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Sample records for monthly medication costs

  1. Impact of telephone medication therapy management on medication and health-related problems, medication adherence, and Medicare Part D drug costs: a 6-month follow up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moczygemba, Leticia R; Barner, Jamie C; Lawson, Kenneth A; Brown, Carolyn M; Gabrillo, Evelyn R; Godley, Paul; Johnsrud, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 mandated the provision of medication therapy management (MTM) to eligible Part D beneficiaries to improve medication-related outcomes. As MTM programs evolve, evaluation is necessary to help inform MTM best practices. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of pharmacist-provided telephone MTM on: (1) medication and health-related problems (MHRPs); (2) medication adherence; and (3) Part D drug costs. This quasi-experimental study included Part D beneficiaries from a Texas health plan. Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use served as the study framework. MTM utilization was the health behavior. Age, gender, and race were predisposing factors, and number of medications, chronic diseases, and medication regimen complexity were need factors. Outcomes were pre-to-post changes in: (1) MHRPs; (2) medication adherence, using the medication possession ratio (MPR); and (3) total drug costs. Multiple regression was used to analyze group differences while controlling for predisposing and need factors. At baseline, the intervention (n = 60) and control (n = 60) groups were not statistically different regarding predisposing and need factors, with the exception of gender. The intervention group had significantly (P = 0.009) more men compared with the control group (51.7% vs 28.3%). There were 4.8 (2.7) and 9.2 (2.9) MHRPs identified at baseline and 2.5 (2.0) and 7.9 (3.0) MHRPs remained at the 6-month follow up in the intervention and control groups, respectively. The intervention group (vs control) had significantly more MHRPs resolved (P = 0.0003). There were no significant predictors of change in MPR or total drug costs from baseline to follow up, although total drug costs decreased by $158 in the intervention group compared with a $118 increase in the control group. A telephone MTM program resolved significantly more MHRPs compared with a control group, but there were no significant changes in adherence and

  2. Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR) replaces the Cost Distribution Report (CDR). The MPCR provides summary information about Veterans Affairs operational costs,...

  3. An examination of periodontal treatment and per member per month (PMPM medical costs in an insured population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papapanou Panos

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic medical conditions have been associated with periodontal disease. This study examined if periodontal treatment can contribute to changes in overall risk and medical expenditures for three chronic conditions [Diabetes Mellitus (DM, Coronary Artery Disease (CAD, and Cerebrovascular Disease (CVD]. Methods 116,306 enrollees participating in a preferred provider organization (PPO insurance plan with continuous dental and medical coverage between January 1, 2001 and December 30, 2002, exhibiting one of three chronic conditions (DM, CAD, or CVD were examined. This study was a population-based retrospective cohort study. Aggregate costs for medical services were used as a proxy for overall disease burden. The cost for medical care was measured in Per Member Per Month (PMPM dollars by aggregating all medical expenditures by diagnoses that corresponded to the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, (ICD-9 codebook. To control for differences in the overall disease burden of each group, a previously calculated retrospective risk score utilizing Symmetry Health Data Systems, Inc. Episode Risk Groups™ (ERGs were utilized for DM, CAD or CVD diagnosis groups within distinct dental services groups including; periodontal treatment (periodontitis or gingivitis, dental maintenance services (DMS, other dental services, or to a no dental services group. The differences between group means were tested for statistical significance using log-transformed values of the individual total paid amounts. Results The DM, CAD and CVD condition groups who received periodontitis treatment incurred significantly higher PMPM medical costs than enrollees who received gingivitis treatment, DMS, other dental services, or no dental services (p Conclusion This two-year retrospective examination of a large insurance company database revealed a possible association between periodontal treatment and PMPM medical costs. The findings suggest that

  4. Multidisciplinary predialysis education reduced the inpatient and total medical costs of the first 6 months of dialysis in incident hemodialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Yu

    Full Text Available The multidisciplinary pre-dialysis education (MPE retards renal progression, reduce incidence of dialysis and mortality of CKD patients. However, the financial benefit of this intervention on patients starting hemodialysis has not yet been evaluated in prospective and randomized trial.We studied the medical expenditure and utilization incurred in the first 6 months of dialysis initiation in 425 incident hemodialysis patients who were randomized into MPE and non-MPE groups before reaching end-stage renal disease. The content of the MPE was standardized in accordance with the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines.The mean age of study patients was 63.8±13.2 years, and 221 (49.7% of them were men. The mean serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate was 6.1±4.0 mg/dL and 7.6±2.9 mL⋅min(-1⋅1.73 m(-2, respectively, at dialysis initiation. MPE patients tended to have lower total medical cost in the first 6 months after hemodialysis initiation (9147.6±0.1 USD/patient vs. 11190.6±0.1 USD/patient, p = 0.003, fewer in numbers [0 (1 vs. 1 (2, p<0.001] and length of hospitalization [0 (15 vs. 8 (27 days, p<0.001], and also lower inpatient cost [0 (2617.4 vs. 1559,4 (5019.6 USD/patient, p<0.001] than non-MPE patients, principally owing to reduced cardiovascular hospitalization and vascular access-related surgeries. The decreased inpatient and total medical cost associated with MPE were independent of patients' demographic characteristics, concomitant disease, baseline biochemistry and use of double-lumen catheter at initiation of hemodialysis.Participation of multidisciplinary education in pre-dialysis period was independently associated with reduction in the inpatient and total medical expenditures of the first 6 months post-dialysis owing to decreased inpatient service utilization secondary to cardiovascular causes and vascular access-related surgeries.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00644046.

  5. Multidisciplinary predialysis education reduced the inpatient and total medical costs of the first 6 months of dialysis in incident hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yu-Jen; Wu, I-Wen; Huang, Chun-Yu; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Lee, Chin-Chan; Sun, Chio-Yin; Hsu, Heng-Jung; Wu, Mai-Szu

    2014-01-01

    The multidisciplinary pre-dialysis education (MPE) retards renal progression, reduce incidence of dialysis and mortality of CKD patients. However, the financial benefit of this intervention on patients starting hemodialysis has not yet been evaluated in prospective and randomized trial. We studied the medical expenditure and utilization incurred in the first 6 months of dialysis initiation in 425 incident hemodialysis patients who were randomized into MPE and non-MPE groups before reaching end-stage renal disease. The content of the MPE was standardized in accordance with the National Kidney Foundation Dialysis Outcomes Quality Initiative guidelines. The mean age of study patients was 63.8±13.2 years, and 221 (49.7%) of them were men. The mean serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate was 6.1±4.0 mg/dL and 7.6±2.9 mL⋅min(-1)⋅1.73 m(-2), respectively, at dialysis initiation. MPE patients tended to have lower total medical cost in the first 6 months after hemodialysis initiation (9147.6±0.1 USD/patient vs. 11190.6±0.1 USD/patient, p = 0.003), fewer in numbers [0 (1) vs. 1 (2), pcatheter at initiation of hemodialysis. Participation of multidisciplinary education in pre-dialysis period was independently associated with reduction in the inpatient and total medical expenditures of the first 6 months post-dialysis owing to decreased inpatient service utilization secondary to cardiovascular causes and vascular access-related surgeries. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00644046.

  6. Managing Costs and Medical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    People with cancer may face major financial challenges and need help dealing with the high costs of care. Cancer treatment can be very expensive, even when you have insurance. Learn ways to manage medical information, paperwork, bills, and other records.

  7. ULTRAPLATE 24 month report and cost statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    At the 24-month milestone the ULTRAPLATE project has proven itself as both an excellent forum for exchange and development of ideas between experts as well as a source of new and commercially highly interesting process technologies. Several outcomes of the project are being pursued for further...... the tasks concluded so far, R&D in basic ultrasonic technologies and the feasibility of using them constructively in electrodeposition (WP 1) has been successfully concluded. An iterative study on process-microstructure-property relations for electrodeposits (WP 2), revealed improved filling behaviour of Ni...

  8. Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old ... regarding special baby care. Keep updating your child's medical record , listing information on growth and any problems ...

  9. Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old ... doctor gives you. At home, update your baby's medical record , tracking growth and any problems or illnesses. ...

  10. Retrospective Analysis of Medication Adherence and Cost Following Medication Therapy Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Branham, PharmD

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine if pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM improves medication adherence in Medicare patients. A secondary objective is to compare the total monthly cost of a patient’s prescription medication regimen 6 months before and 6 months following a comprehensive medication review (CMR. Design: Retrospective analysis of medication adherence, pre-post comparison. Setting: Three independent pharmacies in North Carolina. Patients: 97 Medicare Part D beneficiaries with one or more chronic disease states who participated in a comprehensive medication review (CMR. Intervention: MTM services provided by community pharmacists. Main outcome measure: Change in adherence as measured by the proportion of days covered (PDC and change in medication costs for patients and third party payers. Results: Patients were adherent to chronic disease-state medications before and after MTM (PDC≥ 0.8. Overall, change in mean adherence before and after MTM did not change significantly (0.87 and 0.88, respectively; p = 0.43. However, patients taking medications for cholesterol management, GERD, thyroid and BPH demonstrated improved adherence following a CMR. No change in adherence was noted for patients using antihypertensives and antidiabetic agents. Average total chronic disease-state medication costs for participants were reduced from $210.74 to $193.63 (p=0.08 following the comprehensive medication review. Total costs for patient and third party payers decreased from patients prescribed antilipemics, antihypertensives, GERD and thyroid disorders following a CMR. Conclusions: Pharmacist-provided MTM services were effective at improving medication adherence for some patients managed with chronic medications. Pharmacist-provided MTM services also were effective in decreasing total medication costs.

  11. Medication Days Supply, Adherence, Wastage, and Cost

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In an attempt to contain Medicaid pharmacy costs, nearly all states impose dispensing limits on medication days supply. Although longer days supply appears to...

  12. Estimating medical costs of gastroenterological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Fang Chou

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To estimate the direct medical costs of gastroenterological diseases within the universal health insurance program among the population of local residents in Taiwan.METHODS: The data sources were the first 4 cohort datasets of 200 000 people from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taipei. The ambulatory,inpatient and pharmacy claims of the cohort in 2001 were analyzed. Besides prevalence and medical costs of diseases,both amount and costs of utilization in procedures and drugs were calculated.RESULTS: Of the cohort with 183 976 eligible people, 44.2% had ever a gastroenterological diagnosis during the year.The age group 20-39 years had the lowest prevalence rate(39.2%) while the elderly had the highest (58.4%). The prevalence rate was higher in women than in men (48.5%vs. 40.0%). Totally, 30.4% of 14 888 inpatients had ever a gastroenterological diagnosis at discharge and 18.8% of 51 359 patients at clinics of traditional Chinese medicine had such a diagnosis there. If only the principal diagnosis on each daim was considered, 16.2% of admissions, 8.0% of outpatient visits, and 10.1% of the total medical costs (8 469 909 US dollars/83 830 239 US dollars) were attributed to gastroenterological diseases. On average, 46.0 US dollars per insured person in a year were spent in treating gastroenterological diseases.Diagnostic procedures related to gastroenterological diseases accounted for 24.2% of the costs for all diagnostic procedures and 2.3% of the total medical costs. Therapeutic procedures related to gastroenterological diseases accounted for 4.5% of the costs for all therapeutic procedures and 1.3% of thetotal medical costs. Drugs related to gastroenterological diseases accounted for 7.3% of the costs for all drugs and 1.9% of the total medical costs.CONCLUSION: Gastroenterological diseases are prevalent among the population of local residents in Taiwan, account ingfor a tenth of the total medical costs. Further investigations are needed to

  13. Costs of venous thromboembolism associated with hospitalization for medical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohoon, Kevin P; Leibson, Cynthia L; Ransom, Jeanine E; Ashrani, Aneel A; Petterson, Tanya M; Long, Kirsten Hall; Bailey, Kent R; Heit, Johm A

    2015-04-01

    To determine population-based estimates of medical costs attributable to venous thromboembolism (VTE) among patients currently or recently hospitalized for acute medical illness. Population-based cohort study conducted in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Using Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) resources, we identified all Olmsted County residents with objectively diagnosed incident VTE during or within 92 days of hospitalization for acute medical illness over the 18-year period of 1988 to 2005 (n=286). One Olmsted County resident hospitalized for medical illness without VTE was matched to each case for event date (±1 year), duration of prior medical history, and active cancer status. Subjects were followed forward in REP provider-linked billing data for standardized, inflation-adjusted direct medical costs (excluding outpatient pharmaceutical costs) from 1 year before their respective event or index date to the earliest of death, emigration from Olmsted County, or December 31, 2011 (study end date). We censored follow-up such that each case and matched control had similar periods of observation. We used generalized linear modeling (controlling for age, sex, preexisting conditions, and costs 1 year before index) to predict costs for cases and controls. Adjusted mean predicted costs were 2.5-fold higher for cases ($62,838) than for controls ($24,464) (PCost differences between cases and controls were greatest within the first 3 months after the event date (mean difference=$16,897) but costs remained significantly higher for cases compared with controls for up to 3 years. VTE during or after recent hospitalization for medical illness contributes a substantial economic burden.

  14. Medical cost impact of intrathecal drug delivery for noncancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillemette, Scott; Witzke, Susan; Leier, Jacqueline; Hinnenthal, Jennifer; Prager, Joshua P

    2013-04-01

    As healthcare budgets continue to contract, there is increased payer scrutiny on the use of implantable intrathecal drug-infusion devices. This study utilizes claims data to evaluate the economic effects of intrathecal drug delivery (IDD) based on health services utilization and costs of care before and after implantation. We performed a retrospective database study involving 555 noncancer pain patients that received an IDD system implant within a 3-year service period (1/2006-1/2009). IDD patient costs were temporally aligned to implant month and repriced to a standardized, national pricing schedule over a 6-year episode cycle (3 years preimplant, implant month, and 3 years postimplant). Additionally, we made an actuarial projection of postimplant experience, in the absence of IDD intervention, simulating a conventional pain therapy (CPT) protocol by assuming the same slope in costs prior to implantation at standardized, national price levels. Cost projections were produced over a 30-year time horizon at various reimplantation rates. IDD therapy was less costly than the CPT protocol over our baseline implantation cycle. Costs in the month of IDD implantation, and in the year following, are cumulatively $17,317 more than the CPT protocol; however, IDD financial break-even occurs soon after the second year postimplant. The lifetime analysis indicates that IDD per patient per year savings is $3,111 compared with CPT. The authors found that patients receiving an implantable IDD system may experience reduced cumulative future medical costs relative to anticipated costs in the absence of receiving IDD. This finding complements published literature on the cost-effectiveness of IDD. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Restricting patients' medication supply to one month: saving or wasting money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domino, Marisa Elena; Olinick, Joshua; Sleath, Betsy; Leinwand, Sharman; Byrns, Patricia J; Carey, Tim

    2004-07-01

    A state Medicaid program's pharmacy expenditures associated with dispensing one- and three-month supplies of drugs were examined. We simulated the effect of a policy change from a maximum of a 100-day supply of prescription medication to one where only a 34-day supply was allowed. All North Carolina prescription claims from Medicaid enrollees who filled a prescription for at least one of six medication categories during fiscal years 1999 and 2000 were included. The six categories were angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors, antiulcers, antipsychotics, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors, and sulfonylureas. The dollar value of the medication wasted, the amount of medication wastage diverted after a change to a shorter prescription length, and the total costs incurred by the increases in prescription refills were calculated. For each therapeutic category, 255,000-783,000 prescription drug claims were analyzed. No valid drug claims were excluded for any reason. Although 5-14% of total drug wastage, attributed to switches of drug therapy, could be saved by dispensing a 34-day supply, this saving could not make up for a larger increase in dispensing costs, as consumers would fill prescriptions more often. In addition, reducing the amount of drug dispensed each time may be costly to consumers through increased transportation and other expenses. Simulated calculation showed that the cost of drug therapy to North Carolina's Medicaid program would probably increase if 34-day rather than 100-day supplies of medications are dispensed to patients.

  16. Medical Care Cost Recovery National Database (MCCR NDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Medical Care Cost Recovery National Database (MCCR NDB) provides a repository of summary Medical Care Collections Fund (MCCF) billing and collection information...

  17. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mallory L; Currie, Amanda D; Molinari, Anna L; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M; Heusinkveld, Lauren E; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E; Davis, Thomas L; Neimat, Joseph S; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson's disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD.

  19. Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation May Reduce Medication Costs in Early Stage Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mallory L.; Currie, Amanda D.; Molinari, Anna L.; Turchan, Maxim; Millan, Sarah M.; Heusinkveld, Lauren E.; Roach, Jonathon; Konrad, Peter E.; Davis, Thomas L.; Neimat, Joseph S.; Phibbs, Fenna T.; Hedera, Peter; Byrne, Daniel W.; Charles, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is well-known to reduce medication burden in advanced stage Parkinson’s disease (PD). Preliminary data from a prospective, single blind, controlled pilot trial demonstrated that early stage PD subjects treated with STN-DBS also required less medication than those treated with optimal drug therapy (ODT). Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze medication cost and utilization from the pilot trial of DBS in early stage PD and to project 10 year medication costs. Methods: Medication data collected at each visit were used to calculate medication costs. Medications were converted to levodopa equivalent daily dose, categorized by medication class, and compared. Medication costs were projected to advanced stage PD, the time when a typical patient may be offered DBS. Results: Medication costs increased 72% in the ODT group and decreased 16% in the DBS+ODT group from baseline to 24 months. This cost difference translates into a cumulative savings for the DBS+ODT group of $7,150 over the study period. Projected medication cost savings over 10 years reach $64,590. Additionally, DBS+ODT subjects were 80% less likely to require polypharmacy compared with ODT subjects at 24 months (p <  0.05; OR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.04–0.97). Conclusions: STN-DBS in early PD reduced medication cost over the two-year study period. DBS may offer substantial long-term reduction in medication cost by maintaining a simplified, low dose medication regimen. Further study is needed to confirm these findings, and the FDA has approved a pivotal, multicenter clinical trial evaluating STN-DBS in early PD. PMID:26967937

  20. Effect of medication reconciliation on medication costs after hospital discharge in relation to hospital pharmacy labor costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Karapinar-Çarkit (Fatma); S.D. Borgsteede (Sander); J. Zoer (Jan); T.C.G. Egberts (Toine); P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia); M.W. van Tulder (Maurits)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Medication reconciliation aims to correct discrepancies in medication use between health care settings and to check the quality of pharmacotherapy to improve effectiveness and safety. In addition, medication reconciliation might also reduce costs. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the

  1. Factors That Influence the Financing and Cost of Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPheeters, Harold L.

    Financing and cost factors in medical education and the effect of the many missions of a medical school on funding issues are discussed. The teaching mission of medical schools includes undergraduate medical education (preparation for the MD degree), graduate medical education (training of resident physicians), biomedical specialist education,…

  2. Cost in Medical Education: One Hundred and Twenty Years Ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    The first full paper that is dedicated to cost in medical education appears in the "BMJ" in 1893. This paper "The cost of a medical education" outlines the likely costs associated with undergraduate education at the end of the nineteenth century, and offers guidance to the student on how to make financial planning. Many lessons…

  3. Costs of medical manipulations and funding of medical staff across the Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete Pumpure

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Clinical University hospitals in European Union, including those from new European countries, are providing medical services according to high quality standards; however there are significant differences in medical service payment from the government. There are also differences in the amount of the payment for in- and outpatient services. According to World Bank’s assessment several of new European Union members are ranked as high-income countries alongside to old European member countries, but the payment gap of medical services between these countries is very relevant. Health insurance costs vary a lot across the European Union countries, with the highest percentage in Germany (15.5% and the lowest in France (100 Euro per year. In most countries the government finances the costs of surgical manipulations, but by contrast in Latvia patients have to pay fixed payment of EUR 43 for treatment even in case of malignancy and additional payments for staying in hospital. The salary of surgeons in field of gynecological oncology for the full workload ranges from 500 Euro in Macedonia to 4000 Euro in Denmark per month after the taxes. Reward from government varies a lot for the same manipulations in different countries. Despite the fact World Bank ranks new European countries as high-income countries there is tremendous difference in the manipulation costs covered by government and payment of medical stuff.

  4. Low-Cost Medical Office Data Management System

    OpenAIRE

    Divinski, Jane

    1980-01-01

    This project is developing and demonstrating a low-cost microcomputer-based medical office data management system. The system is aimed at the specific needs of small primary care medical practices, in particular, those located in rural areas.

  5. Activity Analysis and Cost Analysis in Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, John E.; Slighton, Robert L.

    There is no unique answer to the question of what an ongoing program costs in medical schools. The estimates of program costs generated by classical methods of cost accounting are unsatisfactory because such accounting cannot deal with the joint production or joint cost problem. Activity analysis models aim at calculating the impact of alternative…

  6. Mean direct medical care costs associated with cervical cancer for commercially insured patients in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairson, David R; Fu, Shuangshuang; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Li; Shelal, Zeena; Ramondetta, Lois

    2017-04-01

    To determine the mean cervical cancer medical care costs for patients enrolled in commercial insurance in Texas. Cost is represented by insurer and patient payments for care. We estimated the mean medical care costs during the first 2years after the index diagnosis date for patients with cervical cancer (cases). Cases were identified using claims-based International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9), diagnosis codes and matched to controls without a claims-based ICD-9 code for cancer using a 2-step propensity score matching method. Index dates for the cases were randomly assigned to potential controls, and cases and controls were matched by index date. Data for cancer cases and controls were obtained from the de-identified 2011-2014 U.S. MarketScan databases. A generalized linear model was employed to compute the cost for censored months during the 2-year follow-up period. Differential costs were assessed by subtracting the medical costs incurred by controls from those incurred by cases. During 2011-2014, 475 commercially insured Texas patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer met the inclusion criteria. The first-year and second-year mean medical costs were $60,828 and $37,721 for cases and $9982 and $10,066 for controls, respectively. The differential costs of cervical cancer for the first and second years were $50,846 and $27,656, respectively. The major correlates of higher monthly cervical cancer costs were higher Charlson Comorbidity Index score during 6months period prior to diagnosis, higher healthcare costs between 6months and 3months prior to diagnosis, and residence in the western region of Texas. Costs for cervical cancer patients decreased steeply between month 1 and month 5 after diagnosis and then were stable, while costs for the control group were stable throughout the follow-up period. Mean direct medical costs associated with cervical cancer in Texas were substantial. These data will serve as key cost

  7. Medical Care and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 7 meses Babies really begin to show their personality during these months. So you might find yourself ... your baby also may get (depending on the brand of vaccine given, and whether your child has ...

  8. A Case Illustrating the Costs of Quality Improvement: Nine Months to Move Needles and Syringes on the Anesthesia Cart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Alexander K; Macario, Alex; Brock-Utne, John G; Jaffe, Richard A; Kadry, Bassam

    2015-09-01

    Powerful entities are pushing physicians to become more involved with quality improvement (QI). We report a QI project to standardize and improve the ergonomics of the anesthesia medication and supply cart. Simply obtaining approval to make minor changes to the cart involved 54 phone calls, 164 e-mails, 4 presentations, 2 forms, 9 meetings, and 4 months of time. Confusion over fiscal matters further delayed the project by an additional 3 months. A combination of competing regulations, administrative overprocessing, and the lack of dedicated QI financial resources made simple improvements a challenge. The costs of participating in QI deserve attention.

  9. A two-part model for censored medical cost data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lu; Huang, Jie

    2007-10-15

    The two-part model is often used to analyse medical cost data which contain a large proportion of zero cost and are highly skewed with some large costs. The total medical costs over a period of time are often censored due to incomplete follow-up, making the analysis difficult as the censoring can be informative. We propose to apply the inverse probability weighting method on a two-part model to analyse right-censored cumulative medical costs with informative censoring. We also introduce a set of simple functionals based on the intermediate cost history to be applied with the efficiency augmentation technique. In addition, we propose a practical model-checking technique based on the cumulative residuals. Simulation studies are conducted to evaluate the finite sample performance of the proposed method. We use a data set on the cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related Medicare costs to illustrate our proposed method.

  10. Direct medical costs of adverse events in Dutch hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoonhout, L.H.F.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wagner, C.; Zegers, M.; Waaijman, R.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Asscheman, H.; Wal, G. van der; Tulder, M.W. van

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Up to now, costs attributable to adverse events (AEs) and preventable AEs in the Netherlands were unknown. We assessed the total direct medical costs associated with AEs and preventable AEs in Dutch hospitals to gain insight in opportunities for cost savings. METHODS: Trained nurses and

  11. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 18, Number 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    paralysis , sei- zures, coma, and in most cases death.2 Currently, there is no eff ective treat- ment for symptomatic rabies, and pro- gression to...m pt om (l in es ) No. of TBI-related medical encounters Memory loss Headache Dizziness Sleep disturbance Insomnia Tinnitus 2010 2009 2008

  12. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 21, Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    high-fat or high-cholesterol diet, diabetes, and certain medications.1–5 Pregnancy and history of pregnancy are also associated with an increased...should advise service members at greatest risk for gallbladder disease of the modifi able lifestyle changes that could prevent gallstone formation

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. olume 22, Number 1, January 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    months.16 On the other hand, transmission of malaria in tropical regions such as sub- Saharan Africa is less subject to the limita- tions of the...common presentation of ill- ness in non-typhoidal Salmonella is gastro- enteritis with typical signs and symptoms of diarrhea , fever, and abdominal

  14. Medical Care and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Doctor en español Atención médica y su hijo de 1 a 3 meses During these early months, you might have many questions about your baby's health. Most doctors have phone hours when parents can call with routine questions. Don't hesitate ...

  15. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 22, Number 10, October 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    transmitted to humans via the bite of an infected mosquito of the genus Aedes (A. aegypti or A. albopictus). Acute disease is primarily characterized by... prevent illness due to CHIKV infection. Several studies have reported persis- tent and chronic joint pains lasting months to years aft er the...Surveillance Branch, Silver Spring, MD Acknowledgements: Th e authors thank Rohit Chitale, PhD (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  16. Burn epidemiology and cost of medication in paediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha; Sağlam, Zeynep

    2012-09-01

    Burns are common injuries that cause problems to societies throughout the world. In order to reduce the cost of burn treatment in children, it is extremely important to determine the burn epidemiology and the cost of medicines used in burn treatment. The present study used a retrospective design, with data collected from medical records of 140 paediatric patients admitted to a burn centre between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2009. Medical records were examined to determine burn epidemiology, medication administered, dosage, and duration of use. Descriptive statistical analysis was completed for all variables; chi-square was used to examine the relationship between certain variables. It was found that 62.7% of paediatric burns occur in the kitchen, with 70.7% involving boiling water; 55.7% of cases resulted in third-degree burns, 19.3% required grafting, and mean duration of hospital stay was 27.5 ± 1.2 days. Medication costs varied between $1.38 US dollars (USD) and $14,159.09, total drug cost was $46,148.03 and average cost per patient was $329.63. In this study, the medication cost for burn patients was found to be relatively high, with antibiotics comprising the vast majority of medication expenditure. Most paediatric burns are preventable, so it is vital to educate families about potential household hazards that can be addressed to reduce the risk of a burn. Programmes are also recommended to reduce costs and the inappropriate prescribing of medication.

  17. Cost effectiveness of a medical digital library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, F; Darmoni, S J; Thirion, B

    2001-01-01

    The rapid increase in the price of electronic journals has made the optimization of collection management an urgent task. As there is currently no standard procedure for the evaluation of this problem, we applied the Reading Factor (RF), an electronically computed indicator used for consultation of individual articles. The aim of our study was to assess the cost effective impact of modifications in our digital library (i.e. change of access from the Intranet to the Internet or change in editorial policy). The digital OVID library at Rouen University Hospital continues to be cost-effective in comparison with the interlibrary loan costs. Moreover, when electronic versions are offered alongside a limited amount of interlibrary loans, a reduction in library costs was observed.

  18. Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

    This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

  19. Cost-effectiveness of aripiprazole once-monthly compared with paliperidone palmitate once-monthly injectable for the treatment of schizophrenia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrome, Leslie; Kamat, Siddhesh A; Sapin, Christophe; Baker, Ross A; Eramo, Anna; Ortendahl, Jesse; Gutierrez, Benjamin; Hansen, Karina; Bentley, Tanya G K

    2014-08-01

    To develop a decision-analytic model to estimate the cost-effectiveness of initiating maintenance treatment with aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM) vs paliperidone long-acting injectable (PLAI) once-monthly among patients with schizophrenia in the US. A decision-analytic model was developed to evaluate a hypothetical cohort of patients initiating maintenance treatment with AOM or PLAI. Rates of relapse, adverse events (AEs), and direct medical costs were estimated for 1 year. Patients either remained on initial treatment or discontinued treatment due to lack of efficacy, AEs, or other reasons, including non-adherence. Data from placebo-controlled pivotal trials and product prescribing information (PI) were used to estimate treatment efficacy and AEs. Analyses were performed assuming dosing of clinical trials, real-world practice, PIs, and highest therapeutic dose available, because of variation in practice settings. The main outcome of interest was incremental cost per schizophrenia hospitalization averted with AOM vs PLAI. Based on placebo-controlled pivotal trials' dosing, AOM improved clinical outcomes by reducing schizophrenia relapses vs PLAI (0.181 vs 0.277 per person per year [pppy]) at an additional cost of US$1276 pppy, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of US$13,280/relapse averted. When PI dosing was assumed, this ICER increased to US$19,968/relapse averted. When real-world dosing and highest available dosing were assumed, AOM was associated with fewer relapses and lower overall treatment costs vs PLAI. AOM consistently provided favorable clinical benefits. Under various dosing scenarios, AOM results indicated fewer relapses at lower overall costs or a reasonable cost-effectiveness threshold (i.e., less than the cost of a hospitalization relapse) vs PLAI. Given the heterogeneous nature of schizophrenia and variability in treatment response, health plans may consider open access for treatments like AOM. Since model inputs were based

  20. Current & future medical costs of childhood obesity in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guettabi, Mouhcine

    2014-09-01

    This study examines the medical costs of childhood obesity in Alaska, today and in the future. We estimate that 15.2 percent of those ages 2 to 19 in Alaska are obese. Using parameters from published reports and studies, we estimate that the total excess medical costs due to obesity for both adults and children in Alaska in 2012 were $226 million, with medical costs of obese children and adolescents accounting for about $7 million of that total. And those medical costs will get much higher over time, as today's children transition into adulthood. Aside from the 15.2 percent currently obese, another estimated 20 percent of children who aren't currently obese will become obese as adults, if current national patterns continue. We estimate that the 20-year medical costs--discounted to present value--of obesity among the current cohort of Alaska children and adolescents will be $624 million in today's dollars. But those future costs could be decreased if Alaskans found ways to reduce obesity. We consider how reducing obesity in several ways could reduce future medical costs: reducing current rates of childhood obesity, rates of obese children who become obese adults, or rates of non-obese children and adolescents who become obese adults. We undertake modest reductions to showcase the potential cost savings associated with each of these channels. Clearly the financial savings are a direct function of the obesity reductions and therefore the magnitude of the realized savings will vary accordingly. Also keep in mind that these figures are only for the current cohort of children and adolescents; over time more generations of Alaskans will grow from children into adults, repeating the same cycle unless rates of obesity decline. And finally, remember that medical costs are only part of the broader range of social and economic costs obesity creates.

  1. Cost Analysis of Medications Used in Upper Respiratory Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cost Analysis of Medications Used in Upper Respiratory Tract Infections and Prescribing Patterns in University Sans ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... The study was done in the clinics under University Sains Malaysia. A total ...

  2. Medication Adherence and Direct Treatment Cost among Diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medication Adherence and Direct Treatment Cost among Diabetes Patients Attending a ... has been shown to improve glycaemic control, which subsequently improves both the short- and ... DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT ...

  3. Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical cost of Lassa fever treatment in Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Of Lassa Fever Research and Control, Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital (ISTH) Irrua, in Edo State, ...

  4. Determinant of the medical expenses of the elderly during the last seven month period of life

    OpenAIRE

    谷原,真一

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated medical expenses during the last seven months of life in elderly patients aged seventy and over in a rulal town in Okayama prefecture from January 1992 to March 1995, using data from death certificates and medical fee claim records of the elderly. The findings were as follows : 1. The monthly expenses increased toward the last month of life. 2. In the multiple regression model, five independent variables (length of hospital stay, malignant disease, cerebral vascular desea...

  5. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of an Automated Medication System Implemented in a Danish Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risør, Bettina Wulff; Lisby, Marianne; Sørensen, Jan

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of an automated medication system (AMS) implemented in a Danish hospital setting. An economic evaluation was performed alongside a controlled before-and-after effectiveness study with one control ward and one intervention ward. The primary outcome measure was the number of errors in the medication administration process observed prospectively before and after implementation. To determine the difference in proportion of errors after implementation of the AMS, logistic regression was applied with the presence of error(s) as the dependent variable. Time, group, and interaction between time and group were the independent variables. The cost analysis used the hospital perspective with a short-term incremental costing approach. The total 6-month costs with and without the AMS were calculated as well as the incremental costs. The number of avoided administration errors was related to the incremental costs to obtain the cost-effectiveness ratio expressed as the cost per avoided administration error. The AMS resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the proportion of errors in the intervention ward compared with the control ward. The cost analysis showed that the AMS increased the ward's 6-month cost by €16,843. The cost-effectiveness ratio was estimated at €2.01 per avoided administration error, €2.91 per avoided procedural error, and €19.38 per avoided clinical error. The AMS was effective in reducing errors in the medication administration process at a higher overall cost. The cost-effectiveness analysis showed that the AMS was associated with affordable cost-effectiveness rates. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reducing six-month inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs through case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasovsky, Andrew; Reich, Leonard; Meyerkopf, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the reduction in inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs associated with an intensive case management (ICM) program among high-risk adults with chronic mental health conditions. An intent-to-treat, historical control design was used to examine utilization differences between 306 intervention group (IG) members eligible to receive ICM services and a cohort of 290 baseline group (BG) members over a six-month outcome period. Members were identified retrospectively using identical criteria during one year prior to implementation of the program. The six-month recidivism rate for BG members was 49.67% compared to 22.07% among IG members. Forward stepwise regression results indicated a significant main effect for the ICM intervention on inpatient psychiatric costs. Inpatient psychiatric costs for the six-month outcome period were $4,982.90 lower per member in the IG group. Additional models demonstrated that the ICM intervention was associated with significantly lower inpatient substance abuse costs and psychiatric emergency department costs. There were no statistically significant increases in utilization associated with the ICM intervention. After factoring in program costs, it is estimated that the ICM services contributed to almost $1,500,000 in cost savings over the six-month outcome period. The ICM intervention was associated with significant reductions in inpatient, psychiatric six-month readmission rates and associated costs among adult members who are at elevated risk of inpatient, psychiatric recidivism. The intervention, enrollment process, and measurement strategies can be adapted for use by health plans looking to reduce psychiatric costs.

  7. 76 FR 39474 - Monthly Median Cost of Funds Reporting, and Publication of Cost of Funds Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... Mae) and to the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC or Freddie Mac) that use these indices... determine, after notice and opportunity for comment, that (A) the new indices are based upon data... values and changes of 17 publicly available indices on a monthly basis from January 1990 through...

  8. Money for nothing? The net costs of medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Pedro P; Machado, Sara R

    2010-09-01

    One of the stages of medical training is the residency programme. Hosting institutions often claim compensation for the training provided. How much should this compensation be? According to our results, given the benefits arising from having residents among the house staff, no transfer (either tuition fee or subsidy) should be set to compensate the hosting institution for providing medical training. This paper quantifies the net costs of medical training, defined as the training costs over and above the wage paid. We jointly consider two effects. On the one hand, residents take extra time and resources from both the hosting institution and the supervisor. On the other hand, residents can be regarded as a less expensive substitute to nurses and/or graduate physicians, in the production of health care, both in primary care centres and hospitals. The net effect can be either positive or negative. We use the fact that residents, in Portugal, are centrally allocated to National Health Service hospitals to treat them as a fixed exogenous production factor. The data used comes from Portuguese hospitals and primary care centres. Cost function estimates point to a small negative marginal impact of residents on hospitals' (-0.02%) and primary care centres' (-0.9%) costs. Nonetheless, there is a positive relation between size and cost to the very large hospitals and primary care centres. Our approach to estimation of residents' costs controls for other teaching activities hospitals might have (namely undergraduate Medical Schools). Overall, the net costs of medical training appear to be quite small.

  9. Parametric estimation of medical care costs under conditions of censoring

    OpenAIRE

    Raikou, Maria; McGuire, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a set of parametric estimators that attempt to provide consistent estimates of average medical care costs under conditions of censoring. The main finding is that incorporation of the inverse of the probability of an individual not being censored in the estimating equations is instrumental in deriving unbiased cost estimates. The success of the approach is dependent on the amount of available information on the cost history process. The value of this information in...

  10. Medical tourism: a cost or benefit to the NHS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, Johanna; Horsfall, Daniel; Lunt, Neil; Smith, Richard

    2013-01-01

    'Medical Tourism' - the phenomenon of people travelling abroad to access medical treatment - has received increasing attention in academic and popular media. This paper reports findings from a study examining effect of inbound and outbound medical tourism on the UK NHS, by estimating volume of medical tourism and associated costs and benefits. A mixed methods study it includes analysis of the UK International Passenger Survey (IPS); interviews with 77 returning UK medical tourists, 63 policymakers, NHS managers and medical tourism industry actors policymakers, and a review of published literature. These informed costing of three types of treatments for which patients commonly travel abroad: fertility treatment, cosmetic and bariatric surgery. Costing of inbound tourism relied on data obtained through 28 Freedom-of-Information requests to NHS Foundation Trusts. Findings demonstrate that contrary to some popular media reports, far from being a net importer of patients, the UK is now a clear net exporter of medical travellers. In 2010, an estimated 63,000 UK residents travelled for treatment, while around 52,000 patients sought treatment in the UK. Inbound medical tourists treated as private patients within NHS facilities may be especially profitable when compared to UK private patients, yielding close to a quarter of revenue from only 7% of volume in the data examined. Costs arise where patients travel abroad and return with complications. Analysis also indicates possible savings especially in future health care and social costs averted. These are likely to be specific to procedures and conditions treated. UK medical tourism is a growing phenomenon that presents risks and opportunities to the NHS. To fully understand its implications and guide policy on issues such as NHS global activities and patient safety will require investment in further research and monitoring. Results point to likely impact of medical tourism in other universal public health systems.

  11. Medical tourism: a cost or benefit to the NHS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Hanefeld

    Full Text Available 'Medical Tourism' - the phenomenon of people travelling abroad to access medical treatment - has received increasing attention in academic and popular media. This paper reports findings from a study examining effect of inbound and outbound medical tourism on the UK NHS, by estimating volume of medical tourism and associated costs and benefits. A mixed methods study it includes analysis of the UK International Passenger Survey (IPS; interviews with 77 returning UK medical tourists, 63 policymakers, NHS managers and medical tourism industry actors policymakers, and a review of published literature. These informed costing of three types of treatments for which patients commonly travel abroad: fertility treatment, cosmetic and bariatric surgery. Costing of inbound tourism relied on data obtained through 28 Freedom-of-Information requests to NHS Foundation Trusts. Findings demonstrate that contrary to some popular media reports, far from being a net importer of patients, the UK is now a clear net exporter of medical travellers. In 2010, an estimated 63,000 UK residents travelled for treatment, while around 52,000 patients sought treatment in the UK. Inbound medical tourists treated as private patients within NHS facilities may be especially profitable when compared to UK private patients, yielding close to a quarter of revenue from only 7% of volume in the data examined. Costs arise where patients travel abroad and return with complications. Analysis also indicates possible savings especially in future health care and social costs averted. These are likely to be specific to procedures and conditions treated. UK medical tourism is a growing phenomenon that presents risks and opportunities to the NHS. To fully understand its implications and guide policy on issues such as NHS global activities and patient safety will require investment in further research and monitoring. Results point to likely impact of medical tourism in other universal public health

  12. Medical Tourism: A Cost or Benefit to the NHS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanefeld, Johanna; Horsfall, Daniel; Lunt, Neil; Smith, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Medical Tourism’ – the phenomenon of people travelling abroad to access medical treatment - has received increasing attention in academic and popular media. This paper reports findings from a study examining effect of inbound and outbound medical tourism on the UK NHS, by estimating volume of medical tourism and associated costs and benefits. A mixed methods study it includes analysis of the UK International Passenger Survey (IPS); interviews with 77 returning UK medical tourists, 63 policymakers, NHS managers and medical tourism industry actors policymakers, and a review of published literature. These informed costing of three types of treatments for which patients commonly travel abroad: fertility treatment, cosmetic and bariatric surgery. Costing of inbound tourism relied on data obtained through 28 Freedom-of-Information requests to NHS Foundation Trusts. Findings demonstrate that contrary to some popular media reports, far from being a net importer of patients, the UK is now a clear net exporter of medical travellers. In 2010, an estimated 63,000 UK residents travelled for treatment, while around 52,000 patients sought treatment in the UK. Inbound medical tourists treated as private patients within NHS facilities may be especially profitable when compared to UK private patients, yielding close to a quarter of revenue from only 7% of volume in the data examined. Costs arise where patients travel abroad and return with complications. Analysis also indicates possible savings especially in future health care and social costs averted. These are likely to be specific to procedures and conditions treated. UK medical tourism is a growing phenomenon that presents risks and opportunities to the NHS. To fully understand its implications and guide policy on issues such as NHS global activities and patient safety will require investment in further research and monitoring. Results point to likely impact of medical tourism in other universal public health systems

  13. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6-59-Month-Old Children in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice; Tzogiou, Christina; Eichler, Klaus; Brügger, Urs; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in 6-59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses. We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6-23 and 24-59-months), 2 geographical areas (urban and rural), 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe). Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature. IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6-23-month-old and 39.9% in 24-58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6-59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA. Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood.

  14. Unit cost of medical services at different hospitals in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susmita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Institutional care is a growing component of health care costs in low- and middle-income countries, but local health planners in these countries have inadequate knowledge of the costs of different medical services. In India, greater utilisation of hospital services is driven both by rising incomes and by government insurance programmes that cover the cost of inpatient services; however, there is still a paucity of unit cost information from Indian hospitals. In this study, we estimated operating costs and cost per outpatient visit, cost per inpatient stay, cost per emergency room visit, and cost per surgery for five hospitals of different types across India: a 57-bed charitable hospital, a 200-bed private hospital, a 400-bed government district hospital, a 655-bed private teaching hospital, and a 778-bed government tertiary care hospital for the financial year 2010-11. The major cost component varied among human resources, capital costs, and material costs, by hospital type. The outpatient visit cost ranged from Rs. 94 (district hospital to Rs. 2,213 (private hospital (USD 1 = INR 52. The inpatient stay cost was Rs. 345 in the private teaching hospital, Rs. 394 in the district hospital, Rs. 614 in the tertiary care hospital, Rs. 1,959 in the charitable hospital, and Rs. 6,996 in the private hospital. Our study results can help hospital administrators understand their cost structures and run their facilities more efficiently, and we identify areas where improvements in efficiency might significantly lower unit costs. The study also demonstrates that detailed costing of Indian hospital operations is both feasible and essential, given the significant variation in the country's hospital types. Because of the size and diversity of the country and variations across hospitals, a large-scale study should be undertaken to refine hospital costing for different types of hospitals so that the results can be used for policy purposes, such as revising

  15. Therapeutic consideration of carotid-cavernous sinus fistula (CCF) in medical cost. Radiotherapy versus transvenous embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Narisumi; Iizuka, Yuo; Naoi, Yutaka; Maehara, Tadayuki; Katayama, Hitoshi [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-08-01

    Indirect type of CCF has some therapeutic choices. In progressive case, either embolization or irradiation is usually selected. All 9 cases in this study had chemosis due to main draining via SOV from AV shunt. Six cases were treated by irradiation and 3 cases underwent transvenous embolization. Chemosis disappeared 3.7 weeks after transvenous embolization, on the other hand 10.5 months after irradiation. Medical cost is higher in transvenous embolization than in radiotherapy because of coil and micro catheter. Consideration of medical cost, treatment of CCF should be selected not only transvenous embolization but radiotherapy. (author)

  16. Relationship between patient dependence and direct medical-, social-, indirect-, and informal-care costs in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darbà J

    2015-07-01

    over 6 months for direct medical-, social-, indirect-, and informal-care costs were estimated at €1,028.10 (€1,655.00, €843.80 (€2,684.80, €464.20 (€1,639.00, and €33,232.20 (€30,898.90, respectively. Dependence was independently and significantly associated with direct medical-, social-, informal-, and total-care costs. Conclusion: The costs of care for patients with AD in Spain are substantial, with informal care accounting for the greatest part. Interventions that reduce patient dependence on caregivers may be associated with important reduction in direct medical-, social-, informal-, and total-care costs. Keywords: Alzheimer, Dependence Scale, direct medical care costs, social care costs, indirect care costs, informal care costs.

  17. Trend of cost and utilization of COPD medication in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongmin; Lee, Jae Ha; Kim, Jee-Ae; Rhee, Chin Kook

    2017-01-01

    Background There are only a few longitudinal studies regarding medical utilization and costs for patients with COPD. The purpose of this study was to analyze the trend of medical utilization and costs on a long-term basis. Methods Using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) data from 2008 to 2013, COPD patients were identified. The trend of medical utilization and costs was also analyzed. Results The number of COPD patients increased by 13.9% from 2008 to 2013. During the same period, the cost of COPD medication increased by 78.2%. Methylxanthine and systemic beta agonists were most widely prescribed between 2008 and 2013. However, inhaled medications such as long-acting beta-2 agonist (LABA), long-acting muscarinic agonist, and inhaled corticosteroid plus LABA were dispensed to a relatively low proportion of patients with COPD. The number of patients who were prescribed inhaled medications increased gradually from 2008 to 2013, while the number of patients prescribed systemic beta agonist and methylxanthine has decreased since 2010. Conclusion This study shows that there is a large gap between the COPD guidelines and clinical practice in Korea. Training programs for primary care physicians on diagnosis and guideline-based treatment are needed to improve the management of COPD. PMID:28031708

  18. How Are the Costs of Care for Medical Falls Distributed? The Costs of Medical Falls by Component of Cost, Timing, and Injury Severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, Alex A.; Phelan, Elizabeth A.; Fishman, Paul A.; Harris, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: To examine the components of cost that drive increased total costs after a medical fall over time, stratified by injury severity. Design and Methods: We used 2004-2007 cost and utilization data for persons enrolled in an integrated care delivery system. We used a longitudinal cohort study design, where each individual…

  19. Direct medical cost of type 2 diabetes in singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine Shuyu Ng

    Full Text Available Due to the chronic nature of diabetes along with their complications, they have been recognised as a major health issue, which results in significant economic burden. This study aims to estimate the direct medical cost associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM in Singapore in 2010 and to examine both the relationship between demographic and clinical state variables with the total estimated expenditure. The National Healthcare Group (NHG Chronic Disease Management System (CDMS database was used to identify patients with T2DM in the year 2010. DM-attributable costs estimated included hospitalisations, accident and emergency (A&E room visits, outpatient physician visits, medications, laboratory tests and allied health services. All charges and unit costs were provided by the NHG. A total of 500 patients with DM were identified for the analyses. The mean annual direct medical cost was found to be $2,034, of which 61% was accounted for by inpatient services, 35% by outpatient services, and 4% by A&E services. Independent determinants of total costs were DM treatments such as the use of insulin only (p<0.001 and the combination of both oral medications and insulin (p=0.047 as well as having complications such as cerebrovascular disease (p<0.001, cardiovascular disease (p=0.002, peripheral vascular disease (p=0.001, and nephropathy (p=0.041. In this study, the cost of DM treatments and DM-related complications were found to be strong determinants of costs. This finding suggests an imperative need to address the economic burden associated with diabetes with urgency and to reorganise resources required to improve healthcare costs.

  20. Appropriate VTE prophylaxis is associated with lower direct medical costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Alpesh; Hussein, Mohamed; Battleman, David; Lin, Jay; Stemkowski, Stephen; Merli, Geno J

    2010-11-01

    To calculate and compare the direct medical costs of guideline-recommended prophylaxis with prophylaxis that does not fully adhere with guideline recommendations in a large, real-world population. Discharge records were retrieved from the US Premier Perspective™ database (January 2003-December 2003) for patients aged≥40 years with a primary diagnosis of cancer, chronic heart failure, lung disease, or severe infectious disease who received some form of thromboprophylaxis. Univariate analysis and multivariate regression modeling were performed to compare direct medical costs between discharges who received appropriate prophylaxis (correct type, dose, and duration based on sixth edition American College of Chest Physicians [ACCP] recommendations) and partial prophylaxis (not in full accordance with ACCP recommendations). Market segmentation analysis was used to compare costs stratified by hospital and patient characteristics. Of the 683 005 discharges included, 148,171 (21.7%) received appropriate prophylaxis and 534,834 (78.3%) received partial prophylaxis. The total direct unadjusted costs were $15,439 in the appropriate prophylaxis group and $17,763 in the partial prophylaxis group. After adjustment, mean adjusted total costs per discharge were lower for those receiving appropriate prophylaxis ($11,713; 95% confidence interval [CI], $11,675-$11,753) compared with partial prophylaxis ($13,369; 95% CI, $13,332-$13 406; Panalysis suggests that appropriate prophylaxis, in adherence with ACCP guidelines, is potentially cost-saving compared with partial prophylaxis in at-risk medical patients.

  1. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6–59-Month-Old Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice; Tzogiou, Christina; Eichler, Klaus; Brügger, Urs; Wieser, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in 6–59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses. Materials and Methods We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6–23 and 24–59-months), 2 geographical areas (urban and rural), 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe). Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature. Results IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6–23-month-old and 39.9% in 24–58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6–59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA. Conclusion Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood. PMID:26313356

  2. Social Costs of Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6-59-Month-Old Children in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Plessow

    Full Text Available Inadequate nutrition has a severe impact on health in India. According to the WHO, iron deficiency is the single most important nutritional risk factor in India, accounting for more than 3% of all disability-adjusted life years (DALYs lost. We estimate the social costs of iron deficiency anemia (IDA in 6-59-month-old children in India in terms of intangible costs and production losses.We build a health economic model estimating the life-time costs of a birth cohort suffering from IDA between the ages of 6 and 59 months. The model is stratified by 2 age groups (6-23 and 24-59-months, 2 geographical areas (urban and rural, 10 socio-economic strata and 3 degrees of severity of IDA (mild, moderate and severe. Prevalence of anemia is calculated with the last available National Family Health Survey. Information on the health consequences of IDA is extracted from the literature.IDA prevalence is 49.5% in 6-23-month-old and 39.9% in 24-58-month-old children. Children living in poor households in rural areas are particularly affected but prevalence is high even in wealthy urban households. The estimated yearly costs of IDA in 6-59-month-old children amount to intangible costs of 8.3 m DALYs and production losses of 24,001 m USD, equal to 1.3% of gross domestic product. Previous calculations have considerably underestimated the intangible costs of IDA as the improved WHO methodology leads to a threefold increase of DALYs due to IDA.Despite years of iron supplementation programs and substantial economic growth, IDA remains a crucial public health issue in India and an obstacle to the economic advancement of the poor. Young children are especially vulnerable due to the irreversible effects of IDA on cognitive development. Our research may contribute to the design of new effective interventions aiming to reduce IDA in early childhood.

  3. Pattern and cost of medical care for workers with schistosomiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, M I; Ghafar, Y A; Foda, N; Moemen, M

    2001-04-01

    This study describes the pattern of medical care provided to workers with schistosomiasis, estimate the total medical cost and to identify the proportional rates of sickness retirement attributed to schistosomiasis. The observational approach was adopted for this study 170 schistosomiasis workers and a similar number of controls were included in this study. An interviewing schedule and a special format were designed for collecting personal, medical and early retirement data. The results revealed that the mean total cost in the outpatient clinics was significantly higher for schistosomiasis workers than their controls (320.2 " 330.11 versus 210.8 " 260.01 L.E). The hospital cost was also higher for schistosomiasis workers compared with their controls (265.9 " 674.47 vs 195.8 " 629.72 L.E) but this differencewas not statistically significant. More than 80% of the total hospital cost was spent on bed cost. The average operative cost/worker was significantly higher among the schistosomiasis workers than the control workers (7.08 " 22.07 vs 2.35 " 5.2 L.E). The total medical cost (outpatient and hospital) was significantly higher for workers with schistosomiasis compared with their controls (586.02" 845.77 vs 406.57 " 694.34). The total number of workers who retired because of sickness disability other than schistosomiasis increased from 1994 to 1998 with a ratio of 2.54 while those who retired because of schistosomiasis and its complications increased with a ratio of 3.64.

  4. Complementary and alternative medicine use and cost in functional bowel disorders: A six month prospective study in a large HMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drossman Douglas A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional Bowel Disorders (FBD are chronic disorders that are difficult to treat and manage. Many patients and doctors are dissatisfied with the level of improvement in symptoms that can be achieved with standard medical care which may lead them to seek alternatives for care. There are currently no data on the types of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM used for FBDs other than Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS, or on the economic costs of CAM treatments. The aim of this study is to determine prevalence, types and costs of CAM in IBS, functional diarrhea, functional constipation, and functional abdominal pain. Methods 1012 Patients with FBD were recruited through a health care maintenance organization and followed for 6 months. Questionnaires were used to ascertain: Utilization and expenditures on CAM, symptom severity (IBS-SS, quality of life (IBS-QoL, psychological distress (BSI and perceived treatment effectiveness. Costs for conventional medical care were extracted from administrative claims. Results CAM was used by 35% of patients, at a median yearly cost of $200. The most common CAM types were ginger, massage therapy and yoga. CAM use was associated with female gender, higher education, and anxiety. Satisfaction with physician care and perceived effectiveness of prescription medication were not associated with CAM use. Physician referral to a CAM provider was uncommon but the majority of patients receiving this recommendation followed their physician's advice. Conclusion CAM is used by one-third of FBD patients. CAM use does not seem to be driven by dissatisfaction with conventional care. Physicians should discuss CAM use and effectiveness with their patients and refer patients if appropriate.

  5. Antihypertensive use, prescription patterns, and cost of medications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... and 195 (97.5%) were on combination therapy. One hundred and ... The lowest cost per month was ... patterns among physicians and compliance to the drugs .... hypertensive heart disease 14 (7.0%), obesity 13 (6.5%),.

  6. Adherence to Glaucoma Medications Over 12 Months in Two US Community Pharmacy Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, Michael; Munger, Mark A.; Cooper, Daniel K.; Hess, Kyle T.; Durante, Richard; Jones, Gregory J.; Montuoro, Jaime; Morrison, Margaux A.; Clegg, Daniel; Crandall, Alan S.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the degree of adherence to medications for glaucoma among patients refilling prescriptions in community pharmacies. Methods: Data abstracted from the dispensing records for 3615 adult patients (18 years or older, predominantly over 45) receiving glaucoma medications from two retail pharmacy chains (64 stores in total) were analyzed. From a 24-month historic data capture period, the 12-month levels of adherence were determined using standard metrics, the proportion of days covered (PDC) and the medication possession ratio (MPR). The overall 12-month mean PDC was only 57%, and the mean MPR was 71%. Using a criterion by which 80% coverage was considered satisfactory adherence, only 30% had satisfactory overall 12-month PDC coverage, and only 37% had satisfactory overall 12-month MPR coverage. Refill adherence increased with age and was highest in the 65-and-older age group (p < 0.001). Differential adherence was found across medication classes, with the highest satisfactory coverage seen for those taking alpha2-adrenergic agonists (PDC = 36.0%; MPR = 47.6%) down to those taking direct cholinergic agonists (PDC = 25.0%; MPR = 31.2%) and combination products (PDC = 22.7%; MPR = 31.0%). Adherence to glaucoma medications in the community setting, as measured by pharmacy refill data, is very poor and represents a critical target for intervention. Community pharmacists are well positioned to monitor and reinforce adherence in this population. PMID:27618115

  7. Adherence to Glaucoma Medications Over 12 Months in Two US Community Pharmacy Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Feehan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study determined the degree of adherence to medications for glaucoma among patients refilling prescriptions in community pharmacies. Methods: Data abstracted from the dispensing records for 3615 adult patients (18 years or older, predominantly over 45 receiving glaucoma medications from two retail pharmacy chains (64 stores in total were analyzed. From a 24-month historic data capture period, the 12-month levels of adherence were determined using standard metrics, the proportion of days covered (PDC and the medication possession ratio (MPR. The overall 12-month mean PDC was only 57%, and the mean MPR was 71%. Using a criterion by which 80% coverage was considered satisfactory adherence, only 30% had satisfactory overall 12-month PDC coverage, and only 37% had satisfactory overall 12-month MPR coverage. Refill adherence increased with age and was highest in the 65-and-older age group (p < 0.001. Differential adherence was found across medication classes, with the highest satisfactory coverage seen for those taking alpha2-adrenergic agonists (PDC = 36.0%; MPR = 47.6% down to those taking direct cholinergic agonists (PDC = 25.0%; MPR = 31.2% and combination products (PDC = 22.7%; MPR = 31.0%. Adherence to glaucoma medications in the community setting, as measured by pharmacy refill data, is very poor and represents a critical target for intervention. Community pharmacists are well positioned to monitor and reinforce adherence in this population.

  8. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors.

  9. Development of hospital data warehouse for cost analysis of DPC based on medical costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muranaga, F; Kumamoto, I; Uto, Y

    2007-01-01

    To develop a data warehouse system for cost analysis, based on the categories of the diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) system, in which medical costs were estimated by DPC category and factors influencing the balance between costs and fees. We developed a data warehouse system for cost analysis using data from the hospital central data warehouse system. The balance data of patients who were discharged from Kagoshima University Hospital from April 2003 to March 2005 were determined in terms of medical procedure, cost per day and patient admission in order to conduct a drill-down analysis. To evaluate this system, we analyzed cash flow by DPC category of patients who were categorized as having malignant tumors and whose DPC category was reevaluated in 2004. The percentages of medical expenses were highest in patients with acute leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and particularly in patients with malignant tumors of the liver and intrahepatic bile duct. Imaging tests degraded the percentages of medical expenses in Kagoshima University Hospital. These results suggested that cost analysis by patient is important for hospital administration in the inclusive evaluation system using a case-mix index such as DPC.

  10. Direct Medical Costs of Hospitalizations for Cardiovascular Diseases in Shanghai, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengnan; Petzold, Max; Cao, Junshan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Weibing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Few studies in China have focused on direct expenditures for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), making cost trends for CVDs uncertain. Epidemic modeling and forecasting may be essential for health workers and policy makers to reduce the cost burden of CVDs. To develop a time series model using Box–Jenkins methodology for a 15-year forecasting of CVD hospitalization costs in Shanghai. Daily visits and medical expenditures for CVD hospitalizations between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2012 were analyzed. Data from 2012 were used for further analyses, including yearly total health expenditures and expenditures per visit for each disease, as well as per-visit-per-year medical costs of each service for CVD hospitalizations. Time series analyses were performed to determine the long-time trend of total direct medical expenditures for CVDs and specific expenditures for each disease, which were used to forecast expenditures until December 31, 2030. From 2008 to 2012, there were increased yearly trends for both hospitalizations (from 250,354 to 322,676) and total costs (from US $ 388.52 to 721.58 million per year in 2014 currency) in Shanghai. Cost per CVD hospitalization in 2012 averaged US $ 2236.29, with the highest being for chronic rheumatic heart diseases (US $ 4710.78). Most direct medical costs were spent on medication. By the end of 2030, the average cost per visit per month for all CVDs was estimated to be US $ 4042.68 (95% CI: US $ 3795.04–4290.31) for all CVDs, and the total health expenditure for CVDs would reach over US $1.12 billion (95% CI: US $ 1.05–1.19 billion) without additional government interventions. Total health expenditures for CVDs in Shanghai are estimated to be higher in the future. These results should be a valuable future resource for both researchers on the economic effects of CVDs and for policy makers. PMID:25997060

  11. [Ambulatory medical care in Mexico: the cost for users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredondo, A; Nájera, P; Leyva, R

    1999-01-01

    To analyze the results of the National Health Survey (ENSA-II) as to the costs generated by the search and obtainment of ambulatory medical attention in various institutions of the private and public health sector. Information was raised from the health care cost indicators reported by the study population of the ENSA-II. The dependent variable was the direct expense for the consumer and the independent variables, the condition of being insured and the income. Variation significance levels were identified using the test by Duncan. The costs at national level in US dollar were: transport $2.20, medical visit $7.90, drugs $9.60, diagnostic studies $13.6; average total cost for ambulatory attention was $22.70. Empirical finding suggest a new direct and indirect cost-for-consumer analysis for the health care users. These costs represent an important burden on the family income, which worsens when users are not insured. Incorporation of the economic perspective to the analysis of public health issues should not be limited to the analysis of the health provider's expenses, particularly if the problems of equity and accessibility must be solved, which are at present characteristic of health care services in Mexico.

