surface waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huo Wenmian; Ji Weidong; Xu Kuncan

    2001-01-01

    A total of 106 surface water samples were collected in the South China Sea during two transects in June and December 1998. The samples were collected with strictly contamination free procedure and trace metals were measured by clean laboratory methods and GFAAS. The mean concentrations for the dissolved fractions are: Cu 0.100 μg/dm3, Pb 0.060 μg/dm3, Zn 0.086 μg/dm3, Cd 0.007 μg/dm3, which is close to the world open ocean's level. The spatial distribution of the trace heavy metals shows higher concentrations in offshore area and lower concentrations in the central in the South China Sea, and the concentrations decrease with the distance from the offshore, which suggests the existence of significant continental shelf input of the trace heavy metals. The correlationship among the elements is better in summer than that in winter. Cu is positively correlated with Cd in both seasons and it is also found for the first time that they are positively correlated with nutrients in the South China Sea surface waters which further indicate the biogeochemical cycle of these elements in the marine environment. The baseline value of Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd in the South China Sea surface waters is obtained through statistical analysis.

  15. Long-term sea surface temperature and climate change in the Australian-New Zealand region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Timothy T.; Juggins, Steve; de Deckker, Patrick; Calvo, Eva; Pelejero, Carles

    2007-06-01

    We compile and compare data for the last 150,000 years from four deep-sea cores in the midlatitude zone of the Southern Hemisphere. We recalculate sea surface temperature estimates derived from foraminifera and compare these with estimates derived from alkenones and magnesium/calcium ratios in foraminiferal carbonate and with accompanying sedimentological and pollen records on a common absolute timescale. Using a stack of the highest-resolution records, we find that first-order climate change occurs in concert with changes in insolation in the Northern Hemisphere. Glacier extent and inferred vegetation changes in Australia and New Zealand vary in tandem with sea surface temperatures, signifying close links between oceanic and terrestrial temperature. In the Southern Ocean, rapid temperature change of the order of 6°C occurs within a few centuries and appears to have played an important role in midlatitude climate change. Sea surface temperature changes over longer periods closely match proxy temperature records from Antarctic ice cores. Warm events correlate with Antarctic events A1-A4 and appear to occur just before Dansgaard-Oeschger events 8, 12, 14, and 17 in Greenland.

  16. Spatial Gradients in Trace Metal Concentrations in the Surface Microlayer of the Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio eTovar-Sanchez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between dust deposition and surface water metal concentrations is poorly understood. Dissolution, solubility, and partitioning reactions of trace metals from dust particles are governed by complex chemical, biological, and physical processes occurring in the surface ocean. Despite that, the role of the sea surface microlayer (SML, a thin, but fundamental component modulating the air-sea exchange of materials has not been properly evaluated. Our study revealed that the SML of the Mediterranean Sea is enriched with bioactive trace metals (i.e., Cd, Co, Cu and Fe, ranging from 8 (for Cd to 1000 (for Fe times higher than the dissolved metal pool in the underlying water column. The highest enrichments were spatially correlated with the atmospheric deposition of mineral particles. Our mass balance results suggest that the SML in the Mediterranean Sea contains about 2 tonnes of Fe. However, we did not detect any trends between the concentrations of metals in SML with the subsurface water concentrations and biomass distributions. These findings suggest that future studies are needed to quantify the rate of metal exchange between the SML and the bioavailable pool and that the SML should be considered to better understand the effect of atmospheric inputs on the biogeochemistry of trace metals in the ocean.

  17. Low-frequency variability of surface air temperature over the Barents Sea: causes and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Eveline C.; Bintanja, Richard; Hazeleger, Wilco; Graversen, Rune G.