  12. Using a Cost-Construction Model To Assess the Cost of Educating Undergraduate Medical Students at the University of Texas-Houston Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Luisa; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Using a cost-construction model, cost of the University of Texas-Houston Medical School program, instructional costs, educational costs, and milieu costs were calculated. Sensitivity analysis revealed the financial effects of various factors, some of which increased and some of which decreased cost. Despite inherent complexities of the method and…

  13. General medications utilization and cost patterns in hospitalized children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassis I

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Drug utilization in the in-patient setting can provide mechanisms to assess drug prescribing trends, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of hospital formularies and examine sub-populations such as children for which prescribing habits are different from adults. Objectives: The aim of this descriptive study was to analyze general medication utilization patterns and costs excluding antimicrobials prescriptions and to compare two pediatric admission units in a tertiary care university hospital. Methods: The total number of admitted children was 1,521 and 1,467 for the A and B admission units, respectively. The electronic data from 252 and 253 hospitalized children in the A and B admission unit were prospectively screened for general medication prescriptions, children on antimicrobials were excluded from the analysis. Their electronic charts were viewed once weekly from October 15, 2007 up to April 7, 2008 using the prescription-point prevalence method. One medication was considered to be one prescription. Results: The general medications prescription number was 790 for 94 children (8.4 prescription/patient in A and 959 for 88 children (10.9 prescription/patient in B (p=0.02. The general medications defined daily dose (DDD and drug utilization 90% (DU90% index were 2,509.63, 2,259 for A; and 6,110.35, 5,499 for B, respectively. The DU90% index placed salbutamol inhalation with 835 DDD and sodium heparin with 2,102 DDD in the first place for the A and B admission units, respectively. A net increment in medication cost was registered according to the calculated cost from the depicted DU90% when the A (20,263 NIS and B (6,269 NIS admission units were compared (p=0.04. Conclusions: A significant difference in the prescription utilization of general medications was shown between the A and B admission units. The A admission unit had lower prescriptions measured by the DU90% index with higher medication cost. Potential drug-drug interactions were depicted in

  14. Inhaler Costs and Medication Nonadherence Among Seniors With Chronic Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, William H.; Safran, Dana Gelb; Wilson, Ira B.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Chronic pulmonary diseases (CPDs) such as asthma and COPD are associated with particularly high rates of cost-related medication nonadherence (CRN), but the degree to which inhaler costs contribute to this is not known. Here, we examine the relationship between inhaler-specific out-of-pocket costs and CRN in CPD. Methods: Using data obtained in 2006 in a national stratified random sample (N = 16,072) of community-dwelling Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥ 65 years, we used logistic regression to examine the relationship between inhaled medications, various types of out-of-pocket costs, and CRN in persons with CPD. Results: The prevalence of CRN in Medicare recipients with CPD using inhalers was 31%. In multivariate models, the odds that respondents with CPD using inhalers would report CRN was 1.43 (95% CI, 1.21-1.69) compared with respondents without CPD who were not using inhalers. Adjustment for out-of-pocket inhaler costs—but not adjustment for total medication costs or non-inhaler costs—eliminated this excess risk of CRN (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.71-1.28). Patients paying > $20 per month for inhalers were at significantly higher risk for CRN compared with those who had no out-of-pocket inhaler costs. Conclusions: Individuals with CPD and high out-of-pocket inhaler costs are at increased risk for CRN relative to individuals on other medications. Physicians should be aware that inhalers can pose a particularly high risk of medication nonadherence for some patients. PMID:20418367

  15. A prospective study of direct medical costs in a large cohort of consecutively enrolled patients with refractory epilepsy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoni, Chiara; Canevini, Maria Paola; Capovilla, Giuseppe; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Galimberti, Carlo Andrea; Gatti, Giuliana; Guerrini, Renzo; La Neve, Angela; Mazzucchelli, Iolanda; Rosati, Eleonora; Specchio, Luigi Maria; Striano, Salvatore; Tinuper, Paolo; Perucca, Emilio

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate direct medical costs and their predictors in patients with refractory epilepsy enrolled into the SOPHIE study (Study of Outcomes of PHarmacoresistance In Epilepsy) in Italy. Adults and children with refractory epilepsy were enrolled consecutively at 11 tertiary referral centers and followed for 18 months. At entry, all subjects underwent a structured interview and a medical examination, and were asked to keep records of diagnostic examinations, laboratory tests, specialist consultations, treatments, hospital admissions, and day-hospital days during follow-up. Study visits included assessments every 6 months of seizure frequency, health-related quality of life (Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory 31), medication-related adverse events (Adverse Event Profile) and mood state (Beck Depression Inventory-II). Cost items were priced by applying Italian tariffs. Cost estimates were adjusted to 2013 values. Of 1,124 enrolled individuals, 1,040 completed follow-up. Average annual cost per patient was € 4,677. The highest cost was for antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment (50%), followed by hospital admissions (29% of overall costs). AED polytherapy, seizure frequency during follow-up, grade III pharmacoresistance, medical and psychiatric comorbidities, and occurrence of status epilepticus during follow-up were identified as significant predictors of higher costs. Age between 6 and 11 years, and genetic (idiopathic) generalized epilepsies were associated with the lowest costs. Costs showed prominent variation across centers, largely due to differences in the clinical characteristics of cohorts enrolled at each center and the prescribing of second-generation AEDs. Individual outliers associated with high costs related to hospital admissions had a major influence on costs in many centers. Refractory epilepsy is associated with high costs that affect individuals and society. Costs differ across centers in relation to the characteristics of patients and the extent of

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 7, Number 8, September/October 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    figure 2). Injuries (from all causes) accounted for approximately 20% of all DNBI vis- its (figure 2). Respiratory infections (16%) and dermato ...Medical con- ditions not included in specific categories, respiratory in- fections (particularly during winter months), and dermato - logic conditions

  17. Adapting smartphones for low-cost optical medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Vollet-Filho, José D.; Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Blanco, Kate; Inada, Natalia M.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Optical images have been used in several medical situations to improve diagnosis of lesions or to monitor treatments. However, most systems employ expensive scientific (CCD or CMOS) cameras and need computers to display and save the images, usually resulting in a high final cost for the system. Additionally, this sort of apparatus operation usually becomes more complex, requiring more and more specialized technical knowledge from the operator. Currently, the number of people using smartphone-like devices with built-in high quality cameras is increasing, which might allow using such devices as an efficient, lower cost, portable imaging system for medical applications. Thus, we aim to develop methods of adaptation of those devices to optical medical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence. Particularly, smartphones covers were adapted to connect a smartphone-like device to widefield fluorescence imaging systems. These systems were used to detect lesions in different tissues, such as cervix and mouth/throat mucosa, and to monitor ALA-induced protoporphyrin-IX formation for photodynamic treatment of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. This approach may contribute significantly to low-cost, portable and simple clinical optical imaging collection.

  18. Impact of subsequent metastases on costs and medical resource use for prostate cancer patients initially diagnosed with localized disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tracy T; Shore, Neal D; Mehra, Maneesha; Todd, Mary B; Saadi, Ryan; Leblay, Gaetan; Aggarwal, Jyoti; Griffiths, Robert I

    2017-09-15

    The impact of subsequent metastases on costs and medical resource use (MRU) for prostate cancer (PC) patients initially diagnosed with localized disease was estimated. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data, linked to Medicare (1999-2012), were used to identify 7482 patients diagnosed with subsequent metastases 12 months or more after the initial diagnosis of localized PC (cases), and they were matched to 25,709 localized PC patients without subsequent metastases (controls). Patients were followed for costs and MRU from 12 months before their index date (subsequent metastases or a matched date for controls) up to 12 months after it. Costs and MRU were stratified by the setting/type of care/service. Multivariate mixed effects regression analyses were used to construct and compare longitudinal trajectories of marginal predicted costs and predicted probabilities of MRU between cases and controls. Among the controls, predicted monthly costs remained relatively stable throughout the entire observation period (weighted mean per patient per month, $2746; range during 24 months, $2603-2858). In contrast, among the cases, costs increased from $2622 (95% confidence interval [CI], $2525-2719) 12 months before the diagnosis of subsequent metastases to $4767 (95% CI, $4623-4910) 1 month before the diagnosis of subsequent metastases, peaked during the month of metastases at $13,291 (95% CI, $13,148-13,435), and remained significantly higher than costs for the controls thereafter (eg, $4677 at + 12 months; 95% CI, $4549-4805). Costs and MRU increased across a wide range of settings/types, including inpatient, outpatient, home health, and hospice settings. In PC patients initially diagnosed with localized disease, a diagnosis of subsequent metastases is associated with substantially increased costs and MRU. Cancer 2017;123:3591-601. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  19. Inpatient resource use and costs associated with switching from oral antipsychotics to aripiprazole once-monthly for the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Wilson

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Schizophrenia is associated with high direct healthcare costs due to progression of disease and frequent occurrence of relapses. Aripiprazole once-monthly (AOM has been shown to reduce total psychiatric hospitalizations among patients who switched from oral standard of care (SOC therapy to AOM in a multicenter, open-label, mirror-image study of patients with schizophrenia. Because of the increasing need to improve patient outcomes while containing costs, it is important to understand the impact of AOM treatment initiation on medical costs associated with psychiatric hospitalizations and antipsychotic pharmacy costs. Methods: In the current study, an economic model was developed using data from the AOM mirror-image study to evaluate the psychiatric hospitalization-related medical costs and antipsychotic pharmacy costs during a 6-month period before (retrospective period and after (prospective period the AOM treatment initiation. The economic model evaluated cost-saving potential of AOM among all patients (n=433 as well as a subset of patients with ≥1 prior hospitalization (n=165 who switched from oral SOC to AOM. Unit cost data were obtained from publicly available sources. Results: Both hospitalizations and hospital days were reduced following a switch from oral SOC to AOM. As a result, psychiatric hospitalization-related costs were lower during the prospective period when compared with the retrospective period. Furthermore, the increase in antipsychotic pharmacy costs due to switching from oral SOC to AOM was offset by a reduction in psychiatric hospitalization-related medical costs. Per-patient costs were reduced by $1,046 (USD in the overall population and by $20,353 in a subset of patients who had at least 1 psychiatric hospitalization during the retrospective period. Results were most sensitive to changes in hospitalization costs. Conclusions: AOM is associated with reducing the risk of relapse among patients with

  20. Gauging the feasibility of cost-sharing and medical student interest groups to reduce interview costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Bryan A; Wilson, Taylor A; Bell, Randy S; Ashley, William W; Barrow, Daniel L; Wolfe, Stacey Quintero

    2014-11-01

    Indirect costs of the interview tour can be prohibitive. The authors sought to assess the desire of interviewees to mitigate these costs through ideas such as sharing hotel rooms and transportation, willingness to stay with local students, and the preferred modality to coordinate this collaboration. A survey link was posted on the Uncle Harvey website and the Facebook profile page of fourth-year medical students from 6 different medical schools shortly after the 2014 match day. There were a total of 156 respondents to the survey. The majority of the respondents were postinterview medical students (65.4%), but preinterview medical students (28.2%) and current residents (6.4%) also responded to the survey. Most respondents were pursuing a field other than neurosurgery (75.0%) and expressed a desire to share a hotel room and/or transportation (77.4%) as well as stay in the dorm room of a medical student at the program in which they are interviewing (70.0%). Students going into neurosurgery were significantly more likely to be interested in sharing hotel/transportation (89.2% neurosurgery vs 72.8% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) and in staying in the dorm room of a local student when on interviews (85.0% neurosurgery vs 57.1% nonneurosurgery; p = 0.040) than those going into other specialties. Among postinterview students, communication was preferred to be by private, email identification-only chat room. Given neurosurgery resident candidates' interest in collaborating to reduce interview costs, consideration should be given to creating a system that could allow students to coordinate cost sharing between interviewees. Moreover, interviewees should be connected to local students from neurosurgery interest groups as a resource.

  1. Cost, staffing and quality impact of bedside electronic medical record (EMR) in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, Marilyn J; Hicks, Lanis; Petroski, Gregory F; Madsen, Richard W; Alexander, Greg; Galambos, Colleen; Conn, Vicki; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill; Zwygart-Stauffacher, Mary; Greenwald, Leslie

    2010-09-01

    There is growing political pressure for nursing homes to implement the electronic medical record (EMR) but there is little evidence of its impact on resident care. The purpose of this study was to test the unique and combined contributions of EMR at the bedside and on-site clinical consultation by gerontological expert nurses on cost, staffing, and quality of care in nursing homes. Eighteen nursing facilities in 3 states participated in a 4-group 24-month comparison: Group 1 implemented bedside EMR, used nurse consultation; Group 2 implemented bedside EMR only; Group 3 used nurse consultation only; Group 4 neither. Intervention sites (Groups 1 and 2) received substantial, partial financial support from CMS to implement EMR. Costs and staffing were measured from Medicaid cost reports, and staff retention from primary data collection; resident outcomes were measured by MDS-based quality indicators and quality measures. Total costs increased in both intervention groups that implemented technology; staffing and staff retention remained constant. Improvement trends were detected in resident outcomes of ADLs, range of motion, and high-risk pressure sores for both intervention groups but not in comparison groups. Implementation of bedside EMR is not cost neutral. There were increased total costs for all intervention facilities. These costs were not a result of increased direct care staffing or increased staff turnover. Nursing home leaders and policy makers need to be aware of on-going hardware and software costs as well as costs of continual technical support for the EMR and constant staff orientation to use the system. EMR can contribute to the quality of nursing home care and can be enhanced by on-site consultation by nurses with graduate education in nursing and expertise in gerontology. Copyright 2010 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The short-term effect of interdisciplinary medication review on function and cost in ambulatory elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark E; Pulliam, Charles C; Hunter, Rebecca; Johnson, Ted M; Owens, Justine E; Kincaid, Jean; Porter, Carol; Koch, Gary

    2004-01-01

    To determine whether a medication review by a specialized team would promote regimen changes in elders taking multiple medications and to measure the effect of regimen changes on monthly cost and functioning. A randomized-controlled trial. Health center ambulatory clinic. Community-dwelling older adults taking five or more medications were assessed at baseline and 6 weeks. A medication-change intervention group of 57 elders was compared with a control group of 76 elder adults. The primary intervention was a comprehensive review and recommended modification of a patient's medication regimen. Changes were endorsed by each patient's primary physician and discussed with each patient. Measures were the Timed Manual Performance Test, Physical Performance Test, Functional Reach Assessment, subtests from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale, a modified Randt Memory Test, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale, and the Rand 36-item Health Survey 1.0. Comorbidity was determined using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification. Medication usage was determined using brown bag review. Intervention subjects decreased their medications by an average of 1.5 drugs. No differences in functioning were observed between groups. Intervention subjects saved an average $26.92 per month in wholesale medication costs; control subjects saved $6.75 per month (P<.006). Although the intervention significantly reduced the medications taken and monthly cost, most patients were resistant to reducing medications to the recommended level. Further study is needed to understand patient resistance to reducing adverse polypharmacy and to devise better strategies for addressing this important problem in geriatric health. Greater focus on prescriber behavior is recommended.

  3. Medical Cost Analysis of the Osteoporotic Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savaş Çamur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Osteoporotic hip fractures decrease the life expectancy for 20% about 20-50% of the patients become permanently dependent in terms of walking for the rest of their life. Life expectancy is increasing in Turkey in the last 20 years. We investigated the impact of osteoporotic hip fractures which increase the morbidity and mortality on the national economy. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 patients admitted to our emergency department with the diagnosis of femur intertrochanteric fracture and femoral neck fracture between 2008 and 2012 were included in this study. We retrospectively evaluated the medical records and the medical costs of these patients from hospital information management system. Results: Of the 81 patients 32 (39.6% males and 49 (60.4% females meeting the inclusion criteria were included in this study. The mean age was 80.1 years (range, 61-103. Twenty-three (27.5% patients had femoral neck fracture and 58 (72.5% patients had intertrochanteric femur fracture. The mean length of hospital stay was 13.4 days in intertrochanteric femur fracture and 15.5 days in femoral neck fracture; average of the total days of hospitalization of all patients was 13.9 days. The average treatment cost per patient was 5,912.36 TL for intertrochanteric fractures, 5,753.00 TL for neck fractures, and 5,863.09 TL for the whole patient population. Conclusion: Hip fracture is a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly. Taking preventive measures before the fracture occurs may help to prevent this problem which has a high cost treatment and which is a substantial burden for the national economy.

  4. The longitudinal study of turnover and the cost of turnover in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, P Daniel; Jones, Cheryl B; Hubble, Michael W; Carr, Matthew; Weaver, Matthew D; Engberg, John; Castle, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined employee turnover and associated costs in emergency medical services (EMS). To quantify the mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination in a diverse sample of EMS agencies. A convenience sample of 40 EMS agencies was followed over a six-month period. Internet, telephone, and on-site data-collection methods were used to document terminations, new hires, open positions, and costs associated with turnover. The cost associated with turnover was calculated based on a modified version of the Nursing Turnover Cost Calculation Methodology (NTCCM). The NTCCM identified direct and indirect costs through a series of questions that agency administrators answered monthly during the study period. A previously tested measure of turnover to calculate the mean annual rate of turnover was used. All calculations were weighted by the size of the EMS agency roster. The mean annual rate of turnover, total median cost of turnover, and median cost per termination were determined for three categories of agency staff mix: all-paid staff, mix of paid and volunteer (mixed) staff, and all-volunteer staff. The overall weighted mean annual rate of turnover was 10.7%. This rate varied slightly across agency staffing mix (all-paid = 10.2%, mixed = 12.3%, all-volunteer = 12.4%). Among agencies that experienced turnover (n = 25), the weighted median cost of turnover was $71,613.75, which varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $86,452.05, mixed = $9,766.65, and all-volunteer = $0). The weighted median cost per termination was $6,871.51 and varied across agency staffing mix (all-paid = $7,161.38, mixed = $1,409.64, and all-volunteer = $0). Annual rates of turnover and costs associated with turnover vary widely across types of EMS agencies. The study's mean annual rate of turnover was lower than expected based on information appearing in the news media and EMS trade magazines. Findings provide estimates of two key

  5. Evaluation of Medical Cost Lost Due to Smoking in Chinese Cities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENJIE; CAOJIAN-WEN; 等

    1995-01-01

    Smoking induces substantial diseases burden on both individual and the whole society,To identify the true smoking-attributable economic loss,we introduce medical cost accounting as a means to calculate disease-specific medical cost,including inpatient and outpatient cost of those diseases caused by smoking.Medical cost is defined as health resource consumption in terms of money,Cost is allocated to department and services according to coefficient of benefit and operation time.The study in 1988 indicates that total smoking-attriutable medical cost is 2.32 billion RMB Yuan in China,1.70 billion RMB Yuan for outpatient,0.62 billion RMB Yuan for inpatient.If indirect cost is included,the cost will be greater.Chronic obstructive emphysema has the highest proportion(55.41%)in smoking attributable medical cost.

  6. Doctors' attitudes about prescribing and knowledge of the costs of common medications.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGuire, C

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Compliance with medical therapy may be compromised because of the affordability of medications. Inadequate physician knowledge of drug costs may unwittingly contribute to this problem. METHODS: We measured attitudes about prescribing and knowledge of medication costs by written survey of medical and surgical non consultant hospital doctors and consultants in two University teaching hospitals (n = 102). Sixty-eight percent felt the cost of medicines was an important consideration in the prescribing decision, however, 88% often felt unaware of the actual costs. Only 33% had easy access to drug cost data, and only 3% had been formally educated about drug costs. Doctors\\' estimates of the cost of a supply of ten commonly used medications were accurate in only 12% of cases, too low for 50%, and too high for 38%. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed to educate doctors about drug costs and provide them with reliable, easily accessible cost information in real-world practice.

  7. A ten-month program in curriculum development for medical educators: 16 years of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windish, Donna M; Gozu, Aysegul; Bass, Eric B; Thomas, Patricia A; Sisson, Stephen D; Howard, Donna M; Kern, David E

    2007-05-01

    Despite increased demand for new curricula in medical education, most academic medical centers have few faculty with training in curriculum development. To describe and evaluate a longitudinal mentored faculty development program in curriculum development. A 10-month curriculum development program operating one half-day per week of each academic year from 1987 through 2003. The program was designed to provide participants with the knowledge, attitudes, skills, and experience to design, implement, evaluate, and disseminate curricula in medical education using a 6-step model. One-hundred thirty-eight faculty and fellows from Johns Hopkins and other institutions and 63 matched nonparticipants. Pre- and post-surveys from participants and nonparticipants assessed skills in curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation, as well as enjoyment in curriculum development and evaluation. Participants rated program quality, educational methods, and facilitation in a post-program survey. Sixty-four curricula were produced addressing gaps in undergraduate, graduate, or postgraduate medical education. At least 54 curricula (84%) were implemented. Participant self-reported skills in curricular development, implementation, and evaluation improved from baseline (p higher than nonparticipants (all p sustainability and is associated with participant satisfaction, improvement in self-rated skills, and implementation of curricula on important topics.

  8. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 16, Number 01, January 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Eating Disorders *One inpatient or two or more outpatient encounters of ICD-9-CM: 307.1 Anorexia nervosa 307.51 Bulimia nervosa 307.50 Eating disorder...surveillance interest, U.S. Armed Forces, by month and service, January 2003 - December 2008 Traumatic brain injury, hospitalizations (ICD-9: 310.2, 800-801...803-804, 850-854, 950.1-950.3, 959.01, V15.5_1-9, V15.5_A-F)* Reference: Army Medical Surveillance Activity. Traumatic brain injury among members of

  9. Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Aripiprazole Once-Monthly for the Treatment of Schizophrenia in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempest, Michael; Sapin, Christophe; Beillat, Maud; Robinson, Paul; Treur, Maarten

    2015-12-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe and debilitating psychiatric disorder. Pharmacological interventions aim to ameliorate symptoms and reduce the risk of relapse and costly hospitalisation. Despite the established efficacy of antipsychotic medication, compliance to treatment is poor, particularly with oral formulation. The emergence of long acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotic formulations in recent years has aimed to counteract the poor compliance rates observed and optimise long term patient outcomes. To estimate the cost-effectiveness of aripiprazole once-monthly 400mg (AOM 400) vs. risperidone long acting injectable (RLAI), paliperidone long acting injectable (PLAI) and olanzapine long acting injectable (OLAI) in the maintenance treatment of chronic, stable schizophrenia patients in the United Kingdom. A Markov model was developed to emulate the treatment pathway of a hypothetical cohort of patients initiating maintenance treatment with LAI antipsychotics. The economic analysis was conducted from a National Health Service (NHS) and Personal Social Services (PSS) perspective over a 10 year time horizon. Efficacy and safety probabilities were derived from mixed treatment comparisons (MTCs) where possible. Analyses were conducted assuming pooled dosing from randomised clinical trials included in the MTCs. The model estimates that AOM 400 improves clinical outcomes by reducing relapses per patient comparative to other LAIs over the model time horizon (2.38, 2.53, 2.70, and 2.67 for AOM 400, RLAI, PLAI and OLAI respectively). In the deterministic analysis, AOM 400 dominated PLAI and OLAI; an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of GBP 3,686 per QALY gained was observed against RLAI. Results from the univariate sensitivity analyses highlighted the probability and cost of relapse as main drivers for cost-effectiveness. In the probabilistic sensitivity analysis, AOM 400 demonstrated a marginally higher probability of being cost-effective (51%) than RLAI, PLAI and OLAI

  10. Descriptive analysis of medication errors reported to the Egyptian national online reporting system during six months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Zahraa Hassan Abdelrahman; Sabri, Nagwa Ali; Elmelegy, Ahmed Abdelsalam

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzes reports to the Egyptian medication error (ME) reporting system from June to December 2014. Fifty hospital pharmacists received training on ME reporting using the national reporting system. All received reports were reviewed and analyzed. The pieces of data analyzed were patient age, gender, clinical setting, stage, type, medication(s), outcome, cause(s), and recommendation(s). Over the course of 6 months, 12,000 valid reports were gathered and included in this analysis. The majority (66%) came from inpatient settings, while 23% came from intensive care units, and 11% came from outpatient departments. Prescribing errors were the most common type of MEs (54%), followed by monitoring (25%) and administration errors (16%). The most frequent error was incorrect dose (20%) followed by drug interactions, incorrect drug, and incorrect frequency. Most reports were potential (25%), prevented (11%), or harmless (51%) errors; only 13% of reported errors lead to patient harm. The top three medication classes involved in reported MEs were antibiotics, drugs acting on the central nervous system, and drugs acting on the cardiovascular system. Causes of MEs were mostly lack of knowledge, environmental factors, lack of drug information sources, and incomplete prescribing. Recommendations for addressing MEs were mainly staff training, local ME reporting, and improving work environment. There are common problems among different healthcare systems, so that sharing experiences on the national level is essential to enable learning from MEs. Internationally, there is a great need for standardizing ME terminology, to facilitate knowledge transfer. Underreporting, inaccurate reporting, and a lack of reporter diversity are some limitations of this study. Egypt now has a national database of MEs that allows researchers and decision makers to assess the problem, identify its root causes, and develop preventive strategies. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University

  11. Health care resource utilization and costs of California Medicaid patients with schizophrenia treated with paliperidone palmitate once monthly or atypical oral antipsychotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesa, Jacqueline A; Doshi, Dilesh; Wang, Li; Yuce, Huseyin; Baser, Onur

    2017-04-01

    To compare all-cause health care utilization and costs between patients with schizophrenia treated with once monthly paliperidone palmitate (PP1M; Invega Sustenna (1) ) and atypical oral antipsychotic therapy (OAT). This was a retrospective claims-based analysis among adult California Medicaid (Medi-Cal) patients with schizophrenia having ≥2 claims for PP1M or OAT from 1 July 2009 to 31 December 2013 and continuous health plan enrollment for ≥1 year pre- and post-index date (PP1M or OAT initiation date). Baseline characteristics were reported descriptively. Propensity score matching with a 1:1 greedy match method was used to create two matched cohorts. Treatment patterns, all-cause health care utilization, and costs for the 12 month follow-up period were compared between the two matched cohorts. Two well matched cohorts of 722 patients were produced with similar baseline characteristics. During the 12 month follow-up period, PP1M patients were significantly less likely to discontinue treatment (30.6% vs. 39.5%, p costs ($5060 vs. $10,880, p costs were significantly higher in the PP1M cohort ($16,347 vs. $9115, p costs were not significantly different between the matched cohorts ($25,546 vs. $25,307, p = 0.853). Patients with schizophrenia treated with PP1M had significantly fewer inpatient hospitalizations and associated costs with no significant difference in the total costs between the two cohorts. This study is subject to limitations associated with claims data such as miscoding, inability to examine clinical severity, etc.

  12. Medical costs associated with cardiovascular events among high-risk patients with hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonafede MM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Machaon M Bonafede,1 Barbara H Johnson,1 Akshara Richhariya,2 Shravanthi R Gandra2 1Outcomes Research, Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Global Health Economics, Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Objectives: This study descriptively examined acute and longer term direct medical costs associated with a major cardiovascular (CV event among high-risk coronary heart disease risk-equivalent (CHD-RE patients. It also gives a firsthand look at fatal versus nonfatal CV events. Methods: The MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters Database was used to identify adults with a CV event in 2006–2012 with hyperlipidemia or lipid-lowering therapy use in the 18 months prior to one of the following inpatient CV events: myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, unstable angina, transient ischemic attack, percutaneous coronary intervention, or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Patients were required to have a preindex diagnosis of at least one of the following: peripheral arterial disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, carotid artery disease, or diabetes. A subset analysis was conducted with patients with data linkable to the Social Security Administration Master Death File. Direct medical costs were reported for each quarter following a CV event, for up to 36 months after the first CV event. Results: In total, 38,609 CHD-RE patients were included, mean age 57 years, 31% female. CABG, myocardial infarction, and percutaneous coronary intervention were the most frequent and most expensive first CV events, accounting for >75% of all first CV events with mean first quarter costs ranging from $17,454 (nonfatal transient ischemic attack to $125,690 (fatal CABG. Overall, 15% of those with a first CV event went on to have a second event during the 36-month study period with mean first quarter nonfatal and fatal costs similar to first event levels. Third CV events were rare, happening in less than 3% of patients. Conclusion: CV events among CHD-RE patients were

  13. Specialist medication review does not benefit short-term outcomes and net costs in continuing-care patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pope, George

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVES: to evaluate specialist geriatric input and medication review in patients in high-dependency continuing care. DESIGN: prospective, randomised, controlled trial. SETTING: two residential continuing care hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: two hundred and twenty-five permanent patients. INTERVENTION: patients were randomised to either specialist geriatric input or regular input. The specialist group had a medical assessment by a geriatrician and medication review by a multidisciplinary expert panel. Regular input consisted of review as required by a medical officer attached to each ward. Reassessment occurred after 6 months. RESULTS: one hundred and ten patients were randomised to specialist input and 115 to regular input. These were comparable for age, gender, dependency levels and cognition. After 6 months, the total number of medications per patient per day fell from 11.64 to 11.09 in the specialist group (P = 0.0364) and increased from 11.07 to 11.5 in the regular group (P = 0.094). There was no significant difference in mortality or frequency of acute hospital transfers (11 versus 6 in the specialist versus regular group, P = 0.213). CONCLUSION: specialist geriatric assessment and medication review in hospital continuing care resulted in a reduction in medication use, but at a significant cost. No benefits in hard clinical outcomes were demonstrated. However, qualitative benefits and lower costs may become evident over longer periods.

  14. Cost and value in medical education--what we can learn from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, K

    2014-01-01

    What lessons can be learned from the history of cost and value in medical education? First, the issue of cost and value in medical education has been around for a long time. Rising costs and an economic recession have made us focus on the subject more, but the issue has been just below the surface for over 200 years. A problem like this will not go away by itself - we must tackle it now. Second, the history of cost and value in medical education makes us look critically at who should pay. Should it be students, institutions or governments? We can see from the past that several different models have been tried; that all have their advantages and disadvantages; and that none are perfect. Third, looking at the past should make us realise that the issue of cost in medical education cannot be viewed in isolation. Medical educators throughout history have looked at how cost can affect selection for medical school, how costs can be related to benefits, and the effect of rising costs on career choices. Cost in medical education has always had far reaching consequences and implications. It probably always will. Looking at issues in medical education from the perspective of cost often makes them more stark and explicit - this in turn may help us to start to find solutions. In the future our solutions must be evidence based and must take account of cost.

  15. Health care resource use and direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin, People’s Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; He, Xiaoning; Liu, Li; Ye, Wenyu; Montgomery, William; Xue, Haibo; McCombs, Jeffery S

    2015-01-01

    Objective Information concerning the treatment costs of schizophrenia is scarce in People’s Republic of China. The aims of this study were to quantify health care resource utilization and to estimate the direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin, People’s Republic of China. Methods Data were obtained from the Tianjin Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI) database. Adult patients with ≥1 diagnosis of schizophrenia and 12-month continuous enrollment after the first schizophrenia diagnosis between 2008 and 2009 were included. Both schizophrenia-related, psychiatric-related, and all-cause related resource utilization and direct medical costs were estimated. Results A total of 2,125 patients were included with a mean age of 52.3 years, and 50.7% of the patients were female. The annual mean all-cause costs were $2,863 per patient with psychiatric-related and schizophrenia-related costs accounting for 84.1% and 62.0% respectively. The schizophrenia-related costs for hospitalized patients were eleven times greater than that of patients who were not hospitalized. For schizophrenia-related health services, 60.8% of patients experienced at least one hospitalization with a mean (median) length of stay of 112.1 (71) days and a mean cost of $1,904 per admission; 59.0% of patients experienced at least one outpatient visit with a mean (median) number of visits of 6.2 (4) and a mean cost of $42 per visit during the 12-month follow-up period. Non-medication treatment costs were the most important element (45.7%) of schizophrenia-related costs, followed by laboratory and diagnostic costs (19.9%), medication costs (15.4%), and bed fees (13.3%). Conclusion The costs related to the treatment of patients with schizophrenia were considerable in Tianjin, People’s Republic of China, driven mainly by schizophrenia-related hospitalizations. Efforts focusing on community-based treatment programs and appropriate choice of drug treatment have the potential

  16. Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: effects, costs and benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.N. Ringburg (Akkie)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAdvanced prehospital medical care with air transport was introduced in the Netherlands in May 1995. The fi rst helicopter Mobile Medical Team, also called Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) was a joint venture initiative of the VU Medical Center in Amsterdam and the Algemene Ned

  17. An evaluation of the impact of patient cost sharing for antihypertensive medications on adherence, medication and health care utilization, and expenditures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pesa JA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline A Pesa1, Jill Van Den Bos2, Travis Gray2, Colleen Hartsig2, Robert Brett McQueen3, Joseph J Saseen3, Kavita V Nair31Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Louisville, CO, USA; 2Milliman, Inc, Denver, CO, USA; 3University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USAObjective: To assess the impact of patient cost-sharing for antihypertensive medications on the proportion of days covered (PDC by antihypertensive medications, medical utilization, and health care expenditures among commercially insured individuals assigned to different risk categories.Methods: Participants were identified from the Consolidated Health Cost Guidelines (CHCG database (January 1, 2006–December 31, 2008 based on a diagnosis (index claim for hypertension, continuous enrollment ≥12 months pre- and post-index, and no prior claims for antihypertensive medications. Participants were assigned to: low-risk group (no comorbidities, high-risk group (1+ selected comorbidities, or very high-risk group (prior hospitalization for 1+ selected comorbidities. The relationship between patient cost sharing and PDC by antihypertensive medications was assessed using standard linear regression models, controlling for risk group membership, and various demographic and clinical factors. The relationship between PDC and health care service utilization was subsequently examined using negative binomial regression models.Results: Of the 28,688 study patients, 66% were low risk. The multivariate regression model supported a relationship between patient cost sharing per 30-day fill and PDC in the following year. For every US$1.00 increase in cost sharing, PDC decreased by 1.1 days (P < 0.0001. Significant predictors of PDC included high risk, older age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, geography, and total post-index insurer- and patient-paid costs. An increase in PDC was associated with a decrease in all-cause and hypertension-related inpatient, outpatient, and emergency

  18. Direct medical costs and their predictors in South Korean patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Yeon; Joo, Young Bin; Shim, Jeeseon; Sung, Yoon-Kyoung; Bae, Sang-Cheol

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to estimate the annual direct medical costs of South Korean systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and their predictors. The 2010 annual direct medical costs of SLE patients in the Hanyang BAE Lupus cohort in South Korea were assessed. The information was taken directly from the hospital database and medical records, and included clinical characteristics, disease activity, organ damage, and healthcare utilization. Cost predictors were estimated with a multivariate linear regression model. A total of 749 SLE patients (92.7 % female, mean age 35.7 ± 11.3 years, mean disease duration 9.6 ± 4.9 years) were studied. Their mean annual direct medical costs amounted to USD 3305. The largest component of these costs was the cost of medication (USD 1269, 38.4 %), followed by those of diagnostic procedures and tests (USD 1177, 35.6 %). Regression analysis showed that adjusted mean SLE disease activity index score (p systemic damage index (p < 0.0001), and renal (p = 0.0039) and hematologic (p = 0.0353) involvement were associated with increased direct medical costs, whereas longer disease duration was associated with lower direct medical costs. Greater disease activity and greater organ damage predict higher costs for South Korean SLE patients. Major organ involvement such as renal disorder and hematologic involvement also predicts higher costs, whereas longer duration of disease predicts lower costs.

  19. [Direct costs of medical care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico micro-costing analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Bolaños, Rosibel de Los Ángeles; Reynales Shigematsu, Luz Myriam; Jiménez Ruíz, Jorge Alberto; Juárez Márquezy, Sergio Arturo; Hernández Ávila, Mauricio

    2010-12-01

    Estimate the direct cost of medical care incurred by the Mexican Social Security Institute (IMSS, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social) for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). The clinical files of 497 patients who were treated in secondary and tertiary medical care units in 2002-2004 were reviewed. Costs were quantified using a disease costing approach (DCA) from the provider's perspective, a micro-costing technique, and a bottom-up methodology. Average annual costs by diagnosis, complication, and total cost were estimated. Total IMSS DM2 annual costs were US$452 064 988, or 3.1% of operating expenses. The annual average cost per patient was US$3 193.75, with US$2 740.34 per patient without complications and US$3 550.17 per patient with complications. Hospitalization and intensive care bed-days generated the greatest expenses. The high cost of providing medical care to patients with DM2 and its complications represents an economic burden that health institutions should consider in their budgets to enable them to offer quality service that is both adequate and timely. Using the micro-costing methodology allows an approximation to real data on utilization and management of the disease.

  20. [Analysis of cost and efficiency of a medical nursing unit using time-driven activity-based costing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Young; Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi

    2011-08-01

    Time-driven activity-based costing was applied to analyze the nursing activity cost and efficiency of a medical unit. Data were collected at a medical unit of a general hospital. Nursing activities were measured using a nursing activities inventory and classified as 6 domains using Easley-Storfjell Instrument. Descriptive statistics were used to identify general characteristics of the unit, nursing activities and activity time, and stochastic frontier model was adopted to estimate true activity time. The average efficiency of the medical unit using theoretical resource capacity was 77%, however the efficiency using practical resource capacity was 96%. According to these results, the portion of non-added value time was estimated 23% and 4% each. The sums of total nursing activity costs were estimated 109,860,977 won in traditional activity-based costing and 84,427,126 won in time-driven activity-based costing. The difference in the two cost calculating methods was 25,433,851 won. These results indicate that the time-driven activity-based costing provides useful and more realistic information about the efficiency of unit operation compared to traditional activity-based costing. So time-driven activity-based costing is recommended as a performance evaluation framework for nursing departments based on cost management.

  1. Community Oncology Medical Homes: Physician-Driven Change to Improve Patient Care and Reduce Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Teresa M; Webster, Jennifer A; Stevens, Laura A; Li, Tao; Kaplan, Cameron M; Graetz, Ilana; McAneny, Barbara L

    2015-11-01

    Although the patient-centered medical home is a well-established model of care for primary care providers, adoption by specialty providers has been relatively limited. Recently, there has been particular interest in developing specialty medical homes in medical oncology because of practice variation, care fragmentation, and high overall costs of care. In 2012, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation awarded Innovative Oncology Business Solutions a 3-year grant for their Community Oncology Medical Home (COME HOME) program to implement specialty medical homes in seven oncology practices across the country. We report our early experience and lessons learned.Through September 30, 2014, COME HOME has touched 16,353 unique patients through triage encounters, patient education visits, or application of clinical pathways. We describe the COME HOME model and implementation timeline, profile use of key services, and report patient satisfaction. Using feedback from practice sites, we highlight patient-centered innovations and overall lessons learned.COME HOME incorporates best practices care driven by triage and clinical pathways, team-based care, active disease management, enhanced access and care, as well as financial support for the medical home infrastructure. Information technology plays a central role, supporting both delivery of care and performance monitoring. Volume of service use has grown steadily over time, leveling out in second quarter 2014. The program currently averages 1,265 triage encounters, 440 extended hours visits, and 655 patient education encounters per month.COME HOME offers a patient-centered model of care to improve quality and continuity of care. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  2. The Association between Charlson Comorbidity Index and the Medical Care Cost of Cancer: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Jun Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study compared comorbidity-related medical care cost associated with different types of cancer, by examining breast (N=287, colon (N=272, stomach (N=614, and lung (N=391 cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods. Using medical benefits claims data, we calculated Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI and total medical cost. The effect of comorbidity on the medical care cost was investigated using multiple regression and logistic regression models and controlling for demographic characteristics and cancer stage. Results. The treatment costs incurred by stomach and colon cancer patients were 1.05- and 1.01-fold higher, respectively, in patients with higher CCI determined. For breast cancer, the highest costs were seen in those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, but the increase in cost reduced as CCI increased. Colon cancer patients with diabetes mellitus and a CCI = 1 score had the highest medical costs. The lowest medical costs were incurred by lung cancer patients with COPD and a CCI = 2 score. Conclusion. The comorbidities had a major impact on the use of medical resources, with chronic comorbidities incurring the highest medical costs. The results indicate that comorbidities affect cancer outcomes and that they must be considered strategies mitigating cancer’s economic and social impact.

  3. The nosocomial component of medical care. A prospective study on the amount, spectrum and costs of medical disturbances in a department of infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorup-Rönström, C; Britton, S

    1982-01-01

    During a nine month period all patients admitted to a department of infectious diseases were prospectively studied regarding nosocomial reactions defined as any unwanted or unexpected negative effect of medical treatment or care. Eleven percent of 1271 patients were admitted because of complications to previous medical treatment. Twenty-seven percent of the patients developed adverse reactions during the hospital stay. Only four percent of these resulted in a prolonged hospital stay. Six patients (0.5%) died from complications to medical care. We deduce that medical complications are not a major factor in prolonging hospital stay, but rather that the longer the hospital stay the greater the risk for developing nosocomial symptoms. The estimated cost for the whole of the nosocomial matter was seventeen percent of the budget of the department.

  4. Financial costs and patients' perceptions of medical tourism in bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, David H; Sheppard, Caroline E; de Gara, Christopher J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Birch, Daniel W

    2016-02-01

    Many Canadians pursue surgical treatment for severe obesity outside of their province or country - so-called "medical tourism." We have managed many complications related to this evolving phenomenon. The costs associated with this care seem substantial but have not been previously quantified. We surveyed Alberta general surgeons and postoperative medical tourists to estimate costs of treating complications related to medical tourism in bariatric surgery and to understand patients' motivations for pursuing medical tourism. Our analysis suggests more than $560 000 was spent treating 59 bariatric medical tourists by 25 surgeons between 2012 and 2013. Responses from medical tourists suggest that they believe their surgeries were successful despite some having postoperative complications and lacking support from medical or surgical teams. We believe that the financial cost of treating complications related to medical tourism in Alberta is substantial and impacts existing limited resources.

  5. Lifetime medical costs of obesity : Prevention no cure for increasing health expenditure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baal, Pieter H. M.; Polder, Johan J.; de Wit, G. Ardine; Hoogenveen, Rudolf T.; Feenstra, Talitha L.; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Engelfriet, Peter M.; Brouwer, Werner B. F.

    2008-01-01

    Background Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and is associated with high medical expenditures. It has been suggested that obesity prevention could result in cost savings. The objective of this study was to estimate the annual and lifetime medical costs attributable to obesity, to c

  6. Emergency repair of inguinal hernia in the premature infant is associated with high direct medical costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Verhelst (Joost); B. de Goede (Barry); B.J.H. van Kempen (Bob); H.R. Langeveld-Benders (Hester); M.J. Poley (Marten); G. Kazemier (Geert); J. Jeekel (Hans); R.M.H. Wijnen (René); J.F. Lange (Johan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Inguinal hernia repair is frequently performed in premature infants. Evidence on optimal management and timing of repair, as well as related medical costs is still lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the direct medical costs of inguinal hernia, distinguishing b

  7. Frequency, types, and direct related costs of medication errors in an academic nephrology ward in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharekhani, Afshin; Kanani, Negin; Khalili, Hossein; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2014-09-01

    Medication errors are ongoing problems among hospitalized patients especially those with multiple co-morbidities and polypharmacy such as patients with renal diseases. This study evaluated the frequency, types and direct related cost of medication errors in nephrology ward and the role played by clinical pharmacists. During this study, clinical pharmacists detected, managed, and recorded the medication errors. Prescribing errors including inappropriate drug, dose, or treatment durations were gathered. To assess transcription errors, the equivalence of nursery charts and physician's orders were evaluated. Administration errors were assessed by observing drugs' preparation, storage, and administration by nurses. The changes in medications costs after implementing clinical pharmacists' interventions were compared with the calculated medications costs if the medication errors were continued up to patients' discharge time. More than 85% of patients experienced medication error. The rate of medication errors was 3.5 errors per patient and 0.18 errors per ordered medication. More than 95% of medication errors occurred at prescription nodes. Most common prescribing errors were omission (26.9%) or unauthorized drugs (18.3%) and low drug dosage or frequency (17.3%). Most of the medication errors happened on cardiovascular drugs (24%) followed by vitamins and electrolytes (22.1%) and antimicrobials (18.5%). The number of medication errors was correlated with the number of ordered medications and length of hospital stay. Clinical pharmacists' interventions decreased patients' direct medication costs by 4.3%. About 22% of medication errors led to patients' harm. In conclusion, clinical pharmacists' contributions in nephrology wards were of value to prevent medication errors and to reduce medications cost.

  8. Wikipedia vs peer-reviewed medical literature for information about the 10 most costly medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasty, Robert T; Garbalosa, Ryan C; Barbato, Vincenzo A; Valdes, Pedro J; Powers, David W; Hernandez, Emmanuel; John, Jones S; Suciu, Gabriel; Qureshi, Farheen; Popa-Radu, Matei; San Jose, Sergio; Drexler, Nathaniel; Patankar, Rohan; Paz, Jose R; King, Christopher W; Gerber, Hilary N; Valladares, Michael G; Somji, Alyaz A

    2014-05-01

    Since its launch in 2001, Wikipedia has become the most popular general reference site on the Internet and a popular source of health care information. To evaluate the accuracy of this resource, the authors compared Wikipedia articles on the most costly medical conditions with standard, evidence-based, peer-reviewed sources. The top 10 most costly conditions in terms of public and private expenditure in the United States were identified, and a Wikipedia article corresponding to each topic was chosen. In a blinded process, 2 randomly assigned investigators independently reviewed each article and identified all assertions (ie, implication or statement of fact) made in it. The reviewer then conducted a literature search to determine whether each assertion was supported by evidence. The assertions found by each reviewer were compared and analyzed to determine whether assertions made by Wikipedia for these conditions were supported by peer-reviewed sources. For commonly identified assertions, there was statistically significant discordance between 9 of the 10 selected Wikipedia articles (coronary artery disease, lung cancer, major depressive disorder, osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, back pain, and hyperlipidemia) and their corresponding peer-reviewed sources (Ppeer-reviewed sources. Caution should be used when using Wikipedia to answer questions regarding patient care.

  9. Using the Army Medical Cost Avoidance Model to prioritize preventive medicine initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy; McCoskey, Kelsey; Clasing, Jay; Kluchinsky, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    The MCAM's ICD-9 Analysis Tool provides preventive medicine program developers with a powerful tool to demonstrate ROI. Previously disjointed cost components have been brought together in the MCAM to calculate the total medical cost avoided. Users are required to make 4 data entries. In response, the user receives the highly coveted medical cost avoidance that should be realized. The SPHMP example demonstrates how simple it is to use the MCAM to determine the expected ROI.

  10. Comparison of United States and Canadian Glaucoma Medication Costs and Price Change from 2006 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B. Schlenker

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Compare glaucoma medication costs between the United States (USA and Canada. Methods. We modelled glaucoma brand name and generic medication annual costs in the USA and Canada based on October 2013 Costco prices and previously reported bottle overfill rates, drops per mL, and wastage adjustment. We also calculated real wholesale price changes from 2006 to 2013 based on the Average Wholesale Price (USA and the Ontario Drug Benefit Price (Canada. Results. US brand name medication costs were on average 4x more than Canadian medication costs (range: 1.9x–6.9x, averaging a cost difference of $859 annually. US generic costs were on average the same as Canadian costs, though variation exists. US brand name wholesale prices increased from 2006 to 2013 more than Canadian prices (US range: 29%–349%; Canadian range: 9%–16%. US generic wholesale prices increased modestly (US range: −23%–58%, and Canadian wholesale prices decreased (Canadian range: −38%–0%. Conclusions. US brand name glaucoma medications are more expensive than Canadian medications, though generic costs are similar (with some variation. The real prices of brand name medications increased more in the USA than in Canada. Generic price changes were more modest, with real prices actually decreasing in Canada.

  11. Learning to improve medical decision making from imbalanced data without a priori cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiang; Liu, Jiming; Cheung, William K; Tong, Tiejun

    2014-12-05

    In a medical data set, data are commonly composed of a minority (positive or abnormal) group and a majority (negative or normal) group and the cost of misclassifying a minority sample as a majority sample is highly expensive. This is the so-called imbalanced classification problem. The traditional classification functions can be seriously affected by the skewed class distribution in the data. To deal with this problem, people often use a priori cost to adjust the learning process in the pursuit of optimal classification function. However, this priori cost is often unknown and hard to estimate in medical decision making. In this paper, we propose a new learning method, named RankCost, to classify imbalanced medical data without using a priori cost. Instead of focusing on improving the class-prediction accuracy, RankCost is to maximize the difference between the minority class and the majority class by using a scoring function, which translates the imbalanced classification problem into a partial ranking problem. The scoring function is learned via a non-parametric boosting algorithm. We compare RankCost to several representative approaches on four medical data sets varying in size, imbalanced ratio, and dimension. The experimental results demonstrate that unlike the currently available methods that often perform unevenly with different priori costs, RankCost shows comparable performance in a consistent manner. It is a challenging task to learn an effective classification model based on imbalanced data in medical data analysis. The traditional approaches often use a priori cost to adjust the learning of the classification function. This work presents a novel approach, namely RankCost, for learning from medical imbalanced data sets without using a priori cost. The experimental results indicate that RankCost performs very well in imbalanced data classification and can be a useful method in real-world applications of medical decision making.

  12. 42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.324 Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. (a) MA organizations may receive direct graduate medical education payments for the time that... medical education payments if all of the following conditions are met: (1) The resident spends his or...

  13. Revisiting the cost of medical student education: a measure of the experience of UT Medical School-Houston.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammon, Elizabeth; Franzini, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    This study uses a cost construction model to estimate the cost of a four-year undergraduate medical education at the University of Texas-Houston Medical School (UT-Houston) in 2006-2007 compared to 1994-1995. The model computes the cost by measuring increasingly inclusive definitions of the educational mission: instructional (direct-contact teaching), educational (instructional plus general supervision), and milieu (educational plus research costs). Using the model and adjusting for inflation, annual cost per student enrolled decreased by 16 percent in 2006-2007 compared to 1994-1995 and total cost decreased by 9 percent. Additionally, the model predicted 190 full-time equivalent (FTE) faculty and 187 FTE residents for 2006-2007 compared to 201 FTE faculty and 258 FTE residents for 1994-1995. Decreases in the cost of educating medical students were driven by (1) the reduction in the number of educator contact hours required for curriculum delivery; (2) change in the mix of educators; and (3) an increase in medical school class size.

  14. The Affordable Care Act and the Burden of High Cost Sharing and Utilization Management Restrictions on Access to HIV Medications for People Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Hank, Yasamean

    2016-08-01

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic continues to be a critical public health issue in the United States, where an estimated 1.2 million individuals live with HIV infection. Viral suppression is one of the primary public health goals for People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). A crucial component of this goal involves adequate access to health care, specifically anti-retroviral HIV medications. The enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010 raised hopes for millions of PLWHA without access to health care coverage. High cost-sharing requirements enacted by health plans place a financial burden on PLWHA who need ongoing access to these life-saving medications. Plighted with poverty, Detroit, Michigan, is a center of attention for examining the financial burden of HIV medications on PLWHA under the new health plans. From November 2014 to January 2015, monthly out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization requirements for 31 HIV medications were examined for the top 12 insurance carriers offering Qualified Health Plans on Michigan's Health Insurance Marketplace Exchange. The percentage of medications requiring quantity limits and prior authorization were calculated. The average monthly out-of-pocket cost per person ranged from $12 to $667 per medication. Three insurance carriers placed all 31 HIV medications on the highest cost-sharing tier, charging 50% coinsurance. High out-of-pocket costs and medication utilization restrictions discourage PLWHA from enrolling in health plans and threaten interrupted medication adherence, drug resistance, and increased risk of viral transmission. Health plans inflicting high costs and medication restrictions violate provisions of the ACA and undermine health care quality for PLWHA. (Population Health Management 2016;19:272-278).

  15. Medication adherence and direct treatment cost among diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    expenditure on the patients. Introduction ... 53% non-adherence among diabetics in Malaysia; similar studies in ... healthcare expenditure is especially germane in developing countries ... pattern for OHAs, some components of direct costs, and.

  16. Finding Low-Cost Medical Care (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a wellness center (such as for drug or alcohol counseling, for example). continue College Student Health Centers Heading off to college? Many universities offer a low-cost insurance plan that can ...

  17. Cost of Transformation among Primary Care Practices Participating in a Medical Home Pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, Grant R; Kandrack, Ryan; Gabbay, Robert A; Friedberg, Mark W

    2016-07-01

    Medical home initiatives encourage primary care practices to invest in new structural capabilities such as patient registries and information technology, but little is known about the costs of these investments. To estimate costs of transformation incurred by primary care practices participating in a medical home pilot. We interviewed practice leaders in order to identify changes practices had undertaken due to medical home transformation. Based on the principles of activity-based costing, we estimated the costs of additional personnel and other investments associated with these changes. The Pennsylvania Chronic Care Initiative (PACCI), a statewide multi-payer medical home pilot. Twelve practices that participated in the PACCI. One-time and ongoing yearly costs attributed to medical home transformation. Practices incurred median one-time transformation-associated costs of $30,991 per practice (range, $7694 to $117,810), equivalent to $9814 per clinician ($1497 to $57,476) and $8 per patient ($1 to $30). Median ongoing yearly costs associated with transformation were $147,573 per practice (range, $83,829 to $346,603), equivalent to $64,768 per clinician ($18,585 to $93,856) and $30 per patient ($8 to $136). Care management activities accounted for over 60% of practices' transformation-associated costs. Per-clinician and per-patient transformation costs were greater for small and independent practices than for large and system-affiliated practices. Error in interviewee recall could affect estimates. Transformation costs in other medical home interventions may be different. The costs of medical home transformation vary widely, creating potential financial challenges for primary care practices-especially those that are small and independent. Tailored subsidies from payers may help practices make these investments. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  18. The cost of postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education: re-examining the status fifty years back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-03-01

    The subject of the cost and value of medical education is becoming increasingly important. However, this subject is not a new one. Fifty years ago, Mr. DH Patey, Dr. OF Davies, and Dr. John Ellis published a report on the state of postgraduate medical education in the UK. The report was wide-ranging, but it made a considerable mention of cost. In this short article, I have presented the documentary research that I conducted on their report. I have analyzed it from a positivist perspective and have concentrated on the subject of cost, as it appears in their report. The authors describe reforms within postgraduate medical education; however, they are clear from the start that the issue of cost can often be a barrier to such reforms. They state the need for basic facilities for medical education, but then outline the financial barriers to their development. The authors then discuss the costs of library services for education. They state that the "annual spending on libraries varies considerably throughout the country." The authors also describe the educational experiences of newly graduated doctors. According to them, the main problem is that these doctors do not have time to attend formal educational events, and that this will not be possible until there is "a more graduated approach to responsible clinical work," something which is not possible without financial investment. While concluding their report, the authors state that the limited money invested in postgraduate medical education and continuing medical education has been well spent, and that this has had a dual effect on improving medical education as well as the standards of medical care.

  19. Reducing Clinical Trial Monitoring Resource Allocation and Costs Through Remote Access to Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uren, Shannon C.; Kirkman, Mitchell B.; Dalton, Brad S.; Zalcberg, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: With electronic medical records (eMRs), the option now exists for clinical trial monitors to perform source data verification (SDV) remotely. We report on a feasibility study of remote access to eMRs for SDV and the potential advantages of such a process in terms of resource allocation and cost. Methods: The Clinical Trials Unit at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, in collaboration with Novartis Pharmaceuticals Australia, conducted a 6-month feasibility study of remote SDV. A Novartis monitor was granted dedicated software and restricted remote access to the eMR portal of the cancer center, thereby providing an avenue through which perform SDV. Results: Six monitoring visits were conducted during the study period, four of which were performed remotely. The ability to conduct two thirds of the monitoring visits remotely in this complex phase III study resulted in an overall cost saving to Novartis. Similarly, remote monitoring eased the strain on internal resources, particularly monitoring space and hospital computer terminal access, at the cancer center. Conclusion: Remote access to patient eMRs for SDV is feasible and is potentially an avenue through which resources can be more efficiently used. Although this feasibility study involved limited numbers, there is no limit to scaling these processes to any number of patients enrolled onto large clinical trials. PMID:23633977

  20. Health care resource use and direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin, People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jing Wu,1 Xiaoning He,1 Li Liu,2 Wenyu Ye,2 William Montgomery,3 Haibo Xue,2 Jeffery S McCombs41School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Lilly Suzhou Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Eli Lilly and Company, Sydney, Australia; 4Departments of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USAObjective: Information concerning the treatment costs of schizophrenia is scarce in People’s Republic of China. The aims of this study were to quantify health care resource utilization and to estimate the direct medical costs for patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin, People’s Republic of China.Methods: Data were obtained from the Tianjin Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI database. Adult patients with ≥1 diagnosis of schizophrenia and 12-month continuous enrollment after the first schizophrenia diagnosis between 2008 and 2009 were included. Both schizophrenia-related, psychiatric-related, and all-cause related resource utilization and direct medical costs were estimated.Results: A total of 2,125 patients were included with a mean age of 52.3 years, and 50.7% of the patients were female. The annual mean all-cause costs were $2,863 per patient with psychiatric-related and schizophrenia-related costs accounting for 84.1% and 62.0% respectively. The schizophrenia-related costs for hospitalized patients were eleven times greater than that of patients who were not hospitalized. For schizophrenia-related health services, 60.8% of patients experienced at least one hospitalization with a mean (median length of stay of 112.1 (71 days and a mean cost of $1,904 per admission; 59.0% of patients experienced at least one outpatient visit with a mean (median number of visits of 6.2 (4 and a mean cost of $42 per visit during the 12-month follow-up period. Non-medication

  1. Simple calculator to estimate the medical cost of diabetes in sub-Saharan Africa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koffi; Alouki; Hélène; Delisle; Stéphane; Besan?on; Naby; Baldé; Assa; Sidibé-Traoré; Joseph; Drabo; Fran?ois; Djrolo; Jean-Claude; Mbanya; Serge; Halimi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To design a medical cost calculator and show that diabetes care is beyond reach of the majority particularlypatients with complications.METHODS: Out-of-pocket expenditures of patients for medical treatment of type-2 diabetes were estimated based on price data collected in Benin,Burkina Faso,Guinea and Mali. A detailed protocol for realistic medical care of diabetes and its complications in the African context was defined. Care components were based on existing guidelines,published data and clinical experience. Prices were obtained in public and private health facilities. The cost calculator used Excel. The cost for basic management of uncomplicated diabetes was calculated per person and per year. Incremental costs were also computed per annum for chronic complications and per episode for acute complications. RESULTS: Wide variations of estimated care costs were observed among countries and between the public and private healthcare system. The minimum estimated cost for the treatment of uncomplicated diabetes(in the public sector) would amount to 21%-34% of the country’s gross national income per capita,26%-47% in the presence of retinopathy,and above 70% for nephropathy,the most expensive complication. CONCLUSION: The study provided objective evidence for the exorbitant medical cost of diabetes considering that no medical insurance is available in the study countries. Although the calculator only estimates the cost of inaction,it is innovative and of interest for several stakeholders.

  2. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction.......To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction....

  3. Activity cost analysis: a tool to cost medical services and improve quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udpa, S

    2001-01-01

    This paper suggests an activity-based cost (ABC) system as the appropriate cost accounting system to measure and control costs under the microstatistical episode of care (EOC) paradigm suggested by D. W. Emery (1999). ABC systems work well in such an environment because they focus on activities performed to provide services in the delivery of care. Thus, under an ABC system it is not only possible to accurately cost episodes of care but also to more effectively monitor and improve the quality of care. Under the ABC system, costs are first traced to activities and then traced from the activities to units of episodic care using cost drivers based on the consumption of activity resources.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of Zoledronic Acid to Prevent and Treat Postmenopausal Osteoporosis in Comparison with Routine Medical Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohamdi, Fateme Rostami; Abbasi, Mahnaz; Karyani, Ali Kazemi; Sari, Ali Akbari

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fractures caused by osteoporosis are prevalent among elderly females, which reduce quality of life significantly. This study aimed at comparing cost-effectiveness of Zoledronic acid in preventing and treating post-menopause osteoporosis as compared with routine medical treatment. Methods This cost-effectiveness study was carried out retrospectively from the Ministry of Health and insurance organizations perspective. Costs were evaluated based on the cost estimation of a sample of patients. Outcomes were obtained from a systematic review. The Cost-Effectiveness Ratio (CER) and incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for outcome of femoral neck Bone Mineral Density (BMD), hip trochanter BMD, total hip BMD and lumbar spine BMD and cost-benefit of consuming Zoledronic Acid were calculated for fracture outcome obtained from reviewing hospital records. Results The results and the ICER calculated for study outcomes indicated that one percent increase of BMD on femoral neck BMD requires further cost of $386. One percent increase of BMD on hip trochanter BMD requires further cost of $264. One percent increase of BMD on total hip BMD requires further cost of $388, one percent increase of BMD on lumbar spine BMD requires further cost of $347. The Cost Benefit Analysis (CBA) calculated for vertebral and hip fracture, non-vertebral fracture, any clinical fracture, and morphometric fracture for a 36-month period were about 0.82, 0.57, and 1.06, respectively. Vertebral and hip fractures, and non-vertebral fractures or any clinical fracture for a 12-month period were calculated as 1.14 and 0.64, respectively. In other words, Zoledronic acid consumption approach is a cheaper and better approach based on an economic assessment, and it can be considered as a dominant approach. Conclusion According to the cost-effectiveness of zoledronic acid in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in women, despite the costs, it is recommended that insurance coverage for the

  5. Assessment of the Direct Medical Costs of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its Complications in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simten Malhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To estimate the direct annual medical costs of Type 2 diabetes and its complications in diagnosed patients in Turkey. Material and Method: A cost-of-illness model was developed. The prevalence of Type 2 diabetes was derived from the Turkish Diabetes Epidemiology Study, estimated as 13.7% in adults, with one-third of patients previously undiagnosed. Complication costs were extracted from the records of 7095 patients at a Turkish tertiary care hospital in 2009. For each modelled complication, acute phase costs were applied to globally derived incidence rates, and one-year follow-up costs were applied to globally derived prevalence rates. Costs and frequencies of ongoing antihyperglycaemic treatment and disease management were derived from treatment guidelines and Turkish hospital records. Parameter variation was performed. Results: The cost of Type 2 diabetes in diagnosed patients was estimated at between 11.4 to 12.9 billion Turkish Lira, 1% of Gross Domestic Product. Cardiovascular complications comprised the largest share of total medical costs (between 24.3% and 32.6%, followed by renal complications-related costs (between 25% and 28.3% and concomitant cardiovascular and antihypertensive medication costs (between 14.2% and 16%. Antihyperglycaemic medications and screening costs comprised between 10.9% to 12.3% and between 4.4% to 5% of total costs, respectively. Discussion: Type 2 diabetes is a disease burden and economic burden in Turkey; the complications cost is higher than the cost of disease control. For preventing complications, any activities effect positively limited resources and also quality of life. Turk Jem 2014; 2: 39-43

  6. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Radiation Therapy Services at Tripler Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diehl, Diane S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the costs and benefits associated with continuance of "in-house" radiation therapy services to eligible beneficiaries at Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC...

  7. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 3, Number 7, October 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-01

    MSMRVol. 03 / No. 07 7 Active Duty Other FIGURE II. Reportable sexually transmitted diseases, US Army medical treatment facilities* Cases per...Training Area in southeastern Queensland. Pre- exercise activities : Assessment of exer- cise-relevant medical threats identified the follow- ing: injuries...eastern Australia during the rainy season, the RRv threat was considered both operationally and medi- cally significant. Pre- exercise activities

  8. Frequency of medical errors in hospitalized children in khorramabad Madani hospital during six months in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azam Mohsenzadeh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many hospitalized children are suffered from medical errors that may cause serious injuries. The aim of this study was to evaluate medical errors in hospitalized children in khorramabad Madani hospital in the first half of 2008. Materials and Methods: This study was a cross sectional that was performed for all medical errors in hospitalized children in khorramabad Madani hospital from 21/3/2008 to 21/9/2008. The sampling method was census. Studied variables included: age, sex, weight, kinds of errers, education of parents, job of parents. Data was collected by questionnaire and analyzed by SPSS software. Results: In this study out of 2250 records, 151 (6/3% had medical errors. 53%were girls and 47% were boys that there was a significant relation between sex and medical errors. 46/4%were related to age group lower than 2 years old. Most of the errors were occurred in weight group of 6kg. Types of medical errors included drug ordering 46/3% (involved incorrect dosage of drug (37%, frequency 28%, rout 19% and others 16%, transcribing10%, administering32/4%, dispensing11/3%. Most errors related to liquid therapy 76/2% and intravenous rout 85/4%. Most errors were occurred during night 47% and during weekend 56/6%. Conclusion: Medical errors are common in hospitalized patients, and in our study the rate of medical errors was 6/3%. So further efforts are needed to reduce them.

  9. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 15, Number 6, July-August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    laboratory specialist; cytology specialist; hemodialysis technician; medical, histopathology, cytotechnology apprentice, journeyman, or craftsman; iv...reported by August 7, 2007 and 2008 †Seventy medical events/conditions specified by Tri-Service Reportable Events Guidelines and Case Definitions , May...Service Reportable Events Guidelines and Case Definitions , May 2004. Note: Completeness and timeliness of reporting vary by facility. JULY – AUGUST

  10. Cost Analysis of the Military Medical Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    for military physicians. For example, cardio-thoracic surgeons would require a number of patients over age 65 to provide opportunities for heart ...brief treatment periods, such as that in examining rooms or I in the physiotherapy department, is not included in this figure. Nursery space is not...Appliance Clinic Psychiatric Care AFA Psychiatrics AFB Substance Abuse Rehabilitation AGF FamilN Practice Psychiatry IV-5 The MIEPRS cost data come from

  11. Price elasticity and medication use: cost sharing across multiple clinical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatwood, Justin; Gibson, Teresa B; Chernew, Michael E; Farr, Amanda M; Vogtmann, Emily; Fendrick, A Mark

    2014-11-01

    To address the impact that out-of-pocket prices may have on medication use, it is vital to understand how the demand for medications may be affected when patients are faced with changes in the price to acquire treatment and how price responsiveness differs across medication classes.  To examine the impact of cost-sharing changes on the demand for 8 classes of prescription medications. This was a retrospective database analysis of 11,550,363 commercially insured enrollees within the 2005-2009 MarketScan Database. Patient cost sharing, expressed as a price index for each medication class, was the main explanatory variable to examine the price elasticity of demand. Negative binomial fixed effect models were estimated to examine medication fills. The elasticity estimates reflect how use changes over time as a function of changes in copayments. Model estimates revealed that price elasticity of demand ranged from -0.015 to -0.157 within the 8 categories of medications (P  less than  0.01 for 7 of 8 categories). The price elasticity of demand for smoking deterrents was largest (-0.157, P  less than  0.0001), while demand for antiplatelet agents was not responsive to price (P  greater than 0.05). The price elasticity of demand varied considerably by medication class, suggesting that the influence of cost sharing on medication use may be related to characteristics inherent to each medication class or underlying condition.

  12. The cost of bariatric medical tourism on the Canadian healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Caroline E; Lester, Erica L W; Karmali, Shahzeer; de Gara, Christopher J; Birch, Daniel W

    2014-05-01

    Medical tourists are defined as individuals who intentionally travel from their home province/country to receive medical care. Minimal literature exists on the cost of postoperative care and complications for medical tourists. The costs associated with these patients were reviewed. Between February 2009 and June 2013, 62 patients were determined to be medical tourists. Patients were included if their initial surgery was performed between January 2003 and June 2013. A chart review was performed to identify intervention costs sustained upon their return. Conservatively, the costs of length of stay (n = 657, $1,433,673.00), operative procedures (n = 110, $148,924.30), investigations (n = 700, $214,499.06), blood work (n = 357, $19,656.90), and health professionals' time (n = 76, $17,414.87) were summated to the total cost of $1.8 million CAD. The absolute denominator of patients who go abroad for bariatric surgery is unknown. Despite this, a substantial cost is incurred because of medical tourism. Future investigations will analyze the cost effectiveness of bariatric surgery conducted abroad compared with local treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Type 2 diabetes: cost-effectiveness of medication adherence and lifestyle interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerat T

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomaž Nerat, Igor Locatelli, Mitja Kos Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia Introduction: Type 2 diabetes is a major burden for the payer, however, with proper medication adherence, diet and exercise regime, complication occurrence rates, and consequently costs can be altered.Aims: The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis on real patient data and evaluate which medication adherence or lifestyle intervention is less cost demanding for the payer.Methods: Medline was searched systematically for published type 2 diabetes interventions regarding medication adherence and lifestyle in order to determine their efficacies, that were then used in the cost-effectiveness analysis. For cost-effectiveness analysis-required disease progression simulation, United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes model 2.0 and Slovenian type 2 diabetes patient cohort were used. The intervention duration was set to 1, 2, 5, and 10 years. Complications and drug costs in euro (EUR were based on previously published type 2 diabetes costs from the Health Care payer perspective in Slovenia.Results: Literature search proved the following interventions to be effective in type 2 diabetes patients: medication adherence, the Mediterranean diet, aerobic, resistance, and combined exercise. The long-term simulation resulted in no payer net savings. The model predicted following quality-adjusted life-years (QALY gained and incremental costs for QALY gained (EUR/QALYg after 10 years of intervention: high-efficacy medication adherence (0.245 QALY; 9,984 EUR/QALYg, combined exercise (0.119 QALY; 46,411 EUR/QALYg, low-efficacy medication adherence (0.075 QALY; 30,967 EUR/QALYg, aerobic exercise (0.069 QALY; 80,798 EUR/QALYg, the Mediterranean diet (0.057 QALY; 27,246 EUR/QALYg, and resistance exercise (0.050 QALY; 111,847 EUR/QALYg.Conclusion: The results suggest that medication adherence intervention is, regarding cost

  14. Can Low-Price Hospitals Ease The High Cost of Medical Services?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Going to a hospital is not an easy matter for most Chinese people, with overcrowding and soaring medical costs having become two focuses of public complaint. China's medical system has been on a marketization drive since the 1980s. A July 2005 report by the Development Research Center of the State Council, a think tank under China's cabinet, however, came to a

  15. Teaching Medical Students about Quality and Cost of Care at Case Western Reserve University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headrick, Linda A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    At Case Western University (Ohio), medical students critically analyze the quality and cost of asthma care in the community by studying patients in primary care practices. Each writes a case report, listing all medical charges and comparing them with guidelines for asthma care. Several recommendations for improved care have emerged. (MSE)

  16. Continuing medical education costs and benefits: lessons for competing in a changing health care economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazmanian, Paul E

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches to evaluation in continuing medical education (CME) feature results defined as changes in participation, satisfaction, knowledge, behavior, and patient outcomes. Few studies link costs and effectiveness of CME to improved quality of care. As continuing education programs compete for scarce resources, cost-inclusive evaluation offers strategies to measure change and to determine value for resources spent.

  17. Medical cost-offset following treatment referral for alcohol and other drug use disorders in a group model HMO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polen, Michael R; Freeborn, Donald K; Lynch, Frances L; Mullooly, John P; Dickinson, Daniel M

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether specialty alcohol and other drug (AOD) treatment is associated with reduced subsequent medical care costs. AOD treatment costs and medical costs in a group model health maintenance organization (HMO) were collected for up to 6 years on 1,472 HMO members who were recommended for specialty AOD treatment, and on 738 members without AOD diagnoses or treatment. Addiction Severity Index measures were also obtained from a sample of 293 of those recommended for treatment. Changes in medical costs did not differ between treatment and comparison groups. Nor did individuals with improved treatment outcomes have greater reductions in medical costs. AOD treatment costs were not inversely related to subsequent medical costs, except for a subgroup with recent AOD treatment. In the interviewed sample, better treatment outcomes did not predict lower subsequent medical costs. Multiple treatment episodes may hold promise for producing cost-offsets.

  18. Treatment patterns of postherpetic neuralgia patients before and after the launch of pregabalin and its effect on medical costs: Analysis of Japanese claims data provided by Japan Medical Data Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Mariko; Murata, Tatsunori; Ebata, Nozomi; Fujii, Koichi; Ogawa, Setsuro

    2017-03-03

    Except for neurotrophin, no drug had an indication for postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) in Japan prior to pregabalin approval. This approval might have changed PHN treatment patterns. This study aimed to compare PHN treatment patterns and medical costs between patients who started treatment before and after pregabalin approval. Japanese claims data were used to identify patients aged 18 years or more with PHN, postherpetic trigeminal neuralgia or postherpetic polyneuropathy who were initiated on their first PHN-associated prescription through May 2010 (before approval) or from June 2010 (after approval). From these claims, 6-month treatment patterns from first prescription were compared for the periods before and after approval. These patterns included pain-related medications and the frequency of pain-relief procedures. All-cause and pain-related medical costs were also compared for these periods. The number of PHN patients who were initiated on treatment before and after approval were 107 (mean age, 47.4 ± 13.0 years) and 505 (45.9 ± 13.0), respectively. Post-approval, significant reductions were observed for prescription of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, tricyclic antidepressants and neurotrophin relative to before approval. Excluding pregabalin acquisition costs, mean costs per patient for medications associated with PHN for 6 months from the first prescription were significantly lower after approval, ¥2882 vs ¥4185. Total medical costs were similar in both periods. Approval of pregabalin appeared to result in a treatment paradigm toward use of an approved therapy with demonstrated efficacy.

  19. Health Insurance Coverage and Its Impact on Medical Cost: Observations from the Floating Population in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yinjun; Kang, Bowei; Liu, Yawen; Li, Yichong; Shi, Guoqing; Shen, Tao; Jiang, Yong; Zhang, Mei; Zhou, Maigeng; Wang, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Background China has the world's largest floating (migrant) population, which has characteristics largely different from the rest of the population. Our goal is to study health insurance coverage and its impact on medical cost for this population. Methods A telephone survey was conducted in 2012. 644 subjects were surveyed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were conducted on insurance coverage and medical cost. Results 82.2% of the surveyed subjects were covered by basic insurance at hometowns with hukou or at residences. Subjects' characteristics including age, education, occupation, and presence of chronic diseases were associated with insurance coverage. After controlling for confounders, insurance coverage was not significantly associated with gross or out-of-pocket medical cost. Conclusion For the floating population, health insurance coverage needs to be improved. Policy interventions are needed so that health insurance can have a more effective protective effect on cost. PMID:25386914

  20. Community pharmacy and mail order cost and utilization for 90-day maintenance medication prescriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Nikhil; Duncan, Ian; Rubinstein, Elan; Ahmed, Tamim; Pegus, Cheryl

    2012-04-01

    Pharmacy benefit management (PBM) companies promote mail order programs that typically dispense 90-day quantities of maintenance medications, marketing this feature as a key cost containment strategy to address plan sponsors' rising prescription drug expenditures. In recent years, community pharmacies have introduced 90-day programs that provide similar cost advantages, while allowing these prescriptions to be dispensed at the same pharmacies that patients frequent for 30-day quantities. To compare utilization rates and corresponding costs associated with obtaining 90-day prescriptions at community and mail order pharmacies for payers that offer equivalent benefits in different 90-day dispensing channels. We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional investigation using pharmacy claims and eligibility data from employer group clients of a large PBM between January 2008 and September 2010. We excluded the following client types: government, third-party administrators, schools, hospitals, 340B (federal drug pricing), employers in Puerto Rico, and miscellaneous clients for which the PBM provided billing services (e.g., the pharmacy's loyalty card program members). All employer groups in the sample offered 90-day community pharmacy and mail order dispensing and received benefits management services, such as formulary management and mail order pharmacy, from the PBM. We further limited the sample to employer groups that offered equivalent benefits for community pharmacy and mail order, defined as groups in which the mean and median copayments per claim for community and mail order pharmacy, by tier, differed by no more than 5%. Enrollees in the sample were required to have a minimum of 6 months of eligibility in each calendar year but were not required to have filled a prescription in any year. We evaluated pharmacy costs and utilization for a market basket of 14 frequently dispensed therapeutic classes of maintenance medications. The proportional share of claims for

  1. Type 2 diabetes: cost-effectiveness of medication adherence and lifestyle interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerat, Tomaž; Locatelli, Igor; Kos, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a major burden for the payer, however, with proper medication adherence, diet and exercise regime, complication occurrence rates, and consequently costs can be altered. Aims The aim of this study was to conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis on real patient data and evaluate which medication adherence or lifestyle intervention is less cost demanding for the payer. Methods Medline was searched systematically for published type 2 diabetes interventions regarding medication adherence and lifestyle in order to determine their efficacies, that were then used in the cost-effectiveness analysis. For cost-effectiveness analysis-required disease progression simulation, United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Outcomes model 2.0 and Slovenian type 2 diabetes patient cohort were used. The intervention duration was set to 1, 2, 5, and 10 years. Complications and drug costs in euro (EUR) were based on previously published type 2 diabetes costs from the Health Care payer perspective in Slovenia. Results Literature search proved the following interventions to be effective in type 2 diabetes patients: medication adherence, the Mediterranean diet, aerobic, resistance, and combined exercise. The long-term simulation resulted in no payer net savings. The model predicted following quality-adjusted life-years (QALY) gained and incremental costs for QALY gained (EUR/QALYg) after 10 years of intervention: high-efficacy medication adherence (0.245 QALY; 9,984 EUR/QALYg), combined exercise (0.119 QALY; 46,411 EUR/QALYg), low-efficacy medication adherence (0.075 QALY; 30,967 EUR/QALYg), aerobic exercise (0.069 QALY; 80,798 EUR/QALYg), the Mediterranean diet (0.057 QALY; 27,246 EUR/QALYg), and resistance exercise (0.050 QALY; 111,847 EUR/QALYg). Conclusion The results suggest that medication adherence intervention is, regarding cost-effectiveness, superior to diet and exercise interventions from the payer perspective. However, the latter could also be utilized

  2. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 22, Number 9, September 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Angelia A. Eick-Cost, PhD, ScM ; Devin J. Hunt, MS Incidence of syphilis, active component , U.S. Armed Forces, 1 January 2010 through 31 August 2015...Leslie L. Clark, PhD, MS; Devin J. Hunt, MS Brief report: Rate of prescriptions by therapeutic classification, active component , U.S. Armed Forces...Cost, PhD, ScM ; Devin J. Hunt, MS B A C K G R O U N D illness caused by infl uenza viruses has historically imposed a signifi cant annual health

  3. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 8, Number 5, July 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-07-01

    be improving and the overall completeness of reporting is stable. Analysis and report by Barbara E. Nagaraj, MPH, Analysis Group, Army Medical... Leishmaniasis 0 0 - 0 0 - 1 1 100 Leptospirosis 1 0 0 1 1 100 2 1 50 Lyme

  4. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 2, Number 4, April 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Epidemiology of Injuries Associated with Physical Training Among Young Men in the Army. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise . 25:197-203, 1993...available to the Medical Surveillance Activity . Notifiable conditions are reported by date of onset (or date of notification when date of onset is absent...Selected notifiable conditions ....................................... 4 Notifiable sexually transmitted diseases ....................... 6 Injuries

  5. "Empathize with Me, Doctor!" Medical Undergraduates Training Project: Development, Application, Six-Months Follow-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiosses, Vasileios N.; Tatsioni, Athina; Dimoliatis, Ioannis D. K.; Hyphantis, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the effectiveness of specially designed, empathy training for medical undergraduates, based on the principles of Person-Centered Approach. Within the context of the humanistic person-centered patient care, the experiential, 60-hour "Empathize with me, Doctor!" training program contains theory, personal…

  6. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 12, Number 2, March 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    U.S. Military Health System, CY2004 Medical department 1. Excludes transfers and single day chemotherapy or radiation therapy ...bacter Giardia Salmonella cumulative numbers2 for calendar years through March 31, 2005 and 2006 Shigella Hepatitis B Varicella Sentinel reportable

  7. Presurgical biopsychosocial variables predict medical, compensation, and aggregate costs of lumbar discectomy in Utah workers' compensation patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBerard, M Scott; Wheeler, Anthony J; Gundy, Jessica M; Stein, David M; Colledge, Alan L

    2011-05-01

    Elective lumbar discectomy among injured workers is a prevalent spine surgery that often requires a lengthy rehabilitation. It is important to determine presurgical biopsychosocial predictors of compensation and medical costs in such patients. To determine if presurgical biopsychosocial variables are predictive of compensation and medical costs in a cohort of Utah patients who have undergone open or microlumbar discectomy that are receiving workers' compensation. A retrospective cohort study consisting of a review of presurgical medical records and accrued medical and compensation costs. A consecutive sample of 266 compensated workers from Utah who had undergone either open discectomy or microlumbar discectomy from 1994 to 2000. All patients were at least 2 years postsurgery at the time of follow-up. Total accrued medical, compensation, and aggregate costs. A retrospective review of presurgical biopsychosocial variables and total accrued medical, compensation, and aggregate costs. Presurgical variables were statistically significantly correlated with medical and compensation costs. Multiple linear regression models accounted for 31% of variation in compensation costs, 32% in medical costs, and 43% in total aggregate costs. Presurgical biopsychosocial variables are important predictors of compensated lumbar discectomy costs. Medical cost control programs might benefit from identifying biopsychosocial variables related to increased costs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 6, Number 6, July 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    0 3 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 Influenza 0 10 0 1 23 4 0 11 0 Leishmaniasis 17 30 57 1 2 50 0 0 - Leprosy 1 3 33 0 0 - 0 0 - Lyme disease 1 2 50 1 1 100 0 1 0...by Barbara Brynan, MPH, Analysis Group, Army Medical Surveillance Activity. Figure 2. Migraine incidence rates, by race, ethnicity, and gender, US

  9. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 9, Number 5, July/August 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    evaluation, planning, and disease trending5. Analysis and report by Barbara E. Nagaraj, MPH, Analysis Group, Army Medical Surveillance Activity. MSMR10... Leishmaniasis 0 0 - 1 1 100 1 0 0 Leprosy 0 0 - 0 0 - 2 2...7 3 43 Legionellosis 1 1 100 2 0 0 2 0 0 Leishmaniasis 0 0 - 0 0 - 1 0 0 Lyme disease 1 0 0 2 0 0 1

  10. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 22, Number 6, June 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    subsequently diag- nosed with depression, anxiety disorder , or bipolar disorder than women who were not diagnosed with PPD. In addition, women who were...risk of subsequent development of depressive, anxiety , or bipolar disorders than women not diagnosed with PPD. Th e association between PPD...health disorders . Th e Defense Medical Sur- veillance System (DMSS) was used to identify a cohort of primiparous ser- vice women with PPD between 1998 and

  11. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 22, Number 5, May 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    deterioration.1,2 Joint replace- ment is performed aft er other treatments such as physical therapy and medications have failed to prevent severe joint pain...Caribbean are the same species, Aedes albopictus and Aedes aegypti. Th e U.S. Forward Operating Location (FOL), 429th Expeditionary Operations...1231–1239. 12. Long KC, Ziegler SA, Thangamani S, et al. Experimental transmission of Mayaro virus by Aedes aegypti. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2011;85(4

  12. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 14, Number 6, September/October 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    2 Relationship between infl uenza vaccination and subsequent diagnoses of Group A Streptococcus -related illnesses, basic combat trainees...threatening (e.g., pneumonia , necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock). Finally, some “rheumatogenic” strains of GABHS have delayed clinical eff ects that...various training camps and during various periods, benzathine penicillin (BPG) has been given to all non-allergic trainees during their medical in

  13. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 17, Number 01, January 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Regional Medical Center in Germany. En route to Landstuhl, the patient required endotracheal intubation due to his worsening mental status. Upon arrival... Endotracheal intubation en route to LRMC Day 4: Arrival to LRMC Unstable, acidotic Smear and rapid test positive for P. falciparum Antimalarials and broad...they reported applications of DEET three or more times per day “most or all of the time”. From 27 June (the date of diagnosis of the index case

  14. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 19, Number 3, March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    most oft en with the small - pox vaccine, but has also been reported in temporal association with other ACIP- recommended vaccines as well. Th e...other articles in this issue of the MSMR). Commanders, small unit leaders, training cadre, and supporting medical personnel, particularly at recruit...probable cases of exertional rhabdomyolysis was attempted by using aRate per 100,000 p-yrs aCoast Guard not shown due to small annual case counts

  15. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 4, Number 1, January 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    medical treatment facilities* December, 1997 Total number Environmental Injuries Viral Hepatitis Salmonellosis Shigella Varicella Reporting of...duration may be useful to detect multifocal outbreaks of “emerging” infectious diseases, to assess their sizes and distributions, and to track the...Heat exhaustion 4 51 84 5 144 Salmonellosis 17 38 95 49 199 Heat stroke 6 13 31 2 52 Schistosomiasis 0 0 0 0 0 Hemorrhagic fever 0 0 0 2 2

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 3, Number 4, June 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    sentinel reportable diseases, US Army Medical Treatment Facilities* May, 1997 Total number Environmental Injuries Viral Hepatitis Salmonellosis Shigella...uncommon1,3. During March and April 1997, an outbreak of suspected spider bites occurred among trainees of five basic training companies at Fort Benning...laundry facility cleaned all trainee linen Outbreak Investigation MSMRVol. 03 / No. 04 11 and TA-50 (i.e., individual field equipment). This

  17. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 20, Number 2, February 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Tilley, Margaret Mbuchi, Eyako K. Wurapa, Karen Saylors, Christopher C. Duplessis, Naiki Puplampu, Eric C. Garges, R. Scott McClelland, Jose L... Margaret Mbuchi, PhD; Eyako K. Wurapa, MD (LTC, USA); Karen Saylors, PhD; Christopher C. Duplessis, MD (LCDR, USN); Naiki Puplampu, MPhil; Eric C...medical encounter any time prior to OEF/OIF). Reference: Isenbarger DW, Atwood JE, Scott PT, et al. Venous thromboembolism among United States soldiers

  18. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 2, Number 8, October 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-10-01

    including cattle, swine , and poultry. Meat , eggs, and the unpasteurized milk of in- fected animals are often contaminated. Out- breaks occur when widely...examination for ova and parasites. Salmonella , group D, were isolated from all nine specimens. A questionnaire was completed by 29 (36%) of the 81 cases...Officer, 520th Theater Army Medical Lab (TAML). Report from the field Continued on page 10 Average Reported Cases of Salmonella and Shigella May 1994

  19. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 16, Number 5, May 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    safety, and force health protection programs. In addition, service members receive “free” preventive, curative, and rehabilitation medical services...location Arthropod-borne Sexually transmitted Environmental Lyme disease Malaria Chlamydia Gonorrhea Syphilis ‡ Urethritis§ Cold Heat 2008 2009 2008...borne Sexually transmitted Environmental Lyme disease Malaria Chlamydia Gonorrhea Syphilis ‡ Urethritis§ Cold Heat 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008 2009 2008

  20. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 23, Number 2, February 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    provides insight into possible surveil- lance artifacts and can help pinpoint areas for improvement. Th e notable drop in lab- oratory testing volume...Excludes individuals medically evacuated from CENTCOM and/or hospitalized in Landstuhl, Germany, within 10 days prior to death. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Ja nu...f h os pi ta liz at io ns Motorcycle accident-related hospitalizations Other MVA-related hospitalizations Deployment-related Conditions of Special

  1. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 2, Number 11, November 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    identical numbers of index and referent months. For analysis purposes, each index and referent month pair was character- ized in relation to gender , age...M E D I C A L S U R V E I L L A N C E M O N T H L Y R E P O R T msmr A publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch NOVEMBER...2014 Lee Hurt, DrPH, MS; Saixia Ying, PhD S U M M A R Y T A B L E S A N D F I G U R E S P A G E 2 2 Deployment- related conditions of special

  2. Direct Medical Costs of Dengue Fever in Vietnam: A Retrospective Study in a Tertiary Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Nhung Thi Tuyet; Phan, Trang Ngo Diem; Vo, Trung Quang

    2017-05-01

    In Vietnam, dengue fever is a major health concern, yet comprehensive information on its economic costs is lacking. The present study investigated treatment costs associated with dengue fever from the perspective of health care provision. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2013 and December 2015 in Cu Chi General Hospital. The following dengue-related treatment costs were calculated: hospitalisation, diagnosis, specialised services, drug usage and medical supplies. Average cost per case and treatment cost across different age was calculated. In the study period, 1672 patients with dengue fever were hospitalised. The average age was 24.98 (SD = 14.10) years, and 47.5% were males (795 patients). Across age groups, the average cost per episode was USD 48.10 (SD = 3.22). The highest costs (USD 56.61, SD = 48.84) were incurred in the adult age group (> 15 years), and the lowest costs (USD 30.10, SD = 17.27) were incurred in the paediatric age group (< 15 years). The direct medical costs of dengue-related hospitalisation place a severe economic burden on patients and their families. The probable economic value of dengue management in Vietnam is significant.

  3. The effect of the TIM program (Transfer ICU Medication reconciliation) on medication transfer errors in two Dutch intensive care units: design of a prospective 8-month observational study with a before and after period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosma, Bertha Elizabeth; Meuwese, Edmé; Tan, Siok Swan; van Bommel, Jasper; Melief, Piet Herman Gerard Jan; Hunfeld, Nicole Geertruida Maria; van den Bemt, Patricia Maria Lucia Adriana

    2017-02-10

    The transfer of patients to and from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is prone to medication errors. The aim of the present study is to determine whether the number of medication errors at ICU admission and discharge and the associated potential harm and costs are reduced by using the Transfer ICU and Medication reconciliation (TIM) program. This prospective 8-month observational study with a pre- and post-design will assess the effects of the TIM program compared with usual care in two Dutch hospitals. Patients will be included if they are using at least one drug before hospital admission and will stay in the ICU for at least 24 h. They are excluded if they are transferred to another hospital, admitted and discharged in the same weekend or unable to communicate in Dutch or English. In the TIM program, a clinical pharmacist reconciles patient's medication history within 24 h after ICU admission, resulting in a "best possible" medication history and presents it to the ICU doctor. At ICU discharge the clinical pharmacist reconciles the prescribed ICU medication and the medication history with the ICU doctor, resulting in an ICU discharge medication list with medication prescription recommendations for the general ward doctor. Primary outcome measures are the proportions of patients with one or more medication transfer errors 24 h after ICU admission and 24 h after ICU discharge. Secondary outcome measures are the proportion of patients with potential adverse drug events, the severity of potential adverse drug events and the associated costs. For the primary outcome relative risks and 95% confidence intervals will be calculated. Strengths of this study are the tailor-made design of the TIM program and two participating hospitals. This study also has some limitations: A potential selection bias since this program is not performed during the weekends, collecting of potential rather than actual adverse drug events and finally a relatively short study period. Nevertheless

  4. Cost-sensitive case-based reasoning using a genetic algorithm: application to medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Joo; Chun, Se-Hak; Kim, Byung-Chun

    2011-02-01

    The paper studies the new learning technique called cost-sensitive case-based reasoning (CSCBR) incorporating unequal misclassification cost into CBR model. Conventional CBR is now considered as a suitable technique for diagnosis, prognosis and prescription in medicine. However it lacks the ability to reflect asymmetric misclassification and often assumes that the cost of a positive diagnosis (an illness) as a negative one (no illness) is the same with that of the opposite situation. Thus, the objective of this research is to overcome the limitation of conventional CBR and encourage applying CBR to many real world medical cases associated with costs of asymmetric misclassification errors. The main idea involves adjusting the optimal cut-off classification point for classifying the absence or presence of diseases and the cut-off distance point for selecting optimal neighbors within search spaces based on similarity distribution. These steps are dynamically adapted to new target cases using a genetic algorithm. We apply this proposed method to five real medical datasets and compare the results with two other cost-sensitive learning methods-C5.0 and CART. Our finding shows that the total misclassification cost of CSCBR is lower than other cost-sensitive methods in many cases. Even though the genetic algorithm has limitations in terms of unstable results and over-fitting training data, CSCBR results with GA are better overall than those of other methods. Also the paired t-test results indicate that the total misclassification cost of CSCBR is significantly less than C5.0 and CART for several datasets. We have proposed a new CBR method called cost-sensitive case-based reasoning (CSCBR) that can incorporate unequal misclassification costs into CBR and optimize the number of neighbors dynamically using a genetic algorithm. It is meaningful not only for introducing the concept of cost-sensitive learning to CBR, but also for encouraging the use of CBR in the medical area

  5. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 16, Number 10, October 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Iraqi Freedom, active component, U.S.Armed Forces ____________________________________2 Medical evacuation for suspected breast cancer , active and...elsewhere classified,” RD: 14.4 per 1000 p-yrs; - Urinary system disorders, including ICD-9-CM 599 “other disorders of the urethra and urinary tract...0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 O th nonspec abn histo im m uno findings O ther sym tom s inv abdom en pelvis O th disorders urethra urinary tract M igraine

  6. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 12, Number 3, April 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    explosives (includes accidents during war) 754 7.4 Athletics 658 6.5 Poisons and fire 368 3.6 Machinery, tools 311 3.1...miscellaneous,” complications of medical/ surgical care, land transport accidents, guns/ explosives (including accidents during war), and athletics (Table 4...Other knee disorders 14,438 (59) 8,081 (59) 1,116 (46) Osteoarthritis 10,390 (66) 6,932 (63) 577 (63) Other shoulder disorders 9,676 (68) 5,874 (67) 229

  7. 78 FR 62709 - Calendar Year 2013 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-22

    ... BUDGET Calendar Year 2013 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by... the cost of outpatient medical, dental and cosmetic surgery services furnished by military treatment... Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery rates referenced are effective upon publication of...

  8. 76 FR 72003 - Calendar Year 2011 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... BUDGET Calendar Year 2011 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by... the cost of outpatient medical, dental, and cosmetic surgery services furnished by military treatment... outpatient medical, dental, and cosmetic surgery services rates referenced are effective upon publication...

  9. End-of-life costs of medical care for advanced stage cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cancer, one of the leading causes of mortality in the world, imposes a substantial economic burden on each society, including Serbia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the major cancer cost drivers in Serbia. Methods. A retrospective, indepth, bottom-up analysis of two combined databases was performed in order to quantify relevant costs. End-of-life data were obtained from patients with cancer, who deceased within the first year of the established diagnose, including basic demographics, diagnosis, tumour histology, medical resource use and related costs, time and cause of death. All costs were allocated to one of the three categories of cancer health care services: primary care (included home care, hospital outpatient and hospital inpatient care. Results. Exactly 114 patients were analyzed, out of whom a high percent (48.25% had distant metastases at the moment of establishing the diagnosis. Malignant neoplasms of respiratory and intrathoracic organs were leading causes of morbidity. The average costs per patient were significantly different according to the diagnosis, with the highest (13,114.10 EUR and the lowest (4.00 EUR ones observed in the breast cancer and melanoma, respectively. The greatest impact on total costs was observed concerning pharmaceuticals, with 42% of share (monoclonal antibodies amounted to 34% of all medicines and 14% of total costs, followed by oncology medical care (21%, radiation therapy and interventional radiology (11%, surgery (9%, imaging diagnostics (9% and laboratory costs (8%. Conclusion. Cancer treatment incurs high costs, especially for end-of-life pharmaceutical expenses, ensued from medical personnel tendency to improve such patients’ quality of life in spite of nearing the end of life. Reimbursement policy on monoclonal antibodies, in particular at end-stage disease, should rely on cost-effectiveness evidence as well as documented clinical efficiency. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke

  10. Smoke-Free Medical Facility Campus Legislation: Support, Resistance, Difficulties and Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gary Wheeler

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although medical facilities restrict smoking inside, many people continue to smoke outside, creating problems with second-hand smoke, litter, fire risks, and negative role modeling. In 2005, Arkansas passed legislation prohibiting smoking on medical facility campuses. Hospital administrators (N=113 were surveyed pre- and post-implementation. Administrators reported more support and less difficulty than anticipated. Actual cost was 10-50% of anticipated cost. Few negative effects and numerous positive effects on employee performance and retention were reported. The results may be of interest to hospital administrators and demonstrate that state legislation can play a positive role in facilitating broad health-related policy change.

  11. Cost analysis of integrating the PrePex medical device into a voluntary medical male circumcision program in Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Njeuhmeli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fourteen African countries are scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC for HIV prevention. Several devices that might offer alternatives to the three WHO-approved surgical VMMC procedures have been evaluated for use in adults. One such device is PrePex, which was prequalified by the WHO in May 2013. We utilized data from one of the PrePex field studies undertaken in Zimbabwe to identify cost considerations for introducing PrePex into the existing surgical circumcision program. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We evaluated the cost drivers and overall unit cost of VMMC at a site providing surgical VMMC as a routine service ("routine surgery site" and at a site that had added PrePex VMMC procedures to routine surgical VMMC as part of a research study ("mixed study site". We examined the main cost drivers and modeled hypothetical scenarios with varying ratios of surgical to PrePex circumcisions, different levels of site utilization, and a range of device prices. The unit costs per VMMC for the routine surgery and mixed study sites were $56 and $61, respectively. The two greatest contributors to unit price at both sites were consumables and staff. In the hypothetical scenarios, the unit cost increased as site utilization decreased, as the ratio of PrePex to surgical VMMC increased, and as device price increased. CONCLUSIONS: VMMC unit costs for routine surgery and mixed study sites were similar. Low service utilization was projected to result in the greatest increases in unit price. Countries that wish to incorporate PrePex into their circumcision programs should plan to maximize staff utilization and ensure that sites function at maximum capacity to achieve the lowest unit cost. Further costing studies will be necessary once routine implementation of PrePex-based circumcision is established.

  12. Schizophrenia in the Netherlands: Continuity of Care with Better Quality of Care for Less Medical Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Arnold; de Haan, Lieuwe; Beekman, Aartjan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia need continuous elective medical care which includes psychiatric treatment, antipsychotic medication and somatic health care. The objective of this study is to assess whether continuous elective psychiatric is associated with less health care costs due to less inpatient treatment. Methods Data concerning antipsychotic medication and psychiatric and somatic health care of patients with schizophrenia in the claims data of Agis Health Insurance were collected over 2008–2011 in the Netherlands. Included were 7,392 patients under 70 years of age with schizophrenia in 2008, insured during the whole period. We assessed the relationship between continuous elective psychiatric care and the outcome measures: acute treatment events, psychiatric hospitalization, somatic care and health care costs. Results Continuous elective psychiatric care was accessed by 73% of the patients during the entire three year follow-up period. These patients received mostly outpatient care and accessed more somatic care, at a total cost of €36,485 in three years, than those without continuous care. In the groups accessing fewer or no years of elective care 34%-68% had inpatient care and acute treatment events, while accessing less somatic care at average total costs of medical care from €33,284 to €64,509. Conclusions Continuous elective mental and somatic care for 73% of the patients with schizophrenia showed better quality of care at lower costs. Providing continuous elective care to the remaining patients may improve health while reducing acute illness episodes. PMID:27275609

  13. The cost-effectiveness of managed care regarding chronic medicine prescriptions in a selected medical scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Day

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the cost-effectiveness of managed care interventions with respect to prescriptions for chronic illness sufferers enrolled with a specific medical scheme. The illnesses included, were epilepsy, hypertension, diabetes and asthma. The managed care interventions applied were a primary discount; the use of preferred provider pharmacies, and drug utilization review. It was concluded that the managed care interventions resulted in some real cost savings.

  14. Differences in health services utilization and costs between antihypertensive medication users versus nonusers in adults with diabetes and concomitant hypertension from Medical Expenditure Panel Survey pooled years 2006 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis-Ajami, Mary Lynn; Wu, Jun; Fink, Jeffrey C

    2014-01-01

    To compare population-level baseline characteristics, individual-level utilization, and costs between antihypertensive medication users versus nonusers in adults with diabetes and concomitant hypertension. This longitudinal retrospective observational research used Medical Expenditure Panel Survey household component pooled years 2006 to 2009 to analyze adults 18 years or older with nongestational diabetes and coexistent essential hypertension. Two groups were created: 1) antihypertensive medication users and 2) no antihypertensive pharmacotherapy. We examined average annualized health care costs and emergency department and hospital utilization. Accounting for Medical Expenditure Panel Survey's complex survey design, all analyses used longitudinal weights. Logistic regressions examined the likelihood of utilization and anytihypertensive medication use, and log-transformed multiple linear regression models assessed costs and antihypertensive medication use. Of the 3261 adults identified with diabetes, 66% (n = 2137) had concomitant hypertension representing 38.7 million individuals during 2006 to 2009. Significantly, the 16% (n = 338) no antihypertensive pharmacotherapy group showed greater mean nights hospitalized (3.6 vs. 1.7, P = 0.0120), greater all-cause hospitalization events per 1000 patient months (41 vs. 24, P = 0.0.007), and lower mean diabetes-related and hypertension-related ambulatory visits. After adjusting for confounders, non-antihypertensive medication users showed 1.64 odds of hospitalization, 29% lower total, and 27% lower average annualized medical expenses compared with antihypertensive medication users. In adults with diabetes and coexistent hypertension, we observed significantly greater hospitalizations and lower costs for the non antihypertensive pharmacotherapy group versus those using antihypertensive medications. The short-term time horizon greater hospitalizations with lower expenses among non-antihypertensive medication users with

  15. An Insurer's Care Transition Program Emphasizes Medication Reconciliation, Reduces Readmissions And Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinski, Jennifer M; Moore, Janice M; Kyrychenko, Pavlo; Gagnon, Michael; Matlin, Olga S; Fredell, Joshua W; Brennan, Troyen A; Shrank, William H

    2016-07-01

    Adverse drug events and the challenges of clarifying and adhering to complex medication regimens are central drivers of hospital readmissions. Medication reconciliation programs can reduce the incidence of adverse drug events after discharge, but evidence regarding the impact of medication reconciliation on readmission rates and health care costs is less clear. We studied an insurer-initiated care transition program based on medication reconciliation delivered by pharmacists via home visits and telephone and explored its effects on high-risk patients. We examined whether voluntary program participation was associated with improved medication use, reduced readmissions, and savings net of program costs. Program participants had a 50 percent reduced relative risk of readmission within thirty days of discharge and an absolute risk reduction of 11.1 percent. The program saved $2 for every $1 spent. These results represent real-world evidence that insurer-initiated, pharmacist-led care transition programs, focused on but not limited to medication reconciliation, have the potential to both improve clinical outcomes and reduce total costs of care. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR). Volume 19, Number 11, November 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    21.9 1,963 0.4 14,353 2.9 1,498,522 99.6 9,661 Nutritional disorders 138,808 28.0 137 0.0 850 0.2 267,998 17.8 651 Oral conditions 65,601 13.2 4,391...N o. o f c as es Marine Corps Air Force Navy Army Severe acute pneumonia (ICD-9: 518.81, 518.82, 480-487, 786.09)a Leishmaniasis (ICD-9...085.0 to 085.9)b Reference: Army Medical Surveillance Activity. Deployment-related condition of special surveillance interest: severe acute pneumonia

  17. Treatment Patterns, Direct Cost of Biologics, and Direct Medical Costs for Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: A Real-world Analysis of Nationwide Japanese Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Naonobu; Kawahito, Yutaka; Fujii, Takao; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Murata, Tatsunori; Morishima, Yosuke; Fukuma, Yuri

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this article were to characterize the patterns of treating rheumatoid arthritis with biologics and to evaluate costs using claims data from the Japan Medical Data Center Co, Ltd. Patients aged 16 to <75 years who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis and prescribed adalimumab (ADA), etanercept (ETN), infliximab (IFX), tocilizumab (TCZ), abatacept, certolizumab, or golimumab between January 2005 and August 2014 were included. For the cross-sectional analysis, the annual costs of ETN, IFX, ADA, and TCZ from 2009 to 2013 were assessed. For the longitudinal analysis, patients prescribed these biologics as the first line of biologics, from January 2005 to August 2014, were included. The cost of biologic treatment over 1, 2, and 3 years (including prescription of subsequent biologics) and direct medical costs (including treatment of comorbidities) were compared between groups. Discontinuation and switching rates in each group were estimated, and multivariate analyses were conducted to estimate an adjusted hazard ratio of discontinuation and switching rates among each group. The dose of each first-line biologic treatment until discontinuation was analyzed to calculate relative dose intensity. The cross-sectional annual biologic costs of ETN, IFX, ADA, and TCZ were ~$8000 (2009 and 2013), $13,000 (2009) and $15,000 (2013), $10,000 (2009) and $11,000 (2013), and $9000 (2009) and $8000 (2013), respectively. In longitudinal analyses (n = 764), 276 (36%) initiated ETN; 242 (32%), IFX; 147 (19%), ADA; and 99 (13%), TCZ. The 1-year cumulative annual biologic costs per patient from the initial prescription of ETN, IFX, ADA, and TCZ as the first-line biologic treatment were ~$11,000, $19,000, $16,000, and $12,000. The corresponding direct medical costs over 1 year from the initial prescription were ~$17,000, $26,000, $22,000, and $22,000. Costs remained greatest in the IFX-initiation group at year 3. The discontinuation rates at 36 months with ETN, IFX, ADA, and TCZ

  18. The impact of medication adherence on coronary artery disease costs and outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitton, Asaf; Choudhry, Niteesh K; Matlin, Olga S; Swanton, Kellie; Shrank, William H

    2013-04-01

    Given the huge burden of coronary artery disease and the effectiveness of medication therapy, understanding and quantifying known impacts of poor medication adherence for primary and secondary prevention is crucial. We sought to systematically review the literature on this topic area with a focus on quantified cost and clinical outcomes related to adherence. We conducted a systematic review of the literature between 1966 and November 2011 using a fixed search strategy, multiple reviewers, and a quality rating scale. We found 2636 articles using this strategy, eventually weaning them down to 25 studies that met our inclusion criteria. Three reviewers independently reviewed the studies and scored them for quality using the Newcastle Ottawa Scoring Scale. We found 5 studies (4 of which focused on statins) that measured the impact of medication adherence on primary prevention of coronary artery disease and 20 articles that focused on the relationship between medication adherence to costs and outcomes related to secondary prevention of coronary artery disease. Most of these latter studies focused on antihypertensive medications and aspirin. All controlled for confounding comorbidities and sociodemographic characteristics, but few controlled for likelihood of adherent patients to have healthier behaviors ("healthy adherer effect"). Three studies found that high adherence significantly improves health outcomes and reduces annual costs for secondary prevention of coronary artery disease (between $294 and $868 per patient, equating to 10.1%-17.8% cost reductions between high- and low-adherence groups). The studies were all of generally of high quality on the Newcastle Ottawa Scale (median score 8 of 9). Increased medication adherence is associated with improved outcomes and reduced costs, but most studies do not control for a "healthy adherer" effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Total medical costs of treating femoral neck fracture patients with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty: a cost analysis of a multicenter prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.P.W. Burgers (Paul); M. Hoogendoorn (Martine); E.A.C. Van Woensel; R.W. Poolman (Rudolf); M. Bhandari (Mohit); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSummary: The aim of this study was to determine the total medical costs for treating displaced femoral neck fractures with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty in fit elderly patients. The mean total costs per patient at 2 years of follow-up were €26,399. These results contribute to cost awar

  20. Total medical costs of treating femoral neck fracture patients with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty: a cost analysis of a multicenter prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.T.P.W. Burgers (Paul); M. Hoogendoorn (Martine); E.A.C. Van Woensel; R.W. Poolman (Rudolf); M. Bhandari (Mohit); P. Patka (Peter); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractSummary: The aim of this study was to determine the total medical costs for treating displaced femoral neck fractures with hemi- or total hip arthroplasty in fit elderly patients. The mean total costs per patient at 2 years of follow-up were €26,399. These results contribute to cost

  1. A cost-benefit analysis of electronic medical records in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Samuel J; Middleton, Blackford; Prosser, Lisa A; Bardon, Christiana G; Spurr, Cynthia D; Carchidi, Patricia J; Kittler, Anne F; Goldszer, Robert C; Fairchild, David G; Sussman, Andrew J; Kuperman, Gilad J; Bates, David W

    2003-04-01

    Electronic medical record systems improve the quality of patient care and decrease medical errors, but their financial effects have not been as well documented. The purpose of this study was to estimate the net financial benefit or cost of implementing electronic medical record systems in primary care. We performed a cost-benefit study to analyze the financial effects of electronic medical record systems in ambulatory primary care settings from the perspective of the health care organization. Data were obtained from studies at our institution and from the published literature. The reference strategy for comparisons was the traditional paper-based medical record. The primary outcome measure was the net financial benefit or cost per primary care physician for a 5-year period. The estimated net benefit from using an electronic medical record for a 5-year period was 86,400 US dollars per provider. Benefits accrue primarily from savings in drug expenditures, improved utilization of radiology tests, better capture of charges, and decreased billing errors. In one-way sensitivity analyses, the model was most sensitive to the proportion of patients whose care was capitated; the net benefit varied from a low of 8400 US dollars to a high of 140,100 US dollars . A five-way sensitivity analysis with the most pessimistic and optimistic assumptions showed results ranging from a 2300 US dollars net cost to a 330,900 US dollars net benefit. Implementation of an electronic medical record system in primary care can result in a positive financial return on investment to the health care organization. The magnitude of the return is sensitive to several key factors. Copyright 2003 by Excerpta Medica Inc.

  2. Register-based indicators for potentially inappropriate medication in high-cost patients with excessive polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saastamoinen, Leena K; Verho, Jouko

    2015-06-01

    Excessive polypharmacy is often associated with inappropriate drug use. Because drug expenditures are heavily skewed and a considerable share of patients in the top 5% of the cost distribution have excessive polypharmacy, the appropriateness of their drug use should be reviewed. The aim of this study was to review the quality of drug use in patients with extremely high costs and excessive polypharmacy and to compare them with all drug users. This is a nationwide register study. The subjects of this study were all drug users in Finland over 15 years of age, n = 3,303,813. The measures used were annual total costs, average costs, and number of patients. The background characteristics used included gender, age, morbidity, number of prescribers, active substances, and indicators of potentially inappropriate drug use, for example, Beers criteria. The patients with high costs and excessive polypharmacy accounted for 22% of the total pharmaceutical expenditures but only 3% of drug users. One-third of them were elderly, compared with 11.3% of all drug users (p polypharmacy patients used more potentially inappropriate (28.0% vs 19.9%, p polypharmacy with inappropriate medication use should be prevented using all the methods. The patients with excessive polypharmacy and high-drug costs provide a most interesting group for containing pharmaceutical costs via medication reviews. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Lowering medical costs through the sharing of savings by physicians and patients: inclusive shared savings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Harald; Emanuel, Ezekiel J

    2014-12-01

    Current approaches to controlling health care costs have strengths and weaknesses. We propose an alternative, "inclusive shared savings," that aims to lower medical costs through savings that are shared by physicians and patients. Inclusive shared savings may be particularly attractive in situations in which treatments, such as those for gastric cancer, are similar in clinical effectiveness and have modest differences in convenience but substantially differ in cost. Inclusive shared savings incorporates features of typical insurance coverage, shared savings, and value-based insurance design but differs from value-based insurance design, which merely seeks to decrease or eliminate out-of-pocket costs. Inclusive shared savings offers financial incentives to physicians and patients to promote the use of lower-cost, but equally effective, interventions and should be evaluated in a rigorous trial or demonstration project.

  4. Everyday practices at the medical ward: a 16-month ethnographic field study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Axel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern hospital care should ostensibly be multi-professional and person-centred, yet it still seems to be driven primarily by a hegemonic, positivistic, biomedical agenda. This study aimed to describe the everyday practices of professionals and patients in a coronary care unit, and analyse how the routines, structures and physical design of the care environment influenced their actions and relationships. Methods Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted over a 16-month period (between 2009 and 2011 by two researchers working in parallel in a Swedish coronary care unit. Observations, informal talks and formal interviews took place with registered nurses, assistant nurses, physicians and patients in the coronary care unit. The formal interviews were conducted with six registered nurses (five female, one male including the chief nurse manager, three assistant nurses (all female, two cardiologists and three patients (one female, two male. Results We identified the structures that either promoted or counteracted the various actions and relationships of patients and healthcare professionals. The care environment, with its minimalistic design, strong focus on routines and modest capacity for dialogue, restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This resulted in feelings of guilt, predominantly on the part of the registered nurses. Conclusions The care environment restricted the choices available to both patients and healthcare professionals. This may result in increased moral stress among those in multi-professional teams who work in the grey area between biomedical and person-centred care.

  5. Cost-Utility of Group Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Fibromyalgia Versus Recommended Drugs: An Economic Analysis Alongside a 6-Month Randomized Controlled Trial Conducted in Spain (EFFIGACT Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Juan V; D'Amico, Francesco; Feliu-Soler, Albert; McCracken, Lance M; Aguado, Jaume; Peñarrubia-María, María T; Knapp, Martin; Serrano-Blanco, Antoni; García-Campayo, Javier

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the cost utility of a group-based form of acceptance and commitment therapy (GACT) in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) compared with patients receiving recommended pharmacological treatment (RPT) or on a waiting list (WL). The data were derived from a previously published study, a randomized controlled trial that focused on clinical outcomes. Health economic outcomes included health-related quality of life and health care use at baseline and at 6-month follow-up using the EuroQoL and the Client Service Receipt Inventory, respectively. Analyses included quality-adjusted life years, direct and indirect cost differences, and incremental cost effectiveness ratios. A total of 156 FM patients were randomized (51 GACT, 52 RPT, 53 WL). GACT was related to significantly less direct costs over the 6-month study period compared with both control arms (GACT €824.2 ± 1,062.7 vs RPT €1,730.7 ± 1,656.8 vs WL €2,462.7 ± 2,822.0). Lower direct costs for GACT compared with RPT were due to lower costs from primary care visits and FM-related medications. The incremental cost effectiveness ratios were dominant in the completers' analysis and remained robust in the sensitivity analyses. In conclusion, acceptance and commitment therapy appears to be a cost-effective treatment compared with RPT in patients with FM. Decision-makers have to prioritize their budget on the treatment option that is the most cost effective for the management of a specific patient group. From government as well as health care perspectives, this study shows that a GACT is more cost effective than pharmacological treatment in management of FM. Copyright © 2017 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Design. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Setting. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Sample. Seven hund...

  7. Lifetime medical costs of obesity: prevention no cure for increasing health expenditure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter H M van Baal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and is associated with high medical expenditures. It has been suggested that obesity prevention could result in cost savings. The objective of this study was to estimate the annual and lifetime medical costs attributable to obesity, to compare those to similar costs attributable to smoking, and to discuss the implications for prevention. METHODS AND FINDINGS: With a simulation model, lifetime health-care costs were estimated for a cohort of obese people aged 20 y at baseline. To assess the impact of obesity, comparisons were made with similar cohorts of smokers and "healthy-living" persons (defined as nonsmokers with a body mass index between 18.5 and 25. Except for relative risk values, all input parameters of the simulation model were based on data from The Netherlands. In sensitivity analyses the effects of epidemiologic parameters and cost definitions were assessed. Until age 56 y, annual health expenditure was highest for obese people. At older ages, smokers incurred higher costs. Because of differences in life expectancy, however, lifetime health expenditure was highest among healthy-living people and lowest for smokers. Obese individuals held an intermediate position. Alternative values of epidemiologic parameters and cost definitions did not alter these conclusions. CONCLUSIONS: Although effective obesity prevention leads to a decrease in costs of obesity-related diseases, this decrease is offset by cost increases due to diseases unrelated to obesity in life-years gained. Obesity prevention may be an important and cost-effective way of improving public health, but it is not a cure for increasing health expenditures.

  8. THE EARLY BIRD CATCHES THE WORM : EARLY COST-EFFECTIVENESS ANALYSIS OF NEW MEDICAL TESTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buisman, Leander R; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Postmus, Douwe; Luime, Jolanda J; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Redekop, William K

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: There is little specific guidance on performing an early cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of medical tests. We developed a framework with general steps and applied it to two cases. METHODS: Step 1 is to narrow down the scope of analysis by defining the test's application, target populat

  9. Medical Malpractice: Insurance Costs Increased but Varied among Physicians and Hospitals. Report to Congressional Requesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Div. of Human Resources.

    This report concerns the medical malpractice situation in the United States and contains information on the cost of malpractice insurance for physicians and hospitals. The report contains an executive summary and four chapters. Chapter 1 reviews the background of the problem and the objectives, scope, and methodology of the report. Chapter 2…

  10. The Impact of Living in Rural and Urban Areas: Vitamin D and Medical Costs in Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Beth A.; Manning, Todd; Peiris, Alan N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Living in a rural region is associated with significant health disparities and increased medical costs. Vitamin D deficiency, which is increasingly common, is also associated with many adverse health outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether rural-urban residence status of veterans was related to vitamin D levels, and…

  11. A Randomized Controlled Trial on Teaching Geriatric Medical Decision Making and Cost Consciousness With the Serious Game GeriatriX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagro, J.; Pol, M.H.J. van de; Laan, A. van der; Huijbregts-Verheyden, F.J.; Fluit, L.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Medical students often lack training in complex geriatric medical decision making. We therefore developed the serious game, GeriatriX, for training medical decision making with weighing patient preferences, and appropriateness and costs of medical care. We hypothesized that education with

  12. Systematization of a hybrid costing method for medical procedures: a concomitant apllication of the ABC and UEP methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    Márcia Zanievicz da Silva; Altair Borgert; Charles Albino Schultz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study consists in systematization Hybrid Costing Methodology supported by the concepts of Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Production Effort Unit (UEP) to quantify the cost of medical procedures in hospitals. By means of theory-concept research, the hybrid method application stages were organized and then tested at the University Hospital of the University of the State of Santa Catarina with the purpose of determining the cost of medical procedures, more...

  13. Absence of appropriate hospitalization cost control for patients with medical insurance: a comparative analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xilong; Dib, Hassan H; Zhu, Minmin; Zhang, Ying; Fan, Yang

    2009-10-01

    Expose the weak loops in the Chinese medical insurance coverage and uncover hospitals' role of over-pricing hospitalized insured patients compared with those non-insured. A multi-linear regression method was used to analyze hospitalization expense for insured and uninsured patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis, cholecystitis, benign uterine tumors, and normal delivery. Hospitalization cost is higher among insured than uninsured patients due to longer hospitalization lengths of stay, type of disease (highest among cholecystitis patients), type of gender - females, old-aged people, and type of marital status - singles, as well as drugs expenses, surgical expenses, and other medical acts. Require a better government's supervision system over medical insurance expenses such as reforming methods of payments, building up new cost compensation mechanism, and unifying and stabilizing prices for each category of medicines.

  14. The Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of a Four-Month Regimen for First-Line Treatment of Active Tuberculosis in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwenan M Knight

    Full Text Available A 4-month first-line treatment regimen for tuberculosis disease (TB is expected to have a direct impact on patient outcomes and societal costs, as well as an indirect impact on Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission. We aimed to estimate this combined impact in a high TB-burden country: South Africa.An individual based M. tb transmission model was fitted to the TB burden of South Africa using a standard TB natural history framework. We measured the impact on TB burden from 2015-2035 of introduction of a non-inferior 4-month regimen replacing the standard 6-month regimen as first-line therapy. Impact was measured with respect to three separate baselines (Guidelines, Policy and Current, reflecting differences in adherence to TB and HIV treatment guidelines. Further scenario analyses considered the variation in treatment-related parameters and resistance levels. Impact was measured in terms of differences in TB burden and Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs averted. We also examined the highest cost at which the new regimen would be cost-effective for several willingness-to-pay thresholds.It was estimated that a 4-month regimen would avert less than 1% of the predicted 6 million person years with TB disease in South Africa between 2015 and 2035. A similarly small impact was seen on deaths and DALYs averted. Despite this small impact, with the health systems and patient cost savings from regimen shortening, the 4-month regimen could be cost-effective at $436 [NA, 5983] (mean [range] per month at a willingness-to-pay threshold of one GDP per capita ($6,618.The introduction of a non-inferior 4-month first-line TB regimen into South Africa would have little impact on the TB burden. However, under several scenarios, it is likely that the averted societal costs would make such a regimen cost-effective in South Africa.