    2016-08-01

    The predominant decadal to multidecadal variability in the Arctic region is a feature that is not yet well-understood. It is shown that the Barents Sea is a key region for Arctic-wide variability. This is an important topic because low-frequency changes in the ocean might lead to large variations in the sea-ice cover, which then cause massive changes in the ocean-atmosphere heat exchanges. Here we describe the mechanism driving surface temperatures and heat fluxes in the Barents Sea based primarily on analyzes of one global coupled climate model. It is found that the ocean drives the low-frequency changes in surface temperature, whereas the atmosphere compensates the oceanic transport anomalies. The seasonal dependence and the role of individual components of the ocean-atmosphere energy budget are analyzed in detail, showing that seasonally-varying climate mechanisms play an important role. Herein, sea ice is governing the seasonal response, by acting as a lid that opens and closes during warm and cold periods, respectively, thereby modulating the surface heat fluxes.

  18. Quantitative reconstruction of Holocene sea ice and sea surface temperature off West Greenland from the first regional diatom data set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, D. W.; Witkowski, A.; Moros, M.; Lloyd, J. M.; Høyer, J. L.; Miettinen, A.; Kuijpers, A.

    2017-01-01

    Holocene oceanographic conditions in Disko Bay, West Greenland, were reconstructed from high-resolution diatom records derived from two marine sediment cores. A modern data set composed of 35 dated surface sediment samples collected along the West Greenland coast accompanied by remote sensing data was used to develop a diatom transfer function to reconstruct April sea ice concentration (SIC) supported by July sea surface temperature (SST) in the area. Our quantitative reconstruction shows that oceanographic changes recorded throughout the last 11,000 years reflect seasonal interplay between spring (April SIC) and summer (July SST) conditions. Our records show clear correlation with climate patterns identified from ice core data from GISP2 and Agassiz-Renland for the early to middle Holocene. The early Holocene deglaciation of western Greenland Ice Sheet was characterized in Disko Bay by initial strong centennial-scale fluctuations in April SIC with amplitude of over 40%, followed by high April SIC and July SST. These conditions correspond to a general warming of the climate in the Northern Hemisphere. A decrease in April SIC and July SST was recorded during the Holocene Thermal Optimum reflecting more stable spring-summer conditions in Disko Bay. During the late Holocene, high April SIC characterized the Medieval Climate Anomaly, while high July SST prevailed during the Little Ice Age, supporting previously identified antiphase relationship between surface waters in West Greenland and climate in NW Europe. This antiphase pattern might reflect seasonal variations in regional oceanographic conditions and large-scale fluctuations within the North Atlantic Oscillation and Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation.

  19. Modeling the spectrum of infrasonic hydroacoustic radiation generated by the sea surface under storm conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapevalov, A. S.; Pokazeev, K. V.

    2016-09-01

    Generation of infrasonic radiation into a water medium by sea surface waves is analyzed. The analysis is carried out for the situation in which the infrasound is generated by surface waves with frequencies close to those of dominant waves. The presence of two wave systems on the sea surface is assumed: swell and wind waves. It is shown that if the frequencies of spectral peaks of wind waves and swell diverge by 20%, the maximum value of the radiation spectrum decreases by approximately 40% (if the general directions of the two wave systems are oriented strictly towards each other). A deviation of the general directions of the two wave systems from the opposite direction by 45° leads to a decrease in the maximum value of the radiation spectrum by more than two times.

  20. Multisensor satellite data integration for sea surface wind speed and direction determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glackin, D. L.; Pihos, G. G.; Wheelock, S. L.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques to integrate meteorological data from various satellite sensors to yield a global measure of sea surface wind speed and direction for input to the Navy's operational weather forecast models were investigated. The sensors were launched or will be launched, specifically the GOES visible and infrared imaging sensor, the Nimbus-7 SMMR, and the DMSP SSM/I instrument. An algorithm for the extrapolation to the sea surface of wind directions as derived from successive GOES cloud images was developed. This wind veering algorithm is relatively simple, accounts for the major physical variables, and seems to represent the best solution that can be found with existing data. An algorithm for the interpolation of the scattered observed data to a common geographical grid was implemented. The algorithm is based on a combination of inverse distance weighting and trend surface fitting, and is suited to combing wind data from disparate sources.