  15. Maternal medical conditions during pregnancy and gross motor development up to age 24 months in the Upstate KIDS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassabian, Akhgar; Sundaram, Rajeshwari; Wylie, Amanda; Bell, Erin; Bello, Scott C; Yeung, Edwina

    2016-07-01

    We examined whether children of mothers with a medical condition diagnosed before or during pregnancy took longer to achieve gross motor milestones up to age 24 months. We obtained information on medical conditions using self-reports, birth certificates, and hospital records in 4909 mothers participating in Upstate KIDS, a population-based birth cohort. Mothers reported on their children's motor milestone achievement at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 months of age. After adjustment for covariates (including pre-pregnancy body mass index), children of mothers with gestational diabetes took longer to achieve sitting without support (hazard ratio [HR]=0.84, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.75-0.93), walking with assistance (HR=0.88, 95% CI 0.77-0.98), and walking alone (HR=0.88, 95% CI 0.77-0.99) than children of females with no gestational diabetes. Similar findings emerged for maternal diabetes. Gestational hypertension was associated with a longer time to achieve walking with assistance. These associations did not change after adjustment for gestational age or birthweight. Severe hypertensive disorders of pregnancy were related to a longer time to achieve milestones, but not after adjustment for perinatal factors. Children exposed to maternal diabetes, gestational or pre-gestational, may take longer to achieve motor milestones than non-exposed children, independent of maternal obesity. © 2015 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Cost prediction of antipsychotic medication of psychiatric disorder using artificial neural network model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Mirabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antipsychotic monotherapy or polypharmacy (concurrent use of two or more antipsychotics are used for treating patients with psychiatric disorders (PDs. Usually, antipsychotic monotherapy has a lower cost than polypharmacy. This study aimed to predict the cost of antipsychotic medications (AM of psychiatric patients in Iran. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, 790 patients with PDs who were discharged between June and September 2010 were selected from Razi Psychiatric Hospital, Tehran, Iran. For cost prediction of AM of PD, neural network (NN and multiple linear regression (MLR models were used. Analysis of data was performed with R 2.15.1 software. Results: Mean ± standard deviation (SD of the duration of hospitalization (days in patients who were on monotherapy and polypharmacy was 31.19 ± 15.55 and 36.69 ± 15.93, respectively (P < 0.001. Mean and median costs of medication for monotherapy (n = 507 were $8.25 and $6.23 and for polypharmacy (n =192 were $13.30 and $9.48, respectively (P = 0.001. The important variables for cost prediction of AM were duration of hospitalization, type of treatment, and type of psychiatric ward in the MLR model, and duration of hospitalization, type of diagnosed disorder, type of treatment, age, Chlorpromazine dosage, and duration of disorder in the NN model. Conclusion: Our findings showed that the artificial NN (ANN model can be used as a flexible model for cost prediction of AM.

  17. Fitness costs of animal medication: antiparasitic plant chemicals reduce fitness of monarch butterfly hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Leiling; Hoang, Kevin M; Hunter, Mark D; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2016-09-01

    The emerging field of ecological immunology demonstrates that allocation by hosts to immune defence against parasites is constrained by the costs of those defences. However, the costs of non-immunological defences, which are important alternatives to canonical immune systems, are less well characterized. Estimating such costs is essential for our understanding of the ecology and evolution of alternative host defence strategies. Many animals have evolved medication behaviours, whereby they use antiparasitic compounds from their environment to protect themselves or their kin from parasitism. Documenting the costs of medication behaviours is complicated by natural variation in the medicinal components of diets and their covariance with other dietary components, such as macronutrients. In the current study, we explore the costs of the usage of antiparasitic compounds in monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus), using natural variation in concentrations of antiparasitic compounds among plants. Upon infection by their specialist protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha, monarch butterflies can selectively oviposit on milkweed with high foliar concentrations of cardenolides, secondary chemicals that reduce parasite growth. Here, we show that these antiparasitic cardenolides can also impose significant costs on both uninfected and infected butterflies. Among eight milkweed species that vary substantially in their foliar cardenolide concentration and composition, we observed the opposing effects of cardenolides on monarch fitness traits. While high foliar cardenolide concentrations increased the tolerance of monarch butterflies to infection, they reduced the survival rate of caterpillars to adulthood. Additionally, although non-polar cardenolide compounds decreased the spore load of infected butterflies, they also reduced the life span of uninfected butterflies, resulting in a hump-shaped curve between cardenolide non-polarity and the life span of infected butterflies

  18. Direct medical costs and its predictors in EMAR-II cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Leticia; Abasolo, Lydia; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Jover, Juan Angel; Hernandez-Garcia, Cesar

    2016-10-31

    To analyze the resource utilization in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and predictive factors in and patients treated with biological drugs and biologic-naïve. A cross-sectional study was performed in a sample including all regions and hospitals throughout the country. Sociodemographic data, disease activity parameters and treatment data were obtained. Resource utilization for two years of study was recorded and we made costs imputation. Correlation analyzes were performed on all RA patients and those treated with biological and biological naïve, to estimate the differences in resource utilization. Factors associated with increased resources utilization (costs) attending to treatment was analyzed by linear regression models. We included 1,095 RA patients, 26% male, mean age of 62±14 years. Mean of direct medical costs per patient was €24,291±€45,382. Excluding biological drugs, the average cost per patient was €3,742±€3,711. After adjustment, factors associated with direct medical costs for all RA patients were biologic drugs (P=.02) and disease activity (P=.004). In the biologic-naïve group, the predictor of direct medical costs was comorbidity (P<.001). In the biologic treatment group predictors were follow-up length of the disease (P=.04), age (P=.02) and disease activity (P=.007). Our data show a remarkable economic impact of RA. It is important to identify and estimate the economic impact of the disease, compare data from other geographic samples and to develop improvement strategies to reduce these costs and increase the quality of care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. Advertisements for medicines in leading medical journals in 18 countries: a 12-month survey of information content and standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herxheimer, A; Lundborg, C S; Westerholm, B

    1993-01-01

    The information content of 6,710 advertisements for medicines in medical journals was surveyed to provide a baseline for monitoring the effect of WHO's Ethical Criteria for Medicinal Drug Promotion. The advertisements (ads) appeared during 12 months (1987-1988) in 23 leading national medical journals in 18 countries. Local participants, mostly doctors or pharmacists, examined them. The presence or absence in each ad of important information was noted. In most ads the generic name appeared in smaller type than the brand name. Indications were mentioned more often than the negative effects of medicines. The ads gave less pharmacological than medical information. However, important warnings and precautions were missing in half, and side effects and contraindications in about 40 percent. Prices tended to be given only in countries where a social security system pays for the medicines. The information content of ads in the developing countries differed surprisingly little from that in the industrialized countries. Almost all the ads (96 percent) included one or more pictures; 58 percent of these were considered irrelevant. The authors believe it is a mistake to regard ads as trivial. If they are not considered seriously they will influence the use of medicines as they are intended to do, but read critically they can provide useful information.

  20. Medical resource utilization and costs among Australian patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C: results of a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Heather J; Roberts, Stuart K; Thompson, Alex J; Angus, Peter W; McKenna, Sarah Jane; Warren, Emma; Musgrave, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate medical resource utilization (MRU) and associated costs among Australian patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (GT1 CHC), including both untreated patients and those receiving treatment with first-generation protease inhibitor-based regimens (telaprevir, boceprevir with pegylated interferon and ribavirin). Medical records were reviewed for a stratified random sample of GT1 CHC patients first attending two liver clinics between 2011-2013 (principal population; PP), supplemented by all GT1 CHC patients attending one transplant clinic in the same period (transplant population; TP). CHC-related MRU and associated costs are reported for the PP by treatment status (treated/not treated) stratified by baseline fibrosis grade; and for the TP for the pre-transplant, year of transplant and post-transplant periods. A total 1636 patients were screened and 590 patients (36.1%) were included. Comprehensive MRU data were collected for 276 PP patients (F0-1 n = 59, F2 n = 58, F3 n = 53, F4 n = 106; mean follow-up = 17.3 months). Thirty-eight (13.8%) were treatment-experienced prior to enrolment; 55 (19.9%) received triple therapy during the study. Data were collected for 112 TP patients (mean follow-up = 29.9 months), 33 (29.5%) received a transplant during the study, and 51 (45.5%) beforehand. The annual direct medical costs, excluding drug costs, were higher among treated PP vs untreated PP (AU$: $1,954 vs $1,202); and year of transplant TP vs pre-/post-transplant TP (AU$: pre-transplant $32,407, transplant $155,138, post-transplant $7,358). To aid interpretation of results, note that only patients with GT1 CHC who are actively managed are included, and MRU data were collected specifically from liver outpatient clinics. That said, movement of patients between hospitals is rare, and any uncaptured MRU is expected to be minimal. CHC-related MRU increases substantially with disease severity. These real-world MRU data for GT1 CHC will be

  1. Costs of a medical education: comparison with graduate education in law and business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jason R; Brown, Jeffrey J

    2006-02-01

    The costs of graduate school education are climbing, particularly within the fields of medicine, law, and business. Data on graduate level tuition, educational debt, and starting salaries for medical school, law school, and business school graduates were collected directly from universities and from a wide range of published reports and surveys. Medical school tuition and educational debt levels have risen faster than the rate of inflation over the past decade. Medical school graduates have longer training periods and lower starting salaries than law school and business school graduates, although physician salaries rise after completion of post-graduate education. Faced with an early debt burden and delayed entry into the work force, careful planning is required for medical school graduates to pay off their loans and save for retirement.

  2. Surgeon ownership in medical device distribution: does it actually reduce healthcare costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, John C; Edwards, Charles; Eickmann, Thomas; Carlson, Angela; Blight, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Surgeon ownership in medical device distribution is a new model that proposes to reduce the costs associated with surgical implants. In surgeon-owned distributorships (SDs), the surgeon becomes the purchaser through ownership and management of a distributorship. The purpose of this study is to determine whether significant cost savings can result from SDs. Five existing SDs were retrospectively reviewed, and their implant pricing was compared with non-SDs. The hospital pricing for implants supplied by the SDs was compared with 2010 pricing from the best contract/capitated rate for like implants from non-SDs. The average first-year cost savings for the SDs was 36%, with US$2,456,521 total savings in 2010. For distributorships in business for over 2 years, the average annual price from the SDs actually decreased by 1.41%. This study demonstrates that SDs are capable of providing substantial healthcare savings through lower implant costs and reduced annual price escalations.

  3. Cost of pain medication to treat adult patients with nonmalignant chronic pain in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasu, Rafia S; Vouthy, Kiengkham; Crowl, Ashley N; Stegeman, Anne E; Fikru, Bithia; Bawa, Walter Agbor; Knell, Maureen E

    2014-09-01

    Nonmalignant chronic pain (NMCP) is a public health concern. Among primary care appointments, 22% focus on pain management. The American Academy of Pain Medicine guidelines for NMCP recommend combination medication therapy (including analgesics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], opioids, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants) as a key component to effective treatment for many chronic pain diagnoses. However, there has been little evidence outlining the costs of pain medications in adult patients with NMCP in the United States, an area that necessitates further consideration as the nation moves toward value-based benefit design. To estimate the cost of pain medication attributable to treating adult patients with NMCP in the United States and to analyze the trend of outpatient pain visits. This cross-sectional study used the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) data from 2000-2007. The Division of Health Care Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducted the survey. The study included patients aged ≥18 years with chronic pain diagnoses (identified by the ICD-9-CM codes: primary, secondary, and tertiary). Patients prescribed at least 1 pain medication were included in the cost analysis. Pain-related prescription medications prescribed during ambulatory care visits were retrieved by using NAMCS drug codes/National Drug Code numbers. National pain prescription frequencies (weighted) were obtained from NAMCS data, using the statistical software STATA. We created pain therapy categories (drug classes) for cost analysis based on national pain guidelines. Drug classes used in this analysis were opioids/opioid-like agents, analgesics/NSAIDs, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, antirheumatics/immunologics, muscle relaxants, topical products, and corticosteroids. We calculated average prices based on the 3 lowest average wholesale prices reported in the

  4. Pulmonary rehabilitation coupled with negative pressure ventilation decreases decline in lung function, hospitalizations, and medical cost in COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Chou, Pai-Chien; Joa, Wen-Ching; Chen, Li-Fei; Sheng, Te-Fang; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Yang, Lan-Yan; Pan, Yu-Bin; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Wang, Chun-Hua; Kuo, Han-Pin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) brings benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Negative pressure ventilation (NPV) increases ventilation and decreases hyperinflation as well as breathing work in COPD. We evaluated the long-term effects of a hospital-based PR program coupled with NPV support in patients with COPD on clinical outcomes. One hundred twenty-nine patients with COPD were followed up for more than 5 years, with the NPV group (n = 63) receiving the support of NPV (20–30 cm H2O delivery pressure for 60 min) and unsupervised home exercise program of 20 to 30 min daily walk, while the control group (n = 6) only received unsupervised home exercise program. Pulmonary function tests and 6 min walk tests (6MWT) were performed every 3 to 6 months. Emergency room (ER) visits and hospitalization with medical costs were recorded. A significant time-by-group interaction in the yearly decline of forced expiratory volume in 1 s in the control group analyzed by mixed-model repeated-measure analysis was found (P = 0.048). The 6MWT distance of the NPV group was significantly increased during the first 4 years, with the interaction of time and group (P = 0.003), the time alone (P = 0.014), and the quadratic time (P lung function, exacerbations, and hospitalization rates, and improved walking distance and medical costs in patients with COPD during a 5-year observation PMID:27741132

  5. Short-Term Medical Costs of a VHA Health Information Exchange: A CHEERS-Compliant Article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Dustin D; Dixon, Brian E; Perkins, Susan M; Myers, Laura J; Weiner, Michael; Zillich, Allan J; Haggstrom, David A

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record (VLER) Health program provides the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) a framework whereby VHA providers can access the veterans' electronic health record information to coordinate healthcare across multiple sites of care. As an early adopter of VLER, the Indianapolis VHA and Regenstrief Institute implemented a regional demonstration program involving bi-directional health information exchange (HIE) between VHA and non-VHA providers.The aim of the study is to determine whether implementation of VLER HIE reduces 1 year VHA medical costs.A cohort evaluation with a concurrent control group compared VHA healthcare costs using propensity score adjustment. A CHEERs compliant checklist was used to conduct the cost evaluation.Patients were enrolled in the VLER program onsite at the Indianapolis VHA in outpatient clinics or through the release-of-information office.VHA cost data (in 2014 dollars) were obtained for both enrolled and nonenrolled (control) patients for 1 year prior to, and 1 year after, the index date of patient enrollment.There were 6104 patients enrolled in VLER and 45,700 patients in the control group. The annual adjusted total cost difference per patient was associated with a higher cost for VLER enrollees $1152 (95% CI: $807-1433) (P < 0.01) (in 2014 dollars) than VLER nonenrollees.Short-term evaluation of this demonstration project did not show immediate reductions in healthcare cost as might be expected if HIE decreased redundant medical tests and treatments. Cost reductions from shared health information may be realized with longer time horizons.

  6. 3D-printing and the effect on medical costs: a new era?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choonara, Yahya E; du Toit, Lisa C; Kumar, Pradeep; Kondiah, Pierre P D; Pillay, Viness

    2016-01-01

    3D-printing (3DP) is the art and science of printing in a new dimension using 3D printers to transform 3D computer aided designs (CAD) into life-changing products. This includes the design of more effective and patient-friendly pharmaceutical products as well as bio-inspired medical devices. It is poised as the next technology revolution for the pharmaceutical and medical-device industries. After decorous implementation scientists in collaboration with CAD designers have produced innovative medical devices ranging from pharmaceutical tablets to surgical transplants of the human face and skull, spinal implants, prosthetics, human organs and other biomaterials. While 3DP may be cost-efficient, a limitation exists in the availability of 3D printable biomaterials for most applications. In addition, the loss of skilled labor in producing medical devices such as prosthetics and other devices may affect developing economies. This review objectively explores the potential growth and impact of 3DP costs in the medical industry.

  7. State-Level Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Fatal Injuries - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feijun; Florence, Curtis

    2017-01-13

    Injury-associated deaths have substantial economic consequences in the United States. The total estimated lifetime medical and work-loss costs associated with fatal injuries in 2013 were $214 billion (1). In 2014, unintentional injury, suicide, and homicide (the fourth, tenth, and seventeenth leading causes of death, respectively) accounted for 194,635 deaths in the United States (2). In 2014, a total of 199,756 fatal injuries occurred in the United States, and the associated lifetime medical and work-loss costs were $227 billion (3). This report examines the state-level economic burdens of fatal injuries by extending a previous national-level study (1). Numbers and rates of fatal injuries, lifetime costs, and lifetime costs per capita were calculated for each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia (DC) and for four injury intent categories (all intents, unintentional, suicide, and homicide). During 2014, injury mortality rates and economic burdens varied widely among the states and DC. Among fatal injuries of all intents, the mortality rate and lifetime costs per capita ranged from 101.9 per 100,000 and $1,233, respectively (New Mexico) to 40.2 per 100,000 and $491 (New York). States can engage more effectively and efficiently in injury prevention if they are aware of the economic burden of injuries, identify areas for immediate improvement, and devote necessary resources to those areas.

  8. How Much Does Medical Education Cost? A Review. Health Manpower Policy Discussion Paper Series No. A3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBride, Owen

    This survey of studies of medical school costs was made in order to evaluate and compare the methodologies and findings of those studies. The survey covered studies of one or more medical schools that either produced figures for average annual per-student cost of education and/or discussed the methodologies and problems involved in producing such…

  9. 76 FR 15349 - Fiscal Year 2010 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Fiscal Year 2010 Cost of Outpatient Medical, Dental, and Cosmetic Surgery Services Furnished by... the cost of outpatient medical, dental and cosmetic surgery services furnished by military...

  10. Costing of severe pneumonia in hospitalized infants and children aged 2-36 months, at a secondary and tertiary level hospital of a not-for-profit organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Helle Ostergaard; Hanehøj, Malin; Das, Ashima Rani

    2009-01-01

    . At both levels the greatest single cost was the hospital stay itself, comprising 74% and 56% of the total cost, respectively. Diagnostic investigations were a large expense and supportive treatment with nebulization and oxygen therapy added to the costs. Mean household expenditure on secondary level...... was US$ 41.35 (INR 1737) and at tertiary level was US$ 134.62 (INR 5655), the largest single expense being medicines in the former and the hospitalization in the latter. (one US$=INR 42.1 at time of study) CONCLUSIONS: A considerable cost difference exists between secondary and tertiary level treatment......OBJECTIVES: To determine health care provider cost and household cost of the treatment of severe pneumonia in infants and young children admitted to secondary and tertiary level health care facilities. METHODS: The study was done in a private, not-for-profit medical college hospital, in Vellore...

  11. Monthly Progress Report October 1952. Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1952-10-01

    The present monthly report covers the work in Argonne National Laboratory's Biological and Medical Research, Radiological Physics, and Health Services division for the quarterly period ending September 30, 1952.

  12. Effect of PACS/CR on cost of care and length of stay in a medical intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlotz, Curtis P.; Kundel, Harold L.; Brikman, Inna; Pratt, Hugh M.; Redfern, Regina O.; Horii, Steven C.; Schwartz, J. Sanford

    1996-05-01

    Our purpose was to determine the economic effects associated with the introduction of PACS and computed radiology (CR) in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). Clinical and financial data were collected over a period of 6 months, both before and after the introduction of PACS/CR in our medical intensive care unit. Administrative claims data resulting from the MICU stay of each patient enrolled in our study were transferred online to our research database from the administrative databases of our hospital and its affiliated clinical practices. These data included all charge entries, sociodemographic data, admissions/discharge/transfer chronologies, ICD9 diagnostic and procedure codes, and diagnostic related groups. APACHE III scores and other case mix adjusters were computed from the diagnostic codes, and from the contemporaneous medical record. Departmental charge to cost ratios and the Medicare Resource-Based Relative Value Scale fee schedule were used to estimate costs from hospital and professional charges. Data were analyzed using both the patient and the exam as the unit of analysis. Univariate analyses by patient show that patients enrolled during the PACS periods were similar to those enrolled during the Film periods in age, sex, APACHE III score, and other measures of case mix. No significant differences in unadjusted median length of stay between the two Film and two PACS periods were detected. Likewise, no significant differences in unadjusted total hospital and professional costs were found between the Film and PACS periods. In our univariate analyses by exam, we focused on the subgroup of exams that had triggered primary clinical actions in any period. Those action-triggering exams were divided into two groups according to whether the referring clinician elected to obtain imaging results from the workstation or from the usual channels. Patients whose imaging results were obtain from the workstation had significantly lower professional costs in the 7 days

  13. Micro-costing studies in the health and medical literature: protocol for a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao; Grossetta Nardini, Holly K; Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2014-05-21

    Micro-costing is a cost estimation method that allows for precise assessment of the economic costs of health interventions. It has been demonstrated to be particularly useful for estimating the costs of new interventions, for interventions with large variability across providers, and for estimating the true costs to the health system and to society. However, existing guidelines for economic evaluations do not provide sufficient detail of the methods and techniques to use when conducting micro-costing analyses. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to review the current literature on micro-costing studies of health and medical interventions, strategies, and programs to assess the variation in micro-costing methodology and the quality of existing studies. This will inform current practice in conducting and reporting micro-costing studies and lead to greater standardization in methodology in the future. We will perform a systematic review of the current literature on micro-costing studies of health and medical interventions, strategies, and programs. Using rigorously designed search strategies, we will search Ovid MEDLINE, EconLit, BIOSIS Previews, Embase, Scopus, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) to identify relevant English-language articles. These searches will be supplemented by a review of the references of relevant articles identified. Two members of the review team will independently extract detailed information on the design and characteristics of each included article using a standardized data collection form. A third reviewer will be consulted to resolve discrepancies. We will use checklists that have been developed for critical appraisal of health economics studies to evaluate the quality and potential risk of bias of included studies. This systematic review will provide useful information to help standardize the methods and techniques for conducting and reporting micro-costing studies in research, which can improve

  14. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    3,215 (80) 469 (64) Poisoning, drug 3,574 (99) 2,197 (88) 2,585 (26) Other burns 389 (125) 154 (125) 36 (115) Other superfi cial injury 303 (128...Alcohol and drug abuse and dependence. In: Textbook of Military Medicine series: Military psychiatry: preparing in peace for war. Offi ce of the...Encounter for antineoplastic chemotherapy and immunotherapy 49 12.7 Encounter for other orthopedic aftercare 39 10.1 Aftercare following joint replacement

  15. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    personal performance, as members may suffer from cognitive impairment, chronic fatigue, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other chronic...an underesti- mation of the incidence or prevalence of the condition. Finally, findings related to temporal trends need to also take into account...performance while in service. Acknowledgments: The authors thank Ter- rence Lee, PhD, MPH, for assisting with original protocol guidance. Disclaimer

  16. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    albopictus); however, sexual transmis- sion and transmission through other bodily fluids have been confirmed. Approximately one out of five individuals...to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), research suggests a strong association between Zika and GBS, but the link continues...all countries and territories traveled to with ongoing ZIKV transmis- sion or possible endemic transmission that were reported by the infected person

  17. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    likelihood to be able to perform unrestricted duty. Author affiliations: Preventive Medicine Res- idency, Uniformed Services University of the Health...symptoms, health care visits, and absenteeism among Iraq War veterans. Am J Psychiatry. 2007;164(1):150–153. 20. Stein M, McAllister TW. Exploring the...demonstrated the increasing use and acceptance of these approaches in the gen- eral and military populations.6–8 For exam - ple, results of a 2012 survey

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Price Subsidies on Fortified Packaged Infant Cereals in Reducing Iron Deficiency Anemia in 6-23-Month-Old-Children in Urban India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessow, Rafael; Arora, Narendra Kumar; Brunner, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) is a major public health problem in India and especially harmful in early childhood due to its impact on cognitive development and increased all-cause mortality. We estimate the cost-effectiveness of price subsidies on fortified packaged infant cereals (F-PICs) in reducing IDA in 6-23-monthold children in urban India. Materials and Methods Cost-effectiveness is estimated by comparing the net social cost of price subsidies with the disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) averted with price subsidies. The net social costs correspond to the cost of the subsidy minus the monetary costs saved by reducing IDA. The estimation proceeds in three steps: 1) the current lifetime costs of IDA are assessed with a health economic model combining the prevalence of anemia, derived from a large population survey, with information on the health consequences of IDA and their costs in terms of mortality, morbidity, and DALYs. 2) The effects of price subsidies on the demand for F-PICs are assessed with a market survey among 4801 households in 12 large Indian cities. 3) The cost-effectiveness is calculated by combining the findings of the first two steps with the results of a systematic review on the effectiveness of F-PICs in reducing IDA. We compare the cost-effectiveness of interventions that differ in the level of the subsidy and in the socio-economic strata (SES) eligible for the subsidy. Results The lifetime social costs of IDA in 6-23-month-old children in large Indian cities amount to production losses of 3222 USD and to 726,000 DALYs. Poor households incur the highest costs, yet even wealthier households suffer substantial losses. The market survey reveals that few households currently buy F-PICs, with the share ranging from 14% to 36%. Wealthier households are generally more likely to buy FPICs. The costs of the subsidies per DALY averted range from 909 to 3649 USD. Interventions targeted at poorer households are most effective. Almost

  19. Double robust estimator of average causal treatment effect for censored medical cost data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Beste, Lauren A; Maier, Marissa M; Zhou, Xiao-Hua

    2016-08-15

    In observational studies, estimation of average causal treatment effect on a patient's response should adjust for confounders that are associated with both treatment exposure and response. In addition, the response, such as medical cost, may have incomplete follow-up. In this article, a double robust estimator is proposed for average causal treatment effect for right censored medical cost data. The estimator is double robust in the sense that it remains consistent when either the model for the treatment assignment or the regression model for the response is correctly specified. Double robust estimators increase the likelihood the results will represent a valid inference. Asymptotic normality is obtained for the proposed estimator, and an estimator for the asymptotic variance is also derived. Simulation studies show good finite sample performance of the proposed estimator and a real data analysis using the proposed method is provided as illustration. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Patterns and Costs of Health Care Use of Children With Medical Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Eyal; Berry, Jay G.; Camacho, Ximena; Anderson, Geoff; Wodchis, Walter

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Health care use of children with medical complexity (CMC), such as those with neurologic impairment or other complex chronic conditions (CCCs) and those with technology assistance (TA), is not well understood. The objective of the study was to evaluate health care utilization and costs in a population-based sample of CMC in Ontario, Canada. METHODS: Hospital discharge data from 2005 through 2007 identified CMC. Complete health system use and costs were analyzed over the subsequent 2-year period. RESULTS: The study identified 15 771 hospitalized CMC (0.67% of children in Ontario); 10 340 (65.6%) had single-organ CCC, 1063 (6.7%) multiorgan CCC, 4368 (27.6%) neurologic impairment, and 1863 (11.8%) had TA. CMC saw a median of 13 outpatient physicians and 6 distinct subspecialists. Thirty-six percent received home care services. Thirty-day readmission varied from 12.6% (single CCC without TA) to 23.7% (multiple CCC with TA). CMC accounted for almost one-third of child health spending. Rehospitalization accounted for the largest proportion of subsequent costs (27.2%), followed by home care (11.3%) and physician services (6.0%). Home care costs were a much larger proportion of costs in children with TA. Children with multiple CCC with TA had costs 3.5 times higher than children with a single CCC without TA. CONCLUSIONS: Although a small proportion of the population, CMC account for a substantial proportion of health care costs. CMC make multiple transitions across providers and care settings and CMC with TA have higher costs and home care use. Initiatives to improve their health outcomes and decrease costs need to focus on the entire continuum of care. PMID:23184117

  1. Cost drivers for voluntary medical male circumcision using primary source data from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Lori; Adesina, Adebiyi; Forsythe, Steven; Godbole, Ramona; Reuben, Elan; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    As voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) programs scale up, there is a pressing need for information about the important cost drivers, and potential efficiency gains. We examine those cost drivers here, and estimate the potential efficiency gains through an econometric model. We examined the main cost drivers (i.e., personnel and consumables) associated with providing VMMC in sub-Saharan Africa along a number of dimensions, including facility type and service provider. Primary source facility level data from Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia were utilized throughout. We estimated the efficiency gains by econometrically estimating a cost function in order to calculate the impact of scale and other relevant factors. Personnel and consumables were estimated at 36% and 28%, respectively, of total costs across countries. Economies of scale (EOS) is estimated to be eight at the median volume of VMMCs performed, and EOS falls from 23 at the 25th percentile volume of VMMCs performed to 5.1 at the 75th percentile. The analysis suggests that there is significant room for efficiency improvement as indicated by declining EOS as VMMC volume increases. The scale of the fall in EOS as VMMC volume increases suggests that we are still at the ascension phase of the scale-up of VMMC, where continuing to add new sites results in additional start-up costs as well. A key aspect of improving efficiency is task sharing VMMC procedures, due to the large percentage of overall costs associated with personnel costs. In addition, efficiency improvements in consumables are likely to occur over time as prices and distribution costs decrease.

  2. Cost drivers for voluntary medical male circumcision using primary source data from sub-Saharan Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Bollinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC programs scale up, there is a pressing need for information about the important cost drivers, and potential efficiency gains. We examine those cost drivers here, and estimate the potential efficiency gains through an econometric model. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We examined the main cost drivers (i.e., personnel and consumables associated with providing VMMC in sub-Saharan Africa along a number of dimensions, including facility type and service provider. Primary source facility level data from Kenya, Namibia, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia were utilized throughout. We estimated the efficiency gains by econometrically estimating a cost function in order to calculate the impact of scale and other relevant factors. Personnel and consumables were estimated at 36% and 28%, respectively, of total costs across countries. Economies of scale (EOS is estimated to be eight at the median volume of VMMCs performed, and EOS falls from 23 at the 25th percentile volume of VMMCs performed to 5.1 at the 75th percentile. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis suggests that there is significant room for efficiency improvement as indicated by declining EOS as VMMC volume increases. The scale of the fall in EOS as VMMC volume increases suggests that we are still at the ascension phase of the scale-up of VMMC, where continuing to add new sites results in additional start-up costs as well. A key aspect of improving efficiency is task sharing VMMC procedures, due to the large percentage of overall costs associated with personnel costs. In addition, efficiency improvements in consumables are likely to occur over time as prices and distribution costs decrease.

  3. Relationship between health promotion volunteer experience and medical costs: Hoken-hodouin activities in Suzaka, Nagano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Haruhiko; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Okamura, Tomonori; Nishiwaki, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    Objectives This study demonstrated the relationship between experience as a health promotion volunteer (Hoken-hodouin) and medical costs in Japan. The study area was Suzaka City (March 2016 population: 51,637) in Nagano Prefecture, Japan, where a total of about 300 women have been engaged and trained as health promotion volunteers since 1958.Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2014 using a self-administered questionnaire, which included items on experiences as a health promotion volunteer, age at engagement, leadership status, and satisfaction with the experience. Eligible study participants were all residents of Suzaka aged 65 years or over. Medical cost data from April 2013 to March 2014 were collected for women aged 65-74 years who were beneficiaries of the Japanese National Health Insurance (n=2,304). Medical consultation rates and costs for treatment at outpatient and inpatient clinics were analyzed as outcomes. Adjustments were made for age, marital status, educational level, cohabitation status, equivalent income, alcohol use, smoking status, awareness about a healthy diet, and walking time per day.Results Of the 2,304 study participants, 1,274 (55.3%) had experience as health promotion volunteers. Poisson regression analysis revealed that volunteers' experience was positively associated with outpatient care rates (adjusted relative risk [RR]=1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.02-1.07), and negatively associated with inpatient care rates (RR=0.74; 95% CI=0.56-0.98). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that the adjusted geometric means of outpatient and inpatient care costs were 7% and 23% lower, respectively, among participants with volunteer experience than that among those with no volunteer experience (140,588-151,465 JPY for outpatient costs; 418,457-539,971 JPY for inpatient costs). These associations were stronger among participants who began health promotion volunteer at age 60 years or more, those who had leadership roles

  4. The association between diabetes related medical costs and glycemic control: A retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barron John

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this research is to quantify the association between direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes and level of glycemic control. Methods A longitudinal analysis using a large health plan administrative database was performed. The index date was defined as the first date of diabetes diagnosis and individuals had to have at least two HbA1c values post index date in order to be included in the analyses. A total of 10,780 individuals were included in the analyses. Individuals were stratified into groups of good (N = 6,069, fair (N = 3,586, and poor (N = 1,125 glycemic control based upon mean HbA1c values across the study period. Differences between HbA1c groups were analyzed using a generalized linear model (GLM, with differences between groups tested by utilizing z-statistics. The analyses allowed a wide range of factors to affect costs. Results 42.1% of those treated only with oral agents, 66.1% of those treated with oral agents and insulin, and 57.2% of those treated with insulin alone were found to have suboptimal control (defined as fair or poor throughout the study period (average duration of follow-up was 2.95 years. Results show that direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes were 16% lower for individuals with good glycemic control than for those with fair control ($1,505 vs. $1,801, p Conclusion Almost half (44% of all patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are at sub-optimal glycemic control. Evidence from this analysis indicates that the direct medical costs of treating type 2 diabetes are significantly higher for individuals who have fair or poor glycemic control than for those who have good glycemic control. Patients under fair control account for a greater proportion of the cost burden associated with antidiabetic prescription drugs.

  5. Comparative study on medical utilization and costs of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with good lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim JU

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Jeong Uk Lim,1 Kyungjoo Kim,2 Sang Hyun Kim,3 Myung Goo Lee,4 Sang Yeub Lee,5 Kwang Ha Yoo,6 Sang Haak Lee,1 Ki-Suck Jung,7 Chin Kook Rhee,2 Yong Il Hwang7 1Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, St Paul’s Hospital, 2Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 3Big Data Division, Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, Wonju, 4Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Chuncheon Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University, Anam Hospital, 6Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, 7Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea Introduction: Patients with mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are underdiagnosed and undertreated due to the asymptomatic nature of the disease. Previous studies on patients with mild COPD have focused on symptomatic patients. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the treatment status of patients with early COPD in Korea.Materials and methods: We compared hospital visits, medical costs per person, and COPD medication use by patients with COPD screened from the general population and COPD cohort patients. Patients with COPD aged ≥40 years with the value of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 ≥60% were selected from the 2007 to 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES data. Data including the number of outpatient clinic visits, admission to hospitals, COPD-related medications, and medical

  6. Evaluation of the operational cost savings potential from a D-CHP system based on a monthly power-to-heat ratio analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alta Knizley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the analysis of a combined heat and power (CHP system utilizing two power generation units operating simultaneously under differing operational strategies (D-CHP on the basis of operational cost savings. A cost optimization metric, based on the facility monthly power-to-heat ratio (PHR, is presented in this paper. The PHR is defined as the ratio between the facility electric load and thermal load. Previous work in this field has suggested that D-CHP system performance may be improved by limiting operation of the system to months in which the PHR is relatively low. The focus of this paper is to illustrate how the facility PHR parameter could be used to establish the potential of a D-CHP system to reduce operational cost with respect to traditional CHP systems and conventional systems with separate heating and power. This paper analyzes the relationship between the PHR and the operational cost savings of eight different benchmark buildings. Achieving operational cost savings through optimal operation based on monthly PHR for these building types can enhance the implementation potential of D-CHP and CHP systems. Results indicate that the PHR parameter can be used to predict the potential for a D-CHP system to reduce the operational cost.

  7. Impact of a new reimbursement program on hepatitis B antiviral medication cost and utilization in Beijing, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Qiu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is a significant clinical and financial burden for chronic hepatitis B (CHB patients. In Beijing, China, partial reimbursement on antiviral agents was first implemented for the treatment of CHB patients in July 1, 2011. AIMS: In this study, we describe the medical cost and utilization rates of antiviral therapy for CHB patients to explore the impact of the new partial reimbursement policy on the medical care cost, the composition, and antivirals utilization. METHODS: Clinical and claims data of a retrospective cohort of 92,776 outpatients and 2,774 inpatients with non-cirrhotic CHB were retrieved and analyzed from You'an Hospital, Beijing between February 14, 2008 and December 31, 2012. The propensity score matching was used to adjust factors associated with the annual total cost, including age, gender, medical insurance type and treatment indicator. RESULTS: Compared to patients who paid out-of-pocket, medical cost, especially antiviral costs increased greater among patients with medical insurance after July 1, 2011, the start date of reimbursement policy. Outpatients with medical insurance had 16% more antiviral utilization; usage increased 3% among those who paid out-of-pocket after the new partial reimbursement policy was implemented. CONCLUSIONS: Direct medical costs and antiviral utilization rates of CHB patients with medical insurance were higher than those from paid out-of-pocket payments, even after adjusting for inflation and other factors. Thus, a new partial reimbursement program may positively optimize the cost and standardization of antiviral treatment.

  8. Posthospital Discharge Medical Care Costs and Family Burden Associated with Osteoporotic Fracture Patients in China from 2011 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This study collected and evaluated data on the costs of outpatient medical care and family burden associated with osteoporosis-related fracture rehabilitation following hospital discharge in China. Materials and Methods. Data were collected using a patient questionnaire from osteoporosis-related fracture patients (N = 123 who aged 50 years and older who were discharged between January 2011 and January 2013 from 3 large hospitals in China. The survey captured posthospital discharge direct medical costs, indirect medical costs, lost work time for caregivers, and patient ambulatory status. Results. Hip fracture was the most frequent fracture site (62.6%, followed by vertebral fracture (34.2%. The mean direct medical care costs per patient totaled 3,910¥, while mean indirect medical costs totaled 743¥. Lost work time for unpaid family caregivers was 16.4 days, resulting in an average lost income of 3,233¥. The average posthospital direct medical cost, indirect medical cost, and caregiver lost income associated with a fracture patient totaled 7,886¥. Patients’ ambulatory status was negatively impacted following fracture. Conclusions. Significant time and cost of care are placed on patients and caregivers during rehabilitation after discharge for osteoporotic fracture. It is important to evaluate the role and responsibility for creating the growing and inequitable burden placed on patients and caregivers following osteoporotic fracture.

  9. Unrelated medical costs in life-years gained : should they be included in economic evaluations of healthcare interventions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rappange, David R; van Baal, Pieter H M; van Exel, N Job A; Feenstra, Talitha L; Rutten, Frans F H; Brouwer, Werner B F

    2008-01-01

    Which costs and benefits to consider in economic evaluations of healthcare interventions remains an area of much controversy. Unrelated medical costs in life-years gained is an important cost category that is normally ignored in economic evaluations, irrespective of the perspective chosen for the an

  10. Age and the economics of an emergency medical admission-what factors determine costs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, J J; Cournane, S; Byrne, D; Conway, R; O'Riordan, D; Silke, B

    2017-02-01

    The ageing of the population may be anticipated to increase demand on hospital resources. We have investigated the relationship between hospital episode costs and age profile in a single centre. All Emergency Medical admissions (33 732 episodes) to an Irish hospital over a 6-year period, categorized into three age groups, were evaluated against total hospital episode costs. Univariate and adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated using zero truncated Poisson regression. The total hospital episode cost increased with age ( P < 0.001). The multi-variable Poisson regression model demonstrated that the most important drivers of overall costs were Acute Illness Severity-IRR 1.36 (95% CI: 1.30, 1.41), Sepsis Status -1.46 (95% CI: 1.42, 1.51) and Chronic Disabling Disease Score -1.25 (95% CI: 1.22, 1.27) and the Age Group as exemplified for those 85 years IRR 1.23 (95% CI: 1.15, 1.32). Total hospital episode costs are a product of clinical complexity with contributions from the Acute Illness Severity, Co-Morbidity, Chronic Disabling Disease Score and Sepsis Status. However age is also an important contributor and an increasing patient age profile will have a predictable impact on total hospital episode costs.

  11. Implementation of a Low-Cost Mobile Devices to Support Medical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos García Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging has become an absolutely essential diagnostic tool for clinical practices; at present, pathologies can be detected with an earliness never before known. Its use has not only been relegated to the field of radiology but also, increasingly, to computer-based imaging processes prior to surgery. Motion analysis, in particular, plays an important role in analyzing activities or behaviors of live objects in medicine. This short paper presents several low-cost hardware implementation approaches for the new generation of tablets and/or smartphones for estimating motion compensation and segmentation in medical images. These systems have been optimized for breast cancer diagnosis using magnetic resonance imaging technology with several advantages over traditional X-ray mammography, for example, obtaining patient information during a short period. This paper also addresses the challenge of offering a medical tool that runs on widespread portable devices, both on tablets and/or smartphones to aid in patient diagnostics.

  12. Voluntary medical male circumcision: an introduction to the cost, impact, and challenges of accelerated scaling up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hankins

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC for HIV prevention is cost saving and creates fiscal space in the future that otherwise would have been encumbered by antiretroviral treatment costs. An investment of US$1,500,000,000 between 2011 and 2015 to achieve 80% coverage in 13 priority countries in southern and eastern Africa will result in net savings of US$16,500,000,000. Strong political leadership, country ownership, and stakeholder engagement, along with effective demand creation, community mobilisation, and human resource deployment, are essential. This collection of articles on determining the cost and impact of VMMC for HIV prevention signposts the way forward to scaling up VMMC service delivery safely and efficiently to reap individual- and population-level benefits.

  13. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perhac, R.M. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  14. Preparing a cost analysis for the section of medical physics-guidelines and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M D; Spanos, W J; Jose, B O; Kelly, B A; Brill, J P

    2000-01-01

    Radiation oncology is a highly complex medical specialty, involving many varied routine and special procedures. To assure cost-effectiveness and maintain support for the medical physics program, managers are obligated to analyze and defend all aspects of an institutional billing and cost-reporting program. Present standards of practice require that each patient's radiation treatments be customized to fit his/her particular condition. Since the use of personnel time and other resources is highly variable among patients, graduated levels of charges have been established to allow for more precise billing. Some radiation oncology special procedures have no specific code descriptors; so existing codes are modified or additional information attached in order to avoid payment denial. Recent publications have explored the manpower needs, salaries, and other resources required to perform radiation oncology "physics" procedures. This information is used to construct a model cost-based resource use profile for a radiation oncology center. This profile can be used to help the financial officer prepare a cost report for the institution. Both civil and criminal penalties for Medicare fraud and abuse (intentional or unintentional) are included in the False Claims Act and other statutes. Compliance guidelines require managers to train all personnel in correct billing procedures and to review continually billing performance.

  15. Predictors and Course of Medically Intractable Epilepsy in Young Children Presenting Before 36 Months of Age: A Retrospective, Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirrell, Elaine; Wong-Kisiel, Lily; Mandrekar, Jay; Nickels, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence and identify predictors of medical intractability in children presenting with epilepsy prior to 36 months of age, and to assess the impact of medical intractability on long-term mortality and intellectual function. Methods Children with newly-diagnosed epilepsy prior to 36 months between 1980–2009 while resident in Olmsted County, MN were identified. Medical records were reviewed to collect epilepsy specific variables and long-term outcome data. Medically intractable epilepsy was defined as either (1) seizures greater than every 6 months at final follow-up and failure of two or more antiepileptic drugs for lack of efficacy, or (2) having undergone epilepsy surgery after failure of two or more antiepileptic drugs. Key Findings One hundred and twenty seven children with new-onset epilepsy were identified and followed for a median of 78 months. Medically intractable seizures occurred in 35%, and significant predictors on multivariate analysis were age ≤12 months at diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] 6.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.00, 22.84, p=0.002), developmental delay at initial diagnosis of epilepsy (OR 20.03, 95% CI 3.49, 114.83, p=0.0008 ), neuroimaging abnormality (OR 6.48, 95% CI 1.96, 21.40, p=0.002) and focal slowing on initial EEG (OR 5.33, 95% CI 1.14, 24.88, p=0.03). Medical intractability occurred early in the course in most children, being seen in 61% by one year, and 93% by five years after initial diagnosis. Mortality was higher (20% vs 0%, p<0.001) and intellectual outcome poorer (p<0.001) if epilepsy was medically intractable. Significance One third of children presenting with epilepsy before 36 months will be medically intractable and significant predictors are identified. Medically intractable epilepsy is associated with increased mortality risk and significant intellectual disability. PMID:22738069

  16. Cost effectiveness of a lidocaine 5% medicated plaster compared with pregabalin for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia in the UK: a Markov model analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Mark; Liedgens, Hiltrud; Nuijten, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Published analyses have demonstrated that the lidocaine (lignocaine) plaster is a cost-effective treatment for postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) relative to gabapentin or pregabalin. However, these analyses have been based on indirect comparisons from placebo-controlled trials, and there is evidence of a discrepancy between the outcomes of direct and indirect analyses. Fortunately, recent publication of the results of a head-to-head trial comparing the lidocaine plaster and pregabalin in patients with PHN or diabetic polyneuropathy allows customization of the existing model to more accurately reflect the relative cost effectiveness of these two products. To assess the cost-effectiveness of the lidocaine 5% medicated plaster compared with pregabalin for the treatment of PHN in the UK primary-care setting. A Markov model has been developed to assess the costs and benefits of the lidocaine plaster and pregabalin over a 6-month time horizon for the treatment of patients with PHN who are intolerant to tricyclic antidepressants and in whom analgesics are ineffective or contraindicated. The model structure allows for differences in costs, utilities (derived from published data and from the head-to-head trial) and transition probabilities between the initial 30-day run-in period and maintenance therapy, and also takes account of add-in medication and drugs received by patients discontinuing therapy. The calculation was based on data from the recent head-to-head trial described above. Additional data sources included published literature, discussions with a Delphi panel, official price/tariff lists and national population statistics. The study was conducted from the perspective of the UK National Health Service (NHS). The base-case analysis (1.71 lidocaine plasters per day used in the head-to-head trial for the PHN population) indicated that the total cost of treating PHN patients for 6 months with the lidocaine plaster was pound 980 per patient treated, compared with pound 784

  17. Is a home based video teleconcltation setup cost effective for lowering HBA1C for patients with type-2 diabetes over a six-month period?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sall Jensen, Morten; Rasmussen, Ole Winther

    perspective. Cost data were based on study measured time consumption pr. HVT, consultations at out-patient clinic, HVT-equipment, -subscription, -support costs, and hospital operating cost. Medicine costs weren’t included in the model. Model output included the cost of a 1 mmol/l point reduction of HbA1c......OBJECTIVES: A RCT assessed the effectiveness and costs of a home based video teleconsultation (HVT) setup to lower HbA1c in patients with type-2 diabetes against usual out-patient treatment on the hospital. The HVT equipment was delivered to the patients by the hospital. This analysis shows...... the potential incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of using a HVT setup on six-months health care effects and costs. METHODS: The study effectiveness outcome was HbA1c level in mmol/l. The economic analysis was performed with a spreadsheet decision tree model with a Danish hospital payer’s direct cost...

  18. An Analysis of the Medical Costs of Obesity for Fifth Graders in California and Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Danielle E; Jackson, Allen W; Morrow, James R

    The prevalence of childhood obesity in the United States increased more than three-fold from 1976 - 1980 to 2007 - 2008. The Presidential Youth Fitness Program's FitnessGram® is the current method recommended by the President's Council on Fitness, Sports & Nutrition for assessing health-related fitness factors, including body composition. FitnessGram® data from California and Texas, the two most populous states, over a three-year time span indicate that more than one-third of fifth grade students, typically ten-year-olds, are obese. Previous studies report that an obese ten-year-old child who remains obese into adulthood will incur elevated direct medical costs beyond his or her normal-weight peers over a lifetime. The recommended elevated cost estimates are approximately $12,660 when comparing against a normal-weight child who gains weight as an adult and approximately $19,000 compared to a child who remains at normal weight as an adult. By applying these figures to FitnessGram® results from California and Texas, each group of fifth grade students in each of the two states will incur between $1.4 and $3.0 billion in direct medical costs over a lifetime. When the percentage of obese fifth graders is extrapolated to the rest of the United States' 4 million ten-year-olds, this results in more than $17 billion (accounting for adulthood weight gain) or $25 billion (not accounting for adulthood weight gain) in added direct lifetime medical costs attributable to obesity for this single-year age cohort. This information should be used to influence spending decisions and resource allocation to obesity reduction and prevention efforts.

  19. [Costs of medical care attributable to tobacco consumption at the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), Morelos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam; Juárez-Márquez, Sergio Arturo; Valdés-Salgado, Raydel

    2005-01-01

    To estimate the cost of medical care for the major diseases attributable to tobacco consumption at the IMSS, Morelos. A cost of illness (COI) analysis was carried out from the perspective of the health provider. An expert panel characterized medical care in primary and secondary care levels according to severity of disease. The smoking attributable fraction (SAF) by disease was used to derive costs attributable to tobacco consumption. The unitary cost was valuated in 2001 Mexican pesos (MP). The estimated annual average cost of medical care (diagnosis and first year of treatment) was 79,530 MP for acute myocardial infarction (AMI); 73,303 MP for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); and 102,215 MP for lung cancer (LC). The annual total cost of medical care for IMSS was 147,390 688 MP. The total annual cost of medical care attributable to tobacco consumption corresponds to dollars 124 million MP, which is equivalent to 7.3% of the annual budget of the Morelos Delegation. These results confirm the high medical costs associated with smoking. A repetition of this study at the national level is recommended in order to support decision-makers in strengthening public policies to control tobacco use in Mexico.

  20. Association among change in medical costs, level of comorbidity, and change in adherence behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kymes, Steven M; Pierce, Richard L; Girdish, Charmaine; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Tryoen; Shrank, William H

    2016-08-01

    Interventions to improve medication adherence are effective, but resource intensive. Interventions must be targeted to those who will potentially benefit most. We examined what heterogeneity exists in the value of adherence based on levels of comorbidity, and the changes in spending on medical services that followed changes in adherence behavior. Retrospective cohort study examining medical spending for 2 years (April 1, 2011, to March 31, 2013) in commercial insurance beneficiaries. Multivariable linear modeling was used to adjust for differences in patient characteristics. Analyses were performed at the patient/condition level in 2 cohorts: adherent at baseline and nonadherent at baseline. We evaluated 857,041 patients, representing 1,264,797 patient therapies consisting of 40% high cholesterol, 48% hypertension, and 12% diabetes. Among those with 3 or more conditions, annual savings associated with becoming adherent were $5341, $4423, and $2081 for patients with at least diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol, respectively. The increased costs for patients in this group who became nonadherent were $4653, $7946, and $4008, respectively. Depending on the condition and the direction of behavior change, savings were 2 to 7 times greater than the value for individuals with fewer than 3 conditions. In most cases, the value of preventing nonadherence (ie, persistence) was greater than the value of moving people who are nonadherent to an adherent state. There is important heterogeneity in the impact of medication adherence on medical spending. Clinicians and policy makers should consider this when promoting the change of adherence behavior.

  1. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction. Design. Longitudinal cohort study of infertile couples initiating medically assisted reproduction treatment. Setting. Specialized public fertility clinics in Denmark. Sample. Seven...... were abstracted from medical records. Flow diagrams were drawn for different standard treatment cycles and direct costs at each stage in the flow charts were measured and valued by a bottomup procedure. Indirect costs were distributed to each treatment cycle on the basis of number of visits as basis...

  2. An economic evaluation of anticipated costs and savings of a behavior change intervention to enhance medication adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiegand PN

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence across disease states is generally poor. Research has focused on various methods to improve medication adherence, but there is little conclusive evidence regarding specific methods efficacy. The Transtheoretical Model for Behavior Change has been used to modify existing addictive behaviors but not in medication adherence specifically. As a behavioral component is inherently related to medication adherence, it is thought that this model may be applicable. Objective: The purpose of this research is to evaluate the costs and savings of implementing a novel behavioral intervention against the cost of poor medication adherence to determine whether further development is realistic.Methods: The basic tools required to administer this intervention were determined through primary literature review and priced by vendors supplying such materials. Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 (DM2 was used as a vehicle to establish the cost of care for long-term complications of a chronic disease. The primary literature provided information regarding the cost of care for DM2 morbidity and outpatient annual drug therapy expenditure. The total cost of the behavioral intervention components and the cost of care for DM2 morbidity were applied to a theoretical cohort of 1000 patients. By dividing this cost across 1000 patients, a per-patient cost was yielded and multiplied over a 16-year timeframe. Results: It was found that the cost to implement the behavioral intervention and resultant medication costs is USD13,574 per-patient over 16 years. The cost to treat complications of diabetes mellitus is USD 36,528 per patient over the 16 years. The total amount of healthcare dollars potentially saved by utilizing this intervention is USD 22,954 per-patient. Conclusions: It appears that the cost to implement this behavioral intervention is reasonable and permits further evaluation in other chronic conditions with notoriously poor adherence levels.

  3. Medical students' knowledge of indications for imaging modalities and cost analysis of incorrect requests, shiraz, iran 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami Parkoohi, Parisa; Jalli, Reza; Danaei, Mina; Khajavian, Shiva; Askarian, Mehrdad

    2014-05-01

    Medical imaging has a remarkable role in the practice of clinical medicine. This study intends to evaluate the knowledge of indications of five common medical imaging modalities and estimation of the imposed cost of their non-indicated requests among medical students who attend Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We conducted across-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of indications of a number of medical imaging modalities among 270 medical students during their externship or internship periods. Knowledge scoring was performed according to a descriptive international grade conversion (fail to excellent) using Iranian academic grading (0 to 20). In addition, we estimated the cost for incorrect selection of those modalities according to public and private tariffs in US dollars. The participation and response rate was 200/270 (74%). The mean knowledge score was fair for all modalities. Similar scores were excellent for X-ray, acceptable for Doppler ultrasonography, and fair for ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI. The total cost for non-indicated requests of those modalities equaled $104303 (public tariff) and $205581 (private tariff). Medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences lacked favorable knowledge about indications for common medical imaging modalities. The results of this study have shown a significant cost for non-indicated requests of medical imaging. Of note, the present radiology curriculum is in need of a major revision with regards to evidence-based radiology and health economy concerns.

  4. Medical Students’ Knowledge of Indications for Imaging Modalities and Cost Analysis of Incorrect Requests, Shiraz, Iran 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Islami Parkoohi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Medical imaging has a remarkable role in the practice of clinical medicine. This study intends to evaluate the knowledge of indications of five common medical imaging modalities and estimation of the imposed cost of their non-indicated requests among medical students who attend Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. We conducted across-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire to assess the knowledge of indications of a number of medical imaging modalities among 270 medical students during their externship or internship periods. Knowledge scoring was performed according to a descriptive international grade conversion (fail to excellent using Iranian academic grading (0 to 20. In addition, we estimated the cost for incorrect selection of those modalities according to public and private tariffs in US dollars. The participation and response rate was 200/270 (74%. The mean knowledge score was fair for all modalities. Similar scores were excellent for X-ray, acceptable for Doppler ultrasonography, and fair for ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI. The total cost for non-indicated requests of those modalities equaled $104303 (public tariff and $205581 (private tariff. Medical students at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences lacked favorable knowledge about indications for common medical imaging modalities. The results of this study have shown a significant cost for non-indicated requests of medical imaging. Of note, the present radiology curriculum is in need of a major revision with regards to evidence-based radiology and health economy concerns.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of supervised exercise, stenting, and optimal medical care for claudication: results from the Claudication: Exercise Versus Endoluminal Revascularization (CLEVER) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Matthew R; Apruzzese, Patricia; Galper, Benjamin Z; Murphy, Timothy P; Hirsch, Alan T; Cutlip, Donald E; Mohler, Emile R; Regensteiner, Judith G; Cohen, David J

    2014-11-11

    Both supervised exercise (SE) and stenting (ST) improve functional status, symptoms, and quality of life compared with optimal medical care (OMC) in patients with claudication. The relative cost-effectiveness of these strategies is not well defined. The Claudication: Exercise Versus Endoluminal Revascularization (CLEVER) study randomized patients with claudication due to aortoiliac stenosis to a 6-month SE program, to ST, or to OMC. Participants who completed 6-month follow-up (n=98) were included in a health economic analysis through 18 months. Costs were assessed using resource-based methods and hospital billing data. Quality-adjusted life-years were estimated using the EQ-5D. Markov modeling based on the in-trial results was used to explore the impact of assumptions about the longer term durability of observed differences in quality of life. Through 18 months, mean healthcare costs were $5178, $9804, and $14 590 per patient for OMC, SE, and ST, respectively. Measured quality-adjusted life-years through 18 months were 1.04, 1.16, and 1.20. In our base case analysis, which assumed that observed differences in quality of life would dissipate after 5 years, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were $24 070 per quality-adjusted life-year gained for SE versus OMC, $41 376 for ST versus OMC, and $122 600 for ST versus SE. If the treatment effect of ST was assumed to be more durable than that of SE, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for ST versus SE became more favorable. Both SE and ST are economically attractive by US standards relative to OMC for the treatment of claudication in patients with aortoiliac disease. ST is more expensive than SE, with uncertain incremental benefit. www.clinicaltrials.gov, Unique identifier: NCT00132743. © 2014 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  6. Significant cost savings achieved by in-sourcing urine drug testing for monitoring medication compliance in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Stacy E F; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Snyder, Marion L; Darragh, Alicia; Quade, Cathleen; Jarolim, Petr

    2013-06-25

    Reference laboratory testing can represent a significant component of the laboratory budget. Therefore, most laboratories continually reassess the feasibility of in-sourcing various tests. We describe the transfer of urine drug testing performed for monitoring medication compliance in pain management from a reference laboratory into an academic clinical laboratory. The process of implementing of both screening immunoassays and confirmatory LC-MS/MS testing and the associated cost savings is outlined. The initial proposal for in-sourcing this testing, which included the tests to be in-sourced, resources required, estimated cost savings and timeline for implementation, was approved in January 2009. All proposed testing was implemented by March 2011. Keys to the successful implementation included budgeting adequate resources and developing a realistic timeline, incorporating the changes with the highest budget impact first. We were able to in-source testing in 27 months and save the laboratory approximately $1 million in the first 3 year. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term medical management of primary open-angle glaucoma and ocular hypertension in the UK: optimizing cost-effectiveness and clinic resources by minimizing therapy switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, Michelle; Collins, Sarah; Loftus, Jane

    2012-09-01

    The objective was to assess the long-term economic consequences of the medical management of glaucoma in the UK. The economic evaluation was conducted using the results from a 10-year Markov model based around 3 key triggers for a switch in medical therapy for glaucoma, namely: lack of tolerance (using hyperemia as a proxy); intraocular pressure (IOP) not meeting treatment benchmark; and glaucoma progression. Clinical data from a comprehensive systematic literature review and meta-analysis were used. Direct costs associated with glaucoma treatment are considered (at 2008/9 prices) from the perspective of the UK NHS as payer (outpatient/secondary care setting). Using this model, the economic consequences of 3 prostaglandin-based treatment sequences were compared. Drug acquisition costs account for around 8% to 13% of the total cost of glaucoma and, if ophthalmologist visits are included, amount to approximately £0.80 to £0.90 per day of medical therapy. The total long-term costs of all prostaglandin strategies are similar because of a shift in resources: increased drug costs are offset by fewer clinic visits to instigate treatment switches, and by avoiding surgery or costs associated with managing low vision. Under the latanoprost-based strategy, patients would have longer intervals between the need to switch therapies, which is largely due to a reduction in hyperemia, seen as a proxy for tolerance. This leads to a delay in glaucoma progression of 12 to 13 months. For every 1000 clinic appointments, 719 patients can be managed for 1 year with a latanoprost-based strategy compared with 586 or 568 with a bimatoprost or travoprost-based strategy. Drug acquisition costs are not a key driver of the total cost of glaucoma management and the cost of medical therapy is offset by avoiding the cost of managing low vision. Economic models of glaucoma should include the long-term consequences of treatment as these will affect cost-effectiveness. This analysis supports the

  8. Systematization of a hybrid costing method for medical procedures: a concomitant apllication of the ABC and UEP methodologies

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    Márcia Zanievicz da Silva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study consists in systematization Hybrid Costing Methodology supported by the concepts of Activity Based Costing (ABC and the Production Effort Unit (UEP to quantify the cost of medical procedures in hospitals. By means of theory-concept research, the hybrid method application stages were organized and then tested at the University Hospital of the University of the State of Santa Catarina with the purpose of determining the cost of medical procedures, more specifically childbirth. The execution process flow of childbirth is divided into seven distinct procedures because of its variations. Besides presenting the cost calculations of this process, the research establishes a numerical value called Activity Effort Measure which is based on the execution cost for all the activities necessary to achieve it. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can be applied to quantify the costs, as well as support the management of the several hospital activities.

  9. The direct medical cost of cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, diabetes, cancer, pregnancy and female infertility in a large HMO in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodick, Gabriel; Porath, Avi; Alapi, Hillel; Sella, Tal; Flash, Shira; Wood, Francis; Shalev, Varda

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the direct medical cost of treating major chronic illnesses in Maccabi Healthcare Services, a 1.8 million member health maintenance organization in Israel. Direct medical costs were calculated for each member in 2006. We used multiple linear regression models to evaluate the overall costs of chronic conditions (cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, female infertility treatments, and cancer), pregnancy and treatments for female infertility. According to the study model, hypertension was associated with the largest direct medical costs in both sexes. Cardiovascular diseases accounted for 9.5% of the total direct medical costs in men, but only 5.9% in women. Diabetes mellitus accounted for 3.5% of the total medical costs both in men and women and is comparable to the total pregnancy-related costs in women. The findings indicate that hypertension, diabetes mellitus and female infertility treatments impose a considerable economic burden on public healthcare services in Israel which is comparable with the costs of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A propensity score approach to estimating the cost-effectiveness of medical therapies from observational data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Nandita; Indurkhya, Alka

    2005-08-01

    Health summary measures are commonly used by policy makers to help make decisions on the allocation of societal resources for competing medical treatments. The net monetary benefit is a health summary measure that overcomes the statistical limitations of a popular measure namely, the cost-effectiveness ratio. We introduce a linear model framework to estimate propensity score adjusted net monetary benefit. This method provides less biased estimates in the presence of significant differences in baseline measures and demographic characteristics between treatment groups in quasi-randomized or observational studies. Simulation studies were conducted to better understand the utility of propensity score adjusted estimates of net monetary benefits when important covariates are unobserved. The results indicated that the propensity score adjusted net monetary benefit provides a robust measure of cost-effectiveness in the presence of hidden bias. The methods are illustrated using data from SEER-Medicare for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  11. Safety-cost trade-offs in medical device reuse: a Markov decision process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Thomas W

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare expenditures in the US are approaching 2 trillion dollars, and hospitals and other healthcare providers are under tremendous pressure to rein in costs. One cost-saving approach which is gaining popularity is the reuse of medical devices which were designed only for a single use. Device makers decry this practice as unsanitary and unsafe, but a growing number of third-party firms are willing to sterilize, refurbish, and/or remanufacture devices and resell them to hospitals at a fraction of the original price. Is this practice safe? Is reliance on single-use devices sustainable? A Markov decision process (MDP) model is formulated to study the trade-offs involved in these decisions. Several key parameters are examined: device costs, device failure probabilities, and failure penalty cost. For each of these parameters, expressions are developed which identify the indifference point between using new and reprocessed devices. The results can be used to inform the debate on the economic, ethical, legal, and environmental dimensions of this complex issue.

  12. The effect of the TIM program (Transfer ICU Medication reconciliation) on medication transfer errors in two Dutch intensive care units : Design of a prospective 8-month observational study with a before and after period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Bosma; E. Meuwese; Tan, S.S. (Siok Swan); J. van Bommel (Jasper); Melief, P.H.G.J. (Piet Herman Gerard Jan); N.G. Hunfeld; P.M.L.A. van den Bemt (Patricia)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The transfer of patients to and from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) is prone to medication errors. The aim of the present study is to determine whether the number of medication errors at ICU admission and discharge and the associated potential harm and costs are reduced by usi

  13. An intervention to maximize medication management by caregivers of persons with memory loss: Intervention overview and two-month outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingler, Jennifer H; Sereika, Susan M; Amspaugh, Carolyn M; Arida, Janet A; Happ, Mary E; Houze, Martin P; Kaufman, Robert R; Knox, Melissa L; Tamres, Lisa K; Tang, Fengyan; Erlen, Judith A

    2016-01-01

    Overseeing medication-taking is a critical aspect of dementia caregiving. This trial examined a tailored, problem-solving intervention designed to maximize medication management practices among caregivers of persons with memory loss. Eighty-three community-dwelling dyads (patient + informal caregiver) with a baseline average of 3 medication deficiencies participated. Home- and telephone-based sessions were delivered by nurse or social worker interventionists and addressed basics of managing medications, plus tailored problem solving for specific challenges. The outcome of medication management practices was assessed using the Medication Management Instrument for Deficiencies in the Elderly (MedMaIDE) and an investigator-developed Medication Deficiency Checklist (MDC). Linear mixed modeling showed both the intervention and usual care groups had fewer medication management problems as measured by the MedMaIDE (F = 6.91, p importance of medication adherence, there may be benefit.

  14. Patient medical costs for tuberculosis treatment and impact on adherence in China: a systematic review

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    Zhang Tuohong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Charging for tuberculosis (TB treatment could reduce completion rates, particularly in the poor. We identified and synthesised studies that measure costs of TB treatment, estimates of adherence and the potential impact of charging on treatment completion in China. Methods Inclusion criteria were primary research studies, including surveys and studies using qualitative methods, conducted in mainland China. We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, Science Direct, HEED, CNKI to June 2010; and web pages of relevant Chinese and international organisations. Cost estimates were extracted, transformed, and expressed in absolute values and as a percentage of household income. Results Low income patients, defined at household or district level, pay a total of US$ 149 to 724 (RMB 1241 to 5228 for medical costs for a treatment course; as a percentage of annual household income, estimates range from 42% to 119%. One national survey showed 73% of TB patients at the time of the survey had interrupted or suspended treatment, and estimates from 9 smaller more recent studies showed that the proportion of patients at the time of the survey who had run out of drugs or were not taking them ranged from 3 to 25%. Synthesis of surveys and qualitative research indicate that cost is the most cited reason for default. Conclusions Despite a policy of free drug treatment for TB in China, health services charge all income groups, and costs are high. Adherence measured in cross sectional surveys is often low, and the cumulative failure to adhere is likely to be much higher. These findings may be relevant to those concerned with the development and spread of multi-drug resistant TB. New strategies need to take this into account and ensure patient adherence.

  15. Rewards, costs and challenges: the general practitioner's experience of teaching medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturman, Nancy; Régo, Patricia; Dick, Marie-Louise

    2011-07-01

    Medical student attachments in general practices play an important role in undergraduate medical education internationally. The recruitment by universities of new teaching practices or an increase in the teaching commitment of existing practices will be necessary to address rising medical student numbers. General practitioners (GPs) are likely to weigh the perceived rewards of practice-based teaching against the perceived costs and challenges in deciding whether to accept a student placement and how to teach. These aspects of the 'lived experience' of the GP-teacher have not been adequately investigated. This study aims to enhance understanding of the GP clinical teacher experience in order to inform strategies for the recruitment, retention, training and support of teaching general practices. Sixty GP clinical teachers in Brisbane-based urban teaching general practices were interviewed individually face-to-face by the principal investigator, using a semi-structured interview plan. Representativeness was ensured through quota sampling. The interview data were analysed thematically by two of the investigators independently, following member checking of interview transcripts. The results demonstrate a number of key inter-related perceived rewards, costs and challenges of teaching, including intellectual stimulation, cognitive fatigue and student characteristics. The findings extend reports in the previous literature by offering a richer description of current GP-teacher experience. Participants identified teaching rewards in a manner largely consistent with previous research, with the exception of enhanced practice morale and teamwork. Findings confirm that reduced productivity and increased time pressures remain key perceived negative impacts of teaching, but also reveal a number of other important costs and challenges. They emphasise the diversity of GP experience and practice cultures, and the need for teaching to enhance both GP and patient perceptions of

  16. Evaluation of clinical pharmacist's interventions in an infectious diseases ward and impact on patient's direct medication cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Mirzabeigi, Parastoo; Dashti-Khavidaki, Simin

    2013-04-01

    A clinical pharmacist is a key member of the antimicrobial multidisciplinary team involved in patients' pharmacotherapy monitoring. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and type of medication errors, the type of clinical pharmacy interventions, acceptance of pharmacist interventions by health-care provider team, nursing staff satisfaction with clinical pharmacy services, and the probable impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on decreasing direct medication costs at an infectious diseases ward in Iran. All clinical pharmacist interventions such as preventing medication errors were recorded in a previously designed pharmacotherapy monitoring forms. Direct medication cost of patients admitted during the study period was compared with that of subjects hospitalized at the same ward during the year before the intervention period to determine the impact of clinical pharmacy interventions on direct medication costs. The 3 most frequent medication error types were incorrect dose (35.5%), omission error (24.3%), and incorrect medication (14.3%). The mean number of clinical pharmacist intervention per patient was 3.2. Forty percent of clinical pharmacists' interventions are moderate to major clinical significant. Thirty nine percent of clinical pharmacist's interventions had moderate to major financial benefits in present study. The direct medication cost per patient was decreased about 3.8% following clinical pharmacist's interventions. Our data demonstrated that incorrect dose was the most frequent medication error in the infectious diseases ward. Major portion of clinical pharmacist interventions were accepted by physicians and nursing staff. Clinical pharmacist interventions non-significantly decreased the direct medication cost of patients. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The clinical characteristics and direct medical cost of influenza in hospitalized children: a five-year retrospective study in Suzhou, China.

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    Tao Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There have been few studies on children hospitalized with influenza published from mainland China. We performed a retrospective review of medical charts to describe the epidemiology, clinical features and direct medical cost of laboratory-proven influenza hospitalized children in Suzhou, China. METHODS: Retrospective study on children with documented influenza infection hospitalized at Suzhou Children Hospital during 2005-2009 was conducted using a structured chart review instrument. RESULTS: A total of 480 children were positive by immuno-fluorescent assay for influenza during 2005-2009. The hospitalizations for influenza occurred in 8-12 months of the year, most commonly in the winter with a second late summer peak (August-September. Influenza A accounted for 86.3%, and of these 286 (59.6% were male, and 87.2% were 60 months old had shorter hospital stay (OR = 0.45; children with oxygen treatment tended to have longer hospital stays than those without oxygen treatment (OR = 2.14. The mean cost of each influenza-related hospitalization was US$ 624 (US$ 1323 for children referred to ICU and US$ 617 for those cared for on the wards. High risk children had higher total cost than low-risk patients. CONCLUSION: Compared to other countries, in Suzhou, children hospitalized with influenza have longer hospital stay and higher percentage of pneumonia. The direct medical cost is high relative to family income. Effective strategies of influenza immunization of young children in China may be beneficial in addressing this disease burden.

  18. Utilization and cost of services in the last 6 months of life of patients with cancer - with and without home hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentur, Netta; Resnizky, Shirli; Balicer, Ran; Eilat-Tsanani, Tsofia

    2014-11-01

    This study examined the utilization and cost of all health services consumed during the last six months of life by cancer patients, and compared those with and without home-hospice care. Detailed information was extracted from the health care electronic administrative data files on 193 deceased cancer patients that their family approved the study (out of 429, 45%). About 88% had been hospitalized for 19 days on average and 53% visited the ER. One quarter received home-hospice care. Their average cost was $13,648 compared to $18,503 for patients without home-hospice care. Hospitalization contributed 32% to the total cost of patients with home-hospice care and 64% for those with it. The findings support the justification for significant expansion of home-hospice care.

  19. Optimal Medical Equipment Maintenance Service Proposal Decision Support System combining Activity Based Costing (ABC) and the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Leticia; Sloane, Elliot; M Bassani, Jose

    2005-01-01

    This study describes a framework to support the choice of the maintenance service (in-house or third party contract) for each category of medical equipment based on: a) the real medical equipment maintenance management system currently used by the biomedical engineering group of the public health system of the Universidade Estadual de Campinas located in Brazil to control the medical equipment maintenance service, b) the Activity Based Costing (ABC) method, and c) the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method. Results show the cost and performance related to each type of maintenance service. Decision-makers can use these results to evaluate possible strategies for the categories of equipment.

  20. Reducing child conduct disordered behaviour and improving parent mental health in disadvantaged families: a 12-month follow-up and cost analysis of a parenting intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, Sinead; NiMhaille, Grainne; Bywater, Tracey; Leckey, Yvonne; Kelly, Paul; Furlong, Mairead; Comiskey, Catherine; O'Neill, Donal; Donnelly, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The effectiveness of the Incredible Years Basic parent programme (IYBP) in reducing child conduct problems and improving parent competencies and mental health was examined in a 12-month follow-up. Pre- to post-intervention service use and related costs were also analysed. A total of 103 families and their children (aged 32-88 months), who previously participated in a randomised controlled trial of the IYBP, took part in a 12-month follow-up assessment. Child and parent behaviour and well-being were measured using psychometric and observational measures. An intention-to-treat analysis was carried out using a one-way repeated measures ANOVA. Pairwise comparisons were subsequently conducted to determine whether treatment outcomes were sustained 1 year post-baseline assessment. Results indicate that post-intervention improvements in child conduct problems, parenting behaviour and parental mental health were maintained. Service use and associated costs continued to decline. The results indicate that parent-focused interventions, implemented in the early years, can result in improvements in child and parent behaviour and well-being 12 months later. A reduced reliance on formal services is also indicated.

  1. Medical care costs of newly diagnosed children with structural-metabolic epilepsy: a one year prevalence-based approached.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Muhannad R M; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad; Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Abd, Arwa Y; Ganesan, Vigneswari M

    2012-12-01

    Aims of this study were to estimate the first-year medical care costs of newly diagnosed children with structural-metabolic epilepsy and to determine the cost-driving factors in the selected population. This was a prevalence-based retrospective chart review that included patients who attended a pediatric neurology clinic in a tertiary referral center in Malaysia. The total first-year medical care costs were estimated from the provider (i.e., hospital) perspective, using a bottom-up, microcosting analysis. Medical chart/billing data (i.e., case reports) obtained from the hospital (i.e., provider) were collected to determine the resources used. Prices or cost data were standardized for the year 2010 (One Malaysian Ringgit MYR is equivalent to 0.26 Euro or 0.32 USD). The most expensive item in the costs list was antiepileptic drugs, whereas ultrasound examination represented the cheapest item. Hospitalization and the use of non-antiepileptic drugs were the second and third most costly items, respectively. The cost of therapeutic drug monitoring comprised only a small proportion of the total annual expenditure. None of the demographic variables (i.e., gender, race, and age) significantly impacted the first-year medical care costs. Similarly, child development, seizure type, therapy type (i.e., polytherapy versus monotherapy), and therapeutic drug monitoring utilization were also not associated with the cost of management. The first-year medical care costs positively correlated with seizure frequency (r(s)=0.294, p=0.001). However, the only variable that significantly predict the first-year medical care costs was the type of antiepileptic drugs (R(2)=0.292, F=7.772, pMalaysia. The total first-year medical care costs for 120 patients with structural-metabolic epilepsy were MYR 202,816 (i.e., MYR 1690.13 per patient per year). The study findings highlight the importance of optimizing seizure control in reducing the cost of management. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy

  2. Direct medical costs attributable to type 2 diabetes mellitus: a population-based study in Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Cases, Manel; Casajuana, Marc; Franch-Nadal, Josep; Casellas, Aina; Castell, Conxa; Vinagre, Irene; Mauricio, Dídac; Bolíbar, Bonaventura

    2016-11-01

    We estimated healthcare costs associated with patients with type 2 diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects in a population-based primary care database through a retrospective analysis of economic impact during 2011, including 126,811 patients with type 2 diabetes in Catalonia, Spain. Total annual costs included primary care visits, hospitalizations, referrals, diagnostic tests, self-monitoring test strips, medication, and dialysis. For each patient, one control matched for age, gender and managing physician was randomly selected from a population database. The annual average cost per patient was €3110.1 and €1803.6 for diabetic and non-diabetic subjects, respectively (difference €1306.6; i.e., 72.4 % increased cost). The costs of hospitalizations were €1303.1 and €801.6 (62.0 % increase), and medication costs were €925.0 and €489.2 (89.1 % increase) in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects, respectively. In type 2 diabetic patients, hospitalizations and medications had the greatest impact on the overall cost (41.9 and 29.7 %, respectively), generating approximately 70 % of the difference between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. Patients with poor glycaemic control (glycated haemoglobin >7 %; >53 mmol/mol) had average costs of €3296.5 versus €2848.5 for patients with good control. In the absence of macrovascular complications, average costs were €3008.1 for diabetic and €1612.4 for non-diabetic subjects, while its presence increased costs to €4814.6 and €3306.8, respectively. In conclusion, the estimated higher costs for type 2 diabetes patients compared with non-diabetic subjects are due mainly to hospitalizations and medications, and are higher among diabetic patients with poor glycaemic control and macrovascular complications.

  3. Multi-professional clinical medication reviews in care homes for the elderly: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial with cost effectiveness analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sach Tracey

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence demonstrates that measures are needed to optimise therapy and improve administration of medicines in care homes for older people. The aim of this study is to determine the clinical and cost effectiveness of a novel model of multi-professional medication review. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial design, involving thirty care homes. In line with current practice in medication reviews, recruitment and consent will be sought from general practitioners and care homes, rather than individual residents. Care homes will be segmented according to size and resident mix and allocated to the intervention arm (15 homes or control arm (15 homes sequentially using minimisation. Intervention homes will receive a multi-professional medication review at baseline and at 6 months, with follow-up at 12 months. Control homes will receive usual care (support they currently receive from the National Health Service, with data collection at baseline and 12 months. The novelty of the intervention is a review of medications by a multi-disciplinary team. Primary outcome measures are number of falls and potentially inappropriate prescribing. Secondary outcome measures include medication costs, health care resource use, hospitalisations and mortality. The null hypothesis proposes no difference in primary outcomes between intervention and control patients. The primary outcome variable (number of falls will be analysed using a linear mixed model, with the intervention specified as a fixed effect and care homes included as a random effect. Analyses will be at the level of the care home. The economic evaluation will estimate the cost-effectiveness of the intervention compared to usual care from a National Health Service and personal social services perspective. The study is not measuring the impact of the intervention on professional working relationships, the medicines culture in care homes or the generic health-related quality of life of

  4. Impact of a Patient Support Program on Patient Adherence to Adalimumab and Direct Medical Costs in Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, and Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David T; Mittal, Manish; Davis, Matthew; Johnson, Scott; Chao, Jingdong; Skup, Martha

    2017-08-01

    AbbVie provides a free-to-patient patient support program (PSP) to assist adalimumab-treated patients with medication costs, nurse support, injection training, pen disposal, and medication reminders. The impact of these services on patient adherence to adalimumab and direct medical costs associated with autoimmune disease has not been assessed. To quantify the relationship between participation in a PSP and outcomes (adalimumab adherence, persistence, and direct medical costs) in patients initiating adalimumab treatment. A longitudinal, retrospective, cohort study was conducted using patient-level data from the PSP combined with Symphony Health Solutions administrative claims data for patients initiating adalimumab between January 2008 and June 2014. The sample included patients aged ≥ 18 years with a diagnosis of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, or ankylosing spondylitis who were biologic-naïve before initiation of adalimumab. Patients who enrolled in the PSP (PSP cohort) were matched to those who did not enroll (non-PSP cohort) based on age, sex, year of treatment initiation, comorbidities, diagnosis, and initiation at a specialty pharmacy. For the PSP cohort, the index date was assigned as the earliest date of PSP enrollment, and time to enrollment following adalimumab initiation was used to assign index dates for the non-PSP cohort. All patients were required to have evidence of medical and pharmacy coverage for at least 6 months before and after their first adalimumab claim and at least 12 months after their index date. Adherence (proportion of days covered during the 12 months following PSP opt-in [index date]) was compared between cohorts using t-tests. Persistence was assessed using survival analysis of discontinuation rates. Medical costs for emergency department, inpatient, physician, and outpatient visits (all-cause and disease-related) and total costs (medical plus drug costs) were compared at

  5. Real‑life cost and cost‑effectiveness for tiotropium 18 μg od monotherapy in moderate and severe COPD patients: a 48‑month survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Povero

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tiotropium monotherapy enables a significant minimization of morbidity in COPD. OBJECTIVE: to evaluate and compare cost and cost‑effectiveness of tiotropium monotherapy administrated for 24 months (18 μg od in mild‑to‑moderate and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. METHODS: Clinical outcomes (days in hospital; visits in general ward; cycles of systemic steroids; cycles of antibiotics and maintenance therapy drugs were evaluated in two groups of patients corresponding to predicted FEV1 baseline values ≤ 50% (A and > 50% (B from the Italian NHS perspective. In order to perform cost‑effectiveness analysis, FEV1 value, available for each patient, was converted in SGRQ score using a published multivariate linear model. Utilities were then obtained through the Ståhl equation. RESULTS: The comparison between 24 months of standard therapy and subsequent 24‑month period of tiotropium monotherapy showed that hospitalization cost, which represents the driving treatment cost, drops from 77% to 69% (A and from 67% to 33% (B of the total cost. Differently, maintenance therapy cost increased but the amount was more than offset by the savings accruing from the shortening of hospitalization. Furthermore, cost‑effectiveness results revealed a mean savings of about 216 € (A and 961 € (B other than a mean gain of 0.07 QALY (A and 0.02 QALY (B. Dominance of tiotropium (calculated only within patients completing treatment course revealed that in almost 29% (A and 36% (B of subjects tiotropium strategy is dominant while only in 2% (A and 7% (B of cases is associated to costs increment and worsening on quality of life. The dominance was systematic in severe COPD. Statistical analyses confirm such trend. CONCLUSIONS: Results of the present study suggest that tiotropium used as unique treatment in COPD systematically consents significant costs savings together with positive effects on evaluated quality. These effects prove

  6. Type D Personality Predicts Poor Medication Adherence in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Six-Month Follow-Up Study.

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    Xuemei Li

    Full Text Available Type D personality and medication nonadherence have been shown to be associated with poor health outcomes. Type D personality is associated with poor medication adherence in patients with coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. However, the relationship between type D personality and medication adherence in patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM remains unknown. This study aims to examine whether type D personality was associated with medication adherence in patients with T2DM.A follow-up study was conducted in general hospital of the People's Liberation Army in Beijing.412 T2DM patients (205 females, who were recruited by circular systematic random sampling, provided demographic and baseline data about medical information and completed measures of Type D personality. Then, 330 patients went on to complete a self-report measure of medication adherence at the sixth month after baseline data collection. Chi-square test, t tests, and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted, as needed.Patients with type D personality were significantly more likely to have poor medication adherence (p<0.001. Type D personality predicts poor medication adherence before and after controlling for covariates when it was analyzed as a categorical variable. However, the dimensional construct of type D personality was not associated with medication adherence when analyzed as a continuous variable.Although, as a dimensional construct, type D personality may not reflect the components of the personality associated with poor medication adherence in patients with T2DM, screening for type D personality may help to identify those who are at higher risk of poor medication adherence. Interventions, aiming to improve medication adherence, should be launched for these high-risk patients.

  7. Manipulative therapy in addition to usual medical care accelerates recovery of shoulder complaints at higher costs: economic outcomes of a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergman Gert JD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shoulder complaints are common in primary care and have unfavourable long term prognosis. Our objective was to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of manipulative therapy of the cervicothoracic spine and the adjacent ribs in addition to usual medical care (UMC by the general practitioner in the treatment of shoulder complaints. Methods This economic evaluation was conducted alongside a randomized trial in primary care. Included were 150 patients with shoulder complaints and a dysfunction of the cervicothoracic spine and adjacent ribs. Patients were treated with UMC (NSAID's, corticosteroid injection or referral to physical therapy and were allocated at random (yes/no to manipulative therapy (manipulation and mobilization. Patient perceived recovery, severity of main complaint, shoulder pain, disability and general health were outcome measures. Data about direct and indirect costs were collected by means of a cost diary. Results Manipulative therapy as add-on to UMC accelerated recovery on all outcome measures included. At 26 weeks after randomization, both groups reported similar recovery rates (41% vs. 38%, but the difference between groups in improvement of severity of the main complaint, shoulder pain and disability sustained. Compared to the UMC group the total costs were higher in the manipulative group (€1167 vs. €555. This is explained mainly by the costs of the manipulative therapy itself and the higher costs due sick leave from work. The cost effectiveness ratio showed that additional manipulative treatment is more costly but also more effective than UMC alone. The cost-effectiveness acceptability curve shows that a 50%-probability of recovery with AMT within 6 months after initiation of treatment is achieved at €2876. Conclusion Manipulative therapy in addition to UMC accelerates recovery and is more effective than UMC alone on the long term, but is associated with higher costs. International Standard

  8. Zika virus and Assisted Reproductive Technology: to test or not to test, that is the question. Is it an unnecessary cost? The first two months of mandatory testing in an outbreak area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Maria do Carmo B de; Raupp, Veronica; Sobrinho, Fernanda; Menezes, Mariana; Panaino, Tatiana R; Tamm, Maria A; Mancebo, Ana C A; Costa, Ana L R; Antunes, Roberto A

    2016-12-01

    Infection by the Zika virus is a Public Health Emergency of International Concern as defined by the World Health Organization. Resolution no. 72, issued by the Collegiate Board of the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) on March 30, 2016, made ZKV testing mandatory prior to procedures involving germ cells and tissues. This paper aims to discuss the aforementioned Resolution from the standpoint of evidence and cost-effectiveness of the measures taken within the first two months of mandatory testing. The medical staff at the clinic looked into the steps needed to comply with the new rules and checked laboratories in the city to perform the tests with their lead times and costs, health insurance refunds, data maintenance capabilities, how to contact patients, decision-making processes in ongoing cases, deadlines for implementation, in addition to exchanging ideas with other clinics and gathering information from the guidelines being produced. A SWOT analysis was performed. A total of 152 tests were performed within the first two months of mandatory testing, in five different clinical situations: one previously symptomatic woman with a negative PCR test before starting the cycle; two asymptomatic women had positive IgM (1.3%) and negative PCR tests on days 25 and 60; one husband enrolled as a suspect with a negative RT-PCR on day 13 and another untested suspected case; a couple decided to have their oocytes cryopreserved because the husband's test result was not available on pickup day. The mean cost of USD 200 per couple is equivalent to 1.2 day of the stimulation protocol. The staff worked more efficiently and was able to respond promptly to the increased demand for ZKV testing; however, the tests failed to reassure patients of the safety of the procedure and increased costs. The testing requirement for asymptomatic patients prior to ART should be reviewed.

  9. Medical Abortion Provided by Nurse-Midwives or Physicians in a High Resource Setting: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Sjöström

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to calculate the cost-effectiveness of early medical abortion performed by nurse-midwifes in comparison to physicians in a high resource setting where ultrasound dating is part of the protocol. Non-physician health care professionals have previously been shown to provide medical abortion as effectively and safely as physicians, but the cost-effectiveness of such task shifting remains to be established.A cost effectiveness analysis was conducted based on data from a previously published randomized-controlled equivalence study including 1180 healthy women randomized to the standard procedure, early medical abortion provided by physicians, or the intervention, provision by nurse-midwifes. A 1.6% risk difference for efficacy defined as complete abortion without surgical interventions in favor of midwife provision was established which means that for every 100 procedures, the intervention treatment resulted in 1.6 fewer incomplete abortions needing surgical intervention than the standard treatment. The average direct and indirect costs and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER were calculated. The study was conducted at a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden.The average direct costs per procedure were EUR 45 for the intervention compared to EUR 58.3 for the standard procedure. Both the cost and the efficacy of the intervention were superior to the standard treatment resulting in a negative ICER at EUR -831 based on direct costs and EUR -1769 considering total costs per surgical intervention avoided.Early medical abortion provided by nurse-midwives is more cost-effective than provision by physicians. This evidence provides clinicians and decision makers with an important tool that may influence policy and clinical practice and eventually increase numbers of abortion providers and reduce one barrier to women's access to safe abortion.

  10. Medical Abortion Provided by Nurse-Midwives or Physicians in a High Resource Setting: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Susanne; Kopp Kallner, Helena; Simeonova, Emilia; Madestam, Andreas; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to calculate the cost-effectiveness of early medical abortion performed by nurse-midwifes in comparison to physicians in a high resource setting where ultrasound dating is part of the protocol. Non-physician health care professionals have previously been shown to provide medical abortion as effectively and safely as physicians, but the cost-effectiveness of such task shifting remains to be established. A cost effectiveness analysis was conducted based on data from a previously published randomized-controlled equivalence study including 1180 healthy women randomized to the standard procedure, early medical abortion provided by physicians, or the intervention, provision by nurse-midwifes. A 1.6% risk difference for efficacy defined as complete abortion without surgical interventions in favor of midwife provision was established which means that for every 100 procedures, the intervention treatment resulted in 1.6 fewer incomplete abortions needing surgical intervention than the standard treatment. The average direct and indirect costs and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) were calculated. The study was conducted at a university hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. The average direct costs per procedure were EUR 45 for the intervention compared to EUR 58.3 for the standard procedure. Both the cost and the efficacy of the intervention were superior to the standard treatment resulting in a negative ICER at EUR -831 based on direct costs and EUR -1769 considering total costs per surgical intervention avoided. Early medical abortion provided by nurse-midwives is more cost-effective than provision by physicians. This evidence provides clinicians and decision makers with an important tool that may influence policy and clinical practice and eventually increase numbers of abortion providers and reduce one barrier to women's access to safe abortion.

  11. Risk factors for cost-related medication non-adherence among older patients with diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James; X; Zhang; Jhee; U; Lee; David; O; Meltzer

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To assess the risk factors for cost-related medication non-adherence(CRN) among older patients with diabetes in the United States. METHODS: We used data from the 2010 Health and Retirement Study to assess risk factors for CRN including age, drug insurance coverage, nursing home residence, functional limitations, and frequency of hospitalization. CRN was self-reported. We conducted multivariate regression analysis to assess the effect of each risk factor. RESULTS: Eight hundred and seventy-five(18%) of 4880 diabetes patients reported CRN. Age less than 65 years, lack of drug insurance coverage, and frequent hospitalization significantly increased risk for CRN. Limitation in both activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living were also generally associated with increased risk of CRN. Residence in a nursing home and Medicaid coverage significantly reduced risk.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that expandingprescription coverage to uninsured, sicker, and community-dwelling individuals is likely to produce the largest decreases in CRN.

  12. The effects of health information technology on the costs and quality of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Leila

    2014-03-01

    Information technology has been linked to productivity growth in a wide variety of sectors, and health information technology (HIT) is a leading example of an innovation with the potential to transform industry-wide productivity. This paper analyzes the impact of health information technology (HIT) on the quality and intensity of medical care. Using Medicare claims data from 1998 to 2005, I estimate the effects of early investment in HIT by exploiting variation in hospitals' adoption statuses over time, analyzing 2.5 million inpatient admissions across 3900 hospitals. HIT is associated with a 1.3% increase in billed charges (p-value: 5.6%), and there is no evidence of cost savings even five years after adoption. Additionally, HIT adoption appears to have little impact on the quality of care, measured by patient mortality, adverse drug events, and readmission rates.

  13. Cost and Efficacy Assessment of an Alternative Medication Compliance Urine Drug Testing Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Kelly; Strathmann, Frederick G

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the frequency at which quantitative results provide additional clinical benefit compared to qualitative results alone. A comparison between alternative urine drug screens and conventional screens including the assessment of cost-to-payer differences, accuracy of prescription compliance or polypharmacy/substance abuse was also included. In a reference laboratory evaluation of urine specimens from across the United States, 213 urine specimens with provided prescription medication information (302 prescriptions) were analyzed by two testing algorithms: 1) conventional immunoassay screen with subsequent reflexive testing of positive results by quantitative mass spectrometry; and 2) a combined immunoassay/qualitative mass-spectrometry screen that substantially reduced the need for subsequent testing. The qualitative screen was superior to immunoassay with reflex to mass spectrometry in confirming compliance per prescription (226/302 vs 205/302), and identifying non-prescription abuse (97 vs 71). Pharmaceutical impurities and inconsistent drug metabolite patterns were detected in only 3.8% of specimens, suggesting that quantitative results have limited benefit. The percentage difference between the conventional testing algorithm and the alternative screen was projected to be 55%, and a 2-year evaluation of test utilization as a measure of test order volume follows an exponential trend for alternative screen test orders over conventional immunoassay screens that require subsequent confirmation testing. Alternative, qualitative urine drug screens provide a less expensive, faster, and more comprehensive evaluation of patient medication compliance and drug abuse. The vast majority of results were interpretable with qualitative results alone indicating a reduced need to automatically reflex to quantitation or provide quantitation for the majority of patients. This strategy highlights a successful approach using an alternative strategy for both the

  14. Treatment patterns, complications, and direct medical costs associated with ankylosing spondylitis in Chinese urban patients: a retrospective claims dataset analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinghu; Liu, Qingjing; Chen, Yi; Gao, Shuangqing; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Yicheng; Chen, Wendong

    2017-01-01

    To describe treatment pattern, complications, and direct medical costs associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) in Chinese urban patients. The 2013 China Health Insurance Research Association (CHIRA) urban insurance claims database was used to identify patients with AS. The identified patients were stratified by AS treatments for the comparisons of well established AS-related complications and direct medical costs. Conventional regression analyses adjusted the collected patient baseline characteristics to confirm the impact of treatments on complications and direct medical costs. Of the identified 1299 patients with AS, 18.0% received non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), 11.2% received immunosuppressant, 48.2% received NSAID plus immunosuppressant, 4.6% received biologic agents, and 17.9% received medications without indication for AS. Biologic group was associated with the lowest proportion of AS-related complications (8.3%) that was confirmed by multiple logistic regression analysis (odds ratio = 0.200, p = .017). The biologic group was also associated with highest direct medical costs (median: RMB = 14,539) that were confirmed by the multiple generalized linear model (coefficient = 1.644, p < .001). Biologics were not commonly used for AS in Chinese patients likely due to their high cost. Future studies are needed to confirm the potential long-term clinical benefits associated biologic treatment for AS.

  15. Medication cost problems among chronically ill adults in the US: did the financial crisis make a bad situation even worse?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piette JD

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available John D Piette1, Ann Marie Rosland1, Maria J Silveira1, Rodney Hayward1, Colleen A McHorney21Ann Arbor VA Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2US Outcomes Research, Merck and Co, Inc, North Wales, PA, USAAbstract: A national internet survey was conducted between March and April 2009 among 27,302 US participants in the Harris Interactive Chronic Illness Panel. Respondents reported behaviors related to cost-related medication non-adherence (CRN and the impacts of medication costs on other aspects of their daily lives. Among respondents aged 40–64 and looking for work, 66% reported CRN in 2008, and 41% did not fill a prescription due to cost pressures. More than half of respondents aged 40–64 and nearly two-thirds of those in this group who were looking for work or disabled reported other impacts of medication costs, such as cutting back on basic needs or increasing credit card debt. More than one-third of respondents aged 65+ who were working or looking for work reported CRN. Regardless of age or employment status, roughly half of respondents reporting medication cost hardship said that these problems had become more frequent in 2008 than before the economic recession. These data show that many chronically ill patients, particularly those looking for work or disabled, reported greater medication cost problems since the economic crisis began. Given links between CRN and worse health, the financial downturn may have had significant health consequences for adults with chronic illness.Keywords: medication adherence, cost-of-care, access to care, chronic disease

  16. Has increased clinical experience with methotrexate reduced the direct costs of medical management of ectopic pregnancy compared to surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westaby Daniel T

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a debate about the cost-efficiency of methotrexate for the management of ectopic pregnancy (EP, especially for patients presenting with serum human chorionic gonadotrophin levels of >1500 IU/L. We hypothesised that further experience with methotrexate, and increased use of guideline-based protocols, has reduced the direct costs of management with methotrexate. Methods We conducted a retrospective cost analysis on women treated for EP in a large UK teaching hospital to (1 investigate whether the cost of medical management is less expensive than surgical management for those patients eligible for both treatments and (2 to compare the cost of medical management for women with hCG concentrations 1500–3000 IU/L against those with similar hCG concentrations that elected for surgery. Three distinct treatment groups were identified: (1 those who had initial medical management with methotrexate, (2 those who were eligible for initial medical management but chose surgery (‘elected’ surgery and (3 those who initially ‘required’ surgery and did not meet the eligibility criteria for methotrexate. We calculated the costs from the point of view of the National Health Service (NHS in the UK. We summarised the cost per study group using the mean, standard deviation, median and range and, to account for the skewed nature of the data, we calculated 95% confidence intervals for differential costs using the nonparametric bootstrap method. Results Methotrexate was £1179 (CI 819–1550 per patient cheaper than surgery but there were no significant savings with methotrexate in women with hCG >1500 IU/L due to treatment failures. Conclusions Our data support an ongoing unmet economic need for better medical treatments for EP with hCG >1500 IU/L.

  17. Promoting emergency medical care systems in the developing world: weighing the costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, David R

    2011-01-01

    Despite the global health community's historical focus on providing basic, cost-effective primary health care delivered at the community level, recent trends in the developing world show increasing demand for the implementation of emergency care infrastructures, such as prehospital care systems and emergency departments, as well as specialised training programmes. However, the question remains whether, in a setting of limited global health care resources, it is logical to divert these already-sparse resources into the development of emergency care frameworks. The existing literature overwhelmingly supports the idea that emergency care systems, both community-based and within medical institutions, improve important outcomes, including significant morbidity and mortality. Crucial to the success of any public health or policy intervention, emergency care systems also seem to be strongly desired at the community and governmental levels. Integrating emergency care into existing health care systems will ideally rely on modest, low-cost steps to augment current models of primary health care delivery, focusing on adapting the lessons learned in the developed world to the unique needs and local variability of the rest of the globe.

  18. Cost-effectiveness of glaucoma management with monotherapy medications in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Abd-Elaal El-Khamery

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a serious chronic ophthalmic disease since it causes irreversible visual disability if untreated can lead to blindness. Treatment options include medications (classified into five major classes of drugs which are muscarinic cholinergic agonists, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, beta-1 adrenergic antagonists, prostaglandins [PGs], and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors; use of laser therapy or conventional surgery. Pharmacoeconomic analysis helps in choosing among this variety of treatments. There is a great need for such analysis in Egypt since undergoing of it in different countries or societies may produce different results. This work aimed to compare cost-effectiveness of bimatoprost 0.03% once daily versus brimonidine 0.2% twice daily and timolol 0.5% twice daily as monotherapy treatment in Egyptian patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Clinical data revealed that all treatments decreased intraocular pressure (IOP significantly but bimatoprost 0.03% showed the highest efficacy (27.7% decrease in IOP from baseline, while timolol 0.5% reduced IOP by 22.5% then brimonidine 0.2% which decreased IOP by 20.8%. From the cost-effectiveness view, it would be preferable to initiate treatment with timolol in case of absence of any contraindications. PG analog can be used as add-on therapy in low responder patients or as alternative treatment in case of presence of contraindication to use of beta blockers.

  19. 2015 South Carolina PV Soft Cost and Workforce Development Part 2: Six Month Confirmation of Anticipated Job Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, Elise B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Edwards, Thomas B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-01-31

    In 2015, a program was initiated to carefully track and monitor the growth of the solar industry in SC. Prior to then, little information was available on the costs associated with distributed photovoltaic (PV) installations in the Southeastern US. For this report, data were collected from businesses on the number of hires they had at the end of 2014 and compared with data for 2015 and June 2016. It was found that the percentage of installers within the state who serve the residential sector increased to 82% from 67%. During the same time period, the average size of initiated installations for residential, commercial, and utility scale installations all trended upwards. Where residential installations were typically 5 kW-DC in 2014, they were typically 10 kW-DC by late 2015 and in mid-2016. For commercial installations, the average size grew from 84 kW-DC in 2014 to between 136-236 kW-DC in 2015 and then 188-248 kWDC in mid-2016. An exception was seen in utility scale installations where a 2.3 MW-DC system was common in 2014, the size grew to be 5-15 MW-DC in late 2015. The average size dropped 3.1-4.4 MWDC in mid-June 2016, though individual averages up to 20 MW-DC were reported.

  20. Best practices: improving patient outcomes and costs in an ACO through comprehensive medication therapy management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel, Amanda; Lustig, Adam; Westrich, Kimberly; Evans, Michael A; Plank, Gary S; Penso, Jerry; Dubois, Robert W

    2014-12-01

    2007 data found that the percentage of diabetes patients optimally managed (as measured by a composite of hemoglobin A1c, low-density lipoprotein, blood pressure, aspirin use, and no smoking) was significantly higher for MTM patients (21% vs. 45%, P < 0.01). The Fairview MTM also showed a 12:1 return on investment (ROI) when comparing the overall health care costs of patients receiving MTM services with patients who did not receive those services. Developing an MTM program to manage and optimize pharmaceuticals will be a cornerstone to managing the health of a population. Important lessons have been learned that may be helpful to other health systems developing MTM programs. In an accountable care environment measuring the return on the investment of all care interventions, including MTM will be essential to maintain the program. The ACO will also have to be able to correctly identify which patients are candidates for MTM services and provide pharmacists with enough autonomy, including scheduling face-to-face interactions with patients and the ability to change prescriptions if necessary, to ensure that timely and effective care is delivered. In order for an ACO to deliver high quality patient-centered medication services, there must be clear lines of communication between providers, pharmacists, and the other care providers within the organization. Finally, a strong and visionary leader is critical to ensuring the success of an MTM program and ultimately the ACO itself. While there is a plethora of literature touting the benefits of either in-person or telephonic-based MTM, there is little research to date that directly compares these 2 MTM delivery types. It is critical for research to address the direct and indirect costs associated with starting and maintaining an MTM program. Information such as technologies required to start a program and length of time until a program breaks even or meets a sufficient ROI can be helpful for health care providers in similar

  1. Does a One-Size-Fits-All Cost-Sharing Approach Incentivize Appropriate Medication Use? A Roundtable on the Fairness and Ethics Associated with Variable Cost Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Jennifer S; Shih, Chuck; Barker, Thomas; Dieguez, Gabriela; Larson, Cheryl; Sherman, Helen; Dubois, Robert W

    2017-06-01

    Tiered formularies, in which patients pay copays or coinsurance out-of-pocket (OOP), are used to manage costs and encourage more efficient health care resource use. Formulary tiers are typically based on the cost of treatment rather than the medical appropriateness for the patient. Cost sharing may have unintended consequences on treatment adherence and health outcomes. Use of higher-cost, higher-tier medications can be due to a variety of factors, including unsuccessful treatment because of lack of efficacy or side effects, patient clinical or genetic characteristics, patient preferences to avoid potential side effects, or patient preferences based on the route of administration. For example, patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be required to fail low-cost generic treatments before obtaining coverage for a higher-tier tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor for which they would have a larger financial burden. Little is known about stakeholders' views on the acceptability of greater patient cost sharing if the individual patient characteristics lead to the higher-cost treatments. To identify and discuss the trade-offs associated with variable cost sharing in pharmacy benefits. To discuss the trade-offs associated with variable cost sharing in pharmacy benefits, we convened an expert roundtable of patient, payer, and employer representatives (panelists). Panelists reviewed background white papers, including an ethics framework; actuarial analysis; legal review; and stakeholder perspectives representing health plan, employer, and patient views. Using case studies, panelists were asked to consider (a) when it would be more (or less) acceptable to require higher cost sharing; (b) the optimal distribution of financial burdens across patients, all plan members, and employers; and (c) the existing barriers and potential solutions to align OOP costs with medically appropriate treatments. Panelists felt it was least acceptable for patients to have greater OOP costs if the

  2. [Care costs and activity in the last three months of life of cancer patients who died in the Basque Country (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuño-Solinís, Roberto; Herrera Molina, Emilio; Librada Flores, Silvia; Orueta Mendía, Juan F; Cabrera-León, Andrés

    2016-10-01

    To analyse the use of health resources and its budget in the last months of life of the population who died from malignant neoplasm in the Basque Autonomous Country (Spain). Retrospective observational study of a population with a diagnosis of malignancy deceased in the Basque Country (2010 and 2011). MDS and Mortality Register. gender, age, place of death, tumour location, clinical activity data and costs in the last three months of life. We performed a descriptive analysis of clinical activity and costs, and lineal multivariate regressions to obtain the adjusted mean costs by gender, age and place of death. 9,333 deaths from malignancy were identified in 2010 and 2011. 65.4% were men, 61.5% aged 70 or over, mean age 72.9 years, 71.1% died in hospital. People who died in the hospital had an average cost of about double that of the people who died at home (€14,794 and €7,491, respectively; p <0.001) and 31.3% higher than in the nursing home (€11,269; p <0.001). Greater interventions at the end of life at the community level are necessary, strengthening the care capacity of primary health care, both from training and support from expert teams in order to change the current care profile to a more outpatient care that allows a lower consumption of resources and greater care at home. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Mental health, help seeking, and stigma and barriers to care among 3- and 12-month postdeployed and never deployed U.S. Army Combat Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Paula L; Elnitsky, Christine; Pitts, Barbara; Figley, Charles; Thurman, Ryan M; Unwin, Brian

    2014-08-01

    U.S. Army Combat Medic serves as both Soldier and provider of combat casualty care, often in the heat of battle and with limited resources. Yet little is known about their help-seeking behavior and perceived stigma and barriers to care. Participants were three groups of U.S. Army Combat Medics surveyed at 3- and 12-months postdeployment from assignment with line units vs. those Medics who had never deployed to combat. The primary data source was surveys of mental health service utilization, perceived stigma and barriers to care, and depression and post-traumatic stress disorder screens. Medics who received help in the past year from a mental health professional ranged from 18% to 30%, with 18% to 30% seeking mental health assistance from other sources. Previously deployed Medics were more likely to obtain assistance than those who never deployed. Those meeting a mental health screening criteria were more likely to report associated stigma and barriers to care. Findings indicate that Medics in need of assistance report greater perceived barriers to mental health care, as well as stigma from seeking treatment, and that depression may be a salient issue for Medics. The longitudinal nature of the ongoing study will help determine the actual trajectory and onset of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  4. An economic toolkit for identifying the cost of emergency medical services (EMS) systems: detailed methodology of the EMS Cost Analysis Project (EMSCAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, E Brooke; Garrison, Herbert G; Nichol, Graham; Maio, Ronald F; Lookman, Hunaid A; Sheahan, William D; Franz, Timothy R; Austad, James D; Ginster, Aaron M; Spaite, Daniel W

    2012-02-01

    Calculating the cost of an emergency medical services (EMS) system using a standardized method is important for determining the value of EMS. This article describes the development of a methodology for calculating the cost of an EMS system to its community. This includes a tool for calculating the cost of EMS (the "cost workbook") and detailed directions for determining cost (the "cost guide"). The 12-step process that was developed is consistent with current theories of health economics, applicable to prehospital care, flexible enough to be used in varying sizes and types of EMS systems, and comprehensive enough to provide meaningful conclusions. It was developed by an expert panel (the EMS Cost Analysis Project [EMSCAP] investigator team) in an iterative process that included pilot testing the process in three diverse communities. The iterative process allowed ongoing modification of the toolkit during the development phase, based upon direct, practical, ongoing interaction with the EMS systems that were using the toolkit. The resulting methodology estimates EMS system costs within a user-defined community, allowing either the number of patients treated or the estimated number of lives saved by EMS to be assessed in light of the cost of those efforts. Much controversy exists about the cost of EMS and whether the resources spent for this purpose are justified. However, the existence of a validated toolkit that provides a standardized process will allow meaningful assessments and comparisons to be made and will supply objective information to inform EMS and community officials who are tasked with determining the utilization of scarce societal resources.

  5. Recovery of cost of hospital and medical care and treatment furnished by the United States; delegation of authority. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    This rule amends Department of Justice regulations to increase the settlement and waiver authority delegated to heads of departments and agencies of the United States responsible for the furnishing of hospital, medical, surgical, or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the current level of delegated settlement and waiver authority was established, and will further the efficient operation of the government.

  6. Retrospective cost comparison of chiropractic versus medical treatment of back pain in a typical South African mechanised underground mining environment

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    M. Tech. It is well known internationally that the high prevalence of back pain costs the economies of the world many billions of dollars annually. This has prompted a great deal of research abroad into means of reducing the deleterious economic effects of back pain. One of the results of this research is the realisation that Chiropractic treatment of back pain offers an efficacious and cost effective alternative to the conventional medical treatments currently employed in most countries. ...

  7. Ethical acceptability of offering financial incentives for taking antipsychotic depot medication: patients' and clinicians' perspectives after a 12-month randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordraven, Ernst L; Schermer, Maartje H N; Blanken, Peter; Mulder, Cornelis L; Wierdsma, André I

    2017-08-29

    A randomized controlled trial 'Money for Medication'(M4M) was conducted in which patients were offered financial incentives for taking antipsychotic depot medication. This study assessed the attitudes and ethical considerations of patients and clinicians who participated in this trial. Three mental healthcare institutions in secondary psychiatric care in the Netherlands participated in this study. Patients (n = 169), 18-65 years, diagnosed with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder or another psychotic disorder who had been prescribed antipsychotic depot medication, were randomly assigned to receive 12 months of either treatment as usual plus a financial reward for each depot of medication received (intervention group) or treatment as usual alone (control group). Structured questionnaires were administered after the 12-month intervention period. Data were available for 133 patients (69 control and 64 intervention) and for 97 clinicians. Patients (88%) and clinicians (81%) indicated that financial incentives were a good approach to improve medication adherence. Ethical concerns were categorized according to the four-principles approach (autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, and justice). Patients and clinicians alike mentioned various advantages of M4M in clinical practice, such as increased medication adherence and improved illness insight; but also disadvantages such as reduced intrinsic motivation, loss of autonomy and feelings of dependence. Overall, patients evaluated financial incentives as an effective method of improving medication adherence and were willing to accept this reward during clinical treatment. Clinicians were also positive about the use of this intervention in daily practice. Ethical concerns are discussed in terms of patient autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. We conclude that this intervention is ethically acceptable under certain conditions, and that further research is necessary to clarify issues of benefit

  8. Attitudes on cost-effectiveness and equity: a cross-sectional study examining the viewpoints of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David G; Wong, Gordon X; Martin, David T; Tybor, David J; Kim, Jennifer; Lasker, Jeffrey; Mitty, Roger; Salem, Deeb

    2017-08-01

    To determine the attitudes of physicians and trainees in regard to the roles of both cost-effectiveness and equity in clinical decision making. In this cross-sectional study, electronic surveys containing a hypothetical decision-making scenario were sent to medical professionals to select between two colon cancer screening tests for a population. Three Greater Boston academic medical institutions: Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Centre and Lahey Hospital and Medical Centre. 819 medical students, 497 residents-in-training and 671 practising physicians were contacted electronically using institutional and organisational directories. Stratified opinions of medical providers and trainee subgroups regarding cost-effectiveness and equity. A total of 881 respondents comprising 512 medical students, 133 medical residents-in-training and 236 practising physicians completed the survey (total response rate 44.3%). Thirty-six per cent of medical students, 44% of residents-in-training and 53% of practising physicians favoured the less effective and more equitable screening test. Residents-in-training (OR 1.49, CI 1.01 to 2.21; p=0.044) and practising physicians (OR 2.12, CI 1.54 to 2.92; pmedical students. Moreover, female responders across all three cohorts favoured the more equitable screening test to a greater degree than did male responders (OR 1.70, CI 1.29 to 2.24; pmedical professionals place on equity. Among medical professionals, practising physicians appear to be more egalitarian than residents-in-training, while medical students appear to be most utilitarian and cost-effective. Meanwhile, female respondents in all three cohorts favoured the more equitable option to a greater degree than their male counterparts. Healthcare policies that trade off equity in favour of cost-effectiveness may be unacceptable to many medical professionals, especially practising physicians and women. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  9. Effects of shared medical appointments on quality of life and cost-effectiveness for patients with a chronic neuromuscular disease. Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wilt Gert-Jan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shared medical appointments are a series of one-to-one doctor-patient contacts, in presence of a group of 6-10 fellow patients. This group visits substitute the annual control visits of patients with the neurologist. The same items attended to in a one-to- one appointment are addressed. The possible advantages of a shared medical appointment could be an added value to the present management of neuromuscular patients. The currently problem-focused one-to-one out-patient visits often leave little time for the patient's psychosocial needs, patient education, and patient empowerment. Methods/design A randomized, prospective controlled study (RCT with a follow up of 6 months will be conducted to evaluate the clinical and cost-effectiveness of shared medical appointments compared to usual care for 300 neuromuscular patients and their partners at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center. Every included patient will be randomly allocated to one of the two study arms. This study has been reviewed and approved by the medical ethics committee of the region Arnhem-Nijmegen, the Netherlands. The primary outcome measure is quality of life as measured by the EQ-5D, SF-36 and the Individualized neuromuscular Quality of Life Questionnaire. The primary analysis will be an intention-to-treat analysis on the area under the curve of the quality of life scores. A linear mixed model will be used with random factor group and fixed factors treatment, baseline score and type of neuromuscular disease. For the economic evaluation an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis will be conducted from a societal perspective, relating differences in costs to difference in health outcome. Results are expected in 2012. Discussion This study will be the first randomized controlled trial which evaluates the effect of shared medical appointments versus usual care for neuromuscular patients. This will enable to determine if there is additional value of shared

  10. Introducing systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (telephone-CPR) in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System (AMPDS): implementation process and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dami, Fabrice; Fuchs, Vincent; Praz, Laurent; Vader, John-Paul

    2010-07-01

    In order to improve the quality of our Emergency Medical Services (EMS), to raise bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates and thereby meet what is becoming a universal standard in terms of quality of emergency services, we decided to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted or telephone-CPR (T-CPR) in our medical dispatch center, a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System. The aim of this article is to describe the implementation process, costs and results following the introduction of this new "quality" procedure. This was a prospective study. Over an 8-week period, our EMS dispatchers were given new procedures to provide T-CPR. We then collected data on all non-traumatic cardiac arrests within our state (Vaud, Switzerland) for the following 12 months. For each event, the dispatchers had to record in writing the reason they either ruled out cardiac arrest (CA) or did not propose T-CPR in the event they did suspect CA. All emergency call recordings were reviewed by the medical director of the EMS. The analysis of the recordings and the dispatchers' written explanations were then compared. During the 12-month study period, a total of 497 patients (both adults and children) were identified as having a non-traumatic cardiac arrest. Out of this total, 203 cases were excluded and 294 cases were eligible for T-CPR. Out of these eligible cases, dispatchers proposed T-CPR on 202 occasions (or 69% of eligible cases). They also erroneously proposed T-CPR on 17 occasions when a CA was wrongly identified (false positive). This represents 7.8% of all T-CPR. No costs were incurred to implement our study protocol and procedures. This study demonstrates it is possible, using a brief campaign of sensitization but without any specific training, to implement systematic dispatcher-assisted cardiopulmonary resuscitation in a non-Advanced Medical Priority Dispatch System such as our EMS that had no prior experience with systematic T-CPR. The results in terms of T-CPR delivery

  11. A pharmacist-led information technology intervention for medication errors (PINCER): a multicentre, cluster randomised, controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Anthony J; Rodgers, Sarah; Cantrill, Judith A; Armstrong, Sarah; Cresswell, Kathrin; Eden, Martin; Elliott, Rachel A; Howard, Rachel; Kendrick, Denise; Morris, Caroline J; Prescott, Robin J; Swanwick, Glen; Franklin, Matthew; Putman, Koen; Boyd, Matthew; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-04-07

    Medication errors are common in primary care and are associated with considerable risk of patient harm. We tested whether a pharmacist-led, information technology-based intervention was more effective than simple feedback in reducing the number of patients at risk of measures related to hazardous prescribing and inadequate blood-test monitoring of medicines 6 months after the intervention. In this pragmatic, cluster randomised trial general practices in the UK were stratified by research site and list size, and randomly assigned by a web-based randomisation service in block sizes of two or four to one of two groups. The practices were allocated to either computer-generated simple feedback for at-risk patients (control) or a pharmacist-led information technology intervention (PINCER), composed of feedback, educational outreach, and dedicated support. The allocation was masked to researchers and statisticians involved in processing and analysing the data. The allocation was not masked to general practices, pharmacists, patients, or researchers who visited practices to extract data. [corrected]. Primary outcomes were the proportions of patients at 6 months after the intervention who had had any of three clinically important errors: non-selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) prescribed to those with a history of peptic ulcer without co-prescription of a proton-pump inhibitor; β blockers prescribed to those with a history of asthma; long-term prescription of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor or loop diuretics to those 75 years or older without assessment of urea and electrolytes in the preceding 15 months. The cost per error avoided was estimated by incremental cost-effectiveness analysis. This study is registered with Controlled-Trials.com, number ISRCTN21785299. 72 general practices with a combined list size of 480,942 patients were randomised. At 6 months' follow-up, patients in the PINCER group were significantly less likely to have

  12. Association between health literacy and medical care costs in an integrated healthcare system: a regional population based study.

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    Haun, Jolie N; Patel, Nitin R; French, Dustin D; Campbell, Robert R; Bradham, Douglas D; Lapcevic, William A

    2015-06-27

    Low health literacy is associated with higher health care utilization and costs; however, no large-scale studies have demonstrated this in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). This research evaluated the association between veterans' health literacy and their subsequent VHA health care costs across a three-year period. This retrospective study used a Generalized Linear Model to estimate the relative association between a patient's health literacy and VHA medical costs, adjusting for covariates. Secondary data sources included electronic health records and administrative data in the VHA (e.g., Medical and DCG SAS Datasets and DSS-National Data Extracts). Health literacy assessments and identifiers were electronically retrieved from the originating health system. Demographic and cost data were retrieved from the VHA centralized databases for the corresponding patients who had VHA use in all three years. In a study of 92,749 veterans with service utilization from 2007-2009, average per patient cost for those with inadequate and marginal health literacy was significantly higher ($31,581 [95 % CI: $30,186 - $32,975]; $23,508 [95 % CI: $22,749 - $24,268]) than adequate health literacy ($17,033 [95 % CI: $16,810 - $17,255]). Estimated three-year cost associated with veterans' with marginal and inadequate health literacy was $143 million dollars more than those with adequate health literacy. Analyses suggest when controlling for other person-level factors within the VHA integrated healthcare system, lower health literacy is a significant independent factor associated with increased health care utilization and costs. This study confirms the association of lower health literacy with higher medical service utilization and pharmacy costs for veterans enrolled in the VHA. Confirmation of higher costs of care associated with lower health literacy suggests that interventions might be designed to remediate health literacy needs and reduce expenditures. These analyses suggest

  13. A rural cancer outreach program lowers patient care costs and benefits both the rural hospitals and sponsoring academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desch, C E; Grasso, M A; McCue, M J; Buonaiuto, D; Grasso, K; Johantgen, M K; Shaw, J E; Smith, T J

    1999-01-01

    The Rural Cancer Outreach Program (RCOP) between two rural hospitals and the Medical College of Virginia's Massey Cancer Center (MCC) was developed to bring state-of-the-art cancer care to medically underserved rural patients. The financial impact of the RCOP on both the rural hospitals and the MCC was analyzed. Pre- and post-RCOP financial data were collected on 1,745 cancer patients treated at the participating centers, two rural community hospitals and the MCC. The main outcome measures were costs (estimated reimbursement from all sources), revenues, contribution margins and profit (or loss) of the program. The RCOP may have enhanced access to cancer care for rural patients at less cost to society. The net annual cost per patient fell from $10,233 to $3,862 associated with more use of outpatient services, more efficient use of resources, and the shift to a less expensive locus of care. The cost for each rural patient admitted to the Medical College of Virginia fell by more than 40 percent compared with only an 8 percent decrease for all other cancer patients. The rural hospitals experienced rapid growth of their programs to more than 200 new patients yearly, and the RCOP generated significant profits for them. MCC benefited from increased referrals from RCOP service areas by 330 percent for cancer patients and by 9 percent for non-cancer patients during the same time period. While it did not generate a major profit for the MCC, the RCOP generated enough revenue to cover costs of the program. The RCOP had a positive financial impact on the rural and academic medical center hospitals, provided state-of-the-art care near home for rural patients and was associated with lower overall cancer treatment costs.

  14. Vital signs: health burden and medical costs of nonfatal injuries to motor vehicle occupants - United States, 2012.

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    Bergen, Gwen; Peterson, Cora; Ederer, David; Florence, Curtis; Haileyesus, Tadesse; Kresnow, Marcie-jo; Xu, Likang

    2014-10-10

    Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury in the United States. The purpose of this study was to describe the current health burden and medical and work loss costs of nonfatal crash injuries among vehicle occupants in the United States. CDC analyzed data on emergency department (ED) visits resulting from nonfatal crash injuries among vehicle occupants in 2012 using the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System – All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). The number and rate of all ED visits for the treatment of crash injuries that resulted in the patient being released and the number and rate of hospitalizations for the treatment of crash injuries were estimated, as were the associated number of hospital days and lifetime medical and work loss costs. In 2012, an estimated 2,519,471 ED visits resulted from nonfatal crash injuries, with an estimated lifetime medical cost of $18.4 billion (2012 U.S. dollars). Approximately 7.5% of these visits resulted in hospitalizations that required an estimated 1,057,465 hospital days in 2012. Nonfatal crash injuries occur frequently and result in substantial costs to individuals, employers, and society. For each motor vehicle crash death in 2012, eight persons were hospitalized, and 100 were treated and released from the ED. Public health practices and laws, such as primary seat belt laws, child passenger restraint laws, ignition interlocks to prevent alcohol impaired driving, sobriety checkpoints, and graduated driver licensing systems have demonstrated effectiveness for reducing motor vehicle crashes and injuries. They might also substantially reduce associated ED visits, hospitalizations, and medical costs.

  15. Medical resource utilization and associated costs in patients with ulcerative colitis in the UK: a chart review analysis.

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    Bodger, Keith; Yen, Linnette; Szende, Agota; Sharma, Gunjan; Chen, Yaozhu J; McDermott, John; Hodgkins, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Limited evidence is available on the economic burden of ulcerative colitis (UC) in the UK, particularly relating to the impact of relapse frequency on direct medical costs. This study identifies and assesses medical resource utilization (MRU) and associated direct costs in mild and moderate UC patients in the UK. A retrospective chart review of patients with mild-to-moderate UC diagnosed at least 1 year before the study was performed. From 33 general practitioner (GP) and 34 gastroenterologist sites, charts of the last three UC patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria were reviewed. Descriptive statistics were calculated for MRU and 2011 costs (GB£) by number of relapses. The study population included 201 patients with a mean age of 39.9 years; 44% were women and the mean disease duration was 7.4 years. UC-related costs of each MRU category increased with the number of relapses. Comparing patients without relapse with those with more than two relapses, the mean annual UC-related costs were £14 versus £2556 for hospitalizations; £218 versus £988 for visits (including nurse, GP, specialist, and other visits); £21 versus £1303 for procedures; £17 versus £188 for diagnostics; and £1168 versus £6660 for all-cause total costs. Age, sex, and site of data reporting (GP vs. gastroenterologist) were not associated with MRU or costs. Patients with mild-to-moderate UC incurred considerable costs that increased markedly with the number of relapses. These findings support the importance of maintenance therapies in UC that reduce or prevent relapses. Quantifying the relationship between relapse rate and costs will inform future health economic studies.

  16. Legal medical consideration of Alzheimer’s disease patients’ dysgraphia and cognitive dysfunction a 6 month follow up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onofri E

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Onofri,1 Marco Mercuri,1 Trevor Archer,2 Max Rapp-Ricciardi,2 Serafino Ricci1 1Department of Anatomy, Histology, Legal Medicine and Orthopaedics, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients to express intentions and desires, and their decision-making capacity. This study examines the findings from a 6-month follow-up of our previous results in which 30 patients participated. Materials and methods: The patient’s cognition was examined by conducting the tests of 14 questions and letter-writing ability over a period of 19 days, and it was repeated after 6 months. The difference between these two cognitive measures (PQ1 before–PQ2 before, tested previously and later the writing test, was designated DΔ before. The test was repeated after 6 months, and PQ1 after–PQ2 after was designated DΔ after. Results: Several markedly strong relationships between dysgraphia and other measures of cognitive performance in AD patients were observed. The most aged patients (over 86 years, despite less frequency, maintain the cognitive capacity manifested in the graphic expressions. A document, written by an AD patient presents an honest expression of the patient’s intention if that document is legible, clear, and comprehensive. Conclusion: The identification of impairment/deficits in writing and cognition during different phases of AD may facilitate the understanding of disease progression and identify the occasions during which the patient may be considered sufficiently lucid to make decisions. Keywords: cognition, intentions, unfit to plead, consent

  17. Trends in asthma-related direct medical costs from 2002 to 2007 in British Columbia, Canada: a population based-cohort study.

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    Pierrick Bedouch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Asthma-related health resource use and costs may be influenced by increasing asthma prevalence, changes to asthma management guidelines, and new medications over the last decade. The objective of this work was to analyze direct asthma-related medical costs, and trends in total and per-patient costs of hospitalizations, physician visits, and medications. METHODS: A cohort of asthma patients from British Columbia (BC, Canada, was created. Asthma patients were identified using a validated case definition. Costs for hospitalizations, physician visits, and medications were calculated from billing records (in 2008 Canadian dollars. Trends in total and per-patient costs over the study period were analyzed using Generalized Linear Models. RESULTS: 398,235 patients satisfied the asthma case definition (mid-point prevalence 8.0%. Patients consumed $315.9 million (M in direct asthma-related health resources between 2002 and 2007. Hospitalizations, physician visits, and medication costs accounted for 16.0%, 15.7% and 68.2% of total costs, respectively. Cost of asthma increased from $49.4 M in 2002 to $54.7 M in 2007. Total annual costs attributable to hospitalizations and physician visits decreased (-39.8% and -25.5%, respectively; p<0.001, while medication costs increased (+38.7%; p<0.001. INTERPRETATION: This population-based analysis shows that the total direct cost of asthma in BC has increased since 2002, mainly due to a rise in asthma prevalence and cost of medication. Combination therapy with inhaled corticosteroids/long-acting beta-agonists has become a significant component of the cost of asthma. Although billing records capture only a fraction of the true burden of asthma, the simultaneous increase in medication costs and reductions in hospitalization and physician visit costs provides valuable insight for policy makers into the shifts in asthma-related resource use.

  18. Knowledge of the Costs of Diagnostic Imaging: A Survey of Physician Trainees at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Duszak, Richard; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2016-11-01

    To study the awareness of postgraduate physician trainees across a variety of specialties regarding the costs of common imaging examinations. During early 2016, we conducted an online survey of all 1,238 physicians enrolled in internships, residencies, and fellowships at a large academic medical center. Respondents were asked to estimate Medicare national average total allowable fees for five commonly performed examinations: two-view chest radiograph, contrast-enhanced CT abdomen and pelvis, unenhanced MRI lumbar spine, complete abdominal ultrasound, and unenhanced CT brain. Responses within ±25% of published amounts were deemed correct. Respondents were also asked about specialty, postgraduate year of training, previous radiology education, and estimated number of imaging examinations ordered per week. A total of 381 of 1,238 trainees returned complete surveys (30.8%). Across all five examinations, only 5.7% (109/1,905) of responses were within the correct ±25% range. A total of 76.4% (291/381) of all respondents incorrectly estimated every examination's cost. Estimation accuracy was not associated with number of imaging examinations ordered per week or year of training. There was no significant difference in cost estimation accuracy between those who participated in medical school radiology electives and those who did not (P = .14). Only 17.5% of trainees considered their imaging cost knowledge adequate. Overall, 75.3% desire integration of cost data into clinical decision support and/or computerized physician order entry systems. Postgraduate physician trainees across all disciplines demonstrate limited awareness of the costs of commonly ordered imaging examinations. Targeted medical school education and integration of imaging cost information into clinical decision support / computerized physician order entry systems seems indicated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mortality-related factors disparity among Iranian deceased children aged 1-59 months according to the medical activities in emergency units: National mortality surveillance system

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    Roya Kelishadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine disparity in mortality-related factors in 1-59 months children across Iran using hospital records of emergency units. Materials and Methods: After designing and validating a national questionnaire for mortality data collection of children 1-59 months, all 40 medical universities has been asked to fill in the questionnaires and return to the main researcher in the Ministry of Health and Medical Education. Age and sex of deceased children, the type of health center, staying more than 2 h in emergency unit, the reason of prolonged stay in emergency, having emergency (risk signs, vaccination, need to blood transfusion, need to electroshock and so on have also been collected across the country. There was also a comparison of children based on their BMI. Chi-square test has been applied for nominal and ordinal variables. ANOVA and t-student test have been used for measuring the difference of continuous variables among groups. Results: Mortality in 1-59 months children was unequally distributed across Iran. The average month of entrance to hospital was June, the average day was 16 th of month, and the average hour of entrance to hospital was 14:00. The average of month, day and hour for discharge was July, 16, and 14:00, respectively. The hour of discharge was statistically significant between children with and without risk signs. More than half (54% of patients had referred to educational hospital emergency units. There were no statistically significant differences between children with and without emergency signs. There were statistically significant differences between children with and without emergency signs in age less than 24 months (0.034, nutrition situation ( P = 0.031, recommendation for referring ( P = 0.013, access to electroshock facilities ( P = 0.026, and having successful cardiopulmonary resuscitation ( P = 0.01. Conclusion: This study is one of the first to show the distribution of the disparity of early

  20. Cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women: impact of medication persistence and adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingsheng; Si, Lei; Winzenberg, Tania M; Gu, Jieruo; Jiang, Qicheng; Palmer, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Aims Raloxifene treatment of osteoporotic fractures is clinically effective, but economic evidence in support of raloxifene reimbursement is lacking in the People’s Republic of China. We aimed at evaluating the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures using an osteoporosis health economic model. We also assessed the impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of raloxifene. Methods We used a previously developed and validated osteoporosis state-transition microsimulation model to compare treatment with raloxifene with current practices of osteoporotic fracture treatment (conventional treatment) from the health care payer’s perspective. A Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis with microsimulations was conducted. The impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene was addressed in sensitivity analyses. The simulated patients used in the model’s initial state were 65-year-old postmenopausal Chinese women with osteoporosis (but without previous fractures), simulated using a 1-year cycle length until all patients had died. Costs were presented in 2015 US dollars (USD), and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The willingness-to-pay threshold was set at USD 20,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Results Treatment with raloxifene improved clinical effectiveness by 0.006 QALY, with additional costs of USD 221 compared with conventional treatment. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 36,891 per QALY gained. The cost-effectiveness decision did not change in most of the one-way sensitivity analyses. With full raloxifene persistence and adherence, average effectiveness improved compared with the real-world scenario, and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was USD 40,948 per QALY gained compared with conventional treatment. Conclusion Given the willingness-to-pay threshold

  1. Cost-effectiveness of a health-social partnership transitional program for post-discharge medical patients

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    Wong Frances Kam Yuet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Readmissions are costly and have implications for quality of care. Studies have been reported to support effects of transitional care programs in reducing hospital readmissions and enhancing clinical outcomes. However, there is a paucity of studies executing full economic evaluation to assess the cost-effectiveness of these transitional care programs. This study is therefore launched to fill this knowledge gap. Methods Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted alongside a randomized controlled trial that examined the effects of a Health-Social Transitional Care Management Program (HSTCMP for medical patients discharged from an acute regional hospital in Hong Kong. The cost and health outcomes were compared between the patients receiving the HSTCMP and usual care. The total costs comprised the pre-program, program, and healthcare utilization costs. Quality of life was measured with SF-36 and transformed to utility values between 0 and 1. Results The readmission rates within 28 (control 10.2%, study 4.0% and 84 days (control 19.4%, study 8.1% were significantly higher in the control group. Utility values showed no difference between the control and study groups at baseline (p = 0.308. Utility values for the study group were significantly higher than in the control group at 28 (p  Conclusions Previous studies on transitional care focused mainly on clinical outcomes and not too many included cost as an outcome measure. Studies examining the cost-effectiveness of the post-discharge support services are scanty. This study is the first to examine the cost-effectiveness of a transitional care program that used nurse-led services participated by volunteers. Results have shown that a health-social partnership transitional care program is cost-effective in reducing healthcare costs and attaining QALY gains. Economic evaluation helps to inform funders and guide decisions for the effective use of competing healthcare resources.

  2. Medical resource utilization and costs associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in the USA: a retrospective matched cohort analysis of private insurer data

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    Knight T

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Tyler Knight,1 Caroline Schaefer,1 Holly Krasa,2 Dorothee Oberdhan,2 Arlene Chapman,3 Ronald D Perrone4 1Covance Market Access Services Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, 2Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development and Commercialization, Inc., Rockville, MD, 3Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 4Tufts Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Background: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD results in kidney cyst development and enlargement, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD leading to renal failure. This study sought to determine if ADPKD patients in the early stages of CKD contribute to a sizable economic burden for the US health care system. Methods: This was a retrospective, matched cohort study, reviewing medical resource utilization (MRU and costs for adults in a US private-payer claims database with a diagnosis code of ADPKD (ICD-9-CM 753.13. ADPKD patients were matched by age grouping (0–17, 18–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, and 65+ years and sex to controls to understand the burden of ADPKD. Descriptive statistics on 6-month MRU and costs were assessed by CKD stages, dialysis use, or previous renal transplant. Results: The analysis included ADPKD patients in CKD stages 1–5 (n=316 to n=860, dialysis (n=586, and post-transplant (n=615. Mean ages did not differ across CKD stages (range 43–56 years. Men were the majority in the later stages but the minority in the early stages. The proportion of patients with at least one hospitalization increased with CKD stage, (12% to >40% CKD stage 2 to stage 5, dialysis or post-transplant. The majority had at least one hospital outpatient visit and at least one pharmacy claim. Total 6-month per-patient costs were greater among ADPKD patients than in age-matched and sex-matched healthy non-ADPKD controls (P<0.001 for all comparisons. Conclusion: ADPKD patients with normal kidney function are associated with a significant economic burden to the health care system

  3. Medical resource utilization and costs associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in the USA: a retrospective matched cohort analysis of private insurer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Tyler; Schaefer, Caroline; Krasa, Holly; Oberdhan, Dorothee; Chapman, Arlene; Perrone, Ronald D

    2015-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) results in kidney cyst development and enlargement, resulting in chronic kidney disease (CKD) leading to renal failure. This study sought to determine if ADPKD patients in the early stages of CKD contribute to a sizable economic burden for the US health care system. Methods This was a retrospective, matched cohort study, reviewing medical resource utilization (MRU) and costs for adults in a US private-payer claims database with a diagnosis code of ADPKD (ICD-9-CM 753.13). ADPKD patients were matched by age grouping (0–17, 18–34, 35–44, 45–54, 55–64, and 65+ years) and sex to controls to understand the burden of ADPKD. Descriptive statistics on 6-month MRU and costs were assessed by CKD stages, dialysis use, or previous renal transplant. Results The analysis included ADPKD patients in CKD stages 1–5 (n=316 to n=860), dialysis (n=586), and post-transplant (n=615). Mean ages did not differ across CKD stages (range 43–56 years). Men were the majority in the later stages but the minority in the early stages. The proportion of patients with at least one hospitalization increased with CKD stage, (12% to >40% CKD stage 2 to stage 5, dialysis or post-transplant). The majority had at least one hospital outpatient visit and at least one pharmacy claim. Total 6-month per-patient costs were greater among ADPKD patients than in age-matched and sex-matched healthy non-ADPKD controls (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Conclusion ADPKD patients with normal kidney function are associated with a significant economic burden to the health care system relative to the general population. Any treatments that delay progression to later stages of CKD may provide potential health care cost offsets. PMID:25759590

  4. Pregabalin versus SSRIs and SNRIs in benzodiazepine-refractory outpatients with generalized anxiety disorder: a post hoc cost-effectiveness analysis in usual medical practice in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Salas-Cansado M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Marina De Salas-Cansado,1 José M Olivares,2 Enrique Álvarez,3 Jose L Carrasco,4 Andoni Barrueta,5 Javier Rejas,51Trial Form Support Spain, Madrid; 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Meixoeiro, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario, Vigo; 3Department of Psychiatry, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau, Barcelona; 4Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid; 5Health Outcomes Research Department, Medical Unit, Pfizer Spain, Alcobendas, Madrid, SpainBackground: Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD is a prevalent health condition which seriously affects both patient quality of life and the National Health System. The aim of this research was to carry out a post hoc cost-effectiveness analysis of the effect of pregabalin versus selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs/serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs in treated benzodiazepine-refractory outpatients with GAD.Methods: This post hoc cost-effectiveness analysis used secondary data extracted from the 6-month cohort, prospective, noninterventional ADAN study, which was conducted to ascertain the cost of illness in GAD subjects diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria. Benzodiazepine-refractory subjects were those who claimed persistent symptoms of anxiety and showed a suboptimal response (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale ≥16 to benzodiazepines, alone or in combination, over 6 months. Patients could switch to pregabalin (as monotherapy or addon or to an SSRI or SNRI, alone or in combination. Effectiveness was expressed as quality-adjusted life years gained, and the perspective was that of the National Health System in the year 2008. A sensitivity analysis was performed using bootstrapping techniques (10,000 resamples were obtained in order to obtain a cost-effectiveness plane and a corresponding acceptability curve.Results: A total of 282 subjects (mean Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale score 25.8 were

  5. Pulmonary rehabilitation coupled with negative pressure ventilation decreases decline in lung function, hospitalizations, and medical cost in COPD: A 5-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hung-Yu; Chou, Pai-Chien; Joa, Wen-Ching; Chen, Li-Fei; Sheng, Te-Fang; Lin, Horng-Chyuan; Yang, Lan-Yan; Pan, Yu-Bin; Chung, Fu-Tsai; Wang, Chun-Hua; Kuo, Han-Pin

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) brings benefits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Negative pressure ventilation (NPV) increases ventilation and decreases hyperinflation as well as breathing work in COPD. We evaluated the long-term effects of a hospital-based PR program coupled with NPV support in patients with COPD on clinical outcomes.One hundred twenty-nine patients with COPD were followed up for more than 5 years, with the NPV group (n = 63) receiving the support of NPV (20-30 cm H2O delivery pressure for 60 min) and unsupervised home exercise program of 20 to 30 min daily walk, while the control group (n = 6) only received unsupervised home exercise program. Pulmonary function tests and 6 min walk tests (6MWT) were performed every 3 to 6 months. Emergency room (ER) visits and hospitalization with medical costs were recorded.A significant time-by-group interaction in the yearly decline of forced expiratory volume in 1 s in the control group analyzed by mixed-model repeated-measure analysis was found (P = 0.048). The 6MWT distance of the NPV group was significantly increased during the first 4 years, with the interaction of time and group (P = 0.003), the time alone (P = 0.014), and the quadratic time (P function, exacerbations, and hospitalization rates, and improved walking distance and medical costs in patients with COPD during a 5-year observation.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women: impact of medication persistence and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mingsheng Chen,1 Lei Si,2,3 Tania M Winzenberg,2,4 Jieruo Gu,5 Qicheng Jiang,3 Andrew J Palmer2 1School of Health Policy & Management, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People’s Republic of China; 2Menzies Institute for Medical Research, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 3School of Health Administration, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, People’s Republic of China; 4School of Medicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia; 5Department of Rheumatology, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Aims: Raloxifene treatment of osteoporotic fractures is clinically effective, but economic evidence in support of raloxifene reimbursement is lacking in the People’s Republic of China. We aimed at evaluating the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene in the treatment of osteoporotic fractures using an osteoporosis health economic model. We also assessed the impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of raloxifene.Methods: We used a previously developed and validated osteoporosis state-transition microsimulation model to compare treatment with raloxifene with current practices of osteoporotic fracture treatment (conventional treatment from the health care payer’s perspective. A Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis with microsimulations was conducted. The impact of medication persistence and adherence on clinical outcomes and the cost-effectiveness of raloxifene was addressed in sensitivity analyses. The simulated patients used in the model’s initial state were 65-year-old postmenopausal Chinese women with osteoporosis (but without previous fractures, simulated using a 1-year cycle length until all patients had died. Costs were presented in 2015 US dollars (USD, and costs and effectiveness were discounted at 3% annually. The willingness-to-pay threshold was set at USD 20,000 per quality

  7. Primary care team communication networks, team climate, quality of care, and medical costs for patients with diabetes: A cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Agneessens, Filip; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Kamnetz, Sandra A.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care teams play an important role in providing the best quality of care to patients with diabetes. Little evidence is available on how team communication networks and team climate contribute to high quality diabetes care. Objective To determine whether primary care team communication and team climate are associated with health outcomes, health care utilization, and associated costs for patients with diabetes. Methods A cross-sectional survey of primary care team members collected information on frequency of communication with other care team members about patient care and on team climate. Patient outcomes (glycemic, cholesterol, and blood pressure control, urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital visit days, medical costs) in the past 12 months for team diabetes patient panels were extracted from the electronic health record. The data were analyzed using nested (clinic/team/patient) generalized linear mixed modeling. Participants 155 health professionals at 6 U.S. primary care clinics participated from May through December 2013. Results Primary care teams with a greater number of daily face-to-face communication ties among team members were associated with 52% (Rate Ratio=0.48, 95% CI: 0.22, 0.94) fewer hospital days and US$1220 (95% CI: -US$2416, -US$24) lower health-care costs per team diabetes patient in the past 12 months. In contrast, for each additional registered nurse (RN) who reported frequent daily face-to-face communication about patient care with the primary care practitioner (PCP), team diabetes patients had less-controlled HbA1c (Odds Ratio=0.83, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99), increased hospital days (RR=1.57, 95% CI: 1.10, 2.03), and higher healthcare costs (β=US$877, 95% CI: US$42, US$1713). Shared team vision, a measure of team climate, significantly mediated the relationship between team communication and patient outcomes. Conclusions Primary care teams which relied on frequent daily face-to-face communication among more

  8. Maternal educational level, parental preventive behavior, risk behavior, social support and medical care consumption in 8-month-old children in Malmö, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangrio Elisabeth

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The social environment in which children grow up is closely associated with their health. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between maternal educational level, parental preventive behavior, parental risk behavior, social support, and use of medical care in small children in Malmö, Sweden. We also wanted to investigate whether potential differences in child medical care consumption could be explained by differences in parental behavior and social support. Methods This study was population-based and cross-sectional. The study population was 8 month-old children in Malmö, visiting the Child Health Care centers during 2003-2007 for their 8-months check-up, and whose parents answered a self-administered questionnaire (n = 9,289 children. Results Exclusive breast feeding ≥4 months was more common among mothers with higher educational level. Smoking during pregnancy was five times more common among less-educated mothers. Presence of secondhand tobacco smoke during the first four weeks of life was also much more common among children with less-educated mothers. Less-educated mothers more often experienced low emotional support and low practical support than mothers with higher levels of education (>12 years of education. Increased exposure to unfavorable parental behavioral factors (maternal smoking during pregnancy, secondhand tobacco smoke and exclusive breastfeeding Conclusion Children of less-educated mothers were exposed to more health risks, fewer health-promoting factors, worse social support, and had higher medical care consumption than children with higher educated mothers. After adjustment for parental behavioral factors the excess odds of doctor's visits and in-hospital care among children with less-educated mothers were reduced. Improving children's health calls for policies targeting parents' health-related behaviors and social support.

  9. Determinant Factors of the Direct Medical Costs Associated with Genotype 1 Hepatitis C Infection in Treatment-Experienced Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpo, Essè Ifèbi Hervé; Sbarigia, Urbano; Wan, George; Kleintjens, Joris

    2015-12-01

    Limited evidence is available on predictors of medical resource utilization (MRU) and related direct costs, especially in treatment-experienced patients infected with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study aimed at investigating patient and treatment characteristics that predict MRU and related non-drug costs in treatment-experienced patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) treated with simeprevir (SMV) or telapravir (TVR) in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PegIFN/R). A total of 709 patients who completed the 72-week ATTAIN trial were included in the study. Cost data were analysed from the UK NHS perspective. Descriptive statistics and regression analyses were used to determine patterns and predictors of total MRU-related costs associated with SMV/PegIFN/R and TVR/PegIFN/R. Independent predictors for total MRU-related costs were age, region and the following interaction terms: (1) gender × F3-F4 METAVIR score × baseline viral load (BLVL), (2) body mass index (BMI) × F3-F4 METAVIR score × prior response to PegIFN/R and (3) gender × achievement of SVR at 12 weeks (SVR12) × BLVL. A F3-F4 METAVIR score was a stronger predictor of total MRU-related costs than SVR12. Predictors of adverse events included older age, female gender, low BMI, TVR/PegIFN/R and SVR12. Wilcoxon rank sum test revealed comparable total MRU-related costs between SMV/PegIFN/R and TVR/PegIFN/R. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to describe the relationship between commonly admitted predictors of MRU-related costs and their joint effect on total MRU-related costs in treatment-experienced patients with CHC. The identified predictors of MRU-related costs suggest that significant treatment costs can be avoided by starting treatment early before the disease progresses. Furthermore, adverse events seem to be the most important factor to take into consideration for the choice of treatment, especially when therapeutic options are associated with similar

  10. An initial assessment of the cost and utilization of the Integrated Academic Information System (IAIMS) at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, P D; Anderson, R K; Hill, C; McCormack, M

    1991-01-01

    The concept of "one stop information shopping" is becoming a reality at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center (CPMC). The goal of our effort is to provide access to university and hospital administrative systems as well as clinical and library applications from a single workstation, which also provides utility functions such as word processing and mail. Since June 1987, CPMC has invested the equivalent of $23 million dollars to install a digital communications network that encompasses 18 buildings at seven geographically separate sites and to develop clinical and library applications that are integrated with the existing hospital and university administrative and research computing facilities. During June 1991, 2425 different individuals used the clinical information system, 425 different individuals used the library applications, and 900 different individuals used the hospital administrative applications via network access. If we were to freeze the system in its current state, amortize the development and network installation costs, and add projected maintenance costs for the clinical and library applications, our integrated information system would cost $2.8 million on an annual basis. This cost is 0.3% of the medical center's annual budget. These expenditures could be justified by very small improvements in time savings for personnel and/or decreased length of hospital stay and/or more efficient use of resources. In addition to the direct benefits which we detail, a major benefit is the ease with which additional computer-based applications can be added incrementally at an extremely modest cost.

  11. Medical care utilization and costs on end-of-life cancer patients: The role of hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsiao-Ting; Lin, Ming-Hwai; Chen, Chun-Ku; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Tsai, Shu-Lin; Cheng, Shao-Yi; Chiu, Tai-Yuan; Tsai, Shih-Tzu; Hwang, Shinn-Jang

    2016-11-01

    Although there are 3 hospice care programs for terminal cancer patients in Taiwan, the medical utilization and expenses for these patients by programs have not been well-explored. The aim of this study was to examine the medical utilization and expenses of terminal cancer patients under different programs of hospice care in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.This was a retrospective observational study by secondary data analysis. By using the National Health Insurance claim database and Hospice Shared Care Databases. We identified cancer descents from these databases and classified them into nonhospice care and hospice care groups based on different combination of hospice care received. We then analyzed medical utilization including inpatient care, outpatient care, emergency room visits, and medical expenses by patient groups in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life.Among 118,376 cancer descents, 46.9% ever received hospice care. Patients had ever received hospice care had significantly lower average medical utilization and expenses in their last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P hospice care group had significantly less medical utilization and expenses in the last 90, 30, and 14 days of life (all P hospice care program have different effects on medical care utilization reduction and cost-saving at different stage of the end of life of terminal cancer patients.

  12. Adherence styles of schizophrenia patients identified by a latent class analysis of the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS): a six-month follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Susanne; Pfiffner, Carmen; Weiser, Prisca; Kilian, Reinhold; Becker, Thomas; Längle, Gerhard; Eschweiler, Gerhard Wilhelm; Croissant, Daniela; Schepp, Wiltrud; Steinert, Tilman

    2012-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to examine patients' response profiles to the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and to evaluate the potential of response styles as predictors of the future course of psychotic disorders in terms of rehospitalisation and maintenance of medication. A total of 371 psychiatric in-patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were taking part in a naturalistic long-term study completed a German version of the MARS. A Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was performed. Five latent classes of response styles could be identified: "moderately adherent", "critical discontinuers", "good compliers", "careless and forgetful", and "compliant sceptics". Class membership was found to be related to the severity of symptoms, level of functioning, insight into illness, insight into necessity of treatment, treatment satisfaction and medication side effects. At a six-month follow-up appointment, significant differences between the classes persisted. Participants showing a "good compliers" response pattern had a significantly better prognosis in terms of rehospitalisation rate and maintenance of the original medication than "critical discontinuers". Evaluation of the MARS by studying response profiles provides informative results that reach beyond the results obtained by an evaluation by scores. Patients can be classified into adherence groups that are of predictive value for long-term patient outcome.

  13. The Tripler Army Medical Center's LE3AN program: a six-month retrospective analysis of program effectiveness for African-American and European-American females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Mark; Earles, Jay; Folen, Raymond; Trammel, Rick; James, Larry

    2004-10-01

    This is a retrospective study that examines the effectiveness of the Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) LE3AN Program for weight management among African-American and European American women. African-American and European-American active-duty females who enrolled in the TAMC LE3AN Program between July 1998 and December 2001, and completed six months of follow-up were included in the analysis. The results indicate that the program is associated with significant weight loss for participants, and that it is equally effective for African-American and European-American women. Weekly follow-up visits were correlated with greater weight loss.

  14. Predictors of compliance with a home-based exercise program added to usual medical care in preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis: an 18-month prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoux-Benhamou, M A; Roux, C; Perraud, A; Fermanian, J; Rahali-Kachlouf, H; Revel, M

    2005-03-01

    This prospective 18-month study was designed to assess long-term compliance with a program of exercise aimed to prevent osteoporosis after an educational intervention and to uncover determinants of compliance. A total of 135 postmenopausal women were recruited by flyers or instructed by their physicians to participate in an educational session added to usual medical care. After a baseline visit and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, volunteers participated in a 1-day educational session consisting of a lecture and discussion on guidelines for appropriate physical activity and training in a home-based exercise program taught by a physical therapist. Scheduled follow-up visits were 1, 6, and 18 months after the educational session. Compliance with the exercise program was defined as an exercise practice rate 50% or greater than the prescribed training. The 18-month compliance rate was 17.8% (24/135). The main reason for withdrawal from the program was lack of motivation. Two variables predicted compliance: contraindication for hormone replacement therapy (odds ratio [OR] = 0.13; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.04 to 0.46) and general physical function scores from an SF-36 questionnaire (OR=1.26; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.5). To a lesser extent, osteoporosis risk, defined as a femoral T-score exercise, only a minority of postmenopausal women adhered to a home-based exercise program after 18 months.

  15. Integration of a Low-Cost Introductory Ultrasound Curriculum Into Existing Procedural Skills Education for Preclinical Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Lauren; Zach, Kristen; Page, Christopher; Tewari, Neera; Tito, Matthew; Seidman, Peggy

    2017-02-01

    We evaluated integration of an introductory ultrasound curriculum into our existing mandatory procedural skills program for preclinical medical students. Phantoms consisting of olives, pimento olives, and grapes embedded in opaque gelatin were developed. Four classes encouraged progressive refinement of phantom-scanning and object identification skills. Students improved their ability to identify hidden objects, although each object type achieved a statistically significant improvement in correct identification at different time points. The total phantom cost per student was $0.76. Our results suggest that short repeated experiences scanning simple, low-cost ultrasound phantoms confer basic ultrasound skills. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  16. Optimal medical therapy for secondary prevention after an acute coronary syndrome: 18-month follow-up results at a tertiary teaching hospital in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeon HJ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Hee Ja Byeon,1,* Young-Mo Yang,2,* Eun Joo Choi21Department of Pharmacy, Chosun University Hospital, 2Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju, South Korea*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS is a fatal cardiovascular disease caused by atherosclerotic plaque erosion or rupture and formation of coronary thrombus. The latest guidelines for ACS recommend the combined drug regimen, comprising aspirin, P2Y12 inhibitor, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker, β-blocker, and statin, at discharge after ACS treatment to reduce recurrent ischemic cardiovascular events. This study aimed to examine prescription patterns of secondary prevention drugs in Korean patients with ACS after hospital discharge, to access the appropriateness of secondary prevention drug therapy for ACS, and to evaluate whether to persistently use discharge medications for 18 months.Methods: This study was retrospectively conducted with the patients who were discharged from the tertiary hospital, located in South Korea, after ACS treatment between September 2009 and August 2013. Data were collected through electronic medical record.Results: Among 3,676 patients during the study period, 494 were selected based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. The regimen of aspirin + clopidogrel + β-blocker + angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin II receptor blocker + statin was prescribed to 374 (75.71% patients with ACS at discharge. Specifically, this regimen was used in 177 (69.69% unstable angina patients, 44 (70.97% non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients, and 153 (85.96% ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction patients. Compared with the number of ACS patients with all five guideline-recommended drugs at discharge, the number of ACS patients using them 12 (n=169, 34.21% and 18 (n=105, 21.26% months after discharge tended to be gradually

  17. [The problem of double loyalty: medical expert opinion and its cost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinerson, David; Green, Yoseph

    2007-07-01

    Legal procedures, dealing with medical issues like body damages or medical malpractice, are based upon expert medical witnesses. These are essential because the parties involved in the process do not hold the knowledge needed for the correct evaluation of the medical facts relevant to the discussed case. When such cases arrive at court, there are always at least two contradictive medical expert testimonies that are based on the same facts (otherwise, the case would have been settled outside the courtroom). The medical experts are paid for their services, a fact which raises criticism by both legal and medical systems and also creates an atmosphere of suspicion towards their testimony. Many questions are raised in light of the potential damage of such testimonies on the one hand, and the known difficulties of defining "the reasonable standard of care" for a particular case on the other. Worldwide, attempts are made to unify and standardize medical expert testimonies. In this review we present and elaborate on some of the criticism, as well as possible solutions (including one proposed by the authors) with regard to expert medical witnesses.

  18. Voluntary medical male circumcision: a qualitative study exploring the challenges of costing demand creation in eastern and southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane T Bertrand

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This paper proposes an approach to estimating the costs of demand creation for voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC scale-up in 13 countries of eastern and southern Africa. It addresses two key questions: (1 what are the elements of a standardized package for demand creation? And (2 what challenges exist and must be taken into account in estimating the costs of demand creation? METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a key informant study on VMMC demand creation using purposive sampling to recruit seven people who provide technical assistance to government programs and manage budgets for VMMC demand creation. Key informants provided their views on the important elements of VMMC demand creation and the most effective funding allocations across different types of communication approaches (e.g., mass media, small media, outreach/mobilization. The key finding was the wide range of views, suggesting that a standard package of core demand creation elements would not be universally applicable. This underscored the importance of tailoring demand creation strategies and estimates to specific country contexts before estimating costs. The key informant interviews, supplemented by the researchers' field experience, identified these issues to be addressed in future costing exercises: variations in the cost of VMMC demand creation activities by country and program, decisions about the quality and comprehensiveness of programming, and lack of data on critical elements needed to "trigger the decision" among eligible men. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this study's findings, we propose a seven-step methodological approach to estimate the cost of VMMC scale-up in a priority country, based on our key assumptions. However, further work is needed to better understand core components of a demand creation package and how to cost them. Notwithstanding the methodological challenges, estimating the cost of demand creation remains an essential element in deriving

  19. Cost of the medical management and prescription pattern for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in Ghana–a retrospective cross-sectional study from three referral facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Ocansey, Stephen; Kyei, Samuel; Diafo, Ama; Darfor, Kwabena Nkansah; Boadi-Kusi, Samuel Bert; Aglobitse, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness globally, and treatment involves considerable cost to stakeholders in healthcare. However, there is infrequent availability of cost information and patterns of management, especially in developing countries. This study determined the cost of the medical management of POAG, adherence, and pattern of medication prescription in Ghana. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study involving 891 Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) c...

  20. Estimated Lifetime Medical and Work-Loss Costs of Emergency Department-Treated Nonfatal Injuries--United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, Curtis; Haegerich, Tamara; Simon, Thomas; Zhou, Chao; Luo, Feijun

    2015-10-02

    A large number of nonfatal injuries are treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) every year. CDC's National Center for Health Statistics estimates that approximately 29% of all ED visits in 2010 were for injuries. To assess the economic impact of ED-treated injuries, CDC examined injury data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System--All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) for 2013, as well as injury-related lifetime medical and work-loss costs from the Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). NEISS-AIP collects data from a nationally representative sample of EDs, using specific guidelines for recording the primary diagnosis and mechanism of injury. Number of injuries, crude- and age-specific injury rates, and total lifetime work-loss costs and medical costs were calculated for ED-treated injuries, stratified by sex, age groups, and intent and mechanism of injury. ED-treated injuries were further classified as those that were subsequently hospitalized or treated and released. The rate of hospitalized injuries was 950.8 per 100,000, and the rate of treated and released injuries was 8,549.8 per 100,000. Combined medical and work-loss costs for all ED-treated injuries (both hospitalized and treated and released) were $456.9 billion, or approximately 68% of the total costs of $671 billion associated with all fatal and ED-treated injuries. The substantial economic burden associated with nonfatal injuries underscores the need for effective prevention strategies.

  1. Medical net cost of low alcohol consumption - a cause to reconsider improved health as the link between alcohol and wage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerdtham Ulf G

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have found a positive effect of low/moderate alcohol consumption on wages. This has often been explained by referring to epidemiological research showing that alcohol has protective effects on certain diseases, i.e., the health link is normally justified using selected epidemiological information. Few papers have tested this link between alcohol and health explicitly, including all diseases where alcohol has been shown to have either a protective or a detrimental effect. Aim Based on the full epidemiological information, we study the effect of low alcohol consumption on health, in order to determine if it is reasonable to explain the positive effect of low consumption on wages using the epidemiological literature. Methods We apply a non-econometrical cost-of-illness approach to calculate the medical care cost and episodes attributable to low alcohol consumption. Results Low alcohol consumption carries a net cost for medical care and there is a net benefit only for the oldest age group (80+. Low alcohol consumption also causes more episodes in medical care then what is saved, although inpatient care for women and older men show savings. Conclusion Using health as an explanation in the alcohol-wage literature appears invalid when applying the full epidemiological information instead of selected information.

  2. The share of people with high medical costs increased prior to implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The percentage of Americans with high medical cost burdens--those who spend more than 10 percent of their family income on out-of-pocket expenses for health care--increased to 19.2 percent in 2011, after having stabilized at 18.2 percent during the Great Recession of 2007-09. The increase was driven primarily by growth in premium expenses in 2009-11 for people with employer-sponsored coverage. Out-of-pocket spending on health services, especially for prescription drugs, continued to decrease between 2007-09 and 2011. Medical cost burdens were highest for income groups most likely to benefit from the Affordable Care Act's coverage expansions, including people with private insurance coverage. Those who purchased nongroup coverage before the implementation of the health insurance Marketplaces in 2014 spent an especially high proportion of their income on health care, and over half of these people will qualify for premium subsidies in the Marketplaces. Federal subsidies will substantially reduce medical cost burdens for many people who do not obtain health insurance through their employers.

  3. Toward a treaty on safety and cost-effectiveness of pharmaceuticals and medical devices: enhancing an endangered global public good

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faunce Thomas

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract • Expert evaluations of the safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of pharmaceutical and medical devices, prior to marketing approval or reimbursement listing, collectively represent a globally important public good. The scientific processes involved play a major role in protecting the public from product risks such as unintended or adverse events, sub-standard production and unnecessary burdens on individual and governmental healthcare budgets. • Most States now have an increasing policy interest in this area, though institutional arrangements, particularly in the area of cost-effectiveness analysis of medical devices, are not uniformly advanced and are fragile in the face of opposing multinational industry pressure to recoup investment and maintain profit margins. • This paper examines the possibility, in this context, of States commencing negotiations toward bilateral trade agreement provisions, and ultimately perhaps a multilateral Treaty, on safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness analysis of pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Such obligations may robustly facilitate a conceptually interlinked, but endangered, global public good, without compromising the capacity of intellectual property laws to facilitate local product innovations.

  4. Toward a treaty on safety and cost-effectiveness of pharmaceuticals and medical devices: enhancing an endangered global public good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faunce, Thomas Alured

    2006-03-28

    Expert evaluations of the safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of pharmaceutical and medical devices, prior to marketing approval or reimbursement listing, collectively represent a globally important public good. The scientific processes involved play a major role in protecting the public from product risks such as unintended or adverse events, sub-standard production and unnecessary burdens on individual and governmental healthcare budgets. Most States now have an increasing policy interest in this area, though institutional arrangements, particularly in the area of cost-effectiveness analysis of medical devices, are not uniformly advanced and are fragile in the face of opposing multinational industry pressure to recoup investment and maintain profit margins. This paper examines the possibility, in this context, of States commencing negotiations toward bilateral trade agreement provisions, and ultimately perhaps a multilateral Treaty, on safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness analysis of pharmaceuticals and medical devices. Such obligations may robustly facilitate a conceptually interlinked, but endangered, global public good, without compromising the capacity of intellectual property laws to facilitate local product innovations.

  5. Low health literacy associated with higher medication costs in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: Evidence from matched survey and health insurance data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantwill, Sarah; Schulz, Peter J

    2015-07-10

    Studies have shown that people with lower levels of health literacy create higher emergency, inpatient and total healthcare costs, yet little is known about how health literacy may affect medication costs. This cross-sectional study aims at investigating the relationship between health literacy and three years of medication costs (2009-2011) in a sample of patients with type 2 diabetes. 391 patients from the German-speaking part of Switzerland who were insured with the same health insurer were interviewed. Health literacy was measured by a validated screening question and interview records were subsequently matched with data on medication costs. A bootstrap regression analysis was applied to investigate the relationship between health literacy and medication costs. In 2010 and 2011 lower levels of health literacy were significantly associated with higher medication costs (pdiabetic patients with lower health literacy will create higher medication costs. Besides being sensitive towards patients' health literacy levels, healthcare providers may have to take into account its potential impact on patients' medication regimen, misuse and healthcare costs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Medical-device risk management and public safety: using cost-benefit as a measurement of effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Allen A.

    1994-12-01

    Public safety can be enhanced through the development of a comprehensive medical device risk management. This can be accomplished through case studies using a framework that incorporates cost-benefit analysis in the evaluation of risk management attributes. This paper presents a framework for evaluating the risk management system for regulatory Class III medical devices. The framework consists of the following sixteen attributes of a comprehensive medical device risk management system: fault/failure analysis, premarket testing/clinical trials, post-approval studies, manufacturer sponsored hospital studies, product labeling, establishment inspections, problem reporting program, mandatory hospital reporting, medical literature surveillance, device/patient registries, device performance monitoring, returned product analysis, autopsy program, emergency treatment funds/interim compensation, product liability, and alternative compensation mechanisms. Review of performance histories for several medical devices can reveal the value of information for many attributes, and also the inter-dependencies of the attributes in generating risk information flow. Such an information flow network is presented as a starting point for enhancing medical device risk management by focusing on attributes with high net benefit values and potential to spur information dissemination.

  7. The direct medical costs of colorectal cancer in Iran; analyzing the patient′s level data from a cancer specific hospital in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Davari

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: CRC in Iranian population starts in younger age than people in western countries. This imposed considerable direct and indirect economic cost to the society. The direct medical cost of colorectal cancer in Iran is very higher than 38 million $. Screening programs could reduce the economic cost of CRC significantly.

  8. Revenue-based cost assignment: a potent but hidden threat to the survival of the multispecialty medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Robin; Kramer, Theresa R

    2010-03-01

    To demonstrate detrimental effects of revenue-based cost assignment (RBCA) in clinical practice and to compare that system with activity-based costing (ABC). Four cost-allocation methods including RBCA were applied to a comprehensive ophthalmology practice using typical accounting methods. Data were obtained by a survey of practitioners or practices and/or extracted from decision support and practice management systems. Inaccuracies and distortions in reported costs were enumerated. Accounting scenario analysis was used to predict resultant provider and managerial decisions. A sampling survey was used to analyze other specialties. ABC was applied to the practice. RBCA causes procedures with higher profitability to appear less profitable and those with lower profitability to appear more profitable. The distortion in reported costs, in medical settings, is often sufficient to incentivize providers with higher profitability to exit a practice and those with lower profitability to remain in it. The departure of providers causes the residual practice profits to decline. These detrimental effects occur in many subspecialties, which suggests a national effect on health care. ABC allocation can reduce cost distortions and eliminate detrimental effects. RBCA leads to fragmentation of health care and a reduction in the profitability of multispecialty practices. Its use may slow the updating of reimbursement and help eliminate low-profitability specialties.

  9. How to Cover the Medical Costs of Hospitalization: a Theoretical Model Based on the Household Willingness to Pay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela SARPE

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Covering medical costs is very important, in order to solve the various financial problems that limit the users’ access to health care (patients attending the public hospitals. Designing a new model of financing system by using an additional levy to the local tax revenue is one of the solutions to these problems. This theoretical model optimizes the amount of financial participation of the users or "pfu" compared to the direct costs of hospital care starting from the willingness to pay revealed by the household. The criterion of morbidity for predicting the staffing of a part from the tax amount was chosen so that we can handle most of the users of the hospital. Firstly, the model shows that our new system could reduce the direct costs of care paid by users, and secondly, it also helps provide an additional resource in the supplementary budget of hospitals.

  10. Health care costs matter: a review of nutrition economics – is there a role for nutritional support to reduce the cost of medical health care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naberhuis JK

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jane K Naberhuis,1 Vivienne N Hunt,2 Jvawnna D Bell,3 Jamie S Partridge,3 Scott Goates,3 Mark JC Nuijten4 1Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA; 2Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Singapore; 3Abbott Nutrition, Research and Development, Columbus, OH, USA; 4A2M (Ars Accessus Medica, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Background and aims: As policy-makers assess the value of money spent on health care, research in the field of health economics is expanding rapidly. This review covers a period of 10 years and seeks to characterize the publication of papers at the intersection of health economics and nutrition. Methods: Relevant publications on nutrition care were identified in the medical literature databases using predetermined search criteria. These included nutritional interventions linked to health economic terms with inclusion criteria requiring original research that included clinical outcomes and cost analyses, subjects’ ages ≥18 years, and publications in English between January 2004 and October 2014. Results: Of the 5,646 publications identified in first-round searches, 274 met the specified inclusion criteria. The number of publications linking nutrition to economic outcomes has increased markedly over the 10-year period, with a growing number of studies in both developed and developing countries. Most studies were undertaken in Europe (39% and the USA and Canada (28%. The most common study setting was hospital (62% followed by community/noninstitutional care (30%. Of all the studies, 12% involved the use of oral nutritional supplements, and 13% involved parenteral nutrition. The economic outcomes consistently measured were medical care costs (53% of the studies, hospital length of stay (48%, hospital readmission rates (9%, and mortality (25%. Conclusion: The number of publications focused on the economics of nutrition interventions has increased dramatically in recent years

  11. The Direct Cost of Managing a Rare Disease: Assessing Medical and Pharmacy Costs Associated with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Sarah; Bell, Christopher; McDonald, Craig M

    2017-06-01

    A Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) cohort was identified using a claims-based algorithm to estimate health care utilization and costs for commercially insured DMD patients in the United States. Previous analyses have used broad diagnosis codes that include a range of muscular dystrophy types as a proxy to estimate the burden of DMD. To estimate DMD-associated resource utilization and costs in a sample of patients identified via a claims-based algorithm using diagnosis codes, pharmacy prescriptions, and procedure codes unique to DMD management based on DMD clinical milestones. DMD patients were selected from a commercially insured claims database (2000-2009). Patients with claims suggestive of a non-DMD diagnosis or who were aged 30 years or older were excluded. Each DMD patient was matched by age, gender, and region to controls without DMD in a 1:10 ratio (DMD patients n = 75; controls n = 750). All-cause health care resource utilization, including emergency department, inpatient, outpatient, and physician office visits, and all-cause health care costs were examined over a minimum 1-year period. Costs were computed as total health-plan and patient-paid amounts of adjudicated medical claims (in annualized U.S. dollars). The average age of the DMD cohort was 13 years. Patients in the DMD cohort had a 10-fold increase in health care costs compared with controls ($23,005 vs. $2,277, P costs were significantly higher for the DMD cohort across age strata and, in particular, for DMD patients aged 14-29 years ($40,132 vs. $2,746, P costs of DMD are substantial and increase with age. Funding for this study (GHO-10-4441) was provided by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). Optum was contracted by GSK to conduct the study. Thayer was an employee of Optum Health Economics and Outcomes Research at the time of this study and was not compensated for her participation as an author of this manuscript. Bell is an employee and shareholder of GSK. McDonald has been a consultant for GSK, Sarepta

  12. Using propensity scores to estimate the cost-effectiveness of medical therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indurkhya, Alka; Mitra, Nandita; Schrag, Deborah

    2006-05-15

    The cost-effectiveness ratio is a popular statistic that is used by policy makers to decide which programs are cost-effective in the public health sector. Recently, the net monetary benefit has been proposed as an alternative statistical summary measure to overcome the limitations associated with the cost-effectiveness ratio. Research on using the net monetary benefit to assess the cost-effectiveness of therapies in non-randomized studies has yet to be done. Propensity scores are useful in estimating adjusted effectiveness of programs that have non-randomized or quasi-experimental designs. This article introduces the use of propensity score adjustment in cost-effectiveness analyses to estimate net monetary benefits for non-randomized studies. The uncertainty associated with the net monetary benefit estimate is evaluated using cost-effectiveness acceptability curves. Our method is illustrated by applying it to SEER-Medicare data for muscle invasive bladder cancer to determine the most cost-effective treatment protocol.

  13. Your Child's Development: 9 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Baby's Growth: 9 Months Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 9 Months Your Child's Checkup: 9 Months Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Contact ...

  14. THE METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING OF LABOR COSTS OF MEDICAL PERSONNEL IN MARKET CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Katasonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the approximate calculations of working time of physician to work with the patient and documentation. On the base of these calculations they outline the possible ways to optimize the work of the medical staff.

  15. Cost drivers for voluntary medical male circumcision using primary source data from sub-Saharan Africa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bollinger, Lori; Adesina, Adebiyi; Forsythe, Steven; Godbole, Ramona; Reuben, Elan; Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    .... We examined the main cost drivers (i.e., personnel and consumables) associated with providing VMMC in sub-Saharan Africa along a number of dimensions, including facility type and service provider...

  16. Influence of superstition on the date of hospital discharge and medical cost in Japan: retrospective and descriptive study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Kenji; Fukui, Tsuguya; Endoh, Akira; Rahman, Mahbubur; Maekawa, Munetaka

    1998-01-01

    Objectives To determine the influence of superstition about Taian (a lucky day)-Butsumetsu (an unlucky day) on decision to leave hospital. To estimate the costs of the effect of this superstition. Design Retrospective and descriptive study. Setting University hospital in Kyoto, Japan. Subjects Patients who were discharged alive from Kyoto University Hospital from 1 April 1992 to 31 March 1995. Main outcome measures Mean number, age, and hospital stay of patients discharged on each day of six day cycle. Results The mean number, age, and hospital stay of discharged patients were highest on Taian and lowest on Butsumetsu (25.8 v 19.3 patients/day, P=0.0001; 43.9 v 41.4 years, P=0.0001; and 43.1 v 33.3 days, P=0.0001 respectively). The effect of this difference on the hospital’s costs was estimated to be 7.4 million yen (£31 000). Conclusion The superstition influenced the decision to leave hospital, contributing to higher medical care costs in Japan. Although hospital stays need to be kept as short as possible to minimise costs, doctors should not ignore the possible psychological effects on patients’ health caused by dismissing the superstition. Key messagesBelief in Taian-Butsumetsu, a superstition relating to the six day lunar calendar, is common among Japanese peopleThis study showed that the mean number of patients discharged on Taian (a lucky day) is the highest and that on Butsumetsu (an unlucky day) is the lowestPatients discharged on Taian were older, were more likely to be female, and had longer hospital stays than those discharged on other daysThe findings suggest that patients were extending their stay to leave hospital on TaianThis superstitious belief increased the cost of medical care in Japan PMID:9857123

  17. The impact of an online disease management program on medical costs among health plan members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Steven M; Day, Brian; Wildenhaus, Kevin; Silberman, Anna; Wang, Chun; Silberman, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the economic impact of an online disease management program within a broader population health management strategy. A retrospective, quasi-experimental, cohort design evaluated program participants and a matched cohort of nonparticipants on 2003-2007 claims data in a mixed model. The study was conducted through Highmark Inc, Blue Cross Blue Shield, covering 4.8 million members in five regions of Pennsylvania. Overall, 413 online self-management program participants were compared with a matched cohort of 360 nonparticipants. The costs and claims data were measured per person per calendar year. Total payments were aggregated from inpatient, outpatient, professional services, and pharmacy payments. The costs of the online program were estimated on a per-participant basis. All dollars were adjusted to 2008 values. The online intervention, implemented in 2006, was a commercially available, tailored program for chronic condition self management, nested within the Blues on Call(SM) condition management strategy. General linear modeling (with covariate adjustment) was used. Data trends were also explored using second-order polynomial regressions. Health care costs per person per year were $757 less than predicted for participants relative to matched nonparticipants, yielding a return on investment of $9.89 for every dollar spent on the program. This online intervention showed a favorable and cost-effective impact on health care cost.

  18. Low-cost/high-efficiency lasers for medical applications in the 14XX-nm regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, J. J.; McIntyre, E.; Rafferty, C.; Yanushefski, L.; Bean, D. M.

    2011-03-01

    Laser therapy is becoming an increasingly popular method of treating numerous dermatological conditions. The widespread use of these devices is often limited by the cost and size. Low cost, portable lasers would expand the laser market further into homes, general practitioners, dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and 3rd world countries. There are numerous light devices currently on the market for hair removal and growth, acne reduction, and wrinkles. These devices are varied, from LEDs to intense pulsed light (IPL) to lasers. One particular disease is leishmaniasis, caused by a parasite carried by sand flies, most often occurring in third world countries. While there are drug therapies available, they sometimes require hospitalization for several days and are very expensive. An RF device has been FDA approved for treatment of leishmaniasis, but costs about $20,000 which is too expensive for widespread use. Since the method is heating the lesion, the same affect could be achieved using an infrared laser. Diode lasers have the capability to be produced in mass quantity for low costs, as shown by the ubiquity of diode lasers in the telecom industry and household appliances. Unfortunately, many diode lasers suffer from poor efficiency, particularly in wavelengths for dermatology. Advances are being made to improve wall plug efficiency of lasers to reduce waste heat and increase output power. In this paper, those efforts being made to develop manufacturing partners to lower the cost while increasing the production volume of long wavelength lasers will be discussed along with performance data and clinical results.

  19. Superior antidepressant effect occurring 1 month after rTMS: add-on rTMS for subjects with medication-resistant depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaw-Ji; Chang, Chung-Hung; Tsai, Hsin-Chi; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Lin, Chaucer CH

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a major psychiatric disorder. The standard treatment for depression is antidepressant medication, but the responses to antidepressant treatment are only partial, even poor, among 30%–45% of patients. Refractory depression is defined as depression that does not respond to antidepressant therapy after 4 weeks of use. There is evidence that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may exert effects in treating psychiatric disorder through moderating focal neuronal functions. High-frequency rTMS on the left prefrontal area and low-frequency rTMS on the right prefrontal area were shown to be effective in alleviating depressive symptoms. Given the statistically significant antidepressant effectiveness noted, the clinical application of rTMS as a depression treatment warrants further studies. Application of rTMS as an add-on therapy would be a practical research model. High-frequency (5–20 Hz) rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was found to have a significant effect on medication-resistant depression. In the present study, we not only measured the acute antidepressant effect of rTMS during treatment and immediately after its completion but also evaluated participants 1 month after completion of the treatment protocol. Study participants were divided into two groups: an active rTMS group (n = 10) and a sham group (n = 10). The active rTMS group was defined as participants who received the rTMS protocol, and the sham group was defined as participants who received a sham rTMS procedure. A significant Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score reduction was observed in both groups after the fifth and tenth treatments. However, those in the active rTMS group maintained their improvement as measured one month after completion of the rTMS protocol. Participants who received active rTMS were more likely to have persistent improvement in depression scores than participants who received sham rTMS. PMID:23576870

  20. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    stress and hyperemesis gravidarum: temporal and case controlled correlates . PLoS ONE. 2014;9(3):e92036. 8. McCarthy FP, Lutomski JE, Greene RA. Int J...4,190) with a place of occurrence code (ICD-9: E849.0–E849.9), the leading location was recreation/ sports facili- ties (n=1,332, 32%). External cause...shoulder disloca- tions, Achilles tendinitis, stress fractures) that often result from microtrauma due to overuse and related to participation in

  1. Price of pain: population-based cohort burden of disease analysis of medication cost of herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friesen KJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kevin J Friesen,1 Jamie Falk,1 Silvia Alessi-Severini,1 Dan Chateau,2 Shawn Bugden1 1College of Pharmacy, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada; 2Department of Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Background: Pain is a main symptom of herpes zoster (HZ, and postherpetic neuralgia (PHN is a frequent complication occurring in 5% to 15% of cases, causing moderate to severe neuropathic pain. A population-based observational study was conducted to evaluate the treatment patterns and economic burden of prescription drug treatment of HZ and PHN pain in the province of Manitoba (Canada over a period of 15 years. Methods: Administrative health care data, including medical and hospital separation records, were examined to identify episodes of HZ using International Classification of Diseases-9/10 codes between April 1, 1997 and March 31, 2014. Episodes of PHN were identified using medical and prescription claims. Incident use of analgesic, antidepressant, or anticonvulsant drugs was used to determine prescription pain costs. Results: The age-adjusted incidence of HZ increased from 4.7 episodes/1,000 person-years in 1997/98 to 5.7/1,000 person-years in 2013/14. PHN occurred in 9.2% of HZ cases, a rate that did not change over the study period (P=0.57. The annual cost to treat HZ pain rose by 174% from 1997/98, reaching CAD $332,981 in 2011/12, 82.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 81.2%, 84.3% of which was related to PHN. The per episode cost of HZ rose by 111% from $31.59 (95% CI $25.35, $37.84 to $66.81 (95% CI $56.84, $76.78 and by 94% for PHN from $292 (95% CI $225, $358 to $566 (95% CI $478, $655. These increases were driven by increasing use of anticonvulsants, primarily gabapentin, which accounted for 57% of the increase in cost. Conclusion: There has been an increase in the incidence of HZ and PHN and in the average cost associated with the

  2. Cooperative medical insurance and the cost of care in Shandong, PR China: perspectives of patients and community members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal; Raulli, Alexandra; Yan, Wang; Dong, Han; Aiguo, Zhang; Ping, Dong

    2015-03-01

    This research was conducted to identify the cost of care associated with utilization of village clinics and membership of the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) in 2 counties of Shandong province, PR China. A total of 397 community members and 297 patients who used the village clinics were interviewed. The average cost for primary care treatment of 1 episode of illness was about 55 yuan (about US$8). Although more than 50% of people had NCMS membership, many consider the monetary reimbursements as insufficient. The low insurance reimbursement rates and inability to pay out-of-pocket expenses compromise access to care. Delays can cause more serious illnesses with potential to overburden the secondary care at the township and county hospitals. Those rural people who have not yet enjoyed the benefits of China's economic development may not benefit from recent health care reform and finance mechanisms unless schemes such as the NCMS provide more substantial subsidies.

  3. An Analysis and Comparison of Medication Therapy Management Cost-Avoidance vs. Fee-for-Service Financial Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuh, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    To describe, compare, and contrast cost-avoidance and fee-for-service medication therapy management (MTM) financial models of practice to allow clinicians to better choose the type of MTM practice that best fits their particular practice environment. Literature regarding pharmacist practices providing MTM services and capstone projects of proposed and currently operating MTM pharmacist practices presented in the University of Florida Master of Science MTM program. Understanding the two major payment methods of sustaining a financially viable MTM pharmacist practice is critical to practice success. Survey was broad with regard to clinical models to compare differences because funding to support these services can be difficult to obtain. Despite differences in approach, various methods exist to financially sustain a pharmacist with an MTM practice. Each method or model has advantages and disadvantages in differing practice environments. With enough cost avoidance or revenue generation, financially dissimilar MTM financial models can be sustainable.

  4. Dignity and cost-effectiveness: analysing the responsibility for decisions in medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, G S

    1984-01-01

    In the operation of a health care system, defining the limits of medical care is the joint responsibility of many parties including clinicians, patients, philosophers and politicians. It is suggested that changes in the potential for prolonging life make it necessary to give doctors guidance which may have to incorporate certain features of utilitarianism, individualism and patient-autonomy. PMID:6502644

  5. Adoption of Angiomax at Christus Santa Rosa Medical Center decreases costs and increases satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starin, Elvira

    2005-01-01

    Angiomax allows for easier post-percutaneous coronary intervention care and enhanced throughput and has become the gold standard of care in our institution. This article describes how Angiomax was brought into our hospital; the rationale and science to support its use; and the resulting patient and staff satisfaction, improved throughput, and cost savings.

  6. Rapid and low-cost prototyping of medical devices using 3D printed molds for liquid injection molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Philip; Heller, J Alex; Etemadi, Mozziyar; Ottoson, Paige E; Liu, Jonathan A; Rand, Larry; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-06-27

    Biologically inert elastomers such as silicone are favorable materials for medical device fabrication, but forming and curing these elastomers using traditional liquid injection molding processes can be an expensive process due to tooling and equipment costs. As a result, it has traditionally been impractical to use liquid injection molding for low-cost, rapid prototyping applications. We have devised a method for rapid and low-cost production of liquid elastomer injection molded devices that utilizes fused deposition modeling 3D printers for mold design and a modified desiccator as an injection system. Low costs and rapid turnaround time in this technique lower the barrier to iteratively designing and prototyping complex elastomer devices. Furthermore, CAD models developed in this process can be later adapted for metal mold tooling design, enabling an easy transition to a traditional injection molding process. We have used this technique to manufacture intravaginal probes involving complex geometries, as well as overmolding over metal parts, using tools commonly available within an academic research laboratory. However, this technique can be easily adapted to create liquid injection molded devices for many other applications.

  7. General hospital costs in England of medical and psychiatric care for patients who self-harm: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiachristas, Apostolos; McDaid, David; Casey, Deborah; Brand, Fiona; Leal, Jose; Park, A-La; Geulayov, Galit; Hawton, Keith

    2017-09-07

    Self-harm is an extremely common reason for hospital presentation. However, few estimates have been made of the hospital costs of assessing and treating self-harm. Such information is essential for planning services and to help strengthen the case for investment in actions to reduce the frequency and effects of self-harm. In this study, we aimed to calculate the costs of hospital medical care associated with a self-harm episode and the costs of psychosocial assessment, together with identification of the key drivers of these costs. In a retrospective analysis, we estimated hospital resource use and care costs for all presentations for self-harm to the John Radcliffe Hospital (Oxford, UK), between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014. Episode-related data were provided by the Oxford Monitoring System for Self-harm and we linked these with financial hospital records to quantify costs. We assessed time and resources allocated to psychosocial assessments through discussion with clinical and managerial staff. We then used generalised linear models to investigate the associations between hospital costs and methods of self-harm. Between April 1, 2013, and March 31, 2014, 1647 self-harm presentations by 1153 patients were recorded. Of these, 1623 (99%) presentations by 1140 patients could be linked with hospital finance records. 179 (16%) patients were younger than 18 years. 1150 (70%) presentations were for self-poisoning alone, 367 (22%) for self-injury alone, and 130 (8%) for a combination of methods. Psychosocial assessments were made in 75% (1234) of all episodes. The overall mean hospital cost per episode of self-harm was £809. Costs differed significantly between different types of self-harm: self-injury alone £753 (SD 2061), self-poisoning alone £806 (SD 1568), self-poisoning and self-injury £987 (SD 1823; pCosts were mainly associated with the type of health-care service contact such as inpatient stay, intensive care, and psychosocial assessment. Mean costs of

  8. Knee-attributable medical costs and risk of re-surgery among patients utilizing non-surgical treatment options for knee arthrofibrosis in a managed care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Judith J; Quimbo, Ralph A; Gu, Tao

    2010-05-01

    To determine if differences in costs and risks of re-hospitalization and/or re-operation exist between arthrofibrosis patients treated with low intensity stretch (LIS) or high intensity stretch (HIS) mechanical therapies, or physical therapy alone (No Device). This observational cohort study utilized administrative claims data to identify arthrofibrosis patients, age arthrofibrosis for the No Device group. Knee-attributable medical costs (KAMC), accrued over 6-month pre- and post-index periods, as well as risks of re-operation, re-injury, and re-hospitalization were compared between groups. Multivariate models were used to evaluate group differences in utilization and costs when controlling for age, sex, and comorbidities. A total of 60 359 patients (143 HIS; 607 LIS; 59 609 No Device) met the inclusion criteria. Unadjusted post-index KAMC were significantly less (p < 0.0001) among HIS patients ($8213 +/- 10 576) relative to LIS ($16 861 +/- 17 857) and No Device ($9345 +/- 14 120) patients. A significantly greater percentage of LIS Device patients had total knee replacements than HIS Device or No Device patients, and the LIS group had a significantly higher percentage of patients with musculoskeletal disease. When controlling for these group differences, the multivariate predictive model results were similar to the unadjusted results, with greater post-index KAMC for the LIS patients (24%, p = 0.025) and No Device (9%, p = 0.323) relative to HIS patients. No Device patients were 71% (p < 0.0001) more likely to have a subsequent knee event than HIS patients, and HIS patients had significantly lower rates of re-hospitalization than LIS and No Device patients (p < 0.0001). Patients treated with HIS mechanical therapy demonstrated significantly reduced rates of re-hospitalization which corresponded to reduced knee-attributable medical costs. Limitations of this study include those inherent in the use of retrospective claims data to identify the cohorts and for

  9. Cost-effectiveness comparison between non-penetrating deep sclerectomy and maximum-tolerated medical therapy for glaucoma within the Brazilian National Health System (SUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Augusto Paletta Guedes

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Non-penetrating deep sclerectomy (NPDS has emerged as a viable option in the surgical management of open-angle glaucoma. Our aim is to assess the cost-effectiveness of NPDS and to compare it to maximum medical treatment in a 5-year follow-up. METHODS: A decision analysis model was built. Surgical (NPDS arm of the decision tree was observational (consecutive retrospective case series and maximum medical treatment arm was hypothetical. Maximum medical therapy was considered a three-drug regimen (association of a fixed combination of timolol/dorzolamide [FCTD] and a prostaglandin analogue [bimatoprost, latanoprost or travoprost]. Cost-effectiveness ratio was defined as direct cost (US dollars for each percentage of intraocular pressure (IOP reduction. Horizon was 5 years and perspective is from the public health care service in Brazil (SUS. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was calculated. RESULTS: Direct cost for each percentage of IOP reduction in 5 years (cost-effectiveness ratio was US$ 10.19 for NPDS; US$ 37.45 for the association of a FCTD and bimatoprost; US$ 39.33 for FCTD and travoprost; and US$ 41.42 for FCTD and latanoprost. NPDS demonstrated a better cost-effectiveness ratio, compared to maximum medical therapy. The ICER was negative for all medical treatment options; therefore NPDS was dominant. CONCLUSIONS: Despite some limitations, NPDS was both less costly and more effective than maximum medical therapy. From the Brazilian public health perspective, it was the most cost-effective treatment option when compared to maximum medical therapy (FCTD and prostaglandin.

  10. At what cost to health? Tlicho women's medical travel for childbirth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Pertice M; Vollman, Ardene Robinson

    2006-09-01

    Medical travel policies are instituted in all rural and remote areas of Canada as a means of providing universal health care services to residents. These policies are framed, developed and implemented from a colonial perspective and require re-examination through a more inclusive and collaborative postcolonial lens. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the medical travel policy for childbirth in Canada's Northwest Territories from a postcolonial perspective and in consideration of the cultural safety of pregnant Tlicho women. The context within which Tlicho birthing and this policy thrives is reviewed along with the exploration of future possibilities. Personal, socioeconomic, political and legal factors surrounding birthing are highlighted. It is anticipated, that by illuminating the oppressive and paternalistic nature of this childbirth policy, there will be heightened awareness that fosters transitions within the system to transform current risk discourse creating new possibilities for Tlicho women in the birth of their babies.

  11. High fidelity medical simulation in the difficult environment of a helicopter: feasibility, self-efficacy and cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland Carolyn

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study assessed the feasibility, self-efficacy and cost of providing a high fidelity medical simulation experience in the difficult environment of an air ambulance helicopter. Methods Seven of 12 EM residents in their first postgraduate year participated in an EMS flight simulation as the flight physician. The simulation used the Laerdal SimMan™ to present a cardiac and a trauma case in an EMS helicopter while running at flight idle. Before and after the simulation, subjects completed visual analog scales and a semi-structured interview to measure their self-efficacy, i.e. comfort with their ability to treat patients in the helicopter, and recognition of obstacles to care in the helicopter environment. After all 12 residents had completed their first non-simulated flight as the flight physician; they were surveyed about self-assessed comfort and perceived value of the simulation. Continuous data were compared between pre- and post-simulation using a paired samples t-test, and between residents participating in the simulation and those who did not using an independent samples t-test. Categorical data were compared using Fisher's exact test. Cost data for the simulation experience were estimated by the investigators. Results The simulations functioned correctly 5 out of 7 times; suggesting some refinement is necessary. Cost data indicated a monetary cost of $440 and a time cost of 22 hours of skilled instructor time. The simulation and non-simulation groups were similar in their demographics and pre-hospital experiences. The simulation did not improve residents' self-assessed comfort prior to their first flight (p > 0.234, but did improve understanding of the obstacles to patient care in the helicopter (p = 0.029. Every resident undertaking the simulation agreed it was educational and it should be included in their training. Qualitative data suggested residents would benefit from high fidelity simulation in other

  12. Cost and Impact of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in South Africa: Focusing the Program on Specific Age Groups and Provinces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Kripke

    Full Text Available In 2012, South Africa set a goal of circumcising 4.3 million men ages 15-49 by 2016. By the end of March 2014, 1.9 million men had received voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC. In an effort to accelerate progress, South Africa undertook a modeling exercise to determine whether circumcising specific client age groups or geographic locations would be particularly impactful or cost-effective. Results will inform South Africa's efforts to develop a national strategy and operational plan for VMMC.The study team populated the Decision Makers' Program Planning Tool, Version 2.0 (DMPPT 2.0 with HIV incidence projections from the Spectrum/AIDS Impact Module (AIM, as well as national and provincial population and HIV prevalence estimates. We derived baseline circumcision rates from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey. The model showed that circumcising men ages 20-34 offers the most immediate impact on HIV incidence and requires the fewest circumcisions per HIV infection averted. The greatest impact over a 15-year period is achieved by circumcising men ages 15-24. When the model assumes a unit cost increase with client age, men ages 15-29 emerge as the most cost-effective group. When we assume a constant cost for all ages, the most cost-effective age range is 15-34 years. Geographically, the program is cost saving in all provinces; differences in the VMMC program's cost-effectiveness across provinces were obscured by uncertainty in HIV incidence projections.The VMMC program's impact and cost-effectiveness vary by age-targeting strategy. A strategy focusing on men ages 15-34 will maximize program benefits. However, because clients older than 25 access VMMC services at low rates, South Africa could consider promoting demand among men ages 25-34, without denying services to those in other age groups. Uncertainty in the provincial estimates makes them insufficient to support geographic targeting.

  13. Cost and Impact of Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision in South Africa: Focusing the Program on Specific Age Groups and Provinces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripke, Katharine; Thambinayagam, Ananthy; Pillay, Yogan; Loykissoonlal, Dayanund; Bonnecwe, Collen; Barron, Peter; Kiwango, Eva; Castor, Delivette

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2012, South Africa set a goal of circumcising 4.3 million men ages 15–49 by 2016. By the end of March 2014, 1.9 million men had received voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). In an effort to accelerate progress, South Africa undertook a modeling exercise to determine whether circumcising specific client age groups or geographic locations would be particularly impactful or cost-effective. Results will inform South Africa’s efforts to develop a national strategy and operational plan for VMMC. Methods and Findings The study team populated the Decision Makers’ Program Planning Tool, Version 2.0 (DMPPT 2.0) with HIV incidence projections from the Spectrum/AIDS Impact Module (AIM), as well as national and provincial population and HIV prevalence estimates. We derived baseline circumcision rates from the 2012 South African National HIV Prevalence, Incidence and Behaviour Survey. The model showed that circumcising men ages 20–34 offers the most immediate impact on HIV incidence and requires the fewest circumcisions per HIV infection averted. The greatest impact over a 15-year period is achieved by circumcising men ages 15–24. When the model assumes a unit cost increase with client age, men ages 15–29 emerge as the most cost-effective group. When we assume a constant cost for all ages, the most cost-effective age range is 15–34 years. Geographically, the program is cost saving in all provinces; differences in the VMMC program’s cost-effectiveness across provinces were obscured by uncertainty in HIV incidence projections. Conclusion The VMMC program’s impact and cost-effectiveness vary by age-targeting strategy. A strategy focusing on men ages 15–34 will maximize program benefits. However, because clients older than 25 access VMMC services at low rates, South Africa could consider promoting demand among men ages 25–34, without denying services to those in other age groups. Uncertainty in the provincial estimates makes them

  14. The direct medical costs of breast cancer in Iran: analyzing the patient′s level data from a cancer specific hospital in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Davari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The direct economic cost of breast cancer in Iran is very high; nonetheless, as the age of breast cancer in Iran is nearly 10 years lower than Western countries, the burden of the disease in Iran is expected to be significantly high. Medication therapy is the main cost component of the breast cancer.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of Antihypertensive Medication: Exploring Race and Sex Differences Using Data From the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeu, Gabriel S; Mennemeyer, Stephen; Menachemi, Nir; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Kilgore, Meredith

    2017-06-01

    Antihypertensive medication decreases risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in adults with hypertension. Although black adults have higher prevalence of hypertension and worse CVD outcomes compared with whites, limited attention has been given to the cost-effectiveness of antihypertensive medication for blacks. To compare the cost-effectiveness of antihypertensive medication treatment versus no-treatment in white and black adults. We constructed a State Transition Model to assess the costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) associated with either antihypertensive medication treatment or no-treatment using data from the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study and published literature. CVD events and health states considered in the model included stroke, coronary heart disease, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and end-stage renal disease. White and black adults with hypertension in the United States, 45 years of age and above. Yearly risk of CVD was determined using REGARDS data and published literature. Antihypertensive medication costs were determined using Medicare claims. Event and health state costs were estimated from published literature. All costs were adjusted to 2012 US dollars. Effectiveness was assessed using QALYs. Antihypertensive medication treatment was cost-saving and increased QALYs compared with no-treatment for white men ($7387; 1.14 QALYs), white women ($7796; 0.89 QALYs), black men ($8400; 1.66 QALYs), and black women ($10,249; 1.79 QALYs). Antihypertensive medication treatment is cost-saving and increases QALYs for all groups considered in the model, particularly among black adults.

  16. Family medicine in undergraduate medical curriculum: a cost-effective approach to health care in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Saima P

    2010-01-01

    Shifa College of Medicine introduced a two-week rotation in Family Medicine for their third-year medical students in 2008. The purpose of this study was to determine what impact it made on students and how many would consider becoming Family Physicians in future. A questionnaire-based prospective study conducted at Shifa College of Medicine, Islamabad during academic year 2008. A total of 46 students rotated in Family Medicine throughout the academic year-2008. Fifteen students were aware of Family Medicine as a specialty prior to starting their rotation, and only 3 expressed an interest to pursue Family Medicine as a future career. At the start of the rotation only 15 students were able to give correct definition of Family Medicine and on questioning whether it should be a part of the undergraduate curriculum, only 24 answered yes while the rest were unsure. After the rotation, a significant number of students (37%; p definition of Family Medicine as a humanistic approach of medicine with aim to prevent, treat and rehabilitate. About its utility in the undergraduate curriculum, 44 (96%) students believed it should be a regular feature in their curriculum, while 30 (65%) students agreed that their outlook towards patient care had changed. When asked what they learnt most during the rotation, students quoted empathy and development of communication skills. Family medicine rotation as part of undergraduate medical curriculum may help in fostering an interest among medical students in this newly emerging subspecialty which could have a profound effect on delivery of quality health care in this country.

  17. Optical design of low cost imaging systems for mobile medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Alexander; Slyper, Ronit; Levitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Colposcopes, the gold standard devices for imaging the cervix at high magnfication, are expensive and sparse in low resource settings. Using a lens attachment, any smartphone camera can be turned into an imaging device for tissues such as the cervix. We create a smartphone-based colposcope using a simple lens design for high magnification. This particular design is useful because it allows parameters such as F-number, depth of field, and magnification to be controlled easily. We were therefore able to determine a set of design steps which are general to mobile medical imaging devices and allow them to maintain requisite image quality while still being rugged and affordable.

  18. Is motivation enough? Responsiveness, patient-centredness, medicalization and cost in family practice and conventional care settings in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Lerberghe Wim

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Thailand, family practice was developed primarily through a small number of self-styled family practitioners, who were dedicated to this professional field without having benefited from formal training in the specific techniques of family practice. In the context of a predominantly hospital-based health care system, much depends on their personal motivation and commitment to this area of medicine. The purpose of this paper is to compare the responsiveness, degree of patient-centredness, adequacy of therapeutic decisions and the cost of care in 37 such self-styled family practices, i.e. practices run by doctors who call themselves family practitioners, but have not been formally trained, and in 37 conventional public hospital outpatient departments (OPDs, 37 private clinics and 37 private hospital OPDs. Method Analysis of the characteristics of 148 taped consultations with simulated patients. Results The family practices performed better than public hospital OPDs with regard to responsiveness, patient-centredness and cost of technical investigations (M-W U: p Conclusion In Thailand self-styled family practices, even without specific training, provide a service that is more responsive and patient-centred than conventional care, with less overmedicalization and at a lower cost. Changes in prescription practices may require deeper changes in the medical culture.

  19. Implantation of two second-generation trabecular micro-bypass stents and topical travoprost in open-angle glaucoma not controlled on two preoperative medications: 18-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, John; Voskanyan, Lilit; Myers, Jonathan S; Hornbeak, Dana M; Giamporcaro, Jane Ellen; Katz, L Jay; Samuelson, Thomas W

    2017-04-06

    Additional data are sought regarding treatment options for glaucoma, a major cause of global blindness. The study assessed outcomes following standalone implantation of two second-generation trabecular micro-bypass stents and postoperative topical prostaglandin in eyes with open-angle glaucoma not controlled on two preoperative medications. The study design is a prospective, nonrandomized, open-label study at a tertiary-care ophthalmology centre. Subjects had open-angle glaucoma with preoperative intraocular pressure of 18-30 mmHg on two medications, a medication washout phase, and post-washout intraocular pressure of 22-38 mmHg. All subjects (N = 53) have been followed for 18 months. One day following implantation of two second-generation trabecular micro-bypass stents, subjects started topical travoprost. Medication washout was repeated at month 12. The main outcome measure was the proportion of eyes with intraocular pressure reduction ≥ 20% versus medicated baseline intraocular pressure with reduction of one medication at 12 months. At 12 months, 91% of eyes achieved intraocular pressure reduction ≥ 20% with reduction of one medication. All eyes had intraocular pressure ≤ 18 mmHg with reduction of one medication, and 87% had intraocular pressure ≤ 15 mmHg. Mean intraocular pressure on one medication was ≤ 13.0 mmHg (≥ 34% reduction) through 18 months. Mean post-washout intraocular pressure at month 13 was 33% lower than preoperative unmedicated intraocular pressure. No adverse events occurred through 18 months. In open-angle glaucoma eyes on two preoperative medications, treatment with two second-generation trabecular stents and one postoperative prostaglandin resulted in mean intraocular pressure ≤ 13 mmHg with reduction of one medication, with favourable safety. These findings show the utility of second-generation trabecular bypass with postoperative prostaglandin in patients with open-angle glaucoma. © 2017 The Authors

  20. Cost - utility analysis of parenteral antibiotics prescribed in medical wards in a tertiary care health facility in southern province of Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukshmy Menik Hettihewa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Parenteral antibiotic (PA prescription pattern in a hospital will directly influence the annual budget allocation, development of bacterial resistance and occurrence of unnecessary adverse drug reactions if it is done with poor adherence to the standard guidelines of prescription. As specialist in the field we understand the need of conducting economic studies in relation to the cost and utility of PA prescription pattern. It will be helpful to predict the drug procurement plan for the next year and also to prevent unnecessary complications mentioned above. Objective: Our main objective was to analyze the cost/utility relationship of PA drugs which were used in medical wards in this hospital according to the top ten of the cost (TTTC and the top ten of the consumption (TTCS. Materials and method : Aggregate data from the pharmacy record books were collected for year 2010 from indoor pharmacy. Unit prize was obtained from medical supplies division. Total quantity consumed by each medical ward was considered for analysis of the cost /utility relationship. Two top ten lists were prepared according to the cost and the consumption respectively for medical wards and the correlation was analyzed using non parametric testing with spearman test. Results: Regarding PA drugs used in this hospital, 7/10 PA drugs in TTTC are not included in the TTCS. Out of the total cost for TTTC, 82.6% of the cost had been spent for the PA drugs which are not in the TTCS and 17.5% of the cost of TTTC was used to purchase only three drugs from the TTCS. But these three drugs had contributed only 28% of top ten consumption. 72% of the PA drugs in TTCS were not costly drugs and highly consumed in medical wards. Correlation was significantly positive between cost and utility of PA drugs. ( r=-0.91,p<0.001 Conclusion: Majority of the consumed PA drugs are non-costly and it indicates the prescriptions had been done according to the rational guidelines including

  1. Medical Services Cost Method Research Based on Cost Equtvalent%基于当量法的医疗服务项目成本计算方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡守惠

    2011-01-01

    目的:提出简便可行的医疗服务项目成本计算方法,并使计算结果尽可能合理、准确.方法:通过对医疗业务活动特点及医院服务产品的分析,结合医院成本核算的层次,研究医疗服务项目成本计算方法.结果:提出在科室成本核算基础上基于成本当量的项目成本计算方法,并区别情况,对不同科室使用不同的技术方法.%Objective: To propose easy and feasible medical services cost method, and to make the reasonable and accurate calculations. Methods: Through the activities of medical and hospital services product analysis, and combining with the hospital level of cost accounting, medical services cost method is researched. Results: Based on costs calculation of the department, medical services cost method is proposed based on cost equivalent. And according to different circumstances, different technical method is used in different department

  2. Revised management plan, milestone plan, cost plan, and manpower plan. Sixth and seventh monthly status reports, October 1-November 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1978-01-01

    The following are included: project background and discussion, technical progress reports for all subtasks, contract management summary report, milestone schedule and status report, milestone log, cost plans, cost management reports, manpower plans, and manpower management reports. The following appendices are included: selection of heat pumps simulation locations, economic computations, fuel costs, system studies, recommended methodology for calculating residential load models, potential performance of heat pumps, data required from cooling contractors, cooling locations, thermal outputs: cooling, recommended inputs for the 25 ton advanced cooling simulation study, meteorological data, and contract modification. (MHR)

  3. How much does it cost to improve access to voluntary medical male circumcision among high-risk, low-income communities in Uganda?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Larson

    Full Text Available The Ugandan Ministry of Health has endorsed voluntary medical male circumcision as an HIV prevention strategy and has set ambitious goals (e.g., 4.2 million circumcisions by 2015. Innovative strategies to improve access for hard to reach, high risk, and poor populations are essential for reaching such goals. In 2009, the Makerere University Walter Reed Project began the first facility-based VMMC program in Uganda in a non-research setting. In addition, a mobile clinic began providing VMMC services to more remote, rural locations in 2011. The primary objective of this study was to estimate the average cost of performing VMMCs in the mobile clinic compared to those performed in health facilities (fixed sites. The difference between such costs is the cost of improving access to VMMC.A micro-costing approach was used to estimate costs from the service provider's perspective of a circumcision. Supply chain and higher-level program support costs are not included.The average cost (US$2012 of resources used per circumcision was $61 in the mobile program ($72 for more remote locations compared to $34 at the fixed site. Costs for community mobilization, HIV testing, the initial medical exam, and staff for performing VMMC operations were similar for both programs. The cost of disposable surgical kits, the additional upfront cost for the mobile clinic, and additional costs for staff drive the differences in costs between the two programs. Cost estimates are relatively insensitive to patient flow over time.The MUWRP VMMC program improves access for hard to reach, relatively poor, and high-risk rural populations for a cost of $27-$38 per VMMC. Costs to patients to access services are almost certainly less in the mobile program, by reducing out-of-pocket travel expenses and lost time and associated income, all of which have been shown to be barriers for accessing treatment.

  4. Cost-comparison of two trabecular micro-bypass stents versus selective laser trabeculoplasty or medications only for intraocular pressure control for patients with open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, John P; Khatana, Anup K; Katz, L Jay; Herndon, Leon; Layton, Andrew J; Yu, Tiffany M; Bauer, Matthew J; Cantor, Louis B

    2017-07-01

    Patients with open-angle glaucoma (OAG) whose intraocular pressure is not adequately controlled by one medication have several treatment options in the US. This analysis evaluated direct costs of unilateral eye treatment with two trabecular micro-bypass stents (two iStents) compared to selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) or medications only. A population-based, annual state-transition, probabilistic, cost-of-care model was used to assess OAG-related costs over 5 years. Patients were modeled to initiate treatment in year zero with two iStents, SLT, or medications only. In years 1-5, patients could remain on initial treatment or move to another treatment option(s), or filtration surgery. Treatment strategy change probabilities were identified by a clinician panel. Direct costs were included for drugs, procedures, and complications. The projected average cumulative cost at 5 years was lower in the two-stent treatment arm ($4,420) compared to the SLT arm ($4,730) or medications-only arm ($6,217). Initial year-zero costs were higher with two iStents ($2,810) than with SLT ($842) or medications only ($996). Average marginal annual costs in years 1-5 were $322 for two iStents, $777 for SLT, and $1,044 for medications only. The cumulative cost differences between two iStents vs SLT or medications only decreased over time, with breakeven by 5 or 3 years post-initiation, respectively. By year 5, cumulative savings with two iStents over SLT or medications only was $309 or $1,797, respectively. This analysis relies on clinical expert panel opinion and would benefit from real-world evidence on use of multiple procedures and treatment switching after two-stent treatment, SLT, or polypharmaceutical initial approaches. Despite higher costs in year zero, annual costs thereafter were lowest in the two-stent treatment arm. Two-stent treatment may reduce OAG-related health resource use, leading to direct savings, especially over medications only or at longer time horizons.

  5. Costing of Paediatric Treatment alongside Clinical Trials under Low Resource Constraint Environments: Cotrimoxazole and Antiretroviral Medications in Children Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Costing evidence is essential for policy makers for priority setting and resource allocation. It is in this context that the clinical trials of ARVs and cotrimoxazole provided a costing component to provide evidence for budgeting and resource needs alongside the clinical efficacy studies. Methods. A micro based costing approach was adopted, using case record forms for maintaining patient records. Costs for fixed assets were allocated based on the paediatric space. Medication and other resource costs were costed using the WHO/MSH Drug Price Indicators as well as procurement data where these were available. Results. The costs for cotrimoxazole and ARVs are significantly different. The average costs for human resources were US$22 and US$71 for physician costs and $1.3 and $16 for nursing costs while in-patient costs were $257 and $15 for the cotrimoxazole and ARV cohorts, respectively. Mean or average costs were $870 for the cotrimoxazole cohort and $218 for the ARV. The causal factors for the significant cost differences are attributable to the higher human resource time, higher infections of opportunistic conditions, and longer and higher frequency of hospitalisations, among others. PMID:28042479

  6. The feasibility of determining the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of medication organisation devices compared with usual care for older people in a community setting: systematic review, stakeholder focus groups and feasibility randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debi; Aldus, Clare F; Barton, Garry; Bond, Christine M; Boonyaprapa, Sathon; Charles, Ian S; Fleetcroft, Robert; Holland, Richard; Jerosch-Herold, Christina; Salter, Charlotte; Shepstone, Lee; Walton, Christine; Watson, Steve; Wright, David J

    2016-07-01

    Medication organisation devices (MODs) provide compartments for a patient's medication to be organised into the days of the week and the recommended times the medication should be taken. To define the optimal trial design for testing the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MODs. The feasibility study comprised a systematic review and focus groups to inform a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design. The resulting features were tested on a small scale, using a 2 × 2 factorial design to compare MODs with usual packaging and to compare weekly with monthly supply. The study design was then evaluated. Potential participants were identified by medical practices. Aged over 75 years, prescribed at least three solid oral dosage form medications, unintentionally non-adherent and self-medicating. Participants were excluded if deemed by their health-care team to be unsuitable. One of three MODs widely used in routine clinical practice supplied either weekly or monthly. To identify the most effective method of participant recruitment, to estimate the prevalence of intentional and unintentional non-adherence in an older population, to provide a point estimate of the effect size of MODs relative to usual care and to determine the feasibility and acceptability of trial participation. The systematic review included MOD studies of any design reporting medication adherence, health and social outcomes, resource utilisation or dispensing or administration errors. Focus groups with patients, carers and health-care professionals supplemented the systematic review to inform the RCT design. The resulting design was implemented and then evaluated through questionnaires and group discussions with participants and health-care professionals involved in trial delivery. Studies on MODs are largely of poor quality. The relationship between adherence and health outcomes is unclear. Of the limited studies reporting health outcomes, some reported a positive relationship while some

  7. Clutter in electronic medical records: examining its performance and attentional costs using eye tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moacdieh, Nadine; Sarter, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    The objective was to use eye tracking to trace the underlying changes in attention allocation associated with the performance effects of clutter, stress, and task difficulty in visual search and noticing tasks. Clutter can degrade performance in complex domains, yet more needs to be known about the associated changes in attention allocation, particularly in the presence of stress and for different tasks. Frequently used and relatively simple eye tracking metrics do not effectively capture the various effects of clutter, which is critical for comprehensively analyzing clutter and developing targeted, real-time countermeasures. Electronic medical records (EMRs) were chosen as the application domain for this research. Clutter, stress, and task difficulty were manipulated, and physicians' performance on search and noticing tasks was recorded. Several eye tracking metrics were used to trace attention allocation throughout those tasks, and subjective data were gathered via a debriefing questionnaire. Clutter degraded performance in terms of response time and noticing accuracy. These decrements were largely accentuated by high stress and task difficulty. Eye tracking revealed the underlying attentional mechanisms, and several display-independent metrics were shown to be significant indicators of the effects of clutter. Eye tracking provides a promising means to understand in detail (offline) and prevent (in real time) major performance breakdowns due to clutter. Display designers need to be aware of the risks of clutter in EMRs and other complex displays and can use the identified eye tracking metrics to evaluate and/or adjust their display. © 2015, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  8. Perceptions of social capital and cost-related non-adherence to medication among the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Tatiana Chama Borges; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Lima-Costa, Maria Fernanda

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between social capital and cost-related non-adherence (CRN) in an elderly population, using data from 1,134 respondents to the Greater Metropolitan Belo Horizonte Health Survey. CRN was lower for those elderly with a better perception of attachment to their neighbourhoods (PR = 0.68; 95%CI: 0.50-0.94), with more social contacts (one to five, PR = 0.49; 95%CI: 0.30-0.80 and more than five, PR = 0.42; 95%CI: 0.26-0.67), and with private health insurance coverage (PR = 0.64; 95%CI: 0.45-0.93). Meanwhile, CRN was significantly higher for those with fair to poor self-rated health (PR =1.66; 95%CI: 0.95-2.90 and PR = 2.62; 95%CI: 1.46-4.71 respectively), with multiple comorbidities (two, PR = 3.45; 95%CI: 1.38-8.62 and three or more, PR = 4.42; 95%CI: 1.74-11.25), and with a lower frequency of physician-patient dialogue about health/treatment (rarely/never, PR = 1.91; 95%CI: 1.16-3.13). These findings highlight the need to take into account the social context in future research on CRN.

  9. The cost of demand creation activities and voluntary medical male circumcision targeting school-going adolescents in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Gavin; Strauss, Michael; Asfaw, Elias

    2017-01-01

    Voluntary medical male circumcision is an integral part of the South African government's response to the HIV and AIDS epidemic. However, there remains a limited body of economic analysis on the cost of VMMC programming, and the demand creation activities used to mobilize males, especially among adolescent boys in school. This study addresses this gap by presenting the costs of a VMMC program which adopted two demand creation strategies targeting school-going males in South Africa. Cost data was collected from a VMMC program in the KwaZulu-Natal province of South Africa. A retrospective, micro-costing ingredient approach was applied to identify, measure and value resources of two demand creation strategies targeting young males. The program circumcised 4987 young males between May 2011 and February 2013, at a cost of $127.68 per circumcision. Demand creation activities accounted for 32% of the total cost, HCT contributing 10% with the medical circumcision procedure accounting for 58% of the total cost. Using the first demand creation strategy, 2168 circumcisions were performed at a cost of $149.57 per circumcision. Following this first strategy, a second demand creation strategy was adopted which saw the cost fall to $110.85 per circumcision. More young males were recruited following the second strategy with clinic services more efficiently utilized. Whilst the cost per circumcision of demand activities rose slightly between the first ($39.94) and second ($41.65) strategy, there was a substantial reduction in the cost of the circumcision procedure; $90.01 under the first strategy falling to $60.60 following the adoption of the second demand creation strategy. Ensuring the optimal use of clinic facilities was the primary driver in reducing the cost per circumcision. This VMMC program has illustrated the value of evaluating progress and instituting changes to attain better cost efficiencies. This adjustment resulted in a substantial reduction in the cost per

  10. [Impact of comorbid psychiatric disorders on the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment among geriatric patients treated on internal medicine wards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebestyén, Gábor; Hamar, Mátyás; Bíró, László; Kovács, Gábor; Gazdag, Gábor

    2006-01-01

    Coexistence of psychiatric comorbidity is very common in patients hospitalized with somatic problems. Several studies have shown that comorbid dementia increases the length of stay (LOS) in hospitals. The literature is more contradictory in the case of anxiety disorders, substance-related disorders, mood disorders and delirium. Our aim was to explore the influence of psychiatric comorbidity on the average length of hospital stay and the related costs among geriatric patients treated in internal wards. The examination was conducted on two departments of internal medicine for 3 months on all admitted patients above 65 years. Four psychometric tests were carried out in the first three days after hospitalization as a screen for psychiatric comorbidity. In the whole study group the incidence of a depression syndrome of various severity reached 56%. We have not identified any difference in LOS when the depressive and non-depressive groups were compared. 59% of the patients showed some degree of cognitive impairment. Mean LOS was 7.4 days longer among patient suffering in severe dementia than in the group showing no cognitive deficit. Our results have demonstrated that of the investigated psychiatric comorbid conditions, an increased LOS is connected only with dementia. The degree of the cognitive impairment shows a positive correlation with the length of stay and the cost of medical treatment. Given the high incidence rate of affective syndromes, it can be assumed that comorbid depression increases the chance of admission to an internal medicine ward with some somatic complaints. This can be attributed to a larval stage of depression manifesting as somatic symptoms.

  11. [Medical training in Israel--can we realize the comments of Pazi's Committee and at what cost?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenberg, Dov

    2010-06-01

    In spite of the growth of Israel's population, the number of graduates from the four Israeli Schools of Medicine has changed very little in the last 30 years. Nevertheless, the annual number of new practitioners grew from about 300 to 900, due to Israeli graduates of European Schools and the large number of physicians among the new immigrants from the former USSR states in the early nineties. A committee, nominated by the National Board of Higher Education (MALAG), headed by the late Prof. Pazi, concluded that under steady state conditions we must train 800 medical students per year. MALAG adopted this recommendation. As a first step, MALAG approved two new programs: a special program for Academic Reserve candidates (Atudaim) and a new (5th) medical school in the Galilee. These two new programs, together with the new 4-year MD program in Tel Aviv, will add about 200 graduates to the list of medical students. Yet, the question of whether we can realize the recommendation of Pazi's Committee (to train 800 MDs annually) and at what cost, remains open. This preliminary review is devoted to the relevant factors that must be considered before the latter questions can be answered. First, we note that the limiting factor of the number of medical students is the ratio between the number of teaching departments in each of the medical disciplines and the number of weeks of Clerkships required in the given disciplines. Our main conclusion is that realization of the recommendation of Pazi's committee requires an increase in the number of teaching departments, preferably by upgrading the academic level of those departments that do not teach students, and increasing the teaching load of other departments. We may also have to reduce the number of weeks of 'bedside teaching' but should beware of reducing it to a minimum lower than about 70 weeks, as in North America. Regardless of the need to train more physicians, we must increase teaching in the community. Only a combination of

  12. Risk factors and medical costs for healthcare-associated carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli infection among hospitalized patients in a Chinese teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiujuan; Liu, Sidi; Duan, Juping; Huang, Xun; Zhou, Pengcheng; Xiong, Xinrui; Gong, Ruie; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Yao; Fu, Chenchao; Li, Chunhui; Wu, Anhua

    2017-01-17

    The emergence and spread of Carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli (CREC) is becoming a serious problem in Chinese hospitals, however, the data on this is scarce. Therefore, we investigate the risk factors for healthcare-associated CREC infection and study the incidence, antibiotic resistance and medical costs of CREC infections in our hospital. We conducted a retrospective, matched case-control-control, parallel study in a tertiary teaching hospital. Patients admitted between January 2012 and December 2015 were included in this study. For patients with healthcare-associated CREC infection, two matched subject groups were created; one group with healthcare-associated CSEC infection and the other group without infection. Multivariate conditional logistic regression analysis demonstrated that prior hospital stay (infection. Total costs (p = 0.00), medical examination costs (p = 0.00), medical test costs (p = 0.00), total drug costs (p = 0.00) and ant-infective drug costs (p = 0.00) for the CREC group were significantly higher than those for the no infection group. Medical examination costs (p = 0.03), total drug costs (p = 0.03), and anti-infective drug costs (p = 0.01) for the CREC group were significantly higher than for the CSEC group. Mortality in CREC group was significantly higher than the CSEC group (p = 0.01) and no infection group (p = 0.01). Many factors were discovered for acquisition of healthcare-associated CREC infection. CREC isolates were resistant to most antibiotics, and had some association with high financial burden and increased mortality.

  13. Oral Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size: A A A Listen En Español Oral Medication The first treatment for type 2 diabetes blood ... new — even over-the-counter items. Explore: Oral Medication How Much Do Oral Medications Cost? Save money ...

  14. Monthly errors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2006 monthly average statistical metrics for 2m Q (g kg-1) domain-wide for the base and MODIS WRF simulations against MADIS observations. This dataset is...

  15. Cost-effectiveness of the Australian Medical Sheepskin for the prevention of pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients: study protocol for a prospective multi-centre randomised controlled trial (ISRCTN17553857

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montgomery Ken

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pressure ulcers are a major problem, especially in nursing home patients, although they are regarded as preventable and there are many pressure relieving methods and materials. One such pressure relieving material is the recently developed Australian Medical Sheepskin, which has been shown in two randomized controlled trials 12 to be an effective intervention in the prevention of sacral pressure ulcers in hospital patients. However, the use of sheepskins has been debated and in general discouraged by most pressure ulcer working groups and pressure ulcer guidelines, but these debates were based on old forms of sheepskins. Furthermore, nothing is yet known about the (cost-effectiveness of the Australian Medical sheepskin in nursing home patients. The objective of this study is to assess the effects and costs of the use of the Australian Medical Sheepskin combined with usual care with regard to the prevention of sacral pressure ulcers in somatic nursing home patients, versus usual care only. Methods/Design In a multi-centre randomised controlled trial 750 patients admitted for a primarily somatic reason to one of the five participating nursing homes, and not having pressure ulcers on the sacrum at admission, will be randomized to either usual care only or usual care plus the use of the Australian Medical Sheepskin as an overlay on the mattress. Outcome measures are: incidence of sacral pressure ulcers in the first month after admission; sacrum pressure ulcer free days; costs; patient comfort; and ease of use. The skin of all the patients will be observed once a day from admission on for 30 days. Patient characteristics and pressure risk scores are assessed at admission and at day 30 after it. Additional to the empirical phase, systematic reviews will be performed in order to obtain data for economic weighting and modelling. The protocol is registered in the Controlled Trial Register as ISRCTN17553857.

  16. Cost-effectiveness in orthopedics: providing essential information to both physicians and health care policy makers for appropriate allocation of medical resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Christopher P; Howard, Timothy

    2013-09-01

    Cost-effective analysis has become an important tool in helping determine what procedures are both cost-effective and appropriate in today's cost control health care. The quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) is a standard measure for health-related quality-of-life in medical cost-effectiveness research. It can be used to compare different interventions to determine the cost-effectiveness of each procedure. Use of QALY to compare health care interventions has become the new gold standard. The key words arthroscopy, cost-effectiveness analysis, QALY, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, elbow, wrist, and pubic symphysis were searched utilizing PubMed and an internet search engine. Cost/QALY ratios were determined and compared with other surgical procedures using techniques other than arthroscopy. Cost/QALYs were found for the shoulder, hip, knee, and elbow. The QALY for the shoulder was $13,092, for a simple knee was $5783, for a hip $21,700, and for an elbow $2031. General costs were found for the ankle, wrist, and pubic symphysis, that could be used to estimate QALYs without the complex formal calculation. On the basis of our findings, arthroscopy is an extremely cost-effective allocation of health care resources.

  17. Sustained effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of Counselling for Alcohol Problems, a brief psychological treatment for harmful drinking in men, delivered by lay counsellors in primary care: 12-month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijit Nadkarni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Counselling for Alcohol Problems (CAP, a brief intervention delivered by lay counsellors, enhanced remission and abstinence over 3 months among male primary care attendees with harmful drinking in a setting in India. We evaluated the sustainability of the effects after treatment termination, the cost-effectiveness of CAP over 12 months, and the effects of the hypothesized mediator 'readiness to change' on clinical outcomes.Male primary care attendees aged 18-65 years screening with harmful drinking on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT were randomised to either CAP plus enhanced usual care (EUC (n = 188 or EUC alone (n = 189, of whom 89% completed assessments at 3 months, and 84% at 12 months. Primary outcomes were remission and mean standard ethanol consumed in the past 14 days, and the proposed mediating variable was readiness to change at 3 months. CAP participants maintained the gains they showed at the end of treatment through the 12-month follow-up, with the proportion with remission (AUDIT score < 8: 54.3% versus 31.9%; adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] 1.71 [95% CI 1.32, 2.22]; p < 0.001 and abstinence in the past 14 days (45.1% versus 26.4%; adjusted odds ratio 1.92 [95% CI 1.19, 3.10]; p = 0.008 being significantly higher in the CAP plus EUC arm than in the EUC alone arm. CAP participants also fared better on secondary outcomes including recovery (AUDIT score < 8 at 3 and 12 months: 27.4% versus 15.1%; aPR 1.90 [95% CI 1.21, 3.00]; p = 0.006 and percent of days abstinent (mean percent [SD] 71.0% [38.2] versus 55.0% [39.8]; adjusted mean difference 16.1 [95% CI 7.1, 25.0]; p = 0.001. The intervention effect for remission was higher at 12 months than at 3 months (aPR 1.50 [95% CI 1.09, 2.07]. There was no evidence of an intervention effect on Patient Health Questionnaire 9 score, suicidal behaviour, percentage of days of heavy drinking, Short Inventory of Problems score, WHO Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 score, days

  18. Kickbacks, courtesies or cost-effectiveness?: Application of the Medicare antikickback Law to the marketing and promotional practices of drug and medical device manufacturers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulleit, T N; Krause, J H

    1999-01-01

    This article summarizes the purposes and history of the antikickback law and describes its evolution into a potent weapon against the corruption of medical decision making in the procurement of prescription drugs and medical devices. The article also details a variety of strategies for reducing risks under the law in several key areas of importance to manufacturers. While the purposes of the law are laudable, its current broad interpretation may impede not only corruption, but also benign forms of customer relations and innovative approaches to cost-effective medical care.

  19. Effects of a 14-month low-cost maintenance training program in patients with chronic systolic heart failure: a randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise training is known to be beneficial in chronic heart failure (CHF) patients but there is a lack of studies following patient groups for longer duration with maintenance training programs to defer deconditioning. METHODS: Study base consisted of all patients diagnosed with CHF...... in a 3-year period. Sixty-six patients with systolic CHF (ejection fraction Heart Association II-III) were randomized to 12 months of either usual care orhome-based maintenance exercise with group training sessions every 2 weeks after an initial 8-week training program. The primary endpoint...

  20. Changes in medical treatment six months after risk stratification with HeartScore and coronary artery calcification scanning of healthy middle-aged subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette Hjortdal; Gerke, Oke; Lambrechtsen, Jess;

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to examine and compare the impact of HeartScore and coronary artery calcification (CAC) score on subsequent changes in the use of medication. Methods: A total of 1156 healthy men and women, aged 50 or 60, had a baseline medical examination and a coronary artery CT-scan as ...

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  2. Staff report on monthly report cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants. FPC form No. 423. Data for November 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    Electric generating plants with a total combined capacity of 25 MW or greater purchased fossil fuel equivalent to 1.5 quadrillion Btu's in Nov. 98.9% of which was for steam-electric generation. Measured by their total heat content, fossil fuel purchases for steam-electric generation were up 1.7% from last month and up 11.6% from Nov. 1976. Deliveries of coal totaled 48.3 million tons, an increase of 8.2 million tons above shipments made during Nov. 1976. Oil purchases for steam-electric generation reached 39.6 million barrels this month, a decrease of 5.6 million barrels below shipments made in Nov. of last year. Gas deliveries to steam-electric units total 219.2 billion ft/sup 3/ up 6.6% from last year's level. In Nov., the price of coal averaged 101.7 cents per millin Btu, a rise of 17.4% over the average price of a year ago. The average price of all oil delivered to steam plants was 219.3, a rise of 6.2% compared to Nov. 1976. Steam gas purchases averaged 134.9 cents per million Btu, an increase of 19.3% over the Nov. 1976 level. The following tabulations highlight the relative changes in deliveries and prices of fossil fuels for steam-electric generation for Nov. 1976 and Nov. 1977.

  3. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications Details Medications ...

  4. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About IBS Twitter ... Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications Details Medications ...

  5. Childhood Predictors of Use and Costs of Antidepressant Medication by Age 24 Years: Findings from the Finnish Nationwide 1981 Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenberg, David; Sourander, Andre; Niemela, Solja; Helenius, Hans; Sillanmaki, Lauri; Ristkari, Terja; Piha, Jorma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prior studies on antidepressant use in late adolescence and young adulthood have been cross-sectional, and prospective associations with childhood psychiatric problems have not been examined. The objective was to study the association between childhood problems and lifetime prevalence and costs of antidepressant medication by age 24…

  6. Effect of the Look AHEAD Study intervention on medication use and related cost to treat cardiovascular disease risk factors in individuals with Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to examine the effect of a lifestyle intervention to produce weight loss and increased physical fitness on use and cost of medications to treat cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes. Look AHEAD is a multicenter randomized controlled trial of 5,145...

  7. Sustained effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the Healthy Activity Programme, a brief psychological treatment for depression delivered by lay counsellors in primary care: 12-month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Weobong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The Healthy Activity Programme (HAP, a brief behavioural intervention delivered by lay counsellors, enhanced remission over 3 months among primary care attendees with depression in peri-urban and rural settings in India. We evaluated the sustainability of the effects after treatment termination, the cost-effectiveness of HAP over 12 months, and the effects of the hypothesized mediator of activation on clinical outcomes.Primary care attendees aged 18-65 years screened with moderately severe to severe depression on the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9 were randomised to either HAP plus enhanced usual care (EUC (n = 247 or EUC alone (n = 248, of whom 95% completed assessments at 3 months, and 91% at 12 months. Primary outcomes were severity on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II and remission on the PHQ-9. HAP participants maintained the gains they showed at the end of treatment through the 12-month follow-up (difference in mean BDI-II score between 3 and 12 months = -0.34; 95% CI -2.37, 1.69; p = 0.74, with lower symptom severity scores than participants who received EUC alone (adjusted mean difference in BDI-II score = -4.45; 95% CI -7.26, -1.63; p = 0.002 and higher rates of remission (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR] = 1.36; 95% CI 1.15, 1.61; p < 0.009. They also fared better on most secondary outcomes, including recovery (aPR = 1.98; 95% CI 1.29, 3.03; p = 0.002, any response over time (aPR = 1.45; 95% CI 1.27, 1.66; p < 0.001, higher likelihood of reporting a minimal clinically important difference (aPR = 1.42; 95% CI 1.17, 1.71; p < 0.001, and lower likelihood of reporting suicidal behaviour (aPR = 0.71; 95% CI 0.51, 1.01; p = 0.06. HAP plus EUC also had a marginal effect on WHO Disability Assessment Schedule score at 12 months (aPR = -1.58; 95% CI -3.33, 0.17; p = 0.08; other outcomes (days unable to work, intimate partner violence toward females did not statistically significantly differ between the two arms. Economic analyses

  8. The (cost-)effectiveness of a patient-tailored intervention programme to enhance adherence to antihypertensive medication in community pharmacies: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Danielle M; Elders, Petra J M; Boons, Christel C L M; Bosmans, Judith E; Nijpels, Giel; Hugtenburg, Jacqueline G

    2017-01-19

    Medication non-adherence is a complex health care problem. Due to non-adherence, substantial numbers of cardiovascular patients benefit from their medication to only a limited extent. In order to improve adherence, a variety of pharmacist-led interventions have been developed. However, even the most effective interventions achieved only a modest positive effect. To be effective, interventions should be targeted at underlying barriers to adherence, developed in a systematic manner and tailored to specific features of a target group and setting. The current paper describes the design of the Cardiovascular medication non-Adherence Tailored Intervention (CATI) study aimed to evaluate the (cost-)effectiveness of a patient-tailored intervention programme in patients using antihypertensive medication. The CATI study is a randomised controlled trial that will be performed in 13 community pharmacies. Patients aged 45-75 years using antihypertensive medication and considered non-adherent according to pharmacy dispensing data, as well according to a self-report questionnaire, are eligible to participate. Patients in the intervention condition will receive a patient-tailored, pharmacist-led intervention programme. This programme consists of a structured interview at the pharmacy to identify patients' barriers to adherence and to counsel patients in order to overcome these barriers. The primary outcome is self-reported medication adherence measured with the MARS-5 questionnaire. Secondary outcome measures are blood pressure, illness perceptions, quality of life and societal costs. A cost-effectiveness analysis and process evaluation will also be performed. This study will provide insight into the (cost-)effectiveness of a patient-tailored, pharmacist-led intervention programme in non-adherent patients using antihypertensive medication. This intervention programme allows community pharmacists to support their patients in overcoming barriers to adherence and improving medication

  9. Utilization, cost trends, and member cost-share for self-injectable multiple sclerosis drugs--pharmacy and medical benefit spending from 2004 through 2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kunze, April M; Gunderson, Brent W; Gleason, Patrick P; Heaton, Alan H H; Johnson, Steven V

    2007-01-01

    ...) drugs to be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Initially covered as a medical expense, self-injectable MS drugs are increasingly considered specialty pharmaceuticals and are often covered under the pharmacy benefit...

  10. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  11. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  12. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  13. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  14. Role Modeling and Regional Health Care Intensity: U.S. Medical Student Attitudes Toward and Experiences With Cost-Conscious Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Dyrbye, Liselotte N; Starr, Stephanie R; Mandrekar, Jay; Naessens, James M; Tilburt, Jon C; George, Paul; Baxley, Elizabeth G; Gonzalo, Jed D; Moriates, Christopher; Goold, Susan D; Carney, Patricia A; Miller, Bonnie M; Grethlein, Sara J; Fancher, Tonya L; Reed, Darcy A

    2017-05-01

    To examine medical student attitudes toward cost-conscious care and whether regional health care intensity is associated with reported exposure to physician role-modeling behaviors related to cost-conscious care. Students at 10 U.S. medical schools were surveyed in 2015. Thirty-five items assessed attitudes toward, perceived barriers to and consequences of, and observed physician role-modeling behaviors related to cost-conscious care (using scales for cost-conscious and potentially wasteful behaviors; Cronbach alphas of 0.82 and 0.81, respectively). Regional health care intensity was measured using Dartmouth Atlas End-of-Life Chronic Illness Care data: ratio of physician visits per decedent compared with the U.S. average, ratio of specialty to primary care physician visits per decedent, and hospital care intensity index. Of 5,992 students invited, 3,395 (57%) responded. Ninety percent (2,640/2,932) agreed physicians have a responsibility to contain costs. However, 48% (1,1416/2,960) thought ordering a test is easier than explaining why it is unnecessary, and 58% (1,685/2,928) agreed ordering fewer tests will increase the risk of malpractice litigation. In adjusted linear regression analyses, students in higher-health-care-intensity regions reported observing significantly fewer cost-conscious role-modeling behaviors: For each one-unit increase in the three health care intensity measures, scores on the 21-point cost-conscious role-modeling scale decreased by 4.4 (SE 0.7), 3.2 (0.6), and 3.9 (0.6) points, respectively (all P students endorse barriers to cost-conscious care and encounter conflicting role-modeling behaviors, which are related to regional health care intensity. Enhancing role modeling in the learning environment may help prepare future physicians to address health care costs.

  15. A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Blended Versus Face-to-Face Delivery of Evidence-Based Medicine to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklen, Peter; Rivers, George; Foo, Jonathan; Ooi, Ying Ying; Reeves, Scott; Walsh, Kieran; Ilic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Background Blended learning describes a combination of teaching methods, often utilizing digital technologies. Research suggests that learner outcomes can be improved through some blended learning formats. However, the cost-effectiveness of delivering blended learning is unclear. Objective This study aimed to determine the cost-effectiveness of a face-to-face learning and blended learning approach for evidence-based medicine training within a medical program. Methods The economic evaluation was conducted as part of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing the evidence-based medicine (EBM) competency of medical students who participated in two different modes of education delivery. In the traditional face-to-face method, students received ten 2-hour classes. In the blended learning approach, students received the same total face-to-face hours but with different activities and additional online and mobile learning. Online activities utilized YouTube and a library guide indexing electronic databases, guides, and books. Mobile learning involved self-directed interactions with patients in their regular clinical placements. The attribution and differentiation of costs between the interventions within the RCT was measured in conjunction with measured outcomes of effectiveness. An incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated comparing the ongoing operation costs of each method with the level of EBM proficiency achieved. Present value analysis was used to calculate the break-even point considering the transition cost and the difference in ongoing operation cost. Results The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio indicated that it costs 24% less to educate a student to the same level of EBM competency via the blended learning approach used in the study, when excluding transition costs. The sunk cost of approximately AUD $40,000 to transition to the blended model exceeds any savings from using the approach within the first year of its implementation; however, a

  16. Cost-effectiveness of medical primary prevention strategies to reduce absolute risk of cardiovascular disease in Tanzania: a Markov modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngalesoni, Frida N; Ruhago, George M; Mori, Amani T; Robberstad, Bjarne; Norheim, Ole F

    2016-05-17

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a growing cause of mortality and morbidity in Tanzania, but contextualized evidence on cost-effective medical strategies to prevent it is scarce. We aim to perform a cost-effectiveness analysis of medical interventions for primary prevention of CVD using the World Health Organization's (WHO) absolute risk approach for four risk levels. The cost-effectiveness analysis was performed from a societal perspective using two Markov decision models: CVD risk without diabetes and CVD risk with diabetes. Primary provider and patient costs were estimated using the ingredients approach and step-down methodologies. Epidemiological data and efficacy inputs were derived from systematic reviews and meta-analyses. We used disability- adjusted life years (DALYs) averted as the outcome measure. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to evaluate the robustness of the model results. For CVD low-risk patients without diabetes, medical management is not cost-effective unless willingness to pay (WTP) is higher than US$1327 per DALY averted. For moderate-risk patients, WTP must exceed US$164 per DALY before a combination of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) and diuretic (Diu) becomes cost-effective, while for high-risk and very high-risk patients the thresholds are US$349 (ACEI, calcium channel blocker (CCB) and Diu) and US$498 per DALY (ACEI, CCB, Diu and Aspirin (ASA)) respectively. For patients with CVD risk with diabetes, a combination of sulfonylureas (Sulf), ACEI and CCB for low and moderate risk (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) US$608 and US$115 per DALY respectively), is the most cost-effective, while adding biguanide (Big) to this combination yielded the most favourable ICERs of US$309 and US$350 per DALY for high and very high risk respectively. For the latter, ASA is also part of the combination. Medical preventive cardiology is very cost-effective for all risk levels except low CVD risk. Budget impact analyses and

  17. Cost-effectiveness of midwifery services vs. medical services in Quebec. LEquipe dEvaluation des Projets-Pilotes Sages-Femmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinharz, D; Blais, R; Fraser, W D; Contandriopoulos, A P

    2000-01-01

    This study compared the cost-effectiveness of midwife services provided in birth centres operating as pilot projects with current hospital-based medical services in the province of Quebec. One thousand midwives' clients were matched with 1,000 physicians' clients on the basis of socio-demographic characteristics and obstetrical risk. Direct costs for the prenatal, intrapartum and postpartum periods were estimated. Effectiveness was assessed on the basis of three clinical indicators and four indices related to the individualization of care as assessed by women. Results show that the costs of midwife services were barely lower than or equal to those of physician services, but cost-effectiveness ratios were to the advantage of the midwife group, except for one clinical indicator (neonatal ventilation). Overall, this study provides rational support for the process of legalizing midwifery in the province.

  18. Balancing selected medication costs with total number of daily injections: a preference analysis of GnRH-agonist and antagonist protocols by IVF patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sills E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During in vitro fertilization (IVF, fertility patients are expected to self-administer many injections as part of this treatment. While newer medications have been developed to substantially reduce the number of these injections, such agents are typically much more expensive. Considering these differences in both cost and number of injections, this study compared patient preferences between GnRH-agonist and GnRH-antagonist based protocols in IVF. Methods Data were collected by voluntary, anonymous questionnaire at first consultation appointment. Patient opinion concerning total number of s.c. injections as a function of non-reimbursed patient cost associated with GnRH-agonist [A] and GnRH-antagonist [B] protocols in IVF was studied. Results Completed questionnaires (n = 71 revealed a mean +/− SD patient age of 34 +/− 4.1 yrs. Most (83.1% had no prior IVF experience; 2.8% reported another medical condition requiring self-administration of subcutaneous medication(s. When out-of-pocket cost for [A] and [B] were identical, preference for [B] was registered by 50.7% patients. The tendency to favor protocol [B] was weaker among patients with a health occupation. Estimated patient costs for [A] and [B] were $259.82 +/− 11.75 and $654.55 +/− 106.34, respectively (p  Conclusions This investigation found consistently higher non-reimbursed direct medication costs for GnRH-antagonist IVF vs. GnRH-agonist IVF protocols. A conditional preference to minimize downregulation (using GnRH-antagonist was noted among some, but not all, IVF patient sub-groups. Compared to IVF patients with a health occupation, the preference for GnRH-antagonist was weaker than for other patients. While reducing total number of injections by using GnRH-antagonist is a desirable goal, it appears this advantage is not perceived equally by all IVF patients and its utility is likely discounted heavily by patients when nonreimbursed medication costs

  19. Value of systematic intervention for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a regional Japanese city based on case detection rate and medical cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawara Y

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Yuichi Tawara,1 Hideaki Senjyu,1 Kenichiro Tanaka,1 Takako Tanaka,1 Masaharu Asai,1 Ryo Kozu,2 Mitsuru Tabusadani,3 Sumihisa Honda,1 Terumitsu Sawai1 1Department of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Science, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan; 2Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Nagasaki University Hospital, Nagasaki, Japan; 3Center for Industry, University and Government Cooperation, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki, Japan Objective: We established a COPD taskforce for early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and intervention. We implemented a pilot intervention with a prospective and longitudinal design in a regional city. This study evaluates the usefulness of the COPD taskforce and intervention based on COPD case detection rate and per capita medical costs.Method: We distributed a questionnaire to all 8,878 inhabitants aged 50–89 years, resident in Matsuura, Nagasaki Prefecture in 2006. Potentially COPD-positive persons received a pulmonary function test and diagnosis. We implemented ongoing detection, examination, education, and treatment interventions, performed follow-up examinations or respiratory lessons yearly, and supported the health maintenance of each patient. We compared COPD medical costs in Matsuura and in the rest of Nagasaki Prefecture using data from 2004 to 2013 recorded by the association of Nagasaki National Health Insurance Organization, assessing 10-year means and annual change.Results: As of 2014, 256 people have received a definitive diagnosis of COPD; representing 31% of the estimated total number of COPD patients. Of the cases detected, 87.5% were mild or moderate in severity. COPD medical costs per patient in Matsuura were significantly lower than the rest of Nagasaki Prefecture, as was rate of increase in cost over time.Conclusion: The COPD program in Matsuura enabled early detection and treatment of COPD patients and helped to lower the associated burden of medical costs. The

  20. A Study on the Procurement Mode of the High Cost Medical Used-up Materials%高值医用耗材采购模式概述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘云云; 曾丽; 张新平

    2012-01-01

    高值医用耗材的采购管理对于控制医疗费用、规范医疗市场行为有重要意义.目前以医院为主体的高值医用耗材采购仍以科室需求为主导,采购部门仅负责谈判议价及货款报销等,被动性、灵活性及随意性较大;而以政府为主体的高值医用耗材集中采购则通过制定采购目录、减少流通环节等途径促进耗材的合理使用,并在很大程度上控制了医疗费用的过快增长.从医疗、社会、管理和政治等多方面来看,高值医用耗材采取集中招标采购模式是必然趋势.%The purchase management of the High Cost Medical Used-up Materials was important for controlling the medical expenses and regulating the medical market. At present, the purchase management of the High Cost Medical Used-up Materials in hospitals was still bas-ed on the demand of the medical departments, and the procurement departments were only responsible for negotiating a price and submitting an expense account. So this mode of the purchase management held such characteristics as inactivity, flexibility and subjectivity. On the other hand, the government management of the purchase of High Cost Medical Used-up Materials had certain effect on the reasonable use and con-trolling the medical expenses by making a purchasing list and reducing current segment. On the whole, the centralized bid procurement of the High Cost Medical Used-up Materials is a historic choice.

  1. New type of price measurement for medical services: interest of a cost sensitivity index for a research agenda on pharmaceutical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttin, Christine C

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to propose a new methodological agenda for new price measurement for medical services; it is based on a cost sensitivity index coming from series of pilot studies on physicians, in order to provide adjustment methods to household surveys for health care expenditure budgets. The use of stated-revealed preference models with inclusion of stated preference studies is proposed with an example on a physician cost sensitivity study in Europe; it could also help the ISPOR task for force best practices in conjoint study designs.

  2. Drug costs and benefits of medical treatments in high-unmet need solid tumours in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osterlund, P; Sorbye, H; Pfeiffer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Regional and hospital decision-makers increasingly require analyses assessing the cost benefit profile of new cancer drugs. This analysis evaluates the cost-benefit profile of nano albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel) in pancreatic cancer, versus other drugs indicated in high-u...

  3. Cost effectiveness of medication adherence-enhancing interventions: a systematic review of trial-based economic evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oberjé, E.J.M.; de Kinderen, R.J.A.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; van Woerkum, C.M.J.; de Bruin, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In light of the pressure to reduce unnecessary healthcare expenditure in the current economic climate, a systematic review that assesses evidence of cost effectiveness of adherence-enhancing interventions would be timely. Objective Our objective was to examine the cost effectiveness of

  4. Medical Care Costs Associated With Long-term Weight Maintenance Versus Weight Gain Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Gregory A; Bell, Kelly; Kimes, Teresa M; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen

    2016-11-01

    Weight loss is recommended for overweight patients with diabetes but avoidance of weight gain may be a more realistic goal. We calculated the 4-year economic impact of maintaining body weight versus gaining weight. Among 8,154 patients with type 2 diabetes, we calculated weight change as the difference between the first body weight measure in 2010 and the last measure in 2013 and calculated mean glycated hemoglobin (A1C) from all measurements from 2010 to 2013. We created four analysis groups: weight change costs between 2010 and 2013, adjusted for demographic and clinical characteristics. Patients who maintained weight within 5% of baseline experienced a reduction in costs of about $400 regardless of A1C. In contrast, patients who gained ≥5% of baseline weight and had mean A1C ≥7% had an increase in costs of $1,473 (P 5% of their baseline weight with mean A1C costs ($387, NS). Patients who gained at least 5% of their baseline body weight and did not maintain A1C costs, whereas those who maintained good glycemic control had a mean cost increase of 3.3%. However, patients who maintained weight within 5% of baseline had costs that were ∼5% lower than baseline. Avoidance of weight gain may reduce costs in the long-term. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Simplified follow-up after early medical abortion: 12-month experience of a telephone call and self-performed low-sensitivity urine pregnancy test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Lucy; Cameron, Sharon T

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to determine if simplified follow-up after early medical abortion, consisting of a telephone call 2 weeks after the procedure plus a self-performed low-sensitivity urine pregnancy (LSUP) test, was successful for screening for ongoing pregnancies in the year following its introduction as standard service. A retrospective computerized database review of 1084 women at a hospital abortion service in Edinburgh, UK, who had a medical abortion (≤9 weeks) and went home to expel the pregnancy was performed. Women who screened 'positive' at telephone follow-up on the basis of ongoing pregnancy symptoms, scant bleeding or LSUP test result were scheduled for an ultrasound. The main outcome measures were the proportion of women scheduled for telephone follow-up successfully contacted and the proportion of ongoing pregnancies detected. A total of 943 women were scheduled for telephone follow-up. Ten women presented to the hospital before the time of the follow-up call. Of the remaining 933 women, 656 [70%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 67.7-73.2] were successfully contacted. Five hundred seventy-three (87%, 95% CI 84.5-89.7) of those contacted screened 'negative'; no false negatives occurred. Eighty-three (13%, 95% CI 10.2-15.5) screened 'positive,' and of those, three had ongoing pregnancies. Of the 277 (30%, 95% CI 26.7-32.7) who were not contacted, two ongoing pregnancies occurred. The sensitivity of telephone follow-up with LSUP to detect ongoing pregnancy was 100% (95% CI 30.9%-100%), and specificity was 88% (95% CI 84.9%-90.1%). The negative predictive value was 100% (95% CI 99.1%-100%), and positive predictive value was 3.6% (95% CI 0.9%-10.9%). A telephone call and LSUP test at 2 weeks are suitable as a standard method of follow-up for screening for ongoing pregnancy after early medical abortion. For most women, a routine clinic follow-up after early medical abortion (to exclude ongoing pregnancy) can be replaced with a telephone call and a self

  6. 医疗服务项目成本精细化核算研究%Research on Cost Accounting Refinement of Medical Service Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡瑜

    2013-01-01

    Medical service price is a sensitive problem, and one of the particular concerns to the broad mass-es, it is also a very important link to the state administrative department of health system and prices. Therefore, it is particularly important that refinement of accounting make the current medical service project cost and the medical service price match , and provide the basis for reasonable adjustment of medical service prices . This paper try to analyze the current situation of medical service prices, explore cost accounting countermeasures of the fine medi-cal service project ,offer the decision basis for managers.%医疗服务价格是一个敏感的问题,也是广大群众十分关注的问题,更是国家卫生系统及物价管理部门十分重视的环节。因此,精细化核算使现行医疗服务项目成本与医疗服务价格相匹配,为合理调整医疗服务价格提供依据就显得尤为重要。本文试图通过对医疗服务价格的现状分析,探索医疗服务项目成本精细化核算对策;并对特定项目进行成本核算后可以考核项目创造效益的情况,为管理者提供决策依据。

  7. Voluntary medical male circumcision: modeling the impact and cost of expanding male circumcision for HIV prevention in eastern and southern Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Njeuhmeli

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is strong evidence showing that voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC reduces HIV incidence in men. To inform the VMMC policies and goals of 13 priority countries in eastern and southern Africa, we estimate the impact and cost of scaling up adult VMMC using updated, country-specific data. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We use the Decision Makers' Program Planning Tool (DMPPT to model the impact and cost of scaling up adult VMMC in Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Nyanza Province in Kenya. We use epidemiologic and demographic data from recent household surveys for each country. The cost of VMMC ranges from US$65.85 to US$95.15 per VMMC performed, based on a cost assessment of VMMC services aligned with the World Health Organization's considerations of models for optimizing volume and efficiencies. Results from the DMPPT models suggest that scaling up adult VMMC to reach 80% coverage in the 13 countries by 2015 would entail performing 20.34 million circumcisions between 2011 and 2015 and an additional 8.42 million between 2016 and 2025 (to maintain the 80% coverage. Such a scale-up would result in averting 3.36 million new HIV infections through 2025. In addition, while the model shows that this scale-up would cost a total of US$2 billion between 2011 and 2025, it would result in net savings (due to averted treatment and care costs amounting to US$16.51 billion. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that rapid scale-up of VMMC in eastern and southern Africa is warranted based on the likely impact on the region's HIV epidemics and net savings. Scaling up of safe VMMC in eastern and southern Africa will lead to a substantial reduction in HIV infections in the countries and lower health system costs through averted HIV care costs.

  8. ULTRAPLATE 24 month report and cost statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    observations have been made using this technique, which are presently undergoing review for further patent applications. A sulphamate based nickel electrolyte as used extensively in the micro-electroforming of high precision stamper tools for e.g. CD/DVD production and optical microconnectors has been used...... as a model system for the investigation of the effects of low frequency (25 kHz) ultrasound. Analysis techniques used so far in the iterative studies (WP2) include Laser-Doppler Anemometry measurements, X-ray fluorescence analysis, light optical microscopy (LOM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM...

  9. Road crash costs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Road crashes result in all kinds of social costs, such as medical costs, production loss, human losses, property damage, settlement costs and costs due to congestion. Studies into road crash costs and their trends are carried out quite regularly. In 2009, the costs amounted to € 12.5 billion, or 2.2

  10. Reconciling rising serials costs, the serials budget, and reference needs in a medical library serials retrenchment program: a methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spang, L

    1995-01-01

    Devising a coherent serials retrenchment plan while maintaining quality reference service is a dilemma faced by increasing numbers of medical librarians. In 1991, the staff of the Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, began to address increasing serials budget reductions that by 1994 amounted to a projected 20% maximum cut. The resulting retrenchment plan combined an ongoing serials use study, faculty and librarian reviews of cancellation lists, and systematic refinements in interlibrary cooperation and document delivery service. The Shiffman plan provides a constructive framework that can be adapted to other medical libraries facing immediate, major serials retrenchment.

  11. A cost-utility analysis of sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) compared with medical treatment in patients with complete spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlière, Camille; Verpillot, Elise; Donon, Laurence; Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Joseph, Pierre-Alain; Vignes, Jean-Rodolphe; Bénard, Antoine

    2015-12-01

    Sacral anterior root stimulation (SARS) and posterior sacral rhizotomy restores the ability to urinate on demand with low residual volumes, which is a key for preventing urinary complications that account for 10% of the causes of death in patients with spinal cord injury with a neurogenic bladder. Nevertheless, comparative cost-effectiveness results on a long time horizon are lacking to adequately inform decisions of reimbursement. This study aimed to estimate the long-term cost-utility of SARS using the Finetech-Brindley device compared with medical treatment (anticholinergics+catheterization). The following study design is used for the paper: Markov model elaborated with a 10-year time horizon; with four irreversible states: (1) initial treatment, (2) year 1 of surgery for urinary complication, (3) year >1 of surgery for urinary complication, and (4) death; and reversible states: urinary calculi; Finetech-Brindley device failures. The sample consisted of theoretical cohorts of patients with a complete spinal cord lesion since ≥1 year, and a neurogenic bladder. Effectiveness was expressed as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). Costs were valued in EUR 2013 in the perspective of the French health system. A systematic review and meta-analyses were performed to estimate transition probabilities and QALYs. Costs were estimated from the literature, and through simulations using the 2013 French prospective payment system classification. Probabilistic analyses were conducted to handle parameter uncertainty. In the base case analysis (2.5% discount rate), the cost-utility ratio was 12,710 EUR per QALY gained. At a threshold of 30,000 EUR per QALY the probability of SARS being cost-effective compared with medical treatment was 60%. If the French Healthcare System reimbursed SARS for 80 patients per year during 10 years (anticipated target population), the expected incremental net health benefit would be 174 QALYs, and the expected value of perfect information (EVPI

  12. Economic cost of fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao; Menees, Stacy B; Zochowski, Melissa K; Fenner, Dee E

    2012-05-01

    Despite its prevalence and deleterious impact on patients and families, fecal incontinence remains an understudied condition. Few data are available on its economic burden in the United States. The aim of this study was to quantify per patient annual economic costs associated with fecal incontinence. A mail survey of patients with fecal incontinence was conducted in 2010 to collect information on their sociodemographic characteristics, fecal incontinence symptoms, and utilization of medical and nonmedical resources for fecal incontinence. The analysis was conducted from a societal perspective and included both direct and indirect (ie, productivity loss) costs. Unit costs were determined based on standard Medicare reimbursement rates, national average wholesale prices of medications, and estimates from other relevant sources. All cost estimates were reported in 2010 US dollars. This study was conducted at a single tertiary care institution. The analysis included 332 adult patients who had fecal incontinence for more than a year with at least monthly leakage of solid, liquid, or mucous stool. The primary outcome measured was the per patient annual economic costs associated with fecal incontinence. The average annual total cost for fecal incontinence was $4110 per person (median = $1594; interquartile range, $517-$5164). Of these costs, direct medical and nonmedical costs averaged $2353 (median, $1176; interquartile range, $294-$2438) and $209 (median, $75; interquartile range, $17-$262), whereas the indirect cost associated with productivity loss averaged $1549 per patient annually (median, $0; interquartile range, $0-$813). Multivariate regression analyses suggested that greater fecal incontinence symptom severity was significantly associated with higher annual direct costs. This study was based on patient self-reported data, and the sample was derived from a single institution. Fecal incontinence is associated with substantial economic cost, calling for more

  13. Rational emotive behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a randomized clinical trial, posttreatment outcomes, and six-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Daniel; Szentagotai, Aurora; Lupu, Viorel; Cosman, Doina

    2008-06-01

    A randomized clinical trial was undertaken to investigate the relative efficacy of rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT), cognitive therapy (CT), and pharmacotherapy in the treatment of 170 outpatients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. The patients were randomly assigned to one of the following: 14 weeks of REBT, 14 weeks of CT, or 14 weeks of pharmacotherapy (fluoxetine). The outcome measures used were the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Beck Depression Inventory. No differences among treatment conditions at posttest were observed. A larger effect of REBT (significant) and CT (nonsignificant) over pharmacotherapy at 6 months follow-up was noted on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression only. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Management of sacroiliac joint disruption and degenerative sacroiliitis with nonoperative care is medical resource-intensive and costly in a United States commercial payer population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackerman SJ

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stacey J Ackerman,1 David W Polly Jr,2 Tyler Knight,3 Tim Holt,4 John Cummings5 1Covance Market Access Services Inc, San Diego, CA, USA; 2University of Minnesota, Orthopaedic Surgery, Minneapolis, MN, USA; 3Covance Market Access Services Inc, Gaithersburg, MD, USA; 4Montgomery Spine Center, Orthopaedic Surgery, Montgomery, AL, USA; 5Community Health Network, Neurosurgery, Indianapolis, IN, USA Introduction: Low back pain is common and originates in the sacroiliac (SI joint in 15%–30% of cases. Traditional SI joint disruption/degenerative sacroiliitis treatments include nonoperative care or open SI joint fusion. To evaluate the usefulness of newly developed minimally-invasive technologies, the costs of traditional treatments must be better understood. We assessed the costs of nonoperative care for SI joint disruption to commercial payers in the United States (US. Methods: A retrospective study of claim-level medical resource use and associated costs used the MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters as well as Medicare Supplemental Databases of Truven Healthcare. Patients with a primary ICD-9-CM diagnosis code for SI joint disruption (720.2, 724.6, 739.4, 846.9, or 847.3, an initial date of diagnosis from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2007 (index date, and continuous enrollment for ≥1 year before and 3 years after the index date were included. Claims attributable to SI joint disruption with a primary or secondary ICD-9-CM diagnosis code of 71x.xx, 72x.xx, 73x.xx, or 84x.xx were identified; the 3-year medical resource use-associated reimbursement and outpatient pain medication costs (measured in 2011 US dollars were tabulated across practice settings. A subgroup analysis was performed among patients with lumbar spinal fusion. Results: The mean 3-year direct, attributable medical costs were $16,196 (standard deviation [SD] $28,592 per privately-insured patient (N=78,533. Among patients with lumbar spinal fusion (N=434, attributable 3-year

  15. Medication monitoring and optimization : a targeted pharmacist program for effective and cost-effective improvement of chronic therapy adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Boven, Job F.M.; Stuurman-Bieze, Ada G.G.; Hiddink, Eric G.; Postma, Maarten J.; Vegter, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community pharmacies provide a promising platform for monitoring and improving therapy adherence and providing pharmaceutical care. Structured methods and appropriate software are important tools to increase pharmacist effectiveness and improve health outcomes. In 2006, the Medication Mo

  16. Monthly energy review: April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This monthly report presents an overview of energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. A section is also included on international energy. The feature paper which is included each month is entitled ``Energy equipment choices: Fuel costs and other determinants.`` 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  17. Defense Health Care Reform: Actions Needed to Help Realize Potential Cost Savings from Medical Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    dentists , nurses, therapists, and laboratory technicians) and expended approximately $655 million on such training in fiscal year 2013. This includes...medical training to health professionals dedicated to a career as a physician, dentist , or nurse in DOD or the U.S. Public Health Service...promote learning and continuous improvement; (6) create enhanced value in military medical markets using an integrated approach specified in 5-year

  18. Maternal Opioid Drug Use during Pregnancy and Its Impact on Perinatal Morbidity, Mortality, and the Costs of Medical Care in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie E. Whiteman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify factors associated with opioid use during pregnancy and to compare perinatal morbidity, mortality, and healthcare costs between opioid users and nonusers. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of pregnancy-related discharges from 1998 to 2009 using the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient database in the United States. We scanned ICD-9-CM codes for opioid use and perinatal outcomes. Costs of care were estimated from hospital charges. Survey logistic regression was used to assess the association between maternal opioid use and each outcome; generalized linear modeling was used to compare hospitalization costs by opioid use status. Results. Women who used opioids during pregnancy experienced higher rates of depression, anxiety, and chronic medical conditions. After adjusting for confounders, opioid use was associated with increased odds of threatened preterm labor, early onset delivery, poor fetal growth, and stillbirth. Users were four times as likely to have a prolonged hospital stay and were almost four times more likely to die before discharge. The mean per-hospitalization cost of a woman who used opioids during pregnancy was $5,616 (95% CI: $5,166–$6,067, compared to $4,084 (95% CI: $4,002–$4,166 for nonusers. Conclusion. Opioid use during pregnancy is associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and increased healthcare costs.

  19. Cost of treating medical conditions in psychiatric inpatients in Zhejiang,China%浙江省精神病专科医院住院患者治疗费用调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨胜良; 钱敏才; 陆炜; 王春生; 陈海支; 费锦锋; 沈鑫华; 杨剑虹

    2011-01-01

    representative sample of psychiatric hospitals in Zhejiang Province,China. Methods: A two-stage stratified sampling method was used to select 14 of the 42 psychiatric hospitals in Zhejiang and then discharges for three randomly selected months (March,July and November) in 2010 at these hospitals were selected for assessment.A standardized form was used to collect information about the demographic and clinical characteristics of the patient and about the various components of the costs of inpatient care. Results: 7,684 inpatient admissions were included.The median (interquartile range) length of stay was 30 (20-52) days and the median total cost of admission was 10,005 (6,419-14,728) Chinese Yuan (1,539 (S)US).The median cost of medication was 2,512 (1,161-4,182) Yuan,65% of which was for non-psychiatric medications.1,798 (24.3%) of the admissions were associated with one or more medical condition that required treatment,including hypertension,leucopenia,diabetes and different types of infections.The prevalence and type of medical condition varied significantly for patients with different classes of psychiatric diagnoses.After adjustment for other factors the presence of a co-morbid medical condition significantly increased the cost of hospitalization but not the duration of hospitalization.For inpatients with schizophrenia the cost of their psychiatric medications was significantly higher than the cost of their non-psychiatric medications but the opposite was true for patients with other diagnoses.Conclusion:Treatment of somatic conditions account for a high proportion of the cost of inpatient treatment in psychiatric hospitals.Plans to revise the reimbursement mechanisms for mental disorders,to develop diagnostic-related group payment schemes,and to establish diagnostic-specific treatment guidelines need to take into consideration the high prevalence and associated costs of treating somatic conditions that frequently accompany psychiatric illnesses.The in-service training of

  20. Reducing medical claims cost to Ghana's National Health Insurance scheme: a cross-sectional comparative assessment of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsiah-Boateng, Eric; Asenso-Boadi, Francis; Dsane-Selby, Lydia; Andoh-Adjei, Francis-Xavier; Otoo, Nathaniel; Akweongo, Patricia; Aikins, Moses

    2017-02-06

    A robust medical claims review system is crucial for addressing fraud and abuse and ensuring financial viability of health insurance organisations. This paper assesses claims adjustment rate of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana. The study was a cross-sectional comparative assessment of paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the NHIS. Medical claims of subscribers for the year, 2014 were requested from the claims directorate and analysed. Proportions of claims adjusted by the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews were determined for each type of healthcare facility. Bivariate analyses were also conducted to test for differences in claims adjustments between healthcare facility types, and between the two claims reviews. The electronic-based review made overall adjustment of 17.0% from GHS10.09 million (USD2.64 m) claims cost whilst the paper-based review adjusted 4.9% from a total of GHS57.50 million (USD15.09 m) claims cost received, and the difference was significant (p < 0.001). However, there were no significant differences in claims cost adjustment rate between healthcare facility types by the electronic-based (p = 0.0656) and by the paper-based reviews (p = 0.6484). The electronic-based review adjusted significantly higher claims cost than the paper-based claims review. Scaling up the electronic-based review to cover claims from all accredited care providers could reduce spurious claims cost to the scheme and ensure long term financial sustainability.

  1. Medical abortion and manual vacuum aspiration for legal abortion protect women's health and reduce costs to the health system: findings from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria Isabel; Mendoza, Willis Simancas; Guerra-Palacio, Camilo; Guzman, Nelson Alvis; Tolosa, Jorge E

    2015-02-01

    The majority of abortions in Colombia continue to take place outside the formal health system under a range of conditions, with the majority of women obtaining misoprostol from a thriving black market for the drug and self-administering the medication. We conducted a cost analysis to compare the costs to the health system of three approaches to the provision of abortion care in Colombia: post-abortion care for complications of unsafe abortions, and for legal abortions in a health facility, misoprostol-only medical abortion and vacuum aspiration abortion. Hospital billing records from three institutions, two large maternity hospitals and one specialist reproductive health clinic, were analysed for procedure and complication rates, and costs by diagnosis. The majority of visits (94%) were to the two hospitals for post-abortion care; the other 6% were for legal abortions. Only one minor complication was found among the women having legal abortions, a complication rate of less than 1%. Among the women presenting for post-abortion care, 5% had complications during their treatment, mainly from infection or haemorrhage. Legal abortions were associated not only with far fewer complications for women, but also lower costs for the health system than for post-abortion care. We calculated based on our findings that for every 1,000 women receiving post-abortion care instead of a legal abortion within the health system, 16 women experienced avoidable complications, and the health system spent US $48,000 managing them. Increasing women's access to safe abortion care would not only reduce complications for women, but would also be a cost-saving strategy for the health system. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating the condition of medical counseling and some of clinical aspects for fasting in holy month of Ramadan from the perspective of diabetic and hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mahmoudian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although fasting has many benefits for health, it can be dangerous for patients. So it is necessary that physicians have adequate information about clinical aspects of fasting and they should advice patients. Therefore in this study we analyses the condition of physicians counseling about fasting from the perspective of patients. Methods:In this descriptive analytical cross-sectional study, patients with diabetes and hypertension who were going to doctors in Isfahan in holy month of Ramadan of 2012 and 2013 completed the questionnaires. A valid self-regulation questionnaire including patient`s satisfaction from the quality of physicians counseling about fasting (In the area of education, evaluation of the patient condition, communication /relationship with patients, caring for diseases in holy Ramadan and the incidence of symptoms in fasting had been used with  = 0.76. The patients completed the questionnaire after visit. The data was analyzed by Independent t-test, chi-square, Regression, one-way ANOVA in the19 spss software. Results: 285 patients, 199(69.8% female and 86(30.2% male, were selected. The mean satisfaction score of counseling was 70.50 ±13.23. The highest score (75.36±14.16 was referred to counseling of physician, and the least score (66.09±18.84 to patient assessment by physician. Mean score of Patients' satisfaction of specialists was higher than of general practitioner (p-value

  3. Using low-cost Android tablets and instructional videos to teach clinical skills to medical students in Kenya: a prospective study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Roy; Nelson, Brett D; Kagan, Calvin; Burke, Thomas F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and impact of using a low-cost Android tablet to deliver clinical skills training to third-year medical students in Kenya. Design A prospective study using a low cost tablet called ‘connecTAB’, which was designed and manufactured specifically for areas with low bandwidth. Instructional video tutorials demonstrating techniques of cardiovascular and abdominal clinical examinations were pre-loaded onto the tablet. Setting Maseno University School of Medicine, Western Kenya. Participants Fifty-one third-year medical students from Maseno University School of Medicine were subjects in the study. Twenty-five students were assigned to the intervention group and 26 to the control group. Main outcome measures At the start of the study, students from both groups completed an Observed Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) of the cardiovascular and abdominal evaluations. Students who were allocated to the intervention group then received the connecTAB, whereas students in the control group did not. After a period of three weeks, students from both groups completed a post-study OSCE for both the cardiovascular and abdominal evaluations. Results There were significantly higher improvements in the scores for both cardiovascular and abdominal examinations (p clinical education and efficacy and holds promise for international training in both medical and allied healthcare professional spheres in resource-limited settings. PMID:27540487

  4. [Direct medical costs of (severe) obesity: a bottom-up assessment of over- vs. normal-weight adults in the KORA-study region (Augsburg, Germany)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lengerke, T; Reitmeir, P; John, J

    2006-02-01

    To estimate and compare direct medical costs of illness of German adults in different BMI-groups and different degrees of obesity. In a sub-sample (n = 947) of the KORA-Survey S4 1999/2001, a cross-sectional health survey of the adult population in the Augsburg region (Germany; age: 25-74), visits to physicians, receipt and purchase of drugs, and inpatient days in hospital were assessed over half a year. Body mass index (BMI in kg/m(2)) was assessed anthropometrically. Respondents in normal weight (18.5 or = 35) range were compared in their costs of illness via analyses of covariance and regression analyses based on generalized linear models. Physician visits and inpatient days were evaluated as recommended by the Working Group "Methods in Health Economic Evaluation", and drugs by actual costs. Sex, age, socio-economic status (Helmert-Index), sickness fund (statutory vs. private), and place of residence (Augsburg City vs. District of Augsburg or Aichach-Friedberg) were adjusted for. While respondents with moderate obesity statistically did not differ significantly in their direct medical costs from those in normal weight or pre-obese range (1,080.14 euro vs. 847.60 euro and 830.59 euro; for users of care: 1,215.55 euro vs. 993.18 euro and 1,003.23 euro [all estimates adjusted and per annum]), those with severe obesity had significantly higher costs (2,572.19 euro; for users of care: 2,964.87 euro). Sub-analyses for individual parameters of health care use revealed that this pattern is largely due to inpatient days in hospital and receipt/purchase of drugs only available on prescription. On average, results indicate excess direct medical costs primarily in people with severe, and less with moderate obesity. In particular, they underline the need to distinguish moderate vs. severe obesity (classes 1 vs. 2-3) in health economics and health services research.

  5. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in Malawi: Modeling the Impact and Cost of Focusing the Program by Client Age and Geography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Kripke

    Full Text Available In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO recommended scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC in priority countries with high HIV prevalence and low male circumcision (MC prevalence. According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS, an estimated 5.8 million males had undergone VMMC by the end of 2013. Implementation experience has raised questions about the need to refocus VMMC programs on specific subpopulations for the greatest epidemiological impact and programmatic effectiveness. As Malawi prepared its national operational plan for VMMC, it sought to examine the impacts of focusing on specific subpopulations by age and region.We used the Decision Makers' Program Planning Toolkit, Version 2.0, to study the impact of scaling up VMMC to different target populations of Malawi. National MC prevalence by age group from the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey was scaled according to the MC prevalence for each district and then halved, to adjust for over-reporting of circumcision. In-country stakeholders advised a VMMC unit cost of $100, based on implementation experience. We derived a cost of $451 per patient-year for antiretroviral therapy from costs collected as part of a strategic planning exercise previously conducted in- country by UNAIDS.Over a fifteen-year period, circumcising males ages 10-29 would avert 75% of HIV infections, and circumcising males ages 10-34 would avert 88% of infections, compared to the current strategy of circumcising males ages 15-49. The Ministry of Health's South West and South East health zones had the lowest cost per HIV infection averted. Moreover, VMMC met WHO's definition of cost-effectiveness (that is, the cost per disability-adjusted life-year [DALY] saved was less than three times the per capita gross domestic product in all health zones except Central East. Comparing urban versus rural areas in the country, we found that circumcising men in urban areas would be both cost

  6. Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in Malawi: Modeling the Impact and Cost of Focusing the Program by Client Age and Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripke, Katharine; Chimbwandira, Frank; Mwandi, Zebedee; Matchere, Faustin; Schnure, Melissa; Reed, Jason; Castor, Delivette; Sgaier, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Background In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended scaling up voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in priority countries with high HIV prevalence and low male circumcision (MC) prevalence. According to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), an estimated 5.8 million males had undergone VMMC by the end of 2013. Implementation experience has raised questions about the need to refocus VMMC programs on specific subpopulations for the greatest epidemiological impact and programmatic effectiveness. As Malawi prepared its national operational plan for VMMC, it sought to examine the impacts of focusing on specific subpopulations by age and region. Methods We used the Decision Makers’ Program Planning Toolkit, Version 2.0, to study the impact of scaling up VMMC to different target populations of Malawi. National MC prevalence by age group from the 2010 Demographic and Health Survey was scaled according to the MC prevalence for each district and then halved, to adjust for over-reporting of circumcision. In-country stakeholders advised a VMMC unit cost of $100, based on implementation experience. We derived a cost of $451 per patient-year for antiretroviral therapy from costs collected as part of a strategic planning exercise previously conducted in- country by UNAIDS. Results Over a fifteen-year period, circumcising males ages 10–29 would avert 75% of HIV infections, and circumcising males ages 10–34 would avert 88% of infections, compared to the current strategy of circumcising males ages 15–49. The Ministry of Health’s South West and South East health zones had the lowest cost per HIV infection averted. Moreover, VMMC met WHO’s definition of cost-effectiveness (that is, the cost per disability-adjusted life-year [DALY] saved was less than three times the per capita gross domestic product) in all health zones except Central East. Comparing urban versus rural areas in the country, we found that circumcising men in urban

  7. Sanitary costs of osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Franceschini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Muscoloskeletal disorders are the first cause of disability and the second cause of permanent disablement in Italy. Osteoarthritis is the most frequent rheumatic disease and affects about 4 million Italians. In spite of that, data concerning social costs are lacking. On account of this lack we measured sanitary costs of 314 patients suffering from osteoarthritis. A retrospective, prevalence- based multicentric study was performed using a bottom-up approach. The study period was 12 months and referred to 1999. Eight percent of patients didn’t take any drug for the treatment of osteoarthritis; NSAIDs were prescribed to 86.9% of patients, analgesics to 29.9%, chondroprotective drugs to 7.6%, and gastroprotective drugs to 36.9%. Total sanitary costs came to 455 € / patient / year: 122 € were spent on diagnostics, 293 € on therapy and 40 € on management of drug-related gastropathy. Since the costs of anti-inflammatory drugs came to 30 € we calculated iatrogenic cost factor of 2.3. Moreover, the study supplied interesting informations about prescriptive habits, which differ in Italy from international guidelines for the medical treatment of OA, about patient management, because of hospitalization, which by itself absorbs 1/3 of resources, and about physiotherapy, which costs twice as much as pharmacological therapy. At last, data analysis gave the cue for suggestions on changing patients’ management.

  8. [Semester direct cost by rheumatoid arthritis in patients in a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audisio, Marcelo J; Strusberg, Ingrid; Orellana Barrera, Sergio D; Drenkard, Cristina M; Barberis, Gloria; Gamrón, Susana; Onetti, Carlos M

    2003-01-01

    There are no medical publications with economic analysis of rheumatoid arthritis patients (RA) from Argentina are lacking. The objective of the present study is to determine the direct cost and its breakdown in patients with RA. Fifty-two patients who met the American College of Rheumatology RA criteria were included. Direct cost was calculated over a follow-up period of 6 months during year 2001. Variables were analyzed with Student's T test, Mann-Whitney U Test, c' or ANOVA as corresponded. P values < 0.05 were considered significant. The mean monthly home income was $426.6 SD 272. The mean half-yearly direct costs was $677.5 SD 376.2. The components of the direct cost were identified and the mean for medication cost was $606.7 (89%), for lab tests was $45.5 (7%), for medical attention $12.5 (2%) and other costs $2.4. No differences in total cost or in medication cost were found when compared considering age, evolution time of RA or HAQ scores. Half-yearly direct cost in RA is excessively high considering the monthly mean income of the patients being analyzed. The cost of medication was the principal component of the direct cost.

  9. Medications (for IBS)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... IBS Awareness Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us About ... IBS Awareness Month IBS Awareness Month Tips of the Day Art of IBS Gallery Contact Us Medications ...

  10. Balancing costs and benefits at different stages of medical innovation: a systematic review of Multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlster, Philip; Goetghebeur, Mireille; Kriza, Christine; Niederländer, Charlotte; Kolominsky-Rabas, Peter

    2015-07-09

    The diffusion of health technologies from translational research to reimbursement depends on several factors included the results of health economic analysis. Recent research identified several flaws in health economic concepts. Additionally, the heterogeneous viewpoints of participating stakeholders are rarely systematically addressed in current decision-making. Multi-criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) provides an opportunity to tackle these issues. The objective of this study was to review applications of MCDA methods in decisions addressing the trade-off between costs and benefits. Using basic steps of the PRISMA guidelines, a systematic review of the healthcare literature was performed to identify original research articles from January 1990 to April 2014. Medline, PubMed, Springer Link and specific journals were searched. Using predefined categories, bibliographic records were systematically extracted regarding the type of policy applications, MCDA methodology, criteria used and their definitions. 22 studies were included in the analysis. 15 studies (68 %) used direct MCDA approaches and seven studies (32 %) used preference elicitation approaches. Four studies (19 %) focused on technologies in the early innovation process. The majority (18 studies - 81 %) examined reimbursement decisions. Decision criteria used in studies were obtained from the literature research and context-specific studies, expert opinions, and group discussions. The number of criteria ranged between three up to 15. The most frequently used criteria were health outcomes (73 %), disease impact (59 %), and implementation of the intervention (40 %). Economic criteria included cost-effectiveness criteria (14 studies, 64 %), and total costs/budget impact of an intervention (eight studies, 36 %). The process of including economic aspects is very different among studies. Some studies directly compare costs with other criteria while some include economic consideration in a second step. In early

  11. The resource utilisation of medically unexplained physical symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kimberley; Johnson, Malcolm H; Harris, Julie; Sundram, Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: As patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms may present frequently to hospital settings and receive potentially unnecessary investigations and treatments, we aimed to assess the frequency and type of medically unexplained physical symptoms presentations to clinical services and estimate the associated direct healthcare costs. Methods: This study was undertaken at the largest district health board in New Zealand. All patients with a diagnosed presentation of medically unexplained physical symptoms in 2013 were identified using the district health board’s clinical coding system. The clinical records (medical and psychiatric) of 49 patients were examined in detail to extricate all medically unexplained physical symptoms–related secondary care activity within 6 months before or after their medically unexplained physical symptoms presentation. Standardised national costing methodology was used to calculate the associated healthcare costs. Results: In all, 49% of patients attended hospital settings at least twice during 2013. The majority of presentations were for neurological or respiratory concerns. The total cost for the sample was GBP89,636 (median: GBP1,221). Costs were most significant in the areas of inpatient admissions and emergency care. Conclusion: Medically unexplained physical symptoms result in frequent presentations to hospital settings. The costs incurred are substantial and comparable to the costs of chronic medical conditions with identifiable pathology. Improving recognition and management of medically unexplained physical symptoms has potential to offer more appropriate and cost-effective healthcare outcomes. PMID:27635250

  12. The resource utilisation of medically unexplained physical symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Lee

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: As patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms may present frequently to hospital settings and receive potentially unnecessary investigations and treatments, we aimed to assess the frequency and type of medically unexplained physical symptoms presentations to clinical services and estimate the associated direct healthcare costs. Methods: This study was undertaken at the largest district health board in New Zealand. All patients with a diagnosed presentation of medically unexplained physical symptoms in 2013 were identified using the district health board’s clinical coding system. The clinical records (medical and psychiatric of 49 patients were examined in detail to extricate all medically unexplained physical symptoms–related secondary care activity within 6 months before or after their medically unexplained physical symptoms presentation. Standardised national costing methodology was used to calculate the associated healthcare costs. Results: In all, 49% of patients attended hospital settings at least twice during 2013. The majority of presentations were for neurological or respiratory concerns. The total cost for the sample was GBP89,636 (median: GBP1,221. Costs were most significant in the areas of inpatient admissions and emergency care. Conclusion: Medically unexplained physical symptoms result in frequent presentations to hospital settings. The costs incurred are substantial and comparable to the costs of chronic medical conditions with identifiable pathology. Improving recognition and management of medically unexplained physical symptoms has potential to offer more appropriate and cost-effective healthcare outcomes.

  13. Evaluating the impact and costs of deploying an electronic medical record system to support TB treatment in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Hamish SF; Blaya, Joaquin; Choi, Sharon S; Bonilla, Cesar; Jazayeri, Darius

    2006-01-01

    The PIH-EMR is a Web based electronic medical record that has been in operation for over four years in Peru supporting the treatment of drug resistant TB. We describe here the types of evaluations that have been performed on the EMR to assess its impact on patient care, reporting, logistics and observational research. Formal studies have been performed on components for drug order entry, drug requirements prediction tools and the use of PDAs to collect bacteriology data. In addition less formal data on the use of the EMR for reporting and research are reviewed. Experience and insights from porting the PIH-EMR to the Philippines, and modifying it to support HIV treatment in Haiti and Rwanda are discussed. We propose that additional data of this sort is valuable in assessing medical information systems especially in resource poor areas. PMID:17238344

  14. Comparative Cost Analysis of Increasing Registered Nursing Staff on the Labor and Delivery Unit at the National Naval Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    recognized L&D Nurses 9 the central role of the registered nurse. In its most recent Accreditation Manual for Hospitals, JCAHO requires that "a...far beyond that of a L&D Nurses 60 comparably-sized civilian instituCion . Above all else NNMC is a Navy hospital, with responsibilities far beyond...1990). Accreditation Manual for Hospitals, 1990. Chicago: Author. Klarman, H. E. (1974). Application of cost-benefit analysis to the health services and

  15. Drug waste minimisation and cost-containment in Medical Oncology: Two-year results of a feasibility study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansutti Mauro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-containment strategies are required to face the challenge of rising drug expenditures in Oncology. Drug wastage leads to economic loss, but little is known about the size of the problem in this field. Methods Starting January 2005 we introduced a day-to-day monitoring of drug wastage and an accurate assessment of its costs. An internal protocol for waste minimisation was developed, consisting of four corrective measures: 1. A rational, per pathology distribution of chemotherapy sessions over the week. 2. The use of multi-dose vials. 3. A reasonable rounding of drug dosages. 4. The selection of the most convenient vial size, depending on drug unit pricing. Results Baseline analysis focused on 29 drugs over one year. Considering their unit price and waste amount, a major impact on expense was found to be attributable to six drugs: cetuximab, docetaxel, gemcitabine, oxaliplatin, pemetrexed and trastuzumab. The economic loss due to their waste equaled 4.8% of the annual drug expenditure. After the study protocol was started, the expense due to unused drugs showed a meaningful 45% reduction throughout 2006. Conclusion Our experience confirms the economic relevance of waste minimisation and may represent a feasible model in addressing this issue. A centralised unit of drug processing, the availability of a computerised physician order entry system and an active involvement of the staff play a key role in allowing waste reduction and a consequent, substantial cost-saving.

  16. 静脉输液实际消耗成本核算研究%Actual cost consumption accounting of venous transfusion in public medical institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏全志; 韩修英; 崔立敏; 于兰贞

    2012-01-01

    Objectives:To calculate the actual cost consumption of venous transfusion accurately in public medical institutions in Binzhou and to provide data evidence for formulating reasonable charging standard of nursing projects. Methods:Three public medical institutions in Binzhou,each one from First-Grade, Second-Grade and Third-Grade public medical institutions respectively, were selected by representative sampling.We collected the related data in 2010 of each institution, calculated the actual cost consumption of different infusion methods using the project cost accounting, method, analyzed cost construction, and compared the difference between actual cost and current valorization. Results: The actual cost consumption of normal steel needle method, indwelling needle method, P1CC method, and Central Venous Catheter(CVC) method of venous transfusion in Third-Grade public medical institution were 25.46, 24.54, 36.87, and 35.88 yuan respectively. The actual cost consumption of normal steel needle method and indwelling needle method in Second-Grade institution were 19.80 and 19.39 yuan respectively.. The actual cost consumption of normal steel needle method in First-Grade institution was 15.55 yuan. The price gaps between actual cost consumption and valorization were 12.60-30.87 yuan and the cost compensation rates were only 11.78~30.94%. The highest proportion of total venous transfusion cost was the nursing human costs which ranged from 39.05% to 53.25%. Conclusion: There are enormous gaps between actual cost consumption of venous transfusion and current valorization. The government should adjust current charging standard based on scientific project cost accounting of venous transfusion.%目的:准确核算滨州市公立医疗机构静脉输液实际消耗成本,为制定合理的护理项目收费标准提供数据支持.方法:采用便利抽样方法,分别选取滨州市一、二、三级公立医疗机构各一家,收集其2010年的相关资料;运用项目成

  17. Modeling Costs and Impacts of Introducing Early Infant Male Circumcision for Long-Term Sustainability of the Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Peter; Kripke, Katharine; Mugurungi, Owen; Ncube, Gertrude; Xaba, Sinokuthemba; Hatzold, Karin; Christensen, Alice; Stover, John

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) has been shown to be an effective prevention strategy against HIV infection in males [1–3]. Since 2007, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has supported VMMC programs in 14 priority countries in Africa. Today several of these countries are preparing to transition their VMMC programs from a scale-up and expansion phase to a maintenance phase. As they do so, they must consider the best approaches to sustain high levels of male circumcision in the population. The two alternatives under consideration are circumcising adolescents 10–14 years old over the long term or integrating early infant male circumcision (EIMC) into maternal and child health programs. The paper presents an analysis, using the Decision Makers Program Planning Tool, Version 2.0 (DMPPT 2.0), of the estimated cost and impact of introducing EIMC into existing VMMC programs in several countries in eastern and southern Africa. Limited cost data exist for the implementation of EIMC, but preliminary studies, such as the one detailed in Mangenah, et al. [4–5], suggest that the cost of EIMC may be less than that of adolescent and adult male circumcision. If this is the case, then adding EIMC to the VMMC program will increase the number of circumcisions that need to be performed but will not increase the total cost of the program over the long term. In addition, we found that a delayed or slow start-up of EIMC would not substantially reduce the impact of adding it to the program or increase cumulative long-term costs, which should make introduction of EIMC more feasible and attractive to countries contemplating such a program innovation. PMID:27410233

  18. Modeling Costs and Impacts of Introducing Early Infant Male Circumcision for Long-Term Sustainability of the Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeuhmeli, Emmanuel; Stegman, Peter; Kripke, Katharine; Mugurungi, Owen; Ncube, Gertrude; Xaba, Sinokuthemba; Hatzold, Karin; Christensen, Alice; Stover, John

    2016-01-01

    Voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) has been shown to be an effective prevention strategy against HIV infection in males [1-3]. Since 2007, the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has supported VMMC programs in 14 priority countries in Africa. Today several of these countries are preparing to transition their VMMC programs from a scale-up and expansion phase to a maintenance phase. As they do so, they must consider the best approaches to sustain high levels of male circumcision in the population. The two alternatives under consideration are circumcising adolescents 10-14 years old over the long term or integrating early infant male circumcision (EIMC) into maternal and child health programs. The paper presents an analysis, using the Decision Makers Program Planning Tool, Version 2.0 (DMPPT 2.0), of the estimated cost and impact of introducing EIMC into existing VMMC programs in several countries in eastern and southern Africa. Limited cost data exist for the implementation of EIMC, but preliminary studies, such as the one detailed in Mangenah, et al. [4-5], suggest that the cost of EIMC may be less than that of adolescent and adult male circumcision. If this is the case, then adding EIMC to the VMMC program will increase the number of circumcisions that need to be performed but will not increase the total cost of the program over the long term. In addition, we found that a delayed or slow start-up of EIMC would not substantially reduce the impact of adding it to the program or increase cumulative long-term costs, which should make introduction of EIMC more feasible and attractive to countries contemplating such a program innovation.

  19. Impact of prior authorization on the use and costs of lipid-lowering medications among Michigan and Indiana dual enrollees in Medicaid and Medicare: results of a longitudinal, population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Christine Y; Law, Michael R; Soumerai, Stephen B; Graves, Amy Johnson; LeCates, Robert F; Zhang, Fang; Ross-Degnan, Dennis; Adams, Alyce S

    2011-01-01

    Some Medicaid programs have adopted prior-authorization (PA) policies that require prescribers to request approval from Medicaid before prescribing drugs not included on a preferred drug list. This study examined the association between PA policies for lipid-lowering agents in Michigan and Indiana and the use and cost of this drug class among dual enrollees in Medicare and Medicaid. Michigan and Indiana claims data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were assessed. Michigan Medicaid instituted a PA requirement for several lipid-lowering medications in March 2002; Indiana implemented a PA policy for drugs in this class in September 2002. Although the PA policies affected some statins, they predominantly targeted second-line treatments, including bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, and niacins. Individuals aged ≥18 years who were continuously dually enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid from July 2000 through September 2003 were included in this longitudinal, population-based study, which included a 20-month observation period before the implementation of PA in Michigan and a 12-month follow-up period after the Indiana PA policy was initiated. Interrupted time series analysis was used to examine changes in prescription rates and pharmacy costs for lipid-lowering drugs before and after policy implementation. A total of 38,684 dual enrollees in Michigan and 29,463 in Indiana were included. Slightly more than half of the cohort were female (Michigan, 53.3% [20,614/38,684]; Indiana, 56.3% [16,595/29,463]); nearly half were aged 45 to 64 years (Michigan, 43.7% [16,921/38,684]; Indiana, 45.2% [13,321/29,463]). Most subjects were white (Michigan, 77.4% [29,957/38,684]; Indiana: 84.9% [25,022/29,463]). The PA policy was associated with an immediate 58% reduction in prescriptions for nonpreferred medications in Michigan and a corresponding increase in prescriptions for preferred agents. However, the PA policy had no apparent effect in Indiana, where there had

  20. Effectiveness of and Financial Returns to Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in South Africa: An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Haacker

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Empirical studies and population-level policy simulations show the importance of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC in generalized epidemics. This paper complements available scenario-based studies (projecting costs and outcomes over some policy period, typically spanning decades by adopting an incremental approach-analyzing the expected consequences of circumcising one male individual with specific characteristics in a specific year. This approach yields more precise estimates of VMMC's cost-effectiveness and identifies the outcomes of current investments in VMMC (e.g., within a fiscal budget period rather than of investments spread over the entire policy period.The model has three components. We adapted the ASSA2008 model, a demographic and epidemiological model of the HIV epidemic in South Africa, to analyze the impact of one VMMC on HIV incidence over time and across the population. A costing module tracked the costs of VMMC and the resulting financial savings owing to reduced HIV incidence over time. Then, we used several financial indicators to assess the cost-effectiveness of and financial return on investments in VMMC. One circumcision of a young man up to age 20 prevents on average over 0.2 HIV infections, but this effect declines steeply with age, e.g., to 0.08 by age 30. Net financial savings from one VMMC at age 20 are estimated at US$617 at a discount rate of 5% and are lower for circumcisions both at younger ages (because the savings occur later and are discounted more and at older ages (because male circumcision becomes less effective. Investments in male circumcision carry a financial rate of return of up to 14.5% (for circumcisions at age 20. The cost of a male circumcision is refinanced fastest, after 13 y, for circumcisions at ages 20 to 25. Principal limitations of the analysis arise from the long time (decades over which the effects of VMMC unfold-the results are therefore sensitive to the discount rate applied, and

  1. Direct treatment costs of HIV/AIDS in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Perelman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the direct medical costs of HIV/AIDS in Portugal from the perspective of the National Health Service. METHODS A retrospective analysis of medical records was conducted for 150 patients from five specialized centers in Portugal in 2008. Data on utilization of medical resources during 12 months and patients’ characteristics were collected. A unit cost was applied to each care component using official sources and accounting data from National Health Service hospitals. RESULTS The average cost of treatment was 14,277 €/patient/year. The main cost-driver was antiretroviral treatment (€ 9,598, followed by hospitalization costs (€ 1,323. Treatment costs increased with the severity of disease from € 11,901 (> 500 CD4 cells/µl to € 23,351 (CD4 count ≤ 50 cells/ µl. Cost progression was mainly due to the increase in hospitalization costs, while antiretroviral treatment costs remained stable over disease stages. CONCLUSIONS The high burden related to antiretroviral treatment is counterbalanced by relatively low hospitalization costs, which, however, increase with severity of disease. The relatively modest progression of total costs highlights that alternative public health strategies that do not affect transmission of disease may only have a limited impact on expenditure, since treatment costs are largely dominated by constant antiretroviral treatment costs.

  2. Perceived medical benefit, peer/partner influence and safety and cost to access the service: client motivators for voluntary seeking of medical male circumcision in Iganga district eastern Uganda, a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamadi, Lubega; Ibrahim, Musenze; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Peterson, Stefan; Reynolds, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Although voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in Iganga district was launched in 2010 as part of the Uganda national strategy to prevent new HIV infections with a target of having 129,896 eligible males circumcised by 2012, only 35,000 (27%) of the anticipated target had been circumcised by mid 2012. There was paucity of information on why uptake of VMMC was low in this setting where HIV awareness is presumably high. This study sought to understand motivators for uptake of VMMC from the perspective of the clients themselves in order to advocate for feasible approaches to expanding uptake of VMMC in Iganga district and similar settings. In Iganga district, we conducted seven key informant interviews with staff who work in the VMMC clinics and twenty in-depth interviews with clients who had accepted and undergone VMMC. Ten focus-group discussions including a total of 112 participants were also conducted with clients who had undergone VMMC. Motivators for uptake of VMMC in the perspective of the circumcised clients and the health care staff included: perceived medical benefit to those circumcised such as protection against acquiring HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, peer/partner influence, sexual satisfaction and safety and cost to access the service. Since perceived medical benefit was a motivator for seeking VMMC, it can be used to strengthen campaigns for increasing uptake of VMMC. Peer influence could also be used in advocacy campaigns for VMMC expansion, especially using peers who have already undergone VMMC. There is need to ensure that safety and cost to access the service is affordable especially to rural poor as it was mentioned as a motivator for seeking VMMC.

  3. 天津市城镇职工基本医疗保险精神分裂症患者抗精神病药的使用情况及其医疗费用%Antipsychotic medication prescription patterns and associated medical costs for UEMBMI patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚星星; 吴晶

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To describe antipsychotic medication prescription patterns and estimate the associated costs for patients with schizophrenia in Tianjin,China. Methods:Data were 30%random sampling from the Tianjin Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance (UEBMI)database. Adult patients with≥ 1 diagnosis of schizophrenia, antipsychotics prescribed at the first diagnosis of schizophrenia (index date),and 12-month continuous enrollment after the first antipsychotic prescription (follow-up period)between 2008 and 2010 were included. The classes and number of antipsychotics patients prescribed at index date and patterns of antipsychotics patients maintained/changed during the study period were described. The total direct medical costs were also estimated. Results:Among 2125 patients with schizophrenia,1739 (81. 8%)prescribed with antipsychotic medication prescriptions were in-cluded. At the index date,1461 (84. 0%)of the patients prescribed with one antipsychotic medication,278 (16. 0%)with more than two antipsychotics,and 747 (43. 0%)were prescribed with first-generation antipsychot-ics,813 (46. 8%)with second-generation antipsychotics and 179 (10. 2%)with both. During the following 12 months,1387 (79. 8%)patients remained on the index antipsychotic class. The total cost for 1739 patients was (12498. 9 ±14575. 2)CNY. The total direct medical cost was significantly lower for patients only prescribed with second-generation antipsychotics compared with ones only with first-generation antipsychotics [(9064. 1 ±13209. 8) CNY vs. (1 1928. 6 ±13767. 4)CNY,P<0. 001 ]. In addition,the cost for patients prescribed with first-generation and second-generation antipsychotics was 18821. 8 ±15702. 7 CNY. Conclusion:Majority of patients are prescribed with monotherapy,and tend to stay with one antipsychotic medication class. The total medical cost for patients with second-generation antipsychotic medications is lower than first-generation ones.%目的:掌握天津市城镇职工医

  4. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  5. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  6. Cost of treatment of schizophrenia in six European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salize, Hans Joachim; McCabe, Rosemarie; Bullenkamp, Jens; Hansson, Lars; Lauber, Christoph; Martinez-Leal, Rafael; Reinhard, Iris; Rössler, Wulf; Svensson, Bengt; Torres-Gonzalez, Francisco; van den Brink, Rob; Wiersma, Durk; Priebe, Stefan

    2009-06-01

    As part of an RCT in six European sites, the direct mental health care cost for 422 patients with schizophrenia was analysed according to how total and medication costs differed across sites and which variables were likely to predict total or service-specific costs. Service use was recorded continuously during a 12-month follow-up. Prescribed psychotropic medication was recorded at baseline and 12 months later. Service use data were transformed into EURO, log-transformed and analysed using linear regression models. Although samples were homogeneous, large inter-site cost differences were found (annual means ranging from 2958 euro in Spain up to 36978 euro in Switzerland). Psychopharmacologic costs were much more constant across sites than costs for other services. Total costs were associated more with region or socio-demographic characteristics than with disorder related parameters. The findings confirm remarkable differences in direct costs of patients with schizophrenia across Europe. However, the relative stability of medication costs suggests a need to analyse mechanisms that influence service-specific costs for schizophrenia.

  7. Hanford Works monthly report, February 1953

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-03-18

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for February 1953. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Service departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  8. Hanford Works monthly report, September 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-10-20

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for September 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  9. Hanford Works monthly report, August 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-09-24

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for August 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department` section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical,Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  10. Hanford Works monthly report, October 1951

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1951-11-21

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for October 1951. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  11. Hanford Works monthly report, October 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1952-11-20

    this document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer works for October 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summaries work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  12. Hanford Works monthly report, December 1952

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1953-01-23

    This document presents a summary of work and progress at the Hanford Engineer Works for December 1952. The report is divided into sections by department. A plant wide general summary is included at the beginning of the report, after which the departmental summaries begin. The Manufacturing Department reports plant statistics, and summaries for the Metal Preparation, Reactor and Separation sections. The Engineering Department`s section summarizes work for the Technical, Design, and Project Sections. Costs for the various departments are presented in the Financial Department`s summary. The Medical, Radiological Sciences, Utilities and General Services, Employee and Public Relations, and Community Real Estate and Services departments have sections presenting their monthly statistics, work, progress, and summaries.

  13. Petroleum marketing monthly, November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-09

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed costs of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  14. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-11-07

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented. 12 figs., 49 tabs.

  15. Petroleum marketing monthly, February 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-25

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiner`s acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  16. Petroleum marketing monthly, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-10

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) is designed to give information and statistical data about a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication provides statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Sales data for motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane are presented.

  17. Terminal patients in Belgian nursing homes: a cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Vanden Berghe, Paul; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Policy makers and health care payers are concerned about the costs of treating terminal patients. This study was done to measure the costs of treating terminal patients during the final month of life in a sample of Belgian nursing homes from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative care with those of usual care. This multicenter, retrospective cohort study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of nursing homes. Health care costs included fixed nursing home costs, medical fees, pharmacy charges, other charges, and eventual hospitalization costs. Data sources consisted of accountancy and invoice data. The analysis calculated costs per patient during the final month of life at 2007/2008 prices. Nineteen nursing homes participated in the study, generating a total of 181 patients. Total mean nursing home costs amounted to 3,243 € per patient during the final month of life. Total mean nursing home costs per patient of 3,822 € for patients receiving usual care were higher than costs of 2,456 € for patients receiving palliative care (p = 0.068). Higher costs of usual care were driven by higher hospitalization costs (p < 0.001). This study suggests that palliative care models in nursing homes need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients.

  18. Apply the SWOT to analyze the cost control model of urban medical assistance%城市医疗救助费用控制模式SWOT分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高文凤; 尹文强; 张宜民; 黄冬梅; 于倩倩

    2009-01-01

    Make use of SWOT analysis scientific principles to understand the cost control model of urban medical assistance based on community health services's advantages and disadvantages of internal and external opportunities and threats. Use SWOT matrix portfolio analysis (SO, ST, WO, WT strategy) to carry out systematic analysis to find the best strategies.%利用SWOT分析法,客观地分析了以社区卫生服务为基础的城市医疗救助费用控制模式的内部优、劣势及外部环境的机会与威胁.并用SWOT的矩阵组合(SO、ST、WO、WT策略)进行了系统分析,旨在寻求最佳的发展战略和策略.

  19. Atención médica ambulatoria en México: el costo para los usuarios Ambulatory medical care in Mexico: the cost for users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Arredondo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Analizar los resultados de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud II (ENSA-II, en lo relativo a los costos del proceso de búsqueda y obtención de la atención médica ambulatoria en diferentes instituciones del sector público y privado. Material y métodos. La informacion se obtuvo a partir de los indicadores de costos de la atención médica que notificó la población de estudio de la ENSA-II. Los costos para el bolsillo del consumidor fueron la variable dependiente, y las independientes, la condición de aseguramiento y el ingreso económico. La significancia de los niveles de variación se identificó aplicando la prueba de Duncan. Resultados. Los costos en todo el país, en dólares estadunidenses, fueron: transporte, $ 2.20; consulta general, $ 7.90; medicamentos, $ 9.60, y estudios de diagnóstico, $13.6. El costo promedio total de la atención ambulatoria fue de $ 22.70. Los hallazgos empíricos permiten sugerir una nueva propuesta de análisis de los costos en salud, tanto directos como indirectos, en que incurren los consumidores de servicios de salud; dichos costos representan una carga importante en relación con el ingreso familiar, situación que se agudiza en el caso de la población no asegurada. Conclusiones. La incorporación de la perspectiva económica en el análisis de los problemas de los sistemas de salud, no debe limitarse a los costos de producción de servicios en que incurren los proveedores, sobre todo si lo que se busca es resolver los problemas de equidad y accesibilidad que actualmente caracterizan a la oferta de servicios médicos en México.Objective. To analyze the results of the National Health Survey (ENSA-II as to the costs generated by the search and obtainment of ambulatory medical attention in various intitutions of the private and public health sector. Material and methods. Information was raised from the health care cost indicators reported by the study population of the ENSA-II. The dependent

  20. Petroleum marketing monthly, September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum product sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  1. Petroleum marketing monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. Monthly statistics on purchases of crude oil and sales of petroleum products are presented in five sections: Summary Statistics; Crude Oil Prices; Prices of Petroleum Products; Volumes of Petroleum Products; and Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Petroleum Products for Local Consumption. The feature article is entitled ``The Second Oxygenated Gasoline Season.`` 7 figs., 50 tabs.

  2. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